WorldWideScience

Sample records for upper-level precession photography

  1. Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Humm, Maggie

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, Professor Humm analyses the main features of modernist photography and selected theories about photography. The chapter gives a historical overview, from 1900 to the 1980s, of American, European and Japanese modernist photography.

  2. Collage photography

    OpenAIRE

    Leban, Simona

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I was investigating the field of collage photography. Mostly, I was interested in a role of photography in modern art, with an emphasis on interaction of photography with other media, in contact with other techniques and materials, concurrence and merging of photography and collage and photography as a part of collage painting. Therefore, in theoretical part I focused on its development through different periods - from early beggining until digital manipulation of photography a...

  3. Impeller in Precessing Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Yoshida

    2001-01-01

    destabilizing in the region of negative precessing speed ratio (-0.3<Ω/ω<0, at the design flow rate; (2 At reduced flow rate, the destabilizing fluid force moments occurred at small positive precessing speed ratio (0.2<Ω/ω<0.4; (3 From the comparison of direct measured fluid force moments with those estimated from the unsteady pressure measured on the front and back casing walls, it was found that the destabilizing moments in the backward precession are mainly caused by the fluid forces on the front surface of the present impeller, where there is large clearance between the back shroud and casing.

  4. Teaching Astrophysics to Upper Level Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorn Bradt, Hale

    2010-03-01

    A Socratic peer-instruction method for teaching upper level undergraduates is presented. Basically, the instructor sits with the students and guides their presentations of the material. My two textbooks* (on display) as well as many others are amenable to this type of teaching. *Astronomy Methods - A Physical Approach to Astronomical Observations (CUP 2004) *Astrophysics Processes-The Physics of Astronomical Phenomena (CUP 2008)

  5. Indoor Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Sagers, Stephen; Patterson, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Photography is the science of recording light in an artistic way to create a pleasing image. Indoor photography requires a photographer to become familiar with some of the built in functions of a camera.

  6. Thomas precession in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strnad, J.

    1983-01-01

    A Thomas precession mechanism is described which would become effective in a symmetric six-dimensional space-time if the time vector of a particle would rotate uniformly. For the effect a discrepancy of the decay time of particles in flight, proportional to their kinetic energy would be characteristic

  7. Larmor precession reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauter, H.J.; Toperverg, B.P.; Lauter-Pasyuk, V.; Petrenko, A.; Aksenov, V.

    2004-01-01

    Larmor precession phase encoding is applied to modulate TOF reflection spectra measured from a polymer multilayer and from an Fe/Cr multilayer. It is proposed that decoding of the spectra can be used to extract the small-angle scattering signal from the polymer film-embedded nanoparticles. The second example is directed to demonstrate one of the plausible realizations of the vector polarization analysis in reflectometry of magnetic systems. This would allow to unambiguously reconstruct the transverse and lateral distribution of the magnetization vectors throughout the multilayered superlattices

  8. Photography Reframed

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Dahlgren

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of analysing photography as mediated, repro-duced and entangled in media systems, and consequently as part of a larger media culture. Moreover it combines technological considerations drawn from media ar-chaeology with art historical analysis focusing on visual aesthetics. It considers two mediating devices for photography in the nineteenth century, the photo album and the illustrated press. As displayed, a media historical perspective airs new interpre-tat...

  9. Gyro precession and Mach's principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, P.

    1979-01-01

    The precession of a gyroscope is calculated in a nonrelativistic theory due to Barbour which satisfies Mach's principle. It is shown that the theory predicts both the geodetic and motional precession of general relativity to within factors of order 1. The significance of the gyro experiment is discussed from the point of view of metric theories of gravity and this is contrasted with its significance from the point of view of Mach's principle. (author)

  10. Photography Reframed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dahlgren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the benefits of analysing photography as mediated, repro-duced and entangled in media systems, and consequently as part of a larger media culture. Moreover it combines technological considerations drawn from media ar-chaeology with art historical analysis focusing on visual aesthetics. It considers two mediating devices for photography in the nineteenth century, the photo album and the illustrated press. As displayed, a media historical perspective airs new interpre-tations and understandings of processes and practices in relation to photography in the period. Thus what from a photo historical point of view might appear as an important, paradigmatic invention or a critical technical delimitation might from a media historical perspective seem to have been merely a small adjustment in a chain of gradual improvements and experiments in the dissemination and consumption of images. Thus photographic media specificity delimited by technical procedures and certain materials outputs, which was so strongly emphasized in the twentieth cen-tury, was evidently not fixed to materiality and rather opened and negotiated in the nineteenth century. Accordingly, responsiveness to the literal and figurative fram-ing of photography as mediated, discloses other photo histories.

  11. Degenerate Photography?

    OpenAIRE

    Poivert, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pictorialist photography is renowned for its use of pigment printing techniques which enabled interpretive rendering of the photographic subject. Yet a large part of the pictorialist aesthetic came from optics that furnished the ‘blurred’ effects characteristic of the pictorialist movement. Drawing on theories by the Englishman Emerson, which proposed capitalizing on the eye’s natural imperfections, specialized optics were created to obtain the desired effects. France most significantly surpa...

  12. Upper-Level Waves of Synoptic Scale at Midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, Chantal

    1990-01-01

    Upper-level waves of synoptic scale are important dynamical entities at midlatitudes. They often induce surface cyclogenesis (cf. Peterssen and Smebye, 1971), and their life duration is typically longer than time scales for disruption by the ambient shear (Sanders, 1988). The objectives of the present thesis are to explain the maintenance and genesis of upper-level synoptic-scale waves in the midlatitude flow. We develop an analytical model of waves on generalized Eady basic states that have uniform tropospheric and stratospheric potential vorticity, but allow for the decay of density with height. The Eady basic state represents the limiting case of infinite stratospheric stability and constant density. We find that the Eady normal mode characteristics hold in the presence of realistic tropopause and stratosphere. In particular, the basic states studied support at the synoptic scale upper-level normal modes. These modes provide simple models for the dynamics of upper-level synoptic-scale waves, as waves supported by the large latitudinal gradients of potential vorticity at the tropopause. In the presence of infinitesimal positive tropospheric gradients of potential vorticity, the upper-level normal mode solutions no longer exist, as was demonstrated in Green (1960). Disappearance of the normal mode solution when a parameter changes slightly represents a dilemma that we seek to understand. We examine what happens to the upper-level normal modes in the presence of tropospheric gradients of potential vorticity in a series of initial -value experiments. Our results show that the normal modes become slowly decaying quasi-modes. Mathematically the quasi-modes consist of a superposition of singular modes sharply peaked in the phase speed domain, and their decay proceeds as the modes interfere with one another. We repeat these experiments in basic states with a smooth tropopause in the presence of tropospheric and stratospheric gradients, and similar results are obtained

  13. Assessing Upper-Level Winds on Day-of-Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    On the day-or-launch. the 45th Weather Squadron Launch Weather Officers (LWOS) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP). During launch operations, the payload launch team sometimes asks the LWO if they expect the upper level winds to change during the countdown but the LWOs did not have the capability to quickly retrieve or display the upper-level observations and compare them to the numerical weather prediction model point forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a capability in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that would allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center Doppler Radar Wind Profilers and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station rawinsondes and then overlay model point forecast profiles on the observation profiles to assess the performance of these models and graphically display them to the launch team. The AMU developed an Excel-based capability for the LWOs to assess the model forecast upper-level winds and compare them to observations. They did so by creating a GUI in Excel that allows the LWOs to first initialize the models by comparing the O-hour model forecasts to the observations and then to display model forecasts in 3-hour intervals from the current time through 12 hours.

  14. Improved Models for Precession and Nutation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathews, P. M

    2000-01-01

    .... Such a fit is provided by the MHB2000 nutation series (Mathews et al., 2000) based on geophysical theory with a few basic Earth parameters estimated by a fit to nutation-precession data, and its accompanying precession rate...

  15. Photography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Susan A.; Goodman, James A.; Purkis, Samuel J.; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2013-01-01

    Photographic imaging is the oldest form of remote sensing used in coral reef studies. This chapter briefly explores the history of photography from the 1850s to the present, and delves into its application for coral reef research. The investigation focuses on both photographs collected from low-altitude fixed-wing and rotary aircraft, and those collected from space by astronauts. Different types of classification and analysis techniques are discussed, and several case studies are presented as examples of the broad use of photographs as a tool in coral reef research.

  16. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  17. Thomas precession for dressed particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblak, Blagoje

    2018-03-01

    We consider a particle dressed with boundary gravitons in three-dimensional Minkowski space. The existence of BMS transformations implies that the particle’s wavefunction picks up a Berry phase when subjected to changes of reference frames that trace a closed path in the asymptotic symmetry group. We evaluate this phase and show that, for BMS superrotations, it provides a gravitational generalization of Thomas precession. In principle, such phases are observable signatures of asymptotic symmetries.

  18. The upper level of control system of electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribov, I.V.; Nedeoglo, F.N.; Shvedunov, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    The upper level software of a three-level control system that supports several electron accelerators is described. This software operates in the Linux and RTLinux (Real Time Linux) environment. The object information model functions on the basis of a parametric description supported by the SQLite Data Base Management System. The Javascript sublanguage is used for script forming, and the Qt Designer application is used to construct the user interface [ru

  19. Mobile Media Photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Shanks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mobile media photography marks a shift in orientation from the image towards photography as a mode of engagement. This leads is to explore the processes of experience and documentation that mobile media help to constitute. We unfold two aspects of the process of photography: photography as temporal......, archaeological engagement, and photography as spatial, geographical engagement. Finally, as a closing perspective we point out that vernacular photography may be read as an intersection between a personal means of expression and corporate financial interest....

  20. Nordic (Art) Photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    A description of the rise of the role of photography on the Scandinavian art scene the last 25 years......A description of the rise of the role of photography on the Scandinavian art scene the last 25 years...

  1. Review of student difficulties in upper-level quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandralekha Singh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students’ problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multiuniversity investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor, and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties found via research in introductory physics courses. The reasoning difficulties were often due to overgeneralizations of concepts learned in one context to another context where they are not directly applicable. Reasoning difficulties in distinguishing between closely related concepts and in making sense of the formalism of quantum mechanics were common. We conclude with a brief summary of the research-based approaches that take advantage of research on student difficulties in order to improve teaching and learning of quantum mechanics.

  2. Sociology through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness. One set of assignments uses self-portraiture to highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity. Another uses photography to guide sociological inquiry. Both sets of assignments draw on the Literacy Through Photography methodology,…

  3. Bistable flows in precessing spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D, E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, ISTerre, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-15

    Precession driven flows are found in any rotating container filled with liquid, when the rotation axis itself rotates about a secondary axis that is fixed in an inertial frame of reference. Because of its relevance for planetary fluid layers, many works consider spheroidal containers, where the uniform vorticity component of the bulk flow is reliably given by the well-known equations obtained by Busse (1968 J. Fluid Mech. 33 739–51). So far however, no analytical result for the solutions is available. Moreover, the cases where multiple flows can coexist have not been investigated in detail since their discovery by Noir et al (2003 Geophys. J. Int. 154 407–16). In this work we aim at deriving analytical results for the solutions, aiming in particular at first estimating the ranges of parameters where multiple solutions exist, and second studying quantitatively their stability. Using the models recently proposed by Noir and Cébron (2013 J. Fluid Mech. 737 412–39), which are more generic in the inviscid limit than the equations of Busse, we analytically describe these solutions, their conditions of existence, and their stability in a systematic manner. We then successfully compare these analytical results with the theory of Busse (1968). Dynamical model equations are finally proposed to investigate the stability of the solutions, which describe the bifurcation of the unstable flow solution. We also report for the first time the possibility that time-dependent multiple flows can coexist in precessing triaxial ellipsoids. Numerical integrations of the algebraic and differential equations have been efficiently performed with the dedicated script FLIPPER (supplementary material). (paper)

  4. Vandenberg Air Force Base Upper Level Wind Launch Weather Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman III ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The maximum wind speed and 1000-ft shear values for each sounding in each subseason were determined. To accurately calculate the PoV, the AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum shear datasets. Ultimately it was discovered that the maximum wind speeds follow a Gaussian distribution while the maximum shear values follow a lognormal distribution. These results were applied when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition to the requirements outlined in the original task plan, the AMU also included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on day of launch. The interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for this project was developed in

  5. Metacognitive gimmicks and their use by upper level physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gary; Sikorski, Tiffany-Rose; Landay, Justin

    2017-01-01

    We report on the initial phases of a study of three particular metacognitive gimmicks that upper-level physics students can use as a tool in their problem-solving kit, namely: checking units for consistency, discerning whether limiting cases match physical intuition, and computing numerical values for reasonable-ness. Students in a one semester Griffiths electromagnetism course at a small private urban university campus are asked to respond to explicit prompts that encourage adopting these three methods for checking answers to physics problems, especially those problems for which an algebraic expression is part of the final answer. We explore how, and to what extent, these students adopt these gimmicks, as well as the time development of their use. While the term ``gimmick'' carries with it some pejorative baggage, we feel it describes the essential nature of the pedagogical idea adequately in that it gets attention, is easy for the students to remember, and represents, albeit perhaps in a surface way, some key ideas about which professional physicists care.

  6. The Advanced Labs Website: resources for upper-level laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Isea, Ramon

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Labs web resource collection is an effort to create a central, comprehensive information base for college/university faculty who teach upper-level undergraduate laboratories. The website is produced by the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). It is a part of ComPADRE, the online collection of resources in physics and astronomy education, which itself is a part of the National Science Foundation-funded National Science Digital Library (NSDL). After a brief review of its history, we will discuss the current status of the website while describing the various types of resources available at the site and presenting examples of each. We will detail a step-by-step procedure for submitting resources to the website. The resource collection is designed to be a community effort and thus welcomes input and contributions from its users. We will also present plans, and will seek audience feedback, for additional website services and features. The constraints, roadblocks, and rewards of this project will also be addressed.

  7. Photography as a Business

    OpenAIRE

    Jirsák, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    Increasing speed Internet access, technical progress in digital photography and globalization opened up a new business market with stock photography. The aim is to analyze this market from the photographer's point of view and describe his marketing opportunities. The first chapter analyzes the microstock photography market. The second chapter describes the photographer's marketing mix and marketing planning. The third part evaluates microstock customer behavior and requirements based on quant...

  8. Precession effects on a liquid planetary core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Li, Li-Gang

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the desire to understand the rich dynamics of precessionally driven flow in a liquid planetary core, we investigate, through numerical simulations, the precessing fluid motion in a rotating cylindrical annulus, which simultaneously possesses slow precession. The same problemhas been studied extensively in cylinders, where the precessing flow is characterized by three key parameters: the Ekman number E, the Poincaré number Po and the radius-height aspect ratio Γ. While in an annulus, there is another parameter, the inner-radius-height aspect ratio ϒ, which also plays an important role in controlling the structure and evolution of the flow. By decomposing the nonlinear solution into a set of inertial modes, we demonstrate the properties of both weakly and moderately precessing flows. It is found that, when the precessional force is weak, the flow is stable with a constant amplitude of kinetic energy. As the precessional force increases, our simulation suggests that the nonlinear interaction between the boundary effects and the inertial modes can trigger more turbulence, introducing a transitional regime of rich dynamics to disordered flow. The inertial mode u 111, followed by u 113 or u 112, always dominates the precessing flow when 0.001 ≤ Po ≤ 0.05, ranging from weak to moderate precession. Moreover, the precessing flow in an annulus shows more stability than in a cylinder which is likely to be caused by the effect of the inner boundary that restricts the growth of resonant and non-resonant inertial modes. Furthermore, the mechanism of triadic resonance is not found in the transitional regime from a laminar to disordered flow.

  9. What forces act in relativistic gyroscope precession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerák, Oldrich

    1996-11-01

    The translation of the relativistic motion into the language of forces, proposed by the author (1995, Nuovo Cimento B 110 973), is employed to interpret the gyroscope precession in general relativity. The precession is referred to the comoving Frenet triad built up along the projection of the gyroscope's trajectory onto the 3-space of the local hypersurface-orthogonal observer. The contributions of the centrifugal, the gravitational and the dragging + Coriolis forces are identified respectively with the Thomas, the geodetic, and the gravitomagnetic components of precession. Explicit expressions are given for several simple types of motion in the Kerr (or simpler) field in order to show that the general formulae obtained are not only very simple, but also yield clear results in accord with intuition in concrete situations.

  10. Brown dwarfs in retrogradely precessing cataclysmic variables?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E.L.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of retrogradely precessing accretion disks that have a white dwarf primary and a main sequence secondary with observational data and with theory on retrograde precession via tidal torques like those by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth [1, 2]. Assuming the primary does not accrete much of the mass lost from the secondary, we identify the theoretical low mass star/brown dwarf boundary. We find no observational candidates in our study that could qualify as brown dwarfs.

  11. High-Speed Photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) copyright 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  12. Involvement through photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, J

    2016-12-01

    As a photographer living in Tokyo, I have been visiting Suetsugi village regularly to take photographs and show the printed photographs to the residents. What is the role of photography? What does it mean to be involved in the life of Suetsugi through photography? This article discusses some of the answers to these questions 5 years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

  13. Physics Identity Development: A Snapshot of the Stages of Development of Upper-Level Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study into identity development in upper-level physics students a phenomenographic research method is employed to assess the stages of identity development of a group of upper-level students. Three categories of description were discovered which indicate the three different stages of identity development for this group…

  14. Spinor approach to gravitational motion and precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1986-01-01

    The translational and rotational equations of motion for a small rigid body in a gravitational field are combined in a single spinor equation. Besides its computational advantages, this unifies the description of gravitational interaction in classical and quantum theory. Explicit expressions for gravitational precession rates are derived. (author)

  15. Solutions to the relativistic precession model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingram, A.; Motta, S.

    2014-01-01

    The relativistic precession model (RPM) can be used to obtain a precise measurement of the mass and spin of a black hole when the appropriate set of quasi-periodic oscillations is detected in the power-density spectrum of an accreting black hole. However, in previous studies, the solution of the RPM

  16. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  17. Observations Of General Learning Patterns In An Upper-Level Thermal Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David E.

    2009-11-01

    I discuss some observations from using interactive-engagement instructional methods in an upper-level thermal physics course over a two-year period. From the standpoint of the subject matter knowledge of the upper-level students, there was a striking persistence of common learning difficulties previously observed in students enrolled in the introductory course, accompanied, however, by some notable contrasts between the groups. More broadly, I comment on comparisons and contrasts regarding general pedagogical issues among different student sub-populations, for example: differences in the receptivity of lower- and upper-level students to diagrammatic representations; varying receptivity to tutorial-style instructional approach within the upper-level population; and contrasting approaches to learning among physics and engineering sub-populations in the upper-level course with regard to use of symbolic notation, mathematical equations, and readiness to employ verbal explanations.

  18. Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the likely detectability of gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars. We begin by presenting a neutron star model of sufficient complexity to take into account both the elasticity and fluidity of a realistic neutron star. We then examine the effect of internal dissipation (i.e. heat generation within the star) and gravitational radiation reaction on the wobble. This is followed by an examination of various astrophysical scenarios where some mechanism might pump the precessional motion. We estimate the gravitational wave amplitude in these situations. Finally, we conclude that gravitational radiation from freely precessing neutron stars is almost certainly limited to a level undetectable by a LIGO II detector by internal dissipation. (author)

  19. Relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Rene P; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lyutikov, Maxim; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ferdman, Robert D; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea

    2008-07-04

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B consists of two neutron stars in a highly relativistic orbit that displays a roughly 30-second eclipse when pulsar A passes behind pulsar B. Describing this eclipse of pulsar A as due to absorption occurring in the magnetosphere of pulsar B, we successfully used a simple geometric model to characterize the observed changing eclipse morphology and to measure the relativistic precession of pulsar B's spin axis around the total orbital angular momentum. This provides a test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. Our measured relativistic spin precession rate of 4.77 degrees (-0 degrees .65)(+0 degrees .66) per year (68% confidence level) is consistent with that predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 13%.

  20. Evidence for free precession in a pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs; Lyne; Shemar

    2000-08-03

    Pulsars are rotating neutron stars that produce lighthouse-like beams of radio emission from their magnetic poles. The observed pulse of emission enables their rotation rates to be measured with great precision. For some young pulsars, this provides a means of studying the interior structure of neutron stars. Most pulsars have stable pulse shapes, and slow down steadily (for example, see ref. 20). Here we report the discovery of long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations in both the pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of the pulsar PSR B1828-11. The variations are best described as harmonically related sinusoids, with periods of approximately 1,000, 500 and 250 days, probably resulting from precession of the spin axis caused by an asymmetry in the shape of the pulsar. This is difficult to understand theoretically, because torque-free precession of a solitary pulsar should be damped out by the vortices in its superfluid interior.

  1. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Shahid-Saless, B.

    1990-01-01

    In metric theories of gravity the principle of general covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. In this paper it is shown that in an appropriately chosen coordinate system, geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, spinning mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect without invoking spatial curvature. The origin of this reference frame moves around the source but the frame axes point in fixed directions. The drag can be interpreted to arise from the orbital angular momentum of the source around the origin of the reference frame. In this reference frame the effects of geodetic precession and Lense-Thirring drag due to intrinsic angular momentum of the source have the same origin, namely, gravitomagnetism

  2. Concise CIO based precession-nutation formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P. T.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The IAU 2000/2006 precession-nutation models have precision goals measured in microarcseconds. To reach this level of performance has required series containing terms at over 1300 frequencies and involving several thousand amplitude coefficients. There are many astronomical applications for which such precision is not required and the associated heavy computations are wasteful. This justifies developing smaller models that achieve adequate precision with greatly reduced computing costs. Aims: We discuss strategies for developing simplified IAU 2000/2006 precession-nutation procedures that offer a range of compromises between accuracy and computing costs. Methods: The chain of transformations linking celestial and terrestrial coordinates comprises frame bias, precession-nutation, Earth rotation and polar motion. We address the bias and precession-nutation (NPB) portion of the chain, linking the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) with the Celestial Intermediate Reference System (CIRS), the latter based on the Celestial Intermediate Pole (CIP) and Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO). Starting from direct series that deliver the CIP coordinates X,Y and (via the quantity s + XY/2) the CIO locator s, we look at the opportunities for simplification. Results: The biggest reductions come from truncating the series, but some additional gains can be made in the areas of the matrix formulation, the expressions for the nutation arguments and by subsuming long period effects into the bias quantities. Three example models are demonstrated that approximate the IAU 2000/2006 CIP to accuracies of 1 mas, 16 mas and 0.4 arcsec throughout 1995-2050 but with computation costs reduced by 1, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude compared with the full model. Appendices A to G are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Exploring Racism through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Cass; Shin, Ryan; Cinquemani, Shana; Marino, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Photography is a powerful medium with which to explore social issues and concerns through the intersection of artistic form and concept. Through the discussions of images and suggested activities, students will understand various ways photographers have documented and addressed racism and discrimination. This Instructional Resource presents a…

  4. State Skill Standards: Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Frederick; Reed, Loretta; Jensen, Capra; Robison, Gary; Taylor, Susan; Pavesich, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide skill standards for all content areas in career and technical education. The standards in this document are for photography programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program.…

  5. Dreams Memories & Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Photography students spend a considerable amount of time working on technical issues in shooting, composing, editing, and processing prints. Another aspect of their learning should include the conception and communication of their ideas. A student's memories and dreams can serve as motivation to create images in visual art. Some artists claim that…

  6. Precession feature extraction of ballistic missile warhead with high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huixia

    2018-04-01

    This paper establishes the precession model of ballistic missile warhead, and derives the formulas of micro-Doppler frequency induced by the target with precession. In order to obtain micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile warhead with precession, micro-Doppler bandwidth estimation algorithm, which avoids velocity compensation, is presented based on high-resolution time-frequency transform. The results of computer simulations confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Smartphone Fundus Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari Khanamiri, Hossein; Nakatsuka, Austin; El-Annan, Jaafar

    2017-07-06

    Smartphone fundus photography is a simple technique to obtain ocular fundus pictures using a smartphone camera and a conventional handheld indirect ophthalmoscopy lens. This technique is indispensable when picture documentation of optic nerve, retina, and retinal vessels is necessary but a fundus camera is not available. The main advantage of this technique is the widespread availability of smartphones that allows documentation of macula and optic nerve changes in many settings that was not previously possible. Following the well-defined steps detailed here, such as proper alignment of the phone camera, handheld lens, and the patient's pupil, is the key for obtaining a clear retina picture with no interfering light reflections and aberrations. In this paper, the optical principles of indirect ophthalmoscopy and fundus photography will be reviewed first. Then, the step-by-step method to record a good quality retinal image using a smartphone will be explained.

  8. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  9. Upper-Level Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Goals for Their Laboratory Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Brittland K.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to reform undergraduate chemistry laboratory coursework typically focus on the curricula of introductory-level courses, while upper-level courses are bypassed. This study used video-stimulated recall to interview 17 junior- and senior- level chemistry majors after they carried out an experiment as part of a laboratory course. It is assumed…

  10. Fostering Students' Preparation and Achievement in Upper Level Mathematics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Mehmet; Shaqlaih, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study describes an intervention to address both motivation, student engagement and preparation in upper-level mathematics courses. The effect of the intervention regarding students' achievements is investigated via students' opinions and data analysis from students' assessments. The results of this study show the featured intervention…

  11. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  12. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brittany; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students' perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest…

  13. Student Perceptions of an Upper-Level, Undergraduate Human Anatomy Laboratory Course without Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shirley J.

    2012-01-01

    Several programs in health professional education require or are considering requiring upper-level human anatomy as prerequisite for their applicants. Undergraduate students are confronted with few institutions offering such a course, in part because of the expense and logistical issues associated with a cadaver-based human anatomy course. This…

  14. Precession electron diffraction – a topical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Midgley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 20 years since precession electron diffraction (PED was introduced, it has grown from a little-known niche technique to one that is seen as a cornerstone of electron crystallography. It is now used primarily in two ways. The first is to determine crystal structures, to identify lattice parameters and symmetry, and ultimately to solve the atomic structure ab initio. The second is, through connection with the microscope scanning system, to map the local orientation of the specimen to investigate crystal texture, rotation and strain at the nanometre scale. This topical review brings the reader up to date, highlighting recent successes using PED and providing some pointers to the future in terms of method development and how the technique can meet some of the needs of the X-ray crystallography community. Complementary electron techniques are also discussed, together with how a synergy of methods may provide the best approach to electron-based structure analysis.

  15. Development of a nuclear precession magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgens Alves, J.G. das.

    1983-12-01

    The objective of this thesis was to develop a proton precession magnetometer for geophysical prospecting and base stations. The proton procession magnetometer measures the total magnetic fields intensity. It operates on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance by determining the processing frequency of protons of a non viscous liquid in the terrestrial magnetic fields. The instrument was tested in field to evaluate signal/noise ratio, supportable gradient and battery consumption. Application test was carried out to take diurnal variation data and, reconnaissance and detail surveys data on an archaeological site in the Marajo Island-Pa. The test results were confronted with two commercial magnetometers-GP-70, McPhar e G-816, Geometric - and, with data from Observatorio Magnetico Ilha de Tatuoca as well. For all cases, the data comparison showed a good performance of the magnetometer tested. (author)

  16. A QSO with precessing jets: 2300 - 189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunstead, R.W.; Murdoch, H.S.; Phillips, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The QSO 2300-189 (z = 0.1287) is found to have a faint companion galaxy at the same redshift. The separation is 6.8 arcsec on the sky. A spectrum of the fuzz around the QSO shows absorption features typical of late-type stars, which argues for its occurence in a normal disc or E galaxy. Radio maps obtained with the VLA at 1465 MHz and 4885 MHz show inversion (or S-shaped) symmetry, which is explained as due to the ejection of jets along an axis which is precessing, probably due to the tidal influence of the nearby galaxy. Several kinematic parameters are deduced including an upper limit for the jet velocity. Further support for tidal interaction comes from the detection of extensive region of low-brightness optical emission in the vicinity of the QSO. (author)

  17. Thomas precession: correct and incorrect solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malykin, Grigorii B

    2006-01-01

    A wealth of different expressions for the frequency of the Thomas precession (TP) can be found in the literature, with the consequence that this issue has been discussed over a long period of time. It is shown that the correct result was obtained in the works of several authors, which were published more than forty years ago but remained unnoticed against the background of numerous erroneous works. Several TP-related physical paradoxes formulated primarily to disprove the special relativity theory are shown to be fallacious. Different techniques for deriving the correct expression are considered and the reasons for the emergence of the main incorrect expressions for the TP frequency are analyzed. (from the history of physics)

  18. Progressive Derechos in the Presence of Closed Upper-level Subtropical Anticyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastini, C.; Bosart, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    Progressive derechos are a type of long-lived mesoscale convective system that produces large swaths of wind damage. In contrast to their serial derecho counterparts, which form in association with extratropical cyclones, progressive derechos often occur in the presence of benign synoptic conditions on the poleward side of closed upper-level subtropical anticyclones. Forecasters have been known to struggle predicting progressive derechos with any certainty due to the common lack of large-scale support for severe weather in regimes dominated by anticyclonic conditions. This study will classify a group of days on which there was a closed upper-level anticyclone over the United States and a progressive derecho did not occur and a group of days on which there was a closed upper-level anticyclone over the United States and a progressive derecho did occur, examine the synoptic environments of the two groups, and identify derecho null cases. By analyzing the null cases, derecho failure modes will be determined, which will help forecaster situational awareness and reveal the science behind the environmental conditions necessary for, and detrimental to, derecho development. This presentation will include climatologies of both derechos and closed upper-level anticyclones over the United States for June, July, and August of the years 1994-2013 (the modern radar era). The presentation will also include closed anticyclone-relative composites of both derecho cases and derecho null cases. The composites will elucidate which conditions are necessary for, and which are detrimental to, derecho development. The hypothesis is that derecho failure days occur due either to the lack of a triggering mechanism or other phenomena working against convective development such as a strong capping inversion or transverse ageostrophic circulations around an upper-level jet creating subsidence in an otherwise favorable environment. A representative case study will be included to highlight a common

  19. A PULSED, PRECESSING JET IN CEPHEUS A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Moeckel, Nickolas; Bally, John

    2009-01-01

    We present near-infrared H 2 , radio CO, and thermal infrared observations of the nearby massive star-forming region Cepheus A (Cep A). From H 2 bow shocks arranged along four distinct jet axes, we infer that the massive protostellar source HW2 drives a pulsed, precessing jet that has changed its orientation by about 45 deg. in roughly 10 4 years. The current HW2 radio jet represents the most recent event in this time series of eruptions. This scenario is consistent with the recent discovery of a disk around HW2, perpendicular to the current jet orientation, and with the presence of companions at projected distances comparable to the disk radius. We propose that the Cep A system formed by the disk-assisted capture of a sibling star by HW2. We present a numerical model of a 15 M sun star with a circumstellar disk, orbited by a companion in an inclined, eccentric orbit. Close passages of the companion through or near the disk result in periods of enhanced accretion and mass loss, as well as forced precession of the disk and associated orientation changes in the jet. The observations reveal a second powerful outflow that emerges from radio source HW3c or HW3d. This flow is associated with blueshifted CO emission and a faint H 2 bow shock to the east, and with HH 168 to the west. A collision between the flows from HW2 and HW3c/d may be responsible for X-ray and radio continuum emission in Cep A West.

  20. Digital clinical photography: Practical tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Mutalik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography.

  1. Clinical photography: A to Z

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Nayak

    2017-01-01

    Clinical orthodontic photography is a vital skill set that every practicing orthodontist should master to be successful at the documentation of case records, patient education, peer presentations, marketing, and at acquiring additional certifications. This article aims to review various aspects of orthodontic photography and relevant research.

  2. Clinical photography: A to Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Nayak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical orthodontic photography is a vital skill set that every practicing orthodontist should master to be successful at the documentation of case records, patient education, peer presentations, marketing, and at acquiring additional certifications. This article aims to review various aspects of orthodontic photography and relevant research.

  3. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  4. Numerical relativity simulations of precessing binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    We present the first set of numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron mergers that include spin precession effects and are evolved with multiple resolutions. Our simulations employ consistent initial data in general relativity with different spin configurations and dimensionless spin magnitudes ˜0.1 . They start at a gravitational-wave frequency of ˜392 Hz and cover more than 1 precession period and about 15 orbits up to merger. We discuss the spin precession dynamics by analyzing coordinate trajectories, quasilocal spin measurements, and energetics, by comparing spin aligned, antialigned, and irrotational configurations. Gravitational waveforms from different spin configuration are compared by calculating the mismatch between pairs of waveforms in the late inspiral. We find that precession effects are not distinguishable from nonprecessing configurations with aligned spins for approximately face-on binaries, while the latter are distinguishable from nonspinning configurations. Spin precession effects are instead clearly visible for approximately edge-on binaries. For the parameters considered here, precession does not significantly affect the characteristic postmerger gravitational-wave frequencies nor the mass ejection. Our results pave the way for the modeling of spin precession effects in the gravitational waveform from binary neutron star events.

  5. Study of parameters of simultaneous lasing on two lines sharing an upper level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikulev, A A

    2002-01-01

    Stationary lasing at two competing lines sharing an upper level is studied. Based on the expressions for the gain obtained earlier, the possible lasing regimes are considered (at one or two lines) and approximate formulas are derived for determining the output power in each line. These formulas are shown to be the generalisation of the Rigrod formula to the case of simultaneous lasing at several lines. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Brittany; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students’ perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest approach. Significant differences in students’ perception of their knowledge and their determined knowledge exist at the beginning (pretest) and end (postte...

  7. The influence of tropospheric static stability on upper-level frontogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Saute, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Upper-level frontogenesis in an inviscid, dry and adiabatic fluid forced by confluence is investigated by means of a two-dimensional semi-geostrophic model using the specific volume as an isentropic vertical coordinate. The initial conditions are specified given an analytical continuous potential vorticity field in the presence of a temperature contrast at the ground, the lower boundary condition requiring an appropriate treatment because the ground intersects the first levels of the model. T...

  8. Digital Photography and Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sdegno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In some significant film productions of the last thirty years photography play an innovative role, not only from a technical point of view, but also regarding the plot of the movie. The examples described in the text - from Blade Runner to the recent Inception - may allow a better understanding of the way in which the technology of image processing has altered the perception of film sequences, also helping to transform the opinions on this new way of work by artists usually adopting traditional practices, such as Wim Wenders. His film, Until the end of the world, in fact, appears as an episode particularly eloquent in the filmography of the artist, which testifies a change in the definition of the working method.

  9. Larmor-precession based neutron scattering instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The Larmor precession of the neutron spin in a magnetic field allows the attachment of a Larmor clock to every neutron. Such Larmor labelling opens the possibility for the development of unusual neutron scattering techniques, where the energy (momentum) resolution does not require the initial and final states to be well selected. This principally allows for achievement of very high energy (momentum) resolution that is not feasible at all with conventional neutron scattering techniques, because the required neutron beam monochromatization (collimation) will result in intolerable intensity losses. Such decoupling of resolution and collimation allows, for example, for a significant increase in the luminosity of small-angle scattering or high-resolution diffractometers; the fact that opens new perspectives for their implementation at middle flux neutron sources. Different kinds of Larmor clock-based instrumentation, particularly two alternative NSE techniques using rotating and time-gradient magnetic field arrangements, which can be considered as inexpensive and affordable alternatives to present day NSE techniques, will be discussed and results of simulations and first experiments will be presented. (author)

  10. Vortex precession in thin elliptical ferromagnetic nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaspel, C.E., E-mail: craig.zaspel@umwestern.edu

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • A general form for the magnetostatic energy is calculated for the vortex state in a ferromagnetic ellipse. • The ellipse magnetostatic energy is minimized by conformal mapping the circular disk onto the ellipse. • The gyrotropic precession frequency is obtained in general for a range of ellipticities. - Abstract: The magnetostatic energy is calculated for a magnetic vortex in a noncircular elliptical nanodisk. It is well-known that the energy of a vortex in the circular disk is minimized though an ansatz that eliminates the magnetostatic charge at the disk edge. Beginning with this ansatz for the circular disk, a conformal mapping of a circle interior onto the interior of an ellipse results in the magnetization of the elliptical disk. This magnetization in the interior of an ellipse also has no magnetostatic charge at the disk edge also minimizing the magnetostatic energy. As expected the energy has a quadratic dependence on the displacement of the vortex core from the ellipse center, but reflecting the lower symmetry of the ellipse. Through numerical integration of the magnetostatic integral a general expression for the energy is obtained for ellipticity values from 1.0 to about 0.3. Finally a general expression for the gyrotropic frequency as described by the Thiele equation is obtained.

  11. Numerical simulation of a precessing vortex breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochmann, P.; Sinigersky, A.; Hehle, M.; Schaefer, O.; Koch, R.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the results of time-dependent numerical predictions of a turbulent symmetry breaking vortex breakdown in a realistic gas turbine combustor. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved by using the k-ε two-equation model as well as by a full second-order closure using the Reynolds stress model of Speziale, Sarkar and Gatski (SSG). The results for a Reynolds number of 5.2 x 10 4 , a swirl number of 0.52 and an expansion ratio of 5 show that the flow is emerging from the swirler as a spiral gyrating around a zone of strong recirculation which is also asymmetric and precessing. These flow structures which are typical for the spiral type (S-type) vortex breakdown have been confirmed by PIV and local LDA measurements in a corresponding experimental setup. Provided that high resolution meshes are employed the calculations with both turbulence models are capable to reproduce the spatial and temporal dynamics of the flow

  12. Single-spin precessing gravitational waveform in closed form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Andrew; O'Shaughnessy, R.

    2014-02-01

    In coming years, gravitational-wave detectors should find black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries, potentially coincident with astronomical phenomena like short gamma ray bursts. These binaries are expected to precess. Gravitational-wave science requires a tractable model for precessing binaries, to disentangle precession physics from other phenomena like modified strong field gravity, tidal deformability, or Hubble flow; and to measure compact object masses, spins, and alignments. Moreover, current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries use templates where the binary does not precess and are ill-suited for detection of generic precessing sources. In this paper we provide a closed-form representation of the single-spin precessing waveform in the frequency domain by reorganizing the signal as a sum over harmonics, each of which resembles a nonprecessing waveform. This form enables simple analytic calculations of the Fisher matrix for use in template bank generation and coincidence metrics, and jump proposals to improve the efficiency of Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We have verified that for generic BH-NS binaries, our model agrees with the time-domain waveform to 2%. Straightforward extensions of the derivations outlined here (and provided in full online) allow higher accuracy and error estimates.

  13. Light Field Photography A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this survey author will be discussing about light field photography its importance techniques used in it to have an excellent output from the normal cameras. Light field photography has become an emerging area due to its refocusing of digital image and 3D reconstruction. Reconstruction of image tells us about its high resolution and refocusing is used to clear the blur image.1

  14. New precession expressions, valid for long time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrák, J.; Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The present IAU model of precession, like its predecessors, is given as a set of polynomial approximations of various precession parameters intended for high-accuracy applications over a limited time span. Earlier comparisons with numerical integrations have shown that this model is valid only for a few centuries around the basic epoch, J2000.0, while for more distant epochs it rapidly diverges from the numerical solution. In our preceding studies we also obtained preliminary developments for the precessional contribution to the motion of the equator: coordinates X,Y of the precessing pole and precession parameters ψA,ωA, suitable for use over long time intervals. Aims: The goal of the present paper is to obtain upgraded developments for various sets of precession angles that would fit modern observations near J2000.0 and at the same time fit numerical integration of the motions of solar system bodies on scales of several thousand centuries. Methods: We used the IAU 2006 solutions to represent the precession of the ecliptic and of the equator close to J2000.0 and, for more distant epochs, a numerical integration using the Mercury 6 package and solutions by Laskar et al. (1993, A&A, 270, 522) with upgraded initial conditions and constants to represent the ecliptic, and general precession and obliquity, respectively. From them, different precession parameters were calculated in the interval ± 200 millennia from J2000.0, and analytical expressions are found that provide a good fit for the whole interval. Results: Series for the various precessional parameters, comprising a cubic polynomial plus from 8 to 14 periodic terms, are derived that allow precession to be computed with an accuracy comparable to IAU 2006 around the central epoch J2000.0, a few arcseconds throughout the historical period, and a few tenths of a degree at the ends of the ± 200 millennia time span. Computer algorithms are provided that compute the ecliptic and mean equator poles and the

  15. Death and digital photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennis, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers new possibilities for photographing the dying and dead in Australia that have been enabled by digital technologies. It argues that vernacular digital photographs demonstrate unprecedented degrees of control and privacy and further that they are purposefully withheld from public view, thus raising issues about visibility and secrecy.Some historical context is provided. Post mortem photographs were not uncommon in the nineteenth century but were in the domain of professional studio photographers. Commissioning post mortem portraits was rare for most of the twentieth century, due to changing attitudes to death and the transformation of the photographic industry. Photographing the deceased re-emerged in the 1980s, notably in the area of neonatal death.In the last five years death-related vernacular photographs have begun to proliferate. Unlike analogue processes, digital photography bypasses the involvement of others in processing and printing private images. Distribution to intimates can be achieved instantaneously via the internet, reinforcing social and familial connections.Vernacular digital photographs of the deceased do not address historical tradition but share their domestic and intimate contexts. Nor do they belong to a unified group, yet they have a common vocabulary which emphasises specificity and detail.

  16. Death and Digital Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ennis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers new possibilities for photographing the dying and dead in Australia that have been enabled by digital technologies. It argues that vernacular digital photographs demonstrate unprecedented degrees of control and privacy and further that they are purposefully withheld from public view, thus raising issues about visibility and secrecy. Some historical context is provided. Post mortem photographs were not uncommon in the nineteenth century but were in the domain of professional studio photographers. Commissioning post mortem portraits was rare for most of the twentieth century, due to changing attitudes to death and the transformation of the photographic industry. Photographing the deceased re-emerged in the 1980s, notably in the area of neonatal death. In the last five years death-related vernacular photographs have begun to proliferate. Unlike analogue processes, digital photography bypasses the involvement of others in processing and printing private images. Distribution to intimates can be achieved instantaneously via the internet, reinforcing social and familial connections. Vernacular digital photographs of the deceased do not address historical tradition but share their domestic and intimate contexts. Nor do they belong to a unified group, yet they have a common vocabulary which emphasises specificity and detail.

  17. Nuclear and Particle Physics Simulations: The Consortium of Upper-Level Physics Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Roberta; Moloney, Michael J.; Philpott, John; Rothberg, Joseph

    1995-06-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  18. Measuring Student Improvement in Lower- and Upper-Level University Climate Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Taylor, S. V.; Schoonmaker, J. E.; Lane, E.; Francois, R. H.; Austin, P.

    2011-12-01

    What do university students know about climate? What do they learn in a climate course? On the second-to-last day of a course about global climate change, only 48% of our upper-level science students correctly answered a multiple-choice question about the greenhouse effect. The good news: improvement. Only 16% had answered correctly on the first day of class. The bad news: the learning opportunities we've provided appear to have missed more than half the class on a fundamental climate concept. To evaluate the effectiveness of instruction on student learning about climate, we have developed a prototype assessment tool, designed to be deployed as a low-stakes pre-post test. The items included were validated through student interviews to ensure that students interpret the wording and answer choices in the way we intend. This type of validated assessment, administered both at the beginning and end of term, with matched individuals, provides insight regarding the baseline knowledge with which our students enter a course, and the impact of that course on their learning. We administered test items to students in (1) an upper-level climate course for science majors and (2) a lower-level climate course open to all students. Some items were given to both groups, others to only one of the groups. Both courses use evidence-based pedagogy with active student engagement (clickers, small group activities, regular pre-class preparation). Our results with upper-level students show strong gains in student thinking (>70% of students who missed a question on the pre-test answered correctly on the post-test) about stock-and-flow (box model) problems, annual cycles in the Keeling curve, ice-albedo feedbacks, and isotopic fractionation. On different questions, lower-level students showed strong gains regarding albedo and blackbody emission spectra. Both groups show similar baseline knowledge and lower-than-expected gains on greenhouse effect fundamentals, and zero gain regarding the

  19. Numerical simulations of bistable flows in precessing spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormann, J.; Hansen, U.

    2018-05-01

    Precession of the rotation axis is an often neglected mechanical driving mechanism for flows in planetary interiors, through viscous coupling at the boundaries and topographic forcing in non-spherical geometries. We investigate precession-driven flows in spheroidal shells over a wide range of parameters and test the results against theoretical predictions. For Ekman numbers down to 8.0 × 10-7, we see a good accordance with the work of Busse, who assumed the precession-driven flow to be dominated by a rigid rotation component that is tilted to the main rotation axis. The velocity fields show localized small-scale structures for lower Ekman numbers and clear signals of inertial waves for some parameters. For the case of moderate viscosity and strong deformation, we report the realization of multiple solutions at the same parameter combination, depending on the initial condition.

  20. Rotation Detection Using the Precession of Molecular Electric Dipole Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-11-01

    We present a method to detect the rotation by using the precession of molecular electric dipole moment in a static electric field. The molecular electric dipole moments are polarized under the static electric field and a nonzero electric polarization vector emerges in the molecular gas. A resonant radio-frequency pulse electric field is applied to realize a 90° flip of the electric polarization vector of a particular rotational state. After the pulse electric field, the electric polarization vector precesses under the static electric field. The rotation induces a shift in the precession frequency which is measured to deduce the angular velocity of the rotation. The fundamental sensitivity limit of this method is estimated. This work is only a proposal and does not involve experimental results.

  1. Using Digital Photography to Enhance Student Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to help students develop their digital photography skills and see the world through new eyes. An emphasis is placed on using digital photography to communicate ideas and feelings. (Contains 6 figures and 2 tables.)

  2. Conference Proceedings: Photography and Britishness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Willcock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The video-recordings presented here were made at the conference Photography and Britishness, held at the Yale Center for British Art on November 4 – 5, 2016. The conference was the result of a collaboration between the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, and the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino—three research institutions that have a converging interest in British art. The conference sought to investigate the various ways in which notions of “Britishness” have been communicated, inflected, and contested through the photographic image. It was not a conference about the history of photography in Britain, or about British photography. Rather, it sought to consider the nature of the relationship between photography and Britishness: the notion that photography can capture images of Britishness, at the same time that our sense of what Britishness constitutes is produced by the photographic image. A key question for the conference was whether Britishness can have a photographic referent—or whether it is itself an effect of representation. Speakers at the conference approached these questions from a wide range of perspectives and focusing on a diverse number of photographic materials—from family albums and studio portraits to advertisements, reportage, and aerial photography—which demonstrated the complexities and instabilities not only of the term Britishness, but also of the medium of photography. The conference was opened with an introduction by John Tagg. The videos included here are presented in the order they were delivered.

  3. Bounce Precession Fishbones in the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White

    2003-01-01

    Bursting modes are observed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557], which are identified as bounce-precession-frequency fishbone modes. They are predicted to be important in high-current, low-shear discharges with a significant population of trapped particles with a large mean-bounce angle, such as produced by near-tangential beam injection into a large aspect-ratio device. Such a distribution is often stable to the usual precession-resonance fishbone mode. These modes could be important in ignited plasmas, driven by the trapped-alpha-particle population

  4. Examining portfolio-based assessment in an upper-level biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brittany Ann

    Historically, students have been viewed as empty vessels and passive participants in the learning process but students actually are active forming their own conceptions. One way student learning is impacted is through assessment. Alternative assessment, which contrasts traditional assessment methods, takes into account how students learn by promoting engagement and construction of knowledge This dissertation explores portfolio-based assessment, a method of alternative assessment, which requires students to compose a purposeful collection of work demonstrating their knowledge in an upper-level biology course. The research objectives include characterizing and contributing to the understanding of portfolio-based assessment in higher education, examining reflection and inquiry portfolio components, determining student knowledge of biological concepts, and investigating student integrative thinking through the transformation of reflections into concept webs One main finding includes the majority of reflections categorized as naive or novice in quality. There was no difference in quality of reflections among biological topic. There was a relatively equal amount of high and low cognitive level questions. Students' knowledge of biological concepts significantly increased from the beginning to end of the course. Student written reflections were transformed into concept webs to allow for examination of student integrative thinking. Concepts, relationships, and interconnections in concept webs showed variation but declined by the end of the semester This study is one of the first examining portfolio-based assessment in an upper-level biology course We do not contend that this method of assessment is the only way to promote student learning but portfolio-based assessment may be a tool that can transform science education but currently the role of portfolio-based assessment in science education remains unclear. Additional research needs to be conducted before we will fully

  5. Non-resonant precession of the neutron magnetic moment in antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic moment of a neutron moving in an antiferromagnet with a spiral-order magnetic field slowly precesses. Precession pitch strongly depends on the value and direction of the neutron velocity. 4 refs

  6. Digital Photography for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Most elementary students approach photography in an open-minded, experimental way. As a result, their images are often more playful than those taken by adults. Students discover more through their own explorations than they would learn through overly structured lessons. In this article, the author describes how he introduces his elementary…

  7. Street photography as social interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mubi Brighenti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Street photographers know quite well that taking a picture is a form of social interaction. The birth of this genre of photography, they have been discussing at length about the ethical problems involved in taking pictures of personal strangers in public places without asking permission.

  8. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Metin; Bülbül, Murat; Toker, Serdar; Beksaç, Burak; Kara, Adnan

    2014-04-05

    Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established.

  9. The precession of mercury's perihelion via perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, M.H.; Castro-Quilantan, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Perturbation theory is used to solve the problem of the precession of Mercury's perihelion, this phenomenon being a relativistic effect. The expansion parameter appears naturally when the orbit equation is written in an appropriate form and it completely justifies the use of the first order approximation. (author)

  10. Pseudo Steady-State Free Precession for MR-Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assländer, Jakob; Glaser, Steffen J; Hennig, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the signal behavior in the case the flip angle in steady-state free precession sequences is continuously varied as suggested for MR-fingerprinting sequences. Flip angle variations prevent the establishment of a steady state and introduce instabilities regarding to magnetic field inhomogeneities and intravoxel dephasing. We show how a pseudo steady state can be achieved, which restores the spin echo nature of steady-state free precession. Based on geometrical considerations, relationships between the flip angle, repetition and echo time are derived that suffice to the establishment of a pseudo steady state. The theory is tested with Bloch simulations as well as phantom and in vivo experiments. A typical steady-state free precession passband can be restored with the proposed conditions. The stability of the pseudo steady state is demonstrated by comparing the evolution of the signal of a single isochromat to one resulting from a spin ensemble. As confirmed by experiments, magnetization in a pseudo steady state can be described with fewer degrees of freedom compared to the original fingerprinting and the pseudo steady state results in more reliable parameter maps. The proposed conditions restore the spin-echo-like signal behavior typical for steady-state free precession in fingerprinting sequences, making this approach more robust to B 0 variations. Magn Reson Med 77:1151-1161, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Relativistic shifts of bound negative-muon precession frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Froese, A. M.; Fryer, B.A.; Ghandi, K.

    2005-01-01

    High-field negative-muon spin precession experiments have been performed using a backward-muon beam with substantial transverse spin polarization, facilitating high-precision measurements of the magnetogyric ratio of negative muons bound to nuclei in the ground states of muonic atoms. These results may provide a testing ground for quantum electrodynamics in very strong electromagnetic fields

  12. Satellite Orbital Precessions Caused by the Octupolar Mass Moment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I consider a satellite moving around a non-spherical body of mass M and equatorial radius R, and calculate its orbital precessions caused by the body's octupolar mass moment J4. I consider only the effects averaged over one orbital period T of the satellite. I give exact for- mulas, not restricted to any special values ...

  13. Sparse representations of gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Szilagyi, Bela; Galley, Chad R; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-07-11

    Many relevant applications in gravitational wave physics share a significant common problem: the seven-dimensional parameter space of gravitational waveforms from precessing compact binary inspirals and coalescences is large enough to prohibit covering the space of waveforms with sufficient density. We find that by using the reduced basis method together with a parametrization of waveforms based on their phase and precession, we can construct ultracompact yet high-accuracy representations of this large space. As a demonstration, we show that less than 100 judiciously chosen precessing inspiral waveforms are needed for 200 cycles, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and spin magnitudes ≤0.9. In fact, using only the first 10 reduced basis waveforms yields a maximum mismatch of 0.016 over the whole range of considered parameters. We test whether the parameters selected from the inspiral regime result in an accurate reduced basis when including merger and ringdown; we find that this is indeed the case in the context of a nonprecessing effective-one-body model. This evidence suggests that as few as ∼100 numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences may accurately represent the seven-dimensional parameter space of precession waveforms for the considered ranges.

  14. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 1. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino parameters and the twisting structure of the solar magnetic fields from the solar neutrino data. S Dev Jyoti Dhar Sharma U C Pandey S P Sud B C Chauhan. Research Articles Volume 61 Issue 1 ...

  15. Predicting Mercury's precession using simple relativistic Newtonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Y.; Steiner, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new simple relativistic model for planetary motion describing accurately the anomalous precession of the perihelion of Mercury and its origin. The model is based on transforming Newton's classical equation for planetary motion from absolute to real spacetime influenced by the gravitational potential and introducing the concept of influenced direction.

  16. Comparing Post-Newtonian and Numerical-Relativity Precession Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Lawrence; Ossokine, Sergei; Boyle, Michael; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela

    2015-04-01

    Binary black-hole systems are expected to be important sources of gravitational waves for upcoming gravitational-wave detectors. If the spins are not colinear with each other or with the orbital angular momentum, these systems exhibit complicated precession dynamics that are imprinted on the gravitational waveform. We develop a new procedure to match the precession dynamics computed by post-Newtonian (PN) theory to those of numerical binary black-hole simulations in full general relativity. For numerical relativity (NR) simulations lasting approximately two precession cycles, we find that the PN and NR predictions for the directions of the orbital angular momentum and the spins agree to better than ~1° with NR during the inspiral, increasing to 5° near merger. Nutation of the orbital plane on the orbital time-scale agrees well between NR and PN, whereas nutation of the spin direction shows qualitatively different behavior in PN and NR. We also examine how the PN equations for precession and orbital-phase evolution converge with PN order, and we quantify the impact of various choices for handling partially known PN terms.

  17. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: stability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Cambon, C

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Omega(0)) and the additional "precessing" Coriolis force (with angular velocity -epsilonOmega(0)), normal to it. A "weak" shear flow, with rate 2epsilon of the same order of the Poincaré "small" ratio epsilon , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler's equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov's [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré's [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small epsilon . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet's theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small epsilon , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger epsilon values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally

  18. Multiweek cell culture project for use in upper-level biology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E; Gardner, Grant E; Parks, Lisa D

    2012-06-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF, caffeine, epinephrine, heavy metals, and FBS. Students researched primary literature to determine their experimental variables, made their own solutions, and treated their cells over a period of 2 wk. Before this, a sterile technique laboratory was developed to teach students how to work with the cells and minimize contamination. Students designed their experiments, mixed their solutions, seeded their cells, and treated them with their control and experimental media. Students had the choice of manipulating a number of variables, including incubation times, exposure to treatment media, and temperature. At the end of the experiment, students observed the effects of their treatment, harvested and dyed their cells, counted relative cell numbers in control and treatment flasks, and determined the ratio of living to dead cells using a hemocytometer. At the conclusion of the experiment, students presented their findings in a poster presentation. This laboratory can be expanded or adapted to include additional cell lines and treatments. The ability to design and implement their own experiments has been shown to increase student engagement in the biology-related laboratory activities as well as develop the critical thinking skills needed for independent research.

  19. Upper-Level Mediterranean Oscillation index and seasonal variability of rainfall and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redolat, Dario; Monjo, Robert; Lopez-Bustins, Joan A.; Martin-Vide, Javier

    2018-02-01

    The need for early seasonal forecasts stimulates continuous research in climate teleconnections. The large variability of the Mediterranean climate presents a greater difficulty in predicting climate anomalies. This article reviews teleconnection indices commonly used for the Mediterranean basin and explores possible extensions of one of them, the Mediterranean Oscillation index (MOi). In particular, the anomalies of the geopotential height field at 500 hPa are analyzed using segmentation of the Mediterranean basin in seven spatial windows: three at eastern and four at western. That is, different versions of an Upper-Level Mediterranean Oscillation index (ULMOi) were calculated, and monthly and annual variability of precipitation and temperature were analyzed for 53 observatories from 1951 to 2015. Best versions were selected according to the Pearson correlation, its related p value, and two measures of standardized error. The combination of the Balearic Sea and Libya/Egypt windows was the best for precipitation and temperature, respectively. The ULMOi showed the highest predictive ability in combination with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation index (AMOi) for the annual temperature throughout the Mediterranean basin. The best model built from the indices presented a final mean error between 15 and 25% in annual precipitation for most of the studied area.

  20. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students’ perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest approach. Significant differences in students’ perception of their knowledge and their determined knowledge exist at the beginning (pretest) and end (posttest) of the course. Alignment between student perception and determined knowledge was significantly more accurate on the posttest compared with the pretest. Students whose determined knowledge was in the upper quartile had significantly better alignment between their perception and determined knowledge on the pre- and posttest than students in the lower quartile. No difference exists between how students perceived their knowledge between upper- and lower-quartile students. There was a significant difference in alignment of perception and determined knowledge between males and females on the posttest, with females being more accurate in their perception of knowledge. This study provides evidence of discrepancies that exist between what students perceive they know and what they actually know. PMID:26086662

  1. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind profiles to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments incorporate wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the upper-level winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility were developed for use in upper-level wind assessments. Database development procedures as well as statistical analysis of temporal wind variability at each launch range will be presented.

  2. Imagers for digital still photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, Jan; Dillen, Bart; Draijer, Cees; Manoury, Erik-Jan; Meessen, Louis; Peters, Inge

    2006-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of the requirements for, and current state-of-the-art of, CCD and CMOS imagers for use in digital still photography. Four market segments will be reviewed: mobile imaging, consumer "point-and-shoot cameras", consumer digital SLR cameras and high-end professional camera systems. The paper will also present some challenges and innovations with respect to packaging, testing, and system integration.

  3. Audit Log for Forensic Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Timothy; Sorell, Matthew

    We propose an architecture for an audit log system for forensic photography, which ensures that the chain of evidence of a photograph taken by a photographer at a crime scene is maintained from the point of image capture to its end application at trial. The requirements for such a system are specified and the results of experiments are presented which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  4. Incorporating Inquiry into Upper-Level Undergraduate Homework Assignments: The Mini-Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Alan; Speck, Angela; Witzig, Stephen; Abell, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    The US National Science Education Standards (2000) state that science should be taught through inquiry. The five essential features of classroom inquiry are that the leaner (i) engages in scientifically oriented questions, (ii) gives priority to evidence in responding to questions, (iii) formulates explanations from evidence, (iv) connects explanations to scientific knowledge, and (v) communicates and justifies explanations. One difficulty in achieving this vision at the university level lies in the common perception that inquiry be fully open and unstructured, and that its implementation will be impractical due to time and material constraints. In an NSF-funded project, "CUES: Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science," faculty developed new inquiry-based laboratory curriculum materials using a "mini-journal" approach, which is designed as an alternative to the cookbook laboratory and represents the way that scientists do science. Here we adapt this approach to a homework assignment in an upper-level Planetary Science class, and show that inquiry is achievable in this setting. Traditional homeworks in this class consisted of problem sets requiring algebraic manipulation, computation, and in most cases an appraisal of the result Longer questions are broken down into chunks worth 1 to 4 points. In contrast, the mini-journal is a short article that is modeled in the way that scientists do and report science. It includes a title, abstract, introduction (with clear statement of the problem to be tackled), a description of the methods, results (presented as both tables and graphs), a discussion (with suggestions for future work) and a list of cited work. Students devise their research questions and hypothesis from the paper based on a logical next step in the investigation. Guiding questions in the discussion can assist the students ("it would be interesting to evaluate the effect of ..."). Students submit their own minijournal, using the same journal

  5. Steady flow in a rotating sphere with strong precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Shigeo

    2018-04-01

    The steady flow in a rotating sphere is investigated by asymptotic analysis in the limit of strong precession. The whole spherical body is divided into three regions in terms of the flow characteristics: the critical band, which is the close vicinity surrounding the great circle perpendicular to the precession axis, the boundary layer, which is attached to the whole sphere surface and the inviscid region that occupies the majority of the sphere. The analytic expressions, in the leading order of the asymptotic expansion, of the velocity field are obtained in the former two, whereas partial differential equations for the velocity field are derived in the latter, which are solved numerically. This steady flow structure is confirmed by the corresponding direct numerical simulation.

  6. From the Kinematics of Precession Motion to Generalized Rabi Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danail S. Brezov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We use both vector-parameter and quaternion techniques to provide a thorough description of several classes of rotations, starting with coaxial angular velocity Ω of varying magnitude. Then, we fix the magnitude and let Ω precess at constant rate about the z-axis, which yields a particular solution to the free Euler dynamical equations in the case of axially symmetric inertial ellipsoid. The latter appears also in the description of spin precessions in NMR and quantum computing. As we show below, this problem has analytic solutions for a much larger class of motions determined by a simple condition relating the polar angle and z-projection of Ω (expressed in cylindrical coordinates, which are both time-dependent in the generic case. Relevant physical examples are also provided.

  7. Ocular Fundus Photography as an Educational Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Devin D; Garza, Philip S

    2015-10-01

    The proficiency of nonophthalmologists with direct ophthalmoscopy is poor, which has prompted a search for alternative technologies to examine the ocular fundus. Although ocular fundus photography has existed for decades, its use has been traditionally restricted to ophthalmology clinical care settings and textbooks. Recent research has shown a role for nonmydriatic fundus photography in nonophthalmic settings, encouraging more widespread adoption of fundus photography technology. Recent studies have also affirmed the role of fundus photography as an adjunct or alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy in undergraduate medical education. In this review, the authors examine the use of ocular fundus photography as an educational tool and suggest future applications for this important technology. Novel applications of fundus photography as an educational tool have the potential to resurrect the dying art of funduscopy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Precessing vortex core in a swirling wake with heat release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, A.; Klimov, A.; Molevich, N.; Moralev, I.; Porfiriev, D.; Sugak, S.; Zavershinskii, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Precessing vortex core is left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. • The precession frequency grows with the heat-source power. • Growth of the heat-source power decreases vortex core oscillations. • The left-handed bending mode is the most unstable mode in the low-density wake. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of the non-stationary three-dimensional swirling flow is presented for an open tube with a paraxial heat source. In the considered type of swirling flows, it is shown that a precessing vortex core (PVC) appears. The obtained PVC is a left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. The influence of the heat release enhancement on parameters of PVC is investigated. Using various turbulence models (the Spalart–Allmaras, k–ω and SST models), it is shown that an increase in the heat-source power leads to an increase in the PVC frequency and to a decrease in the amplitude of PVC oscillations. Moreover, we conduct the linear stability analysis of the simplified flow model with paraxial heating (the Rankine vortex with the piecewise axial flow and density) and demonstrate that its results correspond to the results of numerical simulations rather well. In particular, we prove that the left-handed bending mode (m = +1) is the most unstable one in the low-density wake and its frequency increases with a decrease of density ratio that is similar to the behavior of precession frequency with an increase of heat-source power.

  9. Reorientation precession measurements of quadrupole moments in 103Rh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelberg, A.; Herskind, B.; Kalish, R.; Neiman, M.

    1976-01-01

    The quadrupole moments of the 3/2 - and 5/2 - states in 103 Rh have been determined by measuring the precession of the gamma-ray angular distribution following Coulomb excitation; 16 O and 32 S beams have been used. The structure of the negative-parity states in 103 Rh is found to be in agreement with the model of Arima and Iachello. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of precession on the mixing of a jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobes, D.S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Nathan, G.J. [Adelaide Univ., Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The mixing of fuel and oxidant are fundamentally linked to the performance characteristics of a diffusion flame, including radiant emissions, flame stability, pollutant emissions and overall dimensions such as flame length and width. Modification of these characteristics through the mixing field can be achieved by appropriate nozzle design. One method is to precess the nozzle fluid which can be gained by fluidic or mechanical means. This paper described the effect of precession on the mixing field from a mechanical nozzle using a two-dimensional imaging technique based on Mie scattering. The paper discussed the experimental technique as well as the results and discussion. The effect of precessing the jet was to create a large scale helix in the near field that contained two counter-rotating vortices within it. This flow supplied high concentration fluid to a region above the nozzle exit that had low momentum and low shear. The resulting flow field had scale mixing larger than the local length scales of the flow in a region close to the nozzle exit. It was found that the flow field beyond this region had low rate of mixing similar to the far field of a jet. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  11. "Notice the Similarities between the Two Sets …": Imperative Usage in a Corpus of Upper-Level Student Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiderhiser, Justine A.; Kelley, Patrick; Kennedy, Kohlee M.; Swales, John M.; Vergaro, Carla

    2016-01-01

    The sparse literature on the use of imperatives in research papers suggests that they are relatively common in a small number of disciplines, but rare, if used at all, in others. The present study addresses the use of imperatives in a corpus of upper-level A-graded student papers from 16 disciplines. A total of 822 papers collected within the past…

  12. Personality Type and Student Performance in Upper-Level Economics Courses: The Importance of Race and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Mary O.; Stranahan, Harriet A.

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates that personality type is an important explanatory variable in student performance in upper level economics courses. Finds that certain personality types, combined with race and gender effects, produce students who outperform other students. Introverts and those with the Keirsey-Bates temperament combination of sensing/judging…

  13. Photography as an Agent of Transformation: Education, Community and Documentary Photography in Post-War Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Radical political activism in the 1970s and 1980s had a huge impact on documentary photography in Britain. Community organisations and photography collectives emerged and endeavoured to democratise the arts for those who would not otherwise have come into contact with them. Community photography used the technology to break down the barriers…

  14. Upper-level enhancement of microphysical processes in extratropical cyclones observed during OLYMPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A.; McMurdie, L. A.; Houze, R.; Zagrodnik, J. P.; Schuldt, T.; Chaplin, M.

    2017-12-01

    Data collected during the Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX) of fall 2015-winter 2016 offer a unique opportunity to document enhancement of precipitation on the windward side of a mountain range as mid-latitude cyclones encountered the complex terrain of the Olympic Mountains. During the campaign, extensive instrumentation was deployed, including ground-based dual-polarization Doppler radars on the windward and leeward sides of the mountains and research aircraft providing in situ microphysical measurements and triple-frequency radar data over the ground-based sites and highest elevations. These datasets provide unprecedented detail on microphysical and dynamical processes associated with precipitation enhancement. Previous studies of precipitation enhancement over mountains have focused on surface rainfall amounts. However, the airflow over the terrain affects precipitation throughout the vertical columns of the atmosphere passing over the mountains. The OLYMPEX data were collected in a way that allows the mechanisms leading to enhancement to be examined at all levels. In particular, NASA's S-band and the NSF/CSWR DOW6 X-band dual-polarization radars provided high-resolution vertical cross sections in sectors upwind and over the mountains. The degree of upper-level enhancement seen in these radar data was most pronounced when the integrated vapor transport was strong, stability was moist neutral, and melting levels were relatively high. These conditions were often found within the warm sectors of the mid-latitude cyclones observed in OLYMPEX. Within widespread stratiform echo, radar data revealed layers of enhanced differential reflectivity aloft in addition to the enhanced reflectivity. In situ microphysical probe data from the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft were obtained in the context of these ground-based radar observations, which along with observations from the APR3 radar aboard the DC8 research aircraft, provide a unique dataset for

  15. An epistemic framing analysis of upper level physics students' use of mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Thomas Joseph

    Mathematics is central to a professional physicist's work and, by extension, to a physics student's studies. It provides a language for abstraction, definition, computation, and connection to physical reality. This power of mathematics in physics is also the source of many of the difficulties it presents students. Simply put, many different activities could all be described as "using math in physics". Expertise entails a complicated coordination of these various activities. This work examines the many different kinds of thinking that are all facets of the use of mathematics in physics. It uses an epistemological lens, one that looks at the type of explanation a student presently sees as appropriate, to analyze the mathematical thinking of upper level physics undergraduates. Sometimes a student will turn to a detailed calculation to produce or justify an answer. Other times a physical argument is explicitly connected to the mathematics at hand. Still other times quoting a definition is seen as sufficient, and so on. Local coherencies evolve in students' thought around these various types of mathematical justifications. We use the cognitive process of framing to model students' navigation of these various facets of math use in physics. We first demonstrate several common framings observed in our students' mathematical thought and give several examples of each. Armed with this analysis tool, we then give several examples of how this framing analysis can be used to address a research question. We consider what effects, if any, a powerful symbolic calculator has on students' thinking. We also consider how to characterize growing expertise among physics students. Framing offers a lens for analysis that is a natural fit for these sample research questions. To active physics education researchers, the framing analysis presented in this dissertation can provide a useful tool for addressing other research questions. To physics teachers, we present this analysis so that it

  16. Incorporating Inquiry into Upper-Level Homework Assignments: The Mini-Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, A. G.; Speck, A. K.; Witzig, S. B.; Abell, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Education Standards provide guidelines for teaching science through inquiry, where students actively develop their understanding of science by combining scientific knowledge with reasoning and thinking skills. Inquiry activities include reading scientific literature, generating hypotheses, designing and carrying out investigations, interpreting data, and formulating conclusions. Inquiry-based instruction emphasizes questions, evidence, and explanation, the essential features of inquiry. As part of an NSF-funded project, “CUES: Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science,” new inquiry-based homework materials were developed for two upper-level classes at the University of Missouri: Geochemistry (required for Geology majors), and Solar System Science (open to seniors and graduate students, co-taught and cross-listed between Geology and Physics & Astronomy). We engage students in inquiry-based learning by presenting homework exercises as “mini-journal” articles that follow the format of a scientific journal article, including a title, authors, abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion and citations to peer-reviewed literature. The mini-journal provides a scaffold and serves as a springboard for students to develop and carry out their own follow-up investigation. They then present their findings in the form of their own mini-journal. Mini-journals replace traditional homework problem sets with a format that more directly reflects and encourages scientific practice. Students are engaged in inquiry-based homework which encompass doing, thinking, and communicating, while the minijournal allows the instructor to contain lines of inquiry within the limits posed by available resources. In the examples we present, research is conducted via spreadsheet modeling, where the students develop their own spreadsheets. The key differences between the old and new formats include (i) the active participation of the students in

  17. 36 CFR 1005.5 - Commercial photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commercial photography. 1005.5 Section 1005.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 1005.5 Commercial photography. (a) Motion pictures, television. Before any motion picture may be filmed or any television production or sound...

  18. Photography and sustainability in historical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monte, A.; Roeling, M.M.; Reijenga, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Photography exists since the early 1800's. This book gives an overview of sustainability of photography during the past 200 years. Both the (chemistry of the) image carrier and photo camera's are treated. While the former has shown consistent improvements, the latter has displayed rapid

  19. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures on taking photos by the general public, given in ...

  20. 36 CFR 5.5 - Commercial photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commercial photography. 5.5 Section 5.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.5 Commercial photography. (a) Motion pictures, television. Before any motion picture may be filmed or any...

  1. Dental photography today. Part 1: basic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaglia, A; DE Dominicis, P; Arcuri, L; Gargari, M; Ottria, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first article in a new series on digital dental photography. Part 1 defines the aims and objectives of dental photography for examination, diagnosis and treatment planning, legal and forensic documentation, publishing, education, marketing and communication with patients, dental team members, colleagues and dental laboratory.

  2. Using Photography to Tell a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Susan; Williams, Kayenta

    2008-01-01

    Photography can be an exciting way to integrate art and creativity into social studies. Photography allows students to use creative self-expression in revealing the symbolism in historic places, people, or scenes with a richness that words alone often cannot accomplish. In this article, the authors provide several ideas for creating photo essays.…

  3. ASO EBI: FASHIONING SELF THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    In Nigeria, fashion and photography have become powerful forces in the ... grown every year since the first photography studios opened in. Lagos in the 1880s. ..... Uchendu was determined to take as many as "fifty pictures and deliver them to ...

  4. Type-I superconductivity and neutron star precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2005-01-01

    Type-I proton superconducting cores of neutron stars break up in a magnetic field into alternating domains of superconducting and normal fluids. We examine two channels of superfluid-normal fluid friction where (i) rotational vortices are decoupled from the nonsuperconducting domains and the interaction is due to the strong force between protons and neutrons; (ii) the nonsuperconducting domains are dynamically coupled to the vortices and the vortex motion generates transverse electric fields within them, causing electronic current flow and Ohmic dissipation. The obtained dissipation coefficients are consistent with the Eulerian precession of neutron stars

  5. Resonant spin-flavor precession of neutrino and the solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.Kh.; Bychuk, O.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1989-01-01

    Resonant amplification of spin-flavor precession of neutrinos in solar matter is considered. Some possible consequences of the process are discussed. It is shown that resonant spin-flavor neutrino precession may account for the deficit of solar neutrinos in Davis' experiment and the anticorrelation between the rate of neutrino counting and solar activity. Experiments are considered which should make it possible to distinguish between spin-flavor neutrino precession and the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. A new restriction on the usual spin precession of solar neutrinos is derived

  6. Equatorial insolation: from precession harmonics to eccentricity frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the paper by Hays et al. (1976, spectral analyses of climate proxy records provide substantial evidence that a fraction of the climatic variance is driven by insolation changes in the frequency ranges of obliquity and precession variations. However, it is the variance components centered near 100 kyr which dominate most Upper Pleistocene climatic records, although the amount of insolation perturbation at the eccentricity driven periods close to 100-kyr (mainly the 95 kyr- and 123 kyr-periods is much too small to cause directly a climate change of ice-age amplitude. Many attempts to find an explanation to this 100-kyr cycle in climatic records have been made over the last decades. Here we show that the double maximum which characterizes the daily irradiation received in tropical latitudes over the course of the year is at the origin in equatorial insolation of not only strong 95 kyr and 123 kyr periods related to eccentricity, but also of a 11-kyr and a 5.5-kyr periods related to precession.

  7. Affordable, Accessible, Immediate: Capture Stunning Images with Digital Infrared Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Technology educators who teach digital photography should consider incorporating an infrared (IR) photography component into their program. This is an area where digital photography offers significant benefits. Either type of IR imaging is very interesting to explore, but traditional film-based IR photography is difficult and expensive. In…

  8. Synoptic climatology of the long-distance dispersal of white pine blister rust I. Development of an upper level synoptic classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. L. Frank; L. S. Kalkstein; B. W. Geils; H. W. Thistle

    2008-01-01

    This study developed a methodology to temporally classify large scale, upper level atmospheric conditions over North America, utilizing a newly-developed upper level synoptic classification (ULSC). Four meteorological variables: geopotential height, specific humidity, and u- and v-wind components, at the 500 hPa level over North America were obtained from the NCEP/NCAR...

  9. High-speed photography. Technique and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Tembleque, R.

    1981-01-01

    It is intended to present some general considerations about ''Higg-speed photography'' as a tool of work common in mos research laboratories in the world. ''High-speed photography'' relies on the principles of photography of actions, that change rapidly with the time. The evolution of this technique goes along with the discovering of new phenomena in wich higher speeds are involved. At present is normal to deal with changing rates involving picoseconds times (10 -12 s) and new developments on the field of femtosecond (10 -15 s) theoretically are contemplated. (author)

  10. The Pole Orientation, Pole Precession, and Moment of Inertia Factor of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R. A.; French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Sepersky, T.; Lonergan, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our determination of the Saturn's pole orientation and precession using a combination of Earthbased and spacecraft based observational data. From our model of the polar motion and the observed precession rate we obtain a value for Saturn's polar moment of inertia

  11. Small, pale blue dot' wins photography competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2018-03-01

    An image of a single positively charged strontium atom held in an ion trap by electric fields has won a UK science photography competition organized by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  12. Coverage for SCS Pre-1941 Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was generated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) at the New Mexico State Office to show the coverage for the Pre-1941 aerial photography...

  13. The gravitational wave spectrum of non-axisymmetric, freely precessing neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeck, Chris van den

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for free precession has been observed in the radio signature of several pulsars. Freely precessing pulsars radiate gravitationally at frequencies near the rotation rate and twice the rotation rate, which for rotation frequencies greater than ∼10 Hz is in the LIGO band. In older work, the gravitational wave spectrum of a precessing neutron star has been evaluated to first order in a small precession angle. Here, we calculate the contributions to second order in the wobble angle, and we find that a new spectral line emerges. We show that for reasonable wobble angles, the second-order line may well be observable with the proposed advanced LIGO detectors for precessing neutron stars as far away as the galactic centre. Observation of the full second-order spectrum permits a direct measurement of the star's wobble angle, oblateness and deviation from axisymmetry, with the potential to significantly increase our understanding of neutron star structure

  14. APPLICATION OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN DENTAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor T. Uzunov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the extent of the use of photography by dentists for the needs of everyday practice. Material and methods: The survey was conducted among 254 dentists practicing in Sofia, 64 (25.2% - men and 190 (74.8% - women. The average age of respondents is 43.21 years. Questionnaire was developed, consisting of 9 questions, divided into two parts. The first part covers questions about the nature of the dental practice of respondent doctor. The second part includes questions about the use of photography for the purpose of daily practice. Results: A statistical data processing is made. The average values of the responses received by groups of questions are analyzed. The factors that affect the use of dental photography were defined. The results show that from all of the surveyed persons, 82 (32.28% people use photography for dental practice and 172 (67.72% dentists do not to apply this method in their daily work. It was found that the reasons for not using the photography by dentists are: fear of cross-infection - 4 persons (1.57%; lack of need to use photography - 14 persons (5.51%; lack of interest - 18 persons (7.09%; cost of clinical time - 24 persons (9.45%; additional training - 58 (22.83%; expensive investment - 98 persons (38.58%. Conclusion: The extent and reasons for use of photography for the dental practice were found. The factors that are relevant to the use of dental photography by dentists were investigated.

  15. Urinary tract infection in childhood: lower or upper level? DMSA scintigraphic validation of a new clinical risk index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayet-Papin, B.; Decomps-Hofmann, A.; Bovier-Lapierre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infection in children can be limited most of time at the lower level of the urinary tractus but an extension to the upper level of the tractus should not be neglected due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease. In our study, we suggest a new graph to predict the probability of acute pyelonephritis only if the bacteriological urinary analyse were obtained in good conditions and without any treatment. In the other cases, a DMSA scintigram should be proposed at the earlier phase of the diagnosis not to underestimate the risk of asymptomatic pyelonephritis. (authors)

  16. Patient perspectives on medical photography in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Marie C; Wu, Timothy; Haimovic, Adele; Kaplan, Rachel; Sanchez, Miguel; Cohen, David; Leger, Elizabeth A; Stein, Jennifer A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical photography enhances medical care, research, and teaching. Empirical data are needed to guide best practices regarding dermatologic photography. To investigate patient opinion about clinical photography and identify demographic factors that influence these opinions. Four hundred patients representing a broad range of ages, self-identified ethnic/racial groups, and socioeconomic levels were recruited from 4 dermatology settings in New York City. Patients were administered a survey about perceptions of photography, willingness to allow photographs to be used in a variety of settings, preferences for photographer and photographic equipment, and methods of consent. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that photography enhanced their quality of care. Most patients would allow their photographs to be used for medical, teaching, and research purposes with significantly more acceptance when patients were not identifiable. Patients preferred photographs taken by a physician rather than a nurse or student, photographers of the same gender, clinic-owned cameras to personal cameras or cell phones, and written consent to verbal consent. There were significant racial/ethnicity and age-related variations in responses, with white and older patients being more permissive than other groups. We use the results of this study to recommend best practices for photography in dermatology.

  17. Spin precession in inversion-asymmetric two-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M.-H.; Chang, C.-R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theoretical method to calculate the expectation value of spin in an inversion-asymmetric two-dimensional (2D) system with respect to an arbitrarily spin-polarized electron state, injected via an ideal point contact. The 2D system is confined in a [0 0 1]-grown quantum well, where both the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings are taken into account. The obtained analytical results allow more concrete description of the spatial behaviors of the spin precession caused individually by the Rashba and the Dresselhaus terms. Applying the calculation on the Datta-Das spin-FET, whose original design considers only the Rashba effect inside the channel, we investigate the possible influence due to the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. Concluded solution is the choice of ±[1±10], in particular [1 1 0], as the channel direction

  18. Resonant spin-flavour precession of neutrinos and pulsar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.Kh.; Lanza, A.; Sciama, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    Young pulsars are known to exhibit large space velocities, up to 10 3 km/s. We propose a new mechanism for the generation of these large velocities based on an asymmetric emission of neutrinos during the supernova explosion. The mechanism involves the resonant spin-flavour precession of neutrinos with a transition magnetic moment in the magnetic field of the supernova. The asymmetric emission of neutrinos is due the distortion of the resonance surface by matter polarization effects in the supernova magnetic field. The requisite values of the field strengths and neutrino parameters are estimated for various neutrino conversions caused by their Dirac or Majorana-type transition magnetic moments. (author). 30 refs, 1 tab

  19. The equations of motion of a secularly precessing elliptical orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotto, S.; Bardella, M.

    2013-01-01

    The equations of motion of a secularly precessing ellipse are developed using time as the independent variable. The equations are useful when integrating numerically the perturbations about a reference trajectory which is subject to secular perturbations in the node, the argument of pericentre and the mean motion. Usually this is done in connection with Encke's method to ensure minimal rectification frequency. Similar equations are already available in the literature, but they are either given based on the true anomaly as the independent variable or in mixed mode with respect to time through the use of a supporting equation to track the anomaly. The equations developed here form a complete and independent set of six equations in time. Reformulations both of Escobal's and Kyner and Bennett's equations are also provided which lead to a more concise form.

  20. A Precessing Jet in the CH Cyg Symbiotic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Hack, Warren; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P.

    2010-02-01

    Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from ~300 AU to ~1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity <100 km s-1. The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at ~170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to ~750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of ~500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

  1. A PRECESSING JET IN THE CH Cyg SYMBIOTIC SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Hack, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from ∼300 AU to ∼1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity -1 . The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at ∼170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to ∼750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of ∼500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

  2. Inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a new precessing convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-01-01

    It is customary to use a precessing convention, based on Newtonian orbital angular momentum L N , to model inspiral gravitational waves from generic spinning compact binaries. A key feature of such a precessing convention is its ability to remove all spin precession induced modulations from the orbital phase evolution. However, this convention usually employs a postNewtonian (PN) accurate precessional equation, appropriate for the PN accurate orbital angular momentum L , to evolve the L N -based precessing source frame. This motivated us to develop inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a precessing convention that explicitly use L to describe the binary orbits. Our approach introduces certain additional 3PN order terms in the orbital phase and frequency evolution equations with respect to the usual L N -based implementation of the precessing convention. The implications of these additional terms are explored by computing the match between inspiral waveforms that employ L and L N -based precessing conventions. We found that the match estimates are smaller than the optimal value, namely 0.97, for a non-negligible fraction of unequal mass spinning compact binaries. (paper)

  3. An Electromagnet for Precession of the Polarization of Fast-Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspesund, O.; Bjorkman, J.; Trumpy, G.

    1965-05-01

    The advantages of using a transverse magnetic field for precessing the polarization of fast-neutrons are discussed. Design details of a powerful electromagnet supplying a transverse field of approximately 20 kGauss are given. Precession characteristics for polarized fast neutrons obtained at 50 deg (lab. syst.) from the Li 7 (p, n) Be 7 reaction are reported, using elastic scattering at 42 deg (lab. syst.) off natural carbon as an analyser. Correlation of the precession data with theoretical predictions presented elsewhere is made, and good agreement is found

  4. An Electromagnet for Precession of the Polarization of Fast-Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspesund, O; Bjorkman, J; Trumpy, G

    1965-05-15

    The advantages of using a transverse magnetic field for precessing the polarization of fast-neutrons are discussed. Design details of a powerful electromagnet supplying a transverse field of approximately 20 kGauss are given. Precession characteristics for polarized fast neutrons obtained at 50 deg (lab. syst.) from the Li{sup 7} (p, n) Be{sup 7} reaction are reported, using elastic scattering at 42 deg (lab. syst.) off natural carbon as an analyser. Correlation of the precession data with theoretical predictions presented elsewhere is made, and good agreement is found.

  5. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S., E-mail: sestrade@ub.edu [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT, Universitat de Barcelona, Solé i Sabarís 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F. [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Darbal, A. D. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); Weiss, J. K. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); NanoMEGAS SPRL, Blvd. Edmond Machtens 79, B-1080 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  6. Larmor precession and dwell time of a relativistic particle scattered by a rectangular quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z J; Liang, J J; Liang, J Q

    2003-01-01

    The Larmor precession of a relativistic neutral spin particle in a uniform constant magnetic field confined to the region of a one-dimensional rectangular potential well is investigated. The spin precession serves as a clock to measure the time spent by a quantum particle dwelling at a potential well. With the help of a general spin coherent state it is explicitly shown that the spin precession time is equal to the dwell time in the first-order approximation of the infinitesimal field limit. The comparison of the time in a potential well with that in free space shows apparent superluminality.

  7. Role of upper-level wind shear on the structure and maintenance of derecho-producing convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, Michael Charles

    Common large-scale environments associated with the development of derecho-producing convective systems from a large number of events are identified using statistical clustering of the 500-mb geopotential heights as guidance. The majority of the events (72%) fall into three main patterns that include a well-defined upstream trough (40%), a ridge (20%), and a zonal, low-amplitude flow (12%), which is defined as an additional warm-season pattern that is not identified in past studies of derecho environments. Through an analysis of proximity soundings, discrepancies are found in both low-level and deep-tropospheric shear parameters between observations and the shear profiles considered favorable for strong, long-lived convective systems in idealized simulations. To explore the role of upper-level shear in derecho environments, a set of two-dimensional simulations of density currents within a dry, neutrally stable environment are used to examine the ability of a cold pool to lift environmental air within a vertically sheared flow. The results confirm that the addition of upper-level shear to a wind profile with weak to moderate low-level shear increases the vertical displacement of low-level parcels despite a decrease in the vertical velocity along the cold pool interface, as suggested by previous studies. Parcels that are elevated above the surface (1-2 km) overturn and are responsible for the deep lifting in the deep-shear environments. This deep overturning caused by the upper-level shear helps to maintain the tilt of the convective systems in more complex two-dimensional and three dimensional simulations. The overturning also is shown to greatly increase the size of the convective systems in the three-dimensional simulations by facilitating the initiation and maintenance of convective cells along the cold pool. When combined with estimates of the cold pool motion and the storm-relative hodograph, these results may best be used for the prediction of the demise of

  8. Clinical photography among African cleft caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Babatunde Olaitan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to document the practice of photography among clinicians whose daily work depends and is influenced so much by medical photography. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires documenting the bio data, place of practice, and experience of cleft caregivers with clinical photography were distributed. Knowledge of rules guiding clinical photography and adherence to them were also asked. Types of camera used were documented and knowledge of the value of clinical photographs were also inquired. Results: Plastic surgeons constitute the highest proportion of 27 (38.6%, followed by Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons with 14 (20.0%. Twenty one (30.0% of the respondents always, 21 (30.0% often, 12 (17.1% frequently, while 9 respondents sometimes took photographs of their patients. Suggested uses of clinical photographs included training, 52 (74.3%, education, 51 (72.9%, medicolegal, 44 (62.9% and advertisement, 44 (62.9% among others. Twenty two (31.4% did not know that there were standard guidelines for taking clinical photographs. Twenty three (32.9% of them did not seek the consent of the patients before taking clinical photographs. Conclusion: While the practice of clinical photography is high among African cleft caregivers, there is a need for further education on the issues of standard rules and obtaining consent from patients.

  9. The Precession Index and a Nonlinear Energy Balance Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    A simple nonlinear energy balance climate model yields a precession index-like term in the temperature. Despite its importance in the geologic record, the precession index e sin (Omega)S, where e is the Earth's orbital eccentricity and (Omega)S is the Sun's perigee in the geocentric frame, is not present in the insolation at the top of the atmosphere. Hence there is no one-for-one mapping of 23,000 and 19,000 year periodicities from the insolation to the paleoclimate record; a nonlinear climate model is needed to produce these long periods. A nonlinear energy balance climate model with radiative terms of form T n, where T is surface temperature and n less than 1, does produce e sin (omega)S terms in temperature; the e sin (omega)S terms are called Seversmith psychroterms. Without feedback mechanisms, the model achieves extreme values of 0.64 K at the maximum orbital eccentricity of 0.06, cooling one hemisphere while simultaneously warming the other; the hemisphere over which perihelion occurs is the cooler. In other words, the nonlinear energy balance model produces long-term cooling in the northern hemisphere when the Sun's perihelion is near northern summer solstice and long-term warming in the northern hemisphere when the aphelion is near northern summer solstice. (This behavior is similar to the inertialess gray body which radiates like T 4, but the amplitude is much lower for the energy balance model because of its thermal inertia.) This seemingly paradoxical behavior works against the standard Milankovitch model, which requires cool northern summers (Sun far from Earth in northern summer) to build up northern ice sheets, so that if the standard model is correct it must be more efficient than previously thought. Alternatively, the new mechanism could possibly be dominant and indicate southern hemisphere control of the northern ice sheets, wherein the southern oceans undergo a long-term cooling when the Sun is far from the Earth during northern summer. The cold

  10. Guidelines for the Standardization of Genital Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joumblat, Natalie R; Chim, Jimmy; Sanchez Aguirre, Priscila Gisselle; Bedolla, Edgar; Salgado, Christopher J

    2018-02-06

    Plastic surgery relies on photography for both clinical practice and research. The Photographic Standards in Plastic Surgery laid the foundation for standardized photography in plastic surgery. Despite these advancements, the current literature lacks guidelines for genital photography, thus resulting in a discordance of documentation. The authors propose photographic standards for the male and female genitalia to establish homogeneity in which information can be accurately exchanged. All medical photographs include a sky-blue background, proper lighting, removal of distractors, consistent camera framing, and standard camera angles. We propose the following guidelines to standardize genital photography. In the anterior upright position, feet are shoulder-width apart and arms are placed posteriorly. The frame is bounded superiorly by the xiphoid-umbilicus midpoint and inferiorly by the patella. For circumferential documentation, frontal 180 degree capture via 45 degree intervals is often sufficient. Images in standard lithotomy position should be captured at both parallel and 45 degrees above the horizontal. Images of the phallus should include both the flaccid and erect states. Despite the increasing incidence of genital procedures, there lacks a standardized methodology in which to document the genitalia, resulting in a substantial heterogeneity in the current literature. Our standardized techniques for genital photography set forth to establish a uniform language that promotes more effective communication with both the patient as well as with colleagues. The proposed photography guidelines provide optimal visualization and standard documentation of the genitalia, allowing for accurate education, meaningful collaborations, and advancement in genital surgery. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Ethereal presences in holography and photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M.; Byrne, Kay

    2007-02-01

    This paper examines the concept of the 'Presence of Absence' in post-mortem photography and holography, drawing upon both historical and lesser-known images as reference. To create a photographic negative one needs the presence of light to expose the light sensitive surface, be it glass, a polished plate or plastic. A hologram may also be created when a coherent light source, for example from a Laser, travels through a light sensitive material and falls upon the subject to be recorded. A holograph however, retains the optical qualities of both phase and amplitude, the memory of light. Both mediums recall, as it were, 'now absent moments', and confronts us with what is 'not there' as much as 'what is'. This paper examines the exploration of absence and presence in post-mortem photography and holography and it's a richly visceral visual language. A photonic syntax can interpret death as an elegant yet horrific aesthetic, the photograph may be beautify screened and yet obscene in its content. In essence one can be a voyeur, experiencing a mere visual whisper of the true nature of the subject. Our Victorian forefathers explored postmortem photography as an object of mourning, and at the close of the nineteenth century when Jack the Ripper had the inhabitants of White Chapel in a grip of fear, photography made its mark as a documentation of violent crime. Today, within contemporary photography, death is now presented within the confines of the 'Art Gallery', as a sensual, and at times, sensationalised art form. In exploring post-mortem imagery, both in holography and conventional photography, absence presents an aspect of death as startling in its unanimated form and detailed in its finite examination of mortality.

  12. Spin precession experiments for light axionic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.; Trahms, Lutz; Wilkason, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Axionlike particles are promising candidates to make up the dark matter of the Universe, but it is challenging to design experiments that can detect them over their entire allowed mass range. Dark matter in general, and, in particular, axionlike particles and hidden photons, can be as light as roughly 10-22 eV (˜10-8 Hz ), with astrophysical anomalies providing motivation for the lightest masses ("fuzzy dark matter"). We propose experimental techniques for direct detection of axionlike dark matter in the mass range from roughly 10-13 eV (˜102 Hz ) down to the lowest possible masses. In this range, these axionlike particles act as a time-oscillating magnetic field coupling only to spin, inducing effects such as a time-oscillating torque and periodic variations in the spin-precession frequency with the frequency and direction of these effects set by the axion field. We describe how these signals can be measured using existing experimental technology, including torsion pendulums, atomic magnetometers, and atom interferometry. These experiments demonstrate a strong discovery capability, with future iterations of these experiments capable of pushing several orders of magnitude past current astrophysical bounds.

  13. Spinning gas clouds with precession: a new formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffet, B

    2010-01-01

    We consider Dyson's model (Dyson F J 1968 J. Math. Mech. 18 91) of an ellipsoidally stratified ideal gas cloud expanding adiabatically into a vacuum, in the Liouville integrable case where the gas is monatomic (γ = 5/3) and there is no vorticity (Gaffet B 2001a J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 2097; Paper I). In the cases of rotation about a fixed axis the separation of variables can be achieved, and the separable variables are linearly related to a set of three variables denoted by ρ, R, W (Gaffet B 2001b J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 9195; Paper II). We show in the present work that these variables admit a natural generalization to cases of rotation about a movable axis (precessing motion). The present study is restricted to the consideration of the so-called degenerate cases (see Gaffet B 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 99; Paper III), but we hope to generalize our results in the future to the non-degenerate ones as well. We also present a new, compact and generally valid formulation of one of the integrals of motion, of the sixth degree in the momenta, denoted by I 6 .

  14. Continuous Faraday measurement of spin precession without light shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasperse, M.; Kewming, M. Â. J.; Fischer, S. Â. N.; Pakkiam, P.; Anderson, R. Â. P.; Turner, L. Â. D.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a dispersive Faraday optical probe of atomic spin which performs a weak measurement of spin projection of a quantum gas continuously for more than one second. To date, focusing bright far-off-resonance probes onto quantum gases has proved invasive due to strong scalar and vector light shifts exerting dipole and Stern-Gerlach forces. We show that tuning the probe near the magic-zero wavelength at 790 nm between the fine-structure doublet of 87Rb cancels the scalar light shift, and careful control of polarization eliminates the vector light shift. Faraday rotations due to each fine-structure line reinforce at this wavelength, enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio for a fixed rate of probe-induced decoherence. Using this minimally invasive spin probe, we perform microscale atomic magnetometry at high temporal resolution. Spectrogram analysis of the Larmor precession signal of a single spinor Bose-Einstein condensate measures a time-varying magnetic field strength with 1 μ G accuracy every 5 ms; or, equivalently, makes more than 200 successive measurements each at 10 pT /√{Hz } sensitivity.

  15. Precession and recession of the rock'n'roller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Peter; Bustamante, Miguel D

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherical rigid body that rocks and rolls on a plane under the effect of gravity. The distribution of mass is non-uniform and the centre of mass does not coincide with the geometric centre. The symmetric case, with moments of inertia I 1 = I 2 3 , is integrable and the motion is completely regular. Three known conservation laws are the total energy E, Jellett's quantity Q J and Routh's quantity Q R . When the inertial symmetry I 1 = I 2 is broken, even slightly, the character of the solutions is profoundly changed and new types of motion become possible. We derive the equations governing the general motion and present analytical and numerical evidence of the recession, or reversal of precession, that has been observed in physical experiments. We present an analysis of recession in terms of critical lines dividing the (Q R , Q J ) plane into four dynamically disjoint zones. We prove that recession implies the lack of conservation of Jellett's and Routh's quantities, by identifying individual reversals as crossings of the orbit (Q R (t), Q J (t)) through the critical lines. Consequently, a method is found to produce a large number of initial conditions so that the system will exhibit recession.

  16. Local Magnetic Fields in Ferromagnetics Studied by Positive Muon Precession

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Positive muons are used to study local magnetic fields in different materials. A polarized muon beam is employed with energies of 30-50 MeV, and the muons are stopped in the target being studied. During its lifetime the muon will precess in the magnetic fields present, and after the decay of the muon the emitted positron is detected in plastic scintillators. The time and angle of the detected positron is used to calculate the magnetic field at the position of the muon in the sample. \\\\ \\\\ The detector system consists of plastic scintillators. Most of the measurements are made in an applied magnetic field. A dilution cryostat is used to produce temperatures down to well below $ 1 ^0 $ K. \\\\ \\\\ The present line of experiments concern mainly: \\item a)~~~~Local magnetism in the paramagnetic state of the Lave's phase type REAl$_{2} $ and RENi$_{2} $ systems ~~~where RE is a rare-earth ion. \\item b)~~~~Local magnetic fields and critical behaviour of the magnetism in Gd metal. \\item c)~~~~Investigation of flux exclu...

  17. The Weyl non-Abelian gauge field and the Thomas precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbashov, B.M.; Pestov, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The connection between the Fermi-Walker transport and the Weyl non-Abelian gauge field is established. A theoretical possibility of detecting the Weyl gauge field caused by the Thomas precession of a gyroscope is discussed

  18. Transport Through a Precessing Spin Coupled to Noncollinearly Polarized Ferromagnetic Leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianchao; Xin Zihua; Feng Liya

    2010-01-01

    The quantum electronic transport through a precessing magnetic spin coupled to noncollinearly polarized ferromagnetic leads (F-MS-F) has been studied in this paper. The nonequilibrium Green function approach is used to calculate local density of states (LDOS) and current in the presence of external bias. The characters of LDOS and the electronic current are obtained. The tunneling current is investigated for different precessing angle and different configurations of the magnetization of the leads. The investigation reveals that when the precessing angle takes θ < π/2 and negative bias is applied, the resonant tunneling current appears, otherwise, it appears when positive bias is applied. When the leads are totally polarized and the precessing angel takes 0, the tunneling current changes with the configuration of two leads; and it becomes zero when the two leads are antiparallel. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Implications of the Occurrence of Glitches in Pulsar Free Precession Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D I; Ashton, G; Prix, R

    2017-06-30

    The timing properties of radio pulsars provide a unique probe of neutron star interiors. Recent observations have uncovered quasiperiodicities in the timing and pulse properties of some pulsars, a phenomenon that has often been attributed to free precession of the neutron star, with profound implications for the distribution of superfluidity and superconductivity in the star. We advance this program by developing consistency relations between free precession and pulsars glitches, and we show that there are difficulties in reconciling the two phenomena in some precession candidates. This indicates that the precession model used here needs to be modified or some other phenomenon is at work in producing the quasiperiodicities, or even that there is something missing in terms of our understanding of glitches.

  20. Citizenship at the Boundaries. Participative Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Alfredo Cubillos Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the practices of participative photography in the construction of child and adolescent citizenship in contexts of exclusion and sociopolitical violence in urban peripheries. On the basis of the community project, Shooting Cameras, in Cazucá, it argues that in contexts of non-citizenship and community breakdown, characterized by the restriction of democratic action and of the constitution of civil societies, it is possible for daily citizenship practices to emerge through photography. In this context, boys, girls, and teenagers become cultural agents who interpellate traditional forms of participation, thus contributing elements for the configuration of a new subject of citizenship.

  1. Underwater photography - A visual survey method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 173 Underwater photography - A visual survey method Rahul Sharma National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403004 rsharma@nio.org Introduction “Photography as a means of observing...-sea photographs were those made by Maurice Ewing and his co-workers during cruises on Atlantis in 1940-48. Their subject was the seafloor and their method of clicking was to trigger the camera mechanically when its mounting struck bottom. This is the only...

  2. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families. © 2014 AWHONN.

  3. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  4. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  5. Improved analysis of GW150914 using a fully spin-precessing waveform model

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Brunett, S.; Cahillane, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) mode...

  6. 76 FR 27307 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit Application No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... Mammals; Photography Permit Application No. 16360 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... commercial/educational photography of cetaceans off Hawaii. DATES: Written, telefaxed, or e-mail comments... CFR part 216). Section 104(c)(6) provides for photography for educational or commercial purposes...

  7. 76 FR 40338 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... photography of cetaceans off Hawaii. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are available for review upon... photography on 12 cetacean species had been submitted by the above-named applicant. The requested permit has...

  8. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  9. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Houbing; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao

    2017-01-01

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4–7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress. - Highlights: • We proposed stress-modulated magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator. • The magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by in-plane stress. • The stress also can widen the magnetization frequency range 4.4–7.0 GHz. • The stress-modulated oscillation frequency can simplify STO devices.

  10. Are we close to putting the anomalous perihelion precessions from Verlinde's emergent gravity to the test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of the emergent gravity scenario by Verlinde, it was recently observed by Liu and Prokopec that, among other things, an anomalous pericenter precession would affect the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting an isolated central body. Here, it is shown that, if it were real, its expected magnitude for the inner planets of the Solar System would be at the same level of the present-day accuracy in constraining any possible deviations from their standard perihelion precessions as inferred from long data records spanning about the last century. The most favorable situation for testing the Verlinde-type precession seems to occur for Mars. Indeed, according to recent versions of the EPM and INPOP planetary ephemerides, non-standard perihelion precessions, of whatsoever physical origin, which are larger than some ≈ 0.02-0.11 milliarcseconds per century are not admissible, while the putative precession predicted by Liu and Prokopec amounts to 0.09 milliarcseconds per century. Other potentially interesting astronomical and astrophysical scenarios like, e.g., the Earth's LAGEOS II artificial satellite, the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the S-stars orbiting the Supermassive Black Hole in Sgr A^* are, instead, not viable because of the excessive smallness of the predicted precessions for them.

  11. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, C.; Casentini, J.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vano-Vinuales, A.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Brügmann, B.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, M.; Haas, R.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; Ossokine, S.; Pan, Y.; Röver, C.; Scheel, M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR). Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR) developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).], and we quote updated component masses of 35-3+5 M⊙ and 3 0-4+3 M⊙ (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals). We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  12. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Houbing, E-mail: hbhuang@ustb.edu.cn; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao, E-mail: xqma@sas.ustb.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4–7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress. - Highlights: • We proposed stress-modulated magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator. • The magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by in-plane stress. • The stress also can widen the magnetization frequency range 4.4–7.0 GHz. • The stress-modulated oscillation frequency can simplify STO devices.

  13. A TOOL FOR PLANNING AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    abstract The U.S. EPAs Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch has developed a tool in the form of an Excel. spreadsheet that facilitates planning aerial photography missions. The spreadsheet accepts various input parameters such as desired photo-scale and boundary coordinates of the stud...

  14. Measuring food intake with digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Digital Photography of Foods Method accurately estimates the food intake of adults and children in cafeterias. With this method, images of food selection and leftovers are quickly captured in the cafeteria. These images are later compared with images of 'standard' portions of food using computer...

  15. 50 CFR 216.42 - Photography. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Photography. [Reserved] 216.42 Section 216.42 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Special Exceptions § 216.42...

  16. Time sequence photography of Roosters Comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of understanding natural landscape changes is key in properly determining rangeland ecology. Time sequence photography allows a landscape snapshot to be documented and enables the ability to compare natural changes overtime. Photographs of Roosters Comb were taken from the same vantag...

  17. Photography of Coral Reefs from ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the uses of photography from the International Space Station (ISS) in studying Earth's coral reefs. The photographs include reefs in various oceans . The photographs have uses for science in assisting NASA mapping initiatives, distribution worldwide through ReefBase, and by biologist in the field.

  18. "Transformative Looks": Practicing Citizenship through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sónia; Maiztegui-Oñate, Concha; Mata-Codesal, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The article discusses the meanings of citizenship and citizenship education when formal citizenship is restricted by exploring the potential of photography education and practice as a tool that promotes the exercise of citizenship in the context of non-formal critical adult education. By doing it, this text aims to enhance our…

  19. Using Photography to Foster Intergenerational Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnside, Lee; Bereza, Matthew; McConn, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how a visual art academic experience might help to reduce anxiety about interactions with the elderly, mitigate fears over aging, encourage more interactions with older people and improve visual literacy skills. University students in an introductory digital photography course interpreted conversations with residents of a local…

  20. Digital dental photography. Part 1: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I

    2009-04-25

    This paper is the first article in a new ten-part series on digital dental photography. Part 1 previews and outlines the contents of the subsequent papers and in addition, defines the aims and objectives of a digital dental image and the features that are required for an ideal intra-oral picture.

  1. Photography/Digital Imaging: Parallel & Paradoxical Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Mary Stieglitz

    With the introduction of photography and photomechanical printing processes in the 19th century, the first age of machine pictures and reproductions emerged. The 20th century introduced computer image processing systems, creating a digital imaging revolution. Rather than concentrating on the adversarial aspects of the computer's influence on…

  2. Transforming Spatial Reasoning Skills in the Upper-Level Undergraduate Geoscience Classroom Through Curricular Materials Informed by Cognitive Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T. A.; Tikoff, B.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential skill in the STEM disciplines, including the geosciences. Undergraduate students, including geoscience majors in upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. Students with weak spatial skills may be unable to understand fundamental concepts and to solve geological problems with a spatial component. However, spatial thinking skills are malleable. As a group of geoscience faculty members and cognitive psychologists, we have developed a set of curricular materials for Mineralogy, Sedimentology & Stratigraphy, and Structural Geology courses. These materials are designed to improve students' spatial skills, and in particular to improve students' abilities to reason about spatially complex 3D geological concepts and problems. Teaching spatial thinking in the context of discipline-based exercises has the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education by removing one significant barrier to success in the STEM disciplines. The curricular materials we have developed are based on several promising teaching strategies that have emerged from cognitive science research on spatial thinking. These strategies include predictive sketching, making visual comparisons, gesturing, and the use of analogy. We have conducted a three-year study of the efficacy of these materials in strengthening the spatial skills of students in upper-level geoscience courses at three universities. Our methodology relies on a pre- and post-test study design, with several tests of spatial thinking skills administered at the beginning and end of each semester. In 2011-2012, we used a "business as usual" approach to gather baseline data, measuring how much students' spatial thinking skills improved in response to the existing curricula. In the two subsequent years we have incorporated our new curricular materials, which can be found on the project website: http://serc.carleton.edu/spatialworkbook/activities.html Structural Geology

  3. Book Review: Precession, Nutation, and Wobble of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Dehant, V.; Mathews, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    This great book describes and explains observational and computational aspects of three apparently tiny changes in the Earth's motion and orientation, viz., precession, nutation, and wobble. The three introductory chapters of this book present fundamental definitions, elementary geodetic theory, and celestial/terrestrial reference systems - including transformations between reference frames. The next chapter on observational techniques describes the principle of accurate measurements of the orientation of the Earth's axis, as obtained from measurements of extra-galactic radio sources using Very Long Baseline Interferometry and GPS observations. Chapter 5 handles precession and nutation of the rigid Earth (i.e., a celestial body that cannot, by definition, deform) and the subsequent chapter takes deformation into consideration, viz., the effect of a centrifugal force caused by a constant-rate rotation that causes the Earth's shape and structure to become ellipsoidal. Deformations caused by external solar-system bodies are discussed in terms of deformability parameters. The next three chapters handle additional complex deviations: non-rigid Earth and more general Earth models, anelastic Earth parameters, and the effects of the fluid layers (i.e., ocean and atmosphere) on Earth rotation. Chapter 10 complements Chapter 7 with refinements that take into account diverse small effects such as the effect of a thermal conductive layer at the top of the core, Core Mantle and Inner Boundary coupling effects on nutation, electromagnetic coupling, and so-called topographic coupling. Chapter 11 covers comparison of observation and theory, and tells us that the present-date precision of the nutation theory is at the level of milliarcseconds in the time domain, and of a tenth of a microsecond in the frequency domain (with some exceptions). This chapter is followed by a 25-page chapter of definitions of equator, equinox, celestial intermediate pole and origin, stellar angle

  4. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers. During launch operations, the payload/launch team sometimes asks the LWOs if they expect the upper-level winds to change during the countdown. The LWOs used numerical weather prediction model point forecasts to provide the information, but did not have the capability to quickly retrieve or adequately display the upper-level observations and compare them directly in the same display to the model point forecasts to help them determine which model performed the best. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a graphical user interface (GUI) that will plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Profiling System (AMPS) rawinsondes with point forecast wind profiles from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Mesoscale (NAM), Rapid Refresh (RAP) and Global Forecast System (GFS) models to assess the performance of these models. The AMU suggested adding observations from the NASA 50 MHz wind profiler and one of the US Air Force 915 MHz wind profilers, both located near the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility, to supplement the AMPS observations with more frequent upper-level profiles. Figure 1 shows a map of KSC/CCAFS with the locations of the observation sites and the model point forecasts.

  5. Laws of motion and precession for black holes and other bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, K.S.; Hartle, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Laws of motion and precession are derived for a Kerr black hole or any other body which is far from all other sources of gravity (''isolated body'') and has multipole moments that change slowly with time. Previous work by D'Eath and others has shown that to high accuracy the body moves along a geodesic of the surrounding spacetime geometry, and Fermi-Walker transports its angular-momentum vector. This paper derives the largest corrections to the geodesic law of motion and Fermi-Walker law of transport. These corrections are due to coupling of the body's angular momentum and quadrupole moment to the Riemann curvature of the surrounding spacetime. The resulting laws of motion and precession are identical to those that have been derived previously, by many researchers, for test bodies with negligible self-gravity. However, the derivation given here is valid for any isolated body, regardless of the strength of its self-gravity. These laws of motion and precession can be converted into equations of motion and precession by combining them with an approximate solution to the Einstein field equations for the surrounding spacetime. As an example, the conversion is carried out for two gravitationally bound systems of bodies with sizes much less than their separations. The resulting equations of motion and precession are derived accurately through post/sup 1.5/-Newtonian order. For the special case of two Kerr black holes orbiting each other, these equations of motion and precession (which include couplings of the holes' spins and quadrupole moments to spacetime curvature) reduce to equations previously derived by D'Eath. The precession due to coupling of a black hole's quadrupole moment to surrounding curvature may be large enough, if the hole lives at the center of a very dense star cluster, for observational detection by its effects on extragalactic radio jets

  6. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebled, J.M.; Yedra, Ll.; Estrade, S.; Portillo, J.; Peiro, F.

    2011-01-01

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49 o to -61 o at intervals of 2 o and with a precession angle of 0.6 o in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: → Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. → Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. → Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. → Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  7. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebled, J.M. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Yedra, Ll. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S.; Portillo, J. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, F., E-mail: francesca.peiro@ub.edu [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49{sup o} to -61{sup o} at intervals of 2{sup o} and with a precession angle of 0.6{sup o} in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: {yields} Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. {yields} Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. {yields} Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. {yields} Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  8. Stochastic Template Bank for Gravitational Wave Searches for Precessing Neutron Star-Black Hole Coalescence Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indik, Nathaniel; Haris, K.; Dal Canton, Tito; Fehrmann, Henning; Krishnan, Badri; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pai, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches to date have largely focused on non-precessing systems. Including precession effects greatly increases the number of templates to be searched over. This leads to a corresponding increase in the computational cost and can increase the false alarm rate of a realistic search. On the other hand, there might be astrophysical systems that are entirely missed by non-precessing searches. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing a template bank using stochastic methods for neutron star-black hole binaries allowing for precession, but with the restrictions that the total angular momentum of the binary is pointing toward the detector and that the neutron star spin is negligible relative to that of the black hole. We quantify the number of templates required for the search, and we explicitly construct the template bank. We show that despite the large number of templates, stochastic methods can be adapted to solve the problem. We quantify the parameter space region over which the non-precessing search might miss signals.

  9. Impact of a small ellipticity on the sustainability condition of developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Yasufumi; Simonet-Davin, Gabriel; Katayama, Atsushi; Goto, Susumu

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow transition to developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid with a small ellipticity. Fully developed turbulence appears through a subcritical transition when we fix the Reynolds number (the spin rate) and gradually increase the Poincaré number (the precession rate). In the transitional range of the Poincaré number, two qualitatively different turbulent states (i.e., fully developed turbulence and quiescent turbulence with a spin-driven global circulation) are stable and they are connected by a hysteresis loop. This discontinuous transition is in contrast to the continuous transition in a precessing sphere, for which neither bistable turbulent states nor hysteresis loops are observed. The small ellipticity of the container makes the global circulation of the confined fluid more stable, and it requires much stronger precession of the spheroid, than a sphere, for fully developed turbulence to be sustained. Nevertheless, once fully developed turbulence is sustained, its flow structures are almost identical in the spheroid and sphere. The argument [Lorenzani and Tilgner, J. Fluid Mech. 492, 363 (2003), 10.1017/S002211200300572X; Noir et al., Geophys. J. Int. 154, 407 (2003), 10.1046/j.1365-246X.2003.01934.x] on the basis of the analytical solution [Busse, J. Fluid Mech. 33, 739 (1968), 10.1017/S0022112068001655] of the steady global circulation in a weak precession range well describes the onset of the fully developed turbulence in the spheroid.

  10. The Juchatengo complex: an upper-level ophiolite assemblage of late Paleozoic age in Oaxaca, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Nishimura, José Manuel; Ramos-Arias, Mario Alfredo; Solari, Luigi; Murillo-Muñetón, Gustavo; Centeno-García, Elena; Schaaf, Peter; Torres-Vargas, Ricardo

    2018-04-01

    The Juchatengo complex (JC) suite is located between the Proterozoic Oaxacan complex to the north and the Xolapa complex to the south, and was amalgamated by late Paleozoic magmatism. It consists of mafic and sedimentary rocks that have oceanic affinities, with internal pseudostratigraphic, structural and metamorphic characteristics, which resemble a typical upper-level ophiolite assemblage. New U-Pb zircon and previous hornblende K-Ar analyses yield ages of ca. 291-313 Ma (U-Pb) for plagiogranites and ca. 282-277 Ma for tonalites intruding the entire sequence, including pelagic sediments at the top, with a maximum deposition age of ca. 278 Ma and noteworthy local provenance. These data constrain the age of the JC to the Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian period. Hf isotopic analyses obtained from zircons in the JC plagiogranite and tonalite show that they come from a similar primitive mantle source (176Hf/177Hf: 0.282539-0.283091; ƐHf(t): + 3.2 to + 15.0). ƐHf(t) values from near 0 to - 2.8 in the tonalites indicate a contribution from the continental crust. Trace elements and REE patterns in whole rock and zircons point to a primitive mantle source for differentiated mafic, plagiogranite dykes and tonalitic plutons. Geochronological and geochemical data address the generation of new oceanic crust above the subduction zone, probably in a backarc setting. In this tectonic scenario, the JC ophiolite originated due to the convergence of the paleo-Pacific plate below the already integrated Oaxacan and Acatlán complexes in western Pangea. The dextral displacement places the deformation in a transtensional regime during the late Paleozoic age.

  11. Truth and beauty in contemporary urban photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Colistra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Does city still need photography? Or does it show itself more effectively through other forms of communication? The question brings us back almost two hundred years ago, at the time of the spread of the first daguerreotypes, when the query was: Does city still need painting? The question raises several other issues - truth and beauty, analogical and digital, truth and photo editing - that this essay examines by comparing some images. We are convinced that “the more we can speak of a picture, the more unlikely it is to speak of photography” (R. Barthes. The essay describes the work of some artists/photographers who have addressed the issue of urban photography. Works in which the figurative and visionary component is based on the interaction of traditional shooting techniques and processes of digital post-production.

  12. X-ray image intensifier photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, K.; Angerstein, W.; Steinhardt, L.

    1980-01-01

    The present treatise on X-ray image intensifier photography starts with introductory remarks on the history of X-ray imaging and image intensifiers. In the physical-technological part especially the quality of image and the methods of its measurement are discussed in detail. The relevant equipment such as image intensifier cameras, X-ray television, video recorder and devices of display and evaluation of images are presented as well as problems of radiation doses and radiation protection. Based on 25,000 examinations of the digestive, the biliary and the urinary tract, resp., as well as of the blood vessels the applicability of the X-ray image intensifier photography and its diagnostic value are demonstrated in the medical part of the book

  13. [Experts consensus of dental esthetic photography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    Clinical photography in esthetic dentistry is an essential skill in clinical practice. It is widely applied clinically in multiple fields related to esthetic dentistry. Society of Esthetic Dentistry of Chinese Stomatological Association established a consensus for clinical photography and standards for images in esthetic dentistry in order to standardize domestic dental practitioners' procedure, and meet the demands of diagnosis and design in modern esthetic dentistry. It was also developed to facilitate domestic and international academic communication. Sixteen commonly used images in practice, which are of apparent importance in guiding esthetic analysis, design and implementation, are proposed in the standards. This consensus states the clinical significance of these images and the standard protocol of acquiring them.

  14. Assessing Rural Communities through Youth Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee A. Oscarson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite frequent concerns about youth and young adult migration from rural to urban areas, most measures used to assess youth in rural community research have been developed by adults. Accurate understanding of youth community perceptions necessitates youth input into the research process. The participatory research strategy described here, using photography to describe community, enables youth to define community and identify what they value about their communities. Photographs and explanations of the photographs indicated that youth value places (schools, churches, as well as locations unique to communities and people from those communities. Photovoice, photography-based participatory-action research, is a feasible and engaging method for obtaining youth perspectives on community issues. Further, Photovoice may be adapted to the needs of different age groups and situations.

  15. Environmental studies using earth orbital photography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobber, F J

    1969-01-01

    Orbital remote sensing, and particularly orbital photography, can provide immediately useful data for scientists familiar with applying aerial photographic techniques to environmental problems. Despite the expansion of analytical techniques in the earth sciences, the environmental data base has remained relatively static compared with increased information needs because of the difficulty of effective worldwide surveys and the high cost of timely data collection. Color, color infrared and black and white space photographs obtained incident to the Gemini and Apollo programs provide unique synoptic tools for analyzing modern environments and processes, and data that cannot be duplicated by aerial photographic mosaics. Principal advantages of orbital surveys include repetitious worldwide coverage promising environmental synthesis within the full spectrum of seasonal contrasts, and synoptic observations on a scale generally impossible from aircraft. The general categories of environmental data that can be extracted from orbital photography are summarized. 26 references, 37 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Calibration of fisheye lenses for hemispherical photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaci, J.; Kolar, U.

    2000-01-01

    Hemispherical photography represents one of the most appropriate methods of estimating averages of solar radiation over extended periods of time. This method is based upon the use of extremely wide-angle fisheye lenses, which produce large projection distortion. To correctly interpret hemispherical photography we have to know the projection characteristics of the fisheye lens in combination with a camera body. This can be achieved through lens calibration. The first part of the article explains in detail the calibration method for fisheye lenses which are used to assess the solar radiation in forest ecology research. In the second part the results of calibration for fisheye lens Sigma 8 mm, f/4 (MF, N) are presented. The lens was used on a Nikon F50 camera body

  17. Shadow photography method for beam emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashkovskij, V.V.; Lisin, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Improved technique of shadow photography which allows to measure rather simply and accurately the angular distribution of electrons extracted from betatron is described. Measurement accuracy of particle flight angles is determined by setting of rods relatively to the plane of photographic paper sheet, their diameter and shadow trace length. Incidental angle deviation of rod axes contributes mainly into the error. Mean root-square error constituted 2-3% according to the results of several measurements of angles

  18. Measuring food intake with digital photography

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Corby K.; Nicklas, Theresa; Gunturk, Bahadir; Correa, John B.; Allen, H. Raymond; Champagne, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Photography of Foods Method accurately estimates the food intake of adults and children in cafeterias. When using this method, imags of food selection and leftovers are quickly captured in the cafeteria. These images are later compared to images of “standard” portions of food using a computer application. The amount of food selected and discarded is estimated based upon this comparison, and the application automatically calculates energy and nutrient intake. Herein, we describe th...

  19. Smartphone photography in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, F

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of staff in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) departments take clinical photographs with their personal phones. We report the results of a survey on the use of smartphone photography in OMFS departments in the United Kingdom, and highlight the guidelines that govern their use and the associated ethical and medicolegal implications. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Benchmarking clinical photography services in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Giles

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking is used in services across the National Health Service (NHS) using various benchmarking programs. Clinical photography services do not have a program in place and services have to rely on ad hoc surveys of other services. A trial benchmarking exercise was undertaken with 13 services in NHS Trusts. This highlights valuable data and comparisons that can be used to benchmark and improve services throughout the profession.

  1. Using "Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editorial Staff, Jce

    2008-05-01

    Do you want to try the cyanotype process with your students? That's easy to do! Start with JCE Classroom Activity #19, "Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process", by Glen D. Lawrence and Stuart Fishelson ( JCE , 1999 , 76 , 1216A-1216B ). In this ready-to-use activity, students create their own cyanotype paper and use it to make blueprint photographs in the sunlight. It's a great way to connect chemistry with art.

  2. Aerial photography in peat production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tervo, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this project, possibilities of using aerial photography in peat technology were studied experimentally, the frequency of self-heating in peat stockpiles was surveyed and the effect of compacting on the inner temperature in a self-heated milled peat stockpile was studied. Air photographs can be used in several sub-fields of the peat production. On the basis of these photos it is possible to draw conclusions from the environmental impacts of peat production, from conditions in the peat field, and from qualitative and moisture differences of surface peat. In addition, aerial photography can be utilised in updating bog maps. On the basis of aerial thermal photography in autumns 1987 - 1993, 29 % of milled peat stockpiles, and 4 % of sod peat stockpiles were found to be self-heated. The susceptibility to self-heating varied at different peatlands. The effect of compacting with a bulldozer was studied at three self-heated test stock-piles, two of which were compacted. The inner temperatures in the test stockpiles decreased significantly over the three-month monitoring period. The falls in the inner temperature of all three stockpiles were identical. Compacting did not have any significant effect on the temperature fall or on the rate of fall. The number of test stockpiles (3) is insufficient to give any statistical reliability. (orig.)

  3. Spin-dynamics simulations of vortex precession in 2-D magnetic dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depondt, Ph.; Levy, J.-C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots of finite size. → A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly erratic ones. → Pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided. -- Abstract: Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots. The Landau-Lifshitz equation with exchange and dipolar interactions was integrated at a low temperature with initial conditions consisting in a single vortex situated aside from the central position. This vortex precesses around the center of the sample and either can be expelled or converges towards the center. These relaxation processes are systematically studied. A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly somewhat erratic ones. Intrinsic pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided.

  4. EELS signal enhancement by means of beam precession in the TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estradé, Sonia; Portillo, Joaquim; Yedra, Lluís; Rebled, José Manuel; Peiró, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    EELS is nowadays a most relevant characterization tool as it provides chemical and electronic information with an extraordinary spatial resolution. When a crystal is viewed in zone axis in the TEM, there is channelling of the electrons along the atom columns, which strongly reduce the EELS signal, so that it is generally advised to work slightly off the zone axis to collect EELS data, which may not always be possible or advantageous. In the present work, we demonstrate the use of precession to compensate for the reduction of EELS signal when in the zone axis. -- Highlights: ► Channelling compromises EELS signal in zone axis. ► Precession can be used to get rid of channelling effects. ► Use of precession to enhance EELS signal in the zone axis is demonstrated.

  5. Neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Toru; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawai, Takeshi; Hino, Masahiro; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Achiwa, Norio; Otake, Yoshie; Funahashi, Haruhiko.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spin quantum precession by multilayer spin splitter has been demonstrated using a new spin interferometer. The multilayer spin splitter consists of a magnetic multilayer mirror on top, followed by a gap layer and a non magnetic multilayer mirror which are evaporated on a silicon substrate. Using the multilayer spin splitter, a polarized neutron wave in a magnetic field perpendicular to the polarization is split into two spin eigenstates with a phase shift in the direction of the magnetic field. The spin quantum precession is equal to the phase shift, which depends on the effective thickness of the gap layer. The demonstration experiments verify the multilayer spin splitter as a neutron spin precession device as well as the coherent superposition principle of the two spin eigenstates. We have developed a new phase-spin echo interferometer using the multilayer spin splitters. We present successful performance tests of the multilayer spin splitter and the phase-spin echo interferometer. (author)

  6. The Effect of an Integrated Course Cluster Learning Community on the Oral and Written Communication Skills and Technical Content Knowledge of Upper-Level College of Agriculture Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Cynthia; Miller, Greg; Polito, Thomas A.; Gibson, Lance

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine if upper-level college students who participated in AgPAQ, an integrated course cluster learning community, would demonstrate enhanced learning in the areas of oral communication, written communication, and agronomic/economic technical content knowledge. The population (N = 182)…

  7. Synthesizing and Characterizing Graphene via Raman Spectroscopy: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Experiment That Exposes Students to Raman Spectroscopy and a 2D Nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Zhenbo; Ward, Michelle; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    In this upper-level undergraduate experiment, students utilize micro-Raman spectroscopy to characterize graphene prepared by mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The mechanically exfoliated samples are prepared by the students while CVD graphene can be purchased or obtained through outside sources. Owing to the intense Raman…

  8. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  9. Determination of the Acid Dissociation Constant of a Phenolic Acid by High Performance Liquid Chromatography: An Experiment for the Upper Level Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboh, Ghada

    2018-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment for the upper level analytical chemistry laboratory is described. The students consider the effect of mobile-phase composition and pH on the retention times of ionizable compounds in order to determine the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], of a phenolic acid. Results are analyzed…

  10. Photography/Monument. History of Childhood and Post-mortem Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Borras Llop

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an argument in favor of the full integration of photographic images within historical analysis. From this perspective, I have approached the history of childhood, the field of research which I have concentrated on, in recent years. My focus is on two major topics: images of child labour and representations of infant mortality. The article is divided into two main sections. The first succinctly lays out the main arguments and opinions concerning the interpretation of photography from the point of view of photographers, historians of photography, photography and art critics, image theorists, anthropologists and social and cultural historians. The second section focuses on the analysis of specific cases, without seeking to present it as a model.

  11. A guideline to medical photography: a perspective on digital photography in an orthopaedic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meijer, P P G; Karlsson, J; LaPrade, R F; Verhaar, J A N; Wijdicks, C A

    2012-12-01

    Quality photographs are essential for clinical documentation, research, and publication in scientific journals and teaching. Oftentimes, non-ideal lighting and a sterile environment restrict the medical photographer, resulting in lower-quality photographs. This article aims to provide a clear and comprehensible guideline for medical photography in an orthopaedic setting. This article is based on extensive photographic involvement in operating and laboratory settings, in close collaboration with medical professionals from the Steadman Clinic (Vail, Colorado, USA), Gothenburg University (Göteborg, Sweden) and Erasmus MC (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Background literature was searched through Google Scholar and PubMed. Three relevant journal articles, and one book on medical photography, were used to write this paper. Seventeen Internet articles were used for background information. A relevant, up-to-date and comprehensive guideline to medical photography for medical professionals, with or without photographic experience, is provided. Expert opinion, Level V.

  12. Predicting Precession Rates from Secular Dynamics for Extra-solar Multi-planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laerhoven, Christa

    2015-12-01

    Considering the secular dynamics of multi-planet systems provides substantial insight into the interactions between planets in those systems. Secular interactions are those that don't involve knowing where a planet is along its orbit, and they dominate when planets are not involved in mean motion resonances. These interactions exchange angular momentum among the planets, evolving their eccentricities and inclinations. To second order in the planets' eccentricities and inclinations, the eccentricity and inclination perturbations are decoupled. Given the right variable choice, the relevant differential equations are linear and thus the eccentricity and inclination behaviors can be described as a sum of eigenmodes. Since the underlying structure of the secular eigenmodes can be calculated using only the planets' masses and semi-major axes, one can elucidate the eccentricity and inclination behavior of planets in exoplanet systems even without knowing the planets' current eccentricities and inclinations. I have calculated both the eccentricity and inclination secular eigenmodes for the population of known multi-planet systems whose planets have well determined masses and periods and have used this to predict what range of pericenter precession (and nodal regression) rates the planets may have. One might have assumed that in any given system the planets with shorter periods would have faster precession rates, but I show that this is not necessarily the case. Planets that are 'loners' have narrow ranges of possible precession rates, while planets that are 'groupies' can have a wider range of possible precession rates. Several planets are expected to undergo significant precession on few-year timescales and many planets (though not the majority of planets) will undergo significant precession on decade timescales.

  13. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016.]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.], and we quote updated component masses of 35_{-3}^{+5} M_{⊙} and 30_{-4}^{+3} M_{⊙} (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals. We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  14. The Significance of Photography as Archives and Cultural Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criscentia Jessica Setiadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted by using textual, qualitative approach while looking closer at the significant of the information that was produced in the form of photography. The aim of this research was to take a stance of the importance of photography as archives and cultural memory in its ability in promoting truths. Photography was observed as three forms; they were singular, plural, and archival. Singular forms suggested the selective association between the photographers and the photographs were taken. Plural formed resonance ideas and overall aspects in what sets of photography could bring. Archival forms offered memories as references. The result of this research shows that photography, despite its ability or inability in promoting truths, is a great pool of resources of gaining information and tracing history. Further to this research, looking closer to current social media applications that put photography forward can be one option to explore within this topic.

  15. First observation of magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.; Albuquerque, I.F.; Baublis, V.V.; Bondar, N.F.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Cooper, P.S.; Lisheng, D.; Denisov, A.S.; Dobrovolsky, A.V.; Dubbs, T.; Endler, A.M.F.; Escobar, C.O.; Foucher, M.; Golovtsov, V.L.; Goritchev, P.A.; Gottschalk, H.; Gouffon, P.; Grachev, V.T.; Khanzadeev, A.V.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lach, J.; Lang Pengfei; Lebedenko, V.N.; Li Chengze; Li Yunshan; Mahon, J.R.P.; McCliment, E.; Morelos, A.; Newsom, C.; Pommot Maia, M.C.; Samsonov, V.M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Shi Huanzhang; Smith, V.J.; Sun, C.R.; Tang Fukun; Terentyev, N.K.; Timm, S.; Tkatch, I.I.; Uvarov, L.N.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Yan Jie; Zhao Wenheng; Zheng Shuchen; Zhong Yuanyuan

    1992-01-01

    Spin precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed for the first time. Polarized Σ + were channeled using bent Si crystals. These crystals provided an effective magnetic field of 45 T which resulted in a measured spin precession of 60±17 degree. This agrees with the prediction of 62±2 degree using the world average of Σ + magnetic moment measurements. This new technique gives a Σ + magnetic moment of (2.40±0.46±0.40)μ N , where the quoted uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We see no evidence of depolarization in the channeling process

  16. On the precession of the optical star in the Cyg X-1 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopylov, I.M.; Sokolov, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are analysed of previoUs spectroscopic investigation of the supergiant HDE 226868 (based on six-year observations at the 6-m telescope) with the puspose of searching for possible variations in the spectrum connected with the precession of the rotation axis of the star upper layers. It is noted that spectral type and HeI lambda 4471 line halfwidth show a coordinated behaviour with the phase of the 39-day period in the frame of the precession hypothesis. Nonuniform distribution of CNO anomalies over the star latitude seems to be possible

  17. The design and construction of a nuclear free-precession magnetometer; Etude et realisation d'un magnetometre a precession libre nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baconnier, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-10-15

    After presenting the advantages of nuclear magnetic resonance with respect to electromagnetic processes, as far as the measurement of the earths' magnetic field is concerned, we deal with the macroscopic theory for the Bloch model and analyse Packard and Varions' experiment. The development of a particular absolute free-precession magnetometer is studied, and the conditions are determined for obtaining a maximum amplitude signal as a function of the geometrical form of the detector coil, of the method of cut-off, and of the coupling between various parts of the system. After having described in detail the technology of amplifiers, we consider the problem of the measurement of the frequency of precession for which an original solution, of analogy form, is proposed and discussed. Complete plans of the equipment are given in an appendix. (author) [French] Apres avoir presente les avantages de la resonance magnetique nucleaire relativement aux procedes electromagnetiques, en ce qui concerne la mesure du champ magnetique terrestre, on traite de la theorie macroscopique dans le modele de Bloch et analyse l'experience de Packard et Varian. On etudie une realisation particuliere d'un magnetometre absolu a precession libre et determine les conditions d'obtention d'un signal d'amplitude maximale en fonction de la forme geometrique du bobinage detecteur, de la methode de coupure, et du couplage entre les differents elements du montage. Apres avoir decrit en detail la technologie des amplificateurs, on aborde le probleme de la mesure de la frequence de precession, pour laquelle une solution originale, sous forme analogique, est proposee et discutee. En annexe est joint un dossier complet des plans de la realisation. (auteur)

  18. 77 FR 36250 - Information Collection Request; Request for Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Farm Service Agency (FSA) is seeking comments from all interested individuals and organizations on an extension of a currently approved information collection associated with FSA Aerial Photography Program. The FSA Aerial Photography Field Office (APFO) uses the information from this form to collect the customer and photography information needed to produce and ship the various photographic products ordered.

  19. Methodological development of the process of appreciation of photography Conceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovany Álvarez García

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the different concepts that are used to methodological appreciation of photography. Since photography is one of the manifestations of the visu al arts with the most commonly interacts daily ; from which can be found in books, magazines and other publications, discusses various methodologies to assess the photographic image. It addresses also the classic themes of photography as well as some expres sive elements.

  20. [Scheimpflug photography for the examination of phakic intraocular lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, M

    2014-10-01

    High myopia phakic intraocular lenses (IOL) have become an established means of surgical correction for high ametropia. Scheimpflug photography is one of the methods which are frequently applied for postoperative examination of the implants. Results from published studies employing Scheimpflug photography for examination of anterior chamber angle-fixated, iris-fixated and sulcus-fixated phakic IOLs were evaluated. In several published studies Scheimpflug photography was used to examine the position of the implant and opacification of the crystalline lens. The results provided valuable evidence for the improvement of phakic IOL design. Scheimpflug photography offers an easy to use, rapid non-contact examination of phakic IOLs.

  1. Precise measurement of magnetic field gradients from free spin precession signals of He-3 and Xe-129 magnetometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allmendinger, Fabian; Blümler, Peter; Doll, Michael; Grasdijk, Oliver; Heil, Werner; Jungmann, Klaus; Karpuk, Sergej; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäuser, Andreas; Repetto, Maricel; Schmidt, Ulrich; Sobolev, Yuri; Tullney, Kathlyne; Willmann, Lorenz; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We report on precise measurements of magnetic field gradients extracted from transverse relaxation rates of precessing spin samples. The experimental approach is based on the free precession of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized He-3 and (12)9Xe atoms in a spherical cell inside a magnetic guiding field

  2. A complete solution for GP-B's gyroscopic precession by retarded gravitational theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keyun

    Mainstream physicists generally believe that Mercury’s Perihelion precession and GP-B’ gyroscopic precession are two of the strongest evidences supporting Einstein’ curved spacetime and general relativity. However, most classical literatures and textbooks (e.g. Ohanain: Gravitation and Spacetime) paint an incorrect picture of Mercury’s orbit anomaly, namely Mercury’s perihelion precessed 43 arc-seconds per century; a correct picture should be that Mercury rotated 43 arc-seconds per century more than along Newtonian theoretical orbit. The essence of Le Verrier’s and Newcomb’s observation and analysis is that the angular speed of Mercury is slightly faster than the Newtonian theoretical value. The complete explanation to Mercury’s orbit anomaly should include two factors, perihelion precession is one of two factors, in addition, the change of orbital radius will also cause a change of angular speed, which is another component of Mercury's orbital anomaly. If Schwarzschild metric is correct, then the solution of the Schwarzschild orbit equation must contain three non-ignorable items. The first corresponds to Newtonian ellipse; the second is a nonlinear perturbation with increasing amplitude, which causes the precession of orbit perihelion; this is just one part of the angular speed anomaly of Mercury; the third part is a linear perturbation, corresponding to a similar figure of the Newton's ellipse, but with a minimal radius; this makes no contribution to the perihelion precession of the Schwarzschild orbit, but makes the Schwarzschild orbital radius slightly smaller, leading to a slight increase in Mercury’s angular speed. All classical literatures of general relativity ignored this last factor, which is a gross oversight. If you correctly take all three factors into consideration, the final result is that the difference between the angles rotated along Schwarzschild’s orbit and the angle rotated along Newton’s orbit for one hundred years should

  3. Safety of iPhone retinal photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sheng Chiong; Wynn-Williams, Giles; Wilson, Graham

    2017-04-01

    With the advancement in mobile technology, smartphone retinal photography is becoming a popular practice. However, there is limited information about the safety of the latest smartphones used for retinal photography. This study aims to determine the photobiological risk of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus when used in conjunction with a 20Diopter condensing lens for retinal photography. iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus (Apple, Cupertino, CA) were used in this study. The geometrical setup of the study was similar to the indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. The phone was set up at one end of the bench with its flash turned on at maximal brightness; a 20 Dioptre lens was placed 15 cm away from the phone. The light that passes through the lens was measured with a spectroradiometer and an illuminance probe at the other end to determine the spectral profile, spatial irradiance, radiant power emitted by the phone's flash. Trigonometric and lens formula were applied to determine the field of view and retinal surface in order to determine the weighted retinal irradiance and weighted retinal radiant exposure. Taking ocular transmission and the distribution of the beam's spatial irradiance into account, the weighted retinal irradiance is 1.40 mW/cm 2 and the weighted retinal radiant exposure is 56.25 mJ/cm 2 . The peak weighted foveal irradiance is 1.61 mW/cm 2 . Our study concluded that the photobiological risk posed by iPhone 6 indirect ophthalmoscopy was at least 1 order of magnitude below the safety limits set by the ISO15004-2.2.

  4. Report of the International Astronomical Union Division I working group on precession and the ecliptic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hilton, J. L.; Capitaine, N.; Chapront, J.; Ferrandiz, J.M.; Fienga, A.; Fukushima, T.; Getino, J.; Mathews, P. M.; Simon, J.-C.; Soffel, M.; Vondrák, Jan; Wallace, P.; Williams, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2006), s. 351-367 ISSN 0923-2958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : precession and the ecliptic * reference systems Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.175, year: 2006

  5. A neutron spin echo spectrometer with two optimal field shape coils for neutron spin precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Ito, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshizawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have designed and have been constructing at the C 2-2 cold neutron guide port of JRR-3M, JAERI, a neutron spin echo spectrometer (NSE) which is equipped with two optimal field shape (OFS) coils for neutron spin precession with the maximum field integral of 0.22 T m, an assembly of position sensitive detectors (PSD), a converging polarizer and a wide area analyzer. The dynamic range of scattering vector Q covers from 0.005 A -1 to 0.2 A -1 and that of energy hω from 10 neV to 30 μeV. Performance tests of the OFS coils show that the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field integral in the OFS coils with the spiral coils is so small that the NSE signal amplitude decreases little even for the neutron cross section of 30 mm diameter as the Fourier time t increases up to 25 ns, though the precession coils are close to iron covers of the neighboring neutron guide. This verifies that the OFS precession coils are appropriate for this NSE spectrometer. Another test experiment shows that the homogeneity condition of the precession magnet is loosened by use of PSD. (orig.)

  6. Classical relativistic spinning particle with anomalous magnetic moment: The precession of spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Cruz, M.G.

    1993-05-01

    The theory of classical relativistic spinning particles with c-number internal spinor variables, modelling accurately the Dirac electron, is generalized to particles with anomalous magnetic moments. The equations of motion are derived and the problem of spin precession is discussed and compared with other theories of spin. (author). 32 refs

  7. Free precession of neutron stars: some plain truths, cautionary remarks, and assorted speculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1974-01-01

    A brief summary is presented of present understanding of free precession in neutron stars. Attention is called to some truths concerning such wobble motion and then one describes some current efforts to devise mechanisms for exciting neutron star wobble with particular attention to the Crab and Vela pulsars and to Her X-1. (U.S.)

  8. Light variations of a spherical star with two hot precessing spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyurkchieva, D.P.; Shkodrov, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    In one of the models of SS443, suggested by Lipunov and Shakura (1982), the second component of the double stellar system is considered a star with two hot spots on the surface. Since the gas jets forming the spots are precessing, the hot spots on the visible disk will do likewise. In this paper, the light variations of a spherical star with two precessing hot spots are analyzed under the following restrictive conditions: (I) the inclination of the precession axis toward the line of sight is i=π/2; (II) the visible disk of the spherical star is considered uniformly illuminated, i.e. the effect of the variation in intensity from the disk center to the limb is neglected. The time variations in the projection area of the precessing spots on the visible stellar disk are investigated. In the studies to follow, the same effect will be analyzed assuming: (1) inot=π/2; (2) the variation in intensity is estimated from center to the stellar boundary; (3) a case of ellipsoidal stars; (4) this effect added to the effect of darkening due to orbital movement in a double stellar system

  9. Extracting the orbital axis from gravitational waves of precessing binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method for extracting the instantaneous orbital axis only from gravitational wave strains of precessing binary systems observed from a particular observer direction. This method enables us to reconstruct the coprecessing frame waveforms only from observed strains for the ideal case with the high signal-to-noise ratio. Specifically, we do not presuppose any theoretical model of the precession dynamics and coprecessing waveforms in our method. We test and measure the accuracy of our method using the numerical relativity simulation data of precessing binary black holes taken from the SXS Catalog. We show that the direction of the orbital axis is extracted within ≈0.07 rad error from gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral phase. The coprecessing waveforms are also reconstructed with high accuracy; the mismatch (assuming white noise) between them and the original coprecessing waveforms is typically a few times 10-3 including the merger-ringdown phase, and can be improved by an order of magnitude focusing only on the inspiral waveform. In this method, the coprecessing frame waveforms are not only the purely technical tools for understanding the complex nature of precessing waveforms but also direct observables.

  10. Measurement of natural convection by speckle photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernekinck, U.; Merzkirch, W.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of speckle photography can be applied to the measurement of density variations in fluids. A modification of existing experimental arrangements allows for the measurement of large values of the light deflection angles as they may occur in heat and mass transfer situations. The method is demonstrated for the case of a helium jet exhausting into still air and the natural convective flow along a heated plate. The obtained data are compared with results measured with classical optical interferometers, and good agreement is found. The advantages of the new technique over the classical optical methods are briefly discussed. 11 references

  11. USGS Southwest Repeat Photography Collection: Kanab Creek, southern Utah and northern Arizona, 1872-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The USGS Southwest Repeat Photography Collection (‘Collection’), formerly named the Desert Laboratory Repeat Photography Collection, is now housed by the Southwest...

  12. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman Ill Ballistic Missiles At Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2013-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) analyze VAFB sounding data to determine the probability of violating (PoV) upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. The AMU suggested also including forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh (RAP) model. This would provide further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast on launch day.

  13. Using Digital Photography to Supplement Learning of Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norflus, Fran

    2012-01-01

    The author used digital photography to supplement learning of biotechnology by students with a variety of learning styles and educational backgrounds. Because one approach would not be sufficient to reach all the students, digital photography was used to explain the techniques and results to the class instead of having to teach each student…

  14. Encountering Over/sights. Remembering Invisible Pasts through Photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . Discussing different forms of cultural memorialisation in South Africa, a special focus is put on visual cultural memory, photography, the notion of absence and visibility. While the tourist script here seems to require a tangible memorial and proper 'sites' to visit, contemporary South African photography...

  15. Burst Mode Composite Photography for Dynamic Physics Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    I am writing this article to raise awareness of burst mode photography as a fun and engaging way for teachers and students to experience physics demonstration activities. In the context of digital photography, "burst mode" means taking multiple photographs per second, and this is a feature that now comes standard on most digital…

  16. The Roles of Photography for Developing Literacy across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Marva; Lafferty, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers can capitalize on the overwhelmingly visual nature of contemporary society for learning and teaching through integrating photography in their classroom instruction. In offering an alternative pathway for acquiring and expressing knowledge, photography has the potential to strengthen instruction across disciplines by drawing on multiple…

  17. 7 CFR 611.21 - Availability of aerial photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of aerial photography. 611.21 Section 611.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SOIL SURVEYS Cartographic Operations § 611.21 Availability of aerial photography. The...

  18. The Impact of Photography in a Developing Economy | Irivwieri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is thus aimed at advancing photography as a versatile creative medium of expression and a veritable tool for research and skill acquisition for employment generation irrespective of one's chosen career. A number of literatures were reviewed to elicit information about the subject content of photography which ...

  19. Using historical photography to monitor and assess threats over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don. Evans

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of aerial photography is perhaps the best way to assess changes in landcover conditions. In the United States, most national forests have repeat photography on approximately a 10-year cycle. Analysis of this rich photo record can reveal changes in insect damage, fuels buildup, unmanaged off-highway vehicle use, loss of open space, and other land-cover...

  20. Photography or Ophthalmoscopy for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, Hendrik A. van; Moll, Annette C.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Abramoff, M.D.; Polak, Bettine C.P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.K. National Screening Committee recommended digital fundus photography as the screening method of choice for diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, concerns have been expressed about replacing ophthalmoscopy with slit-lamp biomicroscopy by digital photography. These concerns included the

  1. Recent developments on in-reactor photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, R.; Jones, B.

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of nuclear reactor inspection is undertaken by CCTV survey. The immediacy of the results and the ability of this technique to scan large areas have obvious advantages. However for detailed inspection of particular components photography is preferred. Two problems beset in-reactor photography, these being radiation fogging of the film and the necessity to change the film in the camera. The former problem can be somewhat obviated by fast manipulator but only in relatively low radiation areas. The latter is more difficult to cope with since the constant removal of a camera to change film is operationally time consuming and also increases the total exposure of film to radiation. This paper describes a method which has recently been devised where film is transported to and from a pre-positioned camera at high speed both reducing drastically the exposure time to radiation and removing the need to extract the camera from the reactor in order to change the film. The full potential of this technique remained undeveloped until a need arose to photograph lower levels of core restraint in a Magnox reactor. (author)

  2. Total body photography for skin cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengel, Lynn T; Petroni, Gina R; Judge, Joshua; Chen, David; Acton, Scott T; Schroen, Anneke T; Slingluff, Craig L

    2015-11-01

    Total body photography may aid in melanoma screening but is not widely applied due to time and cost. We hypothesized that a near-simultaneous automated skin photo-acquisition system would be acceptable to patients and could rapidly obtain total body images that enable visualization of pigmented skin lesions. From February to May 2009, a study of 20 volunteers was performed at the University of Virginia to test a prototype 16-camera imaging booth built by the research team and to guide development of special purpose software. For each participant, images were obtained before and after marking 10 lesions (five "easy" and five "difficult"), and images were evaluated to estimate visualization rates. Imaging logistical challenges were scored by the operator, and participant opinion was assessed by questionnaire. Average time for image capture was three minutes (range 2-5). All 55 "easy" lesions were visualized (sensitivity 100%, 90% CI 95-100%), and 54/55 "difficult" lesions were visualized (sensitivity 98%, 90% CI 92-100%). Operators and patients graded the imaging process favorably, with challenges identified regarding lighting and positioning. Rapid-acquisition automated skin photography is feasible with a low-cost system, with excellent lesion visualization and participant acceptance. These data provide a basis for employing this method in clinical melanoma screening. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  3. Change in General Relativistic precession rates due to Lidov-Kozai oscillations in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; Asher, David J.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Li, Gongjie

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: Two well known phenomena associated with low perihelion distance bodies in orbital dynamics are general relativistic (GR) precession and Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations. The accurate prediction of the perihelion shift of Mercury in accord with real observations is one of the significant triumphs of the general theory of relativity developed by Einstein. The Lidov-Kozai mechanism was first proposed and derived by Kozai and independently by Lidov explaining the periodic exchange between eccentricities e and inclinations i thereby increasing or decreasing the perihelion distance q secularly in the orbiting body. Co-existence of GR Precession and LK Oscillations: In this work, we were interested to identify bodies evolving in the near future (i.e. thousands of years in this case) into rapid sungrazing and sun colliding phases and undergoing inclination flips, due to LK oscillations and being GR active at the same time. Of all the bodies we checked from the IAU-Minor Planet Center, and Marsden plus Kracht families from the comet catalogue, 96P/Machholz 1 stands out because it shows all these trends in the near future. LK leads to secular lowering of q which in turn leads to a huge increase in GR precession of argument of pericentre. This in turn gives feedback to the LK mechanism as the e,i and argument of pericentre in Kozai cycles are closely correlated. In this work, we find real examples of solar system bodies which show the continuum nature between GR precession domi-nant and LK mechanism dominant regimes. Results and Discussion: We have shown that there are bodies in the solar system in which both GR precession and LK mechanism can co-exist at the same time and for which these effects can be measured and identified using analytical and numerical techniques. Thus there is a continuum of bodies encompassing, firstly GR precession dominant, secondly GR precession plus LK mechanism co-existing and finally LK mechanism dominant states which are all

  4. Gigapixel photography for skin cancer surveillance: a novel alternative to total-body photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikailov, Anar; Blechman, Adam

    2013-11-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting the use of cutaneous imaging in combination with standard total-body skin examinations for early detection and treatment of melanoma. In the last 2 decades, total-body photography (TBP) has been widely used in combination with standard total-body skin examinations for active skin cancer surveillance with proven clinical utility; however, the groundbreaking image detail provided by gigapixel photography (GP) could improve dermatologists' ability to monitor suspicious lesions and therefore could serve a critical role in supplementing traditional total-body skin examinations for skin cancer surveillance. Although it has been successfully implemented in other fields, future studies are required to determine the effectiveness of GP in dermatology.

  5. Geometric knowledge and scientific rigor of digital photography: the case of nodal photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carpiceci

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past the formation of the photographic image was almost exclusively delegated to a process of shooting, developing and printing or projecting. Today the picture has so many possibilities that it is difficult to delineate a clear and focused operative boundary. In digital photography, every step offers the opportunity of transformation. However the multiple possibilities offered by digital photography implya required knowledge of all those activities in which the automatisms can prevent user from the realization processes control. As emblem of general cognitive problem, we analyze a significant application field that we define “nodal photography”. It is based on a technique produced from the development of electronics and computer, and that encompasses many aspects of technological innovation we are experiencing.

  6. Experiment S-5: Synoptic Terrain Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    The Synoptic Terrain Photography Experiment (S-5) was successfully conducted during the Gemini V mission, the second of the Gemini flights on which it was carried. This report summarizes briefly the methods and results of the experiment. Interpretation of the many excellent pictures obtained is in progress, and a full report is not possible at this time; instead, representative pictures will be presented and described. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain a large number of high-quality color photographs of selected land areas from geologic and geographic study. Southern Mexico, eastern Africa, and Australia were given high priority, but it was stressed that good pictures of any cloud-free land area would be useful. The same camera (Hasselblad 500 C) and film (Ektachrome MS) used on the Gemini III and IV missions were carried on the Gemini V flight.

  7. Berenice Abbott (1898-1991, photographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Mélia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available C’est la première fois que Berenice Abbott est exposée à Paris. Les cent vingt images et trente documents présentés au Jeu de Paume sont regroupés en quatre grandes séries, qui correspondent aux quatre grandes phases de sa carrière photographique. La première partie retrace son œuvre de portraitiste, qui commence à Paris au début des années 1920, où elle photographie des anonymes, mais aussi beaucoup d’artistes et d’écrivains tels que Marcel Duchamp, Jean Cocteau, James Joyce, ou encore Djuna...

  8. Best practices to optimize intraoperative photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaujoux, Sébastien; Ceribelli, Cecilia; Goudard, Geoffrey; Khayat, Antoine; Leconte, Mahaut; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Balagué, Julie; Dousset, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Intraoperative photography is used extensively for communication, research, or teaching. The objective of the present work was to define, using a standardized methodology and literature review, the best technical conditions for intraoperative photography. Using either a smartphone camera, a bridge camera, or a single-lens reflex (SLR) camera, photographs were taken under various standard conditions by a professional photographer. All images were independently assessed blinded to technical conditions to define the best shooting conditions and methods. For better photographs, an SLR camera with manual settings should be used. Photographs should be centered and taken vertically and orthogonal to the surgical field with a linear scale to avoid error in perspective. The shooting distance should be about 75 cm using an 80-100-mm focal lens. Flash should be avoided and scialytic low-powered light should be used without focus. The operative field should be clean, wet surfaces should be avoided, and metal instruments should be hidden to avoid reflections. For SLR camera, International Organization for Standardization speed should be as low as possible, autofocus area selection mode should be on single point AF, shutter speed should be above 1/100 second, and aperture should be as narrow as possible, above f/8. For smartphone, use high dynamic range setting if available, use of flash, digital filter, effect apps, and digital zoom is not recommended. If a few basic technical rules are known and applied, high-quality photographs can be taken by amateur photographers and fit the standards accepted in clinical practice, academic communication, and publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring food intake with digital photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C K; Nicklas, T; Gunturk, B; Correa, J B; Allen, H R; Champagne, C

    2014-01-01

    The digital photography of foods method accurately estimates the food intake of adults and children in cafeterias. When using this method, images of food selection and leftovers are quickly captured in the cafeteria. These images are later compared with images of 'standard' portions of food using computer software. The amount of food selected and discarded is estimated based upon this comparison, and the application automatically calculates energy and nutrient intake. In the present review, we describe this method, as well as a related method called the Remote Food Photography Method (RFPM), which relies on smartphones to estimate food intake in near real-time in free-living conditions. When using the RFPM, participants capture images of food selection and leftovers using a smartphone and these images are wirelessly transmitted in near real-time to a server for analysis. Because data are transferred and analysed in near real-time, the RFPM provides a platform for participants to quickly receive feedback about their food intake behaviour and to receive dietary recommendations for achieving weight loss and health promotion goals. The reliability and validity of measuring food intake with the RFPM in adults and children is also reviewed. In sum, the body of research reviewed demonstrates that digital imaging accurately estimates food intake in many environments and it has many advantages over other methods, including reduced participant burden, elimination of the need for participants to estimate portion size, and the incorporation of computer automation to improve the accuracy, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the method. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Methods for the determination of lunisolar precession from observations of extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsmore, B.

    1976-01-01

    Although it is not practicable at present to determine the position or motion of the equinox using radio techniques, lunisolar precession may be determined from measurements at two epochs of differences of (i) Right Ascension -RA, and (ii) Declinations - Dec., of extragalactic radio sources. The determinations are largely free from systematic errors, and the magnitudes of random errors, arising principally from tropospheric irregularities, are given for observations with the Cambridge 5-km telescope. Some first epoch measure-ments have been made with this instrument and it is estimated that by carrying out second epoch measurements after an interval of 5 yr, the centennial value of lunisolar precession will be determined with a standard error of +- 0''.25. (author)

  11. Use of digital photography for power plant retrofits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamba, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    One of the latest advancements in electronic tools for reducing engineering and drafting effort is the use of digital photography (DP) for retrofit and betterment projects at fossil and nuclear power plants. Sargent and Lundy (S and L) has effectively used digital photography for condition assessments, minor backfit repairs, thermo-lag fire wrap assessments and repairs, and other applications. Digital photography offers several benefits on these types of projects including eliminating the need for official repair drawings and providing station maintenance with a true 3-D visualization of the repair

  12. Fast and Slow Precession of Gaseous Debris Disks around Planet-accreting White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Ryan; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2018-04-01

    Spectroscopic observations of some metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs), believed to be polluted by planetary material, reveal the presence of compact gaseous metallic disks orbiting them. The observed variability of asymmetric, double-peaked emission-line profiles in about half of such systems could be interpreted as the signature of precession of an eccentric gaseous debris disk. The variability timescales—from decades down to 1.4 year (recently inferred for the debris disk around HE 1349–2305)—are in rough agreement with the rate of general relativistic (GR) precession in the test-particle limit. However, it has not been demonstrated that this mechanism can drive such a fast, coherent precession of a radially extended (out to 1 {R}ȯ ) gaseous disk mediated by internal stresses (pressure). Here, we use the linear theory of eccentricity evolution in hydrodynamic disks to determine several key properties of eccentric modes in gaseous debris disks around WDs. We find a critical dependence of both the precession period and radial eccentricity distribution of the modes on the inner disk radius, r in. For small inner radii, {r}in}≲ (0.2{--}0.4) {R}ȯ , the modes are GR-driven, with periods of ≈1–10 year. For {r}in}≳ (0.2{--}0.4) {R}ȯ , the modes are pressure dominated, with periods of ≈3–20 year. Correspondence between the variability periods and inferred inner radii of the observed disks is in general agreement with this trend. In particular, the short period of HE 1349–2305 is consistent with its small r in. Circum-WD debris disks may thus serve as natural laboratories for studying the evolution of eccentric gaseous disks.

  13. Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction Study of 2xxx Series Aluminium Alloys Exhibiting Several Coexisting Strengthening Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sunde, Jonas Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, scanning precession electron diffraction is applied to heat-treated Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Cu-Ag alloys, shedding light on the distribution of phases present and the complex interplay between these microstructural features. The employed technique yielded high quality data sets, which through subsequent data processing enabled a detailed phase mapping of these multi-component Al alloys. Among the main results presented, are virtual dark field images highlighting all separat...

  14. AN APPARENT PRECESSING HELICAL OUTFLOW FROM A MASSIVE EVOLVED STAR: EVIDENCE FOR BINARY INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Ressler, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Massive, evolved stars play a crucial role in the metal enrichment, dust budget, and energetics of the interstellar medium; however, the details of their evolution are uncertain because of their rarity and short lifetimes before exploding as supernovae. Discrepancies between theoretical predictions from single-star evolutionary models and observations of massive stars have evoked a shifting paradigm that implicates the importance of binary interaction. We present mid- to far-infrared observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy of a conical “helix” of warm dust (∼180 K) that appears to extend from the Wolf–Rayet star WR102c. Our interpretation of the helix is a precessing, collimated outflow that emerged from WR102c during a previous evolutionary phase as a rapidly rotating luminous blue variable. We attribute the precession of WR102c to gravitational interactions with an unseen compact binary companion whose orbital period can be constrained to 800 days < P < 1400 days from the inferred precession period, τ{sub p} ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup 4} yr, and limits imposed on the stellar and orbital parameters of the system. Our results concur with the range of orbital periods (P ≲ 1500 days) where spin-up via mass exchange is expected to occur for massive binary systems.

  15. Equatorial Precession Drove Mid-Latitude Changes in ENSO-Scale Variation in the Earliest Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Lee, D. E.; Wilson, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Foulden Maar is an annually laminated lacustrine diatomite deposit from the South Island of New Zealand. The deposit was laid down over ~100 kyr of the latest Oligocene and earliest Miocene, during the peak and deglaciation phase of the Mi-1 Antarctic glaciation event. At this time, New Zealand was located at approximately the same latitude as today (~45°S). Evidence from organic geochemical proxies (δD, δ13C) and physical properties (density, colour) indicates the presence of an 11-kyr cycle at the site. Although it is known that 11-kyr insolation (half-precession) cycles occur between the Tropics, this cycle is rarely seen in sedimentary archives deposited outside the immediate vicinity of the Equator. Records from Foulden Maar correlate well with the amplitude and phase of the modelled equatorial half-precession cycle for the earliest Miocene. High-resolution (50 µm) colour intensity measurements and lamina thickness measurements both indicate the presence of significant ENSO-like (2-8 year) variation in the Foulden Maar sediments. Early results from targeted lamina thickness measurements suggest that ENSO-band variation is modulated by the 11-kyr cycle, with power in the ENSO band increasing during periods of increased insolation at the Equator. This implies that equatorial half-precession had a significant effect on ENSO-like variation in the early Miocene, and that this effect was felt as far afield as the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF NATURALLY TILTED, RETROGRADELY PRECESSING, NODAL SUPERHUMPING ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Accretion disks around black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf systems are thought to sometimes tilt, retrogradely precess, and produce hump-shaped modulations in light curves that have a period shorter than the orbital period. Although artificially rotating numerically simulated accretion disks out of the orbital plane and around the line of nodes generate these short-period superhumps and retrograde precession of the disk, no numerical code to date has been shown to produce a disk tilt naturally. In this work, we report the first naturally tilted disk in non-magnetic cataclysmic variables using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Our simulations show that after many hundreds of orbital periods, the disk has tilted on its own and this disk tilt is without the aid of radiation sources or magnetic fields. As the system orbits, the accretion stream strikes the bright spot (which is on the rim of the tilted disk) and flows over and under the disk on different flow paths. These different flow paths suggest the lift force as a source to disk tilt. Our results confirm the disk shape, disk structure, and negative superhump period and support the source to disk tilt, source to retrograde precession, and location associated with X-ray and He II emission from the disk as suggested in previous works. Our results identify the fundamental negative superhump frequency as the indicator of disk tilt around the line of nodes.

  17. Three-Dimensional Precession Feature Extraction of Ballistic Targets Based on Narrowband Radar Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shuang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Micro-motion is a crucial feature used in ballistic target recognition. To address the problem that single-view observations cannot extract true micro-motion parameters, we propose a novel algorithm based on the narrowband radar network to extract three-dimensional precession features. First, we construct a precession model of the cone-shaped target, and as a precondition, we consider the invisible problem of scattering centers. We then analyze in detail the micro-Doppler modulation trait caused by the precession. Then, we match each scattering center in different perspectives based on the ratio of the top scattering center’s micro-Doppler frequency modulation coefficient and extract the 3D coning vector of the target by establishing associated multi-aspect equation systems. In addition, we estimate feature parameters by utilizing the correlation of the micro-Doppler frequency modulation coefficient of the three scattering centers combined with the frequency compensation method. We then calculate the coordinates of the conical point in each moment and reconstruct the 3D spatial portion. Finally, we provide simulation results to validate the proposed algorithm.

  18. A covariant formalism of spin precession with respect to a reference congruence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Rickard

    2006-01-01

    We derive an effectively three-dimensional relativistic spin precession formalism. The formalism is applicable to any spacetime where an arbitrary timelike reference congruence of worldlines is specified. We employ what we call a stopped spin vector which is the spin vector that we would get if we momentarily make a pure boost of the spin vector to stop it relative to the congruence. Starting from the Fermi transport equation for the standard spin vector we derive a corresponding transport equation for the stopped spin vector. Employing a spacetime transport equation for a vector along a worldline, corresponding to spatial parallel transport with respect to the congruence, we can write down a precession formula for a gyroscope relative to the local spatial geometry defined by the congruence. This general approach has already been pursued by Jantzen et al (see e.g. Jantzen R T, Carini P and Bini D 1992 Ann. Phys. 215 1-50), but the algebraic form of our respective expressions differs. We are also applying the formalism to a novel type of spatial parallel transport introduced in Jonsson (2006 Class. Quantum Grav. 23 1), as well as verifying the validity of the intuitive approach of a forthcoming paper (Jonsson 2006 forthcoming) where gyroscope precession is explained entirely as a double Thomas type of effect. We also present the resulting formalism in explicit three-dimensional form (using the boldface vector notation), and give examples of applications

  19. Microcomputer-based instrument for the detection and analysis of precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The Centrifuge Precession Analyzer (CPA) is a microcomputer-based instrument which detects precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine and calculates the amplitude and frequency of precession. The CPA consists of a printed circuit board which contains signal-conditioning circuitry and a 24-bit counter and an INTEL iSBC 80-/24 single-board computer. Precession motion is detected by monitoring a signal generated by a variable reluctance pick-up coil in the top of the centrifuge machine. This signal is called a Fidler signal. The initial Fidler signal triggers a counter which is clocked by a high-precision, 20.000000-MHz, temperature-controlled, crystal oscillator. The contents of the counter are read by the computer, and the counter reset after every ten Fidler signals. The speed of the centrifuge machine and the amplitude and frequency of precession are calculated, and the results are displayed on a liquid crystal display on the front panel of the CPA. The thesis contains results from data generated by a Fidler signal simulator and data taken when the centrifuge was operated under three test conditions: (1) nitrogen gas during drive-up, steady state, and drive-down, (2) xenon gas during slip test, steady state, and the addition of gas, and (3) no gas during steady state. The qualitative results were consistent with experience with centrifuge machines UF 6 in that the amplitude of precession increased and the frequency of precession decreased during drive-up, drive-down and the slip check. The magnitude of the amplitude and frequency of precession were proportional to the molecular weight of the gases in steady state

  20. Trends in Upper-Level Cloud Cover and Surface Divergence Over the Tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean Between 1952 And 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Joel R.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the spatial pattern of linear trends in surface-observed upper-level (combined mid-level and High-level) cloud cover, precipitation, and surface divergence over the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean during 1952-1957. Cloud values were obtained from the Extended Edited Cloud Report Archive (EECRA), precipitation values were obtained from the Hulme/Climate Research Unit Data Set, and surface divergence was alternatively calculated from wind reported Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set and from Smith and Reynolds Extended Reconstructed sea level pressure data.

  1. Are we close to putting the anomalous perihelion precessions from Verlinde's emergent gravity to the test?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione, Universita e della Ricerca (M.I.U.R.)-Istruzione, Bari, BA (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    In the framework of the emergent gravity scenario by Verlinde, it was recently observed by Liu and Prokopec that, among other things, an anomalous pericenter precession would affect the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting an isolated central body. Here, it is shown that, if it were real, its expected magnitude for the inner planets of the Solar System would be at the same level of the present-day accuracy in constraining any possible deviations from their standard perihelion precessions as inferred from long data records spanning about the last century. The most favorable situation for testing the Verlinde-type precession seems to occur for Mars. Indeed, according to recent versions of the EPM and INPOP planetary ephemerides, non-standard perihelion precessions, of whatsoever physical origin, which are larger than some ∼ 0.02-0.11 milliarcseconds per century are not admissible, while the putative precession predicted by Liu and Prokopec amounts to 0.09 milliarcseconds per century. Other potentially interesting astronomical and astrophysical scenarios like, e.g., the Earth's LAGEOS II artificial satellite, the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the S-stars orbiting the Supermassive Black Hole in Sgr A* are, instead, not viable because of the excessive smallness of the predicted precessions for them. (orig.)

  2. Colposcopic photography of genital injury following sexual intercourse in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt; Lauritsen, Jens; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate interpretations and the reproducibility of interpretations when looking at colposcopic photographs in a forensic setting, as well as discussing some of the dilemmas and pitfalls of forensic colposcopic photography. A total of 316 colposcopic photographs from 51...... and negative predictive values of the photographs were 82 and 81 % respectively. This study demonstrates relatively poor reliability of colposcopic photography. Some would argue that this makes colposcopic photography a low-quality method of evaluation and that forensic science should aim for higher standards...... because of its use in court. Others would argue that as long as the limitations of a scientific method are acknowledged then it is still eligible for use. The moderate agreement and accuracy stresses the need for quality control in the gynecological part of a rape examination. Colposcopic photography also...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - FDOT 2006 Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — This Imagery was provided by Florida Department of Transportation to the Volusia County Property Appraiser. The photography was acquired Dec 2005 through Feb 2006. 1...

  4. 179 The Impact of Photography in a Developing Economy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    An International Multi-Disciplinary Journal, Ethiopia. Vol. 3 (4) .... (TFT) view screen. The LCD is .... Photography came into being through the artistic aspirations of two .... colour, and modify selected areas of images using dodging and burning.

  5. Medical photography: current technology, evolving issues and legal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, M T; DeWees, J M; Vela, K M; Khirallah, R T

    2015-04-01

    Medical photographic image capture and data management has undergone a rapid and compelling change in complexity over the last 20 years. This is because of multiple factors, including significant advances in ease of photograph capture, alongside an evolution of mechanisms of data portability/dissemination, combined with governmental focus on health information privacy. Literature to guide medical, legal, governmental and business professionals when dealing with issues related to medical photography is virtually nonexistent. Herein, we will address the breadth of uses of medical photography, device properties/specific devices utilised for image capture, methods of data transfer and dissemination and patient perceptions and attitudes regarding photography in a medical setting. In addition, we will address the legal implications, including legal precedent, copyright and privacy law, informed consent, protected health information and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they pertain to medical photography. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Infrared presensitization photography at deuterium fluoride laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, J.M.; Ross, K.; Suter, K.

    1989-01-01

    Near-field irradiance distributions of a deuterium flouride laser system are obtained using infrared presensitization photography. This represents the shortest wavelength region to employ this technique thus far

  7. [Evaluation standards and application for photography of schistosomiasis control theme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Li, Cao; Qing-Biao, Hong; Jing-Ping, Guo; Fang, Liu; Tian-Ping, Wang; Jian-Bin, Liu; Lin, Chen; Hao, Wang; You-Sheng, Liang; Jia-Gang, Guo

    2018-02-26

    To set up and apply the evaluation standards for photography of schistosomiasis control theme, so as to offer the scientific advice for enriching the health information carrier of schistosomiasis control. Through the literature review and expert consultation, the evaluation standard for photography of schistosomiasis control theme was formulated. The themes were divided into 4 projects, such as new construction, natural scenery, working scene, and control achievements. The evaluation criteria of the theme photography were divided into the theme (60%), photographic composition (15%), focus exposure (15%), and color saturation (10%) . A total of 495 pictures (sets) from 59 units with 77 authors were collected from schistosomiasis epidemic areas national wide. After the first-step screening and second-step evaluation, the prizes of 3 themes of control achievements and new construction, working scene, and natural scenery were selected, such as 6 pictures of first prize, 12 pictures of second prize, 18 pictures of third prize, and 20 pictures of honorable prize. The evaluation standards of theme photography should be taken into the consideration of the technical elements of photography and the work specification of schistosomiasis prevention and control. In order to improve the ability of records for propaganda purpose of schistosomiasis control and better play a role of guiding correct propaganda, the training and guidance of photography of professionals should be carried out.

  8. Family Photography and Persecuted Communities: Methodological Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Kirsten Emiko

    2018-05-01

    This paper examines methodological challenges involved in conducting research on family photographs from persecuted communities, using Japanese Canadian photos as a case study. Approaching family photography as a social practice that instills dominant familial ideologies, the paper examines their "performative scripts" that arrange family members according to normative identities and roles. The paper argues that researchers are not immune to scripts that shape how and what we have been socialized to see (and not see) in family photos. The paper thus presents techniques to distance oneself from these performative scripts and one's involvement in their social and emotional dynamics. Once able to disentangle oneself from the genre's normative practices, the paper argues it is necessary to situate the photos in their social and political context of persecution and survival. Given the insular, inward looking character of family photographs, the paper concludes by calling for intersectional analyses, reflecting on how one might bring one's own family photos into engagement with the photos of Indigenous families and turns to those of the Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) Nation. © 2018 Canadian Sociological Association/La Société canadienne de sociologie.

  9. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman III Ballistic Missiles at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum wind shear datasets and applied this information when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition, the AMU included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on the day of launch. The AMU developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Applications. The GUI displays the critical sounding data easily and quickly for LWOs on day of launch. This tool will replace the existing one used by the 30 OSSWF, assist the LWOs in determining the probability of exceeding specific wind threshold values, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast for

  10. Conducting participatory photography with children with disabilities: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Isabel; Cunningham, Barbara Jane; Campbell, Wenonah

    2018-03-28

    This review summarized studies that used participatory photography with children with disabilities, including those with communication impairments, and described modifications made to the methodology to facilitate their participation in qualitative research. In the fall of 2016, we searched Psycinfo (OVID), ERIC, CINAHL and Web of Science to identify studies that used participatory photography with children with disabilities. The search was repeated in January 2018 to retrieve any new publications. The first author extracted data that described the characteristics of each study and the modifications used. Of the 258 articles identified, 19 met inclusion criteria. Participants ranged from 4-21 years old and had a variety of disabilities. Study topics included education, leisure activities and adulthood. Researchers modified participatory photography to enhance accessibility by: modifying cameras; providing individual training; teaching consent through role play; allowing children to direct adults to take photographs; including additional forms of media; using diaries and questionnaires; providing individual interviews with simplified questions; using multiple forms of communication; and modifying how photographs are shared. Participatory photography can be an effective method for studying the lived experiences of children with disabilities, particularly those with communication impairments. Methodological modifications can enhance the accessibility of this approach for this population. Implications for Rehabilitation Participatory photography may be an effective qualitative research method for learning about the perspectives and experiences of children with disabilities on a wide array of topics. There are many specific modifications that researchers can use to support the inclusion of children with disabilities in participatory photography research. The findings of studies that use participatory photography methodology may provide rehabilitation professionals

  11. Theta phase precession and phase selectivity: a cognitive device description of neural coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2009-06-01

    Information in neural systems is carried by way of phase and rate codes. Neuronal signals are processed through transformative biophysical mechanisms at the cellular and network levels. Neural coding transformations can be represented mathematically in a device called the cognitive rhythm generator (CRG). Incoming signals to the CRG are parsed through a bank of neuronal modes that orchestrate proportional, integrative and derivative transformations associated with neural coding. Mode outputs are then mixed through static nonlinearities to encode (spatio) temporal phase relationships. The static nonlinear outputs feed and modulate a ring device (limit cycle) encoding output dynamics. Small coupled CRG networks were created to investigate coding functionality associated with neuronal phase preference and theta precession in the hippocampus. Phase selectivity was found to be dependent on mode shape and polarity, while phase precession was a product of modal mixing (i.e. changes in the relative contribution or amplitude of mode outputs resulted in shifting phase preference). Nonlinear system identification was implemented to help validate the model and explain response characteristics associated with modal mixing; in particular, principal dynamic modes experimentally derived from a hippocampal neuron were inserted into a CRG and the neuron's dynamic response was successfully cloned. From our results, small CRG networks possessing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in combination with feedforward excitation exhibited frequency-dependent inhibitory-to-excitatory and excitatory-to-inhibitory transitions that were similar to transitions seen in a single CRG with quadratic modal mixing. This suggests nonlinear modal mixing to be a coding manifestation of the effect of network connectivity in shaping system dynamic behavior. We hypothesize that circuits containing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in the nervous system may be candidates for interpreting upstream rate codes to

  12. Self-force correction to geodetic spin precession in Kerr spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Sarp

    2017-08-01

    We present an expression for the gravitational self-force correction to the geodetic spin precession of a spinning compact object with small, but non-negligible mass in a bound, equatorial orbit around a Kerr black hole. We consider only conservative backreaction effects due to the mass of the compact object (m1), thus neglecting the effects of its spin s1 on its motion; i.e., we impose s1≪G m12/c and m1≪m2, where m2 is the mass parameter of the background Kerr spacetime. We encapsulate the correction to the spin precession in ψ , the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession angle to the total azimuthal angle over one radial orbit in the equatorial plane. Our formulation considers the gauge-invariant O (m1) part of the correction to ψ , denoted by Δ ψ , and is a generalization of the results of Akcay et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 34, 084001 (2017), 10.1088/1361-6382/aa61d6] to Kerr spacetime. Additionally, we compute the zero-eccentricity limit of Δ ψ and show that this quantity differs from the circular orbit Δ ψcirc by a gauge-invariant quantity containing the gravitational self-force correction to general relativistic periapsis advance in Kerr spacetime. Our result for Δ ψ is expressed in a manner that readily accommodates numerical/analytical self-force computations, e.g., in the radiation gauge, and paves the way for the computation of a new eccentric-orbit Kerr gauge invariant beyond the generalized redshift.

  13. Electron-Spin Precession in Dependence of the Orientation of the External Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2009-03-13

    Electron-spin dynamics in semiconductor-based heterostructures has been investigated in oblique magnetic fields. Spins are generated optically by a circularly polarized light, and the dynamics of spins in dependence of the orientation (theta) of the magnetic field are studied. The electron-spin precession frequency, polarization amplitude, and decay rate as a function of theta are obtained and the reasons for their dependences are discussed. From the measured data, the values of the longitudinal and transverse components of the electron g-factor are estimated and are found to be in good agreement with those obtained in earlier investigations. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects are also discussed.

  14. Negative muon spin precession measurement of the hyperfine states of muonic sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Ghandi, K.; Froese, A.M.; Fryer, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Both hyperfine states of muonic 23 Na and the rate R of conversion between them have been observed directly in a high field negative muon spin precession experiment using a backward muon beam with transverse spin polarization. The result in metallic sodium, R=13.7±2.2 μs -1 , is consistent with Winston's prediction in 1963 based on Auger emission of core electrons, and with the measurements of Gorringe et al. in Na metal, but not with their smaller result in NaF. In NaOH we find R=23.5±8 μs -1 , leaving medium-dependent effects ambiguous

  15. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, G.; Jacob, D.; Roussel, P.; Boullay, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, M.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, C.; Cámara, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), 740-751 ISSN 2052-5206 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Keywords : XRD * structure refinement * precession electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2015

  16. When effective theories predict: the inevitability of Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2012-01-01

    If the concepts underlying Effective Theory were appreciated from the earliest days of Newtonian gravity, Le Verrier's announcement in 1845 of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury would have been no surprise. Furthermore, the size of the effect could have been anticipated through "naturalness" arguments well before the definitive computation in General Relativity. Thus, we have an illustration of how Effective Theory concepts can guide us in extending our knowledge to "new physics", and not just in how to reduce larger theories to restricted (e.g., lower energy) domains.

  17. Environmental regulation of plant gene expression: an RT-qPCR laboratory project for an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J; Fisher, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, a key regulator of floral timing in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students in biochemistry or molecular biology courses. The project provides students with hands-on experience with RT-qPCR, the current "gold standard" for gene expression analysis, including detailed data analysis using the common 2-ΔΔCT method. Moreover, it provides a convenient starting point for many inquiry-driven projects addressing diverse questions concerning ecological biochemistry, naturally occurring genetic variation, developmental biology, and the regulation of gene expression in nature. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of the upper-level decay on the resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing in a modified double-Λ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kien, Fam Le; Hakuta, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study the continuous resonant four-wave mixing in a medium of atoms with a modified double-Λ level configuration. Under the far-off-resonance condition for a pair of levels, we reduce the five-level scheme to an effective three-level scheme, with a two-photon coupling between the two lower levels. We derive the exact steady-state solution to the density-matrix equations for the reduced scheme and obtain the wave-mixing equations for the fields in the continuous-wave regime. We show that the upper-level decay may substantially affect the resonantly enhanced wave-mixing process. We demonstrate that this decay shortens the conversion cycle rather than prolongs it

  19. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare Professionals’ Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  20. The art and science of photography in hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keming; Kowalski, Evan J; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-03-01

    High-quality medical photography plays an important role in teaching and demonstrating the functional capacity of the hands as well as in medicolegal documentation. Obtaining standardized, high-quality photographs is now an essential component of many surgery practices. The importance of standardized photography in facial and cosmetic surgery has been well documented in previous studies, but no studies have thoroughly addressed the details of photography for hand surgery. In this paper, we provide a set of guidelines and basic camera concepts for different scenarios to help hand surgeons obtain appropriate and informative high-quality photographs. A camera used for medical photography should come equipped with a large sensor size and an optical zoom lens with a focal length ranging anywhere from 14 to 75 mm. In a clinic or office setting, we recommend 6 standardized views of the hand and 4 views for the wrist; additional views should be taken for tendon ruptures, nerve injuries, or other deformities of the hand. For intraoperative pictures, the camera operator should understand the procedure and pertinent anatomy in order to properly obtain high-quality photographs. When digital radiographs are not available and radiographic film must be photographed, it is recommended to reduce the exposure and change the color mode to black and white to obtain the best possible pictures. The goal of medical photography is to present the subject in an accurate and precise fashion. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MR fingerprinting using fast imaging with steady state precession (FISP) with spiral readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Seiberlich, Nicole; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    This study explores the possibility of using gradient echo-based sequences other than balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) in the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) framework to quantify the relaxation parameters . An MRF method based on a fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence structure is presented. A dictionary containing possible signal evolutions with physiological range of T1 and T2 was created using the extended phase graph formalism according to the acquisition parameters. The proposed method was evaluated in a phantom and a human brain. T1 , T2 , and proton density were quantified directly from the undersampled data by the pattern recognition algorithm. T1 and T2 values from the phantom demonstrate that the results of MRF FISP are in good agreement with the traditional gold-standard methods. T1 and T2 values in brain are within the range of previously reported values. MRF-FISP enables a fast and accurate quantification of the relaxation parameters. It is immune to the banding artifact of bSSFP due to B0 inhomogeneities, which could improve the ability to use MRF for applications beyond brain imaging. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, A.; Kuligin, K.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Nickolskiy, M.; Boulahya, K.; Portillo, J.; Lepeshov, G.; Sobolev, B.; Collette, J.P.; Martin, N.; Robins, A.C.; Fischione, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession 'Spinning Star' system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF 2 as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry

  3. Exploring the use of numerical relativity waveforms in burst analysis of precessing black hole mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Cadonati, Laura; Mohapatra, Satyanarayan R. P.; Healy, James; London, Lionel; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in numerical relativity and an ever improving performance of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. In preparation for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) and a new era in gravitational wave astronomy, the numerical relativity and gravitational wave data analysis communities are collaborating to ascertain the most useful role for numerical relativity waveforms in the detection and characterization of binary black hole coalescences. In this paper, we explore the detectability of equal mass, merging black hole binaries with precessing spins and total mass M T (set-membership sign)[80,350]M · , using numerical relativity waveforms and templateless search algorithms designed for gravitational wave bursts. In particular, we present a systematic study using waveforms produced by the MayaKranc code that are added to colored, Gaussian noise and analyzed with the Omega burst search algorithm. Detection efficiency is weighed against the orientation of one of the black-hole's spin axes. We find a strong correlation between the detection efficiency and the radiated energy and angular momentum, and that the inclusion of the l=2, m=±1, 0 modes, at a minimum, is necessary to account for the full dynamics of precessing systems.

  4. A model for precessing helical vortex in the turbine discharge cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuibin, P A; University Politehnica Timişoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timişoara (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Hydraulic Machinery, University Politehnica Timişoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timişoara (Romania))" >Susan-Resiga, R F; Muntean, S

    2014-01-01

    The decelerated swirling flow in the discharge cone of hydraulic turbine develops various self-induced instabilities and associated low frequency phenomena when the turbine is operated far from the best efficiency regime. In particular, the precessing helical vortex ( v ortex rope ) developed at part-load regimes is notoriously difficult and expensive to be computed using full three-dimensional turbulent unsteady flow models. On the other hand, modern design and optimization techniques require robust, tractable and accurate a-priori assessment of the turbine flow unsteadiness level within a wide operating range before actually knowing the runner geometry details. This paper presents the development and validation of a quasi-analytical model of the vortex rope in the discharge cone. The first stage is the computing of the axisymmetrical swirling flow at runner outlet with input information related only to the operating point and to the blade outlet angle. Then, the swirling flow profile further downstream is computed in successive cross-sections through the discharge cone. The second stage is the reconstruction of the precessing vortex core parameters in successive cross-sections of the discharge cone. The final stage lies in assembling 3D unsteady flow field in the discharge cone. The end result is validated against both experimental and numerical data

  5. Precession mode on high-K configurations: non-collective axially-symmetric limit of wobbling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    The precession mode, the rotational excitation built on the high-K isomeric state, in comparison with the recently identified wobbling mode has been studied. The random-phase-approximation (RPA) formalism, which has been developed for the nuclear wobbling motion, is invoked and the precession phonon is obtained by the non-collective axially symmetric limit of the formalism. The excitation energies and the electromagnetic properties of the precession bands in 178 W are calculated, and it is found that the results of RPA calculations well correspond to those of the rotor model; the correspondence can be understood by an adiabatic approximation to the RPA phonon. As a by-product, it is also found that the problem of too small out-of-band B(E2) in our previous RPA wobbling calculations can be solved by a suitable choice of the triaxial deformation which corresponds to the one used in the rotor model

  6. Trends in x-ray photography and patient exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orito, Takeo; Sanada, Shigeru; Maekawa, Ryuichi; Koshida, Kichiro; Hiraki, Tatsunosuke

    1980-01-01

    The exposure doses of patients in X-ray photography are influenced by such technological factors as X-ray tube voltage, filter, sensitizing screen, film and grid. Survey by questionnnaire was made previously in 1973 on the above factors. The trends five years after were surveyed similarly, in connection with the exposure doses of patients. Questionnaires were sent to 200 radiation technicians, and 121 (60.5%) answered the survey in March, 1979. The results in the cases of simple X-ray photography and obstetric, infant and breast X-ray photographings are described. X-ray tube voltage is generally on the increase. In the sensitizing screens, exposure doses are fairly decreased due to the use of improved intensifying screen (LT-II). In the grid, the ratio 8 : 1 is used more than 5 : 1. In the usage of additional filters and in the distance of photography, improvements are desired. (J.P.N.)

  7. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  8. Evolution of optic nerve photography for glaucoma screening: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan S; Fudemberg, Scott J; Lee, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Visual evaluation of the optic nerve has been one of the earliest and most widely used methods to evaluate patients for glaucoma. Photography has proven very useful for documentation of the nerve's appearance at a given time, allowing more detailed scrutiny then, and later comparison for change. Photography serves as the basis for real-time or non-simultaneous review in telemedicine and screening events allowing fundus and optic nerve evaluation by experts elsewhere. Expert evaluation of disc photographs has shown diagnostic performance similar to other methods of optic nerve evaluation for glaucoma. Newer technology has made optic nerve photography simpler, cheaper and more portable creating opportunities for broader utilization in screening in underserved populations by non-physicians. Recent investigations suggest that non-physicians or software algorithms for disc photograph evaluation have promise to allow more screening to be done with fewer experts. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  9. Seeing the city: photography as a place of work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altamirano-Allende, Carlo; Selin, Cynthia Lea

    2016-01-01

    was the use of photography as the place of work where the citizen-photographers created a visual language to grant meaning and structure to their experience and deliberations. Drawing on Barthe’s (1980) idea of semiology as a construction of meaning through the exploration and identification of systematic...... regularities of signs and objects, as well on Benjamin’s (1999) notion that there is no photography without discourse, this paper demonstrates what these individuals see as their relationship to their city as portrayed through photographic observations. This paper aims to empirically illustrate the uses...... better understanding pathways to sustainability. To do so, we conducted a visual ethnography of the participants’ photographic images and captions. By pushing the boundaries of photography beyond an artistic practice into the realm of public engagement, we demonstrate the ways in which “a camera...

  10. Burst mode composite photography for dynamic physics demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2018-05-01

    I am writing this article to raise awareness of burst mode photography as a fun and engaging way for teachers and students to experience physics demonstration activities. In the context of digital photography, "burst mode" means taking multiple photographs per second, and this is a feature that now comes standard on most digital cameras—including the iPhone. Sometimes the images are composited to imply motion from a series of still pictures. By analyzing the time between the photos, students can measure rates of velocity and acceleration of moving objects. Some of these composite photographs have already shown up in the AAPT High School Physics Photo Contest. In this article I discuss some ideas for using burst mode photography in the iPhone and provide a discussion of how to edit these photographs to create a composite image. I also compare the capabilities of the iPhone and GoPro cameras in creating these photographic composites.

  11. [The Indian in Brazilian photography: incursions into image and medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacca, Fernando de

    2011-03-01

    The article explores contradictions and convergences between a medium (photography) and the image of the Brazilian Indian from the perspective of the history of Brazilian photography. During the first of three distinct moments, the image of the Indian was of someone exotic, in contradiction with the modern meaning of photography under the Second Empire. During the second moment, in the first fifty years of the twentieth century, the boundaries between ethnography and Brazil as a nation were blurred, as exemplified by the Rondon Commission/Indian Protection Bureau's Research Section (Serviço de Proteção ao Índio) and Brazil's modern photojournalism, as found in the magazine Cruzeiro. During the third moment, the expressions of an ethno-poetry present in the photographs of Cláudia Andujar can be seen to blend medium and image as an ethnographic space in contemporary art.

  12. Medical Photography: Documentation, Art, and the Expression of Human Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberer, Elisabeth; Stieber, Werner; Homayoon, Donja; Fink-Puches, Regina; Lichen, Roland; Salmhofer, Wolfgang; Gruber-Wackernagel, Alexandra; Aberer, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Medical photography is the state of the art for the documentation of dermatological disease. Experienced photographers take pictures of the most typical skin lesions in order to assist the clinician in assessing disease morphology and activity. In this study, we present 6 individuals with a variety of dermatoses and the expression of the patients' emotions. The patients were asked to show their diseased skin and to present typically involved areas in the respective disease. The feelings expressed by their body movements and positions are viewed and interpreted. The patients' history will be reported retrospectively. The aim of the report is to show that the art of medical photography does not only document skin lesions but also the disease burden and the associated impairment of quality of life. Moreover, dermatologic photography is a sensitive intervention for patients viewed in the light of teaching and patient care.

  13. Microcomputer-based instrument for the detection and analysis of precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The Centrifuge Procession Analyzer (CPA) is a microcomputer-based instrument which detects precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine and calculates the amplitude and frequency of precession. The CPA consists of a printed circuit board which contains signal-conditioning circuitry and a 24-bit counter and an INTEL iSBC 80/24 single/board computer. Pression motion is detected by monitoring a signal generated by a variable reluctance pick-up coil in the top of the centrifuge machine. This signal is called a Fidler signal. The initial Fidler signal triggers a counter which is clocked by a high-precision, 20.000000-MHz, temperature-controlled, crystal oscillator. The contents of the counter are read by the computer and the counter reset after every ten Fidler signals. The speed of the centrifuge machine and the amplitude and frequency of precession are calculated and the results are displayed on a liquid crystal display on the front panel of the CPA. The report contains results from data generated by a Fidler signal simulator and data taken when the centrifuge was operated under three test conditions: (1) nitrogen gas during drive-up, steady state, and drive-down; (2) xenon gas during slip test, steady state, and the addition of gas; and (3) no gas during steady state. The qualitative results were consistent with experience with centrifuge machines using UF 6 in that the amplitude of precession increased and the frequency of precession decreased during drive-up, drive-down and the slip check. The magnitude of the amplitude and frequency of precession were proportional to the molecular weight of the gases in steady state

  14. USGS Southwest Repeat Photography Collection: Kanab Creek, southern Utah and northern Arizona, 1872-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The USGS Southwest Repeat Photography Collection (‘Collection’), formerly named the Desert Laboratory Repeat Photography Collection, is now housed by the...

  15. Predictability of prototype flash flood events in the Western Mediterranean under uncertainties of the precursor upper-level disturbance: the HYDROPTIMET case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Romero

    2005-01-01

    uncertainty in the representation of the upper-level disturbance and the necessity to cope with it within the operational context when attempting to issue short to mid-range numerical weather predictions of these high impact weather events, a systematic exploration of the predictability of the three selected case studies subject to uncertainties in the representation of the upper-level precursor disturbance is carried out in this paper. The study is based on an ensemble of mesoscale numerical simulations of each event with the MM5 non-hydrostatic model after perturbing in a systematic way the upper-level disturbance, in the sense of displacing slightly this disturbance upstream/downstream along the zonal direction and intensifying/weakening its amplitude. These perturbations are guided by a previous application of the MM5-adjoint model, which consistently shows high sensitivities of the dynamical control of the heavy rain to the flow configuration about the upper-level disturbance on the day before, thus confirming the precursor characteristics of this agent. The perturbations are introduced to the initial conditions by applying a potential vorticity (PV inversion procedure to the positive PV anomaly associated with the upper-level disturbance, and then using the inverted fields (wind, temperature and geopotential to modify under a physically consistent balance the model initial fields. The results generally show that the events dominated by mesoscale low-level disturbances (Catalogne and last stage of the Piémont episode are very sensitive to the initial uncertainties, such that the heavy rain location and magnitude are in some of the experiments strongly changed in response to the 'forecast errors' of the cyclone trajectory, intensity, shape and translational speed. In contrast, the other situations (Cévennes and initial stage of the Piémont episode, dominated by a larger scale system wich basically acts to guarantee the establishment and persistence of the southerly LLJ

  16. TOPLAR: Time of Flight with Larmor Precessions - or - How to extend the dynamic range of NSE spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Well, A.A.; Bleuel, M.; Pappas, C.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) spectrometers typically cover a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude at a given wavelength. At long Fourier times the limits are given by the homogeneity of precession fields. At short Fourier times, the quasi-elastic approximation and the NSE formalism mark a methodological limit. We propose to overcome this limitation and by combining Time Of Flight with Larmor precession to extend the capabilities of Neutron Spin Echo spectrometers towards short Fourier times. TOFLAR should be easily implemented on NSE spectrometers equipped with a chopper system such as IN15 or the planned WASP. (authors)

  17. Note: A phase synchronization photography method for AC discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ma, Jingtan; Pang, Lei

    2018-05-01

    To research discharge physics under AC voltage, a phase synchronization photography method is presented. By using a permanent-magnet synchronous motor to drive a photography mask synchronized with a discharge power supply, discharge images in a specific phase window can be recorded. Some examples of discharges photographed by this method, including the corona discharge in SF6 and the corona discharge along the air/epoxy surface, demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Therefore, this method provides an effective tool for discharge physics researchers.

  18. Review of the SAFARI 2000 RC-10 Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeff; Shelton, Gary; Annegarn, Harrold; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This presentation will review the aerial photography collected by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the SAFARI (Southern African Regional Science Initiative) year 2000 campaign. It will include specifications on the camera and film, and will show examples of the imagery. It will also detail the extent of coverage, and the procedures to obtain film products from the South African government. Also included will be some sample applications of aerial photography for various environmental applications, and its use in augmenting other SAFARI data sets.

  19. Reflections about cinema and social photography in City of Gold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekane Parejo Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fernando Meirelles’ film City of God is based on real events, and on a real community which shares the codes of aggressiveness, violence, death, easy money, revenge and leadership. From a functionalist point of view there is a consistency between film and community. But this article will focus on one of the film's characters, Buscapé, for whom photography is a means to break away. Phillipe Dubois’ theories of photography in film serve as a basis to for analysing how Buscapé achieves his escape.

  20. Deformation measurements of materials at low temperatures using laser speckle photography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumio Nakahara; Yukihide Maeda; Kazunori Matsumura; Shigeyoshi Hisada; Takeyoshi Fujita; Kiyoshi Sugihara

    1992-01-01

    The authors observed deformations of several materials during cooling down process from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature using the laser speckle photography method. The in-plane displacements were measured by the image plane speckle photography and the out-of-plane displacement gradients by the defocused speckle photography. The results of measurements of in-plane displacement are compared with those of FEM analysis. The applicability of laser speckle photography method to cryogenic engineering are also discussed

  1. Managing out of hours clinical photography at the University Hospitals Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Simon; Kenny, Alice; Knights, Christina

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, Medical Illustration at University Hospitals Bristol (UHBristol) NHS Foundation Trust has seen a steady increase in photography requests, including the need for out of hours photography provision. This paper details how Medical Illustration at UHBristol decided to manage an out of hours clinical photography service.

  2. 78 FR 58342 - Proposed Fee Schedule for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Bureau of Land... still photography conducted on public lands under their jurisdiction. The additional comment period is... proposed location fee schedule to establish land-use fees for commercial filming and still photography that...

  3. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  4. 78 FR 52209 - Proposed Fee Schedule for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Bureau of Land... photography conducted on public lands under their jurisdiction. The proposed fee schedule would establish land-use fees for commercial filming and still photography that are consistent for the National Park...

  5. 7 CFR 500.23 - Fees for commercial photography and cinematography on grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for commercial photography and cinematography on... National Arboretum Facilities and Grounds § 500.23 Fees for commercial photography and cinematography on... photography or cinematography as specified in § 500.24. Facilities and grounds are available for use for...

  6. Use of archive aerial photography for monitoring black mangrove populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted on the south Texas Gulf Coast to evaluate archive aerial color-infrared (CIR) photography combined with supervised image analysis techniques to quantify changes in black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations over a 26-year period. Archive CIR film from two study si...

  7. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 6. Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    This is the final article in this series. In previous articles the contributions of doctors in Australia as painters, sculptors, writers on art and supporters of art galleries and artists have been discussed. Photography is very much a fine art form, and several outstanding doctor-photographers are discussed in this article.

  8. Drawing on Dynamic Local Knowledge through Student-Generated Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles-Ritchie, Marilee; Monson, Bayley; Moses, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors explored how teachers using student-generated photography draw on local knowledge. The study draws on the framework of funds of knowledge to highlight the assets marginalized students bring to the classroom and the need for culturally relevant pedagogy to address the needs of a diverse public school population. The…

  9. Dye laser light for high-resolution classical photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    The test run with the bubble chamber HOLEBC in October 1981 offered the opportunity of checking the usefulness of de-speckled dye laser light for illumination purposes in high-resolution classical dark field photography of small bubble chambers. (orig./HSI)

  10. A Spreadsheet-based GIS tool for planning aerial photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.EPA's Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch has developed a tool which facilitates planning aerial photography missions. This tool is an Excel spreadsheet which accepts various input parameters such as desired photo-scale and boundary coordinates of the study area and compiles ...

  11. High-speed photography application to pulsed hot plasma investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borov'etskij, M.; Koz'yarkevich, V.; Skrzhechanovskij, V.; Socha, R.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma focus is investigated using an electron-optical chamber for high-speed photography (KSK-1). Experimental devices for studying dynamics and structure of a plasma layer in the chosen interval, recording plasma spectra with time resolution as well as for studying the dynamics and structure of a plasma layer by Schlieren- and shadow methods are briefly described. Experimental results are presented

  12. Open Courses, Informal, Social Learning and Mobile Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) and contextualizes them within the broader trends of open, informal and mobile learning. It then discuss Phonar Nation, a free, open, non-credit five-week photography course that was offered twice in 2014 using mobile media to reach youth from 12-18 years of age. The author…

  13. Encouraging Creativity in Mathematics and Science through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of a survey of the science and mathematics students at our university, we observed that students do not consider mathematics and science to be creative endeavors, though the traditional artistic disciplines rank high in this regard. To address this problem in perception, the authors used photography as a means to encourage…

  14. Silver nanoparticles from silver halide photography to plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Tani, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    This book provides systematic knowledge and ideas on nanoparticles of Ag and related materials. While Ag and metal nanoparticles are essential for plasmonics, silver halide (AgX) photography relies to a great extent on nanoparticles of Ag and AgX which have the same crystal structure and have been studied extensively for many years. This book has been written to combine the knowledge of nanoparticles of Ag and related materials in plasmonics and AgX photography in order to provide new ideas for metal nanoparticles in plasmonics. Chapters 1–3 of this book describe the structure and formation of nanoparticles of Ag and related materials. Systematic descriptions of the structure and preparation of Ag, Au, and noble-metal nanoparticles for plasmonics are followed by and related to those of nanoparticles of Ag and AgX in AgX photography. Knowledge of the structure and preparation of Ag and AgX nanoparticles in photography covers nanoparticles with widely varying sizes, shapes, and structures, and formation proce...

  15. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  16. Photography and Writing: Alternative Ways of Learning for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Helen Lepp

    2012-01-01

    To writing, painting, drawing, and photography as artistic media, the author would like to add teaching as a creative endeavor as well. Especially in a classroom where English is not the first language for many students, the writing teacher needs to be creative with assignments and activities that address nontraditional ways of learning. Her…

  17. Quantitative photography of intermittency in surface wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, W.; Budakian, R.; Putterman, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    At high amplitudes of excitation surface waves on water distribute their energy according to a Kolmogorov type of turbulent power spectrum. We have used diffusing light photography to measure the power spectrum and to quantify the presence of large structures in the turbulent state

  18. Participatory Photography: Can It Help Adult Learners Develop Agency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on a participatory photography project conducted with 10 socioeconomically disadvantaged adult learners for six weeks within the framework of production pedagogy. Throughout the project, the participants took photographs about their lives in response to three prompts that I gave: (1) take photographs of people that are important…

  19. Cross Cultural Images: The ETSU/NAU Special Photography Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Donna; Sluss, Dorothy; Lewis, Jamie; Vervelde, Peggy; Prater, Greg; Minner, Sam

    Recreation is a significant part of a full and rich life but is frequently overlooked in relation to handicapped children. A project called Cross-Cultural Images aimed to improve the quality of life for handicapped children by teaching them avocational photography skills. The project involved mildly handicapped children aged 7-11 in Appalachia, on…

  20. 77 FR 2037 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... filmmaker hopes to document the behavior of marine animals in the presence of a gray whale carcass. Filming... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA929 Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  1. 77 FR 24470 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... behavior of marine animals in the presence of a gray whale carcass. Filming will occur between April and... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA929 Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  2. Effects of Photography on Acquisition of Sculpture Skills among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effects of photography on acquisition of sculpture skills among Junior Secondary School Students in Osun State. Forty students were randomly selected from two schools. The two schools were purposefully selected from fifty secondary schools in Ife Central Local Government Council Area of Osun ...

  3. Effects of Photography on Acquisition of Sculpture Skills among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Abstract. The study investigated the effects of photography on acquisition of sculpture skills among Junior Secondary School Students in Osun State. Forty students were randomly selected from two schools. The two schools were purposefully selected from fifty secondary schools in Ife Central Local. Government Council ...

  4. Repeat photography as a tool for detecting and monitoring historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repeat photography was used to illustrate long-term changes occurring in coastal habitats in the Western Cape, South Africa. Hi storic images were sourced from books and theses, the public and subject specialists, and repeat photographs were then taken from the same perspectives. Visible changes could be categorised ...

  5. Informed consent for medical photography in Nigerian surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study is to assess the current practice of informed consent for medical photography in the Nigerian surgical practice and how it compares to international best practices. Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting surgeons attending two major surgical conferences.

  6. Ophthalmoscopy versus non-mydriatic fundus photography in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contribution of non-mydriatic fundus photography in the detection of diabetic retinopathy before and after dilatation of the pupils in black diabetics was investigated and compared with direct ophthalmoscopy. Eighty-six patients were examined and good-quality photographs were obtained for 54,7% of eyes before and ...

  7. Graphic Communications--Commercial Photography. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for graphic communications--commercial photography. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the…

  8. Photographic documentation, a practical guide for non professional forensic photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkalipci, Onder; Volpellier, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Forensic photography is essential for documentation of evidence of torture. Consent of the alleged victim should be sought in all cases. The article gives information about when and how to take pictures of what as well as image authentication, audit trail, storage, faulty pictures and the kind of camera to use.

  9. Studying place practices and consumption through volunteer-employed photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene; Møller, Karina Torp

    2016-01-01

    upon such choices. Additionally, we argue that the employed data collection techniques, involving a combination of volunteer-employed photography with participants’ comments on their own photos and information about their socio-demographic profile, constitute a particularly apt approach for shedding...

  10. Pupil Mortification: Digital Photography and Identity Construction in Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossouard, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cultural theorists have illuminated how photographic images contribute to autobiographical remembering and identity formation. This has new significance given that digital photography now allows personal images to circulate rapidly amongst peer groups. Taking these insights into classroom contexts, this paper draws on recent case-study data to…

  11. Digital Astronaut Photography: A Discovery Dataset for Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Astronaut photography acquired from the International Space Station (ISS) using commercial off-the-shelf cameras offers a freely-accessible source for high to very high resolution (4-20 m/pixel) visible-wavelength digital data of Earth. Since ISS Expedition 1 in 2000, over 373,000 images of the Earth-Moon system (including land surface, ocean, atmospheric, and lunar images) have been added to the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth online database (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov ). Handheld astronaut photographs vary in look angle, time of acquisition, solar illumination, and spatial resolution. These attributes of digital astronaut photography result from a unique combination of ISS orbital dynamics, mission operations, camera systems, and the individual skills of the astronaut. The variable nature of astronaut photography makes the dataset uniquely useful for archaeological applications in comparison with more traditional nadir-viewing multispectral datasets acquired from unmanned orbital platforms. For example, surface features such as trenches, walls, ruins, urban patterns, and vegetation clearing and regrowth patterns may be accentuated by low sun angles and oblique viewing conditions (Fig. 1). High spatial resolution digital astronaut photographs can also be used with sophisticated land cover classification and spatial analysis approaches like Object Based Image Analysis, increasing the potential for use in archaeological characterization of landscapes and specific sites.

  12. Kite aerial photography (KAP) as a tool for field teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneousl...... a new vantage point to the fieldwork experience....

  13. Conductance dips and spin precession in a nonuniform waveguide with spin–orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, A. I., E-mail: malyshev@phys.unn.ru; Kozulin, A. S. [Lobachevsky Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    An infinite waveguide with a nonuniformity, a segment of finite length with spin–orbit coupling, is considered in the case when the Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters are identical. Analytical expressions have been derived in the single-mode approximation for the conductance of the system for an arbitrary initial spin state. Based on numerical calculations with several size quantization modes, we have detected and described the conductance dips arising when the waves are localized in the nonuniformity due to the formation of an effective potential well in it. We show that allowance for the evanescent modes under carrier spin precession in an effective magnetic field does not lead to a change in the direction of the average spin vector at the output of the system.

  14. Electron-Spin Precession in Dependence of the Orientation of the External Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electron-spin dynamics in semiconductor-based heterostructures has been investigated in oblique magnetic fields. Spins are generated optically by a circularly polarized light, and the dynamics of spins in dependence of the orientation (θ of the magnetic field are studied. The electron-spin precession frequency, polarization amplitude, and decay rate as a function ofθare obtained and the reasons for their dependences are discussed. From the measured data, the values of the longitudinal and transverse components of the electrong-factor are estimated and are found to be in good agreement with those obtained in earlier investigations. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects are also discussed.

  15. SPIN-PRECESSION: BREAKING THE BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR DEGENERACY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Klein, Antoine; Yunes, Nicolás [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of compact stellar remnants are prime targets for the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. The gravitational wave signals from these merger events can be used to study the mass and spin distribution of stellar remnants, and provide information about black hole horizons and the material properties of neutron stars. However, it has been suggested that degeneracies in the way that the star's mass and spin are imprinted in the waveforms may make it impossible to distinguish between black holes and neutron stars. Here we show that the precession of the orbital plane due to spin-orbit coupling breaks the mass-spin degeneracy, and allows us to distinguish between standard neutron stars and alternative possibilities, such as black holes or exotic neutron stars with large masses and spins.

  16. In-situ Indentation and Correlated Precession Electron Diffraction Analysis of a Polycrystalline Cu Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianying; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2018-04-01

    In-situ TEM nanoindentation of a polycrystalline Cu film was cross-correlated with precession electron diffraction (PED) to quantify the microstructural evolution. The use of PED is shown to clearly reveal features, such as grain size, that are easily masked by diffraction contrast created by the deformation. Using PED, the accompanying grain refinement and change in texture as well as the preservation of specific grain boundary structures, including a ∑3 boundary, under the indent impression were quantified. The nucleation of dislocations, evident in low-angle grain boundary formations, was also observed under the indent. PED quantification of texture gradients created by the indentation process linked well to bend contours observed in the bright-field images. Finally, PED enabled generating a local orientation spread map that gave an approximate estimation of the spatial distribution of strain created by the indentation impression.

  17. Phase mapping of iron-based rapidly quenched alloys using precession electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, P.; Janotova, I.; Hosko, J.; Matko, I.; Janickovic, D.; Svec, P. Sr.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on application of PED and phase/orientation mapping of nanocrystals of bcc-Fe formed during the first crystallization stage of amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B ribbon. Using precession electron diffraction and phase/orientation mapping the formation of primary crystalline phase, bcc-Fe, from amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B has been analyzed. Important information about mutual orientation of the phase in individual submicron grains as well as against the sample surface has been obtained. This information contributes to the understanding of micromechanisms controlling crystallization from amorphous rapidly quenched structure and of the structure of the original amorphous state. The presented technique due to its high spatial resolution, speed and information content provided complements well classical techniques, especially in nanocrystalline materials. (authors)

  18. Translation compensation and micro-Doppler extraction for precession ballistic targets with a wideband terahertz radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hongqiang; Zhang, Ye; Qin, Yuliang

    2018-01-01

    Imaging, classification, and recognition techniques of ballistic targets in midcourse have always been the focus of research in the radar field for military applications. However, the high velocity translation of ballistic targets will subject range profile and Doppler to translation, slope, and fold, which are especially severe in the terahertz region. Therefore, a two-step translation compensation method based on envelope alignment is presented. The rough compensation is based on the traditional envelope alignment algorithm in inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging, and the fine compensation is supported by distance fitting. Then, a wideband imaging radar system with a carrier frequency of 0.32 THz is introduced, and an experiment on a precession missile model is carried out. After translation compensation with the method proposed in this paper, the range profile and the micro-Doppler distributions unaffected by translation are obtained, providing an important foundation for the high-resolution imaging and micro-Doppler extraction of the terahertz radar.

  19. Topological currents in neutron stars: kicks, precession, toroidal fields, and magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, James; Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The effects of anomalies in high density QCD are striking. We consider a direct application of one of these effects, namely topological currents, on the physics of neutron stars. All the elements required for topological currents are present in neutron stars: degenerate matter, large magnetic fields, and parity violating processes. These conditions lead to the creation of vector currents capable of carrying momentum and inducing magnetic fields. We estimate the size of these currents for many representative states of dense matter in the neutron star and argue that they could be responsible for the large proper motion of neutron stars (kicks), the toroidal magnetic field and finite magnetic helicity needed for stability of the poloidal field, and the resolution of the conflict between type-II superconductivity and precession. Though these observational effects appear unrelated, they likely originate from the same physics — they are all P-odd phenomena that stem from a topological current generated by parity violation

  20. Precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy from scanning precession electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, J. K.; Paulsen, Ø.; Wenner, S.; Holmestad, R.

    2017-09-01

    The key microstructural feature providing strength to age-hardenable Al alloys is nanoscale precipitates. Alloy development requires a reliable statistical assessment of these precipitates, in order to link the microstructure with material properties. Here, it is demonstrated that scanning precession electron diffraction combined with computational analysis enable the semi-automated extraction of precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy. Among the main findings is the precipitate number density, which agrees well with a conventional method based on manual counting and measurements. By virtue of its data analysis objectivity, our methodology is therefore seen as an advantageous alternative to existing routines, offering reproducibility and efficiency in alloy statistics. Additional results include improved qualitative information on phase distributions. The developed procedure is generic and applicable to any material containing nanoscale precipitates.

  1. Searching for gravitational waves from the inspiral of precessing binary systems: New hierarchical scheme using 'spiky' templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandclement, Philippe; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2003-01-01

    In a recent investigation of the effects of precession on the anticipated detection of gravitational-wave inspiral signals from compact object binaries with moderate total masses · , we found that (i) if precession is ignored, the inspiral detection rate can decrease by almost a factor of 10, and (ii) previously proposed 'mimic' templates cannot improve the detection rate significantly (by more than a factor of 2). In this paper we propose a new family of templates that can improve the detection rate by a factor of 5 or 6 in cases where precession is most important. Our proposed method for these new 'mimic' templates involves a hierarchical scheme of efficient, two-parameter template searches that can account for a sequence of spikes that appear in the residual inspiral phase, after one corrects for any oscillatory modification in the phase. We present our results for two cases of compact object masses (10 and 1.4 M · and 7 and 3 M · ) as a function of spin properties. Although further work is needed to fully assess the computational efficiency of this newly proposed template family, we conclude that these 'spiky templates' are good candidates for a family of precession templates used in realistic searches that can improve detection rates of inspiral events

  2. Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russian Federation State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-31

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect). (methodological notes)

  3. Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I

    2009-01-01

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect). (methodological notes)

  4. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I.

    2009-08-01

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect).

  5. Myocardial tagging with steady state free precession techniques and semi-automatic postprocessing--impact on diagnostic value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Thorsten R C; Bayrhof, Nicole; Huber, Armin

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the diagnostic value of myocardial tagging sequences with regard to the evaluable share of the cardiac cycle. Thirty-three patients were examined at 1.5 T using tagging sequences with gradient-echo (GRE) readout, 18 patients at 1.5 T with steady-state free precession (SSF...

  6. Precession of a two-layer Earth: contributions of the core and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Tomás; Ferrándiz, José M.; Escapa, Alberto; Getino, Juan; Navarro, Juan F.

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's internal structure contributes to the precession rate in a small but non-negligible amount, given the current accuracy goals demanded by IAG/GGOS to the reference frames, namely 30 μas and 3 μas/yr. These contributions come from a variety of sources. One of those not yet accounted for in current IAU models is associated to the crossed effects of certain nutation-rising terms of a two-layer Earth model; intuitively, it gathers an 'indirect' effect of the core via the NDFW, or FCN, resonance as well as a 'direct' effect arising from terms that account for energy variations depending on the elasticity of the core. Similar order of magnitude reaches the direct effect of the departure of the Earth's rheology from linear elasticity. To compute those effects we work out the problem in a unified way within the Hamiltonian framework developed by Getino and Ferrándiz (2001). It allows a consistent treatment of the problem since all the perturbations are derived from the same tide generating expansion and the crossing effects are rigorously obtained through Hori's canonical perturbation method. The problem admits an asymptotic analytical solution. The Hamiltonian is constructed by considering a two-layer Earth model made up of an anelastic mantle and a fluid core, perturbed by the gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun. The former effects reach some tens of μas/yr in the longitude rate, hence above the target accuracy level. We outline their influence in the estimation of the Earth's dynamical ellipticity, a main parameter factorizing both precession and nutation.

  7. Evaluating two methods of digital photography in retinopathy screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the advantages of non-mydriatic fundus photography(NMFCSand mydriatic fundus photography(MFCSas eye-bottom screening and diagnosis methods in compared with gold standard fluorescein fundus angiography(FFA. METHODS: A total of 276 patients which involved in Chronic Diabetes Management Achieves within 4 streets of Pudong District Shanghai, were enrolled for diabetic retinopathy(DRexamination including NMFCS, MFCS and FFA. These DR examinations were proceeded after vision, slit-lamp and dioptroscopy tests, and reported by professionals. For those with suspicious fundus diseases, we would make appointments with specialist for further treatment. RESULTS: A total of 1104 colorful fundus images, and 1056 images(95.65%could be used to analyze. There were 408 appreciable images, 116 basically appreciable images and 28 unusable images in 552 NMFCS images. In addition, there were 432 appreciable images, 100 basically appreciable images and 20 unusable images in 552 MFCS images. There was no significant differences between NMFCS and MFCS(P>0.05. Compared with FFA with DRⅠ as the critical value, the specificity of digital photography for NMFCS was 95.71%, the sensitivity was 93.56%; however, MFCS are 95.43% and 98.02%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two screening methods(P>0.05. Compared with FFA with DRⅡ as the critical value, the specificity of digital photography for NMFCS was 95.35% and the sensitivity was 93.44%; however, for MFCS were 95.81% and 98.36%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two screening methods(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Both NMFCS and MFCS could be used for the diagnosis and screening for eye diseases. NMFCS is easier and faster for digital photography, which is suitable for mass screening. MFCS is more likely to provide detailed information about the follow-up of the disease.

  8. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Arulmalar, Subramanian; Usha, Manoharan; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Kareemuddin, Khaji Syed; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of "fundus on phone' (FOP) camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography. Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study. 301 patients (602 eyes) with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR) was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR) or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed. The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR) and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8-96.1) and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3-99.8) respectively and the kappa (ĸ) agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85-0.95 p<0.001) while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2-92.9), specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7-98.2) and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71-0.89 p<0.001), compared to conventional photography. Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography.

  9. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Rajalakshmi

    Full Text Available To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of "fundus on phone' (FOP camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography.Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study.301 patients (602 eyes with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed.The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8-96.1 and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3-99.8 respectively and the kappa (ĸ agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85-0.95 p<0.001 while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2-92.9, specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7-98.2 and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71-0.89 p<0.001, compared to conventional photography.Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography.

  10. [Photography in plastic surgery: practices, uses and legislation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Runz, A; Simon, E; Brix, M; Sorin, T; Brengard-Bresler, T; Pineau, V; Guyon, G; Claudot, F

    2015-02-01

    Photography in plastic surgery is omnipresent. Through its various uses, it may present both ethical and forensic risks. The objective of this study is to analyze the use of medical photography by the plastic surgeon, the perception of this use by the patient, and consequence of such use. A questionnaire about the use of medical photography was assessed to 629 plastic surgeons. A questionnaire was given to patients, about their perception of the use of photography by their surgeon. One hundred and seventy-six surgeon's questionnaires and 93 patient's questionnaires were analyzed. For 97.7% of the responding surgeons, the proportion of patients refusing to be photographed was less then 1/20. The objective of the photography was especially medicolegal for 62.5% of the surgeons, especially for following the patient progress (87.5%), partially for the formation (72.1%), partially for scientific publications (57.8%) and not at all for the personal publicity (73.1%). Surgeons often share his photographs with others surgeons (71.1%), sometimes with others medical personnel (48.8%). The security and the access to photographs were determined to be correct for 67.6% of the surgeons and perfect for 23.3%. In total, 17.2% of the surgeons obtained a written consent, 41.4% obtained an oral consent, and 38.5% did not request patient consent. It was found that 48.3% of the surgeons and 40.2% of the patients think that the right to the photographic images belong to the patient. Medical photographs expose the plastic surgeon to medico-legal risks. He must know and follow the law in order to prevent eventual legal proceedings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Response of the Asian summer monsoons to idealized precession and obliquity forcing in a set of GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, J. H. C.; Erb, M. P.; Dolan, A. M.; Drijfhout, S. S.; Tuenter, E.; Hilgen, F. J.; Edge, D.; Pope, J. O.; Lourens, L. J.

    2018-05-01

    We examine the response of the Indian and East Asian summer monsoons to separate precession and obliquity forcing, using a set of fully coupled high-resolution models for the first time: EC-Earth, GFDL CM2.1, CESM and HadCM3. We focus on the effect of insolation changes on monsoon precipitation and underlying circulation changes, and find strong model agreement despite a range of model physics, parameterization, and resolution. Our results show increased summer monsoon precipitation at times of increased summer insolation, i.e. minimum precession and maximum obliquity, accompanied by a redistribution of precipitation and convection from ocean to land. Southerly monsoon winds over East Asia are strengthened as a consequence of an intensified land-sea pressure gradient. The response of the Indian summer monsoon is less straightforward. Over south-east Asia low surface pressure is less pronounced and winds over the northern Indian Ocean are directed more westward. An Indian Ocean Dipole pattern emerges, with increased precipitation and convection over the western Indian Ocean. Increased temperatures occur during minimum precession over the Indian Ocean, but not during maximum obliquity when insolation is reduced over the tropics and southern hemisphere during northern hemisphere summer. Evaporation is reduced over the northern Indian Ocean, which together with increased precipitation over the western Indian Ocean dampens the increase of monsoonal precipitation over the continent. The southern tropical Indian Ocean as well as the western tropical Pacific (for precession) act as a moisture source for enhanced monsoonal precipitation. The models are in closest agreement for precession-induced changes, with more model spread for obliquity-induced changes, possibly related to a smaller insolation forcing. Our results indicate that a direct response of the Indian and East Asian summer monsoons to insolation forcing is possible, in line with speleothem records but in

  12. FGOALS-s2 simulation of upper-level jet streams over East Asia: Mean state bias and synoptic-scale transient eddy activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fengfei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2013-05-01

    Upper-level jet streams over East Asia simulated by the LASG/IAP coupled climate system model FGOALS-s2 were assessed, and the mean state bias explained in terms of synoptic-scale transient eddy activity (STEA). The results showed that the spatial distribution of the seasonal mean jet stream was reproduced well by the model, except that following a weaker meridional temperature gradient (MTG), the intensity of the jet stream was weaker than in National Centers for Environment Prediction (NCEP)/Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project II reanalysis data (NCEP2). Based on daily mean data, the jet core number was counted to identify the geographical border between the East Asian Subtropical Jet (EASJ) and the East Asian Polar-front Jet (EAPJ). The border is located over the Tibetan Plateau according to NCEP2 data, but was not evident in FGOALS-s2 simulations. The seasonal cycles of the jet streams were found to be reasonably reproduced, except that they shifted northward relative to reanalysis data in boreal summer owing to the northward shift of negative MTGs. To identify the reasons for mean state bias, the dynamical and thermal forcings of STEA on mean flow were examined with a focus on boreal winter. The dynamical and thermal forcings were estimated by extended Eliassen-Palm flux ( E) and transient heat flux, respectively. The results showed that the failure to reproduce the tripolar-pattern of the divergence of E over the jet regions led to an unsuccessful separation of the EASJ and EAPJ, while dynamical forcing contributed less to the weaker EASJ. In contrast, the weaker transient heat flux partly explained the weaker EASJ over the ocean.

  13. MOONLIGHT: A NEW LUNAR LASER RANGING RETROREFLECTOR AND THE LUNAR GEODETIC PRECESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR arrays (developed by the University of Maryland, UMD supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (Alley et al., 1970; Chang et al., 1971; Bender et al.,1973: possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy, weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. The LNF group, in fact, has just completed a new measurement of the lunar geodetic precession with Apollo array, with accuracy of 9 × 10−3, comparable to the best measurement to date. LLR has also provided significant information on the composition and origin of the moon. This is the only Apollo experiment still in operation. In the 1970s Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the project MoonLIGHT (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests, in 2006 INFN-LNF joined UMD in the development and test of a new-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100mm diameter unaffected by the effect of librations. With MoonLIGHT CCRs the accuracy of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession can be improved up to a factor 100 compared to Apollo arrays. From a technological point of view, INFN-LNF built and is operating a new experimental apparatus (Satellite/lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility, SCF and created a new industry-standard test procedure (SCF-Test to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of CCRs in accurately laboratory-simulated space conditions, for industrial and scientific applications. Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP and the

  14. The ethics of clinical photography and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-González, César

    2015-02-01

    Clinical photography is an important tool for medical practice, training and research. While in the past clinical pictures were confined to the stringent controls of surgeries and hospitals technological advances have made possible to take pictures and share them through the internet with only a few clicks. Confronted with this possibility I explore if a case could be made for using clinical photography in tandem with social media. In order to do this I explore: (1) if patient's informed consent is required for the publication of any clinical images that depicts her, irrespective of whether the patient can be identified from the image or not, (2) if social media is an adequate place for clinical images to be displayed, and finally (3) if there are special considerations that should be taken into account when publishing clinical images on social media.

  15. Landscape concept in photography: from Luigi Ghirri to Antonio Ottomanelli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Malavenda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the 80s of the last century the Italian photography, like other art forms, reflected the political, economic and cultural changes of the Nation. It was the time of a new documentary photography that investigated the transformation of the urban areas. Within this process the landscape was the subject of a new interpretation. In 2013 this process of documentation was worked out again, but in a modern way, by Antonio Ottomanelli. In his project "Collateral Landscape", he took pictures in different cities of the world such as Kabul, Baghdad, Sadr City, Herat, Dokan, New York, Gaza City. Distant places and only apparently different from each other. In fact, all of them have been destroyed by war or, in the case of New York, have been target of a terrorist attack.

  16. CERN at Arles: LHC featured in prestigious photography festival

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2011-01-01

    Six photographs of the LHC experiment are being featured in this year’s Rencontres d’Arles photography festival. Simon Norfolk’s series, The LHC: the spirit of enquiry, was chosen as part of an exhibition celebrating 30 years of photography at the New York Times Magazine.   Simon Norfolk’s series "The LHC: the spirit of enquiry" on display at the Rencontres d'Arles festival. The photographs were originally taken in October 2006, when Norfolk was sent on an assignment to a ‘little known’ laboratory in Switzerland. “When I came to CERN, nobody I knew had ever heard of the place,” explains Norfolk. “Everybody I spoke to when I came back said, ‘You’ve been where? You’ve done what?’” Kathy Ryan, New York Times Magazine photo editor, sent Norfolk to ‘capture something new’. He describes Ryan’s assignments...

  17. 30 ans de photographie au New York Times Magazine

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Lesme

    2012-01-01

       « Les photographies du New York Times Magazine », Chapelle Sainte-Anne, Arles, 4 juillet – 4 septembre 2011 Kathy Ryan – directrice de la photographie du New York Times Magazine – et Lesley A. Martin, commissaires d’exposition. Visite d’exposition, le 7 juillet 2011. Dans le cadre d’une thématique placée sous le signe du « document », les Rencontres d’Arles de l’été 2011 offrent une exposition inédite en l’honneur des trente ans du New York Times Magazine. Onze installations dans la cha...

  18. 30 ans de photographie au New York Times Magazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lesme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   « Les photographies du New York Times Magazine », Chapelle Sainte-Anne, Arles, 4 juillet – 4 septembre 2011Kathy Ryan – directrice de la photographie du New York Times Magazine – et Lesley A. Martin, commissaires d’exposition. Visite d’exposition, le 7 juillet 2011.Dans le cadre d’une thématique placée sous le signe du « document », les Rencontres d’Arles de l’été 2011 offrent une exposition inédite en l’honneur des trente ans du New York Times Magazine. Onze installations dans la chapelle ...

  19. Photography activities for developing students’ spatial orientation and spatial visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendroanto, Aan; van Galen, Frans; van Eerde, D.; Prahmana, R. C. I.; Setyawan, F.; Istiandaru, A.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial orientation and spatial visualization are the foundation of students’ spatial ability. They assist students’ performance in learning mathematics, especially geometry. Considering its importance, the present study aims to design activities to help young learners developing their spatial orientation and spatial visualization ability. Photography activity was chosen as the context of the activity to guide and support the students. This is a design research study consisting of three phases: 1) preparation and designing 2) teaching experiment, and 3) retrospective analysis. The data is collected by tests and interview and qualitatively analyzed. We developed two photography activities to be tested. In the teaching experiments, 30 students of SD Laboratorium UNESA, Surabaya were involved. The results showed that the activities supported the development of students’ spatial orientation and spatial visualization indicated by students’ learning progresses, answers, and strategies when they solved the problems in the activities.

  20. Photography equipment and techniques. A survey of NASA developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo program has been the most complex exploration ever attempted by man, requiring extensive research, development, and engineering in most of the sciences before the leap through space could begin. Photography has been used at each step of the way to document the efforts and activities, isolate mistakes, reveal new phenomena, and to record much that cannot be seen by the human eye. At the same time, the capabilities of photography were extended because of the need of meeting space requirements. The results of this work have been applied to community planning and ecology, for example, as well as to space and engineering. Special uses of standard equipment, modifications and new designs, as well as film combinations that indicate actual or potential ecological problems are described.

  1. The use of color infrared photography for wetlands assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslin, W. R.; Sullivan, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study was undertaken of Pointe Mouillee Marsh, located on Lake Erie, to assess shoreline erosion and to inventory and evaluate adjacent land as potential replacement for areas lost to erosion, and to provide better data sources for management decisions. The results of the study were: (1) Evaluation of low altitude oblique photography was useful in determining specifications of operational mission requirements; (2) Accurate base map revisions, reflecting shoreline erosion, were made using aerial photography and a Zoom Transfer Scope; (3) An aerial land cover inventory provided data necessary for the selection of adjacent lands suitable for marshland development; (4) A detailed inventory of vegetative communities (mapped from CIR), was made for management decisions; and (5) A carefully selected and well laid-out transect was a key asset to photo interpretation and analysis of vegetation.

  2. Comparison Among Methods of Retinopathy Assessment (CAMRA) Study: Smartphone, Nonmydriatic, and Mydriatic Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Martha E; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjani, Harish; Narayan, K M Venkat; Olsen, Timothy W; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ward, Laura A; Lynn, Michael J; Hendrick, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    We compared smartphone fundus photography, nonmydriatic fundus photography, and 7-field mydriatic fundus photography for their abilities to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy (DR). This was a prospective, comparative study of 3 photography modalities. Diabetic patients (n = 300) were recruited at the ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary diabetes care center in Chennai, India. Patients underwent photography by all 3 modalities, and photographs were evaluated by 2 retina specialists. The sensitivity and specificity in the detection of DR for both smartphone and nonmydriatic photography were determined by comparison with the standard method, 7-field mydriatic fundus photography. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography, compared with 7-field mydriatic fundus photography, for the detection of any DR were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43-56) and 94% (95% CI, 92-97), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 81% (95% CI, 75-86) and 94% (95% CI, 92-96%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography for the detection of vision-threatening DR were 59% (95% CI, 46-72) and 100% (95% CI, 99-100), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 54% (95% CI, 40-67) and 99% (95% CI, 98-100), respectively. Smartphone and nonmydriatic fundus photography are each able to detect DR and sight-threatening disease. However, the nonmydriatic camera is more sensitive at detecting DR than the smartphone. At this time, the benefits of the smartphone (connectivity, portability, and reduced cost) are not offset by the lack of sufficient sensitivity for detection of DR in most clinical circumstances. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Standardized methods for photography in procedural dermatology using simple equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexsel, Doris; Hexsel, Camile L; Dal'Forno, Taciana; Schilling de Souza, Juliana; Silva, Aline F; Siega, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Photography is an important tool in dermatology. Reproducing the settings of before photos after interventions allows more accurate evaluation of treatment outcomes. In this article, we describe standardized methods and tips to obtain photographs, both for clinical practice and research procedural dermatology, using common equipment. Standards for the studio, cameras, photographer, patients, and framing are presented in this article. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Exhibition of photography from the Estonian diaspora / Ellu Maar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maar, Ellu, 1982-

    2010-01-01

    Näitus "Photography from the Estonian Diaspora / Väliseesti foto" Kumu Kunstimuuseumis 8.10.-19.11.2010, kuraatorid Eha Komissarov ja Ellu Maar. Näitus tutvustas 1944. a. Eestist lahkunud või juba võõrsil sündinud fotograafide (Eric Soovere, Karl Hintzer, Priit Vesilind, Rein Välme jt.) loomingut ja valikut väliseesti fotoarhiividest

  5. Photography and interpretations of the word: art and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Aparecida de Rezende

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes images made and broadcasted by Foto Clube de Londrina (Londrina’s Photo Club in 2011. We aim to think over the imagery reading, specially photograph, at education scope. To achieve this target, we understood photography as something possible to be interpretated and also as a work of art. This way, we show that readers can be benefited by reading and rereading photographs, when they are seen along with the words reading.

  6. Food Photography dan Eating Out di Media Sosial Instagram

    OpenAIRE

    Nisak, Khoirun; Hariyanto, Didik

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze influence of food photography towards eating out Sidoarjo community in instagram media. Data collection was done by using questionnaire to the respondents who visited the cafe/restaurant Mie akhirat, Kedai Kopi Medan, Wong Solo, dan Dapur M’riah that was located on Jalan Raya Ponti Gelanggang Olahraga Sidoarjo. Samples were taken through random sampling technique with total sample of 100 respondents. The result of this quantitative research showed that there was in...

  7. Macro photography with a tablet: applications on Science Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Leonardo Pereira; Lara, Vitor de Oliveira Moraes

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a simple way to get Macro photography (enlarged photographs) using a tablet or phone. We initially discuss the technique, which is essentially the accommodation of a drop of water on the camera lens. Next, we explore some applications to science teaching in primary and secondary levels. As discussed in the text, the simplicity and power of the technique may make it a good teaching tool for use in various disciplines such as Science, Biology and Physics.

  8. Digital dental photography. Part 2: Purposes and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I

    2009-05-09

    Although the primary purpose of using digital photography in dentistry is for recording various aspects of clinical information in the oral cavity, other benefits also accrue. Detailed here are the uses of digital images for dento-legal documentation, education, communication with patients, dental team members and colleagues and for portfolios, and marketing. These uses enhance the status of a dental practice and improve delivery of care to patients.

  9. The Photoshop Smile Design technique (part 1): digital dental photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Edward A; Garber, David A; Figueira, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of digital photography and imaging devices is enhancing clinicians' ability to visually document patients' intraoral conditions. By understanding the elements of esthetics and learning how to incorporate technology applications into clinical dentistry, clinicians can predictably plan smile design and communicate anticipated results to patients and ceramists alike. This article discusses camera, lens, and flash selection and setup, and how to execute specific types of images using the Adobe Photoshop Smile Design (PSD) technique.

  10. Mountaineering and photography. Contacts between 1880 and 1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andorno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the nineteenth century, the photograph produced in high altitude mountain (mountaineering photography gives rise to peculiar images that do not belong to the tradition of landscape painting. Mountaineering is similar to the art of performance, if we talk about physical and mental commitment. Therefore, photos taken during the ascent of a peak shows both conceptual and formal values.

  11. Acceptance and perception of Nigerian patients to medical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, W L; Mofikoya, B O; Akadiri, O A; James, O; Fashina, A A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the acceptance and perception of Nigerian patients to medical photography. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among Nigerian patients attending oral and maxillofacial surgery and plastic surgery clinics of 3 tertiary health institutions. Information requested included patients' opinion about consent process, capturing equipment, distribution and accessibility of medical photographs. The use of non-identifiable medical photographs was more acceptable than identifiable to respondents for all purposes (P = 0.003). Most respondents were favourably disposed to photographs being taken for inclusion in the case note, but opposed to identifiable photographs being used for other purposes most especially in medical websites and medical journals. Female respondents preferred non-identifiable medical photographs to identifiable ones (P = 0.001). Most respondents (78%) indicated that their consent be sought for each of the outline needs for medical photography. Half of the respondents indicated that identifiable photographs may have a negative effect on their persons; and the most commonly mentioned effects were social stigmatization, bad publicity and emotional/psychological effects. Most of the respondents preferred the use of hospital-owned camera to personal camera/personal camera-phone for their medical photographs. Most respondents (67.8%) indicated that they would like to be informed about the use of their photographs on every occasion, and 74% indicated that they would like to be informed of the specific journal in which their medical photographs are to be published. In conclusion, non-identifiable rather than identifiable medical photography is acceptable to most patients in the studied Nigerian environment. The use of personal camera/personal camera-phone should be discouraged as its acceptance by respondents is very low. Judicious use of medical photography is therefore advocated to avoid breach of principle of

  12. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-01-01

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b 2,d , which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b 2,d can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b c,d and the spin-dependent one, b i,d . The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b 2,d below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b i,d . During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the neutron with ferromagnetic samples and magnetic fields

  13. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, T.M.; Rooyen, I.J. van; Wu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC grain orientation determined by TEM-based precession electron diffraction. • Orientation data improved with increasing TEM sample thickness. • Fraction of low angle grain boundaries lower from PED data than EBSD data. • Fractions of high angle and CSL-related boundaries similar to EBSD data. - Abstract: Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. This work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on the quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison to SiC grain boundary characteristics, in an unirradiated TRISO particle, determined previously using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication process (∼80 nm), is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements, although thicker lamellae (∼120 nm) were found to produce higher quality orientation data. Also, analysis of SiC grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low-angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of a TRISO-coated particle made using the same fabrication parameters and a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature from a surrogate TRISO particle. However, the fractions of high-angle and coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm (Kirchhofer et al., 2013), depending on the fabrication parameters, and since grain boundary fission product precipitates in irradiated TRISO fuel can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data

  14. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-07-09

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b{sub 2,d}, which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b{sub 2,d} can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b{sub c,d} and the spin-dependent one, b{sub i,d}. The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b{sub 2,d} below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b{sub i,d}. During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the

  15. Brand New Images? Implications of Instagram Photography for Place Branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Thelander

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to develop an understanding of what happens when Instagram photography is used for branding a place. Questions raised are which photographs are taken and published, does the practice result in novel ways of representing a place, and, in turn the image of a place. A practice approach to photography is used where focus is directed to the performative aspect of photography. Fifteen qualitative interviews were conducted with participants in an Instagram takeover project concerning their photographs. The study shows that adopting a communication strategy based on visual social media is dependent on the participants’ competencies and that it is embedded in everyday life. Moreover, the participants’ photographic practices were found to be influenced by social conventions, which resulted in the city being imagined differently by different participants. To use visual social media such as Instagram for branding purposes does not necessarily mean that novel images are generated, but that they are choreographed according to the conditions of Instagram as medium.

  16. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Deformation in Vibration by Digital Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengxin; Zhang, Guojian; Liu, Xiaodong; Fan, Li; Hai, Hua

    2018-01-01

    This study adopts digital photography to monitor bridge dynamic deformation in vibration. Digital photography in this study is based on PST-TBPM (photographing scale transformation-time baseline parallax method). Firstly, we monitor the bridge in static as a zero image. Then, we continuously monitor the bridge in vibration as the successive images. Based on the reference points on each image, PST-TBPM is used to calculate the images to obtain the dynamic deformation values of these deformation points. Results show that the average measurement accuracies are 0.685 pixels (0.51mm) and 0.635 pixels (0.47mm) in X and Z direction, respectively. The maximal deformations in X and Z direction of the bridge are 4.53 pixels and 5.21 pixels, respectively. PST-TBPM is valid in solving the problem that the photographing direction is not perpendicular to the bridge. Digital photography in this study can be used to assess bridge health through monitoring the dynamic deformation of a bridge in vibration. The deformation trend curves also can warn the possible dangers over time.

  17. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  18. Kirlian Photography as a Teaching Tool of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrel, Andy; Thacker, Beth Ann, , Dr.

    2002-10-01

    There are a number of groups across the country working on redesigning introductory physics courses by incorporating physics education research, modeling, and making the courses appeal to students in broader fields. We spent the summer exploring Kirlian photography, a subject that can be understood by students with a basic comprehension of electrostatics but is still questioned by many people in other fields. Kirlian photography's applications have captivated alternative medicine but still requires research from both physics and biology to understand if it has potential as medical tool. We used a simple setup to reproduce the physics that has been done to see if it could be used in an educational setting. I will demonstrate how Kirlian photography can be explained by physics but also how the topic still needs research to completely understand its possible biological applications. By incorporating such a topic into a curriculum, one is able to teach students to explore supposed supernatural phenomena scientifically and to promote research among undergraduate students.

  19. Near-infrared transillumination photography of intraocular tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Jørgen; Ulltang, Erlend; Kjersem, Bård

    2013-10-01

    To present a technique for near-infrared transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours based on the modifications of a conventional digital slit lamp camera system. The Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG) was used for transillumination photography by gently pressing the tip of the background illumination cable against the surface of the patient's eye. Thus the light from the flash unit was transmitted into the eye, leading to improved illumination and image resolution. The modification for near-infrared photography was done by replacing the original camera with a Canon EOS 30D (Canon Inc) converted by Advanced Camera Services Ltd. In this camera, the infrared blocking filter was exchanged for a 720 nm long-pass filter, so that the near-infrared part of the spectrum was recorded by the sensor. The technique was applied in eight patients: three with anterior choroidal melanoma, three with ciliary body melanoma and two with ocular pigment alterations. The good diagnostic quality of the photographs made it possible to evaluate the exact location and extent of the lesions in relation to pigmented intraocular landmarks such as the ora serrata and ciliary body. The photographic procedure did not lead to any complications. We recommend near-infrared transillumination photography as a supplementary diagnostic tool for the evaluation and documentation of anteriorly located intraocular tumours.

  20. High-K precession modes: Axially symmetric limit of wobbling motion in the cranked random-phase approximation description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    The rotational band built on the high-K multi-quasiparticle state can be interpreted as a multi-phonon band of the precession mode, which represents the precessional rotation about the axis perpendicular to the direction of the intrinsic angular momentum. By using the axially symmetric limit of the random-phase approximation (RPA) formalism developed for the nuclear wobbling motion, we study the properties of the precession modes in 178 W: the excitation energies, B(E2) and B(M1) values. We show that the excitations of such a specific type of rotation can be well described by the RPA formalism, which gives new insight into the wobbling motion in the triaxial superdeformed nuclei from a microscopic viewpoint

  1. Detecting gravitational waves from precessing binaries of spinning compact objects: Adiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Chen Yanbei; Vallisneri, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Black-hole (BH) binaries with single-BH masses m=(5-20)M · , moving on quasicircular orbits, are among the most promising sources for first-generation ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Until now, the development of data-analysis techniques to detect GWs from these sources has been focused mostly on nonspinning BHs. The data-analysis problem for the spinning case is complicated by the necessity to model the precession-induced modulations of the GW signal, and by the large number of parameters needed to characterize the system, including the initial directions of the spins, and the position and orientation of the binary with respect to the GW detector. In this paper we consider binaries of maximally spinning BHs, and we work in the adiabatic-inspiral regime to build families of modulated detection templates that (i) are functions of very few physical and phenomenological parameters, (ii) model remarkably well the dynamical and precessional effects on the GW signal, with fitting factors on average > or approx. 0.97, (iii) but, however, might require increasing the detection thresholds, offsetting at least partially the gains in the fitting factors. Our detection-template families are quite promising also for the case of neutron-star-black-hole binaries, with fitting factors on average ≅0.93. For these binaries we also suggest (but do not test) a further template family, which would produce essentially exact waveforms written directly in terms of the physical spin parameters

  2. Spin precession and spin Hall effect in monolayer graphene/Pt nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savero Torres, W.; Sierra, J. F.; Benítez, L. A.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-12-01

    Spin Hall effects have surged as promising phenomena for spin logics operations without ferromagnets. However, the magnitude of the detected electric signals at room temperature in metallic systems has been so far underwhelming. Here, we demonstrate a two-order of magnitude enhancement of the signal in monolayer graphene/Pt devices when compared to their fully metallic counterparts. The enhancement stems in part from efficient spin injection and the large spin resistance of graphene but we also observe 100% spin absorption in Pt and find an unusually large effective spin Hall angle of up to 0.15. The large spin-to-charge conversion allows us to characterise spin precession in graphene under the presence of a magnetic field. Furthermore, by developing an analytical model based on the 1D diffusive spin-transport, we demonstrate that the effective spin-relaxation time in graphene can be accurately determined using the (inverse) spin Hall effect as a means of detection. This is a necessary step to gather full understanding of the consequences of spin absorption in spin Hall devices, which is known to suppress effective spin lifetimes in both metallic and graphene systems.

  3. Assessing the Detectability of Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes with Precessing Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Sara; Privitera, Stephen; Weinstein, Alan J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors will come online within the year and are expected to outperform the strain sensitivity of initial LIGO/Virgo detectors by an order of magnitude and operate with greater bandwidth, possibly to frequencies as low as 10 Hz. Coalescing binary black holes (BBH) are anticipated to be among the most likely sources of gravitational radiation observable by the detectors. Searches for such systems benefit greatly from the use of accurate predictions for the gravitational wave signal to filter the data. The component black holes of these systems are predicted to have substantial spin, which greatly influences the gravitational waveforms from these sources; however, recent LIGO/Virgo searches have made use of banks of waveform models which neglect the effects of the component spins. The inclusion of spinning components is relatively simplified when the spins are taken to be aligned with the orbital angular momentum, though the difficult task of including precession (allowing for mis-aligned component spins) remains a goal of this work. We aim to assess the ability of the GSTLAL gravitational wave search pipeline using IMR aligned-spin template waveforms to recover signals from generically spinning black hole binaries injected into simulated Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector noise. If black holes are highly spinning as predicted, use of aligned-spin template banks in upcoming searches could increase the detection rate of these systems in Advanced LIGO and Virgo data, providing the opportunity for a deeper understanding of the sources.

  4. Modulation of ice ages via precession and dust-albedo feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Ellis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a simple and novel proposal for the modulation and rhythm of ice-ages and interglacials during the late Pleistocene. While the standard Milankovitch-precession theory fails to explain the long intervals between interglacials, these can be accounted for by a novel forcing and feedback system involving CO2, dust and albedo. During the glacial period, the high albedo of the northern ice sheets drives down global temperatures and CO2 concentrations, despite subsequent precessional forcing maxima. Over the following millennia more CO2 is sequestered in the oceans and atmospheric concentrations eventually reach a critical minima of about 200 ppm, which combined with arid conditions, causes a die-back of temperate and boreal forests and grasslands, especially at high altitude. The ensuing soil erosion generates dust storms, resulting in increased dust deposition and lower albedo on the northern ice sheets. As northern hemisphere insolation increases during the next Milankovitch cycle, the dust-laden ice-sheets absorb considerably more insolation and undergo rapid melting, which forces the climate into an interglacial period. The proposed mechanism is simple, robust, and comprehensive in its scope, and its key elements are well supported by empirical evidence.

  5. Using ERP Systems to Transform Business Processes: A Case Study at a Precession Engineering Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K.M.Lee

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises nowadays strive to keep transforming their business processes in accordance with the fastchanging customer demands so as to survive the intense global competition. In an attempt to provide practitioners with an insight into ERP implementation and the resulting business performances, this paper investigate how a successful ERP implementation can help transform enterprises processes. Case based research which is based on an in-depth observation under managerial and practitioner situation. A case study at a precession engineering company is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed strategic enterprise information model. This paper focuses on the implementation of Sales & Marketing and Warehouse modules of an ERP system. The key performance indicators are used to evaluate how the ERP implementation can improve the business processes. It is found that ERP helps to improve data visibility and improve on-time delivery but less effective on improving employee productivity. This research proposes an enterprise information model to exploit what strategy should be formulate and how ERP tactic can be implemented in company to enhance enterprise competitive advantages. The strategic enterprise information model is formulated based on our in-depth case study and ERP consultant's experience.

  6. In vivo determination of hepatic stiffness using steady-state free precession magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Dieter; Asbach, Patrick; Rump, Jens; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Somasundaram, Rajan; Modrow, Jens; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce an magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) protocol based on fractional motion encoding and planar wave acquisition for rapid measurements of in vivo human liver stiffness. Vibrations of a remote actuator membrane were fed by a rigid rod to the patient's surface beneath the right costal arch resulting in axial shear deflections of the liver. Data acquisition was performed using a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence incorporating oscillating gradients for motion sensitization. Tissue vibrations of frequency fv = 51 Hz were tuned by twice the sequence repetition time (1/fv = 2TR). Twenty axial images acquired by time-resolved through-plane wave encoding were used for planar elasticity reconstruction. The MRE data acquisition was achieved within 4 breathholds of 17 seconds each. The method was applied to 12 healthy volunteers and 2 patients with diffuse liver disease (fibrosis grade 3). MRE data acquisition was successful in all volunteers and patients. The elastic moduli were measured with values between 1.99 +/- 0.16 and 5.77 +/- 0.88 kPa. Follow-up studies demonstrated the reproducibility of the method and revealed a difference of 0.74 +/- 0.47 kPa (P analysis of the strain wave field captured by axial wave images. The measured data indicate individual variations of hepatic stiffness in healthy volunteers.

  7. Deformation-Induced Precession of a Robot Moving on Curved Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkai; Aydin, Yasemin; Lofaro, Olivia; Rieser, Jennifer; Goldman, Daniel

    Previous studies have demonstrated that passive particles rolling on a deformed surface can mimic aspects of general relativity [Ford et al, AJP, 2015]. However, these systems are dissipative. To explore steady-state dynamics, we study the movement of a self-propelled robot car on a large deformable elastic membrane: a spandex sheet stretched over a metal frame with a diameter of 2.5 m. Two wheels in the rear of the car are differentially-driven by a DC motor, and a caster in the front helps maintain directional stability; in the absence of curvature the car drives straight. A linear actuator attached below the membrane allows for controlled deformation at the center of the membrane. We find that closed elliptic orbits occur when the membrane is highly depressed ( 10 cm). However, when the center is only slightly indented, the elliptical orbits precess at a rate depending on the orbit shape and the depression. Remarkably, this dynamic is well described by the Schwarzschild metric solution, typically used to describe the effects of gravity on bodies orbiting a massive object. Experiments with multiple cars reveal complex interactions that are mediated through car-induced deformations of the membrane.

  8. The low cost Proton Precession Magnetometer developed at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahavarkar, P.; Singh, S.; Labde, S.; Dongre, V.; Patil, A.

    2017-01-01

    Proton magnetometers are the oldest scalar magnetometers. The first commercial units were produced in early 1960s as portable instruments. In continuation airborne instruments appeared with optimized speed of readings and sensitivity, large sensors etc. Later development of Overhauser and optically pumped magnetometers has eliminated Proton magnetometers from airborne surveys. However they remain very popular in various ground surveys and observatories. With this primary purpose of generating the ground based magnetic data, the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) for the last 3 decades have been developing low cost Proton Precession Magnetometers (PPM). Beginning with the 1 nT PPM which has undergone several changes in design, the successor PM7 the advanced version has been successfully developed by the institute and is installed at various observatories of the institute. PM7 records the total field 'F' with accuracy of 0.1 nT and a sampling rate of 10 seconds/sample. This article briefly discusses the design and development of this IIG make PM7 and compares the data recorded by this instrument with one of the commercially available Overhauser magnetometer in the world market. The quality of data recorded by PM7 is in excellent agreement with the Overhauser. With the available quality of data generated by this instrument, PM7 is an affordable PPM for scientific institutions, schools and colleges intending to carry out geomagnetic studies. The commercial cost of PM7 is ≈ 20% of the cost of Overhauser available in market.

  9. The low cost Proton Precession Magnetometer developed at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavarkar, P.; Singh, S.; Labde, S.; Dongre, V.; Patil, A.

    2017-05-01

    Proton magnetometers are the oldest scalar magnetometers. The first commercial units were produced in early 1960s as portable instruments. In continuation airborne instruments appeared with optimized speed of readings and sensitivity, large sensors etc. Later development of Overhauser and optically pumped magnetometers has eliminated Proton magnetometers from airborne surveys. However they remain very popular in various ground surveys and observatories. With this primary purpose of generating the ground based magnetic data, the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) for the last 3 decades have been developing low cost Proton Precession Magnetometers (PPM). Beginning with the 1 nT PPM which has undergone several changes in design, the successor PM7 the advanced version has been successfully developed by the institute and is installed at various observatories of the institute. PM7 records the total field `F' with accuracy of 0.1 nT and a sampling rate of 10 seconds/sample. This article briefly discusses the design and development of this IIG make PM7 and compares the data recorded by this instrument with one of the commercially available Overhauser magnetometer in the world market. The quality of data recorded by PM7 is in excellent agreement with the Overhauser. With the available quality of data generated by this instrument, PM7 is an affordable PPM for scientific institutions, schools and colleges intending to carry out geomagnetic studies. The commercial cost of PM7 is ≈ 20% of the cost of Overhauser available in market.

  10. The BANANA Project. V. Misaligned and Precessing Stellar Rotation Axes in CV Velorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Torres, Guillermo; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Setiawan, Johny; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuel; Triaud, Amaury; Queloz, Didier; Snellen, Ignas; Eggleton, Peter

    2014-04-01

    As part of the Binaries Are Not Always Neatly Aligned project (BANANA), we have found that the eclipsing binary CV Velorum has misaligned rotation axes. Based on our analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find sky-projected spin-orbit angles of βp = -52° ± 6° and βs = 3° ± 7° for the primary and secondary stars (B2.5V + B2.5V, P = 6.9 days). We combine this information with several measurements of changing projected stellar rotation speeds (vsin i sstarf) over the last 30 yr, leading to a model in which the primary star's obliquity is ≈65°, and its spin axis precesses around the total angular momentum vector with a period of about 140 yr. The geometry of the secondary star is less clear, although a significant obliquity is also implicated by the observed time variations in the vsin i sstarf. By integrating the secular tidal evolution equations backward in time, we find that the system could have evolved from a state of even stronger misalignment similar to DI Herculis, a younger but otherwise comparable binary. Based on observations made with ESOs 2.2 m Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 084.C-1008 and under MPIA guaranteed time.

  11. Factors influencing fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmakumar, Rohan; Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Li Debiao

    2007-01-01

    The presence of susceptibility-shifting media can lead to signal voids in magnetic resonance images. While signal voids have been traditionally used to detect such magnetic perturbers, selective magnetic resonance imaging of off-resonant spins surrounding susceptibility-shifted media allows for them to be visualized as hyper-intense (positive contrast) regions. These positive contrast methods can potentially improve the detection conspicuity of magnetic perturbers against regions that appear dark due to the absence of protons, such as air. Recently, a fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) technique has been proposed as a positive contrast imaging method. This work systematically evaluates the contrast characteristics and acquisition strategies of FLAPS-based imaging from the standpoint of imaging parameters and physical properties of the magnetic perturbers. Results show that scan parameters (T R , flip angle, B 0 ), physical properties of the perturber (size and concentration of shift reagent) and the ratio of the relaxation constants (T 1 /T 2 ) of the medium are significant factors influencing the FLAPS-based positive contrast

  12. Universal crystal cooling device for precession cameras, rotation cameras and diffractometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, J.; McLaughlin, P.J.; Helliwell, J.R.; Sheldon, J.; Thompson, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A versatile crystal cooling device is described for macromolecular crystallographic applications in the 290 to 80 K temperature range. It utilizes a fluctuation-free cold-nitrogen-gas supply, an insulated Mylar crystal cooling chamber and a universal ball joint, which connects the cooling chamber to the goniometer head and the crystal. The ball joint is a novel feature over all previous designs. As a result, the device can be used on various rotation cameras, precession cameras and diffractometers. The lubrication of the interconnecting parts with graphite allows the cooling chamber to remain stationary while the crystal and goniometer rotate. The construction allows for 360 0 rotation of the crystal around the goniometer axis and permits any settings on the arcs and slides of the goniometer head (even if working at 80 K). There are no blind regions associated with the frame holding the chamber. Alternatively, the interconnecting ball joint can be tightened and fixed. This results in a set up similar to the construction described by Bartunik and Schubert where the cooling chamber rotates with the crystal. The flexibility of the systems allows for the use of the device on most cameras or diffractometers. THis device has been installed at the protein crystallographic stations of the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory and in the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Oxford. Several data sets have been collected with processing statistics typical of data collected without a cooling chamber. Tests using the full white beam of the synchrotron also look promising. (orig./BHO)

  13. Steady-state free precession with myocardial tagging: CSPAMM in a single breathhold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Kuijer, Joost P A; Marcus, J Tim; Heethaar, Robert M

    2003-04-01

    A method is presented that combines steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine imaging with myocardial tagging. Before the tagging preparation at each ECG-R wave, the steady-state magnetization is stored as longitudinal magnetization by an alpha/2 flip-back pulse. Imaging is continued immediately after tagging preparation, using linearly increasing startup angles (LISA) with a rampup over 10 pulses. Interleaved segmented k-space ordering is used to prevent artifacts from the increasing signal during the LISA rampup. First, this LISA-SSFP method was evaluated regarding ghost artifacts from the steady-state interruption by comparing LISA with an alpha/2 startup method. Next, LISA-SSFP was compared with spoiled gradient echo (SGRE) imaging, regarding tag contrast-to-noise ratio and tag persistence. The measurements were performed in phantoms and in six subjects applying breathhold cine imaging with tagging (temporal resolution 51 ms). The results show that ghost artifacts are negligible for the LISA method. Compared to the SGRE reference, LISA-SSFP was two times faster, with a slightly better tag contrast-to-noise. Additionally, the tags persisted 126 ms longer with LISA-SSFP than with SGRE imaging. The high efficiency of LISA-SSFP enables the acquisition of complementary tagged (CSPAMM) images in a single breathhold. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. LDV survey of cavitation and resonance effect on the precessing vortex rope dynamics in the draft tube of Francis turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    The large-scale penetration of the electrical grid by intermittent renewable energy sources requires a continuous operating range extension of hydropower plants. This causes the formation of unfavourable flow patterns in the draft tube of turbines and pump-turbines. At partial load operation, a precessing cavitation vortex rope is formed at the Francis turbine runner outlet, acting as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting high-amplitude pressure pulsations can put at risk the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. It is therefore crucial to understand and accurately simulate the underlying physical mechanisms in such conditions. However, the exact impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on the flow velocity fluctuations in the draft tube remains to be established. The flow discharge pulsations expected to occur in the draft tube in resonance conditions have for instance never been verified experimentally. In this study, two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry is used to investigate the axial and tangential velocity fluctuations at the runner outlet of a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The investigation is performed for a discharge equal to 64 % of the nominal value and three different pressure levels in the draft tube, including resonance and cavitation-free conditions. Based on the convective pressure fluctuations induced by the vortex precession, the periodical velocity fluctuations over one typical precession period are recovered by phase averaging. The impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on both axial and tangential velocity fluctuations in terms of amplitude and phase shift is highlighted for the first time. It is shown that the occurrence of resonance does not have significant effects on the draft tube velocity fields, suggesting that the synchronous axial velocity fluctuations are surprisingly negligible compared to the velocity

  15. Non magnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitter and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Kawai, T.; Akiyoshi, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Achiwa, N.; Hino, M.; Otake, Y.; Funahashi, H.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have developed cold neutron optics and interferometry using multilayer mirrors. The advantages of the multilayer mirrors are their applicability to long wavelength neutrons and a great variety of the mirror performance. The idea of the present spin interferometry is based on nonmagnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters. The equation for polarized neutrons means that the polarized neutrons are equivalent to the coherent superposition of two parallel spin eigenstates. The structure and principle of a multilayer spin splitter are explained, and the nonmagnetic gap layer of the multilayer spin splitter gives rise to neutron spin quantum precession. The performance test of the multilayer spin splitter were made with a new spin interferometer, which is analogous optically to a spin echo system with vertical precession field. The spin interferometers were installed at Kyoto University research reactor and the JRR-3. The testing method and the results are reported. The performance tests on a new phase-spin echo interferometer are described, and its applications to the development of a high resolution spin echo system and a Jamin type cold neutron interferometer are proposed. (K.I.)

  16. Uses and social meanings of post-mortem photography in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Ana María Henao Albarracín

    2013-01-01

    This research is intended to understand the social uses and meanings of post-mortem or funeral photography between the late nineteenth and mid-twentieth century in Colombia. The article seeks to contribute to the analysis of the relationship between photography and society, and more particularly, between photography and a social representation of death, identifying the conventions and rules of this photographic practice that determine aesthetic behaviors around death.

  17. Uses and social meanings of post-mortem photography in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Henao Albarracín

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is intended to understand the social uses and meanings of post-mortem or funeral photography between the late nineteenth and mid-twentieth century in Colombia. The article seeks to contribute to the analysis of the relationship between photography and society, and more particularly, between photography and a social representation of death, identifying the conventions and rules of this photographic practice that determine aesthetic behaviors around death.

  18. Climatology of Tibetan Plateau Vortices and connection to upper-level flow in reanalysis data and a high-resolution model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curio, Julia; Schiemann, Reinhard; Hodges, Kevin; Turner, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) and surrounding high mountain ranges constitute an important forcing of the atmospheric circulation over Asia due to their height and extent. Therefore, the TP impacts weather and climate in downstream regions of East Asia, especially precipitation. Mesoscale Tibetan Plateau Vortices (TPVs) are known to be one of the major precipitation-bearing systems on the TP. They are mainly present at the 500 hPa level and have a vertical extent of 2-3 km while their horizontal scale is around 500 km. Their average lifetime is 18 hours. There are two types of TPVs: the largest number originating and staying on the TP, while a smaller number is able to move off the plateau to the east. The latter category can cause extreme precipitation events and severe flooding in large parts of eastern and southern China downstream of the TP, e.g. the Yangtze River valley. The first aim of the study is to identify and track TPVs in reanalysis data and to connect the TPV activity to the position and strength of the upper-level subtropical jet stream, and to determine favourable conditions for TPV development and maintenance. We identify and track TPVs using the TRACK algorithm developed by Hodges et al. (1994). Relative vorticity at the 500 hPa level from the ERA-Interim and NCEP-CFSR reanalyses are used as input data. TPVs are retained which originate on the TP and which persist for at least two days, since these are more likely to move off the TP to the East. The second aim is to identify TPVs in a high-resolution, present-day climate model simulation of the MetOffice Unified Model (UPSCALE, HadGEM3 GA3.0) to assess how well the model represents the TPV climatology and variability. We find that the reanalysis data sets and the model show similar results for the statistical measures of TPVs (genesis, track, and lysis density). The TPV genesis region is small and stable at a specific region of the TP throughout the year. The reason for this seems to be the convergence

  19. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A DISK SUBJECTED TO LENSE-THIRRING PRECESSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-01-01

    When matter orbits around a central mass obliquely with respect to the mass's spin axis, the Lense-Thirring effect causes it to precess at a rate declining sharply with radius. Ever since the work of Bardeen and Petterson, it has been expected that when a fluid fills an orbiting disk, the orbital angular momentum at small radii should then align with the mass's spin. Nearly all previous work has studied this alignment under the assumption that a phenomenological 'viscosity' isotropically degrades fluid shears in accretion disks, even though it is now understood that internal stress in flat disks is due to anisotropic MHD turbulence. In this paper we report a pair of matched simulations, one in MHD and one in pure (non-viscous) HD in order to clarify the specific mechanisms of alignment. As in the previous work, we find that disk warps induce radial flows that mix angular momentum of different orientation; however, we also show that the speeds of these flows are generically transonic and are only very weakly influenced by internal stresses other than pressure. In particular, MHD turbulence does not act in a manner consistent with an isotropic viscosity. When MHD effects are present, the disk aligns, first at small radii and then at large; alignment is only partial in the HD case. We identify the specific angular momentum transport mechanisms causing alignment and show how MHD effects permit them to operate more efficiently. Last, we relate the speed at which an alignment front propagates outward (in the MHD case) to the rate at which Lense-Thirring torques deliver angular momentum at smaller radii

  1. Smartphone based hemispherical photography for canopy structure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Cui, Jian; Jiang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jingwen; Yang, Yi; Zheng, Tao

    2018-01-01

    The canopy is the most direct and active interface layer of the interaction between plant and environment, and has important influence on energy exchange, biodiversity, ecosystem matter and climate change. The measurement about canopy structure of plant is an important foundation to analyze the pattern, process and operation mechanism of forest ecosystem. Through the study of canopy structure of plant, solar radiation, ambient wind speed, air temperature and humidity, soil evaporation, soil temperature and other forest environmental climate characteristics can be evaluated. Because of its accuracy and effectiveness, canopy structure measurement based on hemispherical photography has been widely studied. However, the traditional method of canopy structure hemispherical photogrammetry based on SLR camera and fisheye lens. This method is expensive and difficult to be used in some low-cost occasions. In recent years, smartphone technology has been developing rapidly. The smartphone not only has excellent image acquisition ability, but also has the considerable computational processing ability. In addition, the gyroscope and positioning function on the smartphone will also help to measure the structure of the canopy. In this paper, we present a smartphone based hemispherical photography system. The system consists of smart phones, low-cost fisheye lenses and PMMA adapters. We designed an Android based App to obtain the canopy hemisphere images through low-cost fisheye lenses and provide horizontal collimation information. In addition, the App will add the acquisition location tag obtained by GPS and auxiliary positioning method in hemisphere image information after the canopy structure hemisphere image acquisition. The system was tested in the urban forest after it was completed. The test results show that the smartphone based hemispherical photography system can effectively collect the high-resolution canopy structure image of the plant.

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Washburn County had ortho/oblique photography flight done in April of 2009. Pictometry was contracted for the project., Published in 2009, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Washburn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2009. Washburn County had ortho/oblique photography flight done in April of 2009. Pictometry...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, 4 inch aerial photography (color, infrared, and color oblique) in urban areas, 1 foot in national forest, Published in 2006, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Los Angeles County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2006. 4 inch aerial photography (color, infrared, and color oblique) in urban areas, 1 foot in...

  4. Multiple rotation assessment through isothetic fringes in speckle photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, Luciano; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Nestor

    2007-01-01

    The use of different pupils for storing each speckled image in speckle photography is employed to determine multiple in-plane rotations. The method consists of recording a four-exposure specklegram where the rotations are done between exposures. This specklegram is then optically processed in a whole field approach rendering isothetic fringes, which give detailed information about the multiple rotations. It is experimentally demonstrated that the proposed arrangement permits the depiction of six isothetics in order to measure either six different angles or three nonparallel components for two local general in-plane displacements

  5. Forensic photography. Ultraviolet imaging of wounds on skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsley, R E; West, M H; Fair, J A

    1990-12-01

    The use of ultraviolet light (UVL) to study and document patterned injuries on human skin has opened a new frontier for law enforcement. This article discusses the photographic techniques involved in reflective and fluorescent UVL. Documentation of skin wounds via still photography and dynamic video photographic techniques, which utilize various methods of UV illumination, are covered. Techniques important for courtroom presentation of evidence gathered from lacerations, contusions, abrasions, and bite marks are presented through case studies and controlled experiments. Such injuries are common sequelae in the crimes of child abuse, rape, and assault.

  6. Application of high-speed photography to hydrodynamic instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Lihua; Li Zuoyou; Xiao Zhengfei; Zou Liyong; Liu Jinhong; Xiong Xueshi

    2012-01-01

    High-speed photography is used to study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of air-water interface driven by high- pressure exploding gas. Clear images illustrating the instability are obtained, along with the air bubble peak speed and turbulent mixing speed. The RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) instability of air/SF 6 interface driven by shock wave is also researched by using high-speed Schlieren technique on the horizontal shock tube and primary experimental results are obtained, which show the change of the turbulent mixing region clearly. (authors)

  7. Francois Brunet, Photography and Literature, London, Reaktion Books, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Trachtenberg

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is much to praise in François Brunet’s recent book, Photography and Literature, not least being the intellectual courage and verve of the undertaking itself. It’s a daring book. The topic, immense and inchoate, at once invites and defies investigation. As Brunet notes at the outset, “the history of photographic involvements with literature remains a shadowy and fragmented subject.” (8. After Brunet’s thoughtful and provocative study, the subject is notably less daunting. He meets the h...

  8. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 3-D computer graphics based on integral photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemura, T; Yoshida, T; Harashima, H

    2001-02-12

    Integral photography (IP), which is one of the ideal 3-D photographic technologies, can be regarded as a method of capturing and displaying light rays passing through a plane. The NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories have developed a real-time IP system using an HDTV camera and an optical fiber array. In this paper, the authors propose a method of synthesizing arbitrary views from IP images captured by the HDTV camera. This is a kind of image-based rendering system, founded on the 4-D data space Representation of light rays. Experimental results show the potential to improve the quality of images rendered by computer graphics techniques.

  10. Comparison of satellite imagery and infrared aerial photography as vegetation mapping methods in an arctic study area: Jameson Land, East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birger Ulf; Mosbech, Anders

    1994-01-01

    Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland......Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland...

  11. Detection of retinal lesions in diabetic retinopathy: comparative evaluation of 7-field digital color photography versus red-free photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sharma, Reetika; Vashist, Nagender; Vohra, Rajpal; Garg, Satpal

    2015-10-01

    Red-free light allows better detection of vascular lesions as this wavelength is absorbed by hemoglobin; however, the current gold standard for the detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy remains 7-field color fundus photography. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of 7-field fundus photography using red-free light to detect retinopathy lesions with corresponding images captured using standard 7-field color photography. Non-stereoscopic standard 7-field 30° digital color fundus photography and 7-field 30° digital red-free fundus photography were performed in 200 eyes of 103 patients with various grades of diabetic retinopathy ranging from mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The color images (n = 1,400) were studied with corresponding red-free images (n = 1,400) by one retina consultant (PV) and two senior residents training in retina. The various retinal lesions [microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, soft exudates, intra-retinal microvascular anomalies (IRMA), neovascularization of the retina elsewhere (NVE), and neovascularization of the disc (NVD)] detected by all three observers in each of the photographs were noted followed by determination of agreement scores using κ values (range 0-1). Kappa coefficient was categorized as poor (≤0), slight (0.01-0.20), fair (0.2 -0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), substantial (0.61-0.80), and almost perfect (0.81-1). The number of lesions detected by red-free images alone was higher for all observers and all abnormalities except hard exudates. Detection of IRMA was especially higher for all observers with red-free images. Between image pairs, there was substantial agreement for detection of hard exudates (average κ = 0.62, range 0.60-0.65) and moderate agreement for detection of hemorrhages (average κ = 0.52, range 0.45-0.58), soft exudates (average κ = 0.51, range 0.42-0.61), NVE (average κ = 0.47, range 0.39-0.53), and NVD

  12. Using Photography and Art in Concept Mapping Research with Adults with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams Carawan, Lena; Nalavany, Blace

    2010-01-01

    Reflexive photography for individual interviews and the use of art with focus groups provides a valuable method for exploring the psychosocial issues encountered by adults with dyslexia. Reflexive photography and art is particularly appropriate when interviewing adults with dyslexia who may have difficulty expressing and focusing on what they want…

  13. Nurses' Experiences of End-of-life Photography in NICU Bereavement Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Sara; Ives-Baine, Lori

    2018-06-07

    To qualitatively explore neonatal intensive care nurses' experiences with end-of-life photography as part of their bereavement support work with families. An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis with data collected through a focus group (n = 6) and one semi-structured interview (n = 1) with neonatal nurses from a Level 3/4 NICU in a Canadian pediatric hospital. Participants' comfort with EOL photography developed over time through exposure to bereavement scenarios and positive experiences with families. Participants' experienced a feeling of pressure to balance the photography with clinical responsibilities and find the right time to introduce photography while being sensitive to family experiences. Participants experienced EOL photography as something tangible to give families and were satisfied knowing the images might play an important role in the family's healing after the NICU. All participants had come to value EOL photography as a positive and meaningful part of their work with bereaved families. Identified challenges related to balancing the practice with the unpredictable flow and demands of critical care and to developing an appreciation for and comfort with the photography as part of their healing and the families' healing. Findings contribute insight into care-provider experience that can inform best practices, training, and staff support for palliative and bereavement work in neonatal and pediatric settings. The findings suggest a need to support nurses emotionally and clinically in carrying out this photography as part of their care for families. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epistemic Agency in an Environmental Sciences Watershed Investigation Fostered by Digital Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Weible, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    This collective case study investigates the role of digital photography to support high school students' engagement in science inquiry practices during a three-week environmental sciences unit. The study's theoretical framework brings together research from digital photography, participation in environmental science practices, and epistemic…

  15. The Power of Photography as a Catalyst for Teaching Informational Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Elizabeth; Fields, Charla

    2014-01-01

    Writing and photography are composition processes that help develop children's linguistic and visual competencies, respectively. Using photography in teaching writing has been found to enhance students' literacy skills by naturally invoking their interest and motivation, and eventually strengthening the reading-writing relationship. Children can…

  16. Early Social Documentary Photography: The Photographs of "Charities," 1897-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethune, Beverly M.

    The preliminary development of social documentary photography can be traced in the early issues of "Charities," a journal established in 1897 by the New York Charity Organization Society. During the journal's earliest years, 1897 to 1902, photography was already associated with social work in the minds of the public; but…

  17. Epistemic agency in an environmental sciences watershed investigation fostered by digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Weible, Jennifer L.

    2018-05-01

    This collective case study investigates the role of digital photography to support high school students' engagement in science inquiry practices during a three-week environmental sciences unit. The study's theoretical framework brings together research from digital photography, participation in environmental science practices, and epistemic agency. Data analysed include field notes and video transcripts from two groups of learners (n = 19) that focus on how high school students used digital photography during their participation in two distinct environmental monitoring practices: stream mapping and macroinvertebrate identification. Our study resulted in two findings related to the role of digital photography where students developed knowledge as they engaged in environmental monitoring inquiry practices. First, we found that digital photography was integral to the youths' epistemic agency (defined as their confidence that they could build knowledge related to science in their community) as they engaged in data collection, documenting environmental monitoring procedures, and sharing data in the classroom. Based this finding, an implication of our work is a refined view of the role of digital photography in environmental sciences education where the use of photography enhances epistemic agency in inquiry-based activities. Second, we found that the youths innovated a use of digital photography to foster a recognition that they were capable and competent in scientific procedures during a streamside study. Based on this finding, we offer a theoretical implication that expands the construct of epistemic agency; we posit that epistemic agency includes a subcomponent where the students purposefully formulate an external recognition as producers of scientific knowledge.

  18. 15 CFR 265.42 - Photography for advertising or commercial purposes; advertising and soliciting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photography for advertising or commercial purposes; advertising and soliciting. 265.42 Section 265.42 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... COLLINS, COLORADO Buildings and Grounds § 265.42 Photography for advertising or commercial purposes...

  19. Setting apart the amateur from the professional: maintaining the value of standardised representational photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Debbie

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of standard representational photography in clinical photography and its aid in maintaining the gold standard in the medical illustration profession. it is important that professionals are aware of potential threats to good practice with many areas identified in the article.

  20. Counseling through Images: Using Photography to Guide the Counseling Process and Achieve Treatment Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginicola, Misty M.; Smith, Cheri; Trzaska, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Creative approaches to counseling help counselors to meet the needs of diverse populations. The utility of photography in counseling has been demonstrated through several case studies; however, clear implications of how photography relates to the counseling process have not been well delineated. The existing literature on phototherapy is reviewed…

  1. PHOTOGRAPHY AS A MEANS OF DEPICTING GENIUS LOCI?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia DOROFTEI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to explore the concept of genius loci (spirit of a place starting from Christian Norberg-Schulz’s notable work “Genius Loci: Towards a Phenomenology of Architecture” and to reflect on the possibility of capturing the spirit of a place through photography. The problem arises in the context of a predominantly visual culture, where photography has become an accesible and omnipresent means of experiencing the world and, therefore, considered a convenient tool for gaining (a type of knowledge. A photographic method of exploring the spirirt of the place could serve in understanding local characteristics, in identifying the elements that make a place unique and recognizible. Norberg-Schulz’s position and other views on the concept of genius loci have been analysed. A photo-essay was employed in order to explore the spirit of the old town of Chefchaouen in Morocco and the ambiguity and dual nature of the concept. A critical reflection was conducted with respect to the results.

  2. The use of photography to record geologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClay, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Although photography is generally used today by geologists to record important data and features of interest, no strong effort has been made to systematically photo-document preliminary investigations and siting of critical facilities such as nuclear power plants, Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) terminals, or dams At a time when the safe siting of critical facilities is coming under ever closer scrutiny by regulatory agencies and the public, the importance and usefulness of photographic evidence and authentication is clear. Photography by no means replaces the accurate, detailed log or map. However, when used together, the photograph and graphic log or map can provide a clearer, more understandable representation of geologic data. This can be extremely important to the non-technical reviewer or decision maker. A simple method of presenting documentary photographs has been used for the proposed LNG facility at Little Cojo Bay, near Point Conception, California. This method combines both geologic data and photographic images through the use of clear mylar or acetate overlays

  3. Psychology and photography: chimneys dreaming and chimneys warriors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilde Giani Gallino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article covers two aspects related to Psychology and Art. The first aspect concerns the similarities found between photography and various Schools of experimental psychology. For instance, the scientists of Psychology of ethological theory, and Non-verbal communication (NVC, observe with particular methodologies the non-verbal messages that animals and humans transmit to their peers through expressions, posture, gestures. The same is done by photographers (those who use the “camera” with a good knowledge of the medium and a “photographic  eye” when they look around, careful to catch an expression, any unusual attitude, or a gesture of friendship. Another School of psychology, the Gestalpsychologie (Gestalt: form, figure, configuration, attributes a decisive value to the perception of space, the foreground and the background, the perspective and vanishing points, the contrast between black and white. All aspects that effectively interest psychologists just as much as photographers. Finally, the second aspect relates to the art of Antony Gaudì and makes some hypothesis about the personality and behavior of the great architect, with regard to the construction of two houses, "Casa Batllo" and "Casa Mila": particularly because of the configuration or Gestalt of the "chimneys" that dominate the two buildings. In this study, cooperate each other psychological analysis and the art of photography. The last enables us to study also the details of the work of Gaudì, as can be seen in the pictures of this essay.

  4. Urban Image. Photography and Images Interactive Semi-immersive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Chiarella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional relation among photographs and drawing relates the study, the representation and the proyectualidad of settings and landscapes of cities, with a history of the urban image and its methods of elaboration. Since the lineal perspectives and the camera obscura of the vedutistas Italian of the 18th century; passing for the cylindrical panorama of the 19th century; the photographic collage of the vanguards of the 20th century and the contemporary resources of the digital photography, a continuity of the urban graphic speech is built oscillating: of the totality to the fragment, of the lineal conical perspective to the digital collage and of the images two-dimensional to the interactive and semi-immersive 3D image. With the potentiality that suggests the use of the digital photography for the relevamiento, study and proyectación of urban fragments an application developed is described partly in a Workshop International of the Universita di Bologna and a proposal of didactic methodology based on the reconstruction vectorial three-dimensional from spherical panorama 360º.

  5. Chapter 20: neurological illustration from photography to cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores iconography in neurology from the birth of photography up to the early medical applications of cinematography before 1914. The important visual part of neurological diagnosis explains why these techniques were adopted very early by neurologists. Duchenne published the first medical book illustrated with photographs of patients. The first and most famous photographic laboratory was created in Charcot's department, at the Salpêtrière in Paris, under the direction of Albert Londe. Londe published the first book dedicated to medical photography. The physiologist Marey and the photographer Muybridge, in association with neurologists, played key roles in the development of chronophotography and cinematography. Germany was the first country to welcome cinematography in a neurology department. Independently, neurologists began to film patients in other countries in Europe and in America. In 1905, Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914), Belgian anatomist and neurologist, began systematically to film neurologic patients, with the intention of building up a complete neurological iconographic collection. This collection has survived and has been restored in the laboratory of the Royal Belgian Film Archive where the films are now safely stored in their vaults.

  6. Contemporary Art Photography In The Context Of Urban Symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Uysal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The symbols that landscape art contains, shows us cultural and intellectual evolution of the humankind. The “Bourgeoisie”, as the initiator of the “Urbanization” also supports the thoughts, which made this evolution possible. This impulse shows itself in two different ways; first, the frame of mind, which made visual codes possible to come into reality. Second, developing the medium, which made this visual codes record possible. It is possible to see the developing of the thought urbanization in every example of fine arts, in every age. Today, the art of photography uses landscape as background of its main theme as well as its major story, by the means of contemporary studies. These practices constitute the background of the main theme, both intellectual and visual way. Most accurate way to record today’s world, both intellectual and visual way -as can be seen in the history of photography- is to associate the story and its background, by the means of cultural and artistic studies. Whereby, the artist invites viewer into the narrative by this way and increases the chance to give message in a more striking manner. Existence of the urban symbols in the artwork is vital because it makes possible to learn more about the place, subject, society and period of the story and eventually about the main theme.

  7. The effects of fundus photography on the multifocal electroretinogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sandip; Tienor, Brian J; Smith, Scott D; Lee, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    To determine the effect of flash fundus photography (FFP) on the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG). Ten subjects underwent mfERG testing on three separate dates. Subjects received either mfERG without FFP, mfERG at 5 and 15 min after FFP, or mfERG at 30 and 45 min after FFP on each date. The FFP groups received 10 fundus photographs followed by mfERG testing, first of the right eye then of the left eye 10 min later. Data were averaged and analyzed in six concentric rings at each time point. Average amplitude and implicit times of the N1, P1, and N2 peaks for each concentric ring at each time point after FFP were compared to baseline. Flash fundus photography did not lead to a significant change of amplitude or implicit times of N1, P1, or N2 at 5 min after light exposure. These findings suggest that it is acceptable to perform mfERG testing without delay after performance of FFP.

  8. The Challenges of Participant Photography: A Critical Reflection on Methodology and Ethics in Two Cultural Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Linda; Nash, Meredith

    2017-05-01

    Photovoice and photo-elicitation are two common methods of participant photography used in health research. Although participatory photography has many benefits, this critical reflection provides fellow researchers with insights into the methodological and ethical challenges faced when using such methods. In this article, we critically reflect on two studies that used participatory photography in different cultural contexts. The first study used photo-elicitation to investigate mothers' experiences of infant settling in central Vietnam. The second study used photovoice to explore pregnant embodiment in Australia. Following a discussion of the literature and a detailed overview of the two studies, we examine the methodological challenges in using participant photography before, during and after each study. This is followed by a discussion of ethical concerns that arose in relation to the burden of participation, confidentiality, consent, and the photographing of families and children. To conclude, we highlight implications for using participatory photography in other settings.

  9. Veiling the Mechanical Eye: Antoine Claudet and the Spectacle of Photography in Victorian London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Monteiro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The rise of commercial portrait photography in the mid-nineteenth century placed the bourgeois body squarely within technological processes of visual representation. Photography's chemical and optical operations required the subject's physical presence before the camera's mechanical eye, reciprocally exposing the apparatus to the subject's fixed gaze and provoking an unprecedented confrontation of vision, body and technology. Setting the client within photography's technical processes, however, could endanger efforts to promote photographic portraiture as a product of artistic endeavour. In response to this in photography's first decade, London studio owner Antoine Claudet enshrouded the apparatus in a competing visual rhetoric evoking luxury and the sublime. Examining contemporary accounts of Claudet's studios and neighbouring attractions of entertainment and consumption uncovers the overlapping references to enlightenment, beauty and pleasure that surrounded photography's early machinery. While this alternative discourse may have softened the stare of the mechanical eye, it nevertheless contributed to technology's increasing hold on the body and mind.

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Polk County retained Ayres Associates to acquire digital aerial photography during the spring of 2010 suitable for the production of color orthophotography at a 12-inch ground pixel resolution (approximately 956 sq. miles). The photography was obtained du, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Polk County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2010. Polk County retained Ayres Associates to acquire digital aerial photography during the...

  11. Comparison of Color Fundus Photography, Infrared Fundus Photography, and Optical Coherence Tomography in Detecting Retinal Hamartoma in Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Da-Yong; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Jun-Yang; Li, Li; Gao, Jun; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-05-20

    A sensitive method is required to detect retinal hamartomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The aim of the present study was to compare the color fundus photography, infrared imaging (IFG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the detection rate of retinal hamartoma in patients with TSC. This study included 11 patients (22 eyes) with TSC, who underwent color fundus photography, IFG, and spectral-domain OCT to detect retinal hamartomas. TSC1 and TSC2RESULTS: The mean age of the 11 patients was 8.0 ± 2.1 years. The mean spherical equivalent was -0.55 ± 1.42 D by autorefraction with cycloplegia. In 11 patients (22 eyes), OCT, infrared fundus photography, and color fundus photography revealed 26, 18, and 9 hamartomas, respectively. The predominant hamartoma was type I (55.6%). All the hamartomas that detected by color fundus photography or IFG can be detected by OCT. Among the methods of color fundus photography, IFG, and OCT, the OCT has higher detection rate for retinal hamartoma in TSC patients; therefore, OCT might be promising for the clinical diagnosis of TSC.

  12. Jet Precession Driven by a Supermassive Black Hole Binary System in the BL Lac Object PG 1553+113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caproni, Anderson; Abraham, Zulema; Motter, Juliana Cristina; Monteiro, Hektor

    2017-12-01

    The recent discovery of a roughly simultaneous periodic variability in the light curves of the BL Lac object PG 1553+113 at several electromagnetic bands represents the first case of such odd behavior reported in the literature. Motivated by this, we analyzed 15 GHz interferometric maps of the parsec-scale radio jet of PG 1553+113 to verify the presence of a possible counterpart of this periodic variability. We used the Cross-entropy statistical technique to obtain the structural parameters of the Gaussian components present in the radio maps of this source. We kinematically identified seven jet components formed coincidentally with flare-like features seen in the γ-ray light curve. From the derived jet component positions in the sky plane and their kinematics (ejection epochs, proper motions, and sky position angles), we modeled their temporal changes in terms of a relativistic jet that is steadily precessing in time. Our results indicate a precession period in the observer’s reference frame of 2.24 ± 0.03 years, compatible with the periodicity detected in the light curves of PG 1553+113. However, the maxima of the jet Doppler boosting factor are systematically delayed relative to the peaks of the main γ-ray flares. We propose two scenarios that could explain this delay, both based on the existence of a supermassive black hole binary system in PG 1553+113. We estimated the characteristics of this putative binary system that also would be responsible for driving the inferred jet precession.

  13. X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillations in the Lense–Thirring Precession Model. I. Variability of Relativistic Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bei; Bursa, Michal; Życki, Piotr T.

    2018-05-01

    We develop a Monte Carlo code to compute the Compton-scattered X-ray flux arising from a hot inner flow that undergoes Lense–Thirring precession. The hot flow intercepts seed photons from an outer truncated thin disk. A fraction of the Comptonized photons will illuminate the disk, and the reflected/reprocessed photons will contribute to the observed spectrum. The total spectrum, including disk thermal emission, hot flow Comptonization, and disk reflection, is modeled within the framework of general relativity, taking light bending and gravitational redshift into account. The simulations are performed in the context of the Lense–Thirring precession model for the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations, so the inner flow is assumed to precess, leading to periodic modulation of the emitted radiation. In this work, we concentrate on the energy-dependent X-ray variability of the model and, in particular, on the evolution of the variability during the spectral transition from hard to soft state, which is implemented by the decrease of the truncation radius of the outer disk toward the innermost stable circular orbit. In the hard state, where the Comptonizing flow is geometrically thick, the Comptonization is weakly variable with a fractional variability amplitude of ≤10% in the soft state, where the Comptonizing flow is cooled down and thus becomes geometrically thin, the fractional variability of the Comptonization is highly variable, increasing with photon energy. The fractional variability of the reflection increases with energy, and the reflection emission for low spin is counterintuitively more variable than the one for high spin.

  14. Space and time reconstruction of the precessing vortex core in Francis turbine draft tube by 2D-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    Francis turbines operating at part load conditions experience the development of a high swirling flow at the runner outlet, giving rise to the development of a cavitation precessing vortex rope in the draft tube. The latter acts as an excitation source for the hydro-mechanical system and may jeopardize the system stability if resonance conditions are met. Although many aspects of the part load issue have been widely studied in the past, the accurate stability analysis of hydro-power plants remains challenging. A better understanding of the vortex rope dynamics in a wide range of operating conditions is an important step towards the prediction and the transposition of the pressure fluctuations from reduced to prototype scale. For this purpose, an investigation of the flow velocity fields at the outlet of a Francis turbine reduced scale physical model operating at part load conditions is performed by means of 2D-PIV in three different horizontal cross-sections of the draft tube cone. The measurements are performed in cavitation-free conditions for three values of discharge factor, comprised between 60% and 81% of the value at the Best Efficiency Point. The present article describes a detailed methodology to properly recover the evolution of the velocity fields during one precession cycle by means of phase averaging. The vortex circulation is computed and the vortex trajectory over one typical precession period is finally recovered for each operating point. It is notably shown that below a given value of the discharge factor, the vortex dynamics abruptly change and loose its periodicity and coherence.

  15. Use of medical photography among dermatologists: a nationwide online survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, E C; Leger, M C

    2018-02-06

    Medical photography enhances patient care, medical education and research. Despite medical photography's widespread use, little is known about how dermatologists choose to implement photography in routine clinical practice, and how they approach issues of image storage, image security and patient consent. To characterize dermatologists' medical photography habits and opinions. A 32-item anonymous, multiple-choice SurveyMonkey questionnaire about medical photography practices was emailed to programme directors of the 117 United States (US) dermatology residency programmes between May and August 2015, with a request to forward to faculty and affiliated dermatologists. Only board-certified dermatologists practicing in the United States were eligible. The Institutional Review Board exempted our study from full review. Our survey included 153 board-certified dermatologists, primarily representing the north-east (43.1%) and identifying as academic dermatologists (75.5%). Medical photography is prevalent: 61.8% report everyday use and 21.7% photograph every patient. Those reporting rare use (3.3%) were, on average, 20 years older. Dermatologists most commonly use photography to mark biopsy sites (87.5%), track disease (82.9%) and for education/teaching (72.4%). Nearly half (46%) use smartphone cameras. Emailing and texting photographs with patients or colleagues are common (69.1%). Most dermatologists (75.7%) always request patient consent for photographs. Only 23.7% adhere to a photography protocol and 73.9% desire more training opportunities. Dermatologists value medical photography. While patterns of image acquisition, storage and consent are noted, a variety of methods and preferences exist. Clearer photography guidelines and increased educational resources are likely to improve image quality, exchangeability and confidentiality. © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. GABAergic contributions to gating, timing, and phase precession of hippocampal neuronal activity during theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Hasselmo, Michael

    2012-07-01

    as well as in the generation and maintenance of theta phase precession of pyramidal cells (place cells) in CA1. The model leads to a number of experimentally testable predictions that may lead to a better understanding of the biophysical computations in the hippocampus and medial septum. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm 3 achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm 3 voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm 3 to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm 3 has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain

  18. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  19. Artificial neural network for suppression of banding artifacts in balanced steady-state free precession MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Sung-Hong

    2017-04-01

    The balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MR sequence is frequently used in clinics, but is sensitive to off-resonance effects, which can cause banding artifacts. Often multiple bSSFP datasets are acquired at different phase cycling (PC) angles and then combined in a special way for banding artifact suppression. Many strategies of combining the datasets have been suggested for banding artifact suppression, but there are still limitations in their performance, especially when the number of phase-cycled bSSFP datasets is small. The purpose of this study is to develop a learning-based model to combine the multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for better banding artifact suppression. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is a feedforward artificial neural network consisting of three layers of input, hidden, and output layers. MLP models were trained by input bSSFP datasets acquired from human brain and knee at 3T, which were separately performed for two and four PC angles. Banding-free bSSFP images were generated by maximum-intensity projection (MIP) of 8 or 12 phase-cycled datasets and were used as targets for training the output layer. The trained MLP models were applied to another brain and knee datasets acquired with different scan parameters and also to multiple phase-cycled bSSFP functional MRI datasets acquired on rat brain at 9.4T, in comparison with the conventional MIP method. Simulations were also performed to validate the MLP approach. Both the simulations and human experiments demonstrated that MLP suppressed banding artifacts significantly, superior to MIP in both banding artifact suppression and SNR efficiency. MLP demonstrated superior performance over MIP for the 9.4T fMRI data as well, which was not used for training the models, while visually preserving the fMRI maps very well. Artificial neural network is a promising technique for combining multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for banding artifact suppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  20. The g-factor of the first excited 4+ state in 20Ne from transient field precession measurement in gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, P.N.; Speidel, K.H.; Mertens, V.; Trolenberg, W.; Kumbartzki, G.S.; Ayres de Campos, N.; Goldberg, M.B.; Gerber, J.; Toulemonde, M.

    1981-01-01

    The g-factor of the 4 + state in 20 Ne at 4.25 MeV has been obtained to be g = +0.08(20) from transient field precession measurements in Gd in agreement with the present authors' earlier reported value of g =- 0.10(19) (1980). The significant reduction in the value of the g- factor, g = -0.01(14), relative to that of the 2 + state (g = + 0.54(4))(1975) is in complete disagreement with theory. In addition the life time of the 4 + state has been measured to be tau = 95(13) fs. (author)

  1. Phase precession through acceleration of local theta rhythm: a biophysical model for the interaction between place cells and local inhibitory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Luísa; Aguiar, Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Phase precession is one of the most well known examples within the temporal coding hypothesis. Here we present a biophysical spiking model for phase precession in hippocampal CA1 which focuses on the interaction between place cells and local inhibitory interneurons. The model's functional block is composed of a place cell (PC) connected with a local inhibitory cell (IC) which is modulated by the population theta rhythm. Both cells receive excitatory inputs from the entorhinal cortex (EC). These inputs are both theta modulated and space modulated. The dynamics of the two neuron types are described by integrate-and-fire models with conductance synapses, and the EC inputs are described using non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Phase precession in our model is caused by increased drive to specific PC/IC pairs when the animal is in their place field. The excitation increases the IC's firing rate, and this modulates the PC's firing rate such that both cells precess relative to theta. Our model implies that phase coding in place cells may not be independent from rate coding. The absence of restrictive connectivity constraints in this model predicts the generation of phase precession in any network with similar architecture and subject to a clocking rhythm, independently of the involvement in spatial tasks.

  2. Orientation and phase mapping in the transmission electron microscope using precession-assisted diffraction spot recognition: state-of-the-art results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladot, D; Véron, M; Gemmi, M; Peiró, F; Portillo, J; Estradé, S; Mendoza, J; Llorca-Isern, N; Nicolopoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed technique based on the transmission electron microscope, which makes use of electron beam precession together with spot diffraction pattern recognition now offers the possibility to acquire reliable orientation/phase maps with a spatial resolution down to 2 nm on a field emission gun transmission electron microscope. The technique may be described as precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope, precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping technique-transmission electron microscope, also known by its product name, ASTAR, and consists in scanning the precessed electron beam in nanoprobe mode over the specimen area, thus producing a collection of precession electron diffraction spot patterns, to be thereafter indexed automatically through template matching. We present a review on several application examples relative to the characterization of microstructure/microtexture of nanocrystalline metals, ceramics, nanoparticles, minerals and organics. The strengths and limitations of the technique are also discussed using several application examples. ©2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Ergonomics Calibration Training Utilizing Photography for Dental Hygiene Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partido, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    Dental and dental hygiene clinical faculty members often do not provide consistent instruction, especially since most procedures involve clinical judgment. Although instructional variations frequently translate into variations in student performance, the effect of inconsistent instruction is unknown, especially related to ergonomics. The aim of this study was to determine whether photography-assisted calibration training would improve interrater reliability among dental hygiene faculty members in ergonomics evaluation. The photography-assisted ergonomics calibration program incorporated features to improve accessibility and optimize the quality of the training. The study used a two-group repeated measures design with a convenience sample of 11 dental hygiene faculty members (eight full-time and three part-time) during the autumn 2016 term at one U.S. dental school. At weeks one and seven, all participants evaluated imaged postures of five dental students using a modified-dental operator posture assessment instrument. During weeks three and five, training group participants completed calibration training using independent and group review of imaged postures. All pre-training and post-training evaluations were evaluated for interrater reliability. Two-way random effects intraclass coefficient (ICC) values were calculated to measure the effects of the training on interrater reliability. The average measure of ICC of the training group improved from 0.694 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.001 to 0.965 (F(4,8)=3.465, p>0.05) to 0.766 with a 95% CI of 0.098 to 0.972 (F(4,8)=7.913, p<0.01). The average measure of ICC of the control group improved from 0.821 with a 95% CI of 0.480 to 0.978 (F(4,28)=7.702, p<0.01) to 0.846 with a 95% CI of 0.542 to 0.981 (F(4,28)=8.561, p<0.01). These results showed that the photography-assisted calibration training with the opportunity to reconcile different opinions resulted in improved agreement among these faculty members.

  4. Zero-field precession and hysteretic threshold currents in a spin torque nano device with tilted polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yan; Bonetti, S; Zha, C L; Akerman, Johan [Department of Microelectronics and Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)], E-mail: zhouyan@kth.se

    2009-10-15

    Using nonlinear system theory and numerical simulations, we map out the static and dynamic phase diagrams in the zero applied field of a spin torque nano device with a tilted polarizer (TP). We find that for sufficiently large currents, even very small tilt angles ({beta}>1 deg.) will lead to steady free layer precession in zero field. Within a rather large range of tilt angles, 1 deg. <{beta}<19 deg., we find coexisting static states and hysteretic switching between these using only current. In a more narrow window (1 deg. <{beta}<5 deg.) one of the static states turns into a limit cycle (precession). The coexistence of current-driven static and dynamic states in the zero magnetic field is unique to the TP device and leads to large hysteresis in the upper and lower threshold currents for its operation. The nano device with TP can facilitate the generation of large amplitude mode of spin torque signals without the need for cumbersome magnetic field sources and thus should be very important for future telecommunication applications based on spin transfer torque effects.

  5. Dynamical ejecta from precessing neutron star-black hole mergers with a hot, nuclear-theory based equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucart, F; Kasen, D; Desai, D; Brege, W; Duez, M D; Hemberger, D A; Scheel, M A; Kidder, L E; Pfeiffer, H P

    2017-01-01

    Neutron star-black hole binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves detectable by current observatories. They can also power bright electromagnetic signals (gamma-ray bursts, kilonovae), and may be a significant source of production of r-process nuclei. A misalignment of the black hole spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum leads to precession of that spin and of the orbital plane, and has a significant effect on the properties of the post-merger remnant and of the material ejected by the merger. We present a first set of simulations of precessing neutron star-black hole mergers using a hot, composition dependent, nuclear-theory based equation of state (DD2). We show that the mass of the remnant and of the dynamical ejecta are broadly consistent with the result of simulations using simpler equations of state, while differences arise when considering the dynamics of the merger and the velocity of the ejecta. We show that the latter can easily be understood from assumptions about the composition of low-density, cold material in the different equations of state, and propose an updated estimate for the ejecta velocity which takes those effects into account. We also present an updated mesh-refinement algorithm which allows us to improve the numerical resolution used to evolve neutron star-black hole mergers. (paper)

  6. Wounding apertures: violence, affect and photography during and after apartheid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Between March and September 2012 there have been sixteen instances of 'necklacing' in the townships just outside of Cape Town. This article argues for understanding these events in relation to the violence of apartheid. It approaches the question of the meanings of the persistence of necklacing through an analysis of photographs of people who had been subject to vigilante violence in the 1980s. The article focuses on the work of Gille de Vlieg, a photographer who, during apartheid, was a member of the Black Sash and of the Afrapix photography collective. I read de Vlieg's photographs as a series of 'wounding apertures' that open a space for affective engagements with the violence of both the past and of the present. The importance of such engagements, the article argues, lies in what political philosopher Hannah Arendt has theorised as the constitutive relation between feeling, thinking and judging.

  7. Comparison between Still photography and videography for smile analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this systematic review was to compare still photography and videography for smile analysis. Materials and Methods: Based on the available data, two authors conducted an electronic database PubMed search from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2015, and ten strategies were designed using five keywords along with their respective synonyms. Twelve articles were shortlisted for the systematic review. Results: The search yielded 91 articles, of which 12 were included based on the selection criteria. Of these 12, five concluded videography compared to be a better tool. Seven articles had variable conclusions based on the study setting and population evaluated. Conclusions: Digital video clips offer a tremendous amount of information for analyzing the dynamic character of the smile, but a standard digital photograph allows for immediate viewing.

  8. Picturing the Wheatbelt: exploring and expressing place identity through photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn, Christopher C; Quayle, Amy F; Kasat, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    Community arts and cultural development is a process that builds on and responds to the aspirations and needs of communities through creative means. It is participatory and inclusive, and uses multiple modes of representation to produce local knowledge. 'Voices' used photography and photo elicitation as the medium for exploring and expressing sense of place among Aboriginal and non-Indigenous children, young people and adults in four rural towns. An analysis of data generated by the project shows the diverse images that people chose to capture and the different meanings they afforded to their pictures. These meanings reflected individual and collective constructions of place, based on positive experiences and emotions tied to the natural environment and features of the built environment. We discuss community arts and cultural development practice with reference to creative visual methodologies and suggest that it is an approach that can contribute to community psychology's empowerment agenda.

  9. Eclipsing Aestheticism: Western Landscape Photography After Ansel Adams

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Bien que l’héritage photographique d’Ansel Adams (1902-84) reste incontestable dans la culture de masse, dans les musées et parmi les collectionneurs, la nature de cet héritage fait débat parmi les artistes contemporains, les chercheurs et les théoriciens de la photographie. Pour certains, à la fin du 20ème siècle, les paysages typiques de Adams représentant l’Ouest américain au milieu du siècle désignaient une connivence secrète avec l’expansion américaine vers l’ouest durant la guerre froid...

  10. Female body as a fetish in Helmut Newton's photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantović Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper illuminates some of the principles by which Helmut Newton's photographic poetics functions. It is examined from the perspectives of recent art history, feminist critique and psychoanalytic theory. His photographs came to a standstill not far from pornography, yet they stayed within the jet-set community, reflecting at the same time the sexual revolution in the 60s and 70s of the twentieth century and the rising of the fashion and film industries and other Western emancipatory movements. Newton's obscure photojournalism provoked conventions, presenting the female body as a fetish and object of erotic pleasure, affirming, nonetheless, a new feminine self-consciousness and freedom. Thus, he constituted modern eroticism by connecting fetishism, voyeurism and sadomasochism, creating a provocative hybrid photography that embraced fashion, eroticism and portrait, hence documenting, in highly stylistic manner, the decadency and eccentricity of the lifestyle of the rich.

  11. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  12. Electronic photography: a new age of medical imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tübergen, D; Manegold, B C

    1993-07-01

    This is a critical overview of present conceptions of the introduction of electronic photography in medicine. It is not a complete list of products, rather it is a description of how the requirements of the physician have influenced medical illustration in the past and will continue to do so in the future. Video systems are widely used in medicine. Besides the learning and teaching of effects of television, minimal invasive surgery (MIS) has become reality through endoscopy, rapidly accepted worldwide. Documentation of endoscopic procedures and their effects is becoming routine. Therefore, the conversion of complex optical information into binary units is a logical development to save space for storage. The reproduction, storage and transfer of detailed images is already realized by digital camera systems, photo CD, scanners and picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). Now electronic imaging in medicine has to be regarded as a matter of routine. The real impact of accelerated editing will be shown in the future.

  13. Six-Position, Frontal View Photography in Blepharoplasty: A Simple Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Guo, Xiaoshuang; Han, Xuefeng; Tian, Yi; Jin, Xiaolei

    2018-02-26

    Photography plays a pivotal role in patient education, photo-documentation, preoperative planning and postsurgical evaluation in plastic surgeries. It has long been serving as a bridge that facilitated communication not only between patients and doctors, but also among plastic surgeons from different countries. Although several basic principles and photographic methods have been proposed, there is no internationally accepted photography that could provide both static and dynamic information in blepharoplasty. In this article, we introduced a novel six-position, frontal view photography for thorough assessment in blepharoplasty. From October 2013 to January 2017, 1068 patients who underwent blepharoplasty were enrolled in our clinical research. All patients received six-position, frontal view photography. Pictures were taken of the patients looking up, looking down, squeezing, smiling, looking ahead and with closed eyes. Conventionally, frontal view photography only contained the last two positions. Then, both novel six-position photographs and conventional two-position photographs were used to appraise postsurgical outcomes. Compared to conventional two-position, frontal view photography, six-position, frontal view photography can provide more detailed, thorough information about the eyes. It is of clinical significance in indicating underlying adhesion of skin/muscle/fat according to individual's features and assessing preoperative and postoperative dynamic changes and aesthetic outcomes. Six-position, frontal view photography is technically uncomplicated while exhibiting static, dynamic and detailed information of the eyes. This innovative method is favorable in eye assessment, especially for revision blepharoplasty. We suggest using six-position, frontal view photography to obtain comprehensive photographs. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer

  14. Let's go outside: using photography to explore values and culture in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, K; de Goeas, S; Davies, S; Radcliffe, M; Christoforou, A

    2015-06-01

    Creative and imaginative approaches to mental healthcare education are known to help students explore emotions, empathy and others' experiences, as well as address ambivalence and ambiguity. Very few studies in mental health nursing education specifically utilise photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, with even fewer utilising photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. Photography makes visible complex, collaborative forms of learning and previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. Photography as a critical pedagogic method helps develop critical, politicized understandings of culture and values. Increasing culturally diverse populations means complex and conflicting values have become a common feature in mental health nursing. In education the need to critically examine such topics necessitates creative and engaging pedagogy, and visual methods are readily acknowledged as such. Yet while many studies advocate and demonstrate the value of art-based methods in student learning, very few studies in mental health nursing specifically utilize photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, and fewer still use photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. In this paper, we discuss a qualitative study where mental health nursing students used photography to create images in order to explore their own and often dominant culture and attendant values. Findings suggest that photography makes visible situated, relational and collaborative learning, and surfaces previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. These practices mimic important processes central to mental health nursing practice and contemporaneous understandings of diverse cultures. We argue that photography provides an important resource with which to unearth subjugated knowledge, promote critical understandings of culture and values, and thereby help address inequalities in mental health care. © 2015

  15. Mapping Urban Ecosystem Services Using High Resolution Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilant, A. N.; Neale, A.; Wilhelm, D.

    2010-12-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are the many life-sustaining benefits we receive from nature: e.g., clean air and water, food and fiber, cultural-aesthetic-recreational benefits, pollination and flood control. The ES concept is emerging as a means of integrating complex environmental and economic information to support informed environmental decision making. The US EPA is developing a web-based National Atlas of Ecosystem Services, with a component for urban ecosystems. Currently, the only wall-to-wall, national scale land cover data suitable for this analysis is the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) at 30 m spatial resolution with 5 and 10 year updates. However, aerial photography is acquired at higher spatial resolution (0.5-3 m) and more frequently (1-5 years, typically) for most urban areas. Land cover was mapped in Raleigh, NC using freely available USDA National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) with 1 m ground sample distance to test the suitability of aerial photography for urban ES analysis. Automated feature extraction techniques were used to extract five land cover classes, and an accuracy assessment was performed using standard techniques. Results will be presented that demonstrate applications to mapping ES in urban environments: greenways, corridors, fragmentation, habitat, impervious surfaces, dark and light pavement (urban heat island). Automated feature extraction results mapped over NAIP color aerial photograph. At this scale, we can look at land cover and related ecosystem services at the 2-10 m scale. Small features such as individual trees and sidewalks are visible and mappable. Classified aerial photo of Downtown Raleigh NC Red: impervious surface Dark Green: trees Light Green: grass Tan: soil

  16. The Perceptual Basis of Some Rules of Thumb in Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin S. Banks

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We communicate increasingly with visual imagery such as realistic pictures (e.g., photographs, computer graphic images, perspective drawings and paintings. People are readily able to interpret pictures, but the means by which they do so is poorly understood. Photographers utilize many guidelines for creating natural-looking pictures. One guideline concerns the lens focal length required to produce pictures that are not spatially distorted. Photography texts recommend choosing a focal length of 50mm. There are two phenomena related to this guideline. One is perceived spatial distortions in wide-angle (short focal length pictures. I will argue that the perceived distortions are caused by the perceptual mechanisms people employ to take into account oblique viewing positions. The second phenomenon is perceived depth in pictures taken with different focal lengths. The textbooks argue that pictures taken with short focal lengths expand perceived depth and those taken with long focal lengths compress it. I will argue that these effects are due to a combination of the viewing geometry and peoples' viewing. Another guideline concerns the camera aperture and depth-of-field blur. Photography textbooks do not describe a quantitative rule and treat the magnitude of depth-of-field blur as arbitrary. I examine apertures, lenses, and image formation. From that examination, I argue that there is a natural relationship between depth-of-field blur and the 3D layout of the photographed scene. Human viewers are sensitive to this relationship. In particular, depicted scenes are perceived differently depending on the relationship between blur and 3D layout. Understanding the perceptual basis of these guidelines provides insight into how to construct photographs, perspective paintings, and computer graphic images for more effective visual communication.

  17. Slit-lamp photography and videography with high magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Mao, Xinjie; Ke, Bilian; Yan, Wentao; Liu, Che; Cintrón-Colón, Hector R; Perez, Victor L; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the use of the slit-lamp photography and videography with extremely high magnifications for visualizing structures of the anterior segment of the eye. Methods A Canon 60D digital camera with Movie Crop Function was adapted into a Nikon FS-2 slit-lamp to capture still images and video clips of the structures of the anterior segment of the eye. Images obtained using the slit-lamp were tested for spatial resolution. The cornea of human eyes was imaged with the slit-lamp and the structures were compared with the pictures captured using the ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). The central thickness of the corneal epithelium and total cornea was obtained using the slit-lamp and the results were compared with the thickness obtained using UHR-OCT. Results High-quality ocular images and higher spatial resolutions were obtained by using the slit-lamp with extremely high magnifications and Movie Crop Function, rather than the traditional slit-lamp. The structures and characteristics of the cornea, such as the normal epithelium, abnormal epithelium of corneal intraepithelial neoplasia, LASIK interface, and contact lenses, were clearly visualized using this device. These features were confirmed by comparing the obtained images with those acquired using UHR-OCT. Moreover, the tear film debris on the ocular surface and the corneal nerve in the anterior corneal stroma were also visualized. The thicknesses of the corneal epithelium and total cornea were similar to that measured using UHR-OCT (P photography and videography with extremely high magnifications allows better visualization of the anterior segment structures of the eye, especially of the epithelium, when compared with the traditional slit-lamp. PMID:26020484

  18. Feasibility and quality of nonmydriatic fundus photography in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, Daniela; Bruce, Beau B.; Lamirel, Cédric; Henderson, Amanda D.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Ocular funduscopic examination is difficult in young children and is rarely attempted by nonophthalmologists. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of reliably obtaining high-quality nonmydriatic fundus photographs in children. Methods Nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in both eyes of children seen in a pediatric ophthalmology clinic. Ease of fundus photography was recorded on a 10-point Likert scale (10 = very easy). Quality was graded from 1 to 5 (1, inadequate for any diagnostic purpose; 2, unable to exclude all emergent findings; 3, only able to exclude emergent findings; 4, not ideal, but still able to exclude subtle findings; and 5, ideal quality). The primary outcome measure was image quality by age. Results A total of 878 photographs of 212 children (median age, 6 years; range,1-18 years) were included. Photographs of at least one eye were obtained in 190 children (89.6%) and in both eyes in 181 (85.3%). Median rating for ease of photography was 7. Photographs of some clinical value (grade ≥2) were obtained in 33% of children 3 years. High-quality photographs (grade 4 or 5) were obtained in both eyes in 7% of children <3 years, 57% of children ≥3 to <7 years, 85% of children ≥7 to <9 years, and 65% of children ≥9 years. The youngest patient with high-quality photographs in both eyes was 22 months. Conclusions Nonmydriatic fundus photographs of adequate quality can be obtained in children over age 3 and in some children as young as 22 months. PMID:22153402

  19. Parental grief and memento mori photography: narrative, meaning, culture, and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Cybele; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem photography is a widespread practice in perinatal bereavement care, yet few studies have explored how it affects bereaved parents, or how it might be received by parents of older children. This study is an examination of the meaning, utility, and social context of postmortem photography in a sample of 181 bereaved parents. Data were subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Photographs were positively regarded by most parents after perinatal death and several parents of older children. Other parents rejected postmortem photography for aesthetic, personal, or cultural reasons. Brief recommendations are offered for healthcare providers.

  20. Science and Photography Linked in iPad and iPhone Apps About Climate Change and Repeat Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, G.; Hone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Red Hill Studio and World View of Global Warming co-developed apps for the iPad and iPhone which graphically show climate-driven changes in repeat photographs and maps. The climate app, with 17 interactive screens that show climate changes to glaciers, coasts, rivers and world temperature, reaches a new part of the public, was featured in USA Today and is used in schoolrooms and museums. It led a list of top ten climate apps for 2012. The low price for this app encourages more users and income is being shared with the Union of Concerned Scientists. Red Hill Studio is also developing an app which is an aid for making time series and repeat photography. The Now & Then Cam app will allow scientists and citizens to take closely aligned repeat photos by overlaying the iPad/iPhone's camera image on top of an archival photo. This guides the photographer back towards the original location of the archival shot - leading to a more carefully aligned repeat photograph. The developers hope this app will contribute to both scientific and artistic creation of time-series photographs, an important and persuasive visualization of change. The Painting with Time and Now & Then Cam apps build upon a traveling museum exhibition, Playing with Time, and an international documentary special, Exploring Time, that were developed by Red Hill Studios under grants from the National Science Foundation. The app programmers, Charlie Brown and J.A. Nelson, use Objective C to create fluid, responsive interfaces with no distracting latencies or delays. World View of Global Warming is an independent photojournalistic documentation of global warming and rapid climate change begun in 1999. Repeat and time-series photography is an integral part it its climate communication.

  1. The clinical application of computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Sen; Guo Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn, especially in chest radiography. Methods: Bedside CR images were selected in 100 cases randomly. The exposure parameters were optimized using the large latitude of CR. The details of images were post-processed and adjusted using spatial tuning technique. Then CR photography was compared with conventional X-ray photography. Results: The images acquired with CR had good contrast, high definition, and little distortion, in which the condemned image rate was 1%. While in conventional X-ray photography, the unsuccessful imaging rate is 9%. Conclusion: Bedside computed radiography of new-born, especially the chest imaging, is very helpful to improve image quality and positive rate of the diagnosis. (authors)

  2. From snapshots to social media the changing picture of domestic photography

    CERN Document Server

    Sarvas, Risto

    2011-01-01

    New technology is changing the face of the photograph. This volume on 'snapshot' photography-pictures taken by non-professionals-examines key future trends, from multimedia and social practices to the notion of embedding physicality into digital snapshots.

  3. Hurricane Gustav Aerial Photography: Rapid ResponseImagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regionsafter Hurricane Gustav made landfall. The aerial photography missions wereconducted by the NOAA Remote...

  4. Hurricane Humberto Aerial Photography: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regions after Hurricane Humberto made landfall. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected - images.DBO.NSB2004COLOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Ortho Photography collected as part of the New Smyrna Beach LiDAR collection project. True color, 1 Foot pixel resolution, horizontal accuracies less than 2 Feet....

  6. Hurricane Ike Aerial Photography: Rapid ResponseImagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regionsafter Hurricane Ike made landfall. The aerial photography missions wereconducted by the NOAA Remote...

  7. Tropical Storm Ernesto Aerial Photography: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the surrounding regions after Tropical Storm Ernesto made landfall. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA...

  8. Very High Resolution Panoramic Photography to Improve Conventional Rangeland Monitoring 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangeland monitoring often includes repeat photographs as a basis for documentation and although photographic equipment and electronics have been evolving rapidly, basic rangeland photo monitoring methods have changed little over time. Ground based digital photography is underutilized, especially s...

  9. From photography to cinematography: recording movement and gait in a neurological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2002-09-01

    The major challenge of photography has been freezing movement, to transform it into a fixed image or series of images. Very soon, photographers became interested in movement itself and tried to use photography as a tool to analyze movement. At the early stages, physicians interested in movement, perhaps surprisingly, made important technical contributions. Mécanisme de la physionomie humaine, by Duchenne, the first book with physiological experiments illustrated by photographs, is a landmark in this historical development. At the Salpêtrière, thanks to Charcot, photography officially entered clinical neurology. Medical journals with photographs were actively developed by Bourneville. Londe established a clinical photographic laboratory and published the first book on medical photography. The study of animal and human movement by Muybridge and Marey in the 1880s led to chronophotography and later cinematography. Clinicians such as Dercum and Richer took advantage of these new techniques to study pathological movement and gait in neurological diseases.

  10. Holographic interferometry and laser speckle photography as aids to assessment of pressurized components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.J.V.

    1975-01-01

    This paper gives details of the defect detection holographic technique and describes laser speckle photography to evaluate in phase movement and strain in pressurized components. The new fibre optic technique and system appraisal is included. The holographic tests show that it is possible to detect on the outside of tubes defects in the bore approximately 10% of thickness deep. Speckle photography gives object lateral movement, direction and strain. (Auth.)

  11. FILM/TALK: Photography A Visual Language: The Landscape Document Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Matthew; United Nations of Photography; Film courtesy of Reece Pickering and Tchad Findlay

    2016-01-01

    This short film is part of a conversation featuring photographers Marc Wilson, Brian David Stevens and Matthew Murray hosted by Ian McGuffie. In this film they passionately discuss the highly personal inspirations for their work, their process of working, the importance of history in personal experience and the role of landscape photography as a social document. \\ud \\ud This talk was part of a day of talks titled Photography A Visual language: A Day of Conversation held by us in collaboration...

  12. The sensitivity and specificity of one field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography for DR screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Bin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of one-field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography and direct ophthalmoscopy for diabetic retinopathy(DRscreening, compared with fundus fluorescein angiography( FFA .METHODS:All 93 patients of type 1 or 2 diabetic who have underwent one-field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography, and direct ophthalmoscopy with dilation of their pupils, and FFA by ophthalmologists. The sensitivity and specificity of one-field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography and direct ophthalmoscopy were calculated respectively, compared with FFA.RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of one-field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography for detection of any DR were 80.4% and 94.7%; The sensitivity and specificity of direct ophthalmoscopy for detection of any DR were 64.2% and 84.2%; After the standard for referable DR being lowered down to the moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(M-NPDR, the sensitivity and specificity of non-mydriatic digital fundus photography for detection were 88.9% and 98.4%, the sensitivity and specificity of direct ophthalmoscopy for detection were 71.5% and 96.7%.CONCLUSION: One-field non-mydriatic digital fundus photography is an effective method for DR screening.

  13. It has not been—it is. The signaletic transformation of photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Sandbye

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the concept of “the signaletic,” this article proposes a new understanding of photography as a social and performative device related to everyday life, to communication, and to presence. Today photography is a ubiquitous, social activity to a much larger extent than before the digital revolution and the introduction of the Internet, creating relational situations and communication as well as new affective involvements between human bodies and the photographic, media-convergent technologies. In the light of this epistemological change, the medium of photography demands a theoretical reformulation, and contemporary art works can help us articulate “the signaletic paradigm” in photography. To illustrate this, the article includes an analysis of Christian Marclay's prize winning “The Clock” and David Claerbout's “Sections of a Happy Moment”. It is my argument that although the traditional photography, such as the early photography theories by Bazin and Barthes have described, confirmed “what-has-been” (Barthes and fulfilled a “mumification desire” (Bazin, the new digital practices at the Internet show “what-is-going-on” (presence and thereby rather fulfills the user's existential desire to “feel time.”

  14. Towards quantifying the aesthetic outcomes of breast cancer treatment: comparison of clinical photography and colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Rodney, William N; Cooper, Tara; Kite, Chris; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2009-02-01

    Scarring is a significant cause of dissatisfaction for women who undergo breast surgery. Scar tissue may be clinically distinguished from normal skin by aberrant colour, rough surface texture, increased thickness (hypertrophy) and firmness. Colorimeters or spectrophotometers can be used to quantitatively assess scar colour, but they require direct patient interaction and can cost thousands of dollars. By comparison, digital photography is already in widespread use to document clinical outcomes and requires less patient interaction. Thus, assessment of scar coloration by digital photography is an attractive alternative. The goal of this study was to compare colour measurements obtained by digital photography and colorimetry. Agreements between photographic and colorimetric measurements of colour were evaluated. Experimental conditions were controlled by performing measurements on artificial scars created by a make-up artist. The colorimetric measurements of the artificial scars were compared with those reported in the literature for real scars in order to confirm the validity of this approach. We assessed the agreement between the colorimetric and photographic measurements of colour using a hypothesis test for equivalence, the intraclass correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman method. Overall, good agreement was obtained for three parameters (L*a*b*) measured by colorimetry and photography from the results of three statistical analyses. Colour measurements obtained by digital photography were equivalent to those obtained using colorimetry. Thus, digital photography is a reliable, cost-effective measurement method of skin colour and should be further investigated for quantitative analysis of surgical outcomes.

  15. Toward Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Comparison of Clinical Photography and Colorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Rodney, William N.; Cooper, Tara; Kite, Chris; Reece, Gregory P.; Markey, Mia K.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Scarring is a significant cause of dissatisfaction for women who undergo breast surgery. Scar tissue may be clinically distinguished from normal skin by aberrant color, rough surface texture, increased thickness (hypertrophy), and firmness. Colorimeters or spectrophotometers can be used to quantitatively assess scar color, but they require direct patient interaction and can cost thousands of dollars By comparison, digital photography is already in widespread use to document clinical outcomes and requires less patient interaction. Thus, assessment of scar coloration by digital photography is an attractive alternative. The goal of this study was to compare color measurements obtained by digital photography and colorimetry. Method Agreement between photographic and colorimetric measurements of color were evaluated. Experimental conditions were controlled by performing measurements on artificial scars created by a makeup artist. The colorimetric measurements of the artificial scars were compared to those reported in the literature for real scars in order to confirm the validity of this approach. We assessed the agreement between the colorimetric and photographic measurements of color using a hypothesis test for equivalence, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and the Bland-Altman method. Results Overall, good agreement was obtained for three parameters (L*a*b*) measured by colorimetry and photography from the results of three statistical analyses. Conclusion Color measurements obtained by digital photography were equivalent to those obtained using colorimetry. Thus, digital photography is a reliable, cost-effective measurement method of skin color and should be further investigated for quantitative analysis of surgical outcomes. PMID:19239578

  16. Does underwater flash photography affect the behaviour, movement and site persistence of seahorses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasti, D; Gladstone, W

    2013-11-01

    The effect of flash photography on seahorse species has never been tested. An experiment was established to test the effect of flash photography and the handling of Hippocampus whitei, a medium-sized seahorse species endemic to Australia, on their behavioural responses, movements and site persistence. A total of 24 H. whitei were utilized in the experiment with eight in each of the three treatments (flash photography, handling and control). The effect of underwater flash photography on H. whitei movements was not significant; however, the effect of handling H. whitei to take a photograph had a significant effect on their short-term behavioural responses to the photographer. Kaplan-Meier log-rank test revealed that there was no significant difference in site persistence of H. whitei from each of the three treatments and that flash photography had no long-term effects on their site persistence. It is concluded that the use of flash photography by divers is a safe and viable technique with H. whitei, particularly if photographs can be used for individual identification purposes. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. The remote characterization of vegetation using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Laliberte, A.; Winters, C.; Maxwell, C.; Steele, C.

    2008-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can fly in place of piloted aircraft to gather remote sensing information on vegetation characteristics. The type of sensors flown depends on the instrument payload capacity available, so that, depending on the specific UAV, it is possible to obtain video, aerial photographic, multispectral and hyperspectral radiometric, LIDAR, and radar data. The characteristics of several small UAVs less than 55lbs (25kg)) along with some payload instruments will be reviewed. Common types of remote sensing coverage available from a small, limited-payload UAV are video and hyperspatial, digital photography. From evaluation of these simple types of remote sensing data, we conclude that UAVs can play an important role in measuring and monitoring vegetation health and structure of the vegetation/soil complex in rangelands. If we fly our MLB Bat-3 at an altitude of 700ft (213m), we can obtain a digital photographic resolution of 6cm. The digital images acquired cover an area of approximately 29,350sq m. Video imaging is usually only useful for monitoring the flight path of the UAV in real time. In our experiments with the 6cm resolution data, we have been able to measure vegetation patch size, crown width, gap sizes between vegetation, percent vegetation and bare soil cover, and type of vegetation. The UAV system is also being tested to acquire height of the vegetation canopy using shadow measurements and a digital elevation model obtained with stereo images. Evaluation of combining the UAV digital photography with LIDAR data of the Jornada Experimental Range in south central New Mexico is ongoing. The use of UAVs is increasing and is becoming a very promising tool for vegetation assessment and change, but there are several operational components to flying UAVs that users need to consider. These include cost, a whole set of, as yet, undefined regulations regarding flying in the National Air Space(NAS), procedures to gain approval for flying in the NAS

  18. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  19. The reorientation precession technique, REPREC, and the quadrupole moments of /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. [Sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselgren, L; Fahlander, C; Edvardson, L O; Thun, J E; Falk, F; Ghumman, B S

    1975-04-01

    The orientation precession technique, REPREC, for measurements of quadrupole moments is described. The application of REPREC to the measurement of the static electric quadrupole moments of the first excited 2/sup +/-states in /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd is presented. The possibility to measure the matrix product P/sub 4/ = M/sub 02/M/sub 22/,M/sub 02/M/sub 22/ is also discussed. Such measurements are presented for /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. The results of these measurements are P/sub 4/O for both /sup 108/Pd and /sup 110/Pd. For /sup 108/Pd the quadrupole moment of the first excited 2/sup +/-state was found to be -.66 +- .18 eb and for /sup 110/Pd -.72 +- .14 eb. Intrinsic nuclear properties for /sup 106 -110/Pd are derived using the sum rules suggested by Kumar.

  20. Reorientation precession measurements on /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd and the quadrupole moments of their first 2/sup +/ states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselgren, L; Fahlander, C; Falk, F; Edvardson, L O; Thun, J E; Ghuman, B S [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Fysiska Institutionen; Skaali, B [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Institutt

    1976-06-28

    The reorientation precession technique, REPREC, for measurements of quadrupole moments is described. The application of REPREC to the measurement of the static electric quadrupole moments of the first excited 2/sup +/ states in /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd is presented. The possibility to measure the sign of the matrix product P/sub 4/ = M/sub 02/Msub(22')Msub(02')M/sub 22/ is also discussed. Such measurements are presented for /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. The results of these measurements are P/sub 4/ < 0 for both /sup 108/Pd and /sup 110/Pd. For /sup 108/Pd the quadrupole moment of the first excited 2/sup +/ state was found to be -0.66+-0.18e.b and for /sup 110/Pd, -0.72+-0.14e.b. Intrinsic nuclear properties for /sup 106 -110/Pd are derived using the sum rules suggested by Kumar.

  1. Spin precession of a particle with an electric dipole moment: contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silenko, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    The new derivation of the equation of the spin precession is given for a particle possessing electric and magnetic dipole moments. Contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect are explicitly separated. A fully covariant approach is used. The final equation is expressed in a very simple form in terms of the fields in the instantaneously accompanying frame. The Lorentz transformations of the electric and magnetic dipole moments and of the spin are derived from basic equations of classical electrodynamics. For this purpose, the Maxwell equations in matter are used and the result is confirmed by other methods. An antisymmetric four-tensor is correctly constructed from the electric and magnetic dipole moments. (article)

  2. INFLUENCE OF THE HIGHER ORDER DERIVATIVES ON THE PLANET PERIHELION PRECESSION IN THE EINSTEIN FIELD EQUATIONS FOR VACUUM CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Budi Prayitno

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of higher order derivative tensor in the Einstein field equations for vacuum condition on the planet perihelion precession. This tensor was initially proposed as the space-time curvature tensor by Deser and Tekin on discussions about the energy effects caused by this tensor. However, they include this tensor to Einstein field equations as a new model in general relativity theory. This is very interesting since there are some questions in cosmology and astrophysics that have no answers. Thus, they hoped this model could solve those problems by finding analytical or perturbative solution and interpreting it. In this case, the perturbative solution was used to find the Schwarzschild solution and it was also applied to consider the planetary motion in the solar gravitational field. Furthermore, it was proven that the tensor is divergence-free in order to keep the Einstein field equations remain valid.

  3. An estimation of Envisat's rotational state accounting for the precession of its rotational axis caused by gravity-gradient torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hou-Yuan; Zhao, Chang-Yin

    2018-01-01

    The rotational state of Envisat is re-estimated using the specular glint times in optical observation data obtained from 2013 to 2015. The model is simplified to a uniaxial symmetric model with the first order variation of its angular momentum subject to a gravity-gradient torque causing precession around the normal of the orbital plane. The sense of Envisat's rotation can be derived from observational data, and is found to be opposite to the sense of its orbital motion. The rotational period is estimated to be (120.674 ± 0.068) · exp((4.5095 ± 0.0096) ×10-4 · t) s , where t is measured in days from the beginning of 2013. The standard deviation is 0.760 s, making this the best fit obtained for Envisat in the literature to date. The results demonstrate that the angle between the angular momentum vector and the negative normal of the orbital plane librates around a mean value of 8.53 ° ± 0.42 ° with an amplitude from about 0.7 ° (in 2013) to 0.5 ° (in 2015), with the libration period equal to the precession period of the angular momentum, from about 4.8 days (in 2013) to 3.4 days (in 2015). The ratio of the minimum to maximum principal moments of inertia is estimated to be 0.0818 ± 0.0011 , and the initial longitude of the angular momentum in the orbital coordinate system is 40.5 ° ± 9.3 ° . The direction of the rotation axis derived from our results at September 23, 2013, UTC 20:57 is similar to the results obtained from satellite laser ranging data but about 20 ° closer to the negative normal of the orbital plane.

  4. Hydro-acoustic resonance behavior in presence of a precessing vortex rope: observation of a lock-in phenomenon at part load Francis turbine operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favrel, A; Landry, C; Müller, A; Yamamoto, K; Avellan, F

    2014-01-01

    Francis turbines operating at part load condition experience the development of a cavitating helical vortex rope in the draft tube cone at the runner outlet. The precession movement of this vortex rope induces local convective pressure fluctuations and a synchronous pressure pulsation acting as a forced excitation for the hydraulic system, propagating in the entire system. In the draft tube, synchronous pressure fluctuations with a frequency different to the precession frequency may also be observed in presence of cavitation. In the case of a matching between the precession frequency and the synchronous surge frequency, hydro-acoustic resonance occurs in the draft tube inducing high pressure fluctuations throughout the entire hydraulic system, causing torque and power pulsations. The risk of such resonances limits the possible extension of the Francis turbine operating range. A more precise knowledge of the phenomenon occurring at such resonance conditions and prediction capabilities of the induced pressure pulsations needs therefore to be developed. This paper proposes a detailed study of the occurrence of hydro-acoustic resonance for one particular part load operating point featuring a well-developed precessing vortex rope and corresponding to 64% of the BEP. It focuses particularly on the evolution of the local interaction between the pressure fluctuations at the precession frequency and the synchronous surge mode passing through the resonance condition. For this purpose, an experimental investigation is performed on a reduced scale model of a Francis turbine, including pressure fluctuation measurements in the draft tube and in the upstream piping system. Changing the pressure level in the draft tube, resonance occurrences are highlighted for different Froude numbers. The evolution of the hydro-acoustic response of the system suggests that a lock-in effect between the excitation frequency and the natural frequency may occur at low Froude number, inducing a hydro

  5. Digital stereoscopic photography using StereoData Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeppen, John; Sykes, David

    2009-02-01

    Stereoscopic digital photography has become much more practical with the use of USB wired connections between a pair of Canon cameras using StereoData Maker software for precise synchronization. StereoPhoto Maker software is now used to automatically combine and align right and left image files to produce a stereo pair. Side by side images are saved as pairs and may be viewed using software that converts the images into the preferred viewing format at the time of display. Stereo images may be shared on the internet, displayed on computer monitors, autostereo displays, viewed on high definition 3D TVs, or projected for a group. Stereo photographers are now free to control composition using point and shoot settings, or are able to control shutter speed, aperture, focus, ISO, and zoom. The quality of the output depends on the developed skills of the photographer as well as their understanding of the software, human vision and the geometry they choose for their cameras and subjects. Observers of digital stereo images can zoom in for greater detail and scroll across large panoramic fields with a few keystrokes. The art, science, and methods of taking, creating and viewing digital stereo photos are presented in a historic and developmental context in this paper.

  6. Principles and practice of external digital photography in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipasha Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is mandatory to incorporate clinical photography in an ophthalmic practice. Patient photographs are routinely used in teaching, presentations, documenting surgical outcomes and marketing. Standardized clinical photographs are part of an armamentarium for any ophthalmologist interested in enhancing his or her practice. Unfortunately, many clinicians still avoid taking patient photographs for want of basic knowledge or inclination. The ubiquitous presence of the digital camera and digital technology has made it extremely easy and affordable to take high-quality images. It is not compulsory to employ a professional photographer or invest in expensive equipment any longer for this purpose. Any ophthalmologist should be able to take clinical photographs in his/her office settings with minimal technical skill. The purpose of this article is to provide an ophthalmic surgeon with guidelines to achieve standardized photographic views for specific procedures, to achieve consistency, to help in pre-operative planning and to produce accurate pre-operative and post-operative comparisons, which will aid in self-improvement, patient education, medicolegal documentation and publications. This review also discusses editing, storage, patient consent, medicolegal issues and importance of maintenance of patient confidentiality.

  7. Photography of a lithium vapor trail during the daytime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Barium and lithium vapors were released from sounding rockets in the thermosphere and observed from aboard a jet aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 ft. The purpose of the releases was to demonstrate the feasibility of an all-weather technique for observing chemical releases and to evaluate methods of observing daytime releases. The selected flight plan of the aircraft allowed a series of observations of the trail from two different straight line paths. Data were recorded photographically. The reduction in sky brightness at the 40,000-ft altitude as compared to the ground allows the use of a filter with a 10-A bandwidth for trail photography in the daytime. These photographs verified the calculation of the usable angular field of the narrow-band filters. Photographs of a 45-min-old trail of lithium vapor were obtained up to 20 min after sunrise at the aircraft. It is concluded that now vapor trail observations may be made during the daytime without regard to weather and logistic restrictions.

  8. Hemispherical photography to estimate biophysical variables of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziany N. Brandão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Leaf Area Index (LAI is a key parameter to evaluate the vegetation spectral response, estimating plant nutrition and water requirements. However, in large fields is difficult to obtain accurate data to LAI determination. Therefore, the objective of this study was the estimation of LAI, biomass and yield of irrigated cotton through digital hemispherical photography. The treatments consisted of four nitrogen doses (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg ha-1 and four phosphorus doses (0, 120, 240 and 360 kg ha-1. Digital hemispherical photographs were collected under similar sky brightness conditions at 60 and 75 days after emergence (DAE, performed by the Digital Plant Canopy Imager - CI-110® of CID Inc. Biomass and LAI measurements were made on the same dates. LAI was also determined by destructive and non-destructive methods through a leaf area integrator (LI-COR® -LI-3100C model, and by measurements based on the midrib length of all leaves, respectively. The results indicate that the hemispherical images were appropriate to estimate the LAI and biomass production of irrigated cotton, while for the estimation of yield, more research is needed to improve the method.

  9. Photography: enhancing sensitivity by silver-halide crystal doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    The physical chemistry of the silver photography processes, exposure, development and fixing, is briefly summarized. The mechanism of the autocatalytic development by the developer of the clusters produced in silver bromide crystals during the exposure which is controlled by the critical nuclearity of these clusters was understood from pulse radiolysis studies. The effective quantum yield PHI eff of photoinduced silver cluster formation in silver halide microcrystals is usually much lower than the photoionization theoretical limit PHI theor =1 electron-hole pair per photon absorbed, owing to a subsequent very fast intra-crystal recombination of a part of the electron-hole pairs. In order to inhibit this recombination and favor the silver reduction by photo-electrons, the AgX crystals were doped with the formate HCO 2 - as a specific hole scavenger. First, the dopant scavenges the photoinduced hole, thus enhancing the electron escape from the pair recombination. Second, the CO 2 ·- radical so formed transfers an electron to another silver cation, so that the PHI eff limit may be of 2Ag 0 per photon. This Photoinduced Bielectronic Transfer mechanism is strictly proportional to the light quanta absorbed and induces an exceptional efficiency for enhancing the radio- or photographic sensitivity insofar as it totally suppresses the electron-hole recombination

  10. HD Photo: a new image coding technology for digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Tu, Chengjie; Regunathan, Shankar L.; Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces the HD Photo coding technology developed by Microsoft Corporation. The storage format for this technology is now under consideration in the ITU-T/ISO/IEC JPEG committee as a candidate for standardization under the name JPEG XR. The technology was developed to address end-to-end digital imaging application requirements, particularly including the needs of digital photography. HD Photo includes features such as good compression capability, high dynamic range support, high image quality capability, lossless coding support, full-format 4:4:4 color sampling, simple thumbnail extraction, embedded bitstream scalability of resolution and fidelity, and degradation-free compressed domain support of key manipulations such as cropping, flipping and rotation. HD Photo has been designed to optimize image quality and compression efficiency while also enabling low-complexity encoding and decoding implementations. To ensure low complexity for implementations, the design features have been incorporated in a way that not only minimizes the computational requirements of the individual components (including consideration of such aspects as memory footprint, cache effects, and parallelization opportunities) but results in a self-consistent design that maximizes the commonality of functional processing components.

  11. Oblique Aerial Photography Tool for Building Inspection and Damage Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Remondino, F.; Rupnik, E.; Nex, F.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerial photography has a long history of being employed for mapping purposes due to some of its main advantages, including large area imaging from above and minimization of field work. Since few years multi-camera aerial systems are becoming a practical sensor technology across a growing geospatial market, as complementary to the traditional vertical views. Multi-camera aerial systems capture not only the conventional nadir views, but also tilted images at the same time. In this paper, a particular use of such imagery in the field of building inspection as well as disaster assessment is addressed. The main idea is to inspect a building from four cardinal directions by using monoplotting functionalities. The developed application allows to measure building height and distances and to digitize man-made structures, creating 3D surfaces and building models. The realized GUI is capable of identifying a building from several oblique points of views, as well as calculates the approximate height of buildings, ground distances and basic vectorization. The geometric accuracy of the results remains a function of several parameters, namely image resolution, quality of available parameters (DEM, calibration and orientation values), user expertise and measuring capability.

  12. Teaching high-speed photography and photo-instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    2005-03-01

    As the tools available to the high speed photographer have become more powerful the underlying technology has increased in complexity and often is beyond the reach of most practitioners in terms of in-the-field troubleshooting or adaptation and this specialization has also driven many systems beyond the reach of high school, community college and undergraduate, non-research funded, universities. In spite of this and with the belief that fundamental techniques, reasoning and approaches have not changed much over the years, several courses in photo-instrumentation at the Imaging and Photographic Technology program at the Rochester Institute of Technology present to a couple dozen undergraduate students a year the principles associated with a various imaging systems and techniques for visualization and data analysis of high speed or "invisible" phenomena. This paper reviews the objectives and philosophy of these courses in the context of a total imaging technology education. It describes and illustrates current topics included in the program. In brief, calibration and time measurement concepts, instantaneous and repetitive time sampling equipment, various visualization technologies, strip and streak cameras and applications using film and improvised digital recorders, basic velocimetry techniques including sensitometric velocimetry and synchro-ballistic photography plus other related techniques are introduced to undergraduate students.

  13. Principles and practice of external digital photography in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan

    2012-01-01

    It is mandatory to incorporate clinical photography in an ophthalmic practice. Patient photographs are routinely used in teaching, presentations, documenting surgical outcomes and marketing. Standardized clinical photographs are part of an armamentarium for any ophthalmologist interested in enhancing his or her practice. Unfortunately, many clinicians still avoid taking patient photographs for want of basic knowledge or inclination. The ubiquitous presence of the digital camera and digital technology has made it extremely easy and affordable to take high-quality images. It is not compulsory to employ a professional photographer or invest in expensive equipment any longer for this purpose. Any ophthalmologist should be able to take clinical photographs in his/her office settings with minimal technical skill. The purpose of this article is to provide an ophthalmic surgeon with guidelines to achieve standardized photographic views for specific procedures, to achieve consistency, to help in pre-operative planning and to produce accurate pre-operative and post-operative comparisons, which will aid in self-improvement, patient education, medicolegal documentation and publications. This review also discusses editing, storage, patient consent, medicolegal issues and importance of maintenance of patient confidentiality. PMID:22446907

  14. Quantification of faults resulting from disregard of standardised facial photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riml, S; Piontke, A; Larcher, L; Kompatscher, P

    2011-07-01

    Medical photography is an important part of documentary procedures in plastic surgery both for quality assurance and for protecting surgeons from possible medico-legal claims filed by patients. Photo documentary standards were established to make photos reliable and to enable comparisons between pre- and post-operative views of a patient, different operative procedures and between results achieved by different surgeons. Despite their obvious importance, especially in the documentation of subtle surgical procedures on the face such as rhinoplasty, photo documentary standards continue to be disregarded. In this article, we analyse and quantify faults caused by even small deviations from photo documentary standards. Photos of 10 healthy, young adults (n = 10) taken in accordance with established standards were compared to photos with the similar types of faults in positioning of the head (±10° deviation from the standard), camera angles (±10° deviation from standard) or mimic expression (slight smile). A computer-assisted facial analysis was performed and the effects of faulty photo documentation on the final result were calculated. The analysis showed, for instance, that a +10° fault in positioning of the head causes a mean shortening of the nasal dorsum by 32.34% (pfault elongates the nasal dorsum by 11.93% (pfaults in the final outcome. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A preliminary training guide for utilizing high-altitude, color-infrared photography in compiling soil maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. E.; Parkhurst, W. H.; Ward, J. F.; Almond, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Instruction for acquiring and analytically processing small-scale color-infrared photography to perform a soil resources inventory over forests of the southern U.S. is provided. Planning the project; acquiring aerial photography, materials, equipment and supplemental data; and preparing the photography for analysis are discussed. The procedures for preparing ancillary and primary component overlays are discussed. The use of correlation charts and dichotomous keys for mountain landforms, water regime, and vegetation is explained.

  16. Erythema-directed digital photography for the enhanced evaluation of topical treatments for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, G; Dall'Oglio, F; Tedeschi, A; Lacarrubba, F

    2018-01-31

    Erythema-directed digital photography is a novel method for evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of topical acne treatments. Here, we describe three case reports in which erythema-directed digital photography was used to evaluate acne before and after up to 12 weeks of treatment with clindamycin 1%/tretinoin 0.025% (Clin-RA). Erythema-directed digital photography was used to evaluate acne in three patients with mild-to-moderate facial acne, two of whom had refused to continue previous topical acne treatment (benzoyl peroxide 5% and clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 5%) due to persistent irritation. Acne lesions and erythema were evaluated using standard clinical photography and erythema-directed digital photography (VISIA-CR ™ system) before and after 8-12 weeks of treatment with Clin-RA. Erythema-directed digital photography revealed background erythema from previous topical acne treatments that was not evident from standard clinical photographs and allowed a better visualization of both inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. In all patients, there was a clear improvement in background erythema and a reduction in acne lesions following treatment with Clin-RA. This study has demonstrated for the first time that erythema-directed digital photography can enhance the evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of topical acne treatments. These cases show that Clin-RA was associated with improved efficacy and tolerability vs previous treatments with topical monotherapy (benzoyl peroxide 5%) or a topical fixed-dose combination (clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 5%). © 2018 The Authors. Skin Research and Technology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Status of X-ray CT photography in the radiology department of our school of dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokari, Seishi; Takahashi, Nobutoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Shirai, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Hiroshi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hidehiko; Okumura, Yasuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Aided by the significant increase in its performance and reduction in cost, the X-ray CT, which originated from the EMI scanner of the 1970's, has become an essential tool in the field of diagnostic X-ray images in medicine. To comprehend in detail the status of X-ray CT photography used in a special diagnostic situation of an adjust hospital of a school of dentistry is beneficial for evaluating the use of exploratory X-ray photography to obtain useful diagnostic information as well as routine photography format. Also, knowledge of its status is necessary to address the issues of justification and optimization of X-ray examinations. Therefore, we conducted research and evaluation on various items, such as the number of cases photographed, number of contrast enhanced, and male to female ratio, over a six-years period to assess the status of photography conducted with a Toshiba CT Scanner TCT-700S, which was introduced to the Radiology Department of our school in September 1991. The following are part of our findings; 1. Status of photography in total. 1) The total number of cases photographed was 5,346 cases. 2) The number of cases contrast enhanced was 903 cases. 3) Contrast enhanced cases ratio was 16.9%. 4) Male to female ratio was 55.4: 44.6%. 2. Status of case photography by different department was: dentistry, 73.3%; medicine, 26.7%. In order to descending case frequency was oral surgery, 53.0%; internal medicine, 19.4%; and radiology 15.0%. 3. Status of case photography by age was, in order of descending frequency, 50s, 40s, and 60s. (author)

  18. Patients' acceptance of medical photography in a French adult and paediatric dermatology department: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacard, F; Maruani, A; Delaplace, M; Caille, A; Machet, L; Lorette, G; Samimi, M

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing use of medical photography by dermatologists, no study on patients' perceptions of photography in dermatology has been performed to date. Firstly, to evaluate patients' perceptions of medical photography. Secondly, to assess whether perceptions differed between patients in our adult department and parents accompanying a child in our paediatric department. An opinion survey was conducted at the Hospital of Tours (France) among adult patients (adult department) and accompanying parents (paediatric department) by completion of a questionnaire after any medical photography had been performed. We collected 272 questionnaires regarding 158 adults and 114 children. A camera used only in the department, and storage of the images in the department's records were the most accepted modalities (> 90%), especially in the paediatric survey. Respondents agreed with the sharing of the images with other practitioners and in medical meetings (> 85%) rather than distribution via publications (58·3%), e-mails (45·5%), health magazines (44·3%) and websites (32·0%). Most (78·8%) considered that the consent form should list all the possible uses of the images. Need for renewed consent for each use of the images was significantly more often expressed in the paediatric than the adult survey (44·5% vs. 24·5%, P = 0·001). More than 95% of respondents considered medical photography to be useful for improving diagnosis, monitoring of skin disease and aiding teaching. These findings could be used to improve practice, to increase the acceptability of medical photography and for devising a standardized consent form for medical practitioners performing medical photography. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  20. Using digital photography to examine grazing in montane meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Susan K.; Allen-Diaz, Barbara H.; Berg, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    Cattle (Bos taurus) numbers on national forests are allocated based on allotment grazing capacity, but spatial patterns of timing and density at smaller scales are difficult to assess. However, it is often in meadows or riparian areas that grazing may affect hydrology, biodiversity, and other important ecosystem characteristics. To explore real-time animal presence in montane meadows we distributed 18 digital cameras across nine sites in the Sierra National Forest, California. Our objectives were to document seasonal and diurnal presence of both cattle and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), identify the effects of three fencing treatments on animal distribution, and test digital photography as a tool for documenting cattle presence. We recorded 409 399 images during daylight hours for two grazing seasons, and we identified 5 084 and 24 482 cattle "marks" (instances of animal occurrence) in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Deer presence was much lower, with 331 marks in 2006 and 598 in 2007. Morning cattle presence was highest before 0800 hours both years (13.7% and 15.4% of total marks for 2006 and 2007, respectively). Marks decreased until 1100 hours and then increased around 1400 hours and remained relatively stable until 1900 hours. Marks then rose precipitously, with >20% of total marks recorded after 1900 hours both years. Deer presence was less than 10% per hour until 1800 hours, when >20% of total marks were recorded after this time both years. Among treatments, cattle marks were highest outside fences at partially fenced meadows, and deer were highest within completely fenced meadows. Our experience suggests that cameras are not viable tools for meadow monitoring due to variation captured within meadows and the time and effort involved in image processing and review.