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Sample records for upscaling physical characterization

  1. Numerical and physical testing of upscaling techniques for constitutive properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, S.A.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates upscaling techniques for hydraulic conductivity measurements based on accuracy and practicality for implementation in evaluating the performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Analytical and numerical techniques are compared to one another, to the results of physical upscaling experiments, and to the results obtained on the original domain. The results from different scaling techniques are then compared to the case where unscaled point scale statistics are used to generate realizations directly at the flow model grid-block scale. Initital results indicate that analytical techniques provide upscaling constitutive properties from the point measurement scale to the flow model grid-block scale. However, no single analytic technique proves to be adequate for all situations. Numerical techniques are also accurate, but they are time intensive and their accuracy is dependent on knowledge of the local flow regime at every grid-block

  2. Characterization and Upscaling of Pore Scale Hydrodynamic Mass Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, P.; Roubinet, D.; Dentz, M.; Planes, V.; Russian, A.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging reservoir rocks in 3D using X-ray microtomography with spatial resolution ranging from about 1 to 10 mm provides us a unique opportunity not only to characterize pore space geometry but also for simulating hydrodynamical processes. Yet, pores and throats displaying sizes smaller than the resolution cannot be distinguished on the images and must be assigned to a so called microporous phase during the process of image segmentation. Accordingly one simulated mass transfers caused by advection and diffusion in the connected pores (mobile domain) and diffusion in the microporous clusters (immobile domain) using Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) and developed a set of metrics that can be used to monitor the different mechanisms of transport in the sample, the final objective being of proposing a simple but accurate upscaled 1D model in which the particle travel times in the mobile and immobile domain and the number of mobile-immobile transfer events (called trapping events) are independently distributed random variables characterized by PDFs. For TDRW the solute concentration is represented by the density distribution of non-interacting point-like solute particles which move due to advection and dispersion. The set of metrics derives from different spatial and temporal statistical analyses of the particle motion, and is used for characterizing the particles transport (i) in the mobile domain in relation with the velocity field properties, (ii) in the immobile domain in relation with the structure and the properties of microporous phase and at the mobile-immobile interface. We specifically focused on how to model the trapping frequency and rate into the immobile domain in relation with the structure and the spatial distribution of the mobile-immobile domain interface. This thorough analysis of the particle motion for both simple artificial structures and real rock images allowed us to derive the parametrization of the upscaled 1D model.

  3. Dispersion upscaling from a pore scale characterization of Lagrangian velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, Régis; de Anna, Pietro; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Tabuteau, Hervé; Méheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2013-04-01

    Mixing and reactive transport are primarily controlled by the interplay between diffusion, advection and reaction at pore scale. Yet, how the distribution and spatial correlation of the velocity field at pore scale impact these processes is still an open question. Here we present an experimental investigation of the distribution and correlation of pore scale velocities and its relation with upscaled dispersion. We use a quasi two-dimensional (2D) horizontal set up, consisting of two glass plates filled with cylinders representing the grains of the porous medium : the cell is built by soft lithography technique, wich allows for full control of the system geometry. The local velocity field is quantified from particle tracking velocimetry using microspheres that are advected with the pore scale flow. Their displacement is purely advective, as the particle size is chosen large enough to avoid diffusion. We thus obtain particle trajectories as well as lagrangian velocities in the entire system. The measured velocity field shows the existence of a network of preferential flow paths in channels with high velocities, as well as very low velocity in stagnation zones, with a non Gaussian distribution. Lagrangian velocities are long range correlated in time, which implies a non-fickian scaling of the longitudinal variance of particle positions. To upscale this process we develop an effective transport model, based on correlated continous time random walk, which is entirely parametrized by the pore scale velocity distribution and correlation. The model predictions are compared with conservative tracer test data for different Peclet numbers. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of different pore geometries on the distribution and correlation of Lagrangian velocities and we discuss the link between these properties and the effective dispersion behavior.

  4. Microstructural characterization, petrophysics and upscaling - from porous media to fractural media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Liu, K.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2017-12-01

    We present an integrated study for the characterization of complex geometry, fluid transport features and mechanical deformation at micro-scale and the upscaling of properties using microtomographic data: We show how to integrate microstructural characterization by the volume fraction, specific surface area, connectivity (percolation), shape and orientation of microstructures with identification of individual fractures from a 3D fractural network. In a first step we use stochastic analyses of microstructures to determine the geometric RVE (representative volume element) of samples. We proceed by determining the size of a thermodynamic RVE by computing upper/lower bounds of entropy production through Finite Element (FE) analyses on a series of models with increasing sizes. The minimum size for thermodynamic RVE's is identified on the basis of the convergence criteria of the FE simulations. Petrophysical properties (permeability and mechanical parameters, including plastic strength) are then computed numerically if thermodynamic convergence criteria are fulfilled. Upscaling of properties is performed by means of percolation theory. The percolation threshold is detected by using a shrinking/expanding algorithm on static micro-CT images of rocks. Parameters of the scaling laws can be extracted from quantitative analyses and/or numerical simulations on a series of models with similar structures but different porosities close to the percolation threshold. Different rock samples are analyzed. Characterizing parameters of porous/fractural rocks are obtained. Synthetic derivative models of the microstructure are used to estimate the relationships between porosity and mechanical properties. Results obtained from synthetic sandstones show that yield stress, cohesion and the angle of friction are linearly proportional to porosity. Our integrated study shows that digital rock technology can provide meaningful parameters for effective upscaling if thermodynamic volume averaging

  5. Physical Aspects in Upscaling of Fractured Reservoirs and Improved Oil Recovery Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, H.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with upscaled models for waterflooded naturally fractured reservoirs (NFRs). Naturally fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20% of the world’s oil reserves and production. From the fluid-flow point of view, a fractured reservoir is defined as a reservoir in which a

  6. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  7. Laboratory investigation of constitutive property up-scaling in volcanic tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.

    1996-08-01

    One of the critical issues facing the Yucca Mountain site characterization and performance assessment programs is the manner in which property up-scaling is addressed. Property up-scaling becomes an issue whenever heterogeneous media properties are measured at one scale but applied at another. A research program has been established to challenge current understanding of property up-scaling with the aim of developing and testing improved models that describe up-scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Up-scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. To date, up-scaling studies have been performed on a series of tuff and sandstone (used as experimental controls) blocks. Samples include a welded, anisotropic tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, upper cliff microstratigraphic unit), and a moderately welded tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Caprock microstratigraphic unit). A massive fluvial sandstone (Berea Sandstone) was also investigated as a means of evaluating the experimental program and to provide a point of comparison for the tuff data. Because unsaturated flow is of prime interest to the Yucca Mountain Program, scoping studies aimed at investigating the up-scaling of hydraulic properties under various saturated conditions were performed to compliment these studies of intrinsic permeability. These studies focused on matrix sorptivity, a constitutive property quantifying the capillarity of a porous medium. 113 refs

  8. Representing soakaways in a physically distributed urban drainage model – Upscaling individual allotments to an aggregated scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldin, Maria Kerstin; Mark, Ole; Kuczera, George

    2012-01-01

    the infiltration rate based on water depth and soil properties for each time step, and controls the removal of water from the urban drainage model. The model is intended to be used to assess the impact of soakaways on urban drainage networks. The model is tested using field data and shown to simulate the behavior......The increased load on urban stormwater systems due to climate change and growing urbanization can be partly alleviated by using soakaways and similar infiltration techniques. However, while soakaways are usually small-scale structures, most urban drainage network models operate on a larger spatial...... of individual soakaways well. Six upscaling methods to aggregate individual soakaway units with varying saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) in the surrounding soil have been investigated. In the upscaled model, the weighted geometric mean hydraulic conductivity of individual allotments is found to provide...

  9. Upscaling of Forchheimer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Aulisa, Eugenio

    2014-08-01

    In this work we propose upscaling method for nonlinear Forchheimer flow in heterogeneous porous media. The generalized Forchheimer law is considered for incompressible and slightly-compressible single-phase flows. We use recently developed analytical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1] and formulate the resulting system in terms of a degenerate nonlinear flow equation for the pressure with the nonlinearity depending on the pressure gradient. The coarse scale parameters for the steady state problem are determined so that the volumetric average of velocity of the flow in the domain on fine scale and on coarse scale are close. A flow-based coarsening approach is used, where the equivalent permeability tensor is first evaluated following streamline methods for linear cases, and modified in order to take into account the nonlinear effects. Compared to previous works (Garibotti and Peszynska, 2009) [2], (Durlofsky and Karimi-Fard) [3], this approach can be combined with rigorous mathematical upscaling theory for monotone operators, (Efendiev et al., 2004) [4], using our recent theoretical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1]. The developed upscaling algorithm for nonlinear steady state problems is effectively used for variety of heterogeneities in the domain of computation. Direct numerical computations for average velocity and productivity index justify the usage of the coarse scale parameters obtained for the special steady state case in the fully transient problem. For nonlinear case analytical upscaling formulas in stratified domain are obtained. Numerical results were compared to these analytical formulas and proved to be highly accurate. © 2014.

  10. Upscaling of reactive flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    The thesis deals with the upscaling of reactive flows in complex geometry. The reactions which may include deposition or dissolution take place at a part of the boundary and depending on the size of the reaction domain, the changes in the pore structure that are due to the deposition process may or

  11. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  12. Upscaling of Constitutive Relations In Unsaturated Heterogeneous Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. H.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    When numerical model are used for modeling field scale flow and transport processes in the subsurface, the problem of ''upscaling'' arises. Typical scales, corresponding to spatial resolutions of subsurface heterogeneity in numerical models, are generally much larger than the measurement scale of the parameters and physical processes involved. The upscaling problems is, then, one of assigning parameters to gridblock scale based on parameter values measured on small scales. The focus of this study is to develop an approach to determine large-scale (upscaled) constitutive relations (relationships among relative permeability, capillary pressure and saturation) from small-scale measurements for porous media for a range of air entry values that are typical for the tuff matrix in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain. For porous media with large air entry values, capillary forces play a key role in determining spatial water distribution at large-scales. Therefore, a relatively uniform capillary pressure approximately exists even for a large gridblock scale under steady state flow conditions. Based on these reasoning, we developed formulations that relate upscaled constitutive relations to ones measured at core-scale. Numerical experiments with stochastically generated heterogeneous porous media were used to evaluate the upscaling formulations

  13. Upscaling soil saturated hydraulic conductivity from pore throat characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upscaling and/or estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat at the core scale from microscopic/macroscopic soil characteristics has been actively under investigation in the hydrology and soil physics communities for several decades. Numerous models have beendeveloped based on different approac...

  14. An Efficient Upscaling Process Based on a Unified Fine-scale Multi-Physics Model for Flow Simulation in Naturally Fracture Carbonate Karst Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Linfeng

    2009-01-01

    The main challenges in modeling fluid flow through naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs are how to address various flow physics in complex geological architectures due to the presence of vugs and caves which are connected via fracture networks at multiple scales. In this paper, we present a unified multi-physics model that adapts to the complex flow regime through naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs. This approach generalizes Stokes-Brinkman model (Popov et al. 2007). The fracture networks provide the essential connection between the caves in carbonate karst reservoirs. It is thus very important to resolve the flow in fracture network and the interaction between fractures and caves to better understand the complex flow behavior. The idea is to use Stokes-Brinkman model to represent flow through rock matrix, void caves as well as intermediate flows in very high permeability regions and to use an idea similar to discrete fracture network model to represent flow in fracture network. Consequently, various numerical solution strategies can be efficiently applied to greatly improve the computational efficiency in flow simulations. We have applied this unified multi-physics model as a fine-scale flow solver in scale-up computations. Both local and global scale-up are considered. It is found that global scale-up has much more accurate than local scale-up. Global scale-up requires the solution of global flow problems on fine grid, which generally is computationally expensive. The proposed model has the ability to deal with large number of fractures and caves, which facilitate the application of Stokes-Brinkman model in global scale-up computation. The proposed model flexibly adapts to the different flow physics in naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs in a simple and effective way. It certainly extends modeling and predicting capability in efficient development of this important type of reservoir.

  15. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1994-01-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in site and waste characterization program effort. The term ''physical sampling'' used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ''physical sampling'' broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measuring of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting

  16. Physical Characterization of Florida International University Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HANSEN, ERICHK.

    2004-08-19

    Florida International University shipped Laponite, clay (bentonite and kaolin blend), and Quality Assurance Requirements Document AZ-101 simulants to the Savannah River Technology Center for physical characterization and to report the results. The objectives of the task were to measure the physical properties of the fluids provided by FIU and to report the results. The physical properties were measured using the approved River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant characterization procedure [Ref. 1]. This task was conducted in response to the work outlined in CCN066794 [Ref. 2], authored by Gary Smith and William Graves of RPP-WTP.

  17. Adaptive upscaling with the dual mesh method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerillot, D.; Verdiere, S.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that upscaling should be calculated during the flow simulation instead of trying to enhance the a priori upscaling methods. Hence, counter-examples are given to motivate our approach, the so-called Dual Mesh Method. The main steps of this numerical algorithm are recalled. Applications illustrate the necessity to consider different average relative permeability values depending on the direction in space. Moreover, these values could be different for the same average saturation. This proves that an a priori upscaling cannot be the answer even in homogeneous cases because of the {open_quotes}dynamical heterogeneity{close_quotes} created by the saturation profile. Other examples show the efficiency of the Dual Mesh Method applied to heterogeneous medium and to an actual field case in South America.

  18. Renormalization group theory outperforms other approaches in statistical comparison between upscaling techniques for porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Agarwal, Umang; Tandon, Kunj; Koelman, J. M. Vianney A.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the pressure differential required to achieve a desired flow rate in a porous medium requires solving Darcy's law, a Laplace-like equation, with a spatially varying tensor permeability. In various scenarios, the permeability coefficient is sampled at high spatial resolution, which makes solving Darcy's equation numerically prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, much effort has gone into creating upscaled or low-resolution effective models of the coefficient while ensuring that the estimated flow rate is well reproduced, bringing to the fore the classic tradeoff between computational cost and numerical accuracy. Here we perform a statistical study to characterize the relative success of upscaling methods on a large sample of permeability coefficients that are above the percolation threshold. We introduce a technique based on mode-elimination renormalization group theory (MG) to build coarse-scale permeability coefficients. Comparing the results with coefficients upscaled using other methods, we find that MG is consistently more accurate, particularly due to its ability to address the tensorial nature of the coefficients. MG places a low computational demand, in the manner in which we have implemented it, and accurate flow-rate estimates are obtained when using MG-upscaled permeabilities that approach or are beyond the percolation threshold.

  19. Sludge characterization: the role of physical consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinosa, Ludovico; Wichmann, Knut

    2003-07-01

    The physical consistency is an important parameter in sewage sludge characterization as it strongly affects almost all treatment, utilization and disposal operations. In addition, in many european Directives a reference to the physical consistency is reported as a characteristic to be evaluated for fulfilling the regulations requirements. Further, in many analytical methods for sludge different procedures are indicated depending on whether a sample is liquid or not, is solid or not. Three physical behaviours (liquid, paste-like and solid) can be observed with sludges, so the development of analytical procedures to define the boundary limit between liquid and paste-like behaviours (flowability) and that between solid and paste-like ones (solidity) is of growing interest. Several devices can be used for evaluating the flowability and solidity properties, but often they are costly and difficult to be operated in the field. Tests have been carried out to evaluate the possibility to adopt a simple extrusion procedure for flowability measurements, and a Vicat needle for solidity ones. (author)

  20. Review of Upscaling Methods for Describing Unsaturated Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2000-09-26

    Representing samll-scale features can be a challenge when one wants to model unsaturated flow in large domains. In this report, the various upscaling techniques are reviewed. The following upscaling methods have been identified from the literature: stochastic methods, renormalization methods, volume averaging and homogenization methods. In addition, a final technique, full resolution numerical modeling, is also discussed.

  1. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in high-level radioactive waste management program effort. The term ''physical sampling'' used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ''physical sampling'' broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH, which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measurements of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting. Therefore, the when and how to take samples is needed to be known and planned

  2. Characterizing the epistemological development of physics majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Gire

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Students in introductory physics courses are likely to have views about physics that differ from those of experts. However, students who continue to study physics eventually become experts themselves. Presumably these students either possess or develop more expertlike views. To investigate this process, the views of introductory physics students majoring in physics are compared with the views of introductory physics students majoring in engineering. In addition, the views of physics majors are assessed at various stages of degree progress. The Colorado learning attitudes about science survey is used to evaluate students’ views about physics, and students’ overall survey scores and responses to individual survey items are analyzed. Beginning physics majors are significantly more expertlike than nonmajors in introductory physics courses, and this high level of sophistication is consistent for most of undergraduate study.

  3. Physical characterization of steel and stainless steel metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavilla, A.O.; Lucchesi, C.G.; Sandin, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the physical characterization of steel powders (obtained by atomization) for later sintering and for the construction of porous sheets and filtrating tubes, capable of operating at temperatures between 600 deg C and 800 deg C in corrosive atmospheres. This methodology was based on the equipment and methods used for the physical characterization of uranium oxide powders. (Author) [es

  4. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of…

  5. Fast numerical upscaling of heat equation for fibrous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg; Lazarov, Raytcho; Willems, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in numerical methods for computing the effective heat conductivities of fibrous insulation materials, such as glass or mineral wool, characterized by low solid volume fractions and high contrasts, i.e., high ratios between the thermal conductivities of the fibers and the surrounding air. We consider a fast numerical method for solving some auxiliary cell problems appearing in this upscaling procedure. The auxiliary problems are boundary value problems of the steady-state heat equation in a representative elementary volume occupied by fibers and air. We make a simplification by replacing these problems with appropriate boundary value problems in the domain occupied by the fibers only. Finally, the obtained problems are further simplified by taking advantage of the slender shape of the fibers and assuming that they form a network. A discretization on the graph defined by the fibers is presented and error estimates are provided. The resulting algorithm is discussed and the accuracy and the performance of the method are illusrated on a number of numerical experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  6. Fast numerical upscaling of heat equation for fibrous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg

    2010-08-01

    We are interested in numerical methods for computing the effective heat conductivities of fibrous insulation materials, such as glass or mineral wool, characterized by low solid volume fractions and high contrasts, i.e., high ratios between the thermal conductivities of the fibers and the surrounding air. We consider a fast numerical method for solving some auxiliary cell problems appearing in this upscaling procedure. The auxiliary problems are boundary value problems of the steady-state heat equation in a representative elementary volume occupied by fibers and air. We make a simplification by replacing these problems with appropriate boundary value problems in the domain occupied by the fibers only. Finally, the obtained problems are further simplified by taking advantage of the slender shape of the fibers and assuming that they form a network. A discretization on the graph defined by the fibers is presented and error estimates are provided. The resulting algorithm is discussed and the accuracy and the performance of the method are illusrated on a number of numerical experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  7. A Simplified Method for Upscaling Composite Materials with High Contrast of the Conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Ewing, R.; Iliev, O.; Lazarov, R.; Rybak, I.; Willems, J.

    2009-01-01

    A large class of industrial composite materials, such as metal foams, fibrous glass materials, mineral wools, and the like, are widely used in insulation and advanced heat exchangers. These materials are characterized by a substantial difference between the thermal properties of the highly conductive materials (glass or metal) and the insulator (air) as well as low volume fractions and complex network-like structures of the highly conductive components. In this paper we address the important issue for the engineering practice of developing fast, reliable, and accurate methods for computing the macroscopic (upscaled) thermal conductivities of such materials. We assume that the materials have constant macroscopic thermal conductivity tensors, which can be obtained by upscaling techniques based on the postprocessing of a number of linearly independent solutions of the steady-state heat equation on representative elementary volumes (REVs). We propose, theoretically justify, and computationally study a numerical method for computing the effective conductivities of materials for which the ratio δ of low and high conductivities satisfies δ ≪ 1. We show that in this case one needs to solve the heat equation in the region occupied by the highly conductive media only. Further, we prove that under certain conditions on the microscale geometry the proposed method gives an approximation that is O(δ)-close to the upscaled conductivity. Finally, we illustrate the accuracy and the limitations of the method on a number of numerical examples. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Simplifying and upscaling water resources systems models that combine natural and engineered components

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, N.; Keir, G.

    2014-12-01

    Water supply systems typically encompass components of both natural systems (e.g. catchment runoff, aquifer interception) and engineered systems (e.g. process equipment, water storages and transfers). Many physical processes of varying spatial and temporal scales are contained within these hybrid systems models. The need to aggregate and simplify system components has been recognised for reasons of parsimony and comprehensibility; and the use of probabilistic methods for modelling water-related risks also prompts the need to seek computationally efficient up-scaled conceptualisations. How to manage the up-scaling errors in such hybrid systems models has not been well-explored, compared to research in the hydrological process domain. Particular challenges include the non-linearity introduced by decision thresholds and non-linear relations between water use, water quality, and discharge strategies. Using a case study of a mining region, we explore the nature of up-scaling errors in water use, water quality and discharge, and we illustrate an approach to identification of a scale-adjusted model including an error model. Ways forward for efficient modelling of such complex, hybrid systems are discussed, including interactions with human, energy and carbon systems models.

  9. Computational Challenges in the Analysis of Petrophysics Using Microtomography and Upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Pereira, G.; Freij-Ayoub, R.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microtomography provides detailed 3D internal structures of rocks in micro- to tens of nano-meter resolution and is quickly turning into a new technology for studying petrophysical properties of materials. An important step is the upscaling of these properties as micron or sub-micron resolution can only be done on the sample-scale of millimeters or even less than a millimeter. We present here a recently developed computational workflow for the analysis of microstructures including the upscaling of material properties. Computations of properties are first performed using conventional material science simulations at micro to nano-scale. The subsequent upscaling of these properties is done by a novel renormalization procedure based on percolation theory. We have tested the workflow using different rock samples, biological and food science materials. We have also applied the technique on high-resolution time-lapse synchrotron CT scans. In this contribution we focus on the computational challenges that arise from the big data problem of analyzing petrophysical properties and its subsequent upscaling. We discuss the following challenges: 1) Characterization of microtomography for extremely large data sets - our current capability. 2) Computational fluid dynamics simulations at pore-scale for permeability estimation - methods, computing cost and accuracy. 3) Solid mechanical computations at pore-scale for estimating elasto-plastic properties - computational stability, cost, and efficiency. 4) Extracting critical exponents from derivative models for scaling laws - models, finite element meshing, and accuracy. Significant progress in each of these challenges is necessary to transform microtomography from the current research problem into a robust computational big data tool for multi-scale scientific and engineering problems.

  10. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  11. Review of Upscaling Methods for Describing Unsaturated Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BD Wood

    2000-09-26

    The representation of small-scale features can be a challenge when attempting to model unsaturated flow in large domains. Upscaling methods offer the possibility of reducing the amount of resolution required to adequately simulate such a problem. In this report, the various upscaling techniques that are discussed in the literature are reviewed. The following upscaling methods have been identified from the literature: (1) stochastic methods, (2) renormalization methods, and (3) volume averaging and homogenization methods; in addition, a final technique, full resolution numerical modeling, is also discussed. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages. The trade-off is a reduction in accuracy in favor of a method that is easier to employ. For practical applications, the most reasonable approach appears to be one in which any of the upscaling methods identified above maybe suitable for upscaling in regions where the variations in the parameter fields are small. For regions where the subsurface structure is more complex, only the homogenization and volume averaging methods are probably suitable. With the continual increases in computational capacity, fill-resolution numerical modeling may in many instances provide a tractable means of solving the flow problem in unsaturated systems.

  12. Synthesis, physical characterization, antibacterial activity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some five-coordinated cobalt(III) complexes were synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, 1H NMR and IR spectra. The formation constants and the thermodynamic parameters were measured spectrophotometrically for the 1:1 adduct formation of [Co(Chel)(PBu3)]ClO4.H2O where Chel = cd3OMesalen, ...

  13. An Efficient Upscaling Procedure Based on Stokes-Brinkman Model and Discrete Fracture Network Method for Naturally Fractured Carbonate Karst Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs are characterized by various-sized solution caves that are connected via fracture networks at multiple scales. These complex geologic features can not be fully resolved in reservoir simulations due to the underlying uncertainty in geologic models and the large computational resource requirement. They also bring in multiple flow physics which adds to the modeling difficulties. It is thus necessary to develop a method to accurately represent the effect of caves, fractures and their interconnectivities in coarse-scale simulation models. In this paper, we present a procedure based on our previously proposed Stokes-Brinkman model (SPE 125593) and the discrete fracture network method for accurate and efficient upscaling of naturally fractured carbonate karst reservoirs.

  14. Characterizing the gender gap in introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-06-01

    Previous research [S. J. Pollock , Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007)] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to previously published work [M. Lorenzo , Am. J. Phys. 74, 118 (2006)]. This study begins by identifying a variety of other gender differences. There is a small but significant difference in the course grades of males and females. Males and females have significantly different prior understandings of physics and mathematics. Females are less likely to take high school physics than males, although they are equally likely to take high school calculus. Males and females also differ in their incoming attitudes and beliefs about physics. This collection of background factors is analyzed to determine the extent to which each factor correlates with performance on a conceptual post-test and with gender. Binned by quintiles, we observe that males and females with similar pretest scores do not have significantly different post-test scores (p>0.2) . The post-test data are then modeled using two regression models (multiple regression and logistic regression) to estimate the gender gap in post-test scores after controlling for these important prior factors. These prior factors account for about 70% of the observed gender gap. The results indicate that the gender gap exists in interactive physics classes at our institution but is largely associated with differences in previous physics and math knowledge and incoming attitudes and beliefs.

  15. Characterizing the gender gap in introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Kost

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research [S. J. Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to previously published work [M. Lorenzo et al., Am. J. Phys. 74, 118 (2006]. This study begins by identifying a variety of other gender differences. There is a small but significant difference in the course grades of males and females. Males and females have significantly different prior understandings of physics and mathematics. Females are less likely to take high school physics than males, although they are equally likely to take high school calculus. Males and females also differ in their incoming attitudes and beliefs about physics. This collection of background factors is analyzed to determine the extent to which each factor correlates with performance on a conceptual post-test and with gender. Binned by quintiles, we observe that males and females with similar pretest scores do not have significantly different post-test scores (p>0.2. The post-test data are then modeled using two regression models (multiple regression and logistic regression to estimate the gender gap in post-test scores after controlling for these important prior factors. These prior factors account for about 70% of the observed gender gap. The results indicate that the gender gap exists in interactive physics classes at our institution but is largely associated with differences in previous physics and math knowledge and incoming attitudes and beliefs.

  16. Characterizing the gender gap in introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Pollock

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research [S. J. Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to previously published work [M. Lorenzo et al., Am. J. Phys. 74, 118 (2006]. This study begins by identifying a variety of other gender differences. There is a small but significant difference in the course grades of males and females. Males and females have significantly different prior understandings of physics and mathematics. Females are less likely to take high school physics than males, although they are equally likely to take high school calculus. Males and females also differ in their incoming attitudes and beliefs about physics. This collection of background factors is analyzed to determine the extent to which each factor correlates with performance on a conceptual post-test and with gender. Binned by quintiles, we observe that males and females with similar pretest scores do not have significantly different post-test scores (p>0.2 . The post-test data are then modeled using two regression models (multiple regression and logistic regression to estimate the gender gap in post-test scores after controlling for these important prior factors. These prior factors account for about 70% of the observed gender gap. The results indicate that the gender gap exists in interactive physics classes at our institution but is largely associated with differences in previous physics and math knowledge and incoming attitudes and beliefs.

  17. Physical characterization and kinetic modelling of matrix tablets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    release mechanisms were characterized by kinetic modeling. Analytical ... findings demonstrate that both the desired physical characteristics and drug release profiles were obtained ..... on the compression, mechanical, and release properties.

  18. Physical and Electrical Characterization of Polymer Aluminum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, David; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer aluminum capacitors from several manufacturers with various combinations of capacitance, rated voltage, and ESR values were physically examined and electrically characterized. The physical construction analysis of the capacitors revealed three different capacitor structures, i.e., traditional wound, stacked, and laminated. Electrical characterization results of polymer aluminum capacitors are reported for frequency-domain dielectric response at various temperatures, surge breakdown voltage, and other dielectric properties. The structure-property relations in polymer aluminum capacitors are discussed.

  19. Physical and Electrical Characterization of Aluminum Polymer Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, David; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer aluminum capacitors from several manufacturers with various combinations of capacitance, rated voltage, and ESR values were physically examined and electrically characterized. The physical construction analysis of the capacitors revealed three different capacitor structures, i.e., traditional wound, stacked, and laminated. Electrical characterization results of polymer aluminum capacitors are reported for frequency-domain dielectric response at various temperatures, surge breakdown voltage, and other dielectric properties. The structure-property relations in polymer aluminum capacitors are discussed.

  20. Thermodynamics principles characterizing physical and chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Honig, Jurgen M

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise overview of thermodynamics, and is written in a manner which makes the difficult subject matter understandable. Thermodynamics is systematic in its presentation and covers many subjects that are generally not dealt with in competing books such as: Carathéodory''s approach to the Second Law, the general theory of phase transitions, the origin of phase diagrams, the treatment of matter subjected to a variety of external fields, and the subject of irreversible thermodynamics.The book provides a first-principles, postulational, self-contained description of physical and chemical processes. Designed both as a textbook and as a monograph, the book stresses the fundamental principles, the logical development of the subject matter, and the applications in a variety of disciplines. This revised edition is based on teaching experience in the classroom, and incorporates many exercises in varying degrees of sophistication. The stress laid on a didactic, logical presentation, and on the relat...

  1. Physical and structural characterization of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective of this thesis was the synthesis of the nano whiskers of aluminum ammonium carbonate hydroxide (AACH) from the mixture of aluminum nitrate and urea with different content levels of urea by hydrothermal process. The AACH precursor of nano alumina whiskers is added into zirconia powder along with CTAB and ethanol to obtain fine precipitates ready for calcining at 650 C. Fine powder of zirconia with alumina whiskers is compacted to form pellets of 5 mm diameter. Sintering of pellets has been performed at 1500 C in open atmosphere. Fabrication of sintered pellets is being done by using uniaxial press under 5 ton loads. The addition of alumina whiskers resulted better mechanical properties like compactness, hardness and flexural strength etc. The influence of urea composition upon the growth of alumina whisker has been revealed by FE-SEM. Low content of urea at 6 gm. to 8 gm. formed urchin like morphology of AACH whiskers, while at higher level 12 gm. of urea independent whiskers obtained. In second stage the varying amount of urea in aluminum nitrate was performed and calcined at different temperatures 80, 100, 200, 300, 400 degree C to reveal the effect on the pure AACH whiskers morphologies. Different characterization like SEM is used for structure morphologies, XRD used for determining of type of structure, FTIR technique used for the study of nature of functional groups, and impedance spectroscopy applied for electrical properties measurements. XRD pattern show the presence of a-alumina, FTIR tells about the missing peaks and absence of functional group due to increases in the temperature and SEM analysis of fractured surface of sintered pellets done for revealing structure morphology. Fracture study of nuclear fuel has also done by SEM analysis in this work to study cause of peeling off flakes at the outer edge of sintered UO 2 pellets. (author)

  2. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  3. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  4. Up-Scaled Supercritical Flow Synthesis of Hybrid Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellstern, Henrik Christian; Becker, Jacob; Hald, Peter

    A new, up-scaled supercritical flow synthesis apparatus is currently under construction in Aarhus. A module based system allows for a range of parameter studies with improved parameter control. The dual-reactor setup enables both single phase and core-shell nanoparticle synthesis, and the large...

  5. Refined characterization of student perspectives on quantum physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Baily

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of physics concepts, and to inform how we might teach traditional content. Our previous investigations of student perspectives on quantum physics have indicated they can be highly nuanced, and may vary both within and across contexts. In order to better understand the contextual and often seemingly contradictory stances of students on matters of interpretation, we interviewed 19 students from four introductory modern physics courses taught at the University of Colorado. We find that students have attitudes and opinions that often parallel the stances of expert physicists when arguing for their favored interpretations of quantum mechanics, allowing for more nuanced characterizations of student perspectives in terms of three key interpretive themes. We present a framework for characterizing student perspectives on quantum mechanics, and demonstrate its utility in interpreting the sometimes contradictory nature of student responses to previous surveys. We further find that students most often vacillate in their responses when what makes intuitive sense to them is not in agreement with what they consider to be a correct response, underscoring the need to distinguish between the personal and the public perspectives of introductory modern physics students.

  6. Upscaling Empirically Based Conceptualisations to Model Tropical Dominant Hydrological Processes for Historical Land Use Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Jones, J.

    2009-12-01

    Surface runoff and percolation to ground water are two hydrological processes of concern to the Atlantic slope of Costa Rica because of their impacts on flooding and drinking water contamination. As per legislation, the Costa Rican Government funds land use management from the farm to the regional scale to improve or conserve hydrological ecosystem services. In this study, we examined how land use (e.g., forest, coffee, sugar cane, and pasture) affects hydrological response at the point, plot (1 m2), and the field scale (1-6ha) to empirically conceptualize the dominant hydrological processes in each land use. Using our field data, we upscaled these conceptual processes into a physically-based distributed hydrological model at the field, watershed (130 km2), and regional (1500 km2) scales. At the point and plot scales, the presence of macropores and large roots promoted greater vertical percolation and subsurface connectivity in the forest and coffee field sites. The lack of macropores and large roots, plus the addition of management artifacts (e.g., surface compaction and a plough layer), altered the dominant hydrological processes by increasing lateral flow and surface runoff in the pasture and sugar cane field sites. Macropores and topography were major influences on runoff generation at the field scale. Also at the field scale, antecedent moisture conditions suggest a threshold behavior as a temporal control on surface runoff generation. However, in this tropical climate with very intense rainstorms, annual surface runoff was less than 10% of annual precipitation at the field scale. Significant differences in soil and hydrological characteristics observed at the point and plot scales appear to have less significance when upscaled to the field scale. At the point and plot scales, percolation acted as the dominant hydrological process in this tropical environment. However, at the field scale for sugar cane and pasture sites, saturation-excess runoff increased as

  7. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems

  8. Characterization of Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Diego; Heeres, H. J.; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    The characterization of Physic nut shells was done using the wet chemical analysis of wood components. The obtained fractions were analyzed using IR, NMR, GPC, ICP and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. TGA was used to determine the fixed carbon (+ash) and water content of the shells. The results of wet

  9. Physical property characterization of 183-H Basin sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyani, R.K.; Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the characterization of 183-H Basin sludge physical properties, e.g. bulk density of sludge and absorbent, and determination of free liquids. Calcination of crucible-size samples of sludge was also done and the resulting 'loss-on-ignition' was compared to the theoretical weight loss based on sludge analysis obtained from Weston Labs

  10. Parallel Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-10-24

    ParELAG is a parallel C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations and element-based algebraic multigrid solvers. It provides optimal complexity algorithms to build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equations (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured meshes. Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  11. Organic solar cells fundamentals, devices, and upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    Solution-Processed DonorsB. Burkhart, B. C. ThompsonSmall-Molecule and Vapor-Deposited Organic Photovoltaics R. R. Lunt, R. J. HolmesAcceptor Materials for Solution-Processed Solar Cells Y. HeInterfacial Layers R. Po, C. Carbonera, A. BernardiElectrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Cells S. Yoo, J.-Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. LeeTandem and Multi-Junction Organic Solar Cells J. Gilot, R. A. J. JanssenBulk Heterojunction Morphology Control and Characterization T. Wang, D. G. LidzeyOptical Modeling and Light Management

  12. Recent developments in stochastic modeling and upscaling of hydrologic properties in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.; Robey, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    A set of detailed geostatistical simulations of porosity has been produced for a layered stratigraphic sequence of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The simulations are produced using a composite. model of spatial continuity and they are highly conditioned to abundant drill hole (core) information. A set of derivative simulations of saturated hydraulic conductivity has been produced, in the absence of conditioning data, using a cross-variable relationship developed from similar data elsewhere. The detailed simulations reproduce both the major stratigraphic units and finer scale layering indicated by the drill hole data. These simulations have been scaled up several order of magnitude to represent block-scale effective hydrologic properties suitable for use in numerical modeling of groundwater flow and transport. The upscaling process involves the reformulation of a previously reported method that iteratively adapts an initial arbitrary grid to ''homogenize'' the detailed hydraulic properties contained within the adjusted cell limits and to minimize the size of cell in highly heterogeneous regions. Although the computation of the block-effective property involves simple numerical averaging, the blocks over which these averages are computed are relatively homogeneous, which reduces the numerical difficulties involved in averaging non-additive properties, such as permeability. The entire process of simulation and upscaling is rapid and computationally efficient compared with alterative techniques. It is thus suitable for the Monte Carlo evaluation of the uncertainty in site characterization as it affects the results of groundwater flow and transport calculations

  13. Clinical-epidemiological characterization of leprosy cases with physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleciane Costa de Sousa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the clinical-epidemiological profile of cases of multibacillary leprosy, diagnosed with physical disabilities. Methods: this is a cross-sectional and retrospective study. The sample consisted of 276 cases of diagnosed leprosy. Results: leprosy mainly affects males, of brown skin color, low education and with a mean age of 51.96 years old (standard deviation, SD=20.33 years old. The Virchowian and dimorphic clinical forms are mainly responsible for the transmission of the disease and the development of physical disabilities. Decreased or lost sensation in hands and feet, trophic ulcers and traumatic injuries, as well as clawed hands were the physical disabilities prevalent in the study. Conclusion: the cases with physical disabilities are predominantly affected by multibacillary clinical forms, and they can be inferred in the maintenance of the transmission chain and the late detection of severe forms of leprosy.

  14. Cnn Based Retinal Image Upscaling Using Zero Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonov, A.; Chesnakov, K.; Krylov, A.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the paper is to obtain high quality of image upscaling for noisy images that are typical in medical image processing. A new training scenario for convolutional neural network based image upscaling method is proposed. Its main idea is a novel dataset preparation method for deep learning. The dataset contains pairs of noisy low-resolution images and corresponding noiseless highresolution images. To achieve better results at edges and textured areas, Zero Component Analysis is applied to these images. The upscaling results are compared with other state-of-the-art methods like DCCI, SI-3 and SRCNN on noisy medical ophthalmological images. Objective evaluation of the results confirms high quality of the proposed method. Visual analysis shows that fine details and structures like blood vessels are preserved, noise level is reduced and no artifacts or non-existing details are added. These properties are essential in retinal diagnosis establishment, so the proposed algorithm is recommended to be used in real medical applications.

  15. Temporal consistent depth map upscaling for 3DTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Sjöström, Mârten; Olsson, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing success of three-dimensional (3D) cinema fuels increasing efforts to spread the commercial success of 3D to new markets. The possibilities of a convincing 3D experience at home, such as three-dimensional television (3DTV), has generated a great deal of interest within the research and standardization community. A central issue for 3DTV is the creation and representation of 3D content. Acquiring scene depth information is a fundamental task in computer vision, yet complex and error-prone. Dedicated range sensors, such as the Time­ of-Flight camera (ToF), can simplify the scene depth capture process and overcome shortcomings of traditional solutions, such as active or passive stereo analysis. Admittedly, currently available ToF sensors deliver only a limited spatial resolution. However, sophisticated depth upscaling approaches use texture information to match depth and video resolution. At Electronic Imaging 2012 we proposed an upscaling routine based on error energy minimization, weighted with edge information from an accompanying video source. In this article we develop our algorithm further. By adding temporal consistency constraints to the upscaling process, we reduce disturbing depth jumps and flickering artifacts in the final 3DTV content. Temporal consistency in depth maps enhances the 3D experience, leading to a wider acceptance of 3D media content. More content in better quality can boost the commercial success of 3DTV.

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of bioaerosols - Implications for nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, P. A.; Sun, J.; Eltouny, N. A.; Hudson, E. D.; Hayes, C. T.; Kos, G.

    The importance of organic compounds in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and as cloud condensation and ice-forming nuclei, has been recognized for several decades. Organic compounds comprise a significant fraction of the suspended matter mass, leading to local (e.g. toxicity, health hazards) and global (e.g. climate change) impacts. The state of knowledge of the physical chemistry of organic aerosols has increased during the last few decades. However, due to their complex chemistry and the multifaceted processes in which they are involved, the importance of organic aerosols, particularly bioaerosols, in driving physical and chemical atmospheric processes is still very uncertain and poorly understood. Factors such as solubility, surface tension, chemical impurities, volatility, morphology, contact angle, deliquescence, wettability, and the oxidation process are pivotal in the understanding of the activation processes of cloud droplets, and their chemical structures, solubilities and even the molecular configuration of the microbial outer membrane, all impact ice and cloud nucleation processes in the atmosphere. The aim of this review paper is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols with a focus on those properties important in nucleation processes. We herein discuss the potential importance (or lack thereof) of physical and chemical properties of bioaerosols and illustrate how the knowledge of these properties can be employed to study nucleation processes using a modeling exercise. We also outline a list of major uncertainties due to a lack of understanding of the processes involved or lack of available data. We will also discuss key issues of atmospheric significance deserving future physical chemistry research in the fields of bioaerosol characterization and microphysics, as well as bioaerosol modeling. These fundamental questions are to be addressed prior to any definite conclusions on the

  17. Study of upscaling possibilities for antimony sulfide solid state sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Archontoula; Raptis, Dimitrios; Dracopoulos, Vasilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Solid state solar cells of inverted structure were constructed by successive deposition of nanoparticulate titania, antimony sulfide sensitizer and P3HT on FTO electrodes with PEDOT:PSS:Ag as counter electrode. Sensitized photoanode electrodes were characterized by XRD, Raman, XPS, FESEM and UV-vis. Small laboratory scale cells were first constructed and optimized. Functional cells were obtained by annealing the antimony sulfide film either in air or in inert atmosphere. High short-circuit currents were recorded in both cases with air-annealed sample producing more current but lower voltage. Small unit cells were combined to form cell modules. Connection of unit cells in parallel increased current but not proportionally to that of the unit cell. Connection in series preserved current and generated voltage multiplication. Cells were constructed and studied under ambient conditions, without encapsulation. The results encourage upscaling of antimony sulfide solar cells.

  18. Up-scaling Strategies for Strengthening of Women's Land Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Karin

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents proposals on strategies of up-scaling based on the concepts of gendered land tools, described in the ‘Gender Mechanism' document by the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN, 2006). The 23 priority land tools selected by GLTN are discusses, in view of how the existing land tools best ...... can be applied in a global quest for strengthening women's land tenure security and access to land. It is argued that the GLTN concept of gendering land tools is about building gender-sensitive processes of upgrading land tenure security....

  19. Spatial up-scaling of the retention by matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.

    2006-11-01

    This work has been carried out as a part of the European research project FUNMIG: Fundamental processes of radionuclide migration (www.funmig.com). FUNMIG is a four year project that will be carried out between years 2005 and 2008. Participation of the VTT to the FUNMIG project is jointly funded by EU and Posiva Oy. The present report is an 18th month project delivery (PID4.6.1) of the work package 4.6. Work package 4.6 covers up-scaling processes of the retention and transport processes in the crystalline rock. (orig.)

  20. Potential up-scaling of inkjet-printed devices for logical circuits in flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Kalyan Yoti, E-mail: kalyan-yoti.mitra@mb.tu-chemnitz.de, E-mail: enrico.sowade@mb.tu-chemnitz.de; Sowade, Enrico, E-mail: kalyan-yoti.mitra@mb.tu-chemnitz.de, E-mail: enrico.sowade@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Chemnitz (Germany); Martínez-Domingo, Carme [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain and Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology (ICN), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Ramon, Eloi, E-mail: eloi.ramon@uab.cat [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology (ICN), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Carrabina, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.carrabina@uab.cat [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gomes, Henrique Leonel, E-mail: hgomes@ualg.pt [Universidade do Algarve, Institute of Telecommunications, Faro (Portugal); Baumann, Reinhard R., E-mail: reinhard.baumann@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Department of Printed Functionalities, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-02-17

    Inkjet Technology is often mis-believed to be a deposition/patterning technology which is not meant for high fabrication throughput in the field of printed and flexible electronics. In this work, we report on the 1) printing, 2) fabrication yield and 3) characterization of exemplary simple devices e.g. capacitors, organic transistors etc. which are the basic building blocks for logical circuits. For this purpose, printing is performed first with a Proof of concept Inkjet printing system Dimatix Material Printer 2831 (DMP 2831) using 10 pL small print-heads and then with Dimatix Material Printer 3000 (DMP 3000) using 35 pL industrial print-heads (from Fujifilm Dimatix). Printing at DMP 3000 using industrial print-heads (in Sheet-to-sheet) paves the path towards industrialization which can be defined by printing in Roll-to-Roll format using industrial print-heads. This pavement can be termed as 'Bridging Platform'. This transfer to 'Bridging Platform' from 10 pL small print-heads to 35 pL industrial print-heads help the inkjet-printed devices to evolve on the basis of functionality and also in form of up-scaled quantities. The high printed quantities and yield of inkjet-printed devices justify the deposition reliability and potential to print circuits. This reliability is very much desired when it comes to printing of circuits e.g. inverters, ring oscillator and any other planned complex logical circuits which require devices e.g. organic transistors which needs to get connected in different staged levels. Also, the up-scaled inkjet-printed devices are characterized and they reflect a domain under which they can work to their optimal status. This status is much wanted for predicting the real device functionality and integration of them into a planned circuit.

  1. Potential up-scaling of inkjet-printed devices for logical circuits in flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Sowade, Enrico; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Ramon, Eloi; Carrabina, Jordi; Gomes, Henrique Leonel; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet Technology is often mis-believed to be a deposition/patterning technology which is not meant for high fabrication throughput in the field of printed and flexible electronics. In this work, we report on the 1) printing, 2) fabrication yield and 3) characterization of exemplary simple devices e.g. capacitors, organic transistors etc. which are the basic building blocks for logical circuits. For this purpose, printing is performed first with a Proof of concept Inkjet printing system Dimatix Material Printer 2831 (DMP 2831) using 10 pL small print-heads and then with Dimatix Material Printer 3000 (DMP 3000) using 35 pL industrial print-heads (from Fujifilm Dimatix). Printing at DMP 3000 using industrial print-heads (in Sheet-to-sheet) paves the path towards industrialization which can be defined by printing in Roll-to-Roll format using industrial print-heads. This pavement can be termed as 'Bridging Platform'. This transfer to 'Bridging Platform' from 10 pL small print-heads to 35 pL industrial print-heads help the inkjet-printed devices to evolve on the basis of functionality and also in form of up-scaled quantities. The high printed quantities and yield of inkjet-printed devices justify the deposition reliability and potential to print circuits. This reliability is very much desired when it comes to printing of circuits e.g. inverters, ring oscillator and any other planned complex logical circuits which require devices e.g. organic transistors which needs to get connected in different staged levels. Also, the up-scaled inkjet-printed devices are characterized and they reflect a domain under which they can work to their optimal status. This status is much wanted for predicting the real device functionality and integration of them into a planned circuit

  2. What Determines Upscale Growth of Oceanic Convection into MCSs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipser, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Over tropical oceans, widely scattered convection of various depths may or may not grow upscale into mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). But what distinguishes the large-scale environment that favors such upscale growth from that favoring "unorganized", scattered convection? Is it some combination of large-scale low-level convergence and ascending motion, combined with sufficient instability? We recently put this to a test with ERA-I reanalysis data, with disappointing results. The "usual suspects" of total column water vapor, large-scale ascent, and CAPE may all be required to some extent, but their differences between large MCSs and scattered convection are small. The main positive results from this work (already published) demonstrate that the strength of convection is well correlated with the size and perhaps "organization" of convective features over tropical oceans, in contrast to tropical land, where strong convection is common for large or small convective features. So, important questions remain: Over tropical oceans, how should we define "organized" convection? By size of the precipitation area? And what environmental conditions lead to larger and better organized MCSs? Some recent attempts to answer these questions will be described, but good answers may require more data, and more insights.

  3. Upscaling species richness and abundances in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovo, Anna; Suweis, Samir; Formentin, Marco; Favretti, Marco; Volkov, Igor; Banavar, Jayanth R; Azaele, Sandro; Maritan, Amos

    2017-10-01

    The quantification of tropical tree biodiversity worldwide remains an open and challenging problem. More than two-fifths of the number of worldwide trees can be found either in tropical or in subtropical forests, but only ≈0.000067% of species identities are known. We introduce an analytical framework that provides robust and accurate estimates of species richness and abundances in biodiversity-rich ecosystems, as confirmed by tests performed on both in silico-generated and real forests. Our analysis shows that the approach outperforms other methods. In particular, we find that upscaling methods based on the log-series species distribution systematically overestimate the number of species and abundances of the rare species. We finally apply our new framework on 15 empirical tropical forest plots and quantify the minimum percentage cover that should be sampled to achieve a given average confidence interval in the upscaled estimate of biodiversity. Our theoretical framework confirms that the forests studied are comprised of a large number of rare or hyper-rare species. This is a signature of critical-like behavior of species-rich ecosystems and can provide a buffer against extinction.

  4. A robust upscaling of the effective particle deposition rate in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Gianluca; Crevacore, Eleonora; Sethi, Rajandrea; Icardi, Matteo

    2018-05-01

    In the upscaling from pore to continuum (Darcy) scale, reaction and deposition phenomena at the solid-liquid interface of a porous medium have to be represented by macroscopic reaction source terms. The effective rates can be computed, in the case of periodic media, from three-dimensional microscopic simulations of the periodic cell. Several computational and semi-analytical models have been studied in the field of colloid filtration to describe this problem. They typically rely on effective deposition rates defined by complex fitting procedures, neglecting the advection-diffusion interplay, the pore-scale flow complexity, and assuming slow reactions (or large Péclet numbers). Therefore, when these rates are inserted into general macroscopic transport equations, they can lead to several conceptual inconsistencies and significant errors. To study more accurately the dependence of deposition on the flow parameters, in this work we advocate a clear distinction between the surface processes (that altogether defines the so-called attachment efficiency), and the pore-scale processes. With this approach, valid when colloidal particles are small enough, we study Brownian and gravity-driven deposition on a face-centred cubic (FCC) arrangement of spherical grains, and define a robust upscaling based on a linear effective reaction rate. The case of partial deposition, defined by an attachment probability, is studied and the limit of perfect sink is retrieved as a particular case. We introduce a novel upscaling approach and a particularly convenient computational setup that allows the direct computation of the asymptotic stationary value of effective rates. This allows to drastically reduce the computational domain down to the scale of the single repeating periodic unit. The savings are ever more noticeable in the case of higher Péclet numbers, when larger physical times are needed to reach the asymptotic regime and thus, equivalently, much larger computational domain and

  5. A Non-Linear Upscaling Approach for Wind Turbines Blades Based on Stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo Capponi, P.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.; Ashuri, T.; Kallesoe, B.

    2011-01-01

    The linear scaling laws for upscaling wind turbine blades show a linear increase of stresses due to the weight. However, the stresses should remain the same for a suitable design. Application of linear scaling laws may lead to an upscaled blade that may not be any more a feasible design. In this

  6. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun; Brown, Donald

    2017-01-01

    upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models

  7. Physical and chemical characterization of waste wood derived biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yargicoglu, Erin N; Sadasivam, Bala Yamini; Reddy, Krishna R; Spokas, Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Biochar, a solid byproduct generated during waste biomass pyrolysis or gasification in the absence (or near-absence) of oxygen, has recently garnered interest for both agricultural and environmental management purposes owing to its unique physicochemical properties. Favorable properties of biochar include its high surface area and porosity, and ability to adsorb a variety of compounds, including nutrients, organic contaminants, and some gases. Physical and chemical properties of biochars are dictated by the feedstock and production processes (pyrolysis or gasification temperature, conversion technology and pre- and post-treatment processes, if any), which vary widely across commercially produced biochars. In this study, several commercially available biochars derived from waste wood are characterized for physical and chemical properties that can signify their relevant environmental applications. Parameters characterized include: physical properties (particle size distribution, specific gravity, density, porosity, surface area), hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and water holding capacity), and chemical and electrochemical properties (organic matter and organic carbon contents, pH, oxidation-reduction potential and electrical conductivity, zeta potential, carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen (CHN) elemental composition, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals, and leachable PAHs and heavy metals). A wide range of fixed carbon (0-47.8%), volatile matter (28-74.1%), and ash contents (1.5-65.7%) were observed among tested biochars. A high variability in surface area (0.1-155.1g/m(2)) and PAH and heavy metal contents of the solid phase among commercially available biochars was also observed (0.7-83 mg kg(-1)), underscoring the importance of pre-screening biochars prior to application. Production conditions appear to dictate PAH content--with the highest PAHs observed in biochar produced via fast pyrolysis and lowest among the gasification

  8. VISCOSE BASED MAGNETIC YARNS – PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU Marian-Cătălin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the rapid growth in the number of electrical and electronic devices and accessories that emit electromagnetic energy in different frequency bands we present and characterize here several magnetic functionalized viscose twisted yarns. A 100% viscose twisted staple yarn was covered through an in-house developed process with a polymeric solution containing micrometric sized barium hexaferrite magnetic powder. The in-house developed process allows deposition of micrometric thickness polymeric paste layer on the yarn surface. Barium hexaferrite is a hard magnetic material exhibiting high chemical stability and corrosion resistivity, relatively large saturation and residual magnetization and microwave absorbing properties. Five different percentages of the magnetic powder in the polymer solution were used, i.e. ranging from 15 wt% to 45 wt%. Physical characterization shows a very good adherence between the highly hygroscopic viscose staple fibers and the polymeric solution that contains polyvinyl acetate and polyurethane as binders. SEM images evidenced the fact that the polymeric solution penetrated more than 1/3 of the yarn diameter. The concentration of magnetic powder in the polymeric solution has a direct influence on the coating amount, diameter and density. The mechanical characterization of the coated yarns revealed that the breaking force is increasing with increasing magnetic powder content up to o certain value and then decreased because the magnetic layer became stiffer. At the same time, the elongation at brake is decreasing.

  9. Physical and morphometric characterization of indigenous cattle of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to study the physical and morphometric characteristics in indigenous cattle of Assam. The data pertain to 339 indigenous cattle of different categories. The physical characteristics included colour pattern of body coat, muzzle, tail switch, hoof and horn. Body length, height at wither, heart girth, pouch girth, length of tail, switch, neck, ear and head were taken up for morphometric characterization. The main body coat colour of indigenous cattle was brown (31.18% followed by white (28.53%, fawn (15.29%, grey (13.53%, black (4.41% and mixed (7.06%. The prominent colour of tail switch was black (74.53%. Most of animals had black muzzle (86.47%, black hooves (84.71% and black horn (100%. Morphometric characteristics data obtained were classified according to location, age group and sex of the animal. The means for body length, height at wither, heart girth, pouch girth, length of tail, switch, neck, ear and head were 83.668±0.590, 91.942±0.55, 113.146±0.738, 121.181±0.761, 54.196±0.527, 26.098±0.186, 32.705±0.166, 18.131±0.111 and 35.035±0.195 cm respectively. Age and sex had significant effect on all the morphometric characters however, location effect was non significant. The indigenous cattle of Assam are comparatively smaller in size than most of the recognized breeds of cattle however coat colour showed sizeable variation. The data generated for indigenous cattle of Assam would be useful to characterize them.

  10. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  11. Stochastic upscaling in solid mechanics: An excercise in machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsourelakis, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a consistent theoretical and computational framework for upscaling in random microstructures. We adopt an information theoretic approach in order to quantify the informational content of the microstructural details and find ways to condense it while assessing quantitatively the approximation introduced. In particular, we substitute the high-dimensional microscale description by a lower-dimensional representation corresponding for example to an equivalent homogeneous medium. The probabilistic characteristics of the latter are determined by minimizing the distortion between actual macroscale predictions and the predictions made using the coarse model. A machine learning framework is essentially adopted in which a vector quantizer is trained using data generated computationally or collected experimentally. Several parallels and differences with similar problems in source coding theory are pointed out and an efficient computational tool is employed. Various applications in linear and non-linear problems in solid mechanics are examined

  12. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process

  13. The future of stochastic and upscaling methods in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nœtinger, Benoît; Artus, Vincent; Zargar, Ghassem

    2005-03-01

    Geological formations are complex features resulting from geological, mechanical, and physico-chemical processes occurring over a very wide range of length scales and time scales. Transport phenomena ranging from the molecular scale to several hundreds of kilometers may influence the overall behavior of fluid flow in these formations. Heterogeneities that cover a large range of spatial scales play an essential role to channel fluid-flows, especially when they are coupled with non-linearities inherent to transport processes in porous media. These issues have considerable practical importance in groundwater management, and in the oil industry, particularly in solving new problems posed by projects concerned with the trapping of CO2 in the subsurface. In order to manage this complexity, one must be able to prioritize the respective influences of various relevant geological and physico-chemical phenomena occurring at several ranges of length and time scales as well as understand and use the increasingly rich and complex geostatistical models to provide realistic simulations of subsurface conditions. Multiscale simulation of fluid transport in these formations should help engineers to focus on the crucial phenomena that control the flow. This provides a natural framework to integrate data, to solve inverse problems involving large amounts of data, resulting in a reduction of the uncertainties of the subsurface description that must be evaluated. This allows in turn the making of more relevant practical decisions. In this paper, some perspectives on the development of upscaling approaches are presented, highlighting some recent multiscale concepts, discarding the fractured media case. Upscaling can be used as a useful framework to simultaneously manage scale-dependant problems, stochastic approaches and inverse problems. Actual and potential applications of upscaling to the elaboration of subsurface models constrained to observed data, and the management of uncertainties

  14. Quick evaluation of multiple geostatistical models using upscaling with coarse grids: A practical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemouzy, P. [Institut Francais du Petrole and ELF/IFP Helios Group, Pau (France)

    1997-08-01

    In field delineation phase, uncertainty in hydrocarbon reservoir descriptions is large. To quickly examine the impact of this uncertainty on production performance, it is necessary to evaluate a large number of descriptions in relation to possible production methods (well spacing, injection rate, etc.). The method of using coarse upscaled models was first proposed by Ballin. Unlike other methods (connectivity analysis, tracer simulations), it considers parameters such as PVT, well management, etc. After a detailed review of upscaling issues, applications to water-injection cases (either with balance or imbalance of production, with or without aquifer) and to depletion of an oil reservoir with aquifer coning are presented. Much more important than the method of permeability upscaling far from wells, the need of correct upscaling of numerical well representation is pointed out Methods are proposed to accurately represent fluids volumes in coarse models. Simple methods to upscale relative permeabilities, and methods to efficiently correct numerical dispersion are proposed. Good results are obtained for water injection. The coarse upscaling method allows the performance of sensitivity analyses on model parameters at a much lower CPU cost than comprehensive simulations. Models representing extreme behaviors can be easily distinguished. For depletion of an oil reservoir showing aquifer coning, however, the method did not work property. It is our opinion that further research is required for upscaling close to wells. We therefore recombined this method for practical use in the case of water injection.

  15. Characterization of Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wever, Diego-Armando Z.; Heeres, H.J.; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of Physic nut shells was done using the wet chemical analysis of wood components. The obtained fractions were analyzed using IR, NMR, GPC, ICP and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. TGA was used to determine the fixed carbon (+ash) and water content of the shells. The results of wet chemical analysis of wood components offered a clear procedure to isolate the main components in Physic nut shells (a). The fractions obtained were: polar extract (b), non-polar extract (c), Acid Insoluble Lignin (d), Holocellulose (e), α-Cellulose (f). The total Lignin content present in the shells equaled 48.84%. IR and NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the non-polar extract is Lignin, which corresponds to the extractable Lignin (1.24%) in the Physic nut shells and the Acid Insoluble Lignin was 47.60%. Elemental analysis showed no Sulfur present in the investigated materials. Furthermore both 1 H and 13 C NMR of the non-polar extract showed the presence of aliphatic hydrocarbon chains. The α-Cellulose content (22.29%) and the Hemicelluloses content (23.84%) were in line with that of agricultural residues. The water content and the fixed carbon content (+ash [2.8%]) equal 5–6% and 35.6%, respectively. GPC showed that the polydispersity of the non-polar extract (3.6) lies between Alcell Lignin and Kraft Lignin. The polar extract contains a variety of metals, with especially a high amount of the alkali metals K and Na. The extraction with water is proposed to generate a fertilizer fraction and may be applied to reduce potential sintering issues during eventual combustion or gasification of the shells. -- Highlights: ► Physic nut shell is a potential source of value added chemicals due to its high lignin content (48.8 wt%). ► Lignin extracted from Jatropha curcas L. shells is rich in aliphatic linkages. ► Water extraction of the shells yields a potential fertilizer fraction rich in alkali metals and phosphorous. ► Pre-extraction is recommended to eliminate

  16. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Wood

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL, which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%, vicarious interactive (20% (involving questions to and from the lecturer, and noninteractive (55%. As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B, although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12% or on individual learning (10% and 7%. These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  17. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  18. Upscaling of greenhouse gas emissions in upland forestry following clearfell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Sylvia; Keane, Ben; Yamulki, Sirwan; Blei, Emanuel; Gibson-Poole, Simon; Xenakis, Georgios; Perks, Mike; Morison, James; Ineson, Phil

    2016-04-01

    . Ridges usually emitted N2O, whilst N2O emissions from hollows and ditches were very low. As much as 25% of the total GHG flux resulted from large intermittent emissions from the ditches following rainfall. Addition of green needles from the brash immediately increased soil respiration and reduced CH4 emission in comparison to controls. To upscale our high-frequency 'SkyLine' GHG flux measurements at the different topographic features to the field scale, we collected high resolution imagery from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flights. We will compare results using this upscaling technique to GHG emissions simultaneously measured by eddy covariance with the 'SkyLine' system in the predominant footprint. This detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of GHG emissions in an upland forest after felling and their drivers, and development of robust upscaling techniques can provide important tools to improve GHG flux models and to design appropriate management practices in upland forestry to mitigate GHG emissions following clearfell.

  19. Physical characterization of plakophilin 1 reconstituted with and without zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, I; Mücke, N; Reed, J; Herrmann, H; Langowski, J

    2000-07-01

    Plakophilin 1 (PKP1) belongs to the arm-repeat protein family which is characterized by the presence of a conserved 42-amino-acid motif. Despite individual members of the family containing a similar type of structural domain, they exhibit diverse cellular functions. PKP1 is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and, depending on the type of cell, found prominently in the karyoplasm and/or in desmosomes. In surface plasmon resonance detection experiments, we noticed that PKP1 specifically bound zinc but not calcium or magnesium. Therefore we have used circular dichroism spectroscopy, limited proteolysis, analytical ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering to establish the physical properties of recombinant PKP1 depending on the presence or absence of zinc. The alpha helix content of PKP1 was considerably higher when reconstituted with zinc than without. By atomic absorption spectroscopy 7.3 atoms zinc were shown to be tightly associated with one molecule of wild-type PKP1. The zinc-reconstituted protein formed globular particles of 21.9 +/- 8.4 nm diameter, as measured by electron microscopy after glycerol spraying/rotary metal shadowing. In parallel, the average sedimentation coefficient (s20, w) for zinc-containing PKP1 was 41S and its diffusion coefficient, as obtained by dynamic light scattering, 1.48 x 10-7 cm2.s-1. The molecular mass of 2.44 x 106 obtained from s and D yields an average stoichiometry of 30 for the PKP1 oligomer. In contrast, PKP1, reconstituted without zinc, contained no significant amount of zinc, sedimented with 4.6S, and was present in monomeric form as determined by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation.

  20. Upscaling permeability for three-dimensional fractured porous rocks with the multiple boundary method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Hiller, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Upscaling permeability of grid blocks is crucial for groundwater models. A novel upscaling method for three-dimensional fractured porous rocks is presented. The objective of the study was to compare this method with the commonly used Oda upscaling method and the volume averaging method. First, the multiple boundary method and its computational framework were defined for three-dimensional stochastic fracture networks. Then, the different upscaling methods were compared for a set of rotated fractures, for tortuous fractures, and for two discrete fracture networks. The results computed by the multiple boundary method are comparable with those of the other two methods and fit best the analytical solution for a set of rotated fractures. The errors in flow rate of the equivalent fracture model decrease when using the multiple boundary method. Furthermore, the errors of the equivalent fracture models increase from well-connected fracture networks to poorly connected ones. Finally, the diagonal components of the equivalent permeability tensors tend to follow a normal or log-normal distribution for the well-connected fracture network model with infinite fracture size. By contrast, they exhibit a power-law distribution for the poorly connected fracture network with multiple scale fractures. The study demonstrates the accuracy and the flexibility of the multiple boundary upscaling concept. This makes it attractive for being incorporated into any existing flow-based upscaling procedures, which helps in reducing the uncertainty of groundwater models.

  1. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  2. Site-scale groundwater flow modelling of Aberg and upscaling of conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Douglas; Gylling, Bjoern

    2002-04-01

    A recent performance assessment study of spent nuclear fuel disposal in Sweden, Safety Report 1997 (SR 97) included modelling of flow and transport in fractured host rocks. Hydraulic conductivity measurements in this system exhibit a strong scale dependence that needed to be addressed when determining the mean and variogram of the hydraulic conductivity for finite-difference blocks and when nesting site-scale models within regional scale models. This study applies four upscaling approaches to the groundwater flow models of Aberg, one of the hypothetical SR 97 repositories. The approaches are: 1) as in SR 97, empirically upscaling the mean conductivity via the observed scale dependence of measurements, and adjusting the covariance via numerical regularisation; 2) empirically upscaling as in SR 97, but considering fracture zones as two-dimensional features; 3) adapting the effective conductivity of stochastic continuum mechanics to upscale the mean, and geostatistical regularisation for variogram; and 4) the analytical approach of Indelman and Dagan. These four approaches are evaluated for their effects on simple measures of repository performance including the canister flux, the advective travel time from representative canister locations to the ground surface, and the F-quotient. A set of sensitivity analyses suggest that the results of the SR 97 Aberg Base Case are insensitive to minor computational changes and to the changes in the properties of minor fracture zones. The comparison of alternative approaches to upscaling indicates that, for the methods examined in this study, the greatest consistency of boundary flows between the regional and site-scale models was achieved when using the scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity observed at Aespoe for the rock domains, the hydraulic conductivities of the large-scale interference tests for the conductor domain, and a numerical regularisation based on Moye's formula for the variogram. The assumption that the

  3. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  4. Upscaling of Large-Scale Transport in Spatially Heterogeneous Porous Media Using Wavelet Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, M.; de Barros, F.; Ebrahimi, F.; Sahimi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling flow and solute transport in large-scale heterogeneous porous media involves substantial computational burdens. A common approach to alleviate this complexity is to utilize upscaling methods. These processes generate upscaled models with less complexity while attempting to preserve the hydrogeological properties comparable to the original fine-scale model. We use Wavelet Transformations (WT) of the spatial distribution of aquifer's property to upscale the hydrogeological models and consequently transport processes. In particular, we apply the technique to a porous formation with broadly distributed and correlated transmissivity to verify the performance of the WT. First, transmissivity fields are coarsened using WT in such a way that the high transmissivity zones, in which more important information is embedded, mostly remain the same, while the low transmissivity zones are averaged out since they contain less information about the hydrogeological formation. Next, flow and non-reactive transport are simulated in both fine-scale and upscaled models to predict both the concentration breakthrough curves at a control location and the large-scale spreading of the plume around its centroid. The results reveal that the WT of the fields generates non-uniform grids with an average of 2.1% of the number of grid blocks in the original fine-scale models, which eventually leads to a significant reduction in the computational costs. We show that the upscaled model obtained through the WT reconstructs the concentration breakthrough curves and the spreading of the plume at different times accurately. Furthermore, the impacts of the Hurst coefficient, size of the flow domain and the orders of magnitude difference in transmissivity values on the results have been investigated. It is observed that as the heterogeneity and the size of the domain increase, better agreement between the results of fine-scale and upscaled models can be achieved. Having this framework at hand aids

  5. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM for flow simulations in heterogeneous porous media at the Darcy scale is proposed in this paper. In the Darcy-scale simulations, the Shan-Chen force model is used to simplify the algorithm. The proposed upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models is proposed as we coarsen the grid. The effective permeability is computed using solutions of local problems (e.g., by performing local LBM simulations on the fine grids using the original permeability distribution and used on the coarse grids in the upscaled simulations. The upscaled LBM that can reduce the computational cost of existing LBM and transfer the information between different scales is implemented. The results of coarse-grid, reduced-order, simulations agree very well with averaged results obtained using a fine grid.

  6. Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

  7. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2017-02-16

    An upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) for flow simulations in heterogeneous porous media at the Darcy scale is proposed in this paper. In the Darcy-scale simulations, the Shan-Chen force model is used to simplify the algorithm. The proposed upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models is proposed as we coarsen the grid. The effective permeability is computed using solutions of local problems (e.g., by performing local LBM simulations on the fine grids using the original permeability distribution) and used on the coarse grids in the upscaled simulations. The upscaled LBM that can reduce the computational cost of existing LBM and transfer the information between different scales is implemented. The results of coarse-grid, reduced-order, simulations agree very well with averaged results obtained using a fine grid.

  8. Negative emissions—Part 3: Innovation and upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Gregory F.; Callaghan, Max W.; Creutzig, Felix; Fuss, Sabine; Hartmann, Jens; Hilaire, Jérôme; Lamb, William F.; Minx, Jan C.; Rogers, Sophia; Smith, Pete

    2018-06-01

    We assess the literature on innovation and upscaling for negative emissions technologies (NETs) using a systematic and reproducible literature coding procedure. To structure our review, we employ the framework of sequential stages in the innovation process, with which we code each NETs article in innovation space. We find that while there is a growing body of innovation literature on NETs, 59% of the articles are focused on the earliest stages of the innovation process, ‘research and development’ (R&D). The subsequent stages of innovation are also represented in the literature, but at much lower levels of activity than R&D. Distinguishing between innovation stages that are related to the supply of the technology (R&D, demonstrations, scale up) and demand for the technology (demand pull, niche markets, public acceptance), we find an overwhelming emphasis (83%) on the supply side. BECCS articles have an above average share of demand-side articles while direct air carbon capture and storage has a very low share. Innovation in NETs has much to learn from successfully diffused technologies; appealing to heterogeneous users, managing policy risk, as well as understanding and addressing public concerns are all crucial yet not well represented in the extant literature. Results from integrated assessment models show that while NETs play a key role in the second half of the 21st century for 1.5 °C and 2 °C scenarios, the major period of new NETs deployment is between 2030 and 2050. Given that the broader innovation literature consistently finds long time periods involved in scaling up and deploying novel technologies, there is an urgency to developing NETs that is largely unappreciated. This challenge is exacerbated by the thousands to millions of actors that potentially need to adopt these technologies for them to achieve planetary scale. This urgency is reflected neither in the Paris Agreement nor in most of the literature we review here. If NETs are to be

  9. Simulation of nitrate reduction in groundwater - An upscaling approach from small catchments to the Baltic Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. L.; Donnelly, C.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Karlsson, I. B.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling approach proposed to simulate the impact of local-scale, spatially targeted N-mitigation measures for the Baltic Sea Basin. Spatially targeted N-regulations aim at exploiting the considerable spatial differences in the natural N-reduction taking place in groundwater and surface water. While such measures can be simulated using local-scale physically-based catchment models, use of such detailed models for the 1.8 million km2 Baltic Sea basin is not feasible due to constraints on input data and computing power. Large-scale models that are able to simulate the Baltic Sea basin, on the other hand, do not have adequate spatial resolution to simulate some of the field-scale measures. Our methodology combines knowledge and results from two local-scale physically-based MIKE SHE catchment models, the large-scale and more conceptual E-HYPE model, and auxiliary data in order to enable E-HYPE to simulate how spatially targeted regulation of agricultural practices may affect N-loads to the Baltic Sea. We conclude that the use of E-HYPE with this upscaling methodology enables the simulation of the impact on N-loads of applying a spatially targeted regulation at the Baltic Sea basin scale to the correct order-of-magnitude. The E-HYPE model together with the upscaling methodology therefore provides a sound basis for large-scale policy analysis; however, we do not expect it to be sufficiently accurate to be useful for the detailed design of local-scale measures.

  10. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... 2Department of Plant Science, Federal University of Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. ... primers were used to characterize toxicity alleles, and none of the accessions presented patterns ... accessions from India (Gupta et al., 2008; Gohil and. Pandya .... ISSR primers, generally low genetic diversity was.

  11. Self-organized quantum rings : Physical characterization and theoretical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fomin, V.M.; Gladilin, V.N.; Devreese, J.T.; Koenraad, P.M.; Fomin, V.M.

    2014-01-01

    An adequate modeling of the self-organized quantum rings is possible only on the basis of the modern characterization of those nanostructures.We discuss an atomic-scale analysis of the indium distribution of self-organized InGaAs quantum rings (QRs). The analysis of the shape, size and composition

  12. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  13. Elevation-based upscaling of organic carbon stocks in High-Arctic permafrost terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Niels; Faucherre, Samuel; Lampiris, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    Accurate quantity and distribution estimates of permafrost soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are needed to project potential feedbacks to climate, following warming. Still, upscaling from local field observations to regional estimates to circumarctic assessments remains a challenge. Here we explore...... elevation-based upscaling techniques for High-Arctic permafrost SOC stocks. We combine two detailed, high-resolution SOC inventories on Spitsbergen (Svalbard) with regional validation data. We find a clear relationship between elevation and SOC content, and use this observed exponential correlation, as well...... as discrete elevation classes, as upscaling models for Spitsbergen. We estimate the total amount of permafrost SOC currently present in soils on Spitsbergen to be 105.36 Tg (0.11 Pg), with a mean SOC content of 2.84 ± 0.74 kg C m−2 (mean ± 95% confidence interval). Excluding glaciers and permanent snowfields...

  14. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Poly(hexamethylene biguanide Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique C. Mattoso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the characterization of commercially available Poly(hexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB, a polymer with biocidal activity and several interesting properties that make this material suitable as a building block for supramolecular chemistry and “smart” materials. We studied polymer structure in water solution by dynamic light scattering, surface tension and capacitance spectroscopy. It shows typical surfactant behavior due to amphiphilic structure and low molecular weight. Spectroscopic (UV/Vis, FT-NIR and thermal characterization (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and thermogravimetric analysis, TGA were performed to give additional insight into the material structure in solution and solid state. These results can be the foundation for more detailed investigations on usefulness of PHMB in new complex materials and devices.

  15. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area...

  16. Laboratory measurement of permeability upscaling: Results for the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Parameterization of predictive models is often complicated by the inability to make measurements at the same scale at which one wishes to perform the analysis. This disparity in scales necessitates the use of some averaging or upscaling model to compute the desired effective media properties. In efforts to better model permeability upscaling, laboratory experiments have been conducted on a series of rock samples with different genetic origins. These experiments involve the collection of exhaustive permeability data sets at different sample supports (i.e., sample volumes) using a specially designed minipermeameter test system. Here the authors present a synopsis of such a data set collected from a block of volcanic tuff

  17. Information Theoretic Characterization of Physical Theories with Projective State Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaopo, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Probabilistic theories are a natural framework to investigate the foundations of quantum theory and possible alternative or deeper theories. In a generic probabilistic theory, states of a physical system are represented as vectors of outcomes probabilities and state spaces are convex cones. In this picture the physics of a given theory is related to the geometric shape of the cone of states. In quantum theory, for instance, the shape of the cone of states corresponds to a projective space over complex numbers. In this paper we investigate geometric constraints on the state space of a generic theory imposed by the following information theoretic requirements: every non completely mixed state of a system is perfectly distinguishable from some other state in a single shot measurement; information capacity of physical systems is conserved under making mixtures of states. These assumptions guarantee that a generic physical system satisfies a natural principle asserting that the more a state of the system is mixed the less information can be stored in the system using that state as logical value. We show that all theories satisfying the above assumptions are such that the shape of their cones of states is that of a projective space over a generic field of numbers. Remarkably, these theories constitute generalizations of quantum theory where superposition principle holds with coefficients pertaining to a generic field of numbers in place of complex numbers. If the field of numbers is trivial and contains only one element we obtain classical theory. This result tells that superposition principle is quite common among probabilistic theories while its absence gives evidence of either classical theory or an implausible theory.

  18. Computational upscaling of Drucker-Prager plasticity from micro-CT images of synthetic porous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Sarout, Joel; Zhang, Minchao; Dautriat, Jeremie; Veveakis, Emmanouil; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying rock physical properties is essential for the mining and petroleum industry. Microtomography provides a new way to quantify the relationship between the microstructure and the mechanical and transport properties of a rock. Studies reporting the use microtomographic images to derive permeability and elastic moduli of rocks are common; only rare studies were devoted to yield and failure parameters using this technique. In this study, we simulate the macroscale plastic properties of a synthetic sandstone sample made of calcite-cemented quartz grains using the microscale information obtained from microtomography. The computations rely on the concept of representative volume elements (RVEs). The mechanical RVE is determined using the upper and lower bounds of finite-element computations for elasticity. We present computational upscaling methods from microphysical processes to extract the plasticity parameters of the RVE and compare results to experimental data. The yield stress, cohesion and internal friction angle of the matrix (solid part) of the rock were obtained with reasonable accuracy. Computations of plasticity of a series of models of different volume-sizes showed almost overlapping stress-strain curves, suggesting that the mechanical RVE determined by elastic computations is also valid for plastic yielding. Furthermore, a series of models were created by self-similarly inflating/deflating the porous models, that is keeping a similar structure while achieving different porosity values. The analysis of these models showed that yield stress, cohesion and internal friction angle linearly decrease with increasing porosity in the porosity range between 8 and 28 per cent. The internal friction angle decreases the most significantly, while cohesion remains stable.

  19. Physical characterization of porous hydroxyapatite prepared by slip casting route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnah Mustaffa; Idris Besar; Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Che Rohaida Che Hak

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments have led to an interest in the potential of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) as a synthetic bone graft. The starting material, that is HA powder, was prepared by the precipitation method using calcium hydroxide and ortho-phosporic acid. Through this route, the HA powder was first made into a slip by mixing with binder and then the slip was transferred into a mould. The binder was used as the porosifier where different ratios of HA to binder were studied. The material was then dried in oven followed by burning in furnace and finally the porous product was obtained and ready for characterization after sintering. The paper presents some characterization of porous HA products including chemical composition, density and macrostructure. The pore sizes obtained were in the range 200 mm to 400 mm diameters. From the different HA to binder ratios, variation in apparent densities were observed which is in the range of 2.63 to 2.76 g/cm 3 . The morphology of porous HA was observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at 15 KV. The chemical structure and composition were also determined using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the SEM EDAX, respectively, and the results will also be discussed. (Author)

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of surfaces of nitrogen implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncoffre, N.

    1986-01-01

    The studied steels are of industrial type (42CD4, 100C6, Z200C13). Very often, the low carbon steel XCO6 has been used as a reference material. The aim of the research is to understand and to explain the mechanisms of wear resistance to improvement. A good characterization of the implanted layer is thus necessary. It implies to establish the distribution profiles of the implanted ions to identify the chemical and structural state of the phases created during implantation as a function of various implantation parameters (dose, temperature). Temperature is the particularly parameter. Its influence is put in evidence both during implantation and during annealings under vacuum. Nitrogen distribution profiles are performed thanks to the non destructive 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C nuclear reaction. The chemical state of the Fe-N phases formed by implantation is determined using first Electron Conversion Moessbauer Spectroscopy and secondly, as a complement, using grazing angle X ray diffraction. The detected compounds are ε-nitrides, ε-carbonitrides, (N) - martensite and α-Fe 16 N 2 whose evolution is carefully followed versus temperature. The diffraction technique reveals a texture of the implanted layer. This preferentiel orientation is found to be temperature dependent but dose independent. The carbon presence at the surface is studied as a function of implantation conditions (vacuum, temperature, dose). Carbon profiling is obtained using α backscattering ( 12 C(α,α') reaction at 5,7 MeV). Thus is achieved a complete characterization of the implanted zone whose evolution as a function of implantation parameters (especially temperature) is correlated with tribological results [fr

  1. Novel instrument for characterizing comprehensive physical properties under multi-mechanical loads and multi-physical field coupling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changyi; Zhao, Hongwei; Ma, Zhichao; Qiao, Yuansen; Hong, Kun; Ren, Zhuang; Zhang, Jianhai; Pei, Yongmao; Ren, Luquan

    2018-02-01

    Functional materials represented by ferromagnetics and ferroelectrics are widely used in advanced sensor and precision actuation due to their special characterization under coupling interactions of complex loads and external physical fields. However, the conventional devices for material characterization can only provide a limited type of loads and physical fields and cannot simulate the actual service conditions of materials. A multi-field coupling instrument for characterization has been designed and implemented to overcome this barrier and measure the comprehensive physical properties under complex service conditions. The testing forms include tension, compression, bending, torsion, and fatigue in mechanical loads, as well as different external physical fields, including electric, magnetic, and thermal fields. In order to offer a variety of information to reveal mechanical damage or deformation forms, a series of measurement methods at the microscale are integrated with the instrument including an indentation unit and in situ microimaging module. Finally, several coupling experiments which cover all the loading and measurement functions of the instrument have been implemented. The results illustrate the functions and characteristics of the instrument and then reveal the variety in mechanical and electromagnetic properties of the piezoelectric transducer ceramic, TbDyFe alloy, and carbon fiber reinforced polymer under coupling conditions.

  2. Physical characterization of asteroid surfaces from photometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.

    1989-01-01

    Rigorous photometric models, like Hapke's equation, can be applied to the analysis of disk-integrated phase curves in order to estimate a variety of regolith physical properties (average particle single-scattering albedo, particle transparency, soil compaction and large-scale roughness). Unfortunately, unambiguous interpretation is difficult due to uncertainties introduced by the irregular shapes of many asteroids and because Earth-based observations are often restricted to small phase angles (<30 degrees). In this chapter, the authors explore in detail how incomplete phase-angle coverage and nonsphericity of asteroids limits the reliable determination of Hapke's photometric parameters from asteroid phase curves. From obtainable Earth-based observations, it is possible to derive useful relative comparisons of single-scattering albedos, opposition-surge amplitudes, and regolith compaction states for different asteroids

  3. Upscaling In Situ Soil Moisture Observations To Pixel Averages With Spatio-Temporal Geostatistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Jianghao; Ge, Yong; Heuvelink, Gerard B.M.; Zhou, Chenghu

    2015-01-01

    Validation of satellite-based soil moisture products is necessary to provide users with an assessment of their accuracy and reliability and to ensure quality of information. A key step in the validation process is to upscale point-scale, ground-based soil moisture observations to satellite-scale

  4. Flexible barrier technology for enabling rollable AMOLED displays and upscaling flexible OLED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.M.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Weijer, P. van de; Assche, F. van; Shen, J.; Ellis, T.; Manders, W.; Akkerman, H.; Bouten, P.; Mol, A.M.B. van

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a high performance thin-film barrier is the most critical challenge in upscaling and commercializing flexible OLED products. We report a flexible thin-film-barrier technology that meets lifetime specifications for OLED lighting, and demonstrate it in rollable QVGA a-IGZO AMOLED

  5. An improved method for upscaling borehole thermal energy storage using inverse finite element modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tordrup, Karl Woldum; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Bjørn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Dimensioning of large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is inherently uncertain due to the natural variability of thermal conductivity and heat capacity in the storage volume. We present an improved method for upscaling a pilot BTES to full scale and apply the method to an operational...

  6. Single-phase Near-well Permeability Upscaling and Productivity Index Calculation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Shamsollah Noorbakhsh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir models with many grid blocks suffer from long run time; it is hence important to deliberate a method to remedy this drawback. Usual upscaling methods are proved to fail to reproduce fine grid model behaviors in coarse grid models in well proximity. This is attributed to rapid pressure changes in the near-well region. Standard permeability upscaling methods are limited to systems with linear pressure changes; therefore, special near-well upscaling approaches based on the well index concept are proposed for these regions with non-linear pressure profile. No general rule is available to calculate the proper well index in different heterogeneity patterns and coarsening levels. In this paper, the available near-well upscaling methods are investigated for homogeneous and heterogeneous permeability models at different coarsening levels. It is observed that the existing well index methods have limited success in reproducing the well flow and pressure behavior of the reference fine grid models as the heterogeneity or coarsening level increases. Coarse-scale well indexes are determined such that fine and coarse scale results for pressure are in agreement. Both vertical and horizontal wells are investigated and, for the case of vertical homogeneous wells, a linear relationship between the default (Peaceman well index and the true (matched well index is obtained, which considerably reduces the error of the Peaceman well index. For the case of heterogeneous vertical wells, a multiplier remedies the error. Similar results are obtained for horizontal wells (both heterogeneous and homogeneous models.

  7. Setting the frame for up-scaled off-shore wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Chaviaropoulos, T.; Jamieson, P.

    2009-01-01

    are described in the paper. In the crude, deterministic formulation generic models for the costs are formulated as function of the design parameters and using basic up-scaling laws adjusted for technology improvement effects. The optimal design is obtained as the design which minimises the total expected costs...

  8. Field scale heterogeneity of redox conditions in till-upscaling to a catchment nitrate model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.R.; Erntsen, V.; Refsgaard, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Point scale studies in different settings of glacial geology show a large local variation of redox conditions. There is a need to develop an upscaling methodology for catchment scale models. This paper describes a study of field-scale heterogeneity of redox-interfaces in a till aquitard within an...

  9. Multilevel techniques lead to accurate numerical upscaling and scalable robust solvers for reservoir simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-01-01

    approach is well suited for the solution of large problems coming from finite element discretizations of systems of partial differential equations. The AMGe technique from 10,9 allows for the construction of operator-dependent coarse (upscaled) models and guarantees approximation properties of the coarse...... implementation of the reservoir simulator is demonstrated....

  10. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Steven, Jin Gyu Park, Anant Paravastu, Elsa Branco Lopes, James S Brooks, Ongi Englander, Theo Siegrist, Papatya Kaner and Rufina G Alamo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline and amorphous (helical structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 °C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size, on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain. The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof

  11. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven, Eden; Brooks, James S [Department of Physics and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Park, Jin Gyu [FAMU-FSU Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, High-Performance Materials Institute, Florida State University, 2005 Levy Ave., Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Paravastu, Anant; Siegrist, Theo; Kaner, Papatya; Alamo, Rufina G [FAMU-FSU Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Branco Lopes, Elsa [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear/CFMC-UL, P-2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Englander, Ongi, E-mail: esteven@magnet.fsu.edu [FAMU-FSU Department of Mechanical Engineering and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of {beta}-sheet (crystalline) and amorphous (helical) structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 deg. C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size), on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates) and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain). The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating) motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and {beta}-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of {beta}-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof

  12. Physical characterization of diesel exhaust nucleation mode particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahde, T.

    2013-11-01

    An increasing concern of the adverse health effects of aerosol particles is forcing the combustion engine industry to develop engines with lower particle emissions. The industry has put most of their efforts into soot control and has achieved a significant reduction in diesel exhaust particle mass. Nevertheless, it is not clear that the large particles, dominating the mass, cause the harmfulness of the exhaust particles in the biological interaction. Nowadays, the harmful potential of diesel exhaust particles often connects with the particle surface area, and the view has turned to particle number below 100 nm size range. Unfortunately, the achieved low exhaust particle mass does not necessarily imply a low particle number. This text focuses on the physical characteristics of diesel exhaust nucleation model particles. The volatility characteristics and the electrical charge state of the particles are studied first. Second, the relation between the nonvolatile nucleation mode emissions and the soot, the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions and the engine parameters are covered. The nucleation mode particles had distinctively different physical characteristics with different after-treatment systems. The nucleation mode was volatile and electrically neutral with a diesel particle filter after-treatment system. Without an after-treatment system or with an after-treatment system with low particle removal efficiency, the nucleation mode was partly nonvolatile and included an electrical charge. The difference suggests different formation routes for the nucleation particles with different after-treatment systems. The existence of the nonvolatile nucleation mode particles also affected the soot mode charge state. The soot charge state was positively biased when the nonvolatile nucleation mode was detected but slightly negatively biased when the nonvolatile nucleation mode was absent. The nonvolatile nucleation mode was always negatively biased. This electrical charge

  13. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven, Eden; Brooks, James S; Park, Jin Gyu; Paravastu, Anant; Siegrist, Theo; Kaner, Papatya; Alamo, Rufina G; Branco Lopes, Elsa; Englander, Ongi

    2011-01-01

    This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline) and amorphous (helical) structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 deg. C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size), on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates) and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain). The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating) motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof-of-concept applications of

  14. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHARACTERIZATION OF PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD OF MOBILE PHONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellington Bastos da Silva de Sant’ana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, electronics industry is the leading sector in developing new technologies. These new technologies lead to cheaper products increasing the consumption. The lifetime of such products is relatively short and soon it becomes waste, known as electronic waste. Cell phone is a common electronic waste. This waste represents an interesting raw material, because it contains large amount of base metals, considerable amount of valuable metals and also those dangerous. In this work, the electronic waste was submitted to mechanical processing: initially the devices were separated into two categories, as year of release (2002 and disassembled manually. The printed circuit boards were milled below 1 mm and then submitted to density and magnetic separation processes. The fractions obtained during the mechanical processing were characterized by chemical analysis. Using mechanical processing it was possible to obtain metal fractions of 80 wt%. A leaching test was carried out to determine if a waste needs to be managed as a hazardous; so that, cell phone waste must be considered in the category of hazardous residue because the lead concentration was above the limit established by Brazilian Standards

  15. Physical and chemical characterization of synthetic calcined sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slates, R.V.; Mosley, W.C. Jr.; Tiffany, B.; Stone, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    Calcined synthetic sludge was chemically characterized in support of engineering studies to design a processing plant to solidify highly radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant. An analytical technique is described which provides quantitative data by mass spectrometric analysis of gases evolved during thermogravimetric analysis without measurements of gas flow rates or mass spectrometer sensitivities. Scanning electron microprobe analysis, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and several other common analytical methods were also used. Calcined sludge consists primarily of amorphous particles of hydrous oxides with iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium distributed fairly uniformly throughout the powder. Iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium exist in forms that are highly insoluble in water, but aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, and sodium exhibit relative water solubilities that increase in the given order from 60% to 94%. Evolved gas analysis in a helium atmosphere showed that calcined sludge is completely dehydrated by heating to 400 0 C, carbon dioxide is evolved between 100 to 700 0 C with maximum evolution at 500 0 C, and oxygen is evolved between 400 and 1000 0 C. Evolved gas analyses are also reported for uncalcined sludge. A spinel-type oxide similar to NiFe 2 O 4 was detected by x-ray diffraction analysis at very low-level in calcined sludge

  16. Up-scaling, formative phases, and learning in the historical diffusion of energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Charlie

    2012-01-01

    The 20th century has witnessed wholesale transformation in the energy system marked by the pervasive diffusion of both energy supply and end-use technologies. Just as whole industries have grown, so too have unit sizes or capacities. Analysed in combination, these unit level and industry level growth patterns reveal some consistencies across very different energy technologies. First, the up-scaling or increase in unit size of an energy technology comes after an often prolonged period of experimentation with many smaller-scale units. Second, the peak growth phase of an industry can lag these increases in unit size by up to 20 years. Third, the rate and timing of up-scaling at the unit level is subject to countervailing influences of scale economies and heterogeneous market demand. These observed patterns have important implications for experience curve analyses based on time series data covering the up-scaling phases of energy technologies, as these are likely to conflate industry level learning effects with unit level scale effects. The historical diffusion of energy technologies also suggests that low carbon technology policies pushing for significant jumps in unit size before a ‘formative phase’ of experimentation with smaller-scale units are risky. - Highlights: ► Comparative analysis of energy technology diffusion. ► Consistent pattern of sequential formative, up-scaling, and growth phases. ► Evidence for conflation of industry level learning effects with unit level up-scaling. ► Implications for experience curve analyses and technology policy.

  17. Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D; Beck, Lee; Barfield, Pamela; Lavrich, Richard J; Dong, Yuanji; Vander Wal, Randy L

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil coupled with the regional proximity and seasonal use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important public health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source is available for climate and air quality modeling and for improving our understanding of aerosol-related human health effects. The gas- and particle-phase emissions from an active ROB firing distillate fuel oil (commonly known as diesel fuel) were evaluated to address this deficiency. Ion chromatography of impactor samples showed that the ultrafine ROB aerosol emissions were approximately 45% (w/w) sulfate. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected various n-alkanes at trace levels, sometimes in accumulation mode particles, and out of phase with the size distributions of aerosol mass and sulfate. The carbonaceous matter in the ROB aerosol was primarily light-adsorbing elemental carbon. Gas chromatography-atomic emission spectroscopy measured a previously unrecognized organosulfur compound group in the ROB aerosol emissions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of ROB soot indicated the presence of a highly ordered primary particle nanostructure embedded in larger aggregates. Organic gas emissions were measured using EPA Methods TO-15 and TO-11A. The ROB emitted volatile oxygenates (8 mg/(kg of oil burned)) and olefins (5 mg/(kg of oil burned)) mostly unrelated to the base fuel composition. In the final analysis, the ROB tested was a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments. Approximations conducted using emissions data from the ROB tests show relatively low contributions to a regional-level anthropogenic emissions inventory for volitile organic compounds, PM2.5, and SO2 mass.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    framework is facilitated by the nanometer-sized dimensions of the materials, which leads to accommodation of strain without amorphization. The topotactic approach demonstrated here indicates not just novel intercalation chemistry accessible at nanoscale dimensions but also suggests a facile synthetic route to ternary vanadium oxide bronzes (MxV2O 5) exhibiting intriguing physical properties that range from electronic phase transitions to charge ordering and superconductivity.

  19. The Physical Characterization of Liposome Salicylic Acid Using Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elman Panjaitan

    2008-01-01

    The physical characterization of liposome, formulated from salicylic acid using thin film hydration methods with cholesterol and soybean lecithin, has been done. The formula was characterized by optical microscopes and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The observation result shows that the salicylic acid can be formulated to liposomes. Soybean lecithin combined with cholesterol (600 mg : 20 mg) was the best formula and the liposome was spherical vesicle like with dimension about 70 nm unit 800 nm. (author)

  20. A physical-topological characterization of group response to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario

    1980-01-01

    A physical-topological model of societal response to the introduction of a technology such as nuclear power is proposed. The formation is based on a conceptual-geometric construct familiar in physics and mathematics. An interesting feature of the model is that it provides for the intrinsic inclusion of such intra-societal conflict manifestations as opinion reversals, opinion polarizations and apparent inconsistencies. The general applicability of this characterization to other societal conflict domains is suggested. (author)

  1. Upscaling wind turbines: theoretical and practical aspects and their impact on the cost of energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieros, G.; Chaviaropoulos, P.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines with a rated power of 5 to 6 MW are now being designed and installed, mostly for offshore operation. Within the EU supported UpWind research project, the barriers for a further increase of size, up to 20 MW, are considered. These wind turbines are expected to have a rotor diameter up......‐efficient way. Finally, a theoretical framework for optimal design of large wind turbines is developed. This is based on a life cycle cost approach, with the introduction of generic models for the costs, as functions of the design parameters and using basic upscaling laws adjusted for technology improvement...... to 250 m and a hub height of more than 150 m. Initially, the theoretical implications of upscaling to such sizes on the weight and loads of the wind turbines are examined, where it is shown that unfavourable increases in weight and load will have to be addressed. Following that, empirical models...

  2. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field…

  3. Physical and combustion characterization of pyrolytic oils derived from biomass material upgraded by catalytic hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitolo, S.; Ghetti, P. (Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica)

    1994-11-01

    Physical and combustion properties of a pyrolytic bio-oil are determined both as-obtained and after catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The tests demonstrate that the hydrogenation treatment improves the oil as regards combustibility, viscosity and acidity. Combustion properties of the oil have been characterized by evaporation and temperature programmed combustion profiles. Short communication. 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Lightweight expanded clay aggregates (LECA), a new up-scaleable matrix for production of microfungal metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    In order to compare the effects of different growth matrices on secondary metabolite production we compared 16 Penicillium species known to produce several families of bioactive compounds. The isolates were grown in rich complex media formulated as semisolid (agar), liquid (still), shake culture,...... for production of sporulation-associated metabolites, such as cyclopenins and viridicatins, for quick up-scaling from agar based media, and as an alternative for production of metabolites that are not induced under submerse conditions....

  5. Upscaling of bio-nano-processes selective bioseparation by magnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing progress in nano- and biomaterial sciences, large scale bioprocessing of nanoparticles remains a great challenge, especially because of the difficulties in removing unwanted elements during processing in food, pharmaceutical and feed industry at production level. This book presents magnetic nanoparticles and a novel technology for the upscaling of protein separation. The results come from the EU Project "MagPro2Life", which was conducted in cooperation of several european institutions and companies.

  6. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  7. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, T., E-mail: tommy.dalgaard@agrsci.dk [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Hutchings, N. [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Dragosits, U. [CEH Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB, Scotland (United Kingdom); Olesen, J.E.; Kjeldsen, C. [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Drouet, J.L.; Cellier, P. [INRA, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, BP 01, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20-30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N accumulation (p > 0.95) was also identified and needs to be included when modelling landscape level N-fluxes and greenhouse gas emissions. - Highlights: > Farm-N balances and the distribution on types of N-losses are modelled for 56 farms. > Farm type significantly affects N-losses and soil-N accumulation. > A non-linear relation between livestock density and ammonia loss is identified. > Approaches for upscaling from farm to landscape level are discussed. > Accounting farm heterogeneity is important when upscaling N-losses. - This study illustrates the importance of including non-linear effects of farm and landscape heterogeneity on the modelling and upscaling of farm nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural landscapes.

  8. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Hutchings, N.; Dragosits, U.; Olesen, J.E.; Kjeldsen, C.; Drouet, J.L.; Cellier, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20-30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N accumulation (p > 0.95) was also identified and needs to be included when modelling landscape level N-fluxes and greenhouse gas emissions. - Highlights: → Farm-N balances and the distribution on types of N-losses are modelled for 56 farms. → Farm type significantly affects N-losses and soil-N accumulation. → A non-linear relation between livestock density and ammonia loss is identified. → Approaches for upscaling from farm to landscape level are discussed. → Accounting farm heterogeneity is important when upscaling N-losses. - This study illustrates the importance of including non-linear effects of farm and landscape heterogeneity on the modelling and upscaling of farm nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural landscapes.

  9. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  10. TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by laser pyrolysis for the up-scaling of efficient solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhem, Hussein; Boucharef, Mourad; Di Bin, Catherine; Ratier, Bernard; Boucle, Johann [XLIM UMR 6172 Universite de Limoges/CNRS, Limoges Cedex (France); Simon, Pardis; Leconte, Yann; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie [IRAMIS/SPAM/LFP, CEA-CNRS URA 2453, CEA Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Beouch, Layla; Goubard, Fabrice [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Polymeres et des Interfaces (LPPI), Federation Institut des Materiaux (FD 4122), Universite de Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2011-10-15

    A crucial issue regarding emerging nanotechnologies remains the up-scaling of new functional nanostructured materials towards their implementation in high performance applications on a large scale. In this context, we demonstrate high efficiency solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells prepared from new porous TiO{sub 2} photoanodes based on laser pyrolysis nanocrystals. This strategy exploits a reduced number of processing steps as well as non-toxic chemical compounds to demonstrate highly porous TiO{sub 2} films. The possibility to easily tune the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal physical properties allows us to demonstrate all solid-state dye-sensitized devices based on a commercial benchmark materials (organic indoline dye and molecular hole transporter) presenting state-of-the-art performance comparable with reference devices based on a commercial TiO{sub 2} paste. In particular, a drastic improvement in pore infiltration, which is found to balance a relatively lower surface area compared to the reference electrode, is evidenced using laser-synthesized nanocrystals resulting in an improved short-circuit current density under full sunlight. Transient photovoltage decay measurements suggest that charge recombination kinetics still limit device performance. However, the proposed strategy emphasizes the potentialities of the laser pyrolysis technique for up-scaling nanoporous TiO{sub 2} electrodes for various applications, especially for solar energy conversion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Barbudo, Auxiliadora; De Brito, Jorge

    2016-02-02

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results) from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  12. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Uceda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%, using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  13. Use of upscaled elevation and surface roughness data in two-dimensional surface water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.D.; Decker, J.D.; Langevin, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that uses a combination of cell-block- and cell-face-averaging of high-resolution cell elevation and roughness data to upscale hydraulic parameters and accurately simulate surface water flow in relatively low-resolution numerical models. The method developed allows channelized features that preferentially connect large-scale grid cells at cell interfaces to be represented in models where these features are significantly smaller than the selected grid size. The developed upscaling approach has been implemented in a two-dimensional finite difference model that solves a diffusive wave approximation of the depth-integrated shallow surface water equations using preconditioned Newton–Krylov methods. Computational results are presented to show the effectiveness of the mixed cell-block and cell-face averaging upscaling approach in maintaining model accuracy, reducing model run-times, and how decreased grid resolution affects errors. Application examples demonstrate that sub-grid roughness coefficient variations have a larger effect on simulated error than sub-grid elevation variations.

  14. Enhanced regional forecasting considering single wind farm distribution for upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremen, Lueder von; Saleck, Nadja; Heinemann, Detlev

    2007-01-01

    With increasing wind power penetration the need for more accurate wind power forecasts increases to raise the market value of wind power. State-of-the-art wind power forecasting tools are considered either statistical or physical. Fundamentally new techniques are rare, thus it is tried to establish a new approach. The spatial decomposition of wind power generation in Germany can be done with principle component analysis to extract the main pattern of variability. They have a physical meaning when linked with typical weather situation. The first four eigenvectors explain about 94 % of the observed variance. The time-evolving principle components are linked with the total wind power feed-in in Germany and are used for its estimation. A new wind power forecasting model has been implemented with this approach and shows very good results that are comparable with state-of-the-art commercial wind power forecast models. The day-ahead forecast error for a common intercomparison period Jan-Jul 2006 is 4.4 %. The suggested approach offers wide ranges for future developments (e.g. several NWP models), because it is computationally very cheap to run

  15. Characterizing pedagogical practices of university physics students in informal learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen A.; Madigan, Peter; Miller, Eric; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between UEs and children in an afterschool physics program facilitated by university physics students from the University of Colorado Boulder. In this program, physics undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers work with K-8 children on hands-on physics activities on a weekly basis over the course of a semester. We use an activity theoretic framework as a tool to examine situational aspects of individuals' behavior in the complex structure of the afterschool program. Using this framework, we analyze video of UE-child interactions and identify three main pedagogical modalities that UEs display during activities: instruction, consultation, and participation modes. These modes are characterized by certain language, physical location, and objectives that establish differences in UE-child roles and division of labor. Based on this analysis, we discuss implications for promoting pedagogical strategies through purposeful curriculum development and university educator preparation.

  16. Upscaling from research watersheds: an essential stage of trustworthy general-purpose hydrologic model building

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, J. P.; Semenova, O.; Restrepo, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly instrumented research watersheds provide excellent opportunities for investigating hydrologic processes. A danger, however, is that the processes observed at a particular research watershed are too specific to the watershed and not representative even of the larger scale watershed that contains that particular research watershed. Thus, models developed based on those partial observations may not be suitable for general hydrologic use. Therefore demonstrating the upscaling of hydrologic process from research watersheds to larger watersheds is essential to validate concepts and test model structure. The Hydrograph model has been developed as a general-purpose process-based hydrologic distributed system. In its applications and further development we evaluate the scaling of model concepts and parameters in a wide range of hydrologic landscapes. All models, either lumped or distributed, are based on a discretization concept. It is common practice that watersheds are discretized into so called hydrologic units or hydrologic landscapes possessing assumed homogeneous hydrologic functioning. If a model structure is fixed, the difference in hydrologic functioning (difference in hydrologic landscapes) should be reflected by a specific set of model parameters. Research watersheds provide the possibility for reasonable detailed combining of processes into some typical hydrologic concept such as hydrologic units, hydrologic forms, and runoff formation complexes in the Hydrograph model. And here by upscaling we imply not the upscaling of a single process but upscaling of such unified hydrologic functioning. The simulation of runoff processes for the Dry Creek research watershed, Idaho, USA (27 km2) was undertaken using the Hydrograph model. The information on the watershed was provided by Boise State University and included a GIS database of watershed characteristics and a detailed hydrometeorological observational dataset. The model provided good simulation results in

  17. Physical Characterization of Solid-Liquid Slurries at High Weight Fractions Using Optical and Ultrasonic Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, L.W.; Brodsky, A.M.; Panetta P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Remediation of highly radioactive waste is a major technical and programmatic challenge for the DOE. Rapid, on-line physical characterization of highly concentrated slurries is required for the safe and efficient remediation of 90 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (HLW), sodium bearing waste, and mixed waste. The research presented here, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) to directly address the need for rapid on-line characterization of the physical properties of HLW slurries during all phases of the remediation process, from in-tank characterization of sediments to monitoring of the concentration, particle size, and degree of agglomeration and gelation of slurries during transport. Near-surface characterization of the slurry flow in the particle size range from nanometer to micrometer is examined using optical low coherence reflectometry. Volumetric characterization at depths in the slurry flow, up to several centimeters in the particle size range from the micrometer to millimeter, is realized by utilizing ultrasonic backscatter and diffuses fields. One of the strengths, the teaming up of significant talents in both experimental and theoretical optics and in ultrasonics, provides a synergistic approach to integrate these complimentary techniques. One of the benefits of this combined approach is the physical characterization of HLW over a concentration and particle size range that is broader than can be achieved with today's technology. This will avoid a costly increase in waste stream volume due to excess dilution, and will lessen chance of plugging pipes that could shut down expensive processing lines

  18. Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Kelly, Victoria; Hall, Mark; Palecki, Michael A.; Temimi, Marouane

    2016-10-01

    Soil observations networks at the national scale play an integral role in hydrologic modeling, drought assessment, agricultural decision support, and our ability to understand climate change. Understanding soil moisture variability is necessary to apply these measurements to model calibration, business and consumer applications, or even human health issues. The installation of soil moisture sensors as sparse, national networks is necessitated by limited financial resources. However, this results in the incomplete sampling of the local heterogeneity of soil type, vegetation cover, topography, and the fine spatial distribution of precipitation events. To this end, temporary networks can be installed in the areas surrounding a permanent installation within a sparse network. The temporary networks deployed in this study provide a more representative average at the 3 km and 9 km scales, localized about the permanent gauge. The value of such temporary networks is demonstrated at test sites in Millbrook, New York and Crossville, Tennessee. The capacity of a single U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) sensor set to approximate the average of a temporary network at the 3 km and 9 km scales using a simple linear scaling function is tested. The capacity of a temporary network to provide reliable estimates with diminishing numbers of sensors, the temporal stability of those networks, and ultimately, the relationship of the variability of those networks to soil moisture conditions at the permanent sensor are investigated. In this manner, this work demonstrates the single-season installation of a temporary network as a mechanism to characterize the soil moisture variability at a permanent gauge within a sparse network.

  19. Characterization samples of Tigris river water treated with nano colloidal silver (physically, chemically, microbiologically)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumboos, H. I.; Beden, S. J.; Zouari, K.; Chkir, N.; Ahmed, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many researches of using nano silver in purification of drinking water from bacteria and its effect on stan dared properties as drinking water were established. Two stages accomplished in these projects. First stage include preparation of colloidal silver with characterization process and prepare water samples through sedimentation, filtration process, PH and turbidity measure then treated with colloidal silver in volume ratio (0.1-Λ) ml/100ml. The second stage represent select the better results from stage one and take samples to determine the standard characterization values with chemical, physical and microbiological taste. Results will be compared with Iraq standard certification. (Author)

  20. Complex confining layers : a physical and geochemical characterization of heterogeneous unconsolidated fluvial deposits using a facies-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoort, Pieter-Jan van

    2003-01-01

    A proper characterization of physical and chemical heterogeneities in the subsoil is an important condition for successful modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. This study focuses on the physical and chemical characterization of a complex confining layer in the Rhine–Meuse deltaic plain

  1. Characterization of Physical and Thermal Properties of Biofield Treated Neopentyl Glycol

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Dahryn; Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Branton, Alice; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Neopentyl glycol (NPG) has been extensively used as solid-solid phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage applications. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment on physical, spectral and thermal properties of NPG. The study was performed in two groups (control and treated). The control group remained as untreated, and treatment group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment. The control and treated NPG were characterized by X-...

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of the (Th, U)O2 mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.M. dos; Avelar, M.M.; Palmieri, H.E.L.; Lameiras, F.S.; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The NUCLEBRAS R and D Center (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN) has been performing, together with german institutions (Kernforschungsanlage Julich GmbH - KFA, Krafwerk Union A.G. - KWU and NUKEM GmbH), a program for utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. In this paper are presented the physical and chemical characterizations necessary to quality the (Th, U)O 2 fuel and the respective methods. (Author) [pt

  3. Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes to Crop Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The improvement of quality traits in food and industrial crops is an important breeding objective for both developed and developing countries in order to add value to the crop and thereby increasing farmers' income. It has been well established that the application of mutagens can be a very important approach for manipulating many crop characteristics including quality. While mutation induction using nuclear techniques such as gamma irradiation is a power tool in generating new genotypes with favourable alleles for improving crop quality in plant breeding, a more thorough understanding of gene expression, gene interactions, and physical location will improve ability to manipulate and control genes, and directly lead to crop improvement. Physical mapping technologies, molecular markers and molecular cytogenetic techniques are tools available with the potential to enhance the ability to tag genes and gene complexes to facilitate the selection of desirable genotypes in breeding programmes, including those based on mutation breeding. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes Contributing to Crop Quality' was conducted under the overall IAEA project objective of 'Identification, Characterization and Transfer of Mutated Genes'. The specific objectives of the CRP were to assist Member States in accelerating crop breeding programmes through the application of physical mapping and complementary genomic approaches, and the characterization and utilization of induced mutants for improvement of crop quality. The IAEA-TECDOC describes the success obtained in the application of molecular cytology, molecular markers, physical mapping and mutation technologies since the inception of the CRP in 2003. The CRP also resulted in two book chapters, 35 peer reviewed papers, 25 conference proceedings, one PhD thesis, and 22 published abstracts. In addition, thirteen sequences were submitted to the

  4. Challenges in Physical Characterization of Dim Space Objects: What Can We Learn from NEOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J.; Thirouin, A.; Rivera-Valentin, E.; Ryan, W.; Ryan, E.; Mokovitz, N.; Tegler, S.

    2016-09-01

    Physical characterization of dim space objects in cis-lunar space can be a challenging task. Of particular interest to both natural and artificial space object behavior scientists are the properties beyond orbital parameters that can uniquely identify them. These properties include rotational state, size, shape, density and composition. A wide range of observational and non-observational factors affect our ability to characterize dim objects in cis-lunar space. For example, phase angle (angle between Sun-Target-Observer), temperature, rotational variations, temperature, and particle size (for natural dim objects). Over the last two decades, space object behavior scientists studying natural dim objects have attempted to quantify and correct for a majority of these factors to enhance our situational awareness. These efforts have been primarily focused on developing laboratory spectral calibrations in a space-like environment. Calibrations developed correcting spectral observations of natural dim objects could be applied to characterizing artificial objects, as the underlying physics is the same. The paper will summarize our current understanding of these observational and non-observational factors and present a case study showcasing the state of the art in characterization of natural dim objects.

  5. Initial Characterization of Colombian High School Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Niño, Lina Viviana; Cañada, Florentina; Mellado, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    We explore the initial characterization of the pedagogical content knowledge of four, in-service, Colombian pre-university secondary education physics teachers on the concept of electric field. Two of them teach the content in English as a second language. The aim of the study was to obtain an image of the participants' teaching of electric field and the inherent complexities that go with that. The results revealed that factors which involved their personal educational models, such as, how they interpret their school's curriculum, the relationship they see between physics and mathematics, the most effective strategies for teaching physics, and the time they have available to develop the topic played a significant role. The teachers considered it essential to establish new strategies that would motivate the pupils by helping them visualize the electric field.

  6. Mixed multiscale finite element methods using approximate global information based on partial upscaling

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Lijian

    2009-10-02

    The use of limited global information in multiscale simulations is needed when there is no scale separation. Previous approaches entail fine-scale simulations in the computation of the global information. The computation of the global information is expensive. In this paper, we propose the use of approximate global information based on partial upscaling. A requirement for partial homogenization is to capture long-range (non-local) effects present in the fine-scale solution, while homogenizing some of the smallest scales. The local information at these smallest scales is captured in the computation of basis functions. Thus, the proposed approach allows us to avoid the computations at the scales that can be homogenized. This results in coarser problems for the computation of global fields. We analyze the convergence of the proposed method. Mathematical formalism is introduced, which allows estimating the errors due to small scales that are homogenized. The proposed method is applied to simulate two-phase flows in heterogeneous porous media. Numerical results are presented for various permeability fields, including those generated using two-point correlation functions and channelized permeability fields from the SPE Comparative Project (Christie and Blunt, SPE Reserv Evalu Eng 4:308-317, 2001). We consider simple cases where one can identify the scales that can be homogenized. For more general cases, we suggest the use of upscaling on the coarse grid with the size smaller than the target coarse grid where multiscale basis functions are constructed. This intermediate coarse grid renders a partially upscaled solution that contains essential non-local information. Numerical examples demonstrate that the use of approximate global information provides better accuracy than purely local multiscale methods. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Upscaling the Coupled Water and Heat Transport in the Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviercoski, R. F.; Efendiev, Y.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2018-02-01

    Predicting simultaneous movement of liquid water, water vapor, and heat in the shallow subsurface has many practical interests. The demand for multidimensional multiscale models for this region is important given: (a) the critical role that these processes play in the global water and energy balances, (b) that more data from air-borne and space-borne sensors are becoming available for parameterizations of modeling efforts. On the other hand, numerical models that consider spatial variations of the soil properties, termed here as multiscale, are prohibitively expensive. Thus, there is a need for upscaled models that take into consideration these features, and be computationally affordable. In this paper, a multidimensional multiscale model coupling the water flow and heat transfer and its respective upscaled version are proposed. The formulation is novel as it describes the multidimensional and multiscale tensorial versions of the hydraulic conductivity and the vapor diffusivity, taking into account the tortuosity and porosity properties of the medium. It also includes the coupling with the energy balance equation as a boundary describing atmospheric influences at the shallow subsurface. To demonstrate the accuracy of both models, comparisons were made between simulation and field experiments for soil moisture and temperature at 2, 7, and 12 cm deep, during 11 days. The root-mean-square errors showed that the upscaled version of the system captured the multiscale features with similar accuracy. Given the good matching between simulated and field data for near-surface soil temperature, the results suggest that it can be regarded as a 1-D variable.

  8. Upscaling Ameriflux observations to assess drought impacts on gross primary productivity across the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M.; Moore, D. J.; Scott, R. L.; MacBean, N.; Ponce-Campos, G. E.; Breshears, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Both satellite observations and eddy covariance estimates provide crucial information about the Earth's carbon, water and energy cycles. Continuous measurements from flux towers facilitate exploration of the exchange of carbon dioxide, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere at fine temporal and spatial scales, while satellite observations can fill in the large spatial gaps of in-situ measurements and provide long-term temporal continuity. The Southwest (Southwest United States and Northwest Mexico) and other semi-arid regions represent a key uncertainty in interannual variability in carbon uptake. Comparisons of existing global upscaled gross primary production (GPP) products with flux tower data at sites across the Southwest show widespread mischaracterization of seasonality in vegetation carbon uptake, resulting in large (up to 200%) errors in annual carbon uptake estimates. Here, remotely sensed and distributed meteorological inputs are used to upscale GPP estimates from 25 Ameriflux towers across the Southwest to the regional scale using a machine learning approach. Our random forest model incorporates two novel features that improve the spatial and temporal variability in GPP. First, we incorporate a multi-scalar drought index at multiple timescales to account for differential seasonality between ecosystem types. Second, our machine learning algorithm was trained on twenty five ecologically diverse sites to optimize both the monthly variability in and the seasonal cycle of GPP. The product and its components will be used to examine drought impacts on terrestrial carbon cycling across the Southwest including the effects of drought seasonality and on carbon uptake. Our spatially and temporally continuous upscaled GPP product drawing from both ground and satellite data over the Southwest region helps us understand linkages between the carbon and water cycles in semi-arid ecosystems and informs predictions of vegetation response to future

  9. Comparison of different tree sap flow up-scaling procedures using Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarinov, Fyodor; Preisler, Yakir; Roahtyn, Shani; Yakir, Dan

    2015-04-01

    An important task in determining forest ecosystem water balance is the estimation of stand transpiration, allowing separating evapotranspiration into transpiration and soil evaporation. This can be based on up-scaling measurements of sap flow in representative trees (SF), which can be done by different mathematical algorithms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the error associated with different up-scaling algorithms under different conditions. Other types of errors (such as, measurement error, within tree SF variability, choice of sample plot etc.) were not considered here. A set of simulation experiments using Monte-Carlo technique was carried out and three up-scaling procedures were tested. (1) Multiplying mean stand sap flux density based on unit sapwood cross-section area (SFD) by total sapwood area (Klein et al, 2014); (2) deriving of linear dependence of tree sap flow on tree DBH and calculating SFstand using predicted SF by DBH classes and stand DBH distribution (Cermak et al., 2004); (3) same as method 2 but using non-linear dependency. Simulations were performed under different SFD(DBH) slope (bs, positive, negative, zero); different DBH and SFD standard deviations (Δd and Δs, respectively) and DBH class size. It was assumed that all trees in a unit area are measured and the total SF of all trees in the experimental plot was taken as the reference SFstand value. Under negative bs all models tend to overestimate SFstand and the error increases exponentially with decreasing bs. Under bs >0 all models tend to underestimate SFstand, but the error is much smaller than for bs

  10. UPSCALING OF SOLAR INDUCED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE FROM LEAF TO CANOPY USING THE DART MODEL AND A REALISTIC 3D FOREST SCENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Solar induced chlorophyll a fluorescence (SIF has been shown to be an excellent proxy of photosynthesis at multiple scales. However, the mechanical linkages between fluorescence and photosynthesis at the leaf level cannot be directly applied at canopy or field scales, as the larger scale SIF emission depends on canopy structure. This is especially true for the forest canopies characterized by high horizontal and vertical heterogeneity. While most of the current studies on SIF radiative transfer in plant canopies are based on the assumption of a homogeneous canopy, recently codes have been developed capable of simulation of fluorescence signal in explicit 3-D forest canopies. Here we present a canopy SIF upscaling method consisting of the integration of the 3-D radiative transfer model DART and a 3-D object model BLENDER. Our aim was to better understand the effect of boreal forest canopy structure on SIF for a spatially explicit forest canopy.

  11. Upscale Impact of Mesoscale Disturbances of Tropical Convection on Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Majda, A.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical convection associated with convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) is typically organized by an eastward-moving synoptic-scale convective envelope with numerous embedded westward-moving mesoscale disturbances. It is of central importance to assess upscale impact of mesoscale disturbances on CCKWs as mesoscale disturbances propagate at various tilt angles and speeds. Here a simple multi-scale model is used to capture this multi-scale structure, where mesoscale fluctuations are directly driven by mesoscale heating and synoptic-scale circulation is forced by mean heating and eddy transfer of momentum and temperature. The two-dimensional version of the multi-scale model drives the synoptic-scale circulation, successfully reproduces key features of flow fields with a front-to-rear tilt and compares well with results from a cloud resolving model. In the scenario with an elevated upright mean heating, the tilted vertical structure of synoptic-scale circulation is still induced by the upscale impact of mesoscale disturbances. In a faster propagation scenario, the upscale impact becomes less important, while the synoptic-scale circulation response to mean heating dominates. In the unrealistic scenario with upward/westward tilted mesoscale heating, positive potential temperature anomalies are induced in the leading edge, which will suppress shallow convection in a moist environment. In its three-dimensional version, results show that upscale impact of mesoscale disturbances that propagate at tilt angles (110o 250o) induces negative lower-tropospheric potential temperature anomalies in the leading edge, providing favorable conditions for shallow convection in a moist environment, while the remaining tilt angle cases have opposite effects. Even in the presence of upright mean heating, the front-to-rear tilted synoptic-scale circulation can still be induced by eddy terms at tilt angles (120o 240o). In the case with fast propagating mesoscale heating, positive

  12. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Georgakopoulos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  13. Numerical Multilevel Upscaling for Incompressible Flow in Reservoir Simulation: An Element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2017-01-01

    associated with non-planar interfaces between agglomerates, the coarse velocity space has guaranteed approximation properties. The employed AMGe technique provides coarse spaces with desirable local mass conservation and stability properties analogous to the original pair of Raviart-Thomas and piecewise......We study the application of a finite element numerical upscaling technique to the incompressible two-phase porous media total velocity formulation. Specifically, an element agglomeration based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) technique with improved approximation proper ties [37] is used, for the first...... discontinuous polynomial spaces, resulting in strong mass conservation for the upscaled systems. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties and the generic nature of the AMGe method, recursive multilevel upscaling is automatically obtained. Furthermore, this technique works for both structured...

  14. Upscaling the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Soil Erosion and Sediment Budget Investigations: Addressing the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Walling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of fallout radionuclides in soil erosion investigations and related sediment budget studies has provided a widely used tool for improving understanding of soil erosion and sediment transfer processes. However, most studies using fallout radionuclides undertaken to date have focussed on small areas. This focus on small areas reflects both the issues addressed and practical constraints associated with sample collection and analysis. Increasing acceptance of the important role of fine sediment in degrading aquatic habitats and in the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants within terrestrial and fluvial systems has emphasised the need to consider larger areas and the catchment or regional scale. The need to upscale existing approaches to the use of fallout radionuclides to larger areas represents an important challenge. This contribution provides a brief review of existing and potential approaches to upscaling the use of fallout radionuclides and presents two examples where such approaches have been successfully applied. These involve a national scale assessment of soil erosion rates in England and Wales based on 137Cs measurements and an investigation of the sediment budgets of three small/intermediate-size catchments in southern Italy.

  15. Advanced ceramic composite for high energy resistors. Characterization of electrical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokh, Fattahi; Navid, Tagizadegan; Naser, Tabatabaei; Ahmad, Rashtehizadeh

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to characterize and apply advanced materials to improve the performance of components used in pulse power systems. One area of innovation is the use of bulk electrically conductive ceramics for non-inductive, high energy and high power electrical resistors. Standard Ceramics Inc. has developed a unique silicon carbide structural ceramic composite which exhibits electrical conductivity. The new conductive bulk ceramic material has a controlled microstructure, which results in improved homogeneity, making the material suitable for use as a non-inductive high energy resistor. This paper describes characterization of the material's physical and electrical properties and relates them to improvements in low-inductance, high temperature, high power density and high energy density resistors. The bulk resistor approach offers high reliability through better mechanical properties and simplicity of construction

  16. Obtaining and characterization catalyst Ki/Al_2O_3 by physical dispersion process via wet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.C. da; Dantas, J.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Costa, N.C.O.; Freitas, N.L. de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is the Obtention and characterization of catalysts being supported alumina impregnated with KI by physical dispersion in wet via attritor mill in periods of 30 and 60 minutes. Before and after impregnation the catalysts were characterized by XRD, X ray fluorescence, particle size distribution, textural analysis (BET). The results show the presence of the stable crystalline phase Al_2O_3 in all samples after impregnation and the second phase formed from KI and K_2O. There was a decrease in the agglomerates incorporated with the potassium due to the milling process. It was observed that the highest specific surface area was obtained by the impregnated sample into a 60 min. (author)

  17. Characterization of basic physical properties of Sb2Se3 and its relevance for photovoltaics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao CHEN; Matthew C.BEARD; Jiang TANG; David C.BOBELA; Ye YANG; Shuaicheng LU; Kai ZENG; Cong GE; Bo YANG; Liang GAO; Yang ZHAO

    2017-01-01

    Antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) is a promising absorber material for thin film photovoltaics because of its attractive material,optical and electrical properties.In recent years,the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of Sb2Se3 thin film solar cells has gradually enhanced to 5.6%.In this article,we systematically studied the basic physical properties of Sb2Se3 such as dielectric constant,anisotropic mobility,carrier lifetime,diffusion length,defect depth,defect density and optical band tail states.We believe such a comprehensive characterization of the basic physical properties of Sb2Se3 lays a solid foundation for further optimization of solar device performance.

  18. Physical-mechanical characterization of hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composites made by the polymeric sponge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galdino, A.G.S.; Zavaglia, C.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioceramics have been used as bone reconstruction materials since last decades, where hydroxyapatite is one of the most used for this purpose. However, hydroxyapatite's mechanical strength is not so high when compared to other bioceramics. This work aimed on characterizing physically and mechanically composites of HA-TiO_2. Samples were made by the polymeric sponge method with 70% - 30% wt., 60% - 40% wt. and 50% - 50% wt. of HA - TiO_2, calcined at 550 deg C for sponge burning and sintered at 1250 deg C, 1300 deg C and 1350 deg C. Samples were submitted to mechanical essays of compression and Hardness Vickers and to physical essays of water absorption, apparent density, burning linear retraction and apparent density. Results showed relatively better than those of pure hydroxyapatite and they are in accordance with the literature. (author)

  19. Construction and Characterization of External Cavity Diode Lasers for Atomic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Kyle S.; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E.; Kuhn, Carlos C. N.; McDonald, Gordon D.; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs1,2. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling1,2 makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman3, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  20. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  1. Physical-mechanical and anatomical characterization in 26-year-old Eucalyptus resinifera wood

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Israel Luiz de; Longui,Eduardo Luiz; Freitas,Miguel Luiz Menezes; Zanatto,Antonio Carlos Scatena; Zanata,Marcelo; Florsheim,Sandra Monteiro Borges; Bortoletto Jr.,Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to characterize Eucalyptus resinifera wood through physical and mechanical assays and wood anatomy studies, as well as determine the relationships between the properties and anatomy of wood. We used samples collected from the area close to the bark of ten 26-year-old E. resinifera trees. We concluded that the specific gravity (Gb), compression (f c0), and shear parallel to grain (f v0) were ranked in strength classes C30, C40 and C60, respectively, and that volu...

  2. Characterization of parameters and strategies used by physical therapists in difficult mechanical ventilation weaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Maria Sabino Meireles

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the main strategies and parameters used by physical therapists in difficult mechanical ventilation weaning. Methods: Cross-sectional study including all the physical therapists working in adult Intensive Care Units in three public hospitals in Fortaleza-CE. A questionnaire with closed questions related to difficult mechanical ventilation weaning was applied, with either one or multiple answers. The data was treated with descriptive and non-parametric analysis. Results: Among the parameters mostly used by the 56 interviewed physical therapists for the difficult weaning, were found: current volume reduction (26 - 46.4% and desaturation during aspiration (17 - 30.4%. It was observed that 38 (67.9% alternate T-tube and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP as strategies for difficult weaning, and 28 (50% reported reducing the pressure support. There was no statistical difference between the strategies used in the studied hospitals, neither correlation between strategies and parameters. Conclusion: It was found that physical therapists have been performing similar strategies, which are also shown in the literature, but this is not the case with the parameters. The parameters used are not supported by the literature.

  3. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edvan V. de; Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials

  4. MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mavko

    2000-10-01

    This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

  5. Methods for the physical characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Déborah L M; Claudio, Virginia; Lässer, Cecilia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Our body fluids contain a multitude of cell-derived vesicles, secreted by most cell types, commonly referred to as extracellular vesicles. They have attracted considerable attention for their function as intercellular communication vehicles in a broad range of physiological processes and pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles and especially the smallest type, exosomes, have also generated a lot of excitement in view of their potential as disease biomarkers or as carriers for drug delivery. In this context, state-of-the-art techniques capable of comprehensively characterizing vesicles in biological fluids are urgently needed. This review presents the arsenal of techniques available for quantification and characterization of physical properties of extracellular vesicles, summarizes their working principles, discusses their advantages and limitations and further illustrates their implementation in extracellular vesicle research. The small size and physicochemical heterogeneity of extracellular vesicles make their physical characterization and quantification an extremely challenging task. Currently, structure, size, buoyant density, optical properties and zeta potential have most commonly been studied. The concentration of vesicles in suspension can be expressed in terms of biomolecular or particle content depending on the method at hand. In addition, common quantification methods may either provide a direct quantitative measurement of vesicle concentration or solely allow for relative comparison between samples. The combination of complementary methods capable of detecting, characterizing and quantifying extracellular vesicles at a single particle level promises to provide new exciting insights into their modes of action and to reveal the existence of vesicle subpopulations fulfilling key biological tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrochemical trends for public supply well fields in The Netherlands (1898-2008), natural backgrounds and upscaling to groundwater bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal, Igor; Baggelaar, Paul K.; Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryStatistical trend analysis is applied to a 110 years long groundwater quality time series from the national network of public supply well fields (PSWFs) in The Netherlands. Such a groundwater quality monitoring network should be available in many countries, so that approaches and experiences presented here could be of interest world wide. Trendless concentration data series measured in the early years, which should bear the least anthropogenic influences, are selected to quantify the regional natural background concentration levels (NBLs) of groundwater resources at the depth of abstraction. Trends in the period 1960-2005, which contained a more homogeneous data set, are normalized to drinking water standards, mapped in planar view and cross sections, and used to identify the responsible hydrochemical processes. Seven representative trend bundles are defined by aggregation of trends for individual chemical parameters. Trend reversals due to either environmental sanitation measures or well field adaptation measures are identified by comparing significant trends obtained for two different periods within the time series. Natural background levels (NBLs) for individual PSWFs are upscaled to the national groundwater body level (as reported to EU), by aggregating them according to a PSWF typology based on a Hydrochemical System Analysis. This aggregation method groups together PSWFs that deliver waters of the same origin and similar hydrogeochemical environment. PSWFs delivering old groundwaters with a very stable quality are clearly differentiated from PSWFs pumping highly vulnerable aquifers characterized by strongly deteriorating water quality trends. Results are presented on national maps of The Netherlands with NBLs and water quality trends for selected major constituents. A normalized concentration change index (NCC) is defined and mapped to relate the quality difference between a recent survey (in 2008) and calculated NBLs, to the EU drinking water

  7. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pereira, Mario M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steen, Franciska H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  8. Advanced ceramic composite for high energy resistors. Characterization of electrical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokh, Fattahi; Navid, Tagizadegan; Naser, Tabatabaei

    2005-01-01

    Full text : There is a need to characterize and apply advanced materials to improve the performance of components used in pulse power systems. One area for innovation is the use of bulk electrically conductive ceramics for non-inductive, high energy and high power electrical resistors. Standard Ceramics, Inc. has developed a unique silicon carbide structural ceramic composite which exhibits electrical conductivity. The new conductive bulk ceramic material has a controlled microstructure, which results an improved homogeneity, making the material suitable for use as a non-inductive, high energy resistor. The new material has higher density, highee peak of temperature limit and greater physical strength compared with bulk ceramics currently used for pulsed power resistors. This paper describes characterization of the material's physical and electrical properties and relates them to improvements in low-power density, as compared to existing components would be expected and derived from specific properties such as good thermal conductivity, high strength, thermal shock resistance and high temperature capability. The bulk resistor approach that weas proposed offers high reliability through better mechanical properties and simplicity of construction

  9. Turbulence Simulation of Laboratory Wind-Wave Interaction in High Winds and Upscaling to Ocean Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Oceanogr., 46, 1377-1397 Cebeci, T. & P. Bradshaw, 1988: physical and computational aspects of convective heat transfer , Springer-Verlag, p.487...on surface properties and flow separation. Strongly-forced wind seas are characterized by enhanced group modulation , as significant additional...energy flux from the wind augments the hydrodynamic modulations . Using compact steep chirped wave packets, we investigated for the first time the

  10. Rock-physics and seismic-inversion based reservoir characterization of the Haynesville Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Meijuan; Spikes, Kyle T

    2016-01-01

    Seismic reservoir characterization of unconventional gas shales is challenging due to their heterogeneity and anisotropy. Rock properties of unconventional gas shales such as porosity, pore-shape distribution, and composition are important for interpreting seismic data amplitude variations in order to locate optimal drilling locations. The presented seismic reservoir characterization procedure applied a grid-search algorithm to estimate the composition, pore-shape distribution, and porosity at the seismic scale from the seismically inverted impedances and a rock-physics model, using the Haynesville Shale as a case study. All the proposed rock properties affected the seismic velocities, and the combined effects of these rock properties on the seismic amplitude were investigated simultaneously. The P- and S-impedances correlated negatively with porosity, and the V _P/V _S correlated positively with clay fraction and negatively with the pore-shape distribution and quartz fraction. The reliability of these estimated rock properties at the seismic scale was verified through comparisons between two sets of elastic properties: one coming from inverted impedances, which were obtained from simultaneous inversion of prestack seismic data, and one derived from these estimated rock properties. The differences between the two sets of elastic properties were less than a few percent, verifying the feasibility of the presented seismic reservoir characterization. (paper)

  11. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLAPSING LOW-MASS PRESTELLAR DENSE CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hincelin, U. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Commerçon, B. [Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR 5574 du CNRS, Université Lyon I, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon cedex 07 (France); Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S. [Univ. Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France); Herbst, E., E-mail: ugo.hincelin@gmail.com [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation as predicted by theory. With recent and future high-performance telescopes, the details of these first phases are becoming accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even present new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, from a theoretical point of view, we study the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions for the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a specific chemical evolution. From some species, the components can clearly be differentiated. The different core models can also be chemically differentiated. Our simulation suggests that some chemical species act as tracers of the different components of a collapsing prestellar dense core, and as tracers of the magnetic field characteristics of the core. From this result, we pinpoint promising key chemical species to be observed.

  12. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  13. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Dragosits, U

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching......) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm...... to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20–30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N...

  14. Towards a Navier Stokes-Darcy Upscaling Based on Permeability Tensor Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Lieb, M.; Neckel, T.; Bungartz, H.-J.; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    The micro scale simulation of CO2 sequestration involves complex, porous-like geometries. For the generation of such geometries, we present two approaches: In 2D, we construct a fractured domain by channel networks. In 3D, we approximate sand grain-like scenarios by dense sphere packings. The flow through these structures is simulated with the incompressible Navier-Stokes solver of the PDE framework Peano. Using an upscaling scheme, the results of the micro scale are used as input data for a Darcy solver on the coarse scales. The coupling concept and the scenario generators are presented together with first simulation results showing the validity of the approach.

  15. Detection of Upscale-Crop and Partial Manipulation in Surveillance Video Based on Sensor Pattern Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dai-Kyung; Ryu, Seung-Jin; Lee, Hae-Yeoun; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    In many court cases, surveillance videos are used as significant court evidence. As these surveillance videos can easily be forged, it may cause serious social issues, such as convicting an innocent person. Nevertheless, there is little research being done on forgery of surveillance videos. This paper proposes a forensic technique to detect forgeries of surveillance video based on sensor pattern noise (SPN). We exploit the scaling invariance of the minimum average correlation energy Mellin radial harmonic (MACE-MRH) correlation filter to reliably unveil traces of upscaling in videos. By excluding the high-frequency components of the investigated video and adaptively choosing the size of the local search window, the proposed method effectively localizes partially manipulated regions. Empirical evidence from a large database of test videos, including RGB (Red, Green, Blue)/infrared video, dynamic-/static-scene video and compressed video, indicates the superior performance of the proposed method. PMID:24051524

  16. Towards a Navier Stokes-Darcy Upscaling Based on Permeability Tensor Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Lieb, M.

    2012-06-02

    The micro scale simulation of CO2 sequestration involves complex, porous-like geometries. For the generation of such geometries, we present two approaches: In 2D, we construct a fractured domain by channel networks. In 3D, we approximate sand grain-like scenarios by dense sphere packings. The flow through these structures is simulated with the incompressible Navier-Stokes solver of the PDE framework Peano. Using an upscaling scheme, the results of the micro scale are used as input data for a Darcy solver on the coarse scales. The coupling concept and the scenario generators are presented together with first simulation results showing the validity of the approach.

  17. The pressure equation arising in reservoir simulation. Mathematical properties, numerical methods and upscaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Bjoern Fredrik

    1997-12-31

    The main purpose of this thesis has been to analyse self-adjoint second order elliptic partial differential equations arising in reservoir simulation. It studies several mathematical and numerical problems for the pressure equation arising in models of fluid flow in porous media. The theoretical results obtained have been illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. The influence of large variations in the mobility tensor upon the solution of the pressure equation is analysed. The performance of numerical methods applied to such problems have been studied. A new upscaling technique for one-phase flow in heterogeneous reservoirs is developed. The stability of the solution of the pressure equation with respect to small perturbations of the mobility tensor is studied. The results are used to develop a new numerical method for a model of fully nonlinear water waves. 158 refs, 39 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Upscaling of Two-Phase Immiscible Flows in Communicating Stratified Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for upscaling two-phase immiscible flows in heterogeneous porous media is described. This method is developed for stratified reservoirs with perfect communication between layers (the case of vertical equilibrium), in a viscous dominant regime, where the effects of capillary...... forces and gravity may be neglected. The method is discussed on the example of its basic application: waterflooding in petroleum reservoirs. We apply asymptotic analysis to a system of two-dimensional (2D) mass conservation equations for incompressible fluids. For high anisotropy ratios, the pressure...... and piston-like displacement, and it presumes non-zero exchange between layers. The method generalizes also the study of Yortsos (Transp Porous Media 18:107–129, 1995), taking into account in a more consistent way the interactions between the layers....

  19. The pressure equation arising in reservoir simulation. Mathematical properties, numerical methods and upscaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Bjoern Fredrik

    1998-12-31

    The main purpose of this thesis has been to analyse self-adjoint second order elliptic partial differential equations arising in reservoir simulation. It studies several mathematical and numerical problems for the pressure equation arising in models of fluid flow in porous media. The theoretical results obtained have been illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. The influence of large variations in the mobility tensor upon the solution of the pressure equation is analysed. The performance of numerical methods applied to such problems have been studied. A new upscaling technique for one-phase flow in heterogeneous reservoirs is developed. The stability of the solution of the pressure equation with respect to small perturbations of the mobility tensor is studied. The results are used to develop a new numerical method for a model of fully nonlinear water waves. 158 refs, 39 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. The Effect of Upscaling and Performance Degradation on Onshore Wind Turbine Lifetime Extension Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, T.; McMillan, D.; Niewczas, P.

    2017-11-01

    Ever greater rated wind turbine generators (WTGs) are reaching their end of design life in the near future. In addition, first research approaches quantified the impact of long-term performance degradation of WTGs. As a consequence, this work is aimed at discussing and analysing the impact of upscaling and performance degradation on the economics of wind turbine lifetime extension. Findings reveal that the lifetime extension levelised cost of energy (LCOE2) of an 18 MW wind farm comprising of 0.5 MW rated WTGs are within the order of £23.52 per MWh. Alternatively, if the same wind farm consists of fewer 2 or 3 MW WTGs, the LCOE2 reduces to £16.56 or £15.49 per MWh, respectively. Further, findings reveal that an annual performance degradation of 1.6% (0.2%) increases LCOE2 by 34-41% (3.6-4.3%).

  1. Upscaling of Surface Soil Moisture Using a Deep Learning Model with VIIRS RDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In current upscaling of in situ surface soil moisture practices, commonly used novel statistical or machine learning-based regression models combined with remote sensing data show some advantages in accurately capturing the satellite footprint scale of specific local or regional surface soil moisture. However, the performance of most models is largely determined by the size of the training data and the limited generalization ability to accomplish correlation extraction in regression models, which are unsuitable for larger scale practices. In this paper, a deep learning model was proposed to estimate soil moisture on a national scale. The deep learning model has the advantage of representing nonlinearities and modeling complex relationships from large-scale data. To illustrate the deep learning model for soil moisture estimation, the croplands of China were selected as the study area, and four years of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS raw data records (RDR were used as input parameters, then the models were trained and soil moisture estimates were obtained. Results demonstrate that the estimated models captured the complex relationship between the remote sensing variables and in situ surface soil moisture with an adjusted coefficient of determination of R ¯ 2 = 0.9875 and a root mean square error (RMSE of 0.0084 in China. These results were more accurate than the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP active radar soil moisture products and the Global Land data assimilation system (GLDAS 0–10 cm depth soil moisture data. Our study suggests that deep learning model have potential for operational applications of upscaling in situ surface soil moisture data at the national scale.

  2. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Two decimeter-scale 2D experiments were conducted in the proposed research. To the extent possible, the first experiment (2.44 m x 0.61 m x 10 cm) was be packed to reproduce the observed distributions of sediment size fractions in the subsurface at the tracer test site. Four size fractions of sediment (<125m, 125-250m, 250m to 2 mm, >2mm) were packed in the tank and the size fractions were placed in a sediment structure imitating pattern rather than the block pattern used in the previous experiments conducted with Naturita sediment. The second tank used the same total amount of sediment and proportions of the three size fractions used in the first experiment but was packed at larger geostatistical correlation lengths to evaluate how the scale of heterogeneity affects the upscaling results. This experiment was conducted with the goal of trying to determine how the upscaling would be affected by the diffusion path length associated with low permeability zones. The initial conditions in the tanks were based on observed field conditions. The influent was a synthetic groundwater that mimicked uncontaminated groundwater observed at the Naturita site. Samples were collected from side and end ports of the tank and were analyzed for U(VI), alkalinity, pH and major ions as was done in previous experiments. Each decimeter scale experiment was run for approximately 6 months and the experiments were run in parallel. Extensive premodeling occurred for both tanks and lasted the first year of the project.

  3. High-resolution global climate modelling: the UPSCALE project, a large-simulation campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Mizielinski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The UPSCALE (UK on PRACE: weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk project constructed and ran an ensemble of HadGEM3 (Hadley Centre Global Environment Model 3 atmosphere-only global climate simulations over the period 1985–2011, at resolutions of N512 (25 km, N216 (60 km and N96 (130 km as used in current global weather forecasting, seasonal prediction and climate modelling respectively. Alongside these present climate simulations a parallel ensemble looking at extremes of future climate was run, using a time-slice methodology to consider conditions at the end of this century. These simulations were primarily performed using a 144 million core hour, single year grant of computing time from PRACE (the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe in 2012, with additional resources supplied by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC and the Met Office. Almost 400 terabytes of simulation data were generated on the HERMIT supercomputer at the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS, and transferred to the JASMIN super-data cluster provided by the Science and Technology Facilities Council Centre for Data Archival (STFC CEDA for analysis and storage. In this paper we describe the implementation of the project, present the technical challenges in terms of optimisation, data output, transfer and storage that such a project involves and include details of the model configuration and the composition of the UPSCALE data set. This data set is available for scientific analysis to allow assessment of the value of model resolution in both present and potential future climate conditions.

  4. Physical and microstructural characterization of clay base ceramic product produced in Icoaraci (PA, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, N.S.S.; Mendes, J.F.; Pamplona, V.M.S.; Andrade, S.M.C.; Dias, C.G.B.T.

    2011-01-01

    The pottery currently produced in the pole ceramist Icoaraci (PA) is an artistic legacy of indigenous peoples who inhabited the Amazon region. In the pole are produced artifacts such as vases and other decorative items, and household appliances. In this work characterizations were obtained from samples of the final product (after firing), using the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis by Fourier transform spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and determining the density of the material. The objective was to evaluate the physical, microstructural and composition of the ceramics after firing. The results revealed the existence of pores and impurities, all of which can influence the quality of the final product, as well as the main elements that constitute mineralogical and chemical material. The photomicrographs showed a considerable degree of porosity, which agrees with the density results. (author)

  5. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATEMÓIA FRUIT IN DIFFERENT MATURATION STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Vanúbia Queiroz de Medeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In sight of scarcity of references and information on the atemóia, this work considered to evaluate some chemical and physical analyses in intention to characterize two maturation stages. The used fruits in the experiment had been gotten in the Agropólo Mossoró-Assú, in the state of the Great River of the North. For this, the following analyses had been carried through: length and diameter of the fruit, total firmness of the pulp, soluble solids, pH, titulável total acidity and vitamin level C total. Differences between stadiums of maturation with degradation of the cellular components and the reserves of the fruits had been observed, thus reducing the firmness of the pulp and liberating simple sugars, respectively. It occurred increment in the acidity and consequence decrease in the value of pH. The vitamin C level didn't suffer significant alterations between such stages.

  6. Physical characterization of austenitic stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 348 L*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da

    2009-01-01

    The study of radiation damages in metals and metallic alloys used as structural materials in nuclear reactors has a strategic meaning to the nuclear technology because it treats of performance of these materials in conditions that simulate the conditions of work in power reactors. Then it becomes necessary to know the essential physical properties of these materials, properties that are sensitive to the microstructural changes that occurred during the irradiation. The purpose of this work is to characterize, initially, some pre-irradiation properties of the stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 348 L * , such as mechanical (stress-strain and microhardness) and electrical (resistivity). The AISI 348 L * has been studied for use as fuel cladding material. Both materials will be tested after irradiation in the IEA-R1 core and their properties will be compared with those in the pre-irradiated condition. The morphology of the fractured zones after tensile tests was observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy). (author)

  7. Physical properties and characterization of Ag doped CdS thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.A.; Nazir, A.; Mahmood, W.; Syed, W.A.A.; Butt, S.; Ali, Z.; Maqsood, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CdS thin films were grown. ► By ion exchange, Ag was doped. ► Physical properties were investigated. - Abstract: Thin films of cadmium sulfide with very well defined preferential orientation and relatively high absorption coefficient were fabricated by thermal evaporation technique. The research is focused to the fabrication and characterization of the compositional data of CdS thin films obtained by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The optical properties were studied by using a UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. The effects of silver-doping by ion exchange process on the properties of as-deposited CdS thin films have been investigated.

  8. Physical and chemical characterization of borosilicate glasses containing Hanford high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    Scouting studies are being performed to develop and evaluate silicate glass forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level wastes. Detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of these glasses is required to assess their suitability for long-term storage or disposal. Some key properties to be considered in selecting a glass waste form include leach resistance, resistance to radiation, microstructure (includes devitrification behavior or crystallinity), homogeneity, viscosity, electrical resistivity, mechanical ruggedness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, density, softening point, annealing point, strain point, glass transformation temperature, and refractive index. Other properties that are important during processing of the glass include volatilization of glass and waste components, and corrosivity of the glass on melter components. Experimental procedures used to characterize silicate waste glass forms and typical properties of selected glass compositions containing simulated Hanford sludge and residual liquid wastes are presented. A discussion of the significance and use of each measured property is also presented

  9. Spatial characterization of Bessel-like beams for strong-field physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Adam M; Yu, Xiaoming; Wang, Xinya; Raoul, Maxime; Nelson, Josh; Todd, Daniel; Zigo, Stefan; Lei, Shuting; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A

    2017-02-06

    We present a compact, simple design for the generation and tuning of both the spot size and effective focal length of Bessel-like beams. In particular, this setup provides an important tool for the use of Bessel-like beams with high-power, femtosecond laser systems. Using a shallow angle axicon in conjunction with a spherical lens, we show that it is possible to focus Bessel-like modes to comparable focal spot sizes to sharp axicons while maintaining a long effective focal length. The resulting focal profiles are characterized in detail using an accurate high dynamic range imaging technique. Quantitatively, we introduce a metric (R0.8) which defines the spot-size containing 80% of the total energy. Our setup overcomes the typical compromise between long working distances and small spot sizes. This is particularly relevant for strong-field physics where most experiments must operate in vacuum.

  10. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

    2013-02-15

    movement accompanying dissolution in the unconsolidated media. The resultant movement changes the anticipated findings for pore and throat size distributions. For column S3, with cancrinite precipitation accompanying quartz dissolution, the precitiation halts much of the grain movement and more systematic distributions are obtained. Column S4, which was sealed with caustic solution acted as a control sample to study reactive effects during periods when columns S1 and S3 were sealed between flow experiments. No significant changes are observed in S4 with time. At Princeton, the imaging and analysis work focused on the effects of mineral precipitation and advancing our understanding of the impacts of these reactions on reactive transport in subsurface sediments. These findings are described in detail below, and have been published in L.E. Crandell, C.A. Peters, W. Um, K.W. Jones, W.B. Lindquist, 2012. “Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction with caustic tank wastes.” Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 131 (2012) 89–99. 3) Multi-Scale Modeling and Up-Scaling. Using an array of modeling approaches, we examined pore-scale variations in physical and mineralogical properties, flow velocities, and (for unsaturated conditions) wetting fluid/grain surface areas, and permeability evolution. Results and Key Findings: To predict the column permeability and estimate the impact of mineral precipitation, pore network models were informed using the pore and throat-size distributions from the imaging analyses. As a comparison, supplemental analyses were performed on Viking sandstone specimens from the Alberta sedimentary basin. In another part of this study we sought to understand how carbonate rocks in contact with CO2-rich brines change due to the precipitation or dissolution of fast-reacting minerals such as calcite and dolomite. Using a newly developed reactive-transport pore-network model we were able to identify the conditions that lead to

  11. Preparation, physical characterization, and stability of Ferrous-Chitosan microcapsules using different iron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Noer Abyor; Luthfansyah, M.; Krisanti, Elsa; Kartohardjono, Sutrasno; Mulia, Kamarza

    2017-11-01

    Dietary modification, supplementation and food fortification are common strategies to alleviate iron deficiencies. Fortification of food is an effective long-term approach to improve iron status of populations. Fortification by adding iron directly to food will cause sensory problems and decrease its bioavailability. The purpose of iron encapsulation is: (1) to improve iron bioavailability, by preventing oxidation and contact with inhibitors and competitors; and (2) to disguise the rancid aroma and flavor of iron. A microcapsule formulation of two suitable iron compounds (iron II fumarate and iron II gluconate) using chitosan as a biodegradable polymer will be very important. Freeze dryer was also used for completing the iron microencapsulation process. The main objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize the iron-chitosan microcapsules. Physical characterization, i.e. encapsulation efficiency, iron loading capacity, and SEM, were also discussed in this paper. The stability of microencapsulated iron under simulated gastrointestinal conditions was also investigated, as well. Both iron sources were highly encapsulated, ranging from 71.5% to 98.5%. Furthermore, the highest ferrous fumarate and ferrous gluconate loaded were 1.9% and 4.8%, respectively. About 1.04% to 9.17% and 45.17% to 75.19% of Fe II and total Fe, were released in simulated gastric fluid for two hours and in simulated intestinal fluid for six hours, respectively.

  12. Comparison of physically based constitutive models characterizing armor steel over wide temperature and strain rate ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zejian; Huang, Fenglei

    2012-01-01

    Both descriptive and predictive capabilities of five physically based constitutive models (PB, NNL, ZA, VA, and RK) are investigated and compared systematically, in characterizing plastic behavior of the 603 steel at temperatures ranging from 288 to 873 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 4500 s −1 . Determination of the constitutive parameters is introduced in detail for each model. Validities of the established models are checked by strain rate jump tests performed under different loading conditions. The results show that the RK and NNL models have better performance in the description of material behavior, especially the work-hardening effect, while the PB and VA models predict better. The inconsistency that is observed between the capabilities of description and prediction of the models indicates the existence of the minimum number of required fitting data, reflecting the degree of a model's requirement for basic data in parameter calibration. It is also found that the description capability of a model is dependent to a large extent on both its form and the number of its constitutive parameters, while the precision of prediction relies largely on the performance of description. In the selection of constitutive models, the experimental data and the constitutive models should be considered synthetically to obtain a better efficiency in material behavior characterization

  13. Physical-Chemical Characterization and Formulation Considerations for Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Harsh; Mohapatra, Sarat; Munt, Daniel J; Chandratre, Shantanu; Dash, Alekha

    2016-06-01

    Pure glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) (lipid) and different batches of GMO commonly used for the preparation of GMO-chitosan nanoparticles were characterized by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), cryo-microscopy, and cryo-X-ray powder diffraction techniques. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles containing poloxamer 407 as a stabilizer in the absence and presence of polymers as crystallization inhibitors were prepared by ultrasonication. The effect of polymers (polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Eudragits, hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), polyethylene glycol (PEG)), surfactants (poloxamer), and oils (mineral oil and olive oil) on the crystallization of GMO was investigated. GMO showed an exothermic peak at around -10°C while cooling and another exothermic peak at around -12°C while heating. It was followed by two endothermic peaks between 15 and 30 C, indicative of GMO melting. The results are corroborated by cryo-microscopy and cryo-X-ray. Significant differences in exothermic and endothermic transition were observed between different grades of GMO and pure GMO. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles resulted in a significant increase in particle size after lyophilization. MDSC confirmed that nanoparticles showed similar exothermic crystallization behavior of lipid GMO. MDSC experiments showed that PVP inhibits GMO crystallization and addition of PVP showed no significant increase in particle size of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) during lyophilization. The research highlights the importance of extensive physical-chemical characterization for successful formulation of SLN.

  14. Do it yourself: optical spectrometer for physics undergraduate instruction in nanomaterial characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuryantini, Ade Yeti; Mahen, Ea Cahya Septia; Sawitri, Asti; Nuryadin, Bebeh Wahid

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a homemade optical spectrometer using diffraction grating and image processing techniques. This device was designed to produce spectral images that could then be processed by measuring signal strength (pixel intensity) to obtain the light source, transmittance, and absorbance spectra of the liquid sample. The homemade optical spectrometer consisted of: (i) a white LED as a light source, (ii) a cuvette or sample holder, (iii) a slit, (iv) a diffraction grating, and (v) a CMOS camera (webcam). In this study, various concentrations of a carbon nanoparticle (CNP) colloid were used in the particle size sample test. Additionally, a commercial optical spectrometer and tunneling electron microscope (TEM) were used to characterize the optical properties and morphology of the CNPs, respectively. The data obtained using the homemade optical spectrometer, commercial optical spectrometer, and TEM showed similar results and trends. Lastly, the calculation and measurement of CNP size were performed using the effective mass approximation (EMA) and TEM. These data showed that the average nanoparticle sizes were approximately 2.4 nm and 2.5 ± 0.3 nm, respectively. This research provides new insights into the development of a portable, simple, and low-cost optical spectrometer that can be used in nanomaterial characterization for physics undergraduate instruction. (paper)

  15. Preparation and characterization of physically modified glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob Dominik; Kappl, Michael; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is the physical modification and characterization of the surface topography of glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). By surface modification the contact area between drug and carrier and thereby interparticle forces may be modified. Thus the performance of DPIs that relies on interparticle interactions may be improved. Glass beads were chosen as model carriers because various prospects of physical surface modification may be applied without affecting other factors also impacting interparticle interactions like particle size and shape. To generate rough surfaces glass beads were processed mechanically by friction and impaction in a ball mill with different grinding materials that were smaller and harder with respect to the glass beads. By varying the grinding time (4 h, 8 h) and by using different grinding media (tungsten carbide, quartz) surfaces with different shades of roughness were generated. Depending on the hardness of the grinding material and the grinding time the surface roughness was more or less pronounced. Surface roughness parameters and specific surface area were determined via several complementary techniques in order to get an enhanced understanding of the impact of the modifying procedure on the surface properties of the glass beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical and Electrochemical Characterization of Palm Kernel Shell Biochar (PKSB as Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ab Karim Ghani Wan Azlina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential low cost and environmentally friendly supercapacitor has been prepared from Palm Kernel Shell Biochar (PKSB. In this study, physical and electrochemical properties of raw, activated and chemical treated (potassium hydroxide (KOH as supercapacitors such as high carbon content, high charge storage capacity and stable were evaluated. For physical analyses, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to study the surface morphology and surface area and porosity were measured using Brunaurer-Emmert-Teller (BET. The chemical treated PKSB shows the highest surface area values of 55.15 m2/g as compared to raw and activated samples with surface area are 0.17 m2/g and 19.32 m2/g, respectively. This is verified by in enhancement of capacitance achieved from 1.76 × 10−3 Fg-1 for the activated biochar and 1.87 × 10−6 Fg-1 for untreated PKSB showed by Raman spectroscopy. This enhancement reflected the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. In addition, this phenomenon also supported by the electrochemical profiles through cyclic voltammogram (CV measured by Potentiostat-Gavanostat (EIS. CV of the treated PKSB gave better square shape than the activated and raw biochar samples. These characterizations conclude that the raw palm kernel biochar need further treatment to become supercapacitor electrodes to replace activated carbon.

  17. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from rubber-seed shell by physical activation with steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kang; Jiang, Jian chun

    2010-01-01

    The use of rubber-seed shell as a raw material for the production of activated carbon with physical activation was investigated. The produced activated carbons were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Scanning electron microscope, Thermo-gravimetric and Differential scanning calorimetric in order to understand the rubber-seed shell activated carbon. The results showed that rubber-seed shell is a good precursor for activated carbon. The optimal activation condition is: temperature 880 o C, steam flow 6 kg h -1 , residence time 60 min. Characteristics of activated carbon with a high yield (30.5%) are: specific surface area (S BET ) 948 m 2 g -1 , total volume 0.988 m 3 kg -1 , iodine number of adsorbent (q iodine ) 1.326 g g -1 , amount of methylene blue adsorption of adsorbent (q mb ) 265 mg g -1 , hardness 94.7%. It is demonstrated that rubber-seed shell is an attractive source of raw material for producing high capacity activated carbon by physical activation with steam.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a cell electrostimulator device combining physical vapor deposition and laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Angel L.; Pérez, Eliseo; Pazos, Antonio; Bao-Varela, Carmen; Nieto, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    In this work we present the process of fabrication and optimization of a prototype of a cell electrostimulator device for medical application combining physical vapor deposition and laser ablation. The fabrication of the first prototype begins with a deposition of a thin layer of 200 nm of aluminium on a borosilicate glass substrate using physical vapor deposition (PVD). In the second stage the geometry design of the electrostimulator is made in a CAD-like software available in a Nd:YVO4 Rofin Power line 20E, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and 20 ns pulse width. Choosing the proper laser parameters the negative of the electrostimulator desing is ablated. After that the glass is assembled between two polycarbonate sheets and a thick sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS sheet has a round hole in where cells are placed. There is also included a thin soda-lime silicate glass (100 μm) between the electrostimulator and the PMDS to prevent the cells for being in contact with the electric circuit. In order to control the electrical signal applied to the electrostimulator is used a digital I/O device from National Instruments (USB-6501) which provides 5 V at the output monitored by a software programmed in LabVIEW. Finally, the optical and electrical characterization of the cell electrostimulator device is presented.

  19. [Physical and chemical characterization of industrial nixtamalized corn flour for human consumption in Central America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressani, R; Turcios, J C; Reyes, L; Mérida, R

    2001-09-01

    The objective of this study was the characterization of industrial nixtamalized maize flour for human consumption and which are marketed in Central America for some selected physical and chemical properties which may contribute to food composition information and help nutrition and micronutrient fortification programs. A total of 12 brands purchased in triplicate were obtained from supermarkets in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. These samples were kept under refrigeration until analyzed. The physical parameters measured and results were the following: particle size with most samples having a high percentage of particles greater than 60 mesh, pH (5.4-7.5), water absorption index (WAI) (3.4-4.0 g gel/g sample), water soluble index (WSI) (4.8-7.8 g/100 g) and flour density (0.410-0.547 g/ml). The differences were statistically significant for all parameters measured, except for WAI. The chemical characteristics included, moisture, protein, fat, ash and dietetic fiber. Differences between flour samples were statistically significant except for fat content. Protein content was low, ranging between 6.7-8.1 g/100 g and total dietary fiber varied between 7.7-12.0 g/100 g. The samples were analyzed for phytic acid with a variation from 632 to 903 mg/100 g, with statistical significant differences. The samples were also analyzed for total and soluble (pH 7.5) iron, phosphorus, calcium, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, and magnesium. The difference in the iron and calcium content between flour samples were statistically significant. The physical and chemical variability found between flour samples of nixtamalized maize was relatively high and it is recommended to establish quality standards through raw material and process standardization for greater effectiveness of nutrition programs and activities on micronutrient fortification which may be pursued in the future.

  20. Physical characterization of a watershed through GIS: a study in the Schmidt stream, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, D R; Plangg, R; Tundisi, J G; Quevedo, D M

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing and geoprocessing are essential tools for obtaining and maintaining records of human actions on space over the course of time; these tools offer the basis for diagnoses of land use, environmental interference and local development. The Schmidt stream watershed, located in the Sinos River basin, in southern Brazil, has an environmental situation similar to that of the majority of small streams draining rural and urban areas in southern Brazil: agricultural and urbanization practices do not recognize the riparian area and there is removal of original vegetation, disregarding the suitability of land use; removal of wetlands; intensive water use for various activities; and lack of control and monitoring in the discharge of wastewater, among other factors, deteriorate the quality of this important environment.This article aims to achieve a physical characterization of the Schmidt stream watershed (Sinos river basin) identifying elements such as land use and occupation, soil science, geology, climatology, extent and location of watershed, among others, so as to serve as the basis for a tool that helps in the integrated environmental management of watersheds. By applying geographic information system - GIS to the process of obtaining maps of land use and occupation, pedologicaland geological, and using climatological data from the Campo Bom meteorological station, field visit, review of literature and journals, and publicly available data, the physical characterization of the Schmidt stream watershed was performed, with a view to the integrated environmental management of this watershed. Out of the total area of the Schmidt stream watershed (23.92 km(2)), in terms of geology, it was observed that 23.7% consist of colluvial deposits, 22.6% consist of grass facies, and 53.7% consist of Botucatu formation. Major soil types of the watershed: 97.4% Argisols and only 2.6% Planosols. Land use and occupation is characterized by wetland (0.5%), Native Forest (12

  1. Integrated use of soil physical and water isotope methods for ecohydrological characterization of desertified areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külls, Christoph; Nunes, Alice; Köbel-Batista, Melanie; Branquinho, Cristina; Bianconi, Nadja; Costantini, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Measures for monitoring desertification and soil degradation require a thorough understanding of soil physical properties and of the water balance in order to guide restoration efforts (Costantini et al. 2009). It is hypothesized that long term restoration success on degraded land depends on a series of interacting factors such as exposition, soil type, soil hydrology including lateral flow on hill-slope catenae. Recently, new soil water isotope measurement techniques have been developed (Garvelmann et al. 2012) that provide much faster and reliable stable water isotope profiles in soils. This technique yield information on groundwater recharge, soil water balance and on the origin of water available for plants, which in combination with conservative chemical tracers (chloride) can be validated. A multidisciplinary study including ecologists, soil physicists and hydrologists of the COST Action Desert Restoration Hub was carried out on four semi-arid sites in Portugal. A comparative characterization of soil physical parameters, soil water isotope and chloride profiles was performed in order to estimate pedoclimate, soil aridity, soil water balance and groundwater recharge. In combination with soil physical data a comprehensive and cross-validated characterization of pedoclimate and soil aridity was obtained. These indicators were then integrated and related to plant cover. The long-term rainfall of the four sites ranges from 512 to 638 mm, whereas air temperature is from 15.8 to 17.0°C. The De Martonne index of aridity spans from 19.3 to 24.6, pointing to semiarid to moderately arid climatic conditions. The long-term average number of days when the first 0.50 m of soil is dry ranges from 110 to 134, while the mean annual soil temperature at 0.50 m spans from 15.8 and 19.1°C. The studied profiles show different hydrological characteristics, in particular, the estimated hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.1-1 to 10-100 µm/s. Three out of four profiles show a

  2. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E

    2005-03-31

    The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).

  3. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that

  4. Large-scale regionalization of water table depth in peatlands optimized for greenhouse gas emission upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, M.; Tiemeyer, B.; Laggner, A.; Leppelt, T.; Frahm, E.; Belting, S.

    2014-09-01

    Fluxes of the three main greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2, CH4 and N2O from peat and other soils with high organic carbon contents are strongly controlled by water table depth. Information about the spatial distribution of water level is thus a crucial input parameter when upscaling GHG emissions to large scales. Here, we investigate the potential of statistical modeling for the regionalization of water levels in organic soils when data covers only a small fraction of the peatlands of the final map. Our study area is Germany. Phreatic water level data from 53 peatlands in Germany were compiled in a new data set comprising 1094 dip wells and 7155 years of data. For each dip well, numerous possible predictor variables were determined using nationally available data sources, which included information about land cover, ditch network, protected areas, topography, peatland characteristics and climatic boundary conditions. We applied boosted regression trees to identify dependencies between predictor variables and dip-well-specific long-term annual mean water level (WL) as well as a transformed form (WLt). The latter was obtained by assuming a hypothetical GHG transfer function and is linearly related to GHG emissions. Our results demonstrate that model calibration on WLt is superior. It increases the explained variance of the water level in the sensitive range for GHG emissions and avoids model bias in subsequent GHG upscaling. The final model explained 45% of WLt variance and was built on nine predictor variables that are based on information about land cover, peatland characteristics, drainage network, topography and climatic boundary conditions. Their individual effects on WLt and the observed parameter interactions provide insight into natural and anthropogenic boundary conditions that control water levels in organic soils. Our study also demonstrates that a large fraction of the observed WLt variance cannot be explained by nationally available predictor variables and

  5. Numerical Upscaling of Solute Transport in Fractured Porous Media Based on Flow Aligned Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leube, P.; Nowak, W.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2013-12-01

    High-contrast or fractured-porous media (FPM) pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for simulating large hydrogeological systems. The high contrast in advective transport between fast conduits and low-permeability rock matrix, including complex mass transfer processes, leads to the typical complex characteristics of early bulk arrivals and long tailings. Adequate direct representation of FPM requires enormous numerical resolutions. For large scales, e.g. the catchment scale, and when allowing for uncertainty in the fracture network architecture or in matrix properties, computational costs quickly reach an intractable level. In such cases, multi-scale simulation techniques have become useful tools. They allow decreasing the complexity of models by aggregating and transferring their parameters to coarser scales and so drastically reduce the computational costs. However, these advantages come at a loss of detail and accuracy. In this work, we develop and test a new multi-scale or upscaled modeling approach based on block upscaling. The novelty is that individual blocks are defined by and aligned with the local flow coordinates. We choose a multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model to represent the remaining sub-block non-Fickian behavior within these blocks on the coarse scale. To make the scale transition simple and to save computational costs, we capture sub-block features by temporal moments (TM) of block-wise particle arrival times to be matched with the MRMT model. By predicting spatial mass distributions of injected tracers in a synthetic test scenario, our coarse-scale solution matches reasonably well with the corresponding fine-scale reference solution. For predicting higher TM-orders (such as arrival time and effective dispersion), the prediction accuracy steadily decreases. This is compensated to some extent by the MRMT model. If the MRMT model becomes too complex, it loses its effect. We also found that prediction accuracy is sensitive to the choice of

  6. Physics of ultrasonic wave propagation in bone and heart characterized using Bayesian parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian Carl

    This Dissertation explores the physics underlying the propagation of ultrasonic waves in bone and in heart tissue through the use of Bayesian probability theory. Quantitative ultrasound is a noninvasive modality used for clinical detection, characterization, and evaluation of bone quality and cardiovascular disease. Approaches that extend the state of knowledge of the physics underpinning the interaction of ultrasound with inherently inhomogeneous and isotropic tissue have the potential to enhance its clinical utility. Simulations of fast and slow compressional wave propagation in cancellous bone were carried out to demonstrate the plausibility of a proposed explanation for the widely reported anomalous negative dispersion in cancellous bone. The results showed that negative dispersion could arise from analysis that proceeded under the assumption that the data consist of only a single ultrasonic wave, when in fact two overlapping and interfering waves are present. The confounding effect of overlapping fast and slow waves was addressed by applying Bayesian parameter estimation to simulated data, to experimental data acquired on bone-mimicking phantoms, and to data acquired in vitro on cancellous bone. The Bayesian approach successfully estimated the properties of the individual fast and slow waves even when they strongly overlapped in the acquired data. The Bayesian parameter estimation technique was further applied to an investigation of the anisotropy of ultrasonic properties in cancellous bone. The degree to which fast and slow waves overlap is partially determined by the angle of insonation of ultrasound relative to the predominant direction of trabecular orientation. In the past, studies of anisotropy have been limited by interference between fast and slow waves over a portion of the range of insonation angles. Bayesian analysis estimated attenuation, velocity, and amplitude parameters over the entire range of insonation angles, allowing a more complete

  7. Physical, mechanical and electrochemical characterization of all-perovskite intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alidad

    Strontium- and magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) has been considered as a promising electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems in recent years due to its high ionic conductivity and chemical stability over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures and temperatures. This research describes synthesis, physical and mechanical behavior, electrochemical properties, phase evolution, and microstructure of components of an all-perovskite anode-supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (ITSOFC), based on porous La 0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3 (LSCM) anode, La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O 2.8 (LSGM) electrolyte, and porous La0.6Sr0.4Fe 0.8Co0.2O3 (LSCF) cathode. The phase evolution of synthesized LSGM and LSCM powders has been investigated, and it has been confirmed that there is no reaction between LSGM and LSCM at sintering temperature. Using different amounts of poreformers and binders as well as controlling firing temperature, porosity of the anode was optimized while still retaining good mechanical integrity. The effect of cell operation conditions under dry hydrogen fuel on the SOFC open circuit voltage (OCV) and cell performance were also investigated. Characterization study of the synthesized LSGM indicates that sintering at 1500°C obtains higher electrical conductivity compared to the currently published results, while conductivity of pellets sintered at 1400°C and 1450°C would be slightly lower. The effect of sintering temperature on bulk and grain boundary resistivities was also discussed. The mechanical properties, such as hardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness and modulus of rupture of the electrolyte were determined and correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphological characterization. Linear thermal expansion and thermal expansion coefficient of LSGM were also measured.

  8. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  9. Chemical, physical and isotopic characterization of U3Si2, for nuclear forensics purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Daniele Scarpim

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1990's, the first illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials was observed mainly in Europe. A decade marked by numerous cases of seizures of these materials. As a result, these events have become the subject of criminal forensic investigations and develop from there, nuclear forensics. In Brazil there are no illicit trafficking official records of nuclear material, however, is widely known the extraction and illegal transportation of radioactive geological materials, and the materials pieces attachment used as shielding for radioactive sources. One of the main tools used in nuclear forensics is the nuclear materials databases establishment. These documents must contain the most information as possible about the physical, chemical and nuclear material seized, allowing the identification of their origin, manufacturing process or age. Thus, it sets characteristic composition standards of each material, called 'chemical signatures' (chemical finger print). In this work nuclear forensic protocol was adopted as well as the three stages of assessment suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in identifying the origin of uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ). Assays were performed in order to make physical, chemical and isotopic characterization of the studied materials and compared the data with those obtained for other uranium compounds (Uranium tetrafluoride, UF 4 ; uranium oxide, UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; Yellow cake) by establishing a characteristic signature for each one. Through the assays the uranium compounds were classify by origin groups, as far as they are from different manufactured process and/ or origin. It was also possible to show the importance of a nuclear forensic database during an investigation of a nuclear forensic event. (author)

  10. Physical-Mechanical characterization of cosmetic formulations and correlation between instrumental measurements and sensorial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, L S; Maia Campos, P M B G

    2017-10-01

    The correct choice of raw materials in the development of cosmetic formulations is essential for obtaining stable and pleasant skin care products. Therefore, rheological, texture and sensory analyses are important to understand the behaviour and stability of the formulations. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop cosmetic formulations containing or not (vehicle) UV filters and chicory root extract, to evaluate their stability as well as to characterize their physical and texture properties and correlate them with the sensory attributes. Four formulations containing organic UV filters and chicory extract, each alone or in combination, were developed and evaluated for 180 days with a cone and plate rheometer, a texture analyzer and consumer's sensorial analysis. Thus, the data obtained were correlated to observe the different influences. The developed formulations remained stable after 180 days regarding macroscopic aspects, organoleptic characteristics and pH values. The addition of the UV filters alone and in combination with the active substance resulted in significant increases in rheology properties, viscosity and consistency. The formulation with the active ingredient showed significant decreases in the texture parameters after 180 days, mainly due to its polysaccharide inulin. All formulations obtained high scores in sensorial parameters. A strong correlation was mainly found between spreadability and work of shear, and between the texture parameters. The raw materials strongly influenced the physical, texture and sensorial parameters. Finally, the UV filters showed a greater influence on the results of the formulations than the chicory root extract. In conclusion, the association of the mentioned methods allows the correct choice of ingredients and their combinations. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. An Efficient Upscaling Procedure Based on Stokes-Brinkman Model and Discrete Fracture Network Method for Naturally Fractured Carbonate Karst Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Guan; Bi, Linfeng; Popov, Peter; Efendiev, Yalchin; Espedal, Magne

    2010-01-01

    , fractures and their interconnectivities in coarse-scale simulation models. In this paper, we present a procedure based on our previously proposed Stokes-Brinkman model (SPE 125593) and the discrete fracture network method for accurate and efficient upscaling

  12. Upscaling reflectance information of lichens and mosses using a singularity index: a case study of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing moisture contents of lichens and mosses using ground-based high spectral resolution spectrometers (400–2500 nm offers immense opportunities for a comprehensive monitoring of peatland moisture status by satellite/airborne imagery. This information may be valuable for present and future carbon balance modeling. Previous studies are based upon point measurements of vegetation moisture content and water table position, and therefore a detailed moisture status of entire northern peatlands is not available. Consequently, upscaling ground and remotely sensed data to the desired spatial resolutions is inevitable. This study continues our previous investigation of the impact of various moisture conditions of common sub-Arctic lichen and moss species (i.e., Cladina stellaris, Cladina rangiferina, Dicranum elongatum, and Tomenthypnum nitens upon the spectral signatures obtained in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Upscaling reflectance measurements of the above species were conducted in the field, and reflectance analysis using a singularity index was made, since this study serves as a basis for future aircraft/satellite research. An attempt to upscale current and new spectral reflectance indices developed in our previous studies was made as well. Our findings indicate that the spectral index C. rangiferina is to a lesser amount influenced by scale since it has a small R2 values between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, reduced slopes between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, and similar slopes between log reflectance and log resolution (α of two wavelengths employed by the index. Future study should focus on concurrent monitoring of moisture variations in lichens and mosses both in situ and from satellite and airborne images, as well as analysis of fractal models in relations to the upscaling experiments.

  13. SiO2@TiO2 Coating: Synthesis, Physical Characterization and Photocatalytic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rosales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of silicon dioxide (SiO2 and titanium dioxide (TiO2 have been widely investigated individually in coatings technology, but their combined properties promote compatibility for different innovative applications. For example, the photocatalytic properties of TiO2 coatings, when exposed to UV light, have interesting environmental applications, such as air purification, self-cleaning and antibacterial properties. However, as reported in different pilot projects, serious durability problems, associated with the adhesion between the substrate and TiO2, have been evidenced. Thus, the aim of this work is to synthesize SiO2 together with TiO2 to increase the durability of the photocatalytic coating without affecting its photocatalytic potential. Therefore, synthesis using sonochemistry, synthesis without sonochemistry, physical characterization, photocatalytic evaluation, and durability of the SiO2, SiO2@TiO2 and TiO2 coatings are presented. Results indicate that using SiO2 improved the durability of the TiO2 coating without affecting its photocatalytic properties. Thus, this novel SiO2@TiO2 coating shows potential for developing long-lasting, self-cleaning and air-purifying construction materials.

  14. Physical-chemical characterization of bovine bone ash for evaluating its potential agricultural use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pacca Luna Mattar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing of bovine bone ash is a low cost and easy production process which can be adopted for making good use of animal residues, in locations without infrastructure, such as the family production units. This study aimed at describing the manufacturing process of bone ash and characterizing the physical and chemical parameters of the resulting material for organic fertilization. The experiment was performed with three replications, being evaluated the bovine bone ash manufacturing process yield, as well as its density, water retention capacity, pH of the resulting material after burning and contents of total calcium, calcium soluble in water, total phosphorus and phosphorus soluble in citric acid and in ammonium citrate. The process resulted in an average yield of 24.4% and the bovine bone ash presented 33.07% of total calcium, 15.6% of total phosphorus, 10.4% of phosphorus soluble in citric acid, pH of 9.94, density of 0.89 g cm-3 and water retention capacity of 73.3%. The bovine bone ash showed promising characteristics, with potential for being used as source of phosphorus and calcium in the organic fertilization process.

  15. Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Sugarcane Bagasse Particleboards for Civil Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Battistelle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the worldwide market of particleboard production, the use of alternative raw materials is increasing, due to high demand and lack of traditional raw material, despite efforts of reforestation. In Brazil, the main agricultural commodity is sugarcane due to the copious production of sugar and ethanol. In the state of São Paulo alone approximately 140 million tons of sugarcane bagasse are produced every year, from which around 70% is burned for energy production, not adding value to the residue and generating pollution to the environment; and the other 30% is sold for composting. The objective of this work is to add value to the sugarcane bagasse by using it as a raw material for particleboard production to be employed as flooring in the area of civil construction. To achieve this, the present research characterized the physical and mechanical characteristics of the particleboards with the following alternative raw materials: sugarcane bagasse and leaves of bamboo. Particleboards were produced to reach high density (0.8g/cm3 using the resin (bi-component polyurethane castor oil. Tests for abrasion, roughness and resistance to denting and wear (Janka hardness verified that the addition of leaves of bamboo in the mixtures, contrary to what was expected, did not confer a greater degree of resistance to the particleboards. Lastly, the results showed that sugarcane bagasse is a viable raw material alternative for the production of particleboards, intended to be used as products and flooring.

  16. Physical chemistry characterization of soils of the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez T, U. O.; Fernandez R, E.; Monroy G, F.; Anguiano A, J.

    2011-11-01

    Any type of waste should be confined so that it does not causes damage to the human health neither the environment and for the storage of the radioactive wastes these actions are the main priority. In the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes the radioactive wastes generated in Mexico by non energy applications are storage of temporary way. The present study is focused in determining the physical chemistry properties of the lands of the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes like they are: real density, ph, conductivity percentage of organic matter and percentage of humidity. With what is sought to make a characterization to verify the reaction capacity of the soils in case of a possible flight of radioactive material. The results show that there are different density variations, ph and conductivity in all the soil samples; the ph and conductivity vary with regard to the contact time between the soil and their saturation point in water, for the case of the density due to the characteristics of the same soil; for what is not possible to establish a general profile, but is necessary to know the properties of each soil type more amply. Contrary case is the content of organic matter and humidity since both are in minor proportions. (Author)

  17. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Janaina G.M.S.; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade; Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes; Santos, Carlos Alberto dos; Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria; Cunha, Joao Batista Marimon da

    2006-01-01

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe 2 O 4 , Fe 3 O 4 , MgFe 2 O 4 , FeCr 2 O 4 , Ca 0.15 Fe 2.85 O 4 , MgO, Mn 3 O 4 , SiO 2 and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe 2 O 4 , Fe 3 O 4 , Ca 0.15 Fe 2.85 O 4 and FeCr 2 O 4 . Magnesium ferrite (MgFe 2 O 4 ), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis

  18. Morphological investigation and physical characterization of ancient fragments of pyrogenic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusceddu, E; Miglietta, F; Criscuoli, I

    2013-01-01

    In the latest years, the attention toward the use of pyrogenic carbon as a climate mitigation strategy has increasingly grown. Biochar (BC) contains substantial amount (60–90%) of pyrogenic carbon, which is a recalcitrant material and it is hardly decomposed by biotic and abiotic oxidation. The carbon mitigation potential of biochar is associated to the fact that carbon is not easily released back into the atmosphere, even after very long incubation time in the soil. Several studies have been addressing the understanding of the fate of pyrogenic carbon in the soil in a quantitative way, but only a few actually considered materials that were produced in the past and they were not fully able to estimate the fraction of carbon that was oxidized on centennial time scales. In this paper, an old deposits of biochar in soils of the Eastern Alps (Trentino, Val di Pejo) was dated at 1859 by means of a dendroanthracological approach. Carbon decomposition in those soils was then investigated to calculate the fraction of carbon that was lost over 155 years. Part of this study is focused on the morphological and physical characterization of several fragments of biochar, using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Such study enabled the identification of specific morphological features of tracheids in the old biochar, which were tentatively associated to a differential oxidation of the structures that were created during carbonization from lignin and cellulose

  19. PHYSICAL, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND TAXONOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PSIDIUM ARAÇA RADDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Rosário Fátima Padilha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available New research has stimulated a large reevaluation of species with regards to the use of fruits from native plants. Araçá (a small Brazilian guava-like fruit is found scattered in the wild in Pernambuco/Brazil. There is a scarcity of detailed studies on such regional fruit trees, especially the Psidium araçá Raddi species, whereas there is an enormous possibility to explore the potential offered by these fruits, such as in the field of gastronomy, where the search for new ingredients and exotic flavors associated with functional properties has been increasing. This article aimed to evaluate the physical, physicochemical and taxonomic characterization of araçá obtained from different agricultural regions of Pernambuco in order to investigate the possibility of developing new products from this native fruit. The taxonomic identification confirmed that all collected material belonged to the species P. araçá Raddi. An average weight of 7.45 g/fruit was observed. With respect to pH, values between 3.17 and 3.48 were found, and the acidity as a percentage of citric acid was on the order of 0.96% to 0.99%. It was shown that the P. araçá Raddi fruit has a desirable quality for the food industry, presenting excellent conditions for the development of formulations of high commercial value and promising application in the national gastronomy.

  20. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, Levi D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huber, Tanja K. [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Breitkreutz, Harald [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  1. Clays for brick manufacturing in Actopan, Hidalgo: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tovar, Raul; Yañez-Hernández, Osiris Annel; Pérez-Moreno, Fidel; Rodríguez-Lugo, Ventura [Área de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo (Mexico); Rivera, José de Jesús Cruz [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Rivera, Ana Leonor, E-mail: analeonor.ventura.2016@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, DF (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Samples of clays from Actopan, Hidalgo employed in brick manufacturing are physical, chemical and mineralogical characterized. Transmitted polarized light microscopy showed a uniform particle size with grain morphology characteristic of euhedral crystals with quartz, feldspars, nontronite, and iron oxides particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed 75 μm to 90 μm wide subhedral structures formed by particles from 2.0 μm to 5.0 μm; and rombohedrales forms 40 μm wide, 70 µm long, constituted of silicon, aluminum, iron, titanium, calcium, minor amounts of potassium, magnesium, and sodium. Minerals such as quartz, albite, cristobalite, calcium and Hematite phases were recognized by X-Ray Diffraction technique. Chemical analysis by atomic emission spectrometry with Inductively Coupled Plasma confirmed this mineralogy composition while laser granulometry method found the same particle size. Grain size analysis determined submicrometric dimensions, and multimodal type curves, that can be interpreted as the mixing of two or more different mineral phases in each sample. (author)

  2. Clays for brick manufacturing in Actopan, Hidalgo: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Tovar, Raul; Yañez-Hernández, Osiris Annel; Pérez-Moreno, Fidel; Rodríguez-Lugo, Ventura; Rivera, José de Jesús Cruz; Rivera, Ana Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Samples of clays from Actopan, Hidalgo employed in brick manufacturing are physical, chemical and mineralogical characterized. Transmitted polarized light microscopy showed a uniform particle size with grain morphology characteristic of euhedral crystals with quartz, feldspars, nontronite, and iron oxides particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed 75 μm to 90 μm wide subhedral structures formed by particles from 2.0 μm to 5.0 μm; and rombohedrales forms 40 μm wide, 70 µm long, constituted of silicon, aluminum, iron, titanium, calcium, minor amounts of potassium, magnesium, and sodium. Minerals such as quartz, albite, cristobalite, calcium and Hematite phases were recognized by X-Ray Diffraction technique. Chemical analysis by atomic emission spectrometry with Inductively Coupled Plasma confirmed this mineralogy composition while laser granulometry method found the same particle size. Grain size analysis determined submicrometric dimensions, and multimodal type curves, that can be interpreted as the mixing of two or more different mineral phases in each sample. (author)

  3. Physical characterization of the liquid adhesive from orb-weaving spiders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Fernando G., E-mail: fgtorres@pucp.edu.pe; Troncoso, Omar P.; Cavalie, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Orb-weaving spiders produce bioadhesives that are used to capture their prey. In this paper, the physical properties of these adhesives are characterised. The liquid adhesive from Argiope argentata spiders has been studied and the morphological properties of the droplets, including size, shape and volume were determined. An estimation of viscosity and Young's modulus using atomic force microscopy has also been carried out. Morphological characterization confirmed that the liquid adhesive displayed a typical beads-on-a-string (BOAS) morphology on the silk fibres. The experimental data confirmed that the elastic modulus of the liquid adhesive from A. argentata was in the range 20–100 kPa which is in agreement with the Dahlquist criterion for adhesives. - Highlights: • The adhesive of the A. Argentata spiders displayed a beads-on-a-string morphology. • The adhesive drops had an average radius of 6.5 μm. • The adhesive drops had an estimated contact angle of 10°. • The estimated apparent viscosity of the adhesive was in the range 340–680 Pa·s. • AFM indentation measurements provided a Young's modulus value of 70 ± 47 kPa.

  4. Nanostructured tin oxide films: Physical synthesis, characterization, and gas sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingole, S M; Navale, S T; Navale, Y H; Bandgar, D K; Stadler, F J; Mane, R S; Ramgir, N S; Gupta, S K; Aswal, D K; Patil, V B

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructured tin oxide (SnO 2 ) films are synthesized using physical method i.e. thermal evaporation and are further characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy measurement techniques for confirming its structure and morphology. The chemiresistive properties of SnO 2 films are studied towards different oxidizing and reducing gases where these films have demonstrated considerable selectivity towards oxidizing nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) gas with a maximum response of 403% to 100ppm @200°C, and fast response and recovery times of 4s and 210s, respectively, than other test gases. In addition, SnO 2 films are enabling to detect as low as 1ppm NO 2 gas concentration @200°C with 23% response enhancement. Chemiresistive performances of SnO 2 films are carried out in the range of 1-100ppm and reported. Finally, plausible adsorption and desorption reaction mechanism of NO 2 gas molecules with SnO 2 film surface has been thoroughly discussed by means of an impedance spectroscopy analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Photo-physical characterization of fluorophore Ru(bpy32+ for optical biosensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Sciuto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied absorption, emission and lifetime of the coordination compound tris(2,2′-bipyridylruthenium(II fluorophore (Ru(bpy32+ both dissolved in water solutions and dried. Lifetime measurements were carried out using a new detector, the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM, which is more sensitive and physically much smaller than conventional optical detectors, such as imager and scanner. Through these analyses and a morphological characterization with transmission electron microscopy, revealed its usability for sensor applications, in particular, as dye in optical DNA-chip technology, a viable alternative to the conventional CY5 fluorophore. The use of Ru(bpy32+ would solve some of the typical disadvantages related to Cy5’s application, such as self-absorption of fluorescence and photobleaching. In addition, the Ru(bpy32+ longer lifetime may play a key role in the definition of new optical DNA-chip. Keywords: Tris(2,2′-bipyridylruthenium(II, Fluorophore, Spectroscopy, Lifetime measurements, SiPM, TEM

  6. Physical-mechanical and anatomical characterization in 26-year-old Eucalyptus resinifera wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Luiz de Lima

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to characterize Eucalyptus resinifera wood through physical and mechanical assays and wood anatomy studies, as well as determine the relationships between the properties and anatomy of wood. We used samples collected from the area close to the bark of ten 26-year-old E. resinifera trees. We concluded that the specific gravity (Gb, compression (f c0, and shear parallel to grain (f v0 were ranked in strength classes C30, C40 and C60, respectively, and that volumetric shrinkage (VS was ranked as high. A positive relationship between Gb and f v0 results from the higher specific gravity associated with higher tissue proportion, in turn, causing higher shear strength. Higher ray frequency increases shear strength, because rays act as reinforcing elements. A negative relationship between VS and vessel diameter occurs because vessel walls are highly resistant to collapse, and since larger lumens represent a higher proportion of empty spaces, less tissue is available for shrinkage.

  7. Upscaling the number of the learners, fragmenting the roles of the teachers: How do MOOCs form new conditions for developing designs for learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Pushpanadham, Karanam

    2018-01-01

    , through upscaling, important facets of students’ intellectual development and critical thinking might be left to the students themselves. This may cause problems. Adequate scaffolding from a teacher, such as adapting activities to the specific situation, might be needed to develop the skills required...... to be a self-directed learner. Furthermore, upscaling seems to promote a separation of the formerly unified teacher functions of planning, teaching and assessing, which necessitates increased collaboration among the many new actors in the field of pedagogy....

  8. Spatial Upscaling of Soil Respiration under a Complex Canopy Structure in an Old‐Growth Deciduous Forest, Central Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilanee Suchewaboripont

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural complexity, especially canopy and gap structure, of old‐growth forests affects the spatial variation of soil respiration (Rs. Without considering this variation, the upscaling of Rs from field measurements to the forest site will be biased. The present study examined responses of Rs to soil temperature (Ts and water content (W in canopy and gap areas, developed the best fit modelof Rs and used the unique spatial patterns of Rs and crown closure to upscale chamber measurements to the site scale in an old‐growth beech‐oak forest. Rs increased with an increase in Ts in both gap and canopy areas, but the effect of W on Rs was different between the two areas. The generalized linear model (GLM analysis identified that an empirical model of Rs with thecoupling of Ts and W was better than an exponential model of Rs with only Ts. Moreover, because of different responses of Rs to W between canopy and gap areas, it was necessary to estimate Rs in these areas separately. Consequently, combining the spatial patterns of Rs and the crown closure could allow upscaling of Rs from chamber‐based measurements to the whole site in the present study.

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  10. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  11. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  12. Offshore Wind Energy Climate Projection Using UPSCALE Climate Data under the RCP8.5 Emission Scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Gross

    Full Text Available In previous work, the authors demonstrated how data from climate simulations can be utilized to estimate regional wind power densities. In particular, it was shown that the quality of wind power densities, estimated from the UPSCALE global dataset in offshore regions of Mexico, compared well with regional high resolution studies. Additionally, a link between surface temperature and moist air density in the estimates was presented. UPSCALE is an acronym for UK on PRACE (the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe-weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk. The UPSCALE experiment was performed in 2012 by NCAS (National Centre for Atmospheric Science-Climate, at the University of Reading and the UK Met Office Hadley Centre. The study included a 25.6-year, five-member ensemble simulation of the HadGEM3 global atmosphere, at 25km resolution for present climate conditions. The initial conditions for the ensemble runs were taken from consecutive days of a test configuration. In the present paper, the emphasis is placed on the single climate run for a potential future climate scenario in the UPSCALE experiment dataset, using the Representation Concentrations Pathways (RCP 8.5 climate change scenario. Firstly, some tests were performed to ensure that the results using only one instantiation of the current climate dataset are as robust as possible within the constraints of the available data. In order to achieve this, an artificial time series over a longer sampling period was created. Then, it was shown that these longer time series provided almost the same results than the short ones, thus leading to the argument that the short time series is sufficient to capture the climate. Finally, with the confidence that one instantiation is sufficient, the future climate dataset was analysed to provide, for the first time, a projection of future changes in wind power resources using the UPSCALE dataset. It is hoped that this, in

  13. Offshore Wind Energy Climate Projection Using UPSCALE Climate Data under the RCP8.5 Emission Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Magar, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, the authors demonstrated how data from climate simulations can be utilized to estimate regional wind power densities. In particular, it was shown that the quality of wind power densities, estimated from the UPSCALE global dataset in offshore regions of Mexico, compared well with regional high resolution studies. Additionally, a link between surface temperature and moist air density in the estimates was presented. UPSCALE is an acronym for UK on PRACE (the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe)-weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk. The UPSCALE experiment was performed in 2012 by NCAS (National Centre for Atmospheric Science)-Climate, at the University of Reading and the UK Met Office Hadley Centre. The study included a 25.6-year, five-member ensemble simulation of the HadGEM3 global atmosphere, at 25km resolution for present climate conditions. The initial conditions for the ensemble runs were taken from consecutive days of a test configuration. In the present paper, the emphasis is placed on the single climate run for a potential future climate scenario in the UPSCALE experiment dataset, using the Representation Concentrations Pathways (RCP) 8.5 climate change scenario. Firstly, some tests were performed to ensure that the results using only one instantiation of the current climate dataset are as robust as possible within the constraints of the available data. In order to achieve this, an artificial time series over a longer sampling period was created. Then, it was shown that these longer time series provided almost the same results than the short ones, thus leading to the argument that the short time series is sufficient to capture the climate. Finally, with the confidence that one instantiation is sufficient, the future climate dataset was analysed to provide, for the first time, a projection of future changes in wind power resources using the UPSCALE dataset. It is hoped that this, in turn, will provide

  14. Offshore Wind Energy Climate Projection Using UPSCALE Climate Data under the RCP8.5 Emission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Magar, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, the authors demonstrated how data from climate simulations can be utilized to estimate regional wind power densities. In particular, it was shown that the quality of wind power densities, estimated from the UPSCALE global dataset in offshore regions of Mexico, compared well with regional high resolution studies. Additionally, a link between surface temperature and moist air density in the estimates was presented. UPSCALE is an acronym for UK on PRACE (the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe)—weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk. The UPSCALE experiment was performed in 2012 by NCAS (National Centre for Atmospheric Science)-Climate, at the University of Reading and the UK Met Office Hadley Centre. The study included a 25.6-year, five-member ensemble simulation of the HadGEM3 global atmosphere, at 25km resolution for present climate conditions. The initial conditions for the ensemble runs were taken from consecutive days of a test configuration. In the present paper, the emphasis is placed on the single climate run for a potential future climate scenario in the UPSCALE experiment dataset, using the Representation Concentrations Pathways (RCP) 8.5 climate change scenario. Firstly, some tests were performed to ensure that the results using only one instantiation of the current climate dataset are as robust as possible within the constraints of the available data. In order to achieve this, an artificial time series over a longer sampling period was created. Then, it was shown that these longer time series provided almost the same results than the short ones, thus leading to the argument that the short time series is sufficient to capture the climate. Finally, with the confidence that one instantiation is sufficient, the future climate dataset was analysed to provide, for the first time, a projection of future changes in wind power resources using the UPSCALE dataset. It is hoped that this, in turn, will

  15. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project. Fiscal Year 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, Paul J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Slonecker, Bruce D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steen, Franciska H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium–molybdenum (LEU-Mo) fuel plate samples and perform analysis in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. The primary research scope was to determine the thermo-physical properties as a function of temperature and burnup. Work conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 complemented measurements performed in FY 2013 on four additional irradiated LEU-Mo fuel plate samples. Specifically, the work in FY 2014 investigated the influence of different processing methods on thermal property behavior, the absence of aluminum alloy cladding on thermal property behavior for additional model validation, and the influence of higher operating surface heat flux / more aggressive irradiation conditions on thermal property behavior. The model developed in FY 2013 and refined in FY 2014 to extract thermal properties of the U-Mo alloy from the measurements conducted on an integral fuel plate sample (i.e., U-Mo alloy with a thin Zr coating and clad in AA6061) continues to perform very well. Measurements conducted in FY 2014 on samples irradiated under similar conditions compare well to measurements performed in FY 2013. In general, there is no gross influence of fabrication method on thermal property behavior, although the difference in LEU-Mo foil microstructure does have a noticeable influence on recrystallization of grains during irradiation. Samples irradiated under more aggressive irradiation conditions, e.g., higher surface heat flux, revealed lower thermal conductivity when compared to samples irradiated at moderate surface heat fluxes, with the exception of one sample. This report documents thermal

  16. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  18. Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    Portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for the characterization and monitoring of transuranic waste, mixed waste, ground water, contaminated soil, and process streams are needed within the DOE complex. A continuation of this basic research program is proposed to study the influence of control of the electrochemical potential of a metallic coating on a microcantilever as a means of developing specific and highly sensitive sensors. Basic research will be needed to understand the influence of variation of electrochemical potential on the bending of cantilevers in an electrolyte solution. Changes in the chemical potential of a metal-electrolyte interface, affected by changing the applied potential, leads to a change in the depletion or accumulation of substances at the interface. This change in the surface excess at the interface is reflected in a change in the interfacial tension, which is sensitively detected as cantilever deflection. Deposition of electroactive heavy metals as well as the adsorption of metal oxide species will be detectable as a cantilever bending. We plan to continue field-testing cantilever sensors at DOE sites as appropriate. Practical sensors for Hg and CrO4 -2 have been developed, and the former has been field tested. A sensor for large poorly hydrated anions (ClO4 -, ReO4 -, TcO4 -) based on a quarternary ammonium SAM coating is under development and will be field tested when appropriate. The advantage of cantilever sensors is that once the basic platform is developed, it can be the basis for a plethora of inexpensive, miniature sensors. This program will take advantage of advances in cantilever technology made by other programs as well

  19. Characterization, modelization and optimization of the Double Chooz acrylic vessels: physics impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, R.

    2010-01-01

    Double Chooz is one of the new generation experiments designed to measure the last unknown leptonic mixing angle, θ 13 . Il studies the oscillations of electronic antineutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power plant. Our knowledge on θ 13 can be improved by reducing both statistical errors (increasing both the detector size and run time) and systematic errors (using identical near and far detectors). Also, special care is dedicated to analyze backgrounds generated by natural radioactivity and cosmic ray interactions. The work presented here mostly focuses on Target and Gamma Catcher acrylic vessels, in the core of the detector. A new material designed for the experiment was developed since no pre-existing material met the required conditions. This material was characterized optically, to maximize light transmission and reduce the induced dead zone. With this in mind, a physics study of the Target vessel design was performed to identify any spectral distortion or count rate modification it could induce. As far as backgrounds are concerned, the material is radio-pure enough so that the singles rate coming from acrylic is negligible compared to the one from the photomultiplier tubes. An unknown single source is coming from the external contamination in the detector, such as dust. This is why we defined cleanliness goals for the detector fabrication and integration. These goals were met, thanks to well-defined protocols and careful team work. After three years of data taking, Double Chooz could disentangle an oscillation signal at 3α for sin 2 2θ 13 ≥ 0.05 - 0.06. If no oscillations were observed, the experiment could give an upper limit on sin 2 2θ 13 of 0.02 - 0.03 at 90 % C.L. (author) [fr

  20. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Janaina G.M.S. [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: jana@ct.ufrgs.br; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Santos, Carlos Alberto dos [Nucleo de Educacao a Distancia, Universidade Estadual do Rio Grande do Sul, UERGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cunha, Joao Batista Marimon da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Campus do Vale, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, FeCr{sub 2}O {sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4}, MgO, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4} and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnesium ferrite (MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  1. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntanoo, K., E-mail: thip-kk@hotmail.com [Graduate School of Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Promkotra, S., E-mail: sarunya@kku.ac.th [Department of Geotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Kaewkannetra, P., E-mail: paknar@kku.ac.th [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand)

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  2. Reactive physical vapor deposition of TixAlyN: Integrated plasma-surface modeling characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Da; Schaeffer, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    Reactive physical vapor deposition (RPVD) has been widely applied in the microelectronic industry for producing thin films. Fundamental understanding of RPVD mechanisms is needed for successful process development due to the high sensitivity of film properties on process conditions. An integrated plasma equipment-target nitridation modeling infrastructure for RPVD has therefore been developed to provide mechanistic insights and assist optimal process design. The target nitridation model computes target nitride coverage based on self-consistently derived plasma characteristics from the plasma equipment model; target sputter yields needed in the plasma equipment model are also self-consistently derived taking into account the yield-suppressing effect from nitridation. The integrated modeling infrastructure has been applied to investigating RPVD processing with a Ti 0.8 Al 0.2 compound target and an Ar/N 2 gas supply. It has been found that the process produces athermal metal neutrals as the primary deposition precursor. The metal stoichiometry in the deposited film is close to the target composition due to the predominance of athermal species in the flux that reaches the substrate. Correlations between process parameters (N 2 flow, target power), plasma characteristics, surface conditions, and deposition kinetics have been studied with the model. The deposition process is characterized by two regimes when the N 2 flow rate is varied. When N 2 is dilute relative to argon, target nitride coverage increases rapidly with increasing N 2 flow. The sputter yield and deposition rate consequently decrease. For less dilute N 2 mixtures, the sputter yield and deposition rate are stable due to the saturation of target nitridation. With increasing target power, the electron density increases nearly linearly while the variation of N generation is much smaller. Target nitridation and its suppression of the sputter yield saturate at high N 2 flow rendering these parameters

  3. Differences in sialic acid residues among bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms: a physical, biochemical, and immunological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, P; Farley, J R

    2002-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separates three human bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) isoforms in serum; two major BALP isoforms, B1 and B2, and a minor fraction, B/I, which is composed on average of 70% bone and 30% intestinal ALP. The current studies were intended to identify an in vitro source of the BALP isoforms for physical, biochemical, and immunological characterizations. The three BALP isoforms were identified in extracts of human osteosarcoma (SaOS-2) cells, by HPLC, after separation by anion-exchange chromatography. All three BALP isoforms were similar with respect to freeze-thaw stability, solubility, heat inactivation, and inhibition by L-phenylalanine, L-homoarginine, and levamisole. The isoforms were also kinetically similar (i.e., maximal velocity and KM at pH 8.8 and pH 10.0). The isoforms differed, however, with respect to sensitivity to precipitation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), P acid residues was estimated to be 29 and 45, for each B1 and B2 homodimer, respectively. Apparent discrepancies between these estimates of molecular weight and estimates based on gel filtration chromatography were attributed to nonspecific interactions between carbohydrate residues and the gel filtration beads. All three BALP isoforms showed similar dose-dependent linearity in the commercial Alkphase-B and Tandem-MP Ostase immunoassays, r = 0.944 and r = 0.985, respectively (P acid residues compared with B/I, which mainly explains the apparent differences in molecular weight. Future investigations will focus on the clinical and functional significance of the revealed differences in sialic acid residues.

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  6. Application of Tempered-Stable Time Fractional-Derivative Model to Upscale Subdiffusion for Pollutant Transport in Field-Scale Discrete Fracture Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingqing Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus provides efficient physical models to quantify non-Fickian dynamics broadly observed within the Earth system. The potential advantages of using fractional partial differential equations (fPDEs for real-world problems are often limited by the current lack of understanding of how earth system properties influence observed non-Fickian dynamics. This study explores non-Fickian dynamics for pollutant transport in field-scale discrete fracture networks (DFNs, by investigating how fracture and rock matrix properties influence the leading and tailing edges of pollutant breakthrough curves (BTCs. Fractured reservoirs exhibit erratic internal structures and multi-scale heterogeneity, resulting in complex non-Fickian dynamics. A Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate pollutant transport through DFNs with a systematic variation of system properties, and the resultant non-Fickian transport is upscaled using a tempered-stable fractional in time advection–dispersion equation. Numerical results serve as a basis for determining both qualitative and quantitative relationships between BTC characteristics and model parameters, in addition to the impacts of fracture density, orientation, and rock matrix permeability on non-Fickian dynamics. The observed impacts of medium heterogeneity on tracer transport at late times tend to enhance the applicability of fPDEs that may be parameterized using measurable fracture–matrix characteristics.

  7. Multi-physics and multi-scale characterization of shale anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarout, J.; Nadri, D.; Delle Piane, C.; Esteban, L.; Dewhurst, D.; Clennell, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Shales are the most abundant sedimentary rock type in the Earth's shallow crust. In the past decade or so, they have attracted increased attention from the petroleum industry as reservoirs, as well as more traditionally for their sealing capacity for hydrocarbon/CO2 traps or underground waste repositories. The effectiveness of both fundamental and applied shale research is currently limited by (i) the extreme variability of physical, mechanical and chemical properties observed for these rocks, and by (ii) the scarce data currently available. The variability in observed properties is poorly understood due to many factors that are often irrelevant for other sedimentary rocks. The relationships between these properties and the petrophysical measurements performed at the field and laboratory scales are not straightforward, translating to a scale dependency typical of shale behaviour. In addition, the complex and often anisotropic micro-/meso-structures of shales give rise to a directional dependency of some of the measured physical properties that are tensorial by nature such as permeability or elastic stiffness. Currently, fundamental understanding of the parameters controlling the directional and scale dependency of shale properties is far from complete. Selected results of a multi-physics laboratory investigation of the directional and scale dependency of some critical shale properties are reported. In particular, anisotropic features of shale micro-/meso-structures are related to the directional-dependency of elastic and fluid transport properties: - Micro-/meso-structure (μm to cm scale) characterization by electron microscopy and X-ray tomography; - Estimation of elastic anisotropy parameters on a single specimen using elastic wave propagation (cm scale); - Estimation of the permeability tensor using the steady-state method on orthogonal specimens (cm scale); - Estimation of the low-frequency diffusivity tensor using NMR method on orthogonal specimens (example

  8. Some safe and sensible shortcuts for efficiently upscaled updates of existing elevation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Aasbjerg Nielsen, Allan

    2013-04-01

    The Danish national elevation model, DK-DEM, was introduced in 2009 and is based on LiDAR data collected in the time frame 2005-2007. Hence, DK-DEM is aging, and it is time to consider how to integrate new data with the current model in a way that improves the representation of new landscape features, while still preserving the overall (very high) quality of the model. In LiDAR terms, 2005 is equivalent to some time between the palaeolithic and the neolithic. So evidently, when (and if) an update project is launched, we may expect some notable improvements due to the technical and scientific developments from the last half decade. To estimate the magnitude of these potential improvements, and to devise efficient and effective ways of integrating the new and old data, we currently carry out a number of case studies based on comparisons between the current terrain model (with a ground sample distance, GSD, of 1.6 m), and a number of new high resolution point clouds (10-70 points/m2). Not knowing anything about the terms of a potential update project, we consider multiple scenarios ranging from business as usual: A new model with the same GSD, but improved precision, to aggressive upscaling: A new model with 4 times better GSD, i.e. a 16-fold increase in the amount of data. Especially in the latter case speeding up the gridding process is important. Luckily recent results from one of our case studies reveal that for very high resolution data in smooth terrain (which is the common case in Denmark), using local mean (LM) as grid value estimator is only negligibly worse than using the theoretically "best" estimator, i.e. ordinary kriging (OK) with rigorous modelling of the semivariogram. The bias in a leave one out cross validation differs on the micrometer level, while the RMSE differs on the 0.1 mm level. This is fortunate, since a LM estimator can be implemented in plain stream mode, letting the points from the unstructured point cloud (i.e. no TIN generation) stream

  9. Physical Characterization of Solid-Liquid Slurries at High Weight Fractions Using Optical and Ultrasonic Methods. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, Lloyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Remediation of highly radioactive waste is a major technical and programmatic challenge for the DOE. Rapid, on-line physical characterization of highly concentrated slurries is required for the safe and efficient remediation of 90 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (HLW), sodium bearing waste, and mixed waste. The research presented here, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington to directly address the need for rapid on-line characterization of the physical properties of HLW slurries during all phases of the remediation process, from in-tank characterization of sediments to monitoring of the concentration, particle size, and degree of agglomeration and gelation of slurries during transport. Near-surface characterization of the slurry flow in the particle size range from nanometer to micrometer is examined using optical low coherence reflectometry. Volumetric characterization at depths in the slurry flow, up to several centimeters in the particle size range from the micrometer to millimeter, is realized by utilizing ultrasonic backscatter and diffuses fields. One of the strengths, the teaming up of significant talents in both experimental and theoretical optics (University of Washington) and in ultrasonics (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)) provides a synergistic approach to integrate these complimentary techniques. One of the benefits of this combined approach is the physical characterization of HLW over a concentration and particle size range that is broader than can be achieved with today's technology. This will avoid a costly increase in waste stream volume due to excess dilution, and will lessen chance of plugging pipes that could shut down expensive processing lines.

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  11. Characterization of physical properties of Al2O3 and ZrO2 nanofluids for heat transfer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Marcelo S.; Cabral, Eduardo L.L.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Yoriyaz, Helio; Lima, Ana Cecilia S.; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Prado, Adelk C.; Filho, Tufic M.; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Shorto, Julian M.B.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Otubo, Larissa; Baptista Filho, Benedito D.; Pinho, Priscila G.M.; Ribatsky, Gherhardt; Moraes, Anderson Antonio Ubices

    2015-01-01

    Studies demonstrate that nanofluids based on metal oxide nanoparticles have physical properties that characterize them as promising fluids, mainly, in industrial systems in which high heat flux takes place. Water based nanofluids of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 were characterized regarding its promising use in heat transfer applications. Three different concentrations of dispersed solutions of cited nanofluids were prepared (0.01% vol., 0.05% vol., and 0.1% vol.) from commercial nanofluids. Experimental measurements were carried out at different temperatures. Thermal conductivity, viscosity and density of the prepared nanofluids were measured. (author)

  12. Coherent tools for physics-based simulation and characterization of noise in semiconductor devices oriented to nonlinear microwave circuit CAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riah, Zoheir; Sommet, Raphael; Nallatamby, Jean C.; Prigent, Michel; Obregon, Juan

    2004-05-01

    We present in this paper a set of coherent tools for noise characterization and physics-based analysis of noise in semiconductor devices. This noise toolbox relies on a low frequency noise measurement setup with special high current capabilities thanks to an accurate and original calibration. It relies also on a simulation tool based on the drift diffusion equations and the linear perturbation theory, associated with the Green's function technique. This physics-based noise simulator has been implemented successfully in the Scilab environment and is specifically dedicated to HBTs. Some results are given and compared to those existing in the literature.

  13. Fluid flow and reaction fronts: characterization of physical processes at the microscale using SEM analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul; Chung, Peter; Martín-Martín, Juan Diego

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migrations are the principal agent for mineral replacement in the upper crust, leading to dramatic changes in the porosity and permeability of rocks over several kilometers. Consequently, a better understanding of the physical parameters leading to mineral replacement is required to better understand and model fluid flow and rock reservoir properties. Large-scale dolostone bodies are one of the best and most debated examples of such fluid-related mineral replacement. These formations received a lot of attention lately, and although genetic mechanics and implications for fluid volume are understood, the mechanisms controlling the formation and propagation of the dolomitization reaction front remain unclear. This contribution aims at an improvement of the knowledge about how this replacement front propagates over space and time. We study the front sharpness on hand specimen and thin section scale and what the influence of advection versus diffusion of material is on the front development. In addition, we demonstrate how preexisting heterogeneities in the host rock affect the propagation of the reaction front. The rock is normally not homogeneous but contains grain boundaries, fractures and stylolites, and such structures are important on the scale of the front width. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy we characterized the reaction front chemistry and morphology in different context. Specimens of dolomitization fronts, collected from carbonate sequences of the southern Maestrat Basin, Spain and the Southwestern Scottish Highlands suggest that the front thickness is about several mm being relatively sharp. Fluid infiltrated grain boundaries and fractures forming mm-scale transition zone. We study the structure of the reaction zone in detail and discuss implications for fluid diffusion-advection models and mineral replacement. In addition we formulate a numerical model taking into account fluid flow, diffusion and advection of the mobile

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  16. Characterizing Pedagogical Practices of University Physics Students in Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen A.; Madigan, Peter; Miller, Eric; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2016-01-01

    University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between…

  17. What characterizes cleaners sustaining good musculoskeletal health after years with physically heavy work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Blangsted, A K; Christensen, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this case-control study was to investigate characteristics of cleaners with good musculoskeletal health after years with physically heavy work. METHODS: One hundred and 41 female seniority cleaners participated. Twenty-five reported no musculoskeletal symptoms, whereas 83...... reported severe symptoms in the low back, neck shoulders or upper limbs. The groups were of matching age, height, body weight and seniority (19 years). Muscular strength was recorded by isometric maximal voluntary contractions on a day without pain. Exposure to physical risk factors at work, psychosocial...... work factors, and leisure time physical activity were assessed by a postal questionnaire. RESULTS: Cleaners with good musculoskeletal health were not reporting different exposure to physical risk factors at work or leisure time physical activity, but had higher muscular strength and reported higher...

  18. A Novel Physical Sensing Principle for Liquid Characterization Using Paper-Based Hygro-Mechanical Systems (PB-HMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Angel; Stiharu, Ion; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio

    2017-07-20

    In recent years paper-based microfluidic systems have emerged as versatile tools for developing sensors in different areas. In this work; we report a novel physical sensing principle for the characterization of liquids using a paper-based hygro-mechanical system (PB-HMS). The PB-HMS is formed by the interaction of liquid droplets and paper-based mini-structures such as cantilever beams. The proposed principle takes advantage of the hygroscopic properties of paper to produce hygro-mechanical motion. The dynamic response of the PB-HMS reveals information about the tested liquid that can be applied to characterize certain properties of liquids. A suggested method to characterize liquids by means of the proposed principle is introduced. The experimental results show the feasibility of such a method. It is expected that the proposed principle may be applied to sense properties of liquids in different applications where both disposability and portability are of extreme importance.

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  1. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  2. Upscaling ecotourism in Kisumu city and its environs: Local community perspective Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Odhiambo HAYOMBE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kenya’s quest to be among the top ten long-haul tourist destinations globally require strategic focus as envisaged in Kenya’s Vision 2030. Ecotourism is emerging as an alternative development path that can enhance environmental conservation, promote preservation of cultural heritage as well as provide an alternative source of sustainable livelihood. Alternative livelihood in ecotourism provides a sustainable development path for Kisumu City and its environs. However, sustainability in ecotourism transformation is a concern; that is how to motivate the local community to participate in this venture? This study discerns these significant sustainability factors as perceived by the local community. The objective of the study was to discern the local community’s perception on significant sustainability factors for ecotourism transformation. And the research questions: What is the local community’s perception on significant sustainability factors for ecotourism transformation? This research design used both qualitative and quantitative research. The qualitative research design focused on site specific analysis of ecotourism sites of Dunga (Kisumu, Miyandhe (Bondo and Seka (Kendu Bay. The quantitative research entailed data collection administered through questionnaire in eco-tourism outlets represented by 10 Beach Management Units (BMU selected through purposive sampling. Principal Component Analysis was used to discern the significant sustainability factors for ecotourism transformation. A total of 28 items converted into variables were subjected against 326 respondents in the PCA analysis. The results indicated a total of seven (7 significant sustainability factors: First factor was willingness to participate in ecotourism ventures; second Factor was upscale ecotourism initiatives in the neighborhood; third factor was women and youth empowerment; fourth factor was youth and women employment in the neighborhood; fifth Factor: Natural Artifact

  3. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  4. Exploring a Theory Describing the Physics of Information Systems, Characterizing the Phenomena of Complex Information Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harmon, Scott

    2001-01-01

    This project accomplished all of its objectives: document a theory of information physics, conduct a workshop on planing experiments to test this theory, and design experiments that validate this theory...

  5. Fluxgate magnetorelaxometry for characterization of hydrogel polymerization kinetics and physical entrapment capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, E; Harling, S; Ludwig, F; Menzel, H; Schilling, M

    2008-05-21

    Hydrogels have the potential for providing drug delivery systems with long release rates. The polymerization kinetics and the physical entrapment capacity of photo-cross-linked hydroxyethyl methacrylate hydroxyethylstarch hydrogels are investigated with a non-destructive method. For this purpose, superparamagnetic nanoparticles as replacements for biomolecules are used as probes. By analyzing their magnetic relaxation behavior, the amounts of physically entrapped and mobile nanoparticles can be determined. The hydrogels were loaded with five different concentrations of nanoparticles. Different methods of analysis of the relaxation curves and the influence of the microviscosity are discussed. This investigation allows one to optimize the UV light irradiation time and to determine the amount of physically entrapped nanoparticles in the hydrogel network. It was found that the polymerization kinetics is faster for decreasing nanoparticle concentration but not all nanoparticles can be physically entrapped in the network.

  6. Fluxgate magnetorelaxometry for characterization of hydrogel polymerization kinetics and physical entrapment capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, E; Ludwig, F; Schilling, M [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Harling, S; Menzel, H [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: e.heim@tu-bs.de

    2008-05-21

    Hydrogels have the potential for providing drug delivery systems with long release rates. The polymerization kinetics and the physical entrapment capacity of photo-cross-linked hydroxyethyl methacrylate hydroxyethylstarch hydrogels are investigated with a non-destructive method. For this purpose, superparamagnetic nanoparticles as replacements for biomolecules are used as probes. By analyzing their magnetic relaxation behavior, the amounts of physically entrapped and mobile nanoparticles can be determined. The hydrogels were loaded with five different concentrations of nanoparticles. Different methods of analysis of the relaxation curves and the influence of the microviscosity are discussed. This investigation allows one to optimize the UV light irradiation time and to determine the amount of physically entrapped nanoparticles in the hydrogel network. It was found that the polymerization kinetics is faster for decreasing nanoparticle concentration but not all nanoparticles can be physically entrapped in the network.

  7. Fluxgate magnetorelaxometry for characterization of hydrogel polymerization kinetics and physical entrapment capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, E; Ludwig, F; Schilling, M; Harling, S; Menzel, H

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogels have the potential for providing drug delivery systems with long release rates. The polymerization kinetics and the physical entrapment capacity of photo-cross-linked hydroxyethyl methacrylate hydroxyethylstarch hydrogels are investigated with a non-destructive method. For this purpose, superparamagnetic nanoparticles as replacements for biomolecules are used as probes. By analyzing their magnetic relaxation behavior, the amounts of physically entrapped and mobile nanoparticles can be determined. The hydrogels were loaded with five different concentrations of nanoparticles. Different methods of analysis of the relaxation curves and the influence of the microviscosity are discussed. This investigation allows one to optimize the UV light irradiation time and to determine the amount of physically entrapped nanoparticles in the hydrogel network. It was found that the polymerization kinetics is faster for decreasing nanoparticle concentration but not all nanoparticles can be physically entrapped in the network

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  11. Upscaling laboratory results for water quality prediction at underground collieries in South Africa's Highveld Coalfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, B.H. [University of Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa). Institute for Groundwater Studies

    2009-01-15

    The prediction of future acidity and water quality is a key aspect of water management in mining environments. In this paper, different prediction techniques tested in an isolated underground compartment at a colliery in the Highveld Coalfield of South Africa are discussed. Considerations for upscaling these results are explained, and a methodology for upscaling is tested at this facility. Over 30 samples were collected around the compartment and through cored boreholes. These samples were tested using acid-base accounting tests, humidity cells, and mineralogy. From this, an integrated interpretation of potential water quality evolution was made, supported by detailed water quality sampling with the use of surface boreholes, stratified sampling underground, and pumped qualities over a period of two years. The results show that analytical tests play an integral role in water quality predictions at underground collieries. The results also show that, despite the vast differences between laboratory test conditions and the situation in the field, by taking site conditions into account to properly contextualise the results, improved predictions of expected water quality can be obtained.

  12. An Upscaling Method for Cover-Management Factor and Its Application in the Loess Plateau of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The cover-management factor (C-factor is important for studying soil erosion. In addition, it is important to use sampling plot data to estimate the regional C-factor when assessing erosion and soil conservation. Here, the loess hill and gully region in Ansai County, China, was studied to determine a method for computing the C-factor. This C-factor is used in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE at a regional scale. After upscaling the slope-scale computational equation, the C-factor for Ansai County was calculated by using the soil loss ratio, precipitation and land use/cover type. The multi-year mean C-factor for Ansai County was 0.36. The C-factor values were greater in the eastern region of the county than in the western region. In addition, the lowest C-factor values were found in the southern region of the county near its southern border. These spatial differences were consistent with the spatial distribution of the soil loess ratios across areas with different land uses. Additional research is needed to determine the effects of seasonal vegetation growth changes on the C-factor, and the C-factor upscaling uncertainties at a regional scale.

  13. An upscaling method for cover-management factor and its application in the loess Plateau of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenwu; Fu, Bojie; Qiu, Yang

    2013-10-09

    The cover-management factor (C-factor) is important for studying soil erosion. In addition, it is important to use sampling plot data to estimate the regional C-factor when assessing erosion and soil conservation. Here, the loess hill and gully region in Ansai County, China, was studied to determine a method for computing the C-factor. This C-factor is used in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) at a regional scale. After upscaling the slope-scale computational equation, the C-factor for Ansai County was calculated by using the soil loss ratio, precipitation and land use/cover type. The multi-year mean C-factor for Ansai County was 0.36. The C-factor values were greater in the eastern region of the county than in the western region. In addition, the lowest C-factor values were found in the southern region of the county near its southern border. These spatial differences were consistent with the spatial distribution of the soil loess ratios across areas with different land uses. Additional research is needed to determine the effects of seasonal vegetation growth changes on the C-factor, and the C-factor upscaling uncertainties at a regional scale.

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  20. TCNQ-embedded heptacene and nonacene: Synthesis, characterization and physical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) moieties into the acene backbone has been successfully achieved and two heptacene-TCNQ derivatives and one nonacene-TCNQ derivative have been synthesized and well characterized. Two TCNQ moieties have been embedded into heptacene and nonacene backbones for the first time. All the three compounds have good stability and solubility due to the presence of TCNQ moieties. Single crystal analysis revealed a bent butterfly-like conformation of these molecules. Their charge transport properties have been characterized using organic field effect transistors (OFETs). © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Micro- and macro-scale petrophysical characterization of potential reservoir units from the Northern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruzi, Peleg; Halisch, Matthias; Katsman, Regina; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Lower Cretaceous sandstone serves as hydrocarbon reservoir in some places over the world, and potentially in Hatira formation in the Golan Heights, northern Israel. The purpose of the current research is to characterize the petrophysical properties of these sandstone units. The study is carried out by two alternative methods: using conventional macroscopic lab measurements, and using CT-scanning, image processing and subsequent fluid mechanics simulations at a microscale, followed by upscaling to the conventional macroscopic rock parameters (porosity and permeability). Comparison between the upscaled and measured in the lab properties will be conducted. The best way to upscale the microscopic rock characteristics will be analyzed based the models suggested in the literature. Proper characterization of the potential reservoir will provide necessary analytical parameters for the future experimenting and modeling of the macroscopic fluid flow behavior in the Lower Cretaceous sandstone.

  2. Characterization and physical stability of spray dried solid dispersions of probucol and PVP-K30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Pia; Pedersen, Betty L; Hovgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to obtain stable, well-characterized solid dispersions (SDs) of amorphous probucol and polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 (PVP-K30) with improved dissolution rates. A secondary aim was to investigate the flow-through dissolution method for in-vitro dissolution measuremen...

  3. Chemical and Physical Analysis Methods for Characterizing Tire Crumb Rubber Used in Synthetic Turf Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tire crumb rubber from recycled tires is widely used as infill material in synthetic turf fields in the United States. Recycled crumb rubber is a complex and potentially variable matrix with many metal, VOC, and SVOC constituents, presenting challenges for characterization and ex...

  4. THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EMISSIONS FROM A RESIDENTIAL OIL BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil and the use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source are available for dispersion, climate, and source-recep...

  5. Characterization and properties of breakwater structures modelled by a physics engine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors examine the question of stability of breakwater structures using the simulation software PhysX. This “physics engine” can be used to construct various packings of breakwater elements, each of which can be used to analyze the damage when...

  6. Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiller, Jochen; Maisl, Michael; Reindl, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents physical and metrological characterization measurements conducted for an industrial x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) system. As is well known in CT metrology, many factors, e.g., in the scanning and reconstruction process, the image processing, and the 3D data evaluation...... components of a CT scanner, i.e. the x-ray tube and the flat-panel detector, are characterized. The contrast and noise transfer property of the scanner is obtained using image-processing methods based on linear systems theory. A long-term temperature measurement in the scanner cabinet has been carried out....... The dimensional measurement property has been quantified by using a calibrated ball-bar and uncertainty budgeting. Information about the performance of a CT scanner system in terms of contrast and noise transmission and sources of geometrical errors will help plan CT scans more efficiently. In particular...

  7. Historical upscaling of the socio-hydrological cycle: Three cases from the Mediterranean Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macian-Sorribes, Hector; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Sanchis-Ibor, Carles

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the co-evolution between hydrological and socio-economic systems is vital to assess how anthropogenic and natural systems will evolve and interact in the future. Examining past socio-hydrological changes is therefore important to produce knowledge able to develop socio-hydrological models for predicting the future hydrology and society evolution patterns. As noticeable climate changes leading to higher water stress are expected in the Mediterranean Europe, socio-hydrological processes are likely to suffer considerable modifications in the XXI century, driving to potential conflicts as water demand increases while water resources fall. The goal of this contribution is to identify the hydro-social processes that have caused water conflicts, and how they have been solved in the Mediterranean Spain. The method is based in the analysis of historical documents, available since the Middle Ages. Once historical water conflicts (always well-documented) were located, a socio-hydrological "causal loop" is formulated, determining what caused that conflict, what factors or chain of factors were involved, and how it was addressed. Repeating that process for all the reported water conflicts allow us to gain insight into their driving forces, the socio-hydrological relationships linked to those, and the successful (and unsuccessful) strategies employed to address them. Three cases were selected from the Mediterranean Spain: the Mijares, the Turia and the Jucar river basins. All of them share similar documental sources (the Royal Archives, courts' archives, municipal archives and farmers' archives), similar climate and similar socio-economic backgrounds. Moreover, all of them are predicted to suffer similar climate change impacts. Irrigation is their major water demand. In these three rivers, during the last millennia, successive waterscapes have been constructed by different societies, in a prolonged process of institutional and environmental up-scaling, from the

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF SCHOOL ATTENDANCE OF STUDENTS WITH PHYSICAL DISABILITIES IN A CITY OF SÃO PAULO STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Garcia Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to characterize the educational services offered to students with physical disabilities in a Municipal Education of a midsize city of São Paulo state. We gathered the data through document analysis and application of semi-structured interviews. We recorded the data on audio, transcribed and analyzed them. We categorized them into two categories, the first of which referred to the attendance policies and second, the organization of care for students with physical disabilities. The results showed that the system investigated showed accessibility policies supporting the use of assistive technology for students with disabilities enrolled in regular education, despite not indicate the need for specialized educational services when the student has no associated cognitive impairment. We concluded that there are myriad factors to contemplate the school inclusion of students with physical disabilities and that many actions are needed to ensure education and social participation of this target audience. Keywords: Special Education. Physical Disabilities. Specialized Educational Services. Assistive Technology.

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  13. Sampling and physical and actinide characterization of colloids from the Grimsel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of groundwater from a granite fracture at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland have been collected as part of a second intercomparison of groundwater colloid sampling and characterization techniques carried out by members of the Coco Club (colloids and complexes) sponsored by the CEC. This report describes the Harwell contribution to this exercise. The bulk of naturally occurring actinides were found to reside in solution with 10 particles/I (detection limit ∼50 nm) for samples determined by three laboratories. The colloids were shown to be negatively charged using microelectrophoresis and to be relatively stable. There was evidence of a reduction in the pH of the water after storage due to air contamination. This work has served to identify the problems associated with colloid sampling and characterization techniques

  14. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  15. Characterization and evaluation physical properties biodegradable plastic composite from seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deni, Glar Donia; Dhaningtyas, Shalihat Afifah; Fajar, Ibnu; Sudarno

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and evaluation of biodegradable plastic composed of a mixture PVA - carrageenan - chitosan was conducted in this study. Obtained data were then compared to commercial biodegradable plastic. Characteristic of plastic was mechanical tested such as tensile - strength and elongation. Plastic degradation was studied using composting method for 7 days and 14 days. The results showed that the increase carrageenan will decrease tensile-strength and elongation plastic composite. In addition, increase carrageenan would increase the degraded plastics composite.

  16. Characterization of the training of research skills in the career of physical culture in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Guillermo Aldas Arcos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In some cases, professors blame research training on the discipline of Research Methodology, oriented at the beginning or end of careers. However, in Ecuador this issue has been little discussed. The present study evidences some difficulties related to the formation of investigative abilities in universities of the Ecuadorian context, specifically the race of Physical Culture. Results are compiled through the application of methods such as documentary analysis (curricula of the main Ecuadorian universities 2014, analysis and synthesis (during the whole process under study surveys of students and graduates attending the III International Congress of Education Curriculum Planning Physics and Planning of Sports Training, held in Riobamba Ecuador UNACH, in 2014. Likewise, interviews were applied to professionals of the fourth level. In the development is theorized on the state of the art, from the conceptions given by scholars on the subject.

  17. Physical-chemical, caloric and sensory characterization of light jambolan (Syzygium cumini Lamarck jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Silva Lago-Vanzela

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, several little economically explored fruits have good potential as raw material for the agro-industry. This study aimed to produce and determine the physical-chemical and sensory characteristics of light jambolan jelly. This fruit has intense purple color, which gave the jellies - both standard and light - a quite attractive visual aspect. The light jellies exhibited similar physical-chemical characteristics to the ones developed through the conventional method and; with the proportion of sweeteners used, the caloric values of the formulations were reduced to the range of 41 to 53%, attending the requirements of the Brazilian legislation for this type of product. The sensory profile obtained for the 4 light formulations developed, clearly showed the tasters' preference for the jelly elaborated with the association of cyclamate and saccharin. Thus, the results revealed good perspectives for the application of this fruit in the food industry.

  18. Characterization of Physical and Thermal Properties of Biofield Treated Neopentyl Glycol

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi , Mahendra Kumar; Tallapragada , Rama Mohan; Branton , Alice; Trivedi , Dahryn; Nayak , Gopal; Mishra , Rakesh; Jana , Snehasis

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Neopentyl glycol (NPG) has been extensively used as solid-solid phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage applications. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment on physical, spectral and thermal properties of NPG. The study was performed in two groups (control and treated). The control group remained as untreated, and treatment group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment. The control and treated NPG ...

  19. USA/FBR program fast flux test facility startup physics and reactor characterization methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.A.; Harris, R.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-09-01

    Final confirmation of much of the engineering mockup work has been achieved in FTR zero-power experiments in February, 1980, and in power demonstration performed in December, 1980, and March, 1981. Final in-core low-power and high-power irradiation of spatially distributed radioactivants will be completed late in 1981. This paper describes physics experiments and present summaries of the extensive results accumulated to date. 53 figures

  20. Electrical and Physical Property Characterization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Ink for Flexible Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    accurately can the 2 ink be printed? How well does the ink adhere to its substrate? How does the substrate affect the adhesion properties? In what...physical characteristics, some of which may be incompatible with inkjet printing, or the Dimatix DMP 2800 specifically. 3.2.1.2 Ink Solvent...The tape test is conducted by applying a flexible adhesive -backed polymer to the fully-dried printed circuit. The tape is then removed and analyzed

  1. Building a mechanistic biogeochemical reaction network for upscaling : Characterization of mass transport limitation between regions of hydrolysis and methanogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Turnhout, A.G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to validate the reaction network with an idealized experiment. We want to show that 1) rate controlling parameters are identifiable from the measured data by inverse modeling, and 2) that this network is able to predict the measured emissions in the experiment given the initial

  2. Synthesis, Physical Characterization and Biological Activity of Some Schiff Base Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajavel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural modification of organic molecule has considerable biological relevance. Further, coordination of a biomolecules to the metal ions significantly alters the effectiveness of the biomolecules. In view of the antimicrobial activity ligand [bis-(2-aminobenzaldehyde] malonoyl dihydrazone], metal complexes with Cu(II, Ni(II, Zn(II and oxovanadium(IV have been synthesized and found to be potential antimicrobial agents. An attempt is also made to correlate the biological activities with geometry of the complexes. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, spectra and cyclicvoltammetric measurements. The structural assessment of the complexes has been carried out based on electronic, infrared and molar conductivity values.

  3. Advanced ceramic composite for high energy resistors : Characterization of electrical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokh, Fattahi; Navid, Tagizadegan; Naser, Tabatabaei; Ahmad, Rashtehizadeh

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to characterize and apply advanced materials to improve the performance of components used in pulse power systems. One area for innovation is the use of bulk electrically conductive ceramics for non-inductive, high energy and high power electrical resistors. Standard Ceramics Inc. has developed a unique silicon carbide structural ceramic composite which exhibits electrical conductivity. The new, new, conductive, bulk ceramic material has a controlled microstructure, which results in improved homogeneity, making the material suitable for use as a non-inductive, high energy resistor

  4. Synthesis and Physical Characterization of Carbon Nano tubes Coated by Conducting Poly pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talib, A.B.Z.A.; Wan Mahmood Mat Yunus; Kasar Behzad; Nayereh Soltani

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the preparation of poly pyrrole multi walled carbon nano tube (PPy/ MWNT) composites by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization. Various ratios of functionalized MWNTs are dispersed in the water, and PPy are then synthesized via in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization on the surface of the carbon nano tubes. The morphology of the resulting complex nano tubes (MWNT-PPY) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The conductivity of each composite showed a maximum in the temperature scale of 120- 160 degree Celsius and then decreased dramatically with the increase of temperature. (author)

  5. Physical and sensory characterization and consumer preference of corn and barley-fed beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismer, W V; Okine, E K; Stein, A; Seibel, M R; Goonewardene, L A

    2008-11-01

    Steaks from corn-fed and barley-fed beef were characterized by a trained panel, which rated corn-fed beef higher (pconsumers preferred (pconsumers showed no preference (p>0.05) for either type of finished beef. Japanese consumers showed a preference (ppreference for cooked corn-fed steaks (p0.05) were observed for Warner-Bratzler shear, marbling scores, cooking losses or Hunter colorimeter values. There was a trend for higher concentrations (p0.10) in mono or polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  7. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang; Lindquist, W. Brent

    2013-01-01

    new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against

  8. Mechanical Analysis of an upscaled version of the Vaporizer (pressure vessel and circulation tubes) of the incineration pilot power plant TEMO-IPP.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerdi, Banan El

    2016-01-01

    To be able to upscale the TEMO-IPP incineration plant to a commercial incineration plant in Tripoli (about40 MW) critical components shall be verified by Finite Element Analysis with the tool Abaqus. The main critical component is the pressure vessel with about 100 bar pressure difference.

  9. Characterization of Thermo-Physical Properties of EVA/ATH: Application to Gasification Experiments and Pyrolysis Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Girardin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of solid polymeric materials is a complex process that involves both chemical and physical phenomena such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, heat transfer, and mass transport of gaseous components. For modeling purposes, it is important to characterize and to quantify the properties driving those phenomena, especially in the case of flame-retarded materials. In this study, protocols have been developed to characterize the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity of an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA flame retarded with aluminum tri-hydroxide (ATH. These properties were measured for the various species identified across the decomposition of the material. Namely, the thermal conductivity was found to decrease as a function of temperature before decomposition whereas the ceramic residue obtained after the decomposition at the steady state exhibits a thermal conductivity as low as 0.2 W/m/K. The heat capacity of the material was also investigated using both isothermal modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and the standard method (ASTM E1269. It was shown that the final residue exhibits a similar behavior to alumina, which is consistent with the decomposition pathway of EVA/ATH. Besides, the two experimental approaches give similar results over the whole range of temperatures. Moreover, the optical properties before decomposition and the heat capacity of the decomposition gases were also analyzed. Those properties were then used as input data for a pyrolysis model in order to predict gasification experiments. Mass losses of gasification experiments were well predicted, thus validating the characterization of the thermo-physical properties of the material.

  10. Characterization of Thermo-Physical Properties of EVA/ATH: Application to Gasification Experiments and Pyrolysis Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, Bertrand; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Duquesne, Sophie; Försth, Michael; Bourbigot, Serge

    2015-11-20

    The pyrolysis of solid polymeric materials is a complex process that involves both chemical and physical phenomena such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, heat transfer, and mass transport of gaseous components. For modeling purposes, it is important to characterize and to quantify the properties driving those phenomena, especially in the case of flame-retarded materials. In this study, protocols have been developed to characterize the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity of an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded with aluminum tri-hydroxide (ATH). These properties were measured for the various species identified across the decomposition of the material. Namely, the thermal conductivity was found to decrease as a function of temperature before decomposition whereas the ceramic residue obtained after the decomposition at the steady state exhibits a thermal conductivity as low as 0.2 W/m/K. The heat capacity of the material was also investigated using both isothermal modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and the standard method (ASTM E1269). It was shown that the final residue exhibits a similar behavior to alumina, which is consistent with the decomposition pathway of EVA/ATH. Besides, the two experimental approaches give similar results over the whole range of temperatures. Moreover, the optical properties before decomposition and the heat capacity of the decomposition gases were also analyzed. Those properties were then used as input data for a pyrolysis model in order to predict gasification experiments. Mass losses of gasification experiments were well predicted, thus validating the characterization of the thermo-physical properties of the material.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  12. Physical chemistry and radiochemistry characterization of sediment dust in Colonia and Soriano provinces in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odino, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Piuma, L.; Reina, E.; Suarez, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work is characterized dust settled in the Departments of Colon ia and Soriano in Uruguay as a result of unusual events that occurred in July 2010. In order to identify the dust settled physicochemical characterization was carried out an analysis by X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) spectrometry and analysis by High Resolution Gamma. With the results obtained by EDXRF was calculated using the enrichment factor matrix Mason. Macroscopic analysis indicated that this is a homogeneous sample of ocher-beige. The microscopic analysis showed the presence of sediment sandy silt with clasts of quartz and feldspar. The chemical composition indicated the presence of an inorganic material composed mainly of Al and Si, Fe, Mn and Ca lesser percentage was observed the presence of S, Cl, P, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As , Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Pb, Th. The enrichment factor calculation showed that the elements As and Zn are enriched by a factor greater than 40. Gamma spectrometry analysis of high resolution and natural radionuclides were identified including the presence of high concentrations of 7Be activity, indicating that such material has been transported by air. Digital simulations were performed using the back trajectory model - Noaa HYSPLIT Model attempt to identify the source of the event. [es

  13. Physical Characterization of Mouse Deep Vein Thrombosis Derived Microparticles by Differential Filtration with Nanopore Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Peramo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of making advancements in the area of pro-thrombotic microparticle characterization in cardiovascular biology, we present a novel method to separate blood circulating microparticles using a membrane-based, nanopore filtration system. In this qualitative study, electron microscopy observations of these pro-thrombotic mouse microparticles, as well as mouse platelets and leukocytes obtained using a mouse inferior vena cava ligation model of deep-vein thrombosis are presented. In particular, we present mouse microparticle morphology and microstructure using SEM and TEM indicating that they appear to be mostly spherical with diameters in the 100 to 350 nm range. The nanopore filtration technique presented is focused on the development of novel methodologies to isolate and characterize blood circulating microparticles that can be used in conjunction with other methodologies. We believe that determination of microparticle size and structure is a critical step for the development of reliable assays with clinical or research application in thrombosis and it will contribute to the field of nanomedicine in thrombosis.

  14. Inhalation toxicology of industrial plutonium and uranium oxide aerosols I. Physical chemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the fabrication of mixed plutonium and uranium oxide fuel, large quantities of dry powders are processed, causing dusty conditions in glove box enclosures. Inadvertent loss of glove box integrity or failure of air filter systems can lead to human inhalation exposure. Powdered samples and aerosol samples of these materials obtained during two fuel fabrication process steps have been obtained. A regimen of physical chemical tests of properties of these materials has been employed to identify physical chemical properties which may influence their biological behavior and dosimetry. Materials to be discussed are 750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the ball milling operation and 1750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the centerless grinding of fuel pellets. Results of x-ray diffraction studies have shown that the powder generated by the centerless grinding of fuel pellets is best described as a solid solution of UO x and PuO x consistent with its temperature history. In vitro dissolution studies of both mixed oxide materials indicate a generally similar dissolution rate for both materials. In one solvent, the material with the higher temperature history dissolves more rapidly. The x-ray diffraction and in vitro dissolution results as well as preliminary results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses will be compared and the implications for the associated biological studies will be discussed. (author)

  15. Characterization of physical and chemical properties of QLARIVIA-line of deuterium depleted Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, Ov. S.; Mladin, C.; Petre, R.M.; Mitu, F.; Costinel, Diana; Vremera, Raluca; Sandru, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    QLARIVIA is the brand-name of Deuterium Depleted Water line of products of drinking water differentiating mainly by the deuterium concentration. It is the result of a national technological transfer project and it is based on an original, patented technology for deuterium depletion from the normal water. The paper presents the measuring and analysis results of the chemical and physical properties of the QLARIVIA brand-line of drinking DDW, as: pH; water hardness; permanganate index; Ca; Mg; Cl - ; SO4 2 - ; NH 4 ; NO 3 - ; NO 2 - , as well as the deuterium concentration determination by mass spectrometry. The analysis has been performed on at least 20 batch-samples, by usual, standardized and/or validated analytical methods, in ISO 17025:2005 accredited laboratories. The results are discussed considering the requirements of the EU directive on drinking water as well as of the Romanian Act on drinking water no. 458/2002 with its supplemental modification by the Act no.363/2004. The conclusion is that QLARIVIA - brand line of drinking DDW fulfills all the official physical and chemical requirements for the drinking water. (authors)

  16. Physical characterization of aerosol particles during the Chinese New Year’s firework events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xin; Gong, Youguo; Geng, Fuhai; Chen, Changhong

    2010-12-01

    Measurements for particles 10 nm to 10 μm were taken using a Wide-range Particle Spectrometer during the Chinese New Year (CNY) celebrations in 2009 in Shanghai, China. These celebrations provided an opportunity to study the number concentration and size distribution of particles in an especial atmospheric pollution situation due to firework displays. The firework activities had a clear contribution to the number concentration of small accumulation mode particles (100-500 nm) and PM 1 mass concentration, with a maximum total number concentration of 3.8 × 10 4 cm -3. A clear shift of particles from nucleation and Aitken mode to small accumulation mode was observed at the peak of the CNY firework event, which can be explained by reduced atmospheric lifetimes of smaller particles via the concept of the coagulation sink. High particle density (2.7 g cm -3) was identified as being particularly characteristic of the firework aerosols. Recalculated fine particles PM 1 exhibited on average above 150 μg m -3 for more than 12 hours, which was a health risk to susceptible individuals. Integral physical parameters of firework aerosols were calculated for understanding their physical properties and further model simulation.

  17. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  18. Lecithin-based microemulsion of a peptide for oral administration: preparation, characterization, and physical stability of the formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilek, Ayşe; Celebi, Nevin; Tirnaksiz, Figen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of our study was to prepare and characterize a stable microemulsion formulation for oral administration of a peptide, e.g., rh-insulin. The microemulsions were prepared using Labrafil M 1944 CS, Phospholipon 90G (lecithin), absolute alcohol, and bidistilled water. Commercially available soybean lecithins (namely, Phospholipon 80, phosphatidylcholine purity 76 +/- 3%, and Phospholipon 90G, phosphatidylcholine purity 93 +/- 3%) were used in the study. The results showed that the phase diagram obtained using a low purity lecithin was not similar to that obtained with a high purity lecithin. We observed that the microemulsion area was wider at the phase diagram obtained with the higher purity lecithin. We found that the extent of the microemulsion region depended upon both the purity of the lecithin and the surfactant/co-surfactant (s/co-s) mixing ratios (K(m)). The rheological studies showed that microemulsions followed a Newtonian behavior. Such physical characteristics as viscosity, turbidity, density, conductivity, refractive index, droplet size, physical appearance, and phase separation of the microemulsion were measured at different temperatures (4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 40 degrees C) during 6 months. The results indicated that the physical characteristics of the developed microemulsions did not change under different storage temperatures (p > 0.05).

  19. Upscaling of dilution and mixing using a trajectory based Spatial Markov random walk model in a periodic flow domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, Nicole L.; Porta, Giovanni M.; Bolster, Diogo

    2017-05-01

    The Spatial Markov Model (SMM) is an upscaled model that has been used successfully to predict effective mean transport across a broad range of hydrologic settings. Here we propose a novel variant of the SMM, applicable to spatially periodic systems. This SMM is built using particle trajectories, rather than travel times. By applying the proposed SMM to a simple benchmark problem we demonstrate that it can predict mean effective transport, when compared to data from fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Next we propose a methodology for using this SMM framework to predict measures of mixing and dilution, that do not just depend on mean concentrations, but are strongly impacted by pore-scale concentration fluctuations. We use information from trajectories of particles to downscale and reconstruct pore-scale approximate concentration fields from which mixing and dilution measures are then calculated. The comparison between measurements from fully resolved simulations and predictions with the SMM agree very favorably.

  20. Effect Of Up-Scaling On The Study Of The Steel/Bentonite Interface In A Deep Geological Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Alvarez, Elena; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Martin, Pedro Luis; Escribano, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Deep geological disposal is the most accepted management option for High Level Nuclear Wastes. The multi-barrier system for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste includes the concept of the spent fuel encapsulated in canisters of carbon steel. Corrosion phenomena affect the integrity of the canister and can modify the chemical environment either at the interface or in the bentonite pore water. The experimental studies conducted by CIEMAT are focused on the iron canister corrosion products interaction with the bentonite system and are based on a series of short term and medium term experiments conceived at different scales, from conventional laboratory experiments and experiments in cylindrical cells, to those specifically designed 3D mock up experiments, the so called 'GAME (Geochemical Mock up experiments) scale'. The results obtained from the up-scaling could be a useful tool to understand the key processes at the steel/bentonite interface and the later modelling work. (authors)

  1. An upscaled two-equation model of transport in porous media through unsteady-state closure of volume averaged formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaynikov, S.; Porta, G.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on a theoretical analysis of nonreactive solute transport in porous media through the volume averaging technique. Darcy-scale transport models based on continuum formulations typically include large scale dispersive processes which are embedded in a pore-scale advection diffusion equation through a Fickian analogy. This formulation has been extensively questioned in the literature due to its inability to depict observed solute breakthrough curves in diverse settings, ranging from the laboratory to the field scales. The heterogeneity of the pore-scale velocity field is one of the key sources of uncertainties giving rise to anomalous (non-Fickian) dispersion in macro-scale porous systems. Some of the models which are employed to interpret observed non-Fickian solute behavior make use of a continuum formulation of the porous system which assumes a two-region description and includes a bimodal velocity distribution. A first class of these models comprises the so-called ''mobile-immobile'' conceptualization, where convective and dispersive transport mechanisms are considered to dominate within a high velocity region (mobile zone), while convective effects are neglected in a low velocity region (immobile zone). The mass exchange between these two regions is assumed to be controlled by a diffusive process and is macroscopically described by a first-order kinetic. An extension of these ideas is the two equation ''mobile-mobile'' model, where both transport mechanisms are taken into account in each region and a first-order mass exchange between regions is employed. Here, we provide an analytical derivation of two region "mobile-mobile" meso-scale models through a rigorous upscaling of the pore-scale advection diffusion equation. Among the available upscaling methodologies, we employ the Volume Averaging technique. In this approach, the heterogeneous porous medium is supposed to be pseudo-periodic, and can be represented through a (spatially) periodic unit cell

  2. Effect Of Up-Scaling On The Study Of The Steel/Bentonite Interface In A Deep Geological Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Alvarez, Elena; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Martin, Pedro Luis; Escribano, Alicia [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Deep geological disposal is the most accepted management option for High Level Nuclear Wastes. The multi-barrier system for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste includes the concept of the spent fuel encapsulated in canisters of carbon steel. Corrosion phenomena affect the integrity of the canister and can modify the chemical environment either at the interface or in the bentonite pore water. The experimental studies conducted by CIEMAT are focused on the iron canister corrosion products interaction with the bentonite system and are based on a series of short term and medium term experiments conceived at different scales, from conventional laboratory experiments and experiments in cylindrical cells, to those specifically designed 3D mock up experiments, the so called 'GAME (Geochemical Mock up experiments) scale'. The results obtained from the up-scaling could be a useful tool to understand the key processes at the steel/bentonite interface and the later modelling work. (authors)

  3. Physical and chemical characterization of urban winter-time aerosols by mobile measurements in Helsinki, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, Liisa; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aurela, Minna; Enroth, Joonas; Carbone, Samara; Saarnio, Karri; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Kousa, Anu; Rönkkö, Topi; Hillamo, Risto

    2017-06-01

    A two-week measurement campaign by a mobile laboratory van was performed in urban environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, in winter 2012, to obtain a comprehensive view on aerosol properties and sources. The abundances and physico-chemical properties of particles varied strongly in time and space, depending on the main sources of aerosols. Four major types of winter aerosol were recognized: 1) clean background aerosol with low particle number (Ntot) and lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentrations due to marine air flows from the Atlantic Ocean; 2) long-range transported (LRT) pollution aerosol due to air flows from eastern Europe where the particles were characterized by the high contribution of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) and inorganic species, particularly sulphate, but low BC contribution, and their size distribution possessed an additional accumulation mode; 3) fresh smoke plumes from residential wood combustion in suburban small houses, these particles were characterized by high biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations; and 4) fresh emissions from traffic while driving on busy streets in the city centre and on the highways during morning rush hours. This aerosol was characterized by high concentration of Ntot, LDSA, small particles in the nucleation mode, as well as high hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and BC concentrations. In general, secondary components (OOA, NO3, NH4, and SO4) dominated the PM1 chemical composition during the LRT episode accounting for 70-80% of the PM1 mass, whereas fresh primary emissions (BC, HOA and BBOA) dominated the local traffic and wood burning emissions. The major individual particle types observed with electron microscopy analysis (TEM/EDX) were mainly related to residential wood combustion (K/S/C-rich, soot, other C-rich particles), traffic (soot, Si/Al-rich, Fe-rich), heavy fuel oil combustion in heat plants or ships (S with V-Ni-Fe), LRT pollutants (S

  4. Upscaling Surface and Subsurface Runoff Process Using a Travel Time Matching Strategy: Application to the Ohio River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Beighley, E.

    2017-12-01

    While hydrologic understanding gained from model assessment and sensitivity analyses continues to grow, computational efficiency is still a challenge for the hydrologic and hydraulic modeling community, especially at continental and global scales. This research presents a runoff flowpath travel-time matching method to upscale hydrologic response characteristics of surface and subsurface runoff from fine to coarse model resolutions. Five model resolutions are investigated in this study: 10, 32, 100, 320, 1000 km2, where model resolution represents the threshold areas used to define the underlying river network and catchment boundaries. Here, the 1 km2 mode resolution is set as the reference model. A case study in the Ohio River Basin (roughly 500,000 km2) is presented using a synthetic SCS 2-year flood event. The velocities of surface and subsurface runoff from Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model operating at 1 km2 resolution is determined on a high-performance computing cluster. Using these simulated velocities and 90-m Digital Elevation Model (DEM), pixel level velocities are determined separately for hillslopes (surface and subsurface) and channels. Cumulative Probability Distributions (CDFs) for surface and subsurface travel times based on the gridded 90-m velocities and conceptualized model units representing individual catchments in the HRR model are matched by adjusting surface roughness and subsurface hydraulic conductivity along HRR hillslopes in the courser model resolutions. The beta distribution is applied to approximate the CDF travel time to reduce pixel-level processing time for large model units. Simulated hydrographs at the outlet of the Ohio River Basin for the five coarser model resolutions are shown to have nearly identical peak discharge and time-to-peak discharge values as compared to the reference model. The proposed upscaling method can reduce the computation time by transferring the hydrologic characteristics captured at fine scales to

  5. A Binomial Modeling Approach for Upscaling Colloid Transport Under Unfavorable Attachment Conditions: Emergent Prediction of Nonmonotonic Retention Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Johnson, William P.

    2018-01-01

    We used a recently developed simple mathematical network model to upscale pore-scale colloid transport information determined under unfavorable attachment conditions. Classical log-linear and nonmonotonic retention profiles, both well-reported under favorable and unfavorable attachment conditions, respectively, emerged from our upscaling. The primary attribute of the network is colloid transfer between bulk pore fluid, the near-surface fluid domain (NSFD), and attachment (treated as irreversible). The network model accounts for colloid transfer to the NSFD of downgradient grains and for reentrainment to bulk pore fluid via diffusion or via expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones (RFSZs). The model describes colloid transport by a sequence of random trials in a one-dimensional (1-D) network of Happel cells, which contain a grain and a pore. Using combinatorial analysis that capitalizes on the binomial coefficient, we derived from the pore-scale information the theoretical residence time distribution of colloids in the network. The transition from log-linear to nonmonotonic retention profiles occurs when the conditions underlying classical filtration theory are not fulfilled, i.e., when an NSFD colloid population is maintained. Then, nonmonotonic retention profiles result potentially both for attached and NSFD colloids. The concentration maxima shift downgradient depending on specific parameter choice. The concentration maxima were also shown to shift downgradient temporally (with continued elution) under conditions where attachment is negligible, explaining experimentally observed downgradient transport of retained concentration maxima of adhesion-deficient bacteria. For the case of zero reentrainment, we develop closed-form, analytical expressions for the shape, and the maximum of the colloid retention profile.

  6. Crystal growth and physical characterization of picolinic acid cocrystallized with dicarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somphon, Weenawan; Haller, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are multicomponent materials containing an active pharmaceutical ingredient with another component in well-defined stoichiometry within the same unit cell. Such cocrystals are important in drug design, particularly for improving physicochemical properties such as solubility, bioavailability, or chemical stability. Picolinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan and is widely used for neuroprotective, immunological, and anti-proliferative effects within the body. In this paper we present cocrystallization experiments of a series of dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, succinic acid, DL-tartaric acid, pimelic acid, and phthalic acid, with picolinic acid. Characterization by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, DSC and TG/DTG analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction show that new compounds are formed, including a 1:1 picolinium tartrate monohydrate, a 2:1 monohydrate adduct of picolinic acid and oxalic acid, and a 2:1 picolinic acid-succinic acid monohydrate cocrystal.

  7. Physical Characterization Of High Amylose/Pectin Mixtures Cross-Linked With Sodium Trimetaphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbinatto, F.M.; Cury, B.S.F.; Evangelista, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Some researches have reported that pectin and high amylose mixtures presented superior mechanical properties in relation to those of the isolated polymers. In this work, mixtures at different ratios (1:4; 1:1) of pectin and high amylose were crosslinked with sodium trimetaphosphate at different degrees by varying reaction conditions. All samples were characterized by rheological and X-ray diffraction analyses. Samples without cross-linker were prepared as control. The oscillatory dynamic tests showed that all samples exhibited predominant elastic behavior, although cross-linked samples presented higher G' values, suggesting that crosslinking by phosphorylation resulted in more strength structures. The diffractograms showed that cross-linked samples underwent structural modifications that resulted in increase of crystallinity due to cross-linking process. (author)

  8. Growth, characterization, and physical properties of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting whiskers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraak, W.; Thiele, P.

    1996-01-01

    Single crystal whiskers of the Bi-based high-T c superconductors have been grown directly from the stoichiometric melt. Conditions for the preferable growth of the (2212) phase and annealing conditions for the conversion from the (2212) phase to the (2223) and (2234) Bi-based superconducting phases are achieved. The orientation and chemical composition of the crystals were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Characteristic structural properties of the whiskers (incommensurable modulation in b-direction, peculiarities of dislocation networks) have been revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Some special features of the broad superconducting transition in multiphase whiskers have been examined by spatially resolved measurements using low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  9. Chemical and physical characterization of Musa sepientum and Musa balbisiana fibers of banana tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinante, Sandra R.; Pacheco, Elen B.A.V.; Visconte, Leila L.Y.; Batista, Luciano do N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the fibers of cavendish and silver banana trunks (Musa sepientum and Musa balbisiana, respectively) concerning their density, lignin and moisture contents, and chemical structure by using the techniques of infrared spectroscopy and low field solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR. From NMR analysis, it was possible to observe the morphological differences between cavendish and silver types of banana fibers. FTIR technique did not allow the observation of any important difference in the banana fibers spectra. The cavendish banana fiber showed higher moisture and lignin contents than the silver banana fiber The NMR technique showed that relaxation times for silver banana fiber were higher than those for cavendish banana fiber, which can be credited to the lower moisture content values found in the silver fibers. (author)

  10. Durability of concrete: characterization and modeling of physical and chemical degradation of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenot, Frederic

    1992-01-01

    Within the frame of nuclear waste management, and more particularly waste storage by confinement in parcels, concrete and geological environment, this research aims at predicting the durability of a concrete paste and of all concrete works. This prediction is based on a material characterization (determination of the thickness and composition of the attacked area) whatever the degradation duration is. The adopted approach is to model concrete lixiviation and to compare model results with experimental results. The model is also used to assess the influence of a great number of parameters, and to simulate non experimented cases. Thus, the author reports a bibliographical study on cement, and presents the equations of a lixiviation model. He reports experiments aimed at verifying modelling hypotheses and at acquiring necessary data. The model is then numerically solved, and applied to an experimental case. Experimental results are compared with modelling results, and a prediction is performed for a 300 year-duration [fr

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of titanium-alginate samples for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morani, L.M.; Ribeiro, A.A.; Oliveira, M.V. de; Dantas, F.M.L., E-mail: marize.varella@int.gov.b [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leao, M.H.M.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The sol-gel technique combined with powder metallurgy may be an alternative to produce titanium parts for bioengineering, with the advantage of eliminating the powder compaction step, which may introduce defects. The present work introduces a system consisted of titanium powder and sodium alginate suspension, which undergoes reticulation in contact with a calcium salt solution, obtaining titanium/calcium alginate hydrogel with granule morphology. The characterization of the raw materials and granules of calcium alginate and titanium/calcium alginate was performed by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The granules topography was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/EDS. Titanium and sodium alginate chemical composition were adequate for use as raw materials, showing that the methodology used is suitable for processing titanium samples for further consolidation by sintering, in order to produce titanium parts. (author)

  12. Characterization of physical, thermal and chemical contributions of sodium bicarbonate particles in extinguishing counterflow nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelliah, H.K.; Krauss, R.H.; Zhou, H.; Lentati, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    Based on laminar, nonpremixed methane-air flames established in a counterflow field, the flame extinction effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate particles is investigated here, both experimentally and numerically. In experiments, particles are separated into varying sizes (with the range of each size group approximately 10 {micro}m), and are introduced with the air stream. Flame extinction strain rates estimated using the measured nozzle exit velocities and separation distance are reported, as well as limited comparisons with LDV data (latter are mainly for calibration of the system). Numerical flame extinction results are also reported using a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model previously developed for characterization of the flame extinction mechanism of fine-water droplets in a counterflow field. Comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicates a similar trend with particular size variation, but uncertainties in the particle decomposition model employed precludes any absolute comparisons at this time.

  13. Maillard Reaction in Natural Rubber Latex: Characterization and Physical Properties of Solid Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Montha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction in Natural Rubber (NR latex was investigated by treating fresh NR latex with glutaraldehyde (C5H8O2 in amounts of 0, 50, 100, and 200 mmol/kg of latex. Protein cross-linking in fresh NR latex and solid NR was confirmed by using sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR spectroscopy, respectively. It was found that degree of protein cross-linking in NR increased with increasing C5H8O2 concentration. Physical properties of untreated and treated NR substances in terms of gel content, initial Wallace plasticity (P0, plasticity retention index (PRI, Mooney viscosity, and tensile strength were carefully explored. Results clearly showed that the Maillard cross-linking of proteins had remarkable effect on bulk NR properties, that is, solvent resistance, hardness, resistance to oxidation, rheological behavior, and resistance to stretching out.

  14. The physics teacher in the classroom: an instrument to characterize classroom practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesuína L. A. Pacca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of analyzing and interpreting physics teachers’ performance in the classroom, we elaborated an analysis instrument with five dimensions which aim to describe – i the strategies chosen to conduct learning, ii the abilities mobilized, iii the attitudes in the interaction with students, iv the evaluation the teacher makes of his work and v the meta-evaluation of his practice. The instrument was constructed from constructivist ideas of teaching and learning and empirical data from teachers’ statements about their classes. Through a to and from process we sought coherence of the adopted theory with the nature of data about teachers’ performance. The broader purpose is to provide ground for teachers’ educators about difficulties teachers may find when trying to modify their practices during a professional development program.

  15. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Thomas G; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-06-05

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-Inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5 nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4 nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical Characterization of Natural Straw Fibers as Aggregates for Construction Materials Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouasker, Marwen; Belayachi, Naima; Hoxha, Dashnor; Al-Mukhtar, Muzahim

    2014-04-11

    The aim of this paper is to find out new alternative materials that respond to sustainable development criteria. For this purpose, an original utilization of straw for the design of lightweight aggregate concretes is proposed. Four types of straw were used: three wheat straws and a barley straw. In the present study, the morphology and the porosity of the different straw aggregates was studied by SEM in order to understand their effects on the capillary structure and the hygroscopic behavior. The physical properties such as sorption-desorption isotherms, water absorption coefficient, pH, electrical conductivity and thermo-gravimetric analysis were also studied. As a result, it has been found that this new vegetable material has a very low bulk density, a high water absorption capacity and an excellent hydric regulator. The introduction of the straw in the water tends to make the environment more basic; this observation can slow carbonation of the binder matrix in the presence of the straw.

  17. Characterization of bead trajectories through the draft tube of a turbine physical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinstry, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) makes extensive use of 1:25 scale Plexiglass models of hydroelectric turbines along the Columbia River to study turbine hydraulic performance and to identify potential hazards for fish passing through the turbines. Plastic beads are sent through the models and imaging has been done with laser Doppler velocimetry and high-speed videography to measure flow field variables and to study the probable paths of fish through the turbine units. Understanding has been limited by the lack of data showing actual bead trajectories in three dimensions (3-D) and the lack of quantified velocity, acceleration, and other kinematics describing the trajectories of beads as they pass through the physical models.

  18. Determinants of physical activity in America: a first characterization of physical activity profile using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ming-Chih Jeffrey; Jarosz, Renata; Goldin, Michael; Patel, Amy; Smuck, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    To develop and implement methodologies for characterizing accelerometry-derived patterns of physical activity (PA) in the United States in relation to demographics, anthropometrics, behaviors, and comorbidities using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dataset. Retrospective analysis of nationally representative database. Computer-generated modeling in silico. A total of 6329 adults in the United States from the NHANES 2003-2004 database. To discover subtle multivariate signal in the dynamic and noisy accelerometry data, we developed a novel approach, termed discretized multiple adaptive regression and implemented the algorithm in SAS 9.2 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Demographic, anthropometric, comorbidity, and behavioral variables. The intensity of PA decreased with both increased age and increased body mass index. Both greater education and greater income correlate with increased activity over short durations and reduced activity intensity over long durations. Numerous predictors demonstrated effects within activity ranges that may be masked by use of the standard activity intensity intervals. These include age, one of the most robust variables, where we discovered decreasing activities inside the moderate activity range. It also includes gender, where women compared with men have increased proportions of active times up to the center of light activity range, and income greater than $45,000, where a complex effect is seen with little correspondence to existing cut-points. The results presented in this study suggest that the method of multiple regression and heat map visualization can generate insights otherwise hidden in large datasets such as NHANES. A review of the provided heat maps reveals the trends discussed previously involving demographic, anthropometric, comorbidity, and behavioral variables. It also demonstrates the power of accelerometry to expose alterations in PA. Ultimately, this study provides a US population-based norm to

  19. Physical and mechanical characterization of gypsum boards containing phase change materials for latent heat storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver-Ramírez, A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design and manufacture of a gypsum board which, despite its 45 % wt content of phase change materials, meets the minimum physical and mechanical requirements laid down in the legislation on gypsum plasters (Spanish and European standard UNE EN 13279 and Spanish specifications for gypsum acceptance, RY 85. Under this design, a one-metre square, 1.5-cm thick board contains 4.75 kg of PCM, much more than in any prior drylining (the maximum attained to date is 3 kg per m2. The mechanical and physical characteristics of this new composite were previously improved with two joint-action additives: polypropylene fibres and melamine formaldehyde as a dispersing agent. In the 20-30 ºC temperature range, a gypsum board 1.5 cm thick containing this percentage of PCMs can store five times more thermal energy than conventional plasterboard of the same thickness, and the same amount of energy as half-foot hollow brick masonry.

    En esta investigación se ha diseñado y fabricado un panel de escayola que incorpora un 45% en peso de material de cambio de fase, manteniendo las propiedades físicas y mecánicas exigidas en la normativa de aplicación para yesos de construcción (UNE EN 13279 y referencias a la RY 85. Así, un panel de 1,0 m2 y 1,5 cm de espesor, contiene 4,75 kg de PCM, cantidad muy superior a la conseguida hasta la fecha (3 kg/m2. Para ello se ha mejorado previamente sus prestaciones mecánicas y físicas mediante adiciones binarias: fibras de polipropileno y dispersión de melanina formaldehído. Este porcentaje es capaz de almacenar en 1,5 cm de espesor cinco veces la energía térmica de un panel de cartón yeso con el mismo espesor y la misma cantidad que una fábrica de 1/2 pie de ladrillo hueco, en el rango de temperaturas próximas a la de confort (20-30 ºC.

  20. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NEUROLOGICAL INJURY IN AN AVIAN MODEL OF PRIMARY GENERALIZED EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Kendall

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study was undertaken to determine if the epileptic chicken phenotype exhibited unique physical and chemical neurological changes. Methods Quantitative 1H-MRI/MRS measurements were performed on adult control (Rr and epileptic (rr chickens. The metrics included nuclear relaxation rate, diffusion rate and concentration of metabolites associated with neuronal cells. Comparisons were performed using Students t or Mann-Whitney tests according to the data distribution. Results Proton density measurements detected no significant difference in density among the cerebral hemispheres and optic lobes within the control and epi birds, nor between bird phenotypes. Thus, within experimental error it appears that brain tissue density is similar in adult control and epi birds. Volume calculation from images spanning the entire brain confirmed that a consistent feature of the epi genotype was megalencephaly. Nuclear relaxation (T2 values obtained for the control bird were within the normal variant range for neuronal tissue. However, T2's of the epi birds were significantly higher than that of the controls ((158 ms versus 123 ms. Similarly, in the diffusion data there was no apparent hemispheric bias. The optic lobes of the control animals exhibited an apparent diffusion coefficient significantly lower than that found for the cerebrum (Table 2. Interestingly, this differential was not apparent in the epi birds. The control birds across all regions of interest exhibited an ADC significantly less than that of the epi birds. Quantitative 1Hspectroscopy using tissue extracts collected immediately after sacrifice revealed phenotypic differences in lactate, glutamate, creatine and NAA but not GABA. A reduction in NAA was detected in the cerebrum of epi birds. This is in agreement with the generally held view that seizure activity causes loss of neurones, thus the loss of N-acetyl aspartate. HPLC data corroborated the spectroscopic NAA findings but also

  1. Radioisotope ratios in characterizing the movement of different physical and chemical species through natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.E.; Perkins, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization studies of reactor effluent water radionuclides at the Hanford N-Reactor are providing important information describing the mobility of radionuclides in freshwater environments. At N-Reactor, cooling water containing a wide spectrum of radionuclides in various physicochemical forms is discharged to a seepage trench located near the reactor. The effluent water migrates through a soil bank between the trench and the Columbia River, and a portion of the water emerges as seepage springs along the bank of the Columbia River near the reactor. The mobility of effluent water radionuclides during transport through the soil is greatly dependent upon the physicochemical forms of the radionuclides. Radionuclides in particulate and cationic forms are nearly quantitatively retained in the soil bank by sorption onto mineral phases; whereas, radionuclides in anionic and soluble nonionic forms are relatively mobile and are retained by the soil to a much lesser degree. Several radionuclides such as 60 Co, 103-106 Ru and 122-124-125 Sb are present in reactor effluent water partitioned among particulate, cationic, anionic and non-ionic species. However, as these radionuclides migrate through the woil bank their particulate and cationic forms are retained, and predominantly anionic and nonionic forms emerged in the seepage springs. Studies of the behavior of these radionuclides are providing data for assessing present rad-waste treatment processes and in improving future processes for reducing environmental releases of radionuclides from nuclear installations. (author)

  2. Formulation and Physical Characterization of Microemulsions Based Carboxymethyl Cellulose as Vitamin C Carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suria Ramli; Safiah Mohd Jaafar; Muhd Asri Abd Sisak; Norhidayu Zainuddin; Irman Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to develop a cellulose derivative based microemulsion for transdermal delivery system. In this research, cellulose derivative used is carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) that was converted from cellulose by etherification reaction and analysed by FTIR instrument. The degree of substitution (DS) for carboxymethyl cellulose is 0.492. Microemulsion system consists of oleic acid as oil phase, Tween 20 as surfactant and propylene glycol as co-surfactant. The active ingredient used in this system is vitamin C. Determination of microemulsion area in the ternary phase diagram was done by titration method. From the result, microemulsion system with surfactant/co-surfactant ratio (K m =3:1) produced the largest surface area in the ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions with and without vitamin C and CMC were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrical conductivity and rheometer. For size particle analysis, system without vitamin C and CMC have microemulsion droplet size between 20-200 nm. Based on the electrical conductivity and viscosity test, phase transition occurred in the microemulsion system from water-in-oil (w/o) to bicontinuous phase at 20 wt. % water percentage. The stability test showed microemulsion systems with the percentage of water up to 30 wt. % were stable at temperatures 4, 25 and 40 degree Celsius upon three weeks storage. (author)

  3. Cuttlefish bone scaffold for tissue engineering: a novel hydrothermal transformation, chemical-physical, and biological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Elisa; Mele, Silvia; Foltran, Ismaela; Lesci, Isidoro Giorgio; Roveri, Norberto; Sabatino, Piera; Rimondini, Lia

    2012-09-27

    Natural resources are receiving growing interest because of their possible conversion from a cheap and easily available material into a biomedical product. Cuttlefish bone from Sepia Officinalis was investigated in order to obtain an hydroxyapatite porous scaffold using hydrothermal transformation. Complete conversion of the previous calcium carbonate (aragonite) phase into a calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite) phase was performed with an hydrothermal transformation at 200 °C (~ 15 atm), for four hours, with an aqueous solution of KH2PO4 in order to set the molar ratio Ca/P = 10/6 in a reactor (Parr 4382). The complete conversion was then analyzed by TGA, ATR-FTIR, x-ray diffraction, and SEM. Moreover, the material was biologically investigated with MC3T3-E1 in static cultures, using both osteogenic and maintenance media. The expression of osteogenic markers as ALP and osteocalcin and the cell proliferation were investigated. Cuttlefish bone has been successfully transformed from calcium carbonate into calcium phosphate. Biological characterization revealed that osteogenic markers are expressed using both osteogenic and maintenance conditions. Cell proliferation is influenced by the static culture condition used for this three-dimensional scaffold. The new scaffold composed by hydroxyapatite and derived for a natural source presents good biocompatibility and can be used for further investigations using dynamic cultures in order to improve cell proliferation and differentiation for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Sustainability assessment and physical characterization of pervious concrete pavement made with GGBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hassan Hilal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of pervious concrete as sustainable and environment-friendly paving materials is primarily owed to its ability to reduce pavement runoff. The mechanical and transport properties of pervious concrete with 50% ground-granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS replacement are examined in this paper. Open-graded 10 mm and 20 mm aggregates were used to attain porosity of 10%, 15%, and 20%. Polypropylene short cut fibers were added to the mix. The clogging potential of pervious concrete exposed to dust was also investigated. The results indicated that increasing the porosity led to a decrease in compressive and tensile strength. Similar findings were reported when smaller aggregates were used. The fiber addition was only effective in low-porosity concrete. Permeability, characterized by its coefficient k, was proportional to porosity and inversely proportional to aggregate size. After 40-year simulated dust exposure, the concrete permeability could be restored with water flushing maintenance process. In comparison to ordinary Portland cement (OPC concrete, pervious concrete incorporating GGBS is a more sustainable paving solution, offering a reduction in heat island effect and electricity consumption while also alleviating carbon emissions.

  5. Design and characterization of a small multipurpose capacitor bank for plasma physics and pulsed power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarifeno, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed power technologies essentially refer to power sources providing a huge amount of energy during very short times. These technologies have applications in several fields of science and engineering: production of transient electrical discharges and plasmas, generation of radiation and ion beams, high density matter, production of pulsed high magnetic fields and shock waves. The achievements of these fields are relevant for several economical and industrial areas: electronics, microlithography, mining, medicine, agriculture, defense, materials, among others. In the present work, the design and construction of a small capacitor bank conceived for carrying out a variety of research activities are presented. The main features of this system are 1.2 μF of capacity, 30 kV maximum charge voltage, 33 nH inductance, 500 J of energy, 180 kA at the peak of current and dI/dt∼10 11 A s -1 . The procedure and results related to the characterization of the capacitor bank are presented. Possible applications of this capacitor bank to scaling studies related to plasma focus and Z-pinch, high pulsed magnetic field generation and rock fragmentation by electrical discharges are mentioned.

  6. Human cytosolic thymidine kinase: purification and physical characterization of the enzyme from HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, J.L.; Kelly, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mammalian cytosolic thymidine kinase is one of a number of enzymes involved in DNA replication whose activities increase dramatically during S phase of the cell cycle. As a first step in defining the mechanisms that control the S phase induction of thymidine kinase activity, the authors have purified the human enzyme from HeLa cells and raised a specific immune serum against the purified protein. The enzyme was isolated from cells arrested in S phase by treatment with methotrexate and purified to near homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. Stabilization of the purified enzyme was achieved by the addition of digitonin. An electrophoretic R/sub m/ of 0.2 in nondenaturing gels characterizes the purified enzyme activity as cytosolic thymidine kinase. The enzyme has a Stoke's radius of 40 A determined by gel filtration and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.5 S determined by glycerol gradient sedimentation. Based on these hydrodynamic values, a native molecular weight of 96,000 was calculated for the purified enzyme. When electrophoresed in denaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels under reducing conditions, the most purified enzyme fraction was found to contain one predominant polypeptide of M/sub r/ = 24,000. Several lines of evidence indicate that this polypeptide is responsible for thymidine kinase enzymatic activity

  7. Physical and chemical characterization of the pulp of different varieties of avocado targeting oil extraction potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinéia Dotti Mooz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of avocado pulp of four different varieties (Avocado, Guatemala, Dickinson, and Butter pear and to identify which has the greatest potential for oil extraction. Fresh avocado pulp was characterized by moisture, protein, fat, ash, carbohydrates and energy contents were determined. The carotenoids and chlorophyll contents were determined by the organic solvent extraction method. The results showed significant differences in the composition of the fruit when varieties are compared. However, the striking feature in all varieties is high lipid content; Avocado and Dickinson are the most suitable varieties for oil extraction, taking into account moisture content and the levels of lipids in the pulp. Moreover, it could be said that the variety Dickinson is the most affected by the parameters evaluated in terms of overall quality. Chlorophyll and carotenoids, fat-soluble pigments, showed a negative correlation with respect to lipids since it could be related to its function in the fruit. The varieties Avocado and Dickinson are an alternative to oil extraction having great commercial potential to be exploited thus avoiding waste and increasing farmers’ income.

  8. Preparation, Physical-Chemical Characterization, and Cytocompatibility of Polymeric Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khashaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control. Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5–12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  9. Face-Sheet Quality Analysis and Thermo-Physical Property Characterization of OOA and Autoclave Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Lort, Richard D., III; Zimmerman, Thomas J.; Sutter, James K.; Pelham, Larry I.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased application of polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials in large vehicle structures requires consideration of non-autoclave manufacturing technology. The NASA Composites for Exploration project, and its predecessor, Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials project, were tasked with the development of materials and manufacturing processes for structures that will perform in a heavy-lift-launch vehicle environment. Both autoclave and out of autoclave processable materials were considered. Large PMC structures envisioned for such a vehicle included the payload shroud and the interstage connector. In this study, composite sandwich panels representing 1/16th segments of the barrel section of the Ares V rocket fairing were prepared as 1.8 m x 2.4 m sections of the 10 m diameter arc segment. IM7/977-3 was used as the face-sheet prepreg of the autoclave processed panels and T40-800B/5320-1 for the out of autoclave panels. The core was 49.7 kg/sq m (3.1 lb/cu ft (pcf)) aluminum honeycomb. Face-sheets were fabricated by automated tape laying 153 mm wide unidirectional tape. This work details analysis of the manufactured panels where face-sheet quality was characterized by optical microscopy, cured ply thickness measurements, acid digestion, and thermal analysis.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of adsorbed protein onto gold electrode functionalized with Tunisian coral and nacre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, Samir; Bouchemi, Meryem; Slimane, Noureddine; Azari, Zitouni

    2013-01-01

    Bone substitutes are more and more used in bone surgery because of their biologic safety, clinic efficiency and facility to synthesize. Bone substitutes with active osteogenic properties, associating biomaterials with organic macromolecule components of the extracellular matrix (protein, GAG) are recommended. Nevertheless, we should have a simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the material. Natural coral and nacre have been found to be impressive bone graft substitutes. In this work, we characterize nacre and coral powder using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, adsorbed to these biomaterial surfaces. In order to understand the nacre/coral-protein interfacial compatibility, it is necessary to investigate the wettability. - Highlights: ► The structural and physico-chemical properties of material operated as a bone substitute. ► This study investigated the adsorption of BSA onto coral and nacre. ► X-ray diffraction analysis of coral and nacre. ► Simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the biomaterial.

  11. Cassava starch films containing acetylated starch nanoparticles as reinforcement: Physical and mechanical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Ana Paula; Mali, Suzana; Romero, Natália; de Carvalho, Gizilene Maria

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the use of acetylated starch nanoparticles (NPAac) as reinforcement in thermoplastic starch films. NPAac with an average size of approximately 500 nm were obtained by nanoprecipitation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that NPAac are more thermally stable and essentially amorphous when compared with acetylated starch. Thermoplastic starch films with different proportions of NPAac (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 10.0%, w/w) were obtained and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water vapor permeability (WVP), adsorption isotherms, TGA and mechanical tests. The inclusion of reinforcement caused changes in film properties: WVP was lowered by 41% for film with 1.5% (w/w) of NPAac and moisture adsorption by 33% for film with 10% (w/w) of NPAac; and the Young's modulus and thermal stability were increased by 162% and 15%, respectively, for film with 0.5% (w/w) of NPAac compared to the starch film without the addition of NPAac. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical and chemical characterization of adsorbed protein onto gold electrode functionalized with Tunisian coral and nacre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, Samir, E-mail: samir.hamza@insat.rnu.tn [Biomaterials and Biomechanics Laboratory, National Institute M.T. Kassab of Orthopedic, 2010 La Manouba, Tunis (Tunisia); National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, Centre Urbain Nord, Box 676, 1080 Tunis cedex (Tunisia); Bouchemi, Meryem, E-mail: bouchemimeryem@yahoo.fr [National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, Centre Urbain Nord, Box 676, 1080 Tunis cedex (Tunisia); Slimane, Noureddine, E-mail: labiomecanique@yahoo.fr [Biomaterials and Biomechanics Laboratory, National Institute M.T. Kassab of Orthopedic, 2010 La Manouba, Tunis (Tunisia); Azari, Zitouni, E-mail: azari@univ-metz.fr [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Polymer and Structures Mechanics, National School of Engineers of Metz, France, 1 route d' Ars Laquenexy, CS 65820 57078 Metz cedex 03 (France)

    2013-01-01

    Bone substitutes are more and more used in bone surgery because of their biologic safety, clinic efficiency and facility to synthesize. Bone substitutes with active osteogenic properties, associating biomaterials with organic macromolecule components of the extracellular matrix (protein, GAG) are recommended. Nevertheless, we should have a simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the material. Natural coral and nacre have been found to be impressive bone graft substitutes. In this work, we characterize nacre and coral powder using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, adsorbed to these biomaterial surfaces. In order to understand the nacre/coral-protein interfacial compatibility, it is necessary to investigate the wettability. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and physico-chemical properties of material operated as a bone substitute. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study investigated the adsorption of BSA onto coral and nacre. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffraction analysis of coral and nacre. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the biomaterial.

  13. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Lone

    Full Text Available Abstract The germination characteristics of the native cactus species are poorly known, being the temperature and the light the factors that the most interferes in that process. Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres. The tested constant temperatures were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and the alternate of 20-30 °C and 25-35 °C in a photoperiod of 10 hours, and with determination of the most appropriate temperature, the germination was tested in light absence. The germination percentage, the index of germination speed and medium time of germination were evaluated. For R. floccosa, the highest germination percentage was at 20 °C. For R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the highest germination percentages occurred in 15 °C and 20 °C. There was correlation to germination percentage between the three species, indicating that they had similar germination behavior. Total absence of germination was verified for the three species in condition of light absence. In conclusion, the temperature of 20 °C is the most suitable for the seed germination of R. floccosa. For the species R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the temperatures of 15 and 20 °C are the most suitable.

  14. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae) fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, A B; Colombo, R C; Andrade, B L G; Takahashi, L S A; Faria, R T

    2016-06-01

    The germination characteristics of the native cactus species are poorly known, being the temperature and the light the factors that the most interferes in that process. Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres. The tested constant temperatures were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and the alternate of 20-30 °C and 25-35 °C in a photoperiod of 10 hours, and with determination of the most appropriate temperature, the germination was tested in light absence. The germination percentage, the index of germination speed and medium time of germination were evaluated. For R. floccosa, the highest germination percentage was at 20 °C. For R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the highest germination percentages occurred in 15 °C and 20 °C. There was correlation to germination percentage between the three species, indicating that they had similar germination behavior. Total absence of germination was verified for the three species in condition of light absence. In conclusion, the temperature of 20 °C is the most suitable for the seed germination of R. floccosa. For the species R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the temperatures of 15 and 20 °C are the most suitable.

  15. Model Analytical Development for Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characterization of Momordica charantia Vegetable Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; Santos, Ravely Lucena; Júnior, Fernando José de Lima Ramos; da Silva, Karla Monik Alves; de Souza, Fabio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a species cultivated throughout the world and widely used in folk medicine, and its medicinal benefits are well documented, especially its pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial activities. Analytical methods have been used to aid in the characterization of compounds derived from plant drug extracts and their products. This paper developed a methodological model to evaluate the integrity of the vegetable drug M. charantia in different particle sizes, using different analytical methods. M. charantia was collected in the semiarid region of Paraíba, Brazil. The herbal medicine raw material derived from the leaves and fruits in different particle sizes was analyzed using thermoanalytical techniques as thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PYR-GC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), in addition to the determination of antimicrobial activity. The different particle surface area among the samples was differentiated by the techniques. DTA and TG were used for assessing thermal and kinetic parameters and PYR-GC/MS was used for degradation products chromatographic identification through the pyrograms. The infusions obtained from the fruit and leaves of Momordica charantia presented antimicrobial activity. PMID:27579215

  16. Fabrication and characterization of Ni-YSZ anode functional coatings by electron beam physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, B.; Sun, Y.; He, X.D.; Peng, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of NiO-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) coatings, respectively with uniform and gradient distributions of NiO content along the coating thickness direction, were prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) via adjusting electron beam currents. Then uniform and graded Ni-YSZ coatings were obtained from corresponding NiO-YSZ coatings after a reduction treatment. For uniform Ni-YSZ coating, the composition and porosity distributions along the coating thickness were uniform. The specific surface area and total pore volume for this coating could reach up to 4.330 m 2 g -1 and 0.0346 cm 3 g -1 respectively. The area specific resistance (ASR) of this coating kept increasing with the rise in temperature and an ASR of 2.1 x 10 -5 Ω cm 2 was obtained at 600 o C. For graded Ni-YSZ coating, a gradient in Ni content and porosity was realized along the coating thickness. A high porosity of up to 33% was achieved in the part of the coating close to the substrate, while a low porosity of 10% was obtained in the part close to coating surface.

  17. Effects of representation on students solving physics problems: A fine-grained characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick B. Kohl

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent papers document that student problem-solving competence varies (often strongly with representational format, and that there are significant differences between the effects that traditional and reform-based instructional environments have on these competences [Kohl and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 1, 010104 (2005; Kohl and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 2, 010102 (2006]. These studies focused on large-lecture introductory physics courses, and included aggregate data on student performance on quizzes and homeworks. In this paper, we complement previous papers with finer-grained in-depth problem-solving interviews. In 16 interviews of students drawn from these classes, we investigate in more detail how and when student problem-solving performance varies with problem representation (verbal, mathematical, graphical, or pictorial. We find that student strategy often varies with representation, and that in this environment students who show more strategy variation tend to perform more poorly. We also verify that student performance depends sensitively on the particular combination of representation, topic, and student prior knowledge. Finally, we confirm that students have generally robust opinions of their representational skills, and that these opinions correlate poorly with their actual performances.

  18. Legal, Physical and Biotic Characterization of Açu Lagoon State Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxoel Barros Costa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since its initial human occupation, the Atlantic Forest suffers from impacts. The damage worsened with the subsequent colonization and exploitation of the area for economic and industrial purposes. In the state of Rio de Janeiro, the sandbank is the most threatened of all ecosystems that make up this biome due to its location in the coastal areas. Currently, there is less than 10% of its original area. The North Fluminense region has large remnants of sandbank. For years, the possibility of creating an Environmental Protection Area that would encompass this area was considered. The Decree 43.522/2012 establishes the creation of Açu Lagoon State Park, which encompasses the Boa Vista Marsh, the Açu Lagoon and part of the Salgada Lagoon within its boundaries, an area with a range of conserved sandbank vegetation, ponds, lagoons, streams that are of great environmental importance to the region. This review aims to make a general analysis from the data collected about the different physical and biotic features of this park, besides the legal parameters that govern it.

  19. Characterization of Chemical and Physical Properties of Hydroxypropylated and Cross-linked Arrowroot (Marantha arundinacea Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijanti Rahaju Maulani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern food industry and a variety of food products require tolerant starch as raw material for processing in a broad range of techniques, from preparation to storage and distribution. Dual modification of arrowroot starch using hydroxypropylation and cross-linking was carried out to overcome the lack of native arrowroot starch in food processing application. The modifications applied were: combined propylene oxide (8%, 10%, and 12%; sodium tri meta phosphate/STMP (1%, 2%, and 3%; and sodium tri poly phosphate/STPP (4%, 5%, and 6%. These modifications significantly affected the composition of the amylose and amylopectin and the amount of phosphorus in the granules. Higher amounts of phosphate salt gave a higher phosphorus content, which increased the degree of substitution (DS and the degree of cross-link. Arrowroot starch that was modified using a concentration of 8-10% propylene oxide and 1-2% STMP : 3-5% STPP produced a starch with < 0.4% phosphorus content. A higher concentration of propylene oxide provided a higher degree of hydroxypropyl. The changed physical properties of the modified granular arrowroot starch were examined through SEM testing, and its changed crystalline patterns through X-ray diffraction measurements. Especially, provision of a high concentration of propylene oxide (12% combined with 3% STMP : 6% STPP affected the granular morphology and the crystallinity.

  20. Boron carbide reinforced aluminium matrix composite: Physical, mechanical characterization and mathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvanimoghaddam, K.; Khayyam, H.; Abdizadeh, H.; Karbalaei Akbari, M.; Pakseresht, A.H.; Ghasali, E.; Naebe, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the manufacturing of aluminium–boron carbide composites using the stir casting method. Mechanical and physical properties tests to obtain hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and density are performed after solidification of specimens. The results show that hardness and tensile strength of aluminium based composite are higher than monolithic metal. Increasing the volume fraction of B_4C, enhances the tensile strength and hardness of the composite; however over-loading of B_4C caused particle agglomeration, rejection from molten metal and migration to slag. This phenomenon decreases the tensile strength and hardness of the aluminium based composite samples cast at 800 °C. For Al-15 vol% B_4C samples, the ultimate tensile strength and Vickers hardness of the samples that were cast at 1000 °C, are the highest among all composites. To predict the mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composites, two key prediction modelling methods including Neural Network learned by Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm (NN-LMA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) models are constructed based on experimental data. Although the results revealed that both mathematical models of mechanical properties of Al–B_4C are reliable with a high level of accuracy, the TPS models predict the hardness and tensile strength values with less error compared to NN-LMA models.

  1. Electrical characterization of 6H-SiC grown by physical vapor transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaremba, G., E-mail: gzaremba@ite.waw.p [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Analysis of Semiconductor Nanostructures, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kaniewska, M.; Jung, W. [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Analysis of Semiconductor Nanostructures, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Guziewicz, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Semiconductor Processing for Photonics, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Grasza, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-11-25

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements have been used to study the electrical properties of electron traps in n-type 6H-silicon carbide (SiC) grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) technique, designed as Schottky diodes. Ir Schottky- and Ni ohmic-contacts were deposited by sputtering. Current versus voltage (I-V) measurements showed that sputter deposition of the Schottky contact yields diodes with a reduced barrier height and poor rectification characteristics. Four main electron traps revealed in DLTS spectra have activation energies at 0. 39, 0.41, 0,66, and 0.74 eV below the conduction band. Based on a comparison made with electron traps reported in the literature, we conclude that three of them are well-known traps found in the as-grown or irradiated material. There was no emission signature in the literature to make such a correspondence for the trap at 0.74 eV. Strongly nonhomogenous spatial distribution with a tendency of the trap to accumulation at the surface was found by DLTS and C-V profiling. This together with the fact that the trap at 0.74 eV has not been previously reported in as-grown or processed material makes it possible that the trap is sputter deposition induced defect.

  2. DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A BIOCOMPATIBLE PHYSICAL HYDROGEL BASED ON SCLEROGLUCAN FOR TOPICAL DRUG DELIVERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicelli, Patrizia; Varani, Gabriele; Pacelli, Settimio; Ogliani, Elisa; Nardoni, Martina; Petralito, Stefania; Adrover, Alessandra; Casadei, Maria Antonietta

    2017-10-15

    Physical hydrogels of a high-carboxymethylated derivative of scleroglucan (Scl-CM 300 ) were investigated as potential systems for topical drug delivery using three different therapeutic molecules (fluconazole, diclofenac and betamethasone). Rheological tests were carried out on drug-loaded hydrogels along with in-vitro release studies in a vertical Franz cell, in order to investigate if and how different drugs may influence the rheological and release properties of Scl-CM 300 hydrogels. Experimental results and theoretical modeling highlighted that, in the absence of drug/polymer interactions (as for fluconazole and betamethasone) Scl-CM 300 matrices offer negligible resistance to drug diffusion and a Fickian transport model can be adopted to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient in the swollen hydrogel. The presence of weak drug/hydrogel chemical bonds (as for diclofenac), confirmed by frequency sweep tests, slow down the drug release kinetics and a non-Fickian two-phase transport model has to be adopted. In-vivo experiments on rabbits evidenced optimal skin tolerability of Scl-CM 300 hydrogels after topical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of PbWO4 crystals for high-energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. J.; Park, H.; Kim, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    High-energy physics (HEP) experiments have employed many new types of scintillators. Specifically, bismuth germanate, thallium-doped cesium iodide, and lead tungstate (PbWO4, PWO) have been used for the L3 experiment; CLEO II, Belle and BES-III; and CMS, respectively. PWO has particularly beneficial properties, such as high density, fast decay time, short radiation length and radiation hardness. In this study, we tested the PWO crystals at low temperatures to determine their applicability in future calorimeters. Various crystals from the Proton Antiproton Annihilations at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment in Giessen, the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant (BTCP) in Russia and by Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS) in China were investigated. We studied the scintillation properties of PWO crystals, such as their X-ray luminescence, relative light yields, absolute light yields, energy resolutions, decay times and longitudinal uniformities of their light yields. In addition, we measured the temperature dependences of the light yields and decay times by using a 137Cs γ-ray source. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals consisted of a broad band from 350 nm to 700 nm, and the peak emission wavelength in each spectrum was 420 nm. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals from SICCAS were slightly shifted to longer wavelengths compared with those of the crystals from the other institutions.

  4. Cementation feasibility of a uranium-thorium based solution by physical and mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentiero, R.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.

    2002-01-01

    By reprocessing Elk River nuclear fuel, at the ENEA ITREC Plant (South of Italy), about 3 m 3 of Uranium-Thorium based solution were produced. Previously considered an intermediate product to be further treated to recover U and Th, it is now being considered a waste, due to considerable content of fission products and to phasing out of the Italian nuclear industry. Together with other treatment options, a conditioning process in cement matrix is being evaluated, supported by some chemical, physical and mechanical tests on samples prepared with simulated waste. The main components selected to simulate the real solution were thorium nitrate (at two different concentrations), ferrous nitrate and nitric acid. This solution has been neutralized with sodium carbonate (at two different concentration) and cemented by means of a properly defined formulation. Pozzolanic blend cement, at different water to cement ratio, with and without a silica type additive, has been investigated. Cubic samples were subjected to compression tests and repeated freeze-thaw cycles followed by compression tests. Cylindrical samples were subjected to a leach test (according. to the tn ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard). The obtained results are above the minimum acceptance values established by the Italian authority. The evaluated properties are the first important elements to estimate the long term-instability of conditioned radioactive waste. Meanwhile a preliminary theoretical study has been done to evaluate the gas evolution from the matrix due to radiolysis effect. The reached conclusions encourage the development of further analysis to implement a cementation facility. (Author)

  5. Characterization of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Miscible Lactose-Sugars Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runjing; Roos, Yrjö H; Miao, Song

    2017-09-01

    Lactose-sugars systems were produced by spray drying. They were lactose, lactose-glucose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-maltose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-sucrose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-trehalose (4:1) mixtures, and lactose-corn syrup solids (CSS) (4:1) mixtures. The physical characteristics, water sorption behavior, glass transition, and mechanical properties of miscible lactose-sugars systems were investigated. Lactose-glucose mixtures had larger particle size than other lactose-sugars systems after spray drying. The presence of glucose or sucrose in lactose-sugars mixtures decreased the glass transition temperatures of amorphous systems, while the presence of maltose and trehalose had only minor impact on the glass transition temperatures. Moreover, glucose accelerated the crystallization of amorphous system at 0.44 a w , but its presence delayed the loss of sorbed water at higher water activities (≥0.54 a w ). Mechanical property study indicated that glucose and sucrose in amorphous system could result in an increase of molecular mobility, while the presence of CSS could decrease the free volume and maintain the stiffness of the miscible systems. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Physical Characterization of Natural Straw Fibers as Aggregates for Construction Materials Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwen Bouasker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to find out new alternative materials that respond to sustainable development criteria. For this purpose, an original utilization of straw for the design of lightweight aggregate concretes is proposed. Four types of straw were used: three wheat straws and a barley straw. In the present study, the morphology and the porosity of the different straw aggregates was studied by SEM in order to understand their effects on the capillary structure and the hygroscopic behavior. The physical properties such as sorption-desorption isotherms, water absorption coefficient, pH, electrical conductivity and thermo-gravimetric analysis were also studied. As a result, it has been found that this new vegetable material has a very low bulk density, a high water absorption capacity and an excellent hydric regulator. The introduction of the straw in the water tends to make the environment more basic; this observation can slow carbonation of the binder matrix in the presence of the straw.

  7. Characterization of starch films containing starch nanoparticles: part 1: physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ai-Min; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Dong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-07-25

    We report, for the first time, the preparation method and characteristics of starch films incorporating spray dried and vacuum freeze dried starch nanoparticles. Physical properties of these films such as morphology, crystallinity, water vapor permeability (WVP), opacity, and glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties (strain versus temperature, strain versus stress, Young's modulus and toughness) were measured. Addition of both starch nanoparticles in starch films increased roughness of surface, lowered degree of crystallinity by 23.5%, WVP by 44% and Tg by 4.3°C, respectively compared to those of starch-only films. Drying method used in preparation of starch nanoparticles only affected opacity of films. The incorporation of nanoparticles in starch films resulted into denser films due to which the extent of variation of strain with temperature was much lower. The toughness and Young's modulus of films containing both types of starch nanoparticles were lower than those of control films especially at <100°C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical characterization and recovery of corroded fingerprint impressions from postblast copper pipe bomb fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, John W; Brady, Thomas F

    2013-05-01

    Pipe bombs made from 1 mm thick copper pipe were detonated with a low explosive power powder. Analysis of the physical characteristics of fragments revealed that the copper had undergone work hardening with an increased Vickers Hardness of 107HV1 compared with 80HV1 for unexploded copper pipe. Mean plastic strain prior to fracture was calculated at 0.28 showing evidence of both plastic deformation and wall thinning. An examination of the external surface showed microfractures running parallel with the length of the pipe at approximately 100 μm intervals and 1-2 μm in width. Many larger fragments had folded "inside out" making the original outside surface inaccessible and difficult to fold back through work hardening. A visual examination for fingerprint corrosion revealed ridge details on several fragments that were enhanced by selective digital mapping of colors reflected from the surface of the copper. One of these fingerprints was identified partially to the original donor. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  10. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of water treatment plant waste for use in soil-cement brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessin, L.R.; Destefani, A.Z.; Holanda, J.N.F.

    2011-01-01

    The water treatment plants (WTP) for human consumption generate huge amounts of waste in the form of sludge (sludge) that have been over the years mostly inadequately prepared in water resources and the environment. Moreover, traditional methods of disposal of waste water treatment plants commonly used are generally costly activities. An alternative method for disposal of this waste abundant is its incorporation in ceramic products. This work is focused on the physical-chemical and mineralogical composition of a sample of waste water treatment plants from the region of Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ to their use in the manufacture of soil-cement brick. Several characterization techniques were used including X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, picnometry, particle size analysis and plasticity. The experimental results indicate that the waste water treatment plants have the potential to be used in the manufacture of ecologic soil-cement bricks. (author)

  11. A new clinical unit for digital radiography based on a thick amorphous Selenium plate: Physical and psychophysical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivetti, Stefano; Lanconelli, Nico; Bertolini, Marco; Acchiappati, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Here, we present a physical and psychophysical characterization of a new clinical unit (named AcSelerate) for digital radiography based on a thick a-Se layer. We also compared images acquired with and without a software filter (named CRF) developed for reducing sharpness and noise of the images and making them similar to images coming from traditional computed radiography systems. Methods: The characterization was achieved in terms of physical figures of merit [modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE)], and psychophysical parameters (contrast-detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images). We accomplished measurements with four standard beam conditions: RAQ3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9. Results: The system shows an excellent MTF (about 50% at the Nyquist frequency). The DQE is about 55% at 0.5 lp/mm and above 20% at the Nyquist frequency and is almost independent from exposure. The contrast-detail curves are comparable to some of the best published data for other systems devoted to imaging in general radiography. The CRF filter influences both the MTF and NPS, but it does lead to very small changes on DQE. Also the visibility of CDRAD details is basically unaltered, when the filter is activated. Conclusions: As normally happens with detector based on direct conversion, the system presents an excellent MTF. The improved efficiency caused by the thick layer allows getting good noise characteristics and DQE results better (about 10% on average) than many of the computed radiography (CR) systems and comparable to those obtained by the best systems for digital radiography available on the market.

  12. Automatically characterizing sensory-motor patterns underlying reach-to-grasp movements on a physical depth inversion illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian eNguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, movement variability has been of great interest to motor control physiologists as it constitutes a physical, quantifiable form of sensory feedback to aid in planning, updating, and executing complex actions. In marked contrast, the psychological and psychiatric arenas mainly rely on verbal descriptions and interpretations of behavior via observation. Consequently, a large gap exists between the body’s manifestations of mental states and their descriptions, creating a disembodied approach in the psychological and neural sciences: contributions of the peripheral nervous system to central control, executive functions, and decision-making processes are poorly understood. How do we shift from a psychological, theorizing approach to characterize complex behaviors more objectively?We introduce a novel, objective, statistical framework and visuomotor control paradigm to help characterize the stochastic signatures of minute fluctuations in overt movements during a visuomotor task. We also quantify a new class of covert movements that spontaneously occur without instruction. These are largely beneath awareness, but inevitably present in all behaviors. The inclusion of these motions in our analyses introduces a new paradigm in sensory-motor integration. As it turns out, these movements, often overlooked as motor noise, contain valuable information that contributes to the emergence of different kinesthetic percepts. We apply these new methods to help better understand perception-action loops. To investigate how perceptual inputs affect reach behavior, we use a depth inversion illusion: the same physical stimulus produces two distinct depth percepts that are nearly orthogonal, enabling a robust comparison of competing percepts. We find that the moment-by-moment empirically estimated motor output variability can inform us of the participants’ perceptual states, detecting physiologically relevant signals from the peripheral nervous system that

  13. Characterization of Whole Grain Pasta: Integrating Physical, Chemical, Molecular, and Instrumental Sensory Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Stefano; Benedetti, Simona; Buratti, Susanna; Abbasi Parizad, Parisa; Masotti, Fabio; Iametti, Stefania; Pagani, Maria Ambrogina

    2017-11-01

    The consumption of whole-grain food-including pasta-has been increasing steadily. In the case of whole-grain pasta, given the many different producers, it seems important to have some objective parameters to define its overall quality. In this study, commercial whole-grain pasta samples representative of the Italian market have been characterized from both molecular and electronic-senses (electronic nose and electronic tongue) standpoint in order to provide a survey of the properties of different commercial samples. Only 1 pasta product showed very low levels of heat damage markers (furosine and pyrraline), suggesting that this sample underwent to low temperature dry treatment. In all samples, the furosine content was directly correlated to protein structural indices, since protein structure compactness increased with increasing levels of heat damage markers. Electronic senses were able to discriminate among pasta samples according to the intensity of heat treatment during the drying step. Pasta sample with low furosine content was discriminated by umami taste and by sensors responding to aliphatic and inorganic compounds. Data obtained with this multidisciplinary approach are meant to provide hints for identifying useful indices for pasta quality. As observed for semolina pasta, objective parameters based on heat-damage were best suited to define the overall quality of wholegrain pasta, almost independently of compositional differences among commercial samples. Drying treatments of different intensity also had an impact on instrumental sensory traits that may provide a reliable alternative to analytical determination of chemical markers of heat damage in all cases where there is a need for avoiding time-consuming procedures. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Antimicrobial activity and physical characterization of silver nanoparticles green synthesized using nitrate reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Shabani, Mohammadhassan; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Norouzian, Dariush; Amini, Abdolhossein; Gholami-Shabani, Zeynab; Imani, Afshin; Chiani, Mohsen; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures from natural sources have received major attention due to wide array of biological activities and less toxicity for humans, animals, and the environment. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a fungal nitrate reductase, and their biological activity was assessed against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The enzyme was isolated from Fusarium oxysporum IRAN 31C after culturing on malt extract-glucose-yeast extract-peptone (MGYP) medium. The enzyme was purified by a combination of ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and its molecular weight was estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. The purified enzyme had a maximum yield of 50.84 % with a final purification of 70 folds. With a molecular weight of 214 KDa, it is composed of three subunits of 125, 60, and 25 KDa. The purified enzyme was successfully used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a way dependent upon NADPH using gelatin as a capping agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These stable nonaggregating nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average size of 50 nm and a zeta potential of -34.3. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effects of synthesized nanoparticles by disk diffusion method showed strong growth inhibitory activity against all tested human pathogenic fungi and bacteria as evident from inhibition zones that ranged from 14 to 25 mm. Successful green synthesis of biologically active silver nanoparticles by a nitrate reductase from F. oxysporum in the present work not only reduces laborious downstream steps such as purification of nanoparticle from interfering cellular components, but also provides a constant source of safe biologically-active nanomaterials with potential application in agriculture and medicine.

  15. Physical-chemical characterization of pre-cooked mixed rice flour and barley bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Palmiro Ramirez Ascheri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The extrusion processing parameters, chemical composition and water content of the flour mixture may affect the structure of rice flour, leading to products with different rheological behavior and hygroscopicity. Therefore, this work aimed to study the rheological properties and water adsorption of mixed flours of broken rice and barley bagasse obtained by extrusion cooking. Samples were prepared from a mixture of grits/bagasse between 82/18 and 73/27 (w/w with water content between 18.04 and 26.96%, using a single screw extruder. The rheological properties of the extruded flour were determined by a rapid viscosity analyzer to evaluate the cooking profile of the pastes by observing the pasting temperature, maximum viscosity, breakdown and retrogradation. The adsorption process was performed by weighing the samples stored at temperatures of 25, 30, 35 and 45 °C with water activity between 0.112 and 0.973. The isotherms were fitted using the following mathematical models: Halsey, Oswin, Smith, GAB and Peleg. The extruded composite flours were characterized by their lack of initial viscosity. The pasting temperature (40-67 °C, maximum viscosity (690-1146 cP, breakdown viscosity (0-175 cP and retrogradation (613-1382 cP were lower than for raw rice flour. The Peleg equation fitted well to the water adsorption data and can be used to represent the sigmoidal type II shape of the water adsorption isotherms for the extruded mixed flours from rice grits and barley bagasse.

  16. Physical characterization and modeling of chitosan/peg blends for injectable scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Daniel B; Almeida, Renata D; Pasquali, Matheus; Borges, Sílvia P; Fook, Marcus L; Lisboa, Hugo M

    2018-06-01

    Injectable scaffolds find many applications on the biomedical field due to several advantages on preformed scaffolds such as being able to fill any defect can be used in minimal invasion surgeries and are ready to use products. The most critical parameter for an injectable scaffold usage is its injectability, which can be related with rheological properties. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to increase knowledge about the critical parameters influencing injectability of biopolymers used for injectable scaffolds. Rheological and mechanical properties of a biopolymer blend in combination with injectability tests for a given design space controlled by the concentrations of both polymers and temperatures was made. Then those results were modeled to better understand the impact of parameters on injectability. The biopolymer blend chosen was Chitosan physically blended with Poly(ethylene glycol) where variations of both polymer concentrations and molecular weights were tested. Rheological and mechanical properties of all samples were determined, together with the injection force using a compression test at different injection conditions. All solutions were clear and transparent suggesting perfect miscibility. Rheological results were modeled using Ostwald-Waelle law and revealed a shear thinning pseudo-plastic solution at any composition and temperature, being chitosan concentration the most influencing variable. Compression tests results revealed mean injection forces ranging from 9.9 ± 0.06N to 29.9 ± 0.65N and it was possible to accurately estimate those results. Simulations revealed draw speed as the most influencing parameter. Cell viability tests revealed a non-cytotoxic biopolymer blend. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical and chemical characterizations of biochars derived from different agricultural residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindo, K.; Mizumoto, H.; Sawada, Y.; Sanchez-Monedero, M. A.; Sonoki, T.

    2014-08-01

    Biochar has received large attention as a strategy to tackle against carbon emission. Not only carbon fixation has been carried out but also other merits for agricultural application due to unique physical and chemical character such as absorption of contaminated compounds in soil, trapping ammonia and methane emission from compost, and enhancement of fertilizer quality. In our study, different local waste feed stocks (rice husk, rice straw, wood chips of apple tree (Malus Pumila) and oak tree (Quercus serrata)), in Aomori, Japan, were utilized for creating biochar with different temperature (400-800 °C). Concerning to the biochar production, the pyrolysis of lower temperature had more biochar yield than higher temperature pyrolysis process. On the contrary, surface areas and adsorption characters have been increased as increasing temperature. The proportions of carbon content in the biochars also increased together with increased temperatures. Infrared-Fourier spectra (FT-IR) and 13C-NMR were used to understand carbon chemical compositions in our biochars, and it was observed that the numbers of the shoulders representing aromatic groups, considered as stable carbon structure appeared as the temperature came closer to 600 °C, as well as in FT-IR. In rice materials, the peak assigned to SiO2, was observed in all biochars (400-800 °C) in FT-IR. We suppose that the pyrolysis at 600 °C creates the most recalcitrant character for carbon sequestration, meanwhile the pyrolysis at 400 °C produces the superior properties as a fertilizer by retaining volatile and easily labile compounds which promotes soil microbial activities.

  18. Amorphous hydroxyapatite-sintered polymeric scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration: physical characterization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushnie, Emily K; Khan, Yusuf M; Laurencin, Cato T

    2008-01-01

    Given the inherent shortcomings of autografts and allografts, donor-site morbidity and risk of disease transmission, respectively, alternatives to traditional bone grafting options are warranted. To this end, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) and in situ-synthesized amorphous hydroxyapatite (HA) were used to construct three-dimensional microsphere-based composite scaffolds of varying HA content for bone regeneration. In the current study, the effect of adding amorphous HA to the PLAGA scaffolds on their physical characteristics and in vitro degradation mechanism was investigated. Porosimetry and uniaxial compression testing were used to analyze the internal structure and elastic modulus of the scaffolds, respectively. Additionally, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) was performed to assess the polymer molecular weight over the course of an 8-week degradation study. HA content (17% or 27%) of the composite scaffolds was found to increase scaffold pore volume from 33.86% for pure polymer scaffolds, to 40.49% or 46.29%, depending on the amount of incorporated HA. This increased pore volume provided the composite scaffolds with a greater surface area and a corresponding decrease in elastic modulus. Scaffold degradation studies conducted over 8 weeks showed PLAGA to degrade in a first-order mechanism, with the rate of polymer degradation for the 27% HA composite scaffold being significantly slower than that of the pure PLAGA scaffold (degradation constants of 0.0324 and 0.0232 week(-1), respectively). These results suggest that the addition of amorphous HA to PLAGA microspheres resulted in porous, bioactive scaffolds that offer potential as alternative bone grafting materials for the field of regenerative medicine. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2008.

  19. Physical modeling and characterization of thermo-acoustic loudspeakers made of silver nano-wire films

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torraca, P.; Larcher, L.; Bobinger, M.; Pavan, P.; Seeber, B.; Lugli, P.

    2017-06-01

    Recent developments of ultra-low heat capacity nanostructured materials revived the interest in the thermo-acoustic (TA) loudspeaker technology, which shows important advantages compared to the classical dynamic loudspeakers as they feature a lower cost and weight, flexibility, conformability to the surface of various shapes, and transparency. The development of the TA loudspeaker technology requires accurate physical models connecting the material properties to the thermal and acoustic speaker's performance. We present here a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of TA loudspeakers, where the electro-thermal and the thermo-acoustic transductions are handled separately, thus allowing an in-depth description of both the pressure and temperature dynamics. The electro-thermal transduction is analyzed by accounting for all the heat flow processes taking place between the TA loudspeaker and the surrounding environment, with focus on their frequency dependence. The thermo-acoustic conversion is studied by solving the coupled thermo-acoustic equations, derived from the Navier-Stokes equations, and by exploiting the Huygens-Fresnel principle to decompose the TA loudspeaker surface into a dense set of TA point sources. A general formulation of the 3D pressure field is derived summing up the TA point source contributions via a Rayleigh integral. The model is validated against temperature and sound pressure level measured on the TA loudspeaker sample made of a Silver Nanowire random network deposited on a polyimide substrate. A good agreement is found between measurements and simulations, demonstrating that the model is capable of connecting material properties to the thermo-acoustic performance of the device, thus providing a valuable tool for the design and optimization of TA loudspeakers.

  20. Fire-resistance, physical, and mechanical characterization of particleboard containing Oceanic Posidonia waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saval, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, particleboards manufactured with Oceanic Posidonia waste and bonded with cement are investigated. The particleboards are made with 3/1.5/0.5 parts of cement per part of Posidonia waste. The physical properties of bulk density, swelling, surface absorption, and dimensional changes due to relative humidity as well as the mechanical properties of modulus of elasticity, bending strength, surface soundness, perpendicular tensile strength and impact resistance are studied. In terms of the above properties, the best results were obtained for particleboards with high cement content and when the waste “leaves” are treated (crushed before board fabrication, due to internal changes to the board structure under these conditions. Based on the results of fire tests, the particleboard is non-flammable without any fire-resistant treatment.En esta investigación se han diseñado y fabricado tableros con residuo de Posidonia Oceánica y cemento. Los tableros se han fabricado con 3/1.5/0.5 partes de cemento por cada parte de Posidonia estudiándose sus propiedades físicas (densidad, hinchazón, absorción superficial, variaciones dimensionales por humedad y mecánicas (módulo de elasticidad, resistencia a flexión, al arranque de superficie, al arranque de tornillo, a la tracción perpendicular y al choque. Se observa una mejora de los resultados de resistencia mecánica con el incremento de la cantidad de cemento y si la hoja del residuo es previamente tratada ya que proporciona una mejor estructura interna en el tablero. Además, tras los ensayos de reacción al fuego, se observa que el material es no inflamable sin ningún tipo de tratamiento ignifugante.

  1. ExploreNEOs. III. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 65 POTENTIAL SPACECRAFT TARGET ASTEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Michael; Delbo', M.; Hora, J. L.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Trilling, D. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Mainzer, A.; Emery, J. P.; Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Penprase, B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Space missions to near-Earth objects (NEOs) are being planned at all major space agencies, and recently a manned mission to an NEO was announced as a NASA goal. Efforts to find and select suitable targets (plus backup targets) are severely hampered by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of dynamically favorable NEOs. In particular, current mission scenarios tend to favor primitive low-albedo objects. For the vast majority of NEOs, the albedo is unknown. Here we report new constraints on the size and albedo of 65 NEOs with rendezvous Δv -1 . Our results are based on thermal-IR flux data obtained in the framework of our ongoing (2009-2011) ExploreNEOs survey using NASA's 'Warm-Spitzer' space telescope. As of 2010 July 14, we have results for 293 objects in hand (including the 65 low-Δv NEOs presented here); before the end of 2011, we expect to have measured the size and albedo of ∼700 NEOs (including probably ∼160 low-Δv NEOs). While there are reasons to believe that primitive volatile-rich materials are universally low in albedo, the converse need not be true: the orbital evolution of some dark objects likely has caused them to lose their volatiles by coming too close to the Sun. For all our targets, we give the closest perihelion distance they are likely to have reached (using orbital integrations from Marchi et al. 2009) and corresponding upper limits on the past surface temperature. Low-Δv objects for which both albedo and thermal history may suggest a primitive composition include (162998) 2001 SK162, (68372) 2001 PM9, and (100085) 1992 UY4.

  2. Successful up-scaled population interventions to reduce risk factors for non-communicable disease in adults: results from the International Community Interventions for Health (CIH) Project in China, India and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Pamela A; Anthony, Denis; Fenton, Brenda; Stevens, Denise E; Champagne, Beatriz; Li, Li-Ming; Lv, Jun; Ramírez Hernández, Jorge; Thankappan, K R; Matthews, David R

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable disease (NCD) is increasing rapidly in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), and is associated with tobacco use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. There is little evidence for up-scaled interventions at the population level to reduce risk in LMIC. The Community Interventions for Health (CIH) program was a population-scale community intervention study with comparator population group undertaken in communities in China, India, and Mexico, each with populations between 150,000-250,000. Culturally appropriate interventions were delivered over 18-24 months. Two independent cross-sectional surveys of a stratified sample of adults aged 18-64 years were conducted at baseline and follow-up. A total of 6,194 adults completed surveys at baseline, and 6,022 at follow-up. The proportion meeting physical activity recommendations decreased significantly in the control group (C) (44.1 to 30.2%), but not in the intervention group (I) (38.0 to 36.1%), p<0.001. Those eating ≥ 5 portions of fruit and vegetables daily decreased significantly in C (19.2 to 17.2%), but did not change in I (20.0 to 19.6%,), p=0.013. The proportion adding salt to food was unchanged in C (24.9 to 25.3%) and decreased in I (25.9 to 19.6%), p<0.001. Prevalence of obesity increased in C (8.3 to 11.2%), with no change in I (8.6 to 9.7%,) p=0.092. Concerning tobacco, for men the difference-in-difference analysis showed that the reduction in use was significantly greater in I compared to C (p=0.014). Up-scaling known health promoting interventions designed to reduce the incidence of NCD in whole communities in LMIC is feasible, and has measurable beneficial outcomes on risk factors for NCD, namely tobacco use, diet, and physical inactivity.

  3. Successful up-scaled population interventions to reduce risk factors for non-communicable disease in adults: results from the International Community Interventions for Health (CIH Project in China, India and Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A Dyson

    Full Text Available Non-communicable disease (NCD is increasing rapidly in low and middle-income countries (LMIC, and is associated with tobacco use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. There is little evidence for up-scaled interventions at the population level to reduce risk in LMIC.The Community Interventions for Health (CIH program was a population-scale community intervention study with comparator population group undertaken in communities in China, India, and Mexico, each with populations between 150,000-250,000. Culturally appropriate interventions were delivered over 18-24 months. Two independent cross-sectional surveys of a stratified sample of adults aged 18-64 years were conducted at baseline and follow-up.A total of 6,194 adults completed surveys at baseline, and 6,022 at follow-up. The proportion meeting physical activity recommendations decreased significantly in the control group (C (44.1 to 30.2%, but not in the intervention group (I (38.0 to 36.1%, p<0.001. Those eating ≥ 5 portions of fruit and vegetables daily decreased significantly in C (19.2 to 17.2%, but did not change in I (20.0 to 19.6%,, p=0.013. The proportion adding salt to food was unchanged in C (24.9 to 25.3% and decreased in I (25.9 to 19.6%, p<0.001. Prevalence of obesity increased in C (8.3 to 11.2%, with no change in I (8.6 to 9.7%, p=0.092. Concerning tobacco, for men the difference-in-difference analysis showed that the reduction in use was significantly greater in I compared to C (p=0.014.Up-scaling known health promoting interventions designed to reduce the incidence of NCD in whole communities in LMIC is feasible, and has measurable beneficial outcomes on risk factors for NCD, namely tobacco use, diet, and physical inactivity.

  4. Industrial wastes from the boat-building sector in the Marche Region (Italy): a parametric and chemical-physical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchesio, M; Tatàno, F; Tosi, G; Trivellone, C H

    2013-01-01

    Using the renowned leisure boat-building sector in the Marche Region (Italy) as a case-study, this paper addresses the characterization of (1) the industrial waste generation from the building of composite material-based boats and (2) some chemical-physical properties of representative types of boat-building residues (plastic foam, hardened resin, fibre-reinforced composite residues, and sanding dust). A parametric evaluation based on the number of employees gave a representative unit generation rate per employee (UGRpE) of 1.47 tons(waste) employee(-1) year(-1) for the entire Marche regional boatbuilding district, whereas evaluations carried out separately for three case-study companies provided values of 1.56, 3.07, and 1.12 tons(waste) employee(-1) year(-1) as representative for a mass-produced motor boat builder (case-study company '1'), a customized sailing boat builder (case-study company '2'), and a mould and structural component builder (case-study company '3'), respectively. The original proposal and evaluation of two additional generation rates based on physical characteristics intrinsic to the manufactured product, i.e. the unit generation rate per boat area (UGRpA) and per boat weight (UGRpW), confirmed the higher waste generation for the sailing boat builder(representative UGRpA and UGRpW values of 0.35 tons(waste) m(-2)(boat) year(-1) and 2. 71 tons(waste) tons(-1)(boat) year(-1), respectively) compared with the motor boat builder (representative UGRpA and UGRpW values of 0.06 tons(waste) m(-2)(boat) year(-1) and 0.49 tons(waste) tons(-1)(boat) year(-1), respectively). The chemical-physical property characterization of the selected residues revealed the following aspects: a general condition of low moisture contents; significant ash contents in the glass- and carbon-fibre composite residues and the correlated sanding dust; and relatively high energy content values in the overall range 14,144-32,479 kJ kg(-1), expressed as the lower heating value.

  5. Characterizing physical properties and heterogeneous chemistry of single particles in air using optical trapping-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z.; Wang, C.; Pan, Y. L.; Videen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of solid particles in a gaseous environment are of increasing interest; however, most of the heterogeneous chemistry studies of airborne solids were conducted on particle ensembles. A close examination on the heterogeneous chemistry between single particles and gaseous-environment species is the key to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of hydroscopic growth, cloud nuclei condensation, secondary aerosol formation, etc., and reduce the uncertainty of models in radiative forcing, climate change, and atmospheric chemistry. We demonstrate an optical trapping-Raman spectroscopy (OT-RS) system to study the heterogeneous chemistry of the solid particles in air at single-particle level. Compared to other single-particle techniques, optical trapping offers a non-invasive, flexible, and stable method to isolate single solid particle from substrates. Benefited from two counter-propagating hollow beams, the optical trapping configuration is adaptive to trap a variety of particles with different materials from inorganic substitution (carbon nanotubes, silica, etc.) to organic, dye-doped polymers and bioaerosols (spores, pollen, etc.), with different optical properties from transparent to strongly absorbing, with different sizes from sub-micrometers to tens of microns, or with distinct morphologies from loosely packed nanotubes to microspheres and irregular pollen grains. The particles in the optical trap may stay unchanged, surface degraded, or optically fragmented according to different laser intensity, and their physical and chemical properties are characterized by the Raman spectra and imaging system simultaneously. The Raman spectra is able to distinguish the chemical compositions of different particles, while the synchronized imaging system can resolve their physical properties (sizes, shapes, morphologies, etc.). The temporal behavior of the trapped particles also can be monitored by the OT-RS system at an indefinite time with a resolution from

  6. Chemical and Physical Properties of Individual Aerosol Particles Characterized in Sacramento, CA during CARES Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Beranek, J.; Vaden, T.; Imre, D. G.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We present results of measurements conducted by our Single Particle Mass Spectrometer, SPLAT II, in Sacramento, CA over the month of June 2010. SPLAT II measured the size of 195 million particles, and compositions of 10 million particles. In addition to size and composition, SPLAT II simultaneously measured size, density and composition of 121,000 individual particles. These measurements were conducted 2 - 3 times per day, depending on conditions. The data show that throughout the day particles were relatively small (<200 nm), and the vast majority were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with various amounts of sulfate. In addition, we characterized fresh and processed soot, biomass burning aerosol, organic amines, fresh and processed sea salt, and few dust particles. The data show a reproducible diurnal pattern in aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and compositions. Early in the day, number concentrations were low, particles were very small, and the size distributions peaked at ~70 nm. At this time of the day, 80 nm particles had a density of 1.3 g cm-3; while the density of 200 nm particles was 1.6 g cm-3, consistent with our mass spectra showing that smaller particles were composed of organics mixed with ~10% sulfates, while larger particles were composed mostly of sulfate mixed with a small amount of organics. Later in the day, secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation led to a number of nucleation events that significantly increased the number concentrations of very small particles. By mid-afternoon, as more SOA formed and condensed, particles increased in size the number concentrations of particles larger than 70 nm increased and the densities of particles 80 to 200 nm particles was ~1.3 g cm-3. The vast majority of these particles were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with a ~10% sulfate. In other words they were SOA particles mixed with a small amount of sulfate. The mass spectra of these particles shows that there were two types of

  7. Physical characterization of single convergent beam device for teletherapy: theoretical and Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, R G; Valente, M

    2015-09-21

    The main purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility and physical characteristics of a new teletherapy device of radiation therapy based on the application of a convergent x-ray beam of energies like those used in radiotherapy providing highly concentrated dose delivery to the target. We have denominated it Convergent Beam Radio Therapy (CBRT). Analytical methods are developed first in order to determine the dosimetry characteristic of an ideal convergent photon beam in a hypothetical water phantom. Then, using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code, a similar convergent beam that is applied to the water phantom is compared with that of the analytical method. The CBRT device (Converay(®)) is designed to adapt to the head of LINACs. The converging beam photon effect is achieved thanks to the perpendicular impact of LINAC electrons on a large thin spherical cap target where Bremsstrahlung is generated (high-energy x-rays). This way, the electrons impact upon various points of the cap (CBRT condition), aimed at the focal point. With the X radiation (Bremsstrahlung) directed forward, a system of movable collimators emits many beams from the output that make a virtually definitive convergent beam. Other Monte Carlo simulations are performed using realistic conditions. The simulations are performed for a thin target in the shape of a large, thin, spherical cap, with an r radius of around 10-30 cm and a curvature radius of approximately 70 to 100 cm, and a cubed water phantom centered in the focal point of the cap. All the interaction mechanisms of the Bremsstrahlung radiation with the phantom are taken into consideration for different energies and cap thicknesses. Also, the magnitudes of the electric and/or magnetic fields, which are necessary to divert clinical-use electron beams (0.1 to 20 MeV), are determined using electromagnetism equations with relativistic corrections. This way the above-mentioned beam is manipulated and guided for its perpendicular impact

  8. Contribution to the physical modeling of the actinide characterization by electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moy, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) is used to quantify with a high accuracy the amount of different elements present on a sample of unknown composition. EPMA is largely used to quantify the amount of actinides present in fresh and irradiated fuels, to manage waste disposal and to date rocks. However, quantitative EPMA is not always possible to achieve for these materials due to the lack of suitable reference standards for the radionuclides. To overcome this difficulty, standard-less methods of analysis are employed with mean of virtual calculated standards. These calculated standards are generally obtained from empirical formulae based on experimental extrapolations or from theoretical calculations that require physical parameters which are poorly known as it is the case for the X-ray production cross section. The accurate knowledge of these cross sections is required in many applications such as in particle transport code and in Monte Carlo simulations. The computer simulations are widely used in the medical field and particularly in medical imaging and in electron beam therapy. In the field of astronomy, these data are used to perform simulations that predict the compositions of stars and galactic clouds, and the formation of planetary systems. In the present work, L- and M-shell absolute x-ray production cross sections were determined experimentally for elements lead, thorium and uranium by electron impact using ultrathin self-supporting targets with thickness varying from 0.2 to 8 nm. The measured cross sections have been compared, with the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculated by Bote et al. and with the predictions of analytical formulae widely used in practical applications. For the conversion of inner-shell ionization cross sections into x-ray production cross sections, atomic relaxation parameters were extracted from the literature. The predictions of the DWBA calculations are in excellent agreement with our measured x-ray production cross

  9. On the Failure of Upscaling the Single-Collector Efficiency to the Transport of Colloids in an Array of Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, F.; Tosco, T.; Sethi, R.

    2017-12-01

    Colloidal transport and deposition in saturated porous media are phenomena of considerable importance in a large number of natural processes and engineering applications, such as the contaminant and microorganism propagation in aquifer systems, the development of innovative groundwater remediation technologies, air and water filtration, and many others. Therefore, a thorough understanding of particle filtration is essential for predicting the transport and fate of colloids in the subsurface environment. The removal efficiency of a filter is a key aspect for colloid transport in porous media. Several efforts were devoted to derive accurate correlations for the single collector efficiency, one of the key concept in the filtration theory. However, up scaling this parameter to the entire porous medium is still a challenge. The common up-scaling approach assumes the deposition to be independent of the transport history, which means that the collector efficiency is considered uniform along the porous medium. However, previous works showed that this approach is inadequate under unfavorable deposition conditions. This study demonstrates that it is not adequate even in the simplest case of favorable deposition. Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations were run for a simplify porous media geometry, composed of a vertical array of 50 identical spherical collectors. A combination of Lagrangian and Eulerian simulations were performed to analyze the particle transport under a broad range of parameters (i.e., particle size, particle density, water velocity). The results show the limits of the existing models to interpret the experimental data. In fact, the outcome evidenced that when particle deposition is not controlled by Brownian diffusion, non-exponential concentration profiles are retrieved, in contrast with the assumption of uniform efficiency. Moreover, when the deposition mechanisms of sedimentation and interception dominate, the efficiency of the first sphere of the

  10. Study of the permeability up-scaling by direct filtering of geostatistical model; Etude du changement d'echelle des permeabilites par filtrage direct du modele geostatistique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zargar, G

    2005-10-15

    In this thesis, we present a new approach, which consists in directly up-scaling the geostatistical permeability distribution rather than the individual realizations. Practically, filtering techniques based on. the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform), allows us to generate geostatistical images, which sample the up-scaled distributions. In the log normal case, an equivalence hydraulic criterion is proposed, allowing to re-estimate the geometric mean of the permeabilities. In the anisotropic case, the effective geometric mean becomes a tensor which depends on the level of filtering used and it can be calculated by a method of renormalisation. Then, the method was generalized for the categorial model. Numerical tests of the method were set up for isotropic, anisotropic and categorial models, which shows good agreement with theory. (author)

  11. Study of the permeability up-scaling by direct filtering of geostatistical model; Etude du changement d'echelle des permeabilites par filtrage direct du modele geostatistique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zargar, G.

    2005-10-15

    In this thesis, we present a new approach, which consists in directly up-scaling the geostatistical permeability distribution rather than the individual realizations. Practically, filtering techniques based on. the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform), allows us to generate geostatistical images, which sample the up-scaled distributions. In the log normal case, an equivalence hydraulic criterion is proposed, allowing to re-estimate the geometric mean of the permeabilities. In the anisotropic case, the effective geometric mean becomes a tensor which depends on the level of filtering used and it can be calculated by a method of renormalisation. Then, the method was generalized for the categorial model. Numerical tests of the method were set up for isotropic, anisotropic and categorial models, which shows good agreement with theory. (author)

  12. On the nature of data collection for soft-tissue image-to-physical organ registration: a noise characterization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jarrod A.; Heiselman, Jon S.; Weis, Jared A.; Clements, Logan W.; Simpson, Amber L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    In image-guided liver surgery (IGLS), sparse representations of the anterior organ surface may be collected intraoperatively to drive image-to-physical space registration. Soft tissue deformation represents a significant source of error for IGLS techniques. This work investigates the impact of surface data quality on current surface based IGLS registration methods. In this work, we characterize the robustness of our IGLS registration methods to noise in organ surface digitization. We study this within a novel human-to-phantom data framework that allows a rapid evaluation of clinically realistic data and noise patterns on a fully characterized hepatic deformation phantom. Additionally, we implement a surface data resampling strategy that is designed to decrease the impact of differences in surface acquisition. For this analysis, n=5 cases of clinical intraoperative data consisting of organ surface and salient feature digitizations from open liver resection were collected and analyzed within our human-to-phantom validation framework. As expected, results indicate that increasing levels of noise in surface acquisition cause registration fidelity to deteriorate. With respect to rigid registration using the raw and resampled data at clinically realistic levels of noise (i.e. a magnitude of 1.5 mm), resampling improved TRE by 21%. In terms of nonrigid registration, registrations using resampled data outperformed the raw data result by 14% at clinically realistic levels and were less susceptible to noise across the range of noise investigated. These results demonstrate the types of analyses our novel human-to-phantom validation framework can provide and indicate the considerable benefits of resampling strategies.

  13. Characterization of the aspects of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with physical tetracalcium phosphate anchorage on titanium implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Yuan; Liou, Cian-Hua [Alliance Global Technology Co., Ltd., Kaohsiung Medical Device Special Zone in Southern Taiwan Science Park, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-01

    Well-designed implants are used not only to modify the geometry of the implant but also to change the chemical properties of its surfaces. The present study aims to assess the biofunctional effects of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles as a physical anchor on the implant surface derived through sandblasting. The characteristics of the surface, cell viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity toward osteoprogenitor cells (D1) were obtained. D1 cells were cultured on a plain surface that underwent sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) (control SLA group) and on different SLA surfaces with different anchoring TTCP rates (new test groups, M and H). The mean anchoring rates were 57% (M) and 74% (H), and the anchored thickness was estimated to range from 12.6 μm to 18.3 μm. Compared with the control SLA surface on Ti substrate, the new test groups with different TTCP anchoring rates (M and H) failed to improve cell proliferation significantly but had a well-differentiated D1 cell phenotype that enhanced ALP expression in the early stage of cell cultures, specifically, at day 7. Results suggest that the SLA surface with anchored TTCP can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. This study shows the potential clinical application of the constructed geometry in TTCP anchorage on Ti for dental implant surface modification. - Highlights: • TTCP (tetracalcium phosphate) as a physical anchorage on implant is characterized. • Theoretical values of anchored thickness and capping areas were estimated. • TTCP anchored by sandblasting can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. • TTCP anchored on SLA (sandblasting and acid etching) surface is a promising method.

  14. Characterization of the aspects of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with physical tetracalcium phosphate anchorage on titanium implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chang, Ya-Yuan; Liou, Cian-Hua; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Well-designed implants are used not only to modify the geometry of the implant but also to change the chemical properties of its surfaces. The present study aims to assess the biofunctional effects of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles as a physical anchor on the implant surface derived through sandblasting. The characteristics of the surface, cell viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity toward osteoprogenitor cells (D1) were obtained. D1 cells were cultured on a plain surface that underwent sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) (control SLA group) and on different SLA surfaces with different anchoring TTCP rates (new test groups, M and H). The mean anchoring rates were 57% (M) and 74% (H), and the anchored thickness was estimated to range from 12.6 μm to 18.3 μm. Compared with the control SLA surface on Ti substrate, the new test groups with different TTCP anchoring rates (M and H) failed to improve cell proliferation significantly but had a well-differentiated D1 cell phenotype that enhanced ALP expression in the early stage of cell cultures, specifically, at day 7. Results suggest that the SLA surface with anchored TTCP can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. This study shows the potential clinical application of the constructed geometry in TTCP anchorage on Ti for dental implant surface modification. - Highlights: • TTCP (tetracalcium phosphate) as a physical anchorage on implant is characterized. • Theoretical values of anchored thickness and capping areas were estimated. • TTCP anchored by sandblasting can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. • TTCP anchored on SLA (sandblasting and acid etching) surface is a promising method

  15. Up-scaling of multi-variable flood loss models from objects to land use units at the meso-scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flood risk management increasingly relies on risk analyses, including loss modelling. Most of the flood loss models usually applied in standard practice have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel multi-variable models significantly improve loss estimation on the micro-scale and may also be advantageous for large-scale applications. However, more input parameters also reveal additional uncertainty, even more in upscaling procedures for meso-scale applications, where the parameters need to be estimated on a regional area-wide basis. To gain more knowledge about challenges associated with the up-scaling of multi-variable flood loss models the following approach is applied: Single- and multi-variable micro-scale flood loss models are up-scaled and applied on the meso-scale, namely on basis of ATKIS land-use units. Application and validation is undertaken in 19 municipalities, which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany by comparison to official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB.In the meso-scale case study based model validation, most multi-variable models show smaller errors than the uni-variable stage-damage functions. The results show the suitability of the up-scaling approach, and, in accordance with micro-scale validation studies, that multi-variable models are an improvement in flood loss modelling also on the meso-scale. However, uncertainties remain high, stressing the importance of uncertainty quantification. Thus, the development of probabilistic loss models, like BT-FLEMO used in this study, which inherently provide uncertainty information are the way forward.

  16. Up-scaling of multi-variable flood loss models from objects to land use units at the meso-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Flood risk management increasingly relies on risk analyses, including loss modelling. Most of the flood loss models usually applied in standard practice have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel multi-variable models significantly improve loss estimation on the micro-scale and may also be advantageous for large-scale applications. However, more input parameters also reveal additional uncertainty, even more in upscaling procedures for meso-scale applications, where the parameters need to be estimated on a regional area-wide basis. To gain more knowledge about challenges associated with the up-scaling of multi-variable flood loss models the following approach is applied: Single- and multi-variable micro-scale flood loss models are up-scaled and applied on the meso-scale, namely on basis of ATKIS land-use units. Application and validation is undertaken in 19 municipalities, which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany by comparison to official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB).In the meso-scale case study based model validation, most multi-variable models show smaller errors than the uni-variable stage-damage functions. The results show the suitability of the up-scaling approach, and, in accordance with micro-scale validation studies, that multi-variable models are an improvement in flood loss modelling also on the meso-scale. However, uncertainties remain high, stressing the importance of uncertainty quantification. Thus, the development of probabilistic loss models, like BT-FLEMO used in this study, which inherently provide uncertainty information are the way forward.

  17. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A [Princeton University

    2013-05-15

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE legacy waste problems.

  18. A Modified Thermal Treatment Method for the Up-Scalable Synthesis of Size-Controlled Nanocrystalline Titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysar Sabah Keiteb

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increasing demand for titania nanoparticles with controlled quality for various applications, the present work reports the up-scalable synthesis of size-controlled titanium dioxide nanocrystals with a simple and convenient thermal treatment route. Titanium dioxide nanocrystals with tetragonal structure were synthesized directly from an aqueous solution containing titanium (IV isopropoxide as the main reactant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP as the capping agent, and deionized water as a solvent. With the elimination of the drying process in a thermal treatment method, an attempt was made to decrease the synthesis time. The mixture directly underwent calcination to form titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanocrystalline powder, which was confirmed by FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The control over the size and optical properties of nanocrystals was achieved via variation in calcination temperatures. The obtained average sizes from XRD spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images showed exponential variation with increasing calcination temperature. The optical properties showed a decrease in the band gap energy with increasing calcination temperature due to the enlargement of the nanoparticle size. These results prove that direct calcination of reactant solution is a convenient thermal treatment route for the potential large-scale production of size-controlled Titania nanoparticles.

  19. Up-Scaling Radiation-Processed Oligochitosan and its Application in the Plantation of Rice. Chapter 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaman, K.; Hashim, K.; Mahmod, M.; Yaacob, N.; Talip, N.; Harun, Abd Rahim [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-15

    The up-scaling production of oligochitosan using a continuous gamma irradiation facility at Nuclear Malaysia has been established. Over 2 000 L of 20 000 ppm of oligochitosan at molecular weight of ≤ 10 000 D can be produced per cycle. Subsequently, the oligochitosan has been used in field trials at two different rice plantations during the wet and dry seasons. Both field trials showed remarkable effects on the growth of rice seedlings as well as rice yields. The use of oligochitosan has proven to shorten the period of the rice seedlings from 15 days to 10−12 days. In addition, the cost of this procedure has been greatly reduced since no additional nutrients were used. The growth of the rice seedlings increased by 22.8−23.3% on burned rice husk substrate and by 13.0% on commercial soil when sprayed with oligochitosan as compared to those sprayed with commercial nutrients. With the introduction of oligochitosan, the yield of rice also increased from 2.0-20.0%, depending on the seasons. (author)

  20. Leaching of biocides from building facades: Upscaling of a local two-region leaching model to the city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, S.; Rota, C.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Facades are protected by paints that contain biocides as protection against degradation. These biocides are leached by rainfall (albeit at low concentrations). At the city scale, however, the surface area of building facades is significant, and leached biocides are a potential environmental risk to receiving waters. A city-scale biocide-leaching model was developed based on two main steps. In the first step, laboratory experiments on a single facade were used to calibrate and validate a 1D, two-region phenomenological model of biocide leaching. The same data set was analyzed independently by another research group who found empirically that biocide leachate breakthrough curves were well represented by a sum of two exponentials. Interestingly, the two-region model was found analytically to reproduce this functional form as a special case. The second step in the method is site-specific, and involves upscaling the validated single facade model to a particular city. In this step, (i) GIS-based estimates of facade heights and areas are deduced using the city's cadastral data, (ii) facade flow is estimated using local meteorological data (rainfall, wind direction) and (iii) paint application rates are modeled as a stochastic process based on manufacturers' recommendations. The methodology was applied to Lausanne, Switzerland, a city of about 200,000 inhabitants. Approximately 30% of the annually applied mass of biocides was estimated to be released to the environment.

  1. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2013-11-01

    We have extended reactive flow simulation in pore-network models to include geometric changes in the medium from dissolution effects. These effects include changes in pore volume and reactive surface area, as well as topological changes that open new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against the predictions of a continuum model. Specifically, we modeled anorthite and kaolinite reactions under acidic flow conditions during which the anorthite reactions remain far from equilibrium (dissolution only), while the kaolinite reactions can be near-equilibrium. Under dissolution changes, core-scale reaction rates continuously and nonlinearly evolved in time. At higher injection rates, agreement with predictions of the continuum model degraded significantly. For the far-from-equilibrium reaction, our results indicate that the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in dissolution changes in the reactive mineral surface area is critical to accurately predict upscaled reaction rates. For the near-equilibrium reaction, the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in the saturation state remains critical. Inclusion of a Nernst-Planck term to ensure neutral ionic currents under differential diffusion resulted in at most a 9% correction in upscaled rates.

  2. The characterization, replication and testing of dermal denticles of Scyliorhinus canicula for physical mechanisms of biofouling prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Timothy; Regan, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    There is a current need to develop novel non-toxic antifouling materials. The mechanisms utilized by marine organisms to prevent fouling of external surfaces are of interest in this regard. Biomimicry of these mechanisms and the ability to transfer the antifouling characteristics of these surfaces to artificial surfaces are a highly attractive prospect to those developing antifouling technologies. In order to achieve this, the mechanisms responsible for any antifouling ability must be elucidated from the study of the natural organism and the critical surface parameters responsible for fouling reduction. Dermal denticles of members of the shark family have been speculated to possess some natural, as yet unidentified antifouling mechanism related to the physical presence of denticles. In this study, the dermal denticles of one particular member of the slow-swimming sharks, Scyliorhinus canicula were characterized and it was found that a significant natural variation in denticle dimensions exists in this species. The degree of denticle surface contamination was quantified on denticles at various locations and it was determined that the degree of contamination of the dorsal surface of denticles varies with the position on the shark body. In addition, we successfully produced synthetic sharkskin samples using the real skin as a template. Testing of the produced synthetic skin in field conditions resulted in significant differences in material attachment on surfaces exhibiting denticles of different dimensions.

  3. Physical characterization and preliminary results of a PET system using time-of-flight for quantitative studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, F.; Verrey, B.; Comar, D.; Campagnolo, R.; Bouvier, A.; Lecomte, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A positron camera was designed to meet the needs for a high sensitivity, high resolution, dynamic imaging at high count rate, multislice system, for quantitative measurements. Actually, the goals of present positron camera design are clearly to provide accurate quantitative images of physiological or biochemical parameters with dramatically improved spatial, temporal and contrast resolutions. The use of the time-of-flight (TOF) information which produces more accurate images with fewer detected events, provides an approach to such idenfied needs. This paper first presents the physical characterization of this system, so-called TTVO1, which confirms the TOF system capabilities and main advantages on the system without use of TOF, namely: the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio due to the better, however approximate, localization of the source position, providing an equivalent gain in sensitivity; the good elimination of accidental -or random- coincidences due to the short time-window (3 nsec for a whole body inner ring); the ability to handle very high count rates without pile up of the detectors or electronic, due to the short scintillation decay time in fast crystals such as CsF or BaF 2 (Baryum fluoride)

  4. The characterization, replication and testing of dermal denticles of Scyliorhinus canicula for physical mechanisms of biofouling prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Timothy; Regan, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.regan@dcu.ie [Marine and Environmental Sensing Technology Hub (MESTECH), National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2011-12-15

    There is a current need to develop novel non-toxic antifouling materials. The mechanisms utilized by marine organisms to prevent fouling of external surfaces are of interest in this regard. Biomimicry of these mechanisms and the ability to transfer the antifouling characteristics of these surfaces to artificial surfaces are a highly attractive prospect to those developing antifouling technologies. In order to achieve this, the mechanisms responsible for any antifouling ability must be elucidated from the study of the natural organism and the critical surface parameters responsible for fouling reduction. Dermal denticles of members of the shark family have been speculated to possess some natural, as yet unidentified antifouling mechanism related to the physical presence of denticles. In this study, the dermal denticles of one particular member of the slow-swimming sharks, Scyliorhinus canicula were characterized and it was found that a significant natural variation in denticle dimensions exists in this species. The degree of denticle surface contamination was quantified on denticles at various locations and it was determined that the degree of contamination of the dorsal surface of denticles varies with the position on the shark body. In addition, we successfully produced synthetic sharkskin samples using the real skin as a template. Testing of the produced synthetic skin in field conditions resulted in significant differences in material attachment on surfaces exhibiting denticles of different dimensions.

  5. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined.

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of 50 pulverized coal ashes with respect to partial cement replacement in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sloot, H A; Weijers, E G

    1986-04-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of 50 pulverized coal ashes from Dutch, Belgian and German installations has been carried out to identify the parameters that have to be kept under control, when pulverized coal ashes are to be used as partial cement replacement in concrete. For a good workability of fly ash/cement mortars the particle size and the carbon content are important. By performing a mortar flow test (Heagermann) upon delivery exterme ashes can be easily eliminated. The compressive strength is largely determined by the fineness of the ash (weight fraction below 20 micron). A direct effect of carbon content on strength development is not observed, but a reduction in mortar slow due to carbon leads to loss in strength, while the workability has to be adjusted. Size distribution measurement by optical methods is recommended as the relevant part of the ash size distribution cannot be properly assessed by sieve methods. The net contribution of fly ash to the compressive strength of a fly ash/cement (20/80) mortar exhibits a minimum at 14 days curing, which is common to all 50 ashes studied. Improvements in ash quality as obtained from pulverized-coal fired installations can be achieved by improvements in coal milling and optimizing ash collection. 6 figs., 4 tabs., 19 refs.

  7. Sensitivity of physics parameters for establishment of a burned CANDU full-core model for decommissioning waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dong-Keun; Sun, Gwang-Min; Choi, Jongwon; Hwang, Dong-Hyun; Hwang, Tae-Won; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Park, Dong-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of parameters related with reactor physics on the source terms of decommissioning wastes from a CANDU reactor was investigated in order to find a viable, simplified burned core model of a Monte Carlo simulation for decommissioning waste characterization. First, a sensitivity study was performed for the level of nuclide consideration in an irradiated fuel and implicit geometry modeling, the effects of side structural components of the core, and structural supporters for reactive devices. The overall effects for computation memory, calculation time, and accuracy were then investigated with a full-core model. From the results, it was revealed that the level of nuclide consideration and geometry homogenization are not important factors when the ratio of macroscopic neutron absorption cross section (MNAC) relative to a total value exceeded 0.95. The most important factor affecting the neutron flux of the pressure tube was shown to be the structural supporters for reactivity devices, showing an 10% difference. Finally, it was concluded that a bundle-average homogeneous model considering a MNAC of 0.95, which is the simplest model in this study, could be a viable approximate model, with about 25% lower computation memory, 40% faster simulation time, and reasonable engineering accuracy compared with a model with an explicit geometry employing an MNAC of 0.99. (author)

  8. The characterization, replication and testing of dermal denticles of Scyliorhinus canicula for physical mechanisms of biofouling prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy; Regan, Fiona

    2011-12-01

    There is a current need to develop novel non-toxic antifouling materials. The mechanisms utilized by marine organisms to prevent fouling of external surfaces are of interest in this regard. Biomimicry of these mechanisms and the ability to transfer the antifouling characteristics of these surfaces to artificial surfaces are a highly attractive prospect to those developing antifouling technologies. In order to achieve this, the mechanisms responsible for any antifouling ability must be elucidated from the study of the natural organism and the critical surface parameters responsible for fouling reduction. Dermal denticles of members of the shark family have been speculated to possess some natural, as yet unidentified antifouling mechanism related to the physical presence of denticles. In this study, the dermal denticles of one particular member of the slow-swimming sharks, Scyliorhinus canicula were characterized and it was found that a significant natural variation in denticle dimensions exists in this species. The degree of denticle surface contamination was quantified on denticles at various locations and it was determined that the degree of contamination of the dorsal surface of denticles varies with the position on the shark body. In addition, we successfully produced synthetic sharkskin samples using the real skin as a template. Testing of the produced synthetic skin in field conditions resulted in significant differences in material attachment on surfaces exhibiting denticles of different dimensions.

  9. Upscaling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Related Agroecosystems Services in Smallholder Farming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruru, Marjorie Bonareri; Njeru, Ezekiel Mugendi

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems form unique ecosystems that can protect beneficial soil biota and form an important source of useful genetic resources. They are characterized by high level of agricultural diversity mainly focused on meeting farmers' needs. Unfortunately, these systems often experience poor crop production mainly associated with poor planning and resource scarcity. Soil fertility is among the primary challenges faced by smallholder farmers, which necessitate the need to come up with affordable and innovative ways of replenishing soils. One such way is the use of microbial symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a beneficial group of soil microbiota that form symbiotic associations with majority of cultivated crops and play a vital role in biological soil fertility, plant nutrition, and protection. AMF can be incorporated in smallholder farming systems to help better exploit chemical fertilizers inputs which are often unaffordable to many smallholder farmers. The present review highlights smallholder farming practices that could be innovatively redesigned to increase AMF symbiosis and related agroecosystem services. Indeed, the future of global food security depends on the success of smallholder farming systems, whose crop productivity depends on the services provided by well-functioning ecosystems, including soil fertility. PMID:26942194

  10. Upscaling the pollutant emission from mixed recycled aggregates under compaction for civil applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvín, Adela P; Ayuso, Jesús; Barbudo, Auxi; Cabrera, Manuel; López-Uceda, Antonio; Rosales, Julia

    2017-12-27

    In general terms, plant managers of sites producing construction wastes assess materials according to concise, legally recommended leaching tests that do not consider the compaction stage of the materials when they are applied on-site. Thus, the tests do not account for the real on-site physical conditions of the recycled aggregates used in civil works (e.g., roads or embankments). This leads to errors in estimating the pollutant potential of these materials. For that reason, in the present research, an experimental procedure is designed as a leaching test for construction materials under compaction. The aim of this laboratory test (designed specifically for the granular materials used in civil engineering infrastructures) is to evaluate the release of pollutant elements when the recycled aggregate is tested at its commercial grain-size distribution and when the material is compacted under on-site conditions. Two recycled aggregates with different gypsum contents (0.95 and 2.57%) were used in this study. In addition to the designed leaching laboratory test, the conventional compliance leaching test and the Dutch percolation test were performed. The results of the new leaching method were compared with the conventional leaching test results. After analysis, the chromium and sulphate levels obtained from the newly designed test were lower than those obtained from the conventional leaching test, and these were considered more seriously pollutant elements. This result confirms that when the leaching behaviour is evaluated for construction aggregates without density alteration, crushing the aggregate and using only the finest fraction, as is done in the conventional test (which is an unrealistic situation for aggregates that are applied under on-site conditions), the leaching behaviour is not accurately assessed.

  11. Structural and physical property characterization in the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project — hole 1 (WFSD-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibing; Xu, Zhiqin; Niu, Yixiong; Kong, Guangsheng; Huang, Yao; Wang, Huan; Si, Jialiang; Sun, Zhiming; Pei, Junling; Gong, Zheng; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Liu, Dongliang

    2014-04-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) started right after the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake to investigate its faulting mechanism. Hole 1 (WFSD-1) reached the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF), and core samples were recovered from 32 to 1201.15 m-depth. Core investigation and a suite of geophysical downhole logs (including P-wave velocity, natural gamma ray, self-potential, resistivity, density, porosity, temperature, magnetic susceptibility and ultrasound borehole images) were acquired in WFSD-1. Integrated studies of cores and logs facilitate qualitative and quantitative comparison of the structures and physical properties of rocks. Logging data revealed that the geothermal gradient of the volcanic Pengguan complex (above 585.75 m) is 1.85 °C/100 m, while that of the sedimentary Xujiahe Formation (below 585.75 m) is 2.15 °C/100 m. In general, natural gamma ray, resistivity, density, porosity, P-wave velocity and magnetic susceptibility primarily depend on the rock lithology. All major fault zones are characterized by high magnetic susceptibility, low density and high porosity, with mostly low resistivity, high natural gamma ray and sound wave velocity. The high magnetic susceptibility values most likely result from the transformation of magnetic minerals by frictional heating due to the earthquake. The YBF exposed in WFSD-1 can be subdivided into five different parts based on different logging responses, each of them corresponding to certain fault-rocks. The high gamma radiation, porosity and P-wave velocity, as well as low resistivity and temperature anomalies indicate that the Wenchuan earthquake fault zone is located at 585.75-594.5 m-depth, with an average inclination and dip angle of N305° and 71°, respectively. The fact that the fracture directions in the hanging wall and footwall are different suggests that their stress field direction is completely different, implying that the upper Pengguan complex may not be local.

  12. Summary report on the up-scaling of the retention properties by matrix diffusion in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.

    2009-02-01

    Fractured rocks are composed of porous but almost impermeable rock matrix and water conducting fractures. The main characteristic of the fractured rock is the great heterogeneity in different scales that leads to preferential flow paths and channelling of the flow. Three distinct flow environments can be identified: channeling that causes variable flow in the individual fracture planes, transmissivity differences between fractures that leads to preferential flow paths and extensive fracture zones that provide highly transmissive connections over long distances. Large and transmissive fractures have an important role to the flow and transport properties of the fractured rock. Flow paths tend to accumulate on the large features that carry the majority of the flow. Modelling exercises have indicated persistence of the flow properties along the flow paths. This means that once a particle has entered a major flow path it tends to follow the high flow rate channel. The main challenge in spatial up-scaling of the retention properties is connected to the description of the flow characteristics in the fractured rock. The importance of individual fractures to the overall retention is proportional to the flow rate along the fracture. This means that simulations need to consider individual fractures. Fracture network modelling offers a suitable approach that is able to take into account the multiscale structure of the fractured rock and to determine retention properties of the flow paths. It also provides a straightforward way to up-scale transport properties along the preferential flow paths through the fracture network. However, the computational feasibility of the site scale applications in the performance assessment limits the range of different size fractures that can be taken into account in the fracture network simulations. Heterogeneity in the immobile zone properties may influence effective retention properties if the heterogeneity is coupled with a limited capacity

  13. Upscaling the recruitment and retention of human resources for health at primary healthcare centres in Lebanon: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Khodr, Hiba; Mourad, Yara; Yassoub, Rami; Abi Ramia, Jinane

    2016-05-01

    The sustainability of primary healthcare (PHC) worldwide has been challenged by a global shortage in human resources for health (HRH). This study is a unique attempt at systematically soliciting and synthesising the voice of PHC and community stakeholders on the HRH recruitment and retention strategies at the PHC sector in Lebanon, the obstacles and challenges hindering their optimisation and the recommendations to overcome such obstacles. A qualitative design was utilised, involving 22 semi-structured interviews with PHC experts in Lebanon conducted in 2013. Nvivo qualitative data analysis software was employed for the thematic analysis of data collected from interviews. Five comprehensive themes emerged: understanding PHC scope, HRH recruitment issues, HRH retention challenges, rural areas' specific challenges and stakeholders' recommendations. Analysis of stakeholders' responses revealed a lack of a unified understanding of the PHC scope impacting the capacity for appropriate HRH planning. Identified impediments to recruitment included the suboptimal supply of HRH, financial constraints and poor management. Retention difficulties were attributed to poor working environments, financial constraints and lack of professional development. There was consensus that HRH challenges faced were aggravated in rural areas, jeopardising the equitable access to PHC services of quality. Equitable access was also jeopardised by the reported shortage of female HRH in a sociocultural context where many females prefer providers of the same gender. The study sets the path towards upscaling recruitment and retention policies and practices through the endorsement of a nationally acknowledged PHC definition and scope, the sustainable development of the PHC workforce and through the implementation of targeted recruitment and retention strategies addressing rural settings and gender equity. Decision-makers and planners are urged to identify HRH as the most important input for the success

  14. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of

  15. Geophysical and physical measurements applied to characterize an area prone to quick clay landslides in SW Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Romero, Silvia; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Lougheed, Bryan C.; Hellqvist, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The study of quick clay landslides in Nordic countries, such as Sweden and Norway, is wide and varied. However, the occurrence of catastrophes like those in Munkedal, Sweden, in 2006, demands a more complete characterization of these materials and their extensiveness. The objectives of this research are mainly focused on obtaining information about the properties and behavior of quick clays in an area prone to landslides in southwestern Sweden. Two fieldwork campaigns were carried out in 2011 and 2013, using methods such as 2D and 3D P-wave and S-wave seismic, geoelectrics, controlled-source and radio-magnetotellurics, ground gravity, as well as downhole geophysics (measuring fluid temperature and conductivity, gamma radiation, sonic velocity and resistivity) performed in three boreholes located in the study area. Drill cores recovered using the SONIC technique provided samples for paleontological information, as well as laboratory measurements of physical properties of the subsurface materials to a maximum subsurface depth of about 60 m. The laboratory measurements included grain size analysis, mineral magnetic properties, electric conductivity, pH, salinity, total dissolved solids, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and a reconnaissance study of the fossil content. A correlation study of the downhole geophysical measurements, 2D seismic sections located at the intersection with the boreholes and the sample observations indicated that the presence of quick clays is associated with contacts with coarse-grained materials. Although the PVC casing of the boreholes interferes with the sonic and resistivity measurements, the perforated parts of the PVC casing show significant changes. The most important variations in magnetic susceptibility and conductivity mostly coincide with these coarse-grained layers, supporting the seismic data. Coarse-grained layers are characterized by enhanced magnetic susceptibility and conductivity. Grain size analysis results on subsamples from the

  16. Instantaneous-to-daily GPP upscaling schemes based on a coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model: correcting the overestimation of GPP by directly using daily average meteorological inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fumin; Gonsamo, Alemu; Chen, Jing M; Black, T Andrew; Zhou, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Daily canopy photosynthesis is usually temporally upscaled from instantaneous (i.e., seconds) photosynthesis rate. The nonlinear response of photosynthesis to meteorological variables makes the temporal scaling a significant challenge. In this study, two temporal upscaling schemes of daily photosynthesis, the integrated daily model (IDM) and the segmented daily model (SDM), are presented by considering the diurnal variations of meteorological variables based on a coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model. The two models, as well as a simple average daily model (SADM) with daily average meteorological inputs, were validated using the tower-derived gross primary production (GPP) to assess their abilities in simulating daily photosynthesis. The results showed IDM closely followed the seasonal trend of the tower-derived GPP with an average RMSE of 1.63 g C m(-2) day(-1), and an average Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E) of 0.87. SDM performed similarly to IDM in GPP simulation but decreased the computation time by >66%. SADM overestimated daily GPP by about 15% during the growing season compared to IDM. Both IDM and SDM greatly decreased the overestimation by SADM, and improved the simulation of daily GPP by reducing the RMSE by 34 and 30%, respectively. The results indicated that IDM and SDM are useful temporal upscaling approaches, and both are superior to SADM in daily GPP simulation because they take into account the diurnally varying responses of photosynthesis to meteorological variables. SDM is computationally more efficient, and therefore more suitable for long-term and large-scale GPP simulations.

  17. Upscaling the number of learners, fragmenting the role of teachers: How do massive open online courses (MOOCs) form new conditions for learning design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Pushpanadham, Karanam

    2018-03-01

    The proliferation and expansion of massive open online courses (MOOCs) prompts a need to revisit classical pedagogical questions. In what ways will MOOCs facilitate and promote new e-learning pedagogies? Is current learning design adequate for the "massiveness" and "openness" of MOOCs? This article discusses the ways in which MOOCs create new conditions for designing learning processes. The authors present various theoretical approaches to learning design and discuss a combination of theoretical perspectives. They discern a fragmentation of the teacher role; where the teacher was once the main person responsible for planning, practice and reflection, those activities may now be performed by different actors with different areas of responsibility. The theoretical discussion is complemented by a review of recent studies of new practices and design formats aiming to overcome the upscaling issues of MOOCs. The authors present a multifaceted picture of MOOC methodologies, including a typology of hybrid approaches to MOOC design. Through the example of MOOC implementation in India, they address the integration of MOOCs into formal higher education systems. They conclude their article with the contention that, through upscaling, important facets of students' intellectual development and critical thinking might be left to the students themselves. This may cause problems. Adequate scaffolding from a teacher, such as adapting activities to the specific situation, might be needed to develop the skills required to be a self-directed learner. Furthermore, upscaling seems to promote a separation of the formerly unified teacher functions of planning, teaching and assessing, which necessitates increased collaboration among the many new actors in the field of pedagogy.

  18. Up-scaling of a two-phase flow model including gravity effect in geological heterogeneous media: application to CO2 sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Tri-Dat

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the migration under gravity and capillarity effects of the supercritical CO 2 injected into a geological heterogeneous sequestration site. The simulations are performed with the code DuMux. Particularly, we consider the up-scaling, from the cell scale to the reservoir scale, of a two-phase (CO 2 -brine) flow model within a periodic stratified medium made up of horizontal low permeability barriers, continuous or discontinuous. The up-scaling is done by the two-scale asymptotic method. First, we consider perfectly layered media. An homogenized model is developed and validated by numerical simulation for different values of capillary number and the incident flux of CO 2 . The homogenization method is then applied to the case of a two-dimensional medium made up of discontinuous layers. Due to the gravity effect, the CO 2 accumulates under the low permeability layers, which leads to a non-standard local mathematical problem. This stratification is modeled using the gravity current approach. This approach is then extended to the case of semi-permeable strata taking into account the capillarity. The up-scaled model is compared with numerical simulations for different types of layers, with or without capillary pressure, and its limit of validity is discussed in each of these cases. The final part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the parallel computing performances of the code DuMux to simulate the injection and migration of CO 2 in three-dimensional heterogeneous media (layered periodic media, fluvial media and reservoir model SPE 10). (author) [fr

  19. CONSORT to community: translation of an RCT to a large-scale community intervention and learnings from evaluation of the upscaled program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Carly Jane; Miller, Jacqueline; Perry, Rebecca Anne; Chan, Lily Lai Hang; Daniels, Lynne Allison; Vidgen, Helen Anna; Magarey, Anthea Margaret

    2017-11-29

    Translation encompasses the continuum from clinical efficacy to widespread adoption within the healthcare service and ultimately routine clinical practice. The Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health (PEACH™) program has previously demonstrated clinical effectiveness in the management of child obesity, and has been recently implemented as a large-scale community intervention in Queensland, Australia. This paper aims to describe the translation of the evaluation framework from a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to large-scale community intervention (PEACH™ QLD). Tensions between RCT paradigm and implementation research will be discussed along with lived evaluation challenges, responses to overcome these, and key learnings for future evaluation conducted at scale. The translation of evaluation from PEACH™ RCT to the large-scale community intervention PEACH™ QLD is described. While the CONSORT Statement was used to report findings from two previous RCTs, the REAIM framework was more suitable for the evaluation of upscaled delivery of the PEACH™ program. Evaluation of PEACH™ QLD was undertaken during the project delivery period from 2013 to 2016. Experiential learnings from conducting the evaluation of PEACH™ QLD to the described evaluation framework are presented for the purposes of informing the future evaluation of upscaled programs. Evaluation changes in response to real-time changes in the delivery of the PEACH™ QLD Project were necessary at stages during the project term. Key evaluation challenges encountered included the collection of complete evaluation data from a diverse and geographically dispersed workforce and the systematic collection of process evaluation data in real time to support program changes during the project. Evaluation of large-scale community interventions in the real world is challenging and divergent from RCTs which are rigourously evaluated within a more tightly-controlled clinical research setting. Constructs

  20. Parent engagement and attendance in PEACH™ QLD – an up-scaled parent-led childhood obesity program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. Williams

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health (PEACH™ is a multicomponent treatment program delivered over ten group sessions to parents of overweight/obese primary school-aged children. It has been shown to be efficacious in an RCT and was recently translated to a large-scale community intervention funded by the Queensland (Australia Government. Engagement (enrolment and attendance was critical to achieving program outcomes and was challenging. The purpose of the present study was to examine sample characteristics and mediating factors that potentially influenced program attendance. Methods Data collected from parents who attended at least one PEACH™ Queensland session delivered between October 2013 and October 2015 (47 programs implemented in 29 discrete sites, was used in preliminary descriptive analyses of sample characteristics and multilevel single linear regression analyses. Mediation analysis examined associations between socio-demographic and parent characteristics and attendance at group sessions and potential mediation by child and parent factors. Results 365/467 (78% enrolled families (92% mothers including 411/519 (79% children (55% girls, mean age 9 ± 2 years attended at least one session (mean 5.6 ± 3.2. A majority of families (69% self-referred to the program. Program attendance was greater in: advantaged (5.9 ± 3.1 sessions vs disadvantaged families (5.4 ± 3.4 sessions (p < 0.05; partnered (6.1 ± 3.1 sessions vs un-partnered parents (5.0 ± 3.1 sessions (p < 0.01; higher educated (6.1 ± 3.0 sessions vs lower educated parents (5.1 ± 3.3 sessions (p = 0.02; and self-referral (6.1 ± 3.1 vs professional referral (4.7 ± 3.3 (p < 0.001. Child (age, gender, pre-program healthy eating and parent (perceptions of child weight, self-efficacy factors did not mediate these relationships. Conclusions To promote reach and effectiveness of up-scaled programs, it is important to

  1. Parent engagement and attendance in PEACH™ QLD - an up-scaled parent-led childhood obesity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan L; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Magarey, Anthea; Moores, Carly J; Croyden, Debbie; Esdaile, Emma; Daniels, Lynne

    2017-06-09

    Parenting, Eating and Activity for Child Health (PEACH™) is a multicomponent treatment program delivered over ten group sessions to parents of overweight/obese primary school-aged children. It has been shown to be efficacious in an RCT and was recently translated to a large-scale community intervention funded by the Queensland (Australia) Government. Engagement (enrolment and attendance) was critical to achieving program outcomes and was challenging. The purpose of the present study was to examine sample characteristics and mediating factors that potentially influenced program attendance. Data collected from parents who attended at least one PEACH™ Queensland session delivered between October 2013 and October 2015 (47 programs implemented in 29 discrete sites), was used in preliminary descriptive analyses of sample characteristics and multilevel single linear regression analyses. Mediation analysis examined associations between socio-demographic and parent characteristics and attendance at group sessions and potential mediation by child and parent factors. 365/467 (78%) enrolled families (92% mothers) including 411/519 (79%) children (55% girls, mean age 9 ± 2 years) attended at least one session (mean 5.6 ± 3.2). A majority of families (69%) self-referred to the program. Program attendance was greater in: advantaged (5.9 ± 3.1 sessions) vs disadvantaged families (5.4 ± 3.4 sessions) (p parents (5.0 ± 3.1 sessions) (p parents (5.1 ± 3.3 sessions) (p = 0.02); and self-referral (6.1 ± 3.1) vs professional referral (4.7 ± 3.3) (p parent (perceptions of child weight, self-efficacy) factors did not mediate these relationships. To promote reach and effectiveness of up-scaled programs, it is important to identify ways to engage less advantaged families who carry higher child obesity risk. Understanding differences in referral source and parent readiness for change may assist in tailoring program content. The influence of program

  2. Physical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Schulman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    "Protons, electrons, positrons, quarks, gluons, muons, shmuons! I should have paid better attention to my high scholl physics teacher. If I had, maybe I could have understood even a fration of what Israeli particle physicist Giora Mikenberg was talking about when explaining his work on the world's largest science experiment." (2 pages)

  3. Upscaling microstructured emulsification devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions, which are dispersions of two immiscible liquids (e.g. oil and water), are part of our daily life through many products that we use such as milk, mayonnaise, salad dressings, ice cream, lotions, shampoos, medicines, wall paints, etc. Many quality attributes of these products such as

  4. Upscaling of Forchheimer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Aulisa, Eugenio; Bloshanskaya, Lidia I.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Ibragimov, Akif I.

    2014-01-01

    analytical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1] and formulate the resulting system in terms of a degenerate nonlinear flow equation for the pressure with the nonlinearity depending on the pressure gradient. The coarse scale parameters for the steady state

  5. THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS ASTEROID 2004 BL86: A FRAGMENT OF A DIFFERENTIATED ASTEROID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Takir, Driss; Corre, Lucille Le [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gary, Bruce L. [Hereford Arizona Observatory, Hereford, AZ 85615 (United States); Thomas, Cristina A. [NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hardersen, Paul S. [Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Ogmen, Yenal [Green Island Observatory, Geçitkale, Maǧusa, via Mersin 10  North Cyprus (Turkey); Benni, Paul [Acton Sky Portal, 3 Concetta Circle, Acton, MA 01720 (United States); Kaye, Thomas G. [Raemor Vista Observatory, Sierra Vista, AZ 85650 (United States); Gregorio, Joao [Atalaia Group, Crow Observatory (Portalegre) Travessa da Cidreira, 2 rc D, 2645-039 Alcabideche (Portugal); Garlitz, Joe [1155 Hartford Street, Elgin, OR 97827 (United States); Polishook, David [Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl Street 234, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Nathues, Andreas, E-mail: reddy@psi.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-09-20

    The physical characterization of potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) is important for impact hazard assessment and evaluating mitigation options. Close flybys of PHAs provide an opportunity to study their surface photometric and spectral properties that enable the identification of their source regions in the main asteroid belt. We observed PHA (357439) 2004 BL86 during a close flyby of the Earth at a distance of 1.2 million km (0.0080 AU) on 2015 January 26, with an array of ground-based telescopes to constrain its photometric and spectral properties. Lightcurve observations showed that the asteroid was a binary and subsequent radar observations confirmed the binary nature and gave a primary diameter of 300 m and a secondary diameter of 50–100 m. Our photometric observations were used to derive the phase curve of 2004 BL86 in the V-band. Two different photometric functions were fitted to this phase curve, the IAU H–G model and the Shevchenko model. From the fit of the H–G function we obtained an absolute magnitude of H = 19.51 ± 0.02 and a slope parameter of G = 0.34 ± 0.02. The Shevchenko function yielded an absolute magnitude of H = 19.03 ± 0.07 and a phase coefficient b = 0.0225 ± 0.0006. The phase coefficient was used to calculate the geometric albedo (Ag) using the relationship found by Belskaya and Schevchenko, obtaining a value of Ag = 40% ± 8% in the V-band. With the geometric albedo and the absolute magnitudes derived from the H–G and the Shevchenko functions we calculated the diameter (D) of 2004 BL86, obtaining D = 263 ± 26 and D = 328 ± 35 m, respectively. 2004 BL86 spectral band parameters and pyroxene chemistry are consistent with non-cumulate eucrite meteorites. A majority of these meteorites are derived from Vesta and are analogous with surface lava flows on a differentiated parent body. A non-diagnostic spectral curve match using the Modeling for Asteroids tool yielded a best-match with non-cumulate eucrite Bereba. Three other

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Fluid Flow in Continental Carbonate Reservoir Rocks and in Upscaled Rock Models Generated with Multiple-Point Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcomputed tomography (μCT and Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM simulations were applied to continental carbonates to quantify fluid flow. Fluid flow characteristics in these complex carbonates with multiscale pore networks are unique and the applied method allows studying their heterogeneity and anisotropy. 3D pore network models were introduced to single-phase flow simulations in Palabos, a software tool for particle-based modelling of classic computational fluid dynamics. In addition, permeability simulations were also performed on rock models generated with multiple-point geostatistics (MPS. This allowed assessing the applicability of MPS in upscaling high-resolution porosity patterns into large rock models that exceed the volume limitations of the μCT. Porosity and tortuosity control fluid flow in these porous media. Micro- and mesopores influence flow properties at larger scales in continental carbonates. Upscaling with MPS is therefore necessary to overcome volume-resolution problems of CT scanning equipment. The presented LBM-MPS workflow is applicable to other lithologies, comprising different pore types, shapes, and pore networks altogether. The lack of straightforward porosity-permeability relationships in complex carbonates highlights the necessity for a 3D approach. 3D fluid flow studies provide the best understanding of flow through porous media, which is of crucial importance in reservoir modelling.

  7. Challenges in Upscaling Geomorphic Transport Laws: Scale-dependence of Local vs. Non-local Formalisms and Derivation of Closures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ganti, V. K.; Passalacqua, P.

    2010-12-01

    Nonlinear geomorphic transport laws are often derived from mechanistic considerations at a point, and yet they are implemented on 90m or 30 m DEMs, presenting a mismatch in the scales of derivation and application of the flux laws. Since estimates of local slopes and curvatures are known to depend on the scale of the DEM used in their computation, two questions arise: (1) how to meaningfully compensate for the scale dependence, if any, of local transport laws? and (2) how to formally derive, via upscaling, constitutive laws that are applicable at larger scales? Recently, non-local geomorphic transport laws for sediment transport on hillslopes have been introduced using the concept of an integral flux that depends on topographic attributes in the vicinity of a point of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate the scale dependence of local nonlinear hillslope sediment transport laws and derive a closure term via upscaling (Reynolds averaging). We also show that the non-local hillslope transport laws are inherently scale independent owing to their non-local, scale-free nature. These concepts are demonstrated via an application to a small subbasin of the Oregon Coast Range using 2m LiDAR topographic data.

  8. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends

  9. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ∼2 m DIAMETER NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID 2015 TC25: A POSSIBLE BOULDER FROM E-TYPE ASTEROID (44) NYSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Bottke, William F.; Thirouin, Audrey; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Kelley, Michael S.; Ryan, William; Cloutis, Edward A.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Ryan, Eileen V.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Richardson, James E.; Le Corre, Lucille; Moskovitz, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) (<20 m) are interesting, because they are progenitors for meteorites in our terrestrial collection. The physical characteristics of these small NEAs are crucial to our understanding of the effectiveness of our atmosphere in filtering low-strength impactors. In the past, the characterization of small NEAs has been a challenge, because of the difficulty in detecting them prior to close Earth flyby. In this study, we physically characterized the 2 m diameter NEA 2015 TC25 using ground-based optical, near-infrared and radar assets during a close flyby of the Earth (distance 128,000 km) in 2015 October 12. Our observations suggest that its surface composition is similar to aubrites, a rare class of high-albedo differentiated meteorites. Aubrites make up only 0.14% of all known meteorites in our terrestrial meteorite collection. 2015 TC25 is also a very fast rotator with a period of 133 ± 6 s. We combined the spectral and dynamical properties of 2015 TC25 and found the best candidate source body in the inner main belt to be the 70 km diameter E-type asteroid (44) Nysa. We attribute the difference in spectral slope between the two objects to the lack of regolith on the surface of 2015 TC25. Using the albedo of E-type asteroids (50%–60%) we refine the diameter of 2015 TC25 to 2 m, making it one of the smallest NEAs ever to be characterized.

  10. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ∼2 m DIAMETER NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID 2015 TC25: A POSSIBLE BOULDER FROM E-TYPE ASTEROID (44) NYSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Bottke, William F.; Thirouin, Audrey; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Kelley, Michael S.; Ryan, William; Cloutis, Edward A.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Ryan, Eileen V.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Richardson, James E.; Le Corre, Lucille [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Moskovitz, Nicholas [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) (<20 m) are interesting, because they are progenitors for meteorites in our terrestrial collection. The physical characteristics of these small NEAs are crucial to our understanding of the effectiveness of our atmosphere in filtering low-strength impactors. In the past, the characterization of small NEAs has been a challenge, because of the difficulty in detecting them prior to close Earth flyby. In this study, we physically characterized the 2 m diameter NEA 2015 TC25 using ground-based optical, near-infrared and radar assets during a close flyby of the Earth (distance 128,000 km) in 2015 October 12. Our observations suggest that its surface composition is similar to aubrites, a rare class of high-albedo differentiated meteorites. Aubrites make up only 0.14% of all known meteorites in our terrestrial meteorite collection. 2015 TC25 is also a very fast rotator with a period of 133 ± 6 s. We combined the spectral and dynamical properties of 2015 TC25 and found the best candidate source body in the inner main belt to be the 70 km diameter E-type asteroid (44) Nysa. We attribute the difference in spectral slope between the two objects to the lack of regolith on the surface of 2015 TC25. Using the albedo of E-type asteroids (50%–60%) we refine the diameter of 2015 TC25 to 2 m, making it one of the smallest NEAs ever to be characterized.

  11. Characterizing Gaseous Fuels for Their Knock Resistance based on the Chemical and Physical Properties of the Fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; van Essen, Martijn; van Dijk, Gerco

    2016-01-01

    A method is described to characterize the effects of changes in the composition of gaseous fuels on engine knock by computing the autoignition process during the compression and burn periods of the engine cycle. To account for the effects of fuel composition on the in-cylinder pressure and

  12. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions

  13. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  14. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms; Caracterizacao de materiais tecido-equivalentes para uso em construcao de fantomas fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edvan V. de, E-mail: edvanmsn@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H. de, E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cenen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials.

  15. Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, M.S.; Hannon, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 21 ) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF 6 process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO 2 F 2 is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO 2 F 2 -nH 2 O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits

  16. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  17. Identification and Mapping of Simple Sequence Repeat Markers from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome End Sequences for Genome Characterization and Genetic–Physical Map Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M. Córdoba

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers or simple sequence repeat (SSR loci are useful for diversity characterization and genetic–physical mapping. Different in silico microsatellite search methods have been developed for mining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences for SSRs. The overall goal of this study was genome characterization based on SSRs in 89,017 BAC end sequences (BESs from the G19833 common bean ( L. library. Another objective was to identify new SSR taking into account three tandem motif identification programs (Automated Microsatellite Marker Development [AMMD], Tandem Repeats Finder [TRF], and SSRLocator [SSRL]. Among the microsatellite search engines, SSRL identified the highest number of SSRs; however, when primer design was attempted, the number dropped due to poor primer design regions. Automated Microsatellite Marker Development software identified many SSRs with valuable AT/TA or AG/TC motifs, while TRF found fewer SSRs and produced no primers. A subgroup of 323 AT-rich, di-, and trinucleotide SSRs were selected from the AMMD results and used in a parental survey with DOR364 and G19833, of which 75 could be mapped in the corresponding population; these represented 4052 BAC clones. Together with 92 previously mapped BES- and 114 non-BES-derived markers, a total of 280 SSRs were included in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based map, integrating a total of 8232 BAC clones in 162 contigs from the physical map.

  18. Physical characterization and sanitary conditions of cheese type cabacinha market places in three municipalities of the Jequitinhonha Valley, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair da Silva Santos Filho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese type cabacinha from Vale do Jequitinhonha is obtained by curd heating in a similar process made to Mozzarella, but the raw milk is unpasteurized and the final product is stored unpackaged and at room temperature. This milk derivative may contribute to the increase the income of the local population, especially the residents of the edges of roads, due to the flow of vehicles and possible buyers. The purpose of this work was to identify the physical and sanitary conditions of cheese type cabacinha market places present in three municipalities of the Vale do Jequitinhonha, MG, Brazil. Previously the investigation was detected the number of marketplaces that sell these cheese in the Medina, Cachoeira de Pajeú and Pedra Azul, municipalities of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, located on the surrounding area of the highways BR 251 and BR 116. Afterward as developed a physical and sanitary checklist and it were filled in loco. It was observed that most market places were not provided of masonry walls, piped water or toilet and sink. It is also common to the presence of possible contamination vectors in surroundings, such as dogs and insects. It is verified that most of these cheese is exposed in pairs held by string and unpackaged. This study demonstrated the precariousness of the physical structures and consequently the lack of adequate sanitary conditions in the cheese type cabacinha market places. Because it is an artisanal product from family farming, which generates income and employment in the field deserve more attention of competent state and municipal authorities.

  19. Estimating and Up-Scaling Fuel Moisture and Leaf Dry Matter Content of a Temperate Humid Forest Using Multi Resolution Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Adab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation moisture and dry matter content are important indicators in predicting the behavior of fire and it is widely used in fire spread models. In this study, leaf fuel moisture content such as Live Fuel Moisture Content (LFMC, Leaf Relative Water Content (RWC, Dead Fuel Moisture Content (DFMC, and Leaf Dry Matter Content (LDMC (hereinafter known as moisture content indices (MCI were calculated in the field for different forest species at 32 sites in a temperate humid forest (Zaringol forest located in northeastern Iran. These data and several relevant vegetation-biophysical indices and atmospheric variables calculated using Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ data with moderate spatial resolution (30 m were used to estimate MCI of the Zaringol forest using Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR methods. The prediction of MCI using ANN showed that ETM+ predicted MCI slightly better (Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE of 6%–12% than MLR (MAPE between 8% and 17%. Once satisfactory results in estimating MCI were obtained by using ANN from ETM+ data, these data were then upscaled to estimate MCI using MODIS data for daily monitoring of leaf water and leaf dry matter content at 500 m spatial resolution. For MODIS derived LFMC, LDMC, RWC, and DLMC, the ANN produced a MAPE between 11% and 29% for the indices compared to MLR which produced an MAPE of 14%–33%. In conclusion, we suggest that upscaling is necessary for solving the scale discrepancy problems between the indicators and low spatial resolution MODIS data. The scaling up of MCI could be used for pre-fire alert system and thereby can detect fire prone areas in near real time for fire-fighting operations.

  20. New index based on the physical separation of motion into three categories for characterizing the effect of cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hiroto; Nakatomi, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Chihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Hanai, Kazumitsu

    2013-09-21

    Characterization of open-field behavior and locomotor activity is widely used to assess the influence of a drug on mouse or rat behavior. In this study, we developed an index for characterizing the behavior of cocaine-administered mice (C57BL/6, DBA/2, and BALB/c). Because a three-exponential-model exhibited the best fit to the obtained data among the different probability density functions, we divided each walking episode into three categories according to the duration of movement. We found a significant difference in decay variation of mean speed with time in the case of long walking duration. To clarify this difference quantitatively, we developed an index for the changes in locomotion control, based on a heuristic argument regarding the ratio of the coefficients of the drag term obtained by the biphasic motion-equation model. The index had a significant dose-related effect in each strain and a significant strain effect in high-concentration drug. Therefore, it would thus be useful for examining the effect of the drug on locomotor activity in mice. Moreover, evaluating other characters suggested previously, the proposed index had good advantage to differentiate the dose-related response in the three species of inbred mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploitation of cloud top characterization from three-channel IR measurements in a physical PMW rain retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Torricella

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall intensity estimates by passive microwave (PMW measurements from space perform generally better over the sea surface with respect to land, due to the problems in separating true rain signatures from those produced by surfaces having similar spectral behaviour (e.g. snow, ice, desert and semiarid grounds. The screening procedure aimed at recognizing the various surface types and delimit precipitation is based on tests that rely on PMW measurements only and global thresholds. The shortcoming is that the approach tries to discard spurious precipitating features (often detected over the land-sea border thus leading to no-rain conservative tests and thresholds. The TRMM mission, with its long record of simultaneous data from the Visible and Infrared Radiometer System (VIRS, the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI and rain profiles from the Precipitation Radar (PR allows for unambiguous testing of the usefulness of cloud top characterization in rain detection. An intense precipitation event over the North Africa is analysed exploiting a night microphysical RGB scheme applied to VIRS measurements to classify and characterize the components of the observed scenario and to discriminate the various types of clouds. This classification is compared to the rain intensity maps derived from TMI by means of the Goddard profiling algorithm and to the near-surface rain intensities derived from PR. The comparison allows to quantify the difference between the two rain retrievals and to assess the usefulness of RGB analysis in identifying areas of precipitation.

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of composite flour from canna flour (Canna edulis) and lima bean flour (Phaseolus lunatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseptiangga, Danar; Tryas, Anisha Ayuning; Affandi, Dian Rachmawanti; Atmaka, Windi; Ariyantoro, Achmad Ridwan; Minardi, Slamet

    2018-02-01

    The diversity of Indonesian local food sources has potential to be developed for supporting food security based development of local food diversification. Canna tubers (Canna edulis) and lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) are two local commodities in Indonesia which under is utilization and has limited assessment to its characteristics. This study aimed at determining the best formula of composite flour based on physical and chemical properties of composite flour produced. There were three formulas, F1 for 85% of canna flour and 15%of lima beans flour, F2 for 70% of canna flour and 30% of lima beans flour and F3 for 55% of canna flour and 45% of lima beans flour. Physical and chemical analyses were conducted and completely randomized design was used. De Garmo analysis was then used to determine the highest effectiveness index from the three formulas developed in this study and F3 demonstrated the highest effectiveness index (0.545) among three formulas evaluated. Thus, formula (F3) was selected as the best composite of the flour developed from canna flour and lima beans flour.

  3. Brain serotonin synthesis in adult males characterized by physical aggression during childhood: a 21-year longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Booij

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adults exhibiting severe impulsive and aggressive behaviors have multiple indices of low serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission. It remains unclear though whether low 5-HT mediates the behavior or instead reflects a pre-existing vulnerability trait.In the present study, positron emission tomography with the tracer alpha-[(11C]methyl-L-tryptophan ((11C-AMT was used to compare 5-HT synthesis capacity in two groups of adult males from a 21-year longitudinal study (mean age +/- SD: 27.1+/-0.7: individuals with a history of childhood-limited high physical aggression (C-LHPA; N = 8 and individuals with normal (low patterns of physical aggression (LPA; N = 18. The C-LHPA males had significantly lower trapping of (11C-AMT bilaterally in the orbitofrontal cortex and self-reported more impulsiveness. Despite this, in adulthood there were no group differences in plasma tryptophan levels, genotyping, aggression, emotional intelligence, working memory, computerized measures of impulsivity, psychosocial functioning/adjustment, and personal and family history of mood and substance abuse disorders.These results force a re-examination of the low 5-HT hypothesis as central in the biology of violence. They suggest that low 5-HT does not mediate current behavior and should be considered a vulnerability factor for impulsive-aggressive behavior that may or may not be expressed depending on other biological factors, experience, and environmental support during development.

  4. Review on physical and chemical characterizations of contaminated sediments from urban stormwater infiltration basins within the framework of the French observatory for urban hydrology (SOERE URBIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mufleh, Amelène; Béchet, Béatrice; Ruban, Véronique; Legret, Michel; Clozel, Blandine; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Delolme, Cécile

    2014-04-01

    Urban stormwater infiltration basins are designed to hold runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of sediments and associated pollutants. However concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants on groundwater, soils and ecosystems. In this context, sediment characterization represents a key issue for local authorities in terms of management strategies. During the last two decades, several studies were launched including either physical or chemical characterization of stormwater sediments but without real synthesis of data and methods used. Consequently, there is an important need for reviewing the current experimental techniques devoted to the physico-chemical characterization of sediment. The review is based on the outcomes of two experimental sites for which long term monitoring and data collection have been done: the Cheviré basin (near Nantes) and the Django Reinhardt basin (near Lyon). The authors summarize the studies dealing with bulk properties, pollutant contents, their potential mobility and speciation. This paper aims at promoting the significant progresses that were made through a multidisciplinary approach involving multi-scaled and combined experimental techniques.

  5. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO: chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Hersey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1–2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Regardless of regime, organic aerosol (OA is the most significant constituent of nonrefractory submicron Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55 % of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively. The overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively, with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA in Los Angeles. Online analysis of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC indicates that water soluble organic mass (WSOM reaches maxima near 14:00–15:00 local time (LT, but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly

  6. Preparation and characterization of nano fluids: Influence of variables on its stability, agglomeration state and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, R.; Julia, J. E.; Barba, A.; Jarque, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years it has spread the use of suspensions containing nano metre sized particles, known as nano fluids, in many applications owing the good properties having nanocrystalline materials. One of the main advantages of using nano fluids is its high stability, which causes the particles do not settle over long periods of time. This stability depends on the preparation conditions such as pH, the presence of electrolytes or the solids content. Moreover, there are a number of physical properties which are influenced and altered by agglomeration of the particles. This article will analyze all the variables that affect agglomeration of the particles, nano fluids stability and properties from which it can obtain information on the state of suspension. It then lays out the different methods of dispersion of nanoparticles and their effectiveness. (Author)

  7. Preparation And Characterization Of Microporous Activated Carbon From Oil Palm Shell By Physical Activation Using Purified Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwar Allwar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Oil palm shell, a byproduct of palm oil industry was successfully used as a raw material for the production of highly porous activated carbons. Preparation of activated carbon was carried out by physical activation under nitrogen at various activation temperatures. The nitrogen isotherms show Type I characteristics of microporous activated carbon. The maximum surface areas obtained at 900oC was 936 m2g-1. The morphology structure of the activated carbon indicated the existence of the porosities with different size pores. Keywords: Oil palm shell; Micropores; Physical activation; Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm

  8. Characterization of electron-beam-modified surface coated clay fillers and their influence on physical properties of rubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Sudip; Bhowmick, Anil K.; Sarma, K.S.S.; Majali, A.B.; Tikku, V.K.

    2002-01-01

    A novel process of surface modification of clay filler has been developed by coating this with an acrylate monomer, trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or a silane coupling agent, triethoxy vinyl silane (TEVS) followed by electron beam irradiation. Characterization of these surface modified fillers has been carried out by Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), wettability by dynamic wicking method measuring the rise of a liquid through a filler-packed capillary tube and water flotation test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Presence of the acrylate and the silane coupling agent on the modified fillers has been confirmed from FTIR, ESCA, and EDX studies, which has also been supported by TGA studies. The contact angle measurement by dynamic wicking method suggests improvement in hydrophobicity of the treated fillers, which is supported by water flotation test especially in the case of silanized clay. However, XRD studies demonstrate that the entire modification process does not affect the bulk properties of the fillers. Finally, both unmodified and modified clay fillers have been incorporated in styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and nitrile rubber (NBR). Rheometric and mechanical properties reveal that there is a definite improvement using these modified fillers specially in the case of silanized clay compared to the control sample, probably due to successful enhancement in interaction between the treated clay and the base polymer

  9. Synthesis, characterization and study of some physical properties of some lanthanide complexes of salicylaldehyde oxal-dihydrazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, S.; Rao, T.R.; Narang, K.K.; Shrestha, S.P.

    2006-05-01

    Some Lanthanoid complexes of the type [Ln (L-2H).A.H 2 O] [Ln = Y, La, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, A=OAc; and L = Salicyaldehyde oxal di-hydrazone] was synthesized and characterized by various physico- chemical techniques. Dehydration study at two specific temperatures (110 deg. C and 150 deg. C) indicates the presence of water molecules only in co-ordination sphere of the metal ion. IR, electronic spectra, DTA-TG have been recorded to establish the bonding sites of the ligand. All the complexes decomposed above and not melting up to 350 deg. C. The complexes are insoluble in any common organic solvent even in DMF and DMSO. Solid state electrical conductivities at various frequencies show a semiconducting nature of the complexes. Optical band gap measurement of the complex [Dy(SODH-2H).OAc.H 2 O] shows that complex behaves as direct band gap material. No well-defined peaks, except broad humps were observed in X-ray diffractogram of these complexes, indicating an amorphous nature of the complexes. (author)

  10. Characterization of electron-beam-modified surface coated clay fillers and their influence on physical properties of rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sudip; Bhowmick, Anil K.; Sarma, K. S. S.; Majali, A. B.; Tikku, V. K.

    2002-12-01

    A novel process of surface modification of clay filler has been developed by coating this with an acrylate monomer, trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or a silane coupling agent, triethoxy vinyl silane (TEVS) followed by electron beam irradiation. Characterization of these surface modified fillers has been carried out by Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), wettability by dynamic wicking method measuring the rise of a liquid through a filler-packed capillary tube and water flotation test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Presence of the acrylate and the silane coupling agent on the modified fillers has been confirmed from FTIR, ESCA, and EDX studies, which has also been supported by TGA studies. The contact angle measurement by dynamic wicking method suggests improvement in hydrophobicity of the treated fillers, which is supported by water flotation test especially in the case of silanized clay. However, XRD studies demonstrate that the entire modification process does not affect the bulk properties of the fillers. Finally, both unmodified and modified clay fillers have been incorporated in styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and nitrile rubber (NBR). Rheometric and mechanical properties reveal that there is a definite improvement using these modified fillers specially in the case of silanized clay compared to the control sample, probably due to successful enhancement in interaction between the treated clay and the base polymer.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of Ag-doped Ti coatings produced by magnetron sputtering of modular targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Tobias; Warmuth, Franziska; Werner, Ewald; Hertl, Cornelia; Groll, Jürgen; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Silver-doped Ti films were produced using a single magnetron sputtering source equipped with a titanium target containing implemented silver modules under variation of bias voltage and substrate temperature. The Ti(Ag) films were characterized regarding their morphology, contact angle, phase composition, silver content and distribution as well as the elution of Ag + ions into cell media. SEM and AFM pictures showed that substrate heating during film deposition supported the formation of even and dense surface layers with small roughness values, an effect that could even be enforced, when a substrate bias voltage was applied instead. The deposition of both Ti and Ag was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. ICP-MS and EDX showed a clear correlation between the applied sputtering parameters and the silver content of the coatings. Surface-sensitive XPS measurements revealed that higher substrate temperatures led to an accumulation of Ag in the near-surface region, while the application of a bias voltage had the opposite effect. Additional elution measurements using ICP-MS showed that the release kinetics depended on the amount of silver located at the film surface and hence could be tailored by variation of the sputter parameters. - Highlights: • Modular targets were used to deposit Ti(Ag) films. • Ag-content is adjustable by bias voltage, sputtering power and substrate temperature. • Coating parameters significantly change film morphology and roughness. • A critical parameter for Ag release is the fraction of silver on the film surface

  12. Characterization and in vitro biocompatibility study of Ti–Si–N nanocomposite coatings developed by using physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Pramanshu; Gupta, Pallavi [Centre of Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 India (India); Srivastava, Swati [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India); Jayaganthan, R., E-mail: rjayafmt@iitr.ernet.in [Centre of Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 India (India); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India); Chandra, Ramesh [Nanoscience Laboratory, Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India); Roy, Partha [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India)

    2014-02-28

    Amongst the Ti alloys used as orthopedic implant materials, Ti6Al4V is one of the widely used alloys. Magnetron sputtering was used to deposit nanocomposite coating of Ti–Si–N on the Ti6Al4V substrate at different power and then the coating structure and surface properties were characterized through contact angle measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In vitro biocompatibility of the coatings was assessed by using mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mBMMSC). Antibacterial studies were performed using Escherichia coli (E. coli) microorganisms. The osteogenic differentiation was also carried out in order to get gene expressions. The AFM results confirmed that the coatings deposited at 120 W was smoother as compared to other coatings developed at different power, along with optimum contact angle, also these coatings showed good antibacterial results. The fluorescent and viability results of 120 W sample confirmed their good biocompatibility as compared to the coatings deposited 20, 40, 60, and 100 W power. Hence, the coating deposited at 120 W exhibit desirable microstructural characteristics beneficial for surface modification of orthopedic implants.

  13. Characterization and in vitro biocompatibility study of Ti–Si–N nanocomposite coatings developed by using physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Pramanshu; Gupta, Pallavi; Srivastava, Swati; Jayaganthan, R.; Chandra, Ramesh; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Amongst the Ti alloys used as orthopedic implant materials, Ti6Al4V is one of the widely used alloys. Magnetron sputtering was used to deposit nanocomposite coating of Ti–Si–N on the Ti6Al4V substrate at different power and then the coating structure and surface properties were characterized through contact angle measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In vitro biocompatibility of the coatings was assessed by using mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mBMMSC). Antibacterial studies were performed using Escherichia coli (E. coli) microorganisms. The osteogenic differentiation was also carried out in order to get gene expressions. The AFM results confirmed that the coatings deposited at 120 W was smoother as compared to other coatings developed at different power, along with optimum contact angle, also these coatings showed good antibacterial results. The fluorescent and viability results of 120 W sample confirmed their good biocompatibility as compared to the coatings deposited 20, 40, 60, and 100 W power. Hence, the coating deposited at 120 W exhibit desirable microstructural characteristics beneficial for surface modification of orthopedic implants

  14. Characterization and in vitro biocompatibility study of Ti-Si-N nanocomposite coatings developed by using physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pramanshu; gupta, Pallavi; Srivastava, Swati; Jayaganthan, R.; Chandra, Ramesh; Roy, Partha

    2014-02-01

    Amongst the Ti alloys used as orthopedic implant materials, Ti6Al4V is one of the widely used alloys. Magnetron sputtering was used to deposit nanocomposite coating of Ti-Si-N on the Ti6Al4V substrate at different power and then the coating structure and surface properties were characterized through contact angle measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In vitro biocompatibility of the coatings was assessed by using mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mBMMSC). Antibacterial studies were performed using Escherichia coli (E. coli) microorganisms. The osteogenic differentiation was also carried out in order to get gene expressions. The AFM results confirmed that the coatings deposited at 120 W was smoother as compared to other coatings developed at different power, along with optimum contact angle, also these coatings showed good antibacterial results. The fluorescent and viability results of 120 W sample confirmed their good biocompatibility as compared to the coatings deposited 20, 40, 60, and 100 W power. Hence, the coating deposited at 120 W exhibit desirable microstructural characteristics beneficial for surface modification of orthopedic implants.

  15. Biology of the temperate Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophage TP-J34 and physical characterization of the phage genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve, Horst; Freudenberg, Wiebke; Diestel-Feddersen, Frederike; Ehlert, Regina; Heller, Knut J.

    2003-01-01

    The temperate Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophage TP-J34 was identified in the lysogenic host strain J34. The majority of phage particles produced upon induction was defective and noninfectious, consisting of DNA-filled heads lacking tails. A physical map (45.6 kb) was established. Analysis of minor restriction bands of the DNA isolated from phage particles as well as the analysis of the protein pattern indicated that phage TP-J34 is a pac-type phage. This was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy using antisera raised against virulent cos- and pac-type S. thermophilus phages. The lysogenic host J34 but not its noninducible derivate J34-12 contained phage DNA in the nonintegrated state and exhibited autolysis at elevated temperatures. Prophage-carrying strains grew homogeneously while 16 of 20 prophage-cured derivatives aggregated and sedimented rapidly. When phage TP-J34 was propagated lytically on a prophage-cured host strain, a 2.7-kb site-specific deletion occurred in the phage genome. This deletion was also identified in the prophage DNAs of relysogenized strains

  16. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-01

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid–liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50–250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration. PMID:21289986

  17. Poly (vinyl alcohol-alginate physically crosslinked hydrogel membranes for wound dressing applications: Characterization and bio-evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbadawy A. Kamoun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PVA-sodium alginate (SA hydrogel membranes containing sodium ampicillin as a topical antibiotic were developed using the freeze–thawing method for wound dressing application. Aqueous solution of sodium alginate has been blended in a certain ratio with PVA, followed by the crosslinking method has been conducted by freeze–thawing method as physical crosslinking instead of the use of traditional chemical crosslinking to avoid riskiness of chemical reagents and crosslinkers. The physicochemical properties of PVA-SA membranes e.g. gel fraction and water uptake % have been performed. Increased SA content with PVA decreased gel fraction, elasticity, and elongation to break of PVA-SA membranes. However, it resulted in an increase in swelling degree, protein adsorption, and roughness of membrane surface. High SA content in PVA membranes had apparently an impact on surface morphology structure of hydrogel membranes. Pore size and pore area distribution have been observed with addition of high SA concentration. However, high SA content had an insignificant effect on the release of ampicillin. The hydrolytic degradation of PVA-SA membranes has prominently increased with increasing SA content. Furthermore, hemolysis (% and in vitro inhibition (% for both Gram positive and negative bacteria have been sharply affected by addition of SA into PVA, indicating the improved blood hemocompatibility. Thus, PVA-SA hydrogel membrane based wound dressing system containing ampicillin could be a good polymeric membrane candidate in wound care.

  18. Characterization of the critical current and physical properties of superconducting epitaxial NbTiN sub-micron structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A., E-mail: aklimov@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Słysz, W.; Guziewicz, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kolkovsky, V.; Zaytseva, I.; Malinowski, A. [Institute of Physics Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This manuscript presents investigation of the critical current dependence of Nb(Ti)N nanostructured superconducting single photon detectors (SNSPD) in function of temperature and applied magnetic field. • Presented results are complimentary and compared with the same data received for submicron-wide single bridge Nb(Ti)N structures. • Our data demonstrate significant influence of local constrictions on physical properties of our SNSPD detectors. - Abstract: Measurements of critical current in NbTiN as a function of applied magnetic field and temperature are reported for two samples: 700-nm-wide bridge and 100-nm-wide meander. In 700-nm-wide NbTiN bridge we pinpointed the limiting factors for the critical current density to be current-driven vortex de-pinning at low temperatures and thermally activated flux flow closer to the transition temperature. In 100-nm-wide NbTiN meander we found phase slips activation, accompanied by hotspots formation at all measured temperatures. These two types of structures demonstrate different dependence of the critical current on the applied magnetic field. Although our NbTiN meander structures has high de-pairing critical current densities ∼10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} at low temperatures, the real critical currents are smaller due to the presence of the local constrictions.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION AND STATISTICAL CORRELATION BETWEEN CHARCOAL’S PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Eucalyptus AND Corymbia CLONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Pereira Moutinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the physical and mechanical properties of charcoal from eucalypt clones by principal component analysis and demonstrate the relationships between these properties, in order to assess which charcoal property should aimed in the process to obtain a higher quality product. In this way, was cut eight clones of Eucalyptus and two of Corymbia , collecting three trees per clone and five disk in different heights. The disks were transformed into test samples, totaling an average of 75 samples per clones, which were carbonized under specific conditions for analysis of apparent density, compressive strength parallel to grain and linear and volumetric degradation due to high temperature. It is noteworthy that the data were weighted by disk and per tree, to an average closer to reality. For correlations, was used multivariate analysis of principal components. Herein, it is found that the apparent density of charcoal acts as the focal point of the other properties studied, and observed that as the higher the density, higher will be the compressive strength parallel to grain, the elastic modulus and the gravimetric yield.

  20. Physically crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol-hydroxyethyl starch blend hydrogel membranes: Synthesis and characterization for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Refaie Kenawy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol, PVA is a polymer of great importance because of its many appealing characteristics specifically for various pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Physically crosslinked hydrogel membranes composed of different amounts of hydroxyethyl starch (HES in (PVA and ampicillin were prepared by applying freeze–thawing method. This freezing–thawing cycle was repeated for three consecutive cycles. Physicochemical properties of PVA–HES membrane gel such as gel fraction, swelling, morphology, elongation, tensile strength, and protein adsorption were investigated. Introducing HES into freeze–thawed PVA structure affected crystal size distribution of PVA; and hence physicochemical properties and morphological structure have been affected. Increased HES concentration decreased the gel fraction %, maximum strength and break elongation. Indeed it resulted into a significant incrementing of the swelling ability, amount of protein adsorption, broader pore size, and pore distribution of membrane morphological structure. Furthermore, an increase in HES concentration resulted in better and still lower thermal stability compared to virgin PVA and freeze–thawed PVA. The maximum weight loss of PVA–HES hydrogel membranes ranged between 18% and 60% according to HES content, after two days of degradation in phosphate buffer saline (PBS, which indicates they are biodegradable. Thus, PVA–HES hydrogel membranes containing ampicillin could be a novel approach for biomedical application e.g. wound dressing purposes.

  1. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla Aiolfi, E-mail: carlaaiolfi@usp.br [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Menaa, Farid [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg 97080 (Germany); Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Menaa, Bouzid, E-mail: bouzid.menaa@gmail.com [Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Quenca-Guillen, Joyce S. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Matos, Jivaldo do Rosario [Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Mercuri, Lucildes Pita [Department of Exact and Earth Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Diadema, SP 09972-270 (Brazil); Braz, Andre Borges [Department of Engineering of Mines and Oil, Polytechnical School, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rossetti, Fabia Cristina [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14015-120 (Brazil); Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Ines Rocha Miritello [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-06-10

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  2. Physical properties and characterization of RuSr2GdCu2O8 (Ru-1212) grown by top seeded melt textured technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uthayakumar, S.; Santhosh, P.; Gombos, M.; Babu, M. Ramesh; Jayavel, R.; Vecchione, A.; Pace, S.

    2009-01-01

    Efforts have been made in optimizing growth conditions for bulk textured growth of RuSr 2 GdCu 2 O 8 (Ru-1212) employing top seeded growth technique (TSG). Thermal stability and peritectic temperature (T p ) have been determined by TG-DTA analysis. The study facilitates appropriate thermal treatments to yield good quality sample. The structural study of the as grown sample has been carried out by X-ray diffraction technique. Morphological study by polarized optical microscope (PLOM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveals the growth mechanism. Subsequently, the stoichiometry has been confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The observed characterization results show the influence of superconducting property on growth technique and allow one to correlate between the physical properties and experimental technique.

  3. Physical characterization and study of the electrical magnetic and thermal properties of the ceramic high Tc superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo Orlando, M.T. de.

    1991-01-01

    It was built four systems for physical characterization of high Tc superconductors, with data acquisition by computer, and recent results on AC susceptibility, AC resistivity, specific heat and thermal diffusivity of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (x ≅ 0.15) compound, in a ceramic form, could be reproduced. Our study pointed that those ceramics exhibit a preferential orientation of the grains, being the c axis of the compound parallel to the compression direction. The study of this material in the four different technics, for samples with same density and oxygen stoichiometry, has pointed also that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by the intergrain region. This influence can be described by the clem model for the intergrain region and by the Malozemoff proposition for the fluxoids collective behavior. (author)

  4. Functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs by Silanization: Use of Amine (APTES and Thiol (MPTMS Silanes and Their Physical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Villa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results concerning the synthesis of magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs, their functionalization using silane derivatives, such as (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES and (3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS, and their exhaustive morphological and physical characterization by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometer (EDX analysis, AC magnetic susceptibility, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric (TGA analyses are reported. Two different paths were adopted to achieve the desired functionalization: (1 the direct reaction between the functionalized organo-silane molecule and the surface of the magnetite nanoparticle; and (2 the use of an intermediate silica coating. Finally, the occurrence of both the functionalization with amino and thiol groups has been demonstrated by the reaction with ninhydrin and the capture of Au NPs, respectively.

  5. Applying a probabilistic seismic-petrophysical inversion and two different rock-physics models for reservoir characterization in offshore Nile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleardi, Mattia

    2018-01-01

    We apply a two-step probabilistic seismic-petrophysical inversion for the characterization of a clastic, gas-saturated, reservoir located in offshore Nile Delta. In particular, we discuss and compare the results obtained when two different rock-physics models (RPMs) are employed in the inversion. The first RPM is an empirical, linear model directly derived from the available well log data by means of an optimization procedure. The second RPM is a theoretical, non-linear model based on the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory. The first step of the inversion procedure is a Bayesian linearized amplitude versus angle (AVA) inversion in which the elastic properties, and the associated uncertainties, are inferred from pre-stack seismic data. The estimated elastic properties constitute the input to the second step that is a probabilistic petrophysical inversion in which we account for the noise contaminating the recorded seismic data and the uncertainties affecting both the derived rock-physics models and the estimated elastic parameters. In particular, a Gaussian mixture a-priori distribution is used to properly take into account the facies-dependent behavior of petrophysical properties, related to the different fluid and rock properties of the different litho-fluid classes. In the synthetic and in the field data tests, the very minor differences between the results obtained by employing the two RPMs, and the good match between the estimated properties and well log information, confirm the applicability of the inversion approach and the suitability of the two different RPMs for reservoir characterization in the investigated area.

  6. Physical characterization of a time-of-flight positron emission tomography system for whole-body quantitative studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, F.; Campagnolo, R.; Verrey, B.; Bendriem, B.; Bouvier, A.; Lecomte, J.L.; Comar, D.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a first PET system using the time of flight (TOF) information, is aimed at whole-body, quantitative, dynamic, 3D studies. It comprises 3 rings of 96 CsF probes and a ring of 96 BaF/sub 2/ probes. The physical performance was measured: spatial transverse and longitudinal resolution for a reconstructed source, sensitivity, time resolution (480 psec +- 28 psec for CsF and 380 psec +-28 psec for BaF/sub 2/), interplane (< 5% for the means difference for a uniform ring source) and intraplane uniformity (< 4% RMS uncertainty). Calibration in absolute concentration was performed with a precision of 2%. Special attention was directed to the specific advantages of the use of fast crystal -PM tubes for TOF measurements: very fast count rate studies, elimination of random events, and improvement of the S/N ratio. Counts rates up to a million counts per sec for each detector are feasible, without loss due to pile up. Actually, the maximum count rate is 450000 events/sec due to the transfert time to magnetic disc in list mode (30 μCi/cc). At these rates, the random fraction is 30% of the true coincidences rate, while it is less than 3% for concentration of 1 μCi/cc. The sensitivity gain was measured as a function of the object size: 2 for the head of 4.8 the wholebody. Other advantages of TOF as Compton events reduction and the accuracy of attenuation correction coefficients are evaluated for thoracic studies

  7. Physical-chemical characterization and stability study of alpha-trypsin at ph 3.0 by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.M.C.; Santana, M.A.; Gomide, F.T.F.; Oliveira, J.S.; Vilas Boas, F.A.S.; Santoro, M.M.; Teixera, K.N. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas (ICB). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Miranda, A.A.C.; Biondi, I. [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Vasconcelos, A.B.; Bemquerer, M.P. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Parque Estacao Biologica (PqEB)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: {alpha}-Trypsin is a serine-protease with a polypeptide chain of 223 amino acid residues and six disulfide bridges. It is a globular protein with predominance of antiparallel {beta}-sheet secondary structure and it has two domains with similar structures. In the present work, a stability study of {alpha}-trypsin in the acid pH range was performed and physical-chemical denaturation parameters were measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The {alpha}-trypsin has a shelf-life (t{sub 95%}) of about ten months at pH 3.0 and 4 deg C and its hydrolysis into the {psi}-trypsin isoform is negligible during six months as monitored by mass spectrometry (Micromass Q-ToF). The observed {delta}H{sub cal}/{delta}H{sub vH} ratio is close to unity for {alpha}-trypsin denaturation, which suggests the occurrence of a two-state transition, devoid of molten-globule intermediates. At pH 3.0, {alpha}-trypsin unfolded with T{sub m} 325.9 K and {delta}H= 99.10 kcal mol{sup -1}, and the change in heat capacity between the native and unfolded forms of the protein was estimated to be 1.96 {+-} 0.18 kcal mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. The stability of {alpha}-trypsin calculated at 298 K and at pH 3.0 was {delta}G{sub U} = 6.10 kcal mol{sup -1}. These values are in the range expected for a small globular protein. These results show that the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding of {beta}-trypsin do not change substantially after its conversion to {alpha}-trypsin.

  8. Characterization and performance optimization of radiation monitoring sensors for high energy physics experiments at the CERN LHC and Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, Julien

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the matter originating from the universe, a new particle accelerator named the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been built at CERN. The radiation environment generated by the hadrons collisions in the high energy physics experiments of the LHC will be complex and locally very intense. For monitoring this complex radiation field, dosimeters have been installed in the LHC experiments. In previous study, RadFET dosimeters and PIN diodes have been characterized for their use in the particle accelerator. However, even if the RadFETs sensors have been already extensively characterized, their radiation response can be affected by their package. Depending on the material and the geometry, the package can induce errors in the dose measurement. In this thesis, a complete study has been carried out in order to evaluate its influence. Concerning the PIN diodes, the readout protocol used for the LHC is no longer valuable for the Super-LHC. Therefore, a complete study on their radiation response has been p...

  9. Physical-chemical characterization of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus L., and chia (Salvia hispanica L. flours and seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucía Torres Vargas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa, amaranth, and chia flours have considerable amounts of protein, starch, dietary fiber, lipids, minerals, vitamins, and bioactive components, which provide in them exceptional properties for human nutrition. The aim of this research was the physical-chemical characterization of quinoa, amaranth, and chia flours and seeds through proximal, optical, functional, thermal, and structural analyses. From the results obtained during the proximal analysis, considerable proportions were determined of protein and fiber for the three flours, with the highest values in chia flour at 28.56% and 39.8%, respectively. These results were corroborated by optical microscopy analysis performed on longitudinal cuts in the three types of seeds. Thermal parameters indicated that the three flours presented irreversible thermal degradation processes and glass transition change for amaranth and chia flours at temperatures above 100ºC. Structural characterization of the flours via FTIR have allowed detecting differences in protein and lipid characteristic absorption bands. Diffraction patterns of type A starch were identified for quinoa and amaranth flours, while the chia flour had two crystalline peaks corresponding to calcium and magnesium. Scanning electron microscopy images showed starch aggregates in the quinoa flour, a complex structure composed of spherical proteins that surround the starches in amaranth flour and fibrous structures and spherical proteins in chia flour.

  10. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da, E-mail: katiadvitall@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to {sup 18}F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since {sup 18}F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 {sup x}3{sup s}cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of {sup 18}F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  11. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of 18F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da

    2017-01-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to 18 F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since 18 F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of 18 F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 x 3 s cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in 18 F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of 18 F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  12. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calciati, Marco; Vallone, Marco; Zhou, Xiangyu; Ghione, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Goano, Michele, E-mail: michele.goano@polito.it; Bertazzi, Francesco [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Padova, Via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, 02215 Boston, MA (United States); Verzellesi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs). First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional) classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i) the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii) the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii) the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10{sup −30} cm{sup 6}/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary

  13. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Calciati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence (EL characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs, coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs. First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10−30 cm6/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary

  14. Characterization of optical and micro-physical properties of cirrus clouds using a wideband thermal infrared spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Luca; Di Natale, Gianluca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    High-altitude ice clouds such as cirrus clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget since they cover permanently about 20-30% of the surface of the planet, reaching even to 60-70% in the tropics. The modulation of the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing Earth's thermal emission due to cirrus can contribute to heat or to cool the atmosphere, according to their optical properties, which must be characterised with great accuracy and over the whole spectral range involved in the scattering and emission processes. Here we present the infrared measurements over the wide spectral range from 9 to 50 micron performed by the Fourier transform spectrometer REFIR-PAD (Radiation Explorer in Far InfraRed - Prototype for Application and Development) during many field campaigns that have taken place since 2007 from different high-altitude ground-based stations: Testa Grigia Station, Cervinia-Italy, (3480 m asl), Cerro Toco, Atacama-Chile, (5380 m asl), Concordia Base, Dome C-Antarctica (3230 m asl). These measurements show for the first time the spectral effect of cirrus clouds in the long-wave part of the emission spectrum above 15 micron of wavelength. To characterise these measurements over the wide spectral range as a function of the optical properties of ice particles, a model of the radiative transfer, that integrates the well known numerical code LBLRTM, which simulates the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, with a specific code which simulates the propagation of the radiation through the cloud, was developed. The optical properties of clouds have been modelled using the δ-scaled Eddington approximation for a single layer and the Ping Yang's database for the single-scattering properties of ice crystals. The preliminary results of the fit procedure used for the determination of the micro-physical parameters of ice crystals, such as the effective diameter, ice water path, effective temperature and optical thickness will be shown in the presentation. The

  15. Plasma and process characterization of high power magnetron physical vapor deposition with integrated plasma equipment--feature profile model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Da; Stout, Phillip J.; Ventzek, Peter L.G.

    2003-01-01

    High power magnetron physical vapor deposition (HPM-PVD) has recently emerged for metal deposition into deep submicron features in state of the art integrated circuit fabrication. However, the plasma characteristics and process mechanism are not well known. An integrated plasma equipment-feature profile modeling infrastructure has therefore been developed for HPM-PVD deposition, and it has been applied to simulating copper seed deposition with an Ar background gas for damascene metalization. The equipment scale model is based on the hybrid plasma equipment model [M. Grapperhaus et al., J. Appl. Phys. 83, 35 (1998); J. Lu and M. J. Kushner, ibid., 89, 878 (2001)], which couples a three-dimensional Monte Carlo sputtering module within a two-dimensional fluid model. The plasma kinetics of thermalized, athermal, and ionized metals and the contributions of these species in feature deposition are resolved. A Monte Carlo technique is used to derive the angular distribution of athermal metals. Simulations show that in typical HPM-PVD processing, Ar + is the dominant ionized species driving sputtering. Athermal metal neutrals are the dominant deposition precursors due to the operation at high target power and low pressure. The angular distribution of athermals is off axis and more focused than thermal neutrals. The athermal characteristics favor sufficient and uniform deposition on the sidewall of the feature, which is the critical area in small feature filling. In addition, athermals lead to a thick bottom coverage. An appreciable fraction (∼10%) of the metals incident to the wafer are ionized. The ionized metals also contribute to bottom deposition in the absence of sputtering. We have studied the impact of process and equipment parameters on HPM-PVD. Simulations show that target power impacts both plasma ionization and target sputtering. The Ar + ion density increases nearly linearly with target power, different from the behavior of typical ionized PVD processing. The

  16. Geochemical, petrographic and physical characterizations and associated alterations of the volcanic rocks of the Romanesque San Nicola Church (Ottana, central Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbu, Stefano; Palomba, Marcella; Sitzia, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    In this research, the volcanic rocks belonging to the Sardinia Oligo-Miocene volcanic cycle (32 - 11 Ma) and building up the structure of the San Nicola church, one of the most representative churches of the Romanesque architecture, were studied. These stones were widely used in medieval architecture for the excellent workability, but they present some disadvantages, since they are greatly affected by alteration phenomena. The main objectives of this research are i) to focus the mineral, chemical and petrographic compositions of the San Nicola stones, ii) the chemical and physical alteration processes affecting these materials, and iii) to establish the exactly provenance of the volcanic rocks. Furthermore, a comparative study between the rocks from the ancient quarries and those forming the structure of the church was performed. In the ancient quarries, where presumably a more advanced alteration occurs due to the vertical alteration gradient, different facies of the same volcanic lithology, characterized by macroscopical evidences of chemical-physical degradation degree, were sampled. Petrographic, geochemical (both major elements that the traces) and physical-mechanical features of the collected samples were determined to highlight the compositional differences (density, porosity, water-absorption kinetics, mechanical resistance) as a function of the different alteration degree. Moreover, chemical-mineralogical analysis of the sample surfaces from the church, was performed, to highlight possible presence and nature of secondary newly-formed phases (e.g., salt efflorescence). Several methodologies were applied to carry out physical-chemical and petrographic analysis: X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) for chemical and mineral composition; Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for textures, mineral assemblages and microstructures studies; He-picnometry, water-absorption and mechanical

  17. The economics of leaf-gas exchange in a fluctuating environment and their upscaling to the canopy-level using turbulent transport theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Manzoni, S.; Oren, R.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate models predict decreases in leaf stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration due to increases in atmospheric CO2. The consequences of these reductions are increases in soil moisture availability and continental scale run-off at decadal time-scales. Thus, a theory explaining the differential sensitivity of stomata to changing atmospheric CO2 and other environmental conditions such as soil moisture at the ecosystem scale must be identified. Here, these responses are investigated using an optimality theory applied to stomatal conductance. An analytical model for gs is first proposed based on (a) Fickian mass transfer of CO2 and H2O through stomata; (b) a biochemical photosynthesis model that relates intercellular CO2 to net photosynthesis; and (c) a stomatal model based on optimization for maximizing carbon gains when water losses represent a cost. The optimization theory produced three gas exchange responses that are consistent with observations across a wide-range of species: (1) the sensitivity of gs to vapour pressure deficit (D) is similar to that obtained from a previous synthesis of more than 40 species, (2) the theory is consistent with the onset of an apparent 'feed-forward' mechanism in gs, and (3) the emergent non-linear relationship between the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2 (ci/ca) and D agrees with the results available on this response. A simplified version of this leaf-scale approach recovers the linear relationship between stomatal conductance and leaf-photosynthesis employed in numerous climate models that currently use a variant on the 'Ball-Berry' or the 'Leuning' approaches provided the marginal water use efficiency increases linearly with atmospheric CO2. The model is then up-scaled to the canopy-level using novel theories about the structure of turbulence inside vegetation. This up-scaling proved to be effective in resolving the complex (and two-way) interactions between leaves and their immediate micro

  18. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    For the past several years a lot of attention has been given to pore-scale flow in order to understand and model transport, mixing and reaction in porous media. Nevertheless we believe that an accurate study of spatial and temporal evolution of velocities could bring important additional information for the upscaling from pore to higher scales. To gather these pieces of information, we perform Stokes flow simulations on pore-scale digitized images of a Berea sandstone core. First, micro-tomography (XRMT) imaging and segmentation processes allow us to obtain 3D black and white images of the sample [1]. Then we used an OpenFoam solver to perform the Stokes flow simulations mentioned above, which gives us the velocities at the interfaces of a cubic mesh. Subsequently, we use a particle streamline reconstruction technique which uses the Eulerian velocity field previously obtained. This technique, based on a modified Pollock algorithm [2], enables us to make particle tracking simulations on the digitized sample. In order to build a stochastic pore-scale transport model, we analyze the Lagrangian velocity series in two different ways. First we investigate the velocity evolution by sampling isochronically (t-Lagrangian), and by studying its statistical properties in terms of one- and two-points statistics. Intermittent patterns can be observed. These are due to the persistance of low velocities over a characteristic space length. Other results are investigated, such as correlation functions and velocity PDFs, which permit us to study more deeply this persistence in the velocities and to compute the correlation times. However, with the second approach, doing these same analysis in space by computing the velocities equidistantly, enables us to remove the intermittency shown in the temporal evolution and to model these velocity series as a Markov process. This renders the stochastic particle dynamics into a CTRW [3]. [1] Gjetvaj, F., A. Russian, P. Gouze, and M. Dentz (2015

  19. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture: Modeling and Up-Scaling to CO2 Capture for an 800 MWe Coal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball Erin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A techno-economic analysis was completed to compare the use of Hollow Fiber Membrane Modules (HFMM with the more conventional structured packing columns as the absorber in amine-based CO2 capture systems for power plants. In order to simulate the operation of industrial scale HFMM systems, a two-dimensional model was developed and validated based on results of a laboratory scale HFMM. After successful experiments and validation of the model, a pilot scale HFMM was constructed and simulated with the same model. The results of the simulations, from both sizes of HFMM, were used to assess the feasibility of further up-scaling to a HFMM system to capture the CO2 from an 800 MWe power plant. The system requirements – membrane fiber length, total contact surface area, and module volume – were determined from simulations and used for an economic comparison with structured packing columns. Results showed that a significant cost reduction of at least 50% is required to make HFMM competitive with structured packing columns. Several factors for the design of industrial scale HFMM require further investigation, such as the optimal aspect ratio (module length/diameter, membrane lifetime, and casing material and shape, in addition to the need to reduce the overall cost. However, HFMM were also shown to have the advantages of having a higher contact surface area per unit volume and modular scale-up, key factors for applications requiring limited footprints or flexibility in configuration.

  20. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan H

    2015-07-01

    mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair and bone-tissue engineering. Keywords: calcium sulfate cement (CSC, SBA-15, physical characterization, BMP-2

  1. Synthesis of zeolites from boiler fly ash: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization; Sintese de zeolitas a partir de cinza volante de caldeiras: caracterizacao fisica, quimica e mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha Junior, C.A.F.; Santos, S.C.A.; Souza, C.A.G., E-mail: augustorocha2@gmail.com [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica (PPEQ-UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil); Angelica, R.S.; Neves, R.F. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geologia e Geoquimica, Instituto de Geociencias (PPGG-IG-UFPA), Ananindeua, PA (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    Along the years, worldwide industrial development has causing a growing generation of residues, bringing potentials environmental problems. A study of the characteristics of these wastes, as well as the development of techniques for their use in new processes becomes indispensable for the environment preservation. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possible use of two important industrial residues from the Amazon region for zeolite synthesis: (a) the fly ash (particle size < 100 {mu}m) that comes from burning of mineral coal in boiler; and (b) the micro silica, a by-product of the reaction between quartz and coal in the production of metallic silicon and alloys iron-silicon.The following chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization methods were carried out: X-ray diffractometry, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, granulometric analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). The analyses were carried out at the following conditions: 60, 100, 150 and 190 deg C, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio of 5 and Si/Al molar ratio ranging from 2.12 to 15, and reaction time of 24 h. The results of the fly characterization demonstrate its enormous potential as raw material for the zeolite synthesis. SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} represent more than 50% of its composition, mineralogical phases defined, low humidity content, low particle size (d{sub 90} < 10 {mu}m), among others. Mineralogical analyses of the synthesized products showed the formation of some zeolite types, as follow: analcime, phillipsite, sodalite, zeolite P and tobermorite. The results show that the mixture fly ash-micro silica in these reaction conditions point to a promising material for zeolite synthesis (author)

  2. Fruit physical characteristics, proximate, mineral and starch characterization of FHIA 19 and FHIA 20 plantain and FHIA 03 cooking banana hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annor, George Amponsah; Asamoah-Bonti, Prudence; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cooking banana and plantain (Musa spp. AAB and ABB groups), have over the years been affected by pest and diseases, resulting in various organizations developing disease resistant hybrids with superior agronomic potential. The characteristics of these improved varieties needs to be studied to ascertain their suitability for use in various food systems. This study aimed at evaluating the physical characteristics, proximate and minerals composition, and characterizing the starch of plantain and a cooking banana hybrid release by Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola (FHIA), and comparing them to a local landrace in Ghana. FHIA 19 and FHIA 20 plantain, Apentu pa (a local landrace) and FHIA 03 cooking banana hybrid were used for the study. Their physical characteristics, proximate and mineral composition were determined at the proximal, midsection and distal hand positions. Starch granules and cells were then examined under light microscope. Ranges obtained for protein content for FHIA 20, FHIA 03 and FHIA 19 were 3.01-3.40, 2.66-2.91 and 2.81-2.91 %. Potassium was found to be the most abundant mineral in all the cultivars. The highest mean value of 982.5-1013.76 mg/100 g was obtained for FHIA 19. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in the proximate and mineral composition of the varieties, however no significant difference exited between the hand positions. The largest starch granule size was found in FHIA 19 hybrid. FHIA 03 was also composed predominantly of two types: longitudinal and rounded granules with each type grouped together. The new plantain hybrids compa