WorldWideScience

Sample records for unresectable gastric cancer

  1. Combined Treatment of Residual, Recurrent and Unresectable Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hoon Sik

    1990-01-01

    A series of 25 patients with residual, recurrent, and unresectable gastric cancer received various combination of surgery, radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), and hyperthermia (HT). They were placed INTO 7 categories; 1) CT and HT-14 patients; 2) RT and HT-15 patients; 3) surgery, RT and HT-2 patients; 4) surgery, RT, HT and CT-1 patient; 5) RT, HT and CT-1 patient; 6) RT and CT-1 patient; 7) RT alone-1 patient. Three patients had curative resection. 21 patients received irradiation with tightly contoured portals to spare as much small bowel, kidney and marrow as possible. Hyperthermia was applied regionally once or twice a week for 23 patients using 8 MHz radiofrequency capacitive heating device (Thermotron RF-8). HT was given approximately 30 min after RT. 7 patients were treated with CT: 4 patients received HT and concomitant Mitomycin-C; 3 patients received HT and sequential 5-FU+Adriamycin+Mitomycin-C. There was not any treatment related deaths. There was also no evidence of treatment related problems with liver, kidney, stomach, or spinal cord except only one case of transient diabetic ketoacidosis. The tumor response was evaluable in 22 patients. None achieved complete remission. 11(50%) achieved partial remission. The response rate was correlated with total radiation dose and achieved maximum temperature. 9 of 14 (64%) received more than 4000 cGy showed partial remission; especially, all 3 patients received more than 5500 cGy achieved partial response. 8 of the 12 patients (67%) who achieved maximal temperature more than 41 .deg. C showed partial response in comparing with 25% (2 of 8 patients, below 41 .deg. C). The numbers of HT, however, was not correlated with the response. 3 of the 25 patients (12%) remain alive. The one who was surgically unresectable and underwent irradiation alone is in progression of the disease with distant metastases. The remaining two patients with curative resection are alive with free of disease, 24 and 35 months

  2. Laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy with reduced-port techniques for unresectable distal gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hyakudomi, Ryoji; Hari, Yoko; Fujii, Yusuke; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2014-03-01

    The improvement of quality of life is of great importance in managing patients with far-advanced gastric cancer. We report a new cure and less invasive method of creating a stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy in reduced-port laparoscopic surgery for unresectable gastric cancers with gastric outlet obstruction. A 2.5-cm vertical intraumbilical incision was made, and EZ Access (Hakko Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was placed. After pneumoperitoneum was created, an additional 5-mm trocar was inserted in the right upper abdomen. A gastrojejunostomy was performed in the form of an antiperistaltic side-to-side anastomosis, in which the jejunal loop was elevated in the antecolic route and anastomosed to the greater curvature of the stomach using an endoscopic linear stapler. The jejunal loop together with the stomach was dissected with additional linear staplers just proximal to the common entry hole so that a functional end-to-end gastrojejunostomy was completed. At the same time, the stomach was partitioned using a linear stapler to leave a 2-cm-wide lumen in the lesser curvature. Subsequently, jejunojejunostomy was performed 30 cm distal to the gastrojejunostomy, and the stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy resembling Roux-en Y anastomosis was completed. All patients resumed oral intake on the day of operation. Neither anastomotic leakage nor anastomotic stricture was observed. Our less invasive palliative operation offers the utmost priority to improve quality of life for patients with unresectable gastric cancer.

  3. Human epidermal growth factor receptor2 expression in unresectable gastric cancers: Relationship with CT characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock Ah; Kim, Min A; Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To retrospectively analyze the qualitative CT features that correlate with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expression in pathologically-proven gastric cancers. A total of 181 patients with pathologically-proven unresectable gastric cancers with HER2-expression (HER2-positive [n = 32] and negative [n = 149]) were included. CT features of primary gastric and metastatic tumors were reviewed. The prevalence of each CT finding was compared in both groups. Thereafter, binary logistic regression determined the most significant differential CT features. Clinical outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier method. HER2-postive cancers showed lower clinical T stage (21.9% vs. 8.1%; p = 0.015), hyperattenuation on portal phase (62.5% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.003), and was more frequently metastasized to the liver (62.5% vs. 32.2%; p = 0.001), than HER2-negative cancers. On binary regression analysis, hyperattenuation of the tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; p < 0.001) and hepatic metastasis (OR, 4.43; p = 0.001) were significant independent factors that predict HER2-positive cancers. Median survival of HER2-positive cancers (13.7 months) was significantly longer than HER2-negative cancers (9.6 months) (p = 0.035). HER2-positive gastric cancers show less-advanced T stage, hyperattenuation on the portal phase, and frequently metastasize to the liver, as compared to HER2-negative cancers.

  4. Human epidermal growth factor receptor2 expression in unresectable gastric cancers: Relationship with CT characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock Ah; Kim, Min A; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the qualitative CT features that correlate with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expression in pathologically-proven gastric cancers. A total of 181 patients with pathologically-proven unresectable gastric cancers with HER2-expression (HER2-positive [n = 32] and negative [n = 149]) were included. CT features of primary gastric and metastatic tumors were reviewed. The prevalence of each CT finding was compared in both groups. Thereafter, binary logistic regression determined the most significant differential CT features. Clinical outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier method. HER2-postive cancers showed lower clinical T stage (21.9% vs. 8.1%; p = 0.015), hyperattenuation on portal phase (62.5% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.003), and was more frequently metastasized to the liver (62.5% vs. 32.2%; p = 0.001), than HER2-negative cancers. On binary regression analysis, hyperattenuation of the tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; p < 0.001) and hepatic metastasis (OR, 4.43; p = 0.001) were significant independent factors that predict HER2-positive cancers. Median survival of HER2-positive cancers (13.7 months) was significantly longer than HER2-negative cancers (9.6 months) (p = 0.035). HER2-positive gastric cancers show less-advanced T stage, hyperattenuation on the portal phase, and frequently metastasize to the liver, as compared to HER2-negative cancers

  5. Laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy versus duodenal stenting in unresectable gastric cancer with gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sa-Hong; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Min; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2017-09-01

    To compare the outcome between laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy (LapGJ) and duodenal stenting (DS) in terms of oral intake, nutritional status, patency duration, effect on chemotherapy and survival. Medical records of 115 patients, who had LapGJ or duodenal stent placement between July 2005 and September 2015 in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, have been reviewed retrospectively. Oral intake was measured with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System. Serum albumin and body weight was measured as indicators of nutritional status. The duration of patency was measured until the date of reintervention. Chemotherapy effect was calculated after the procedures. Survival period and oral intake was analyzed by propensity score matching age, sex, T-stage, comorbidities, and chemotherapy status. Forty-three LapGJ patients and 58 DS patients were enrolled. Improvement in oral intake was shown in LapGJ group versus DS group (88% vs. 59%, P = 0.011). Serum albumin showed slight but significant increase after LapGJ (+0.75 mg/dL vs. -0.15 mg/dL, P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in their body weight (+5.1 kg vs. -1.0 kg, P = 0.670). Patients tolerated chemotherapy longer without dosage reduction after LapGJ (243 days vs . 74 days, P = 0.006) and maintained the entire chemotherapy regimen after the procedure longer in LapGJ group (247 days vs. 137 days, P = 0.042). LapGJ showed significantly longer survival than DS (220 vs. 114 days, P = 0.004). DS can provide faster symptom relief but LapGJ can provide improved oral intake, better compliance to chemotherapy, and longer survival. Therefore, LapGJ should be the first choice in gastric outlet obstruction patients for long-term and better quality of life.

  6. External beam radiotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nishio, Masamichi; Narimatsu, Naoto; Ogawa, Hajime; Betsuyaku, Takashi; Hirata, Kouji; Ikeda, Shigeyuki (Sapporo National Hospital (Japan). Hokkaido Cancer Center)

    1992-04-01

    Between 1980 to 1989, 24 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (10 with localized tumor alone and 14 with distant metastases) have been treated with external beam radiation at Sapporo National Hospital, Hokkaido Cancer Center. Response rate of pancreatic tumor treated with external beam radiation was 33.3% (7/21) with no complete response. Median survival time of the patients with localized tumor was 10 months and that of the patients with distant metastases was 3 months. Relief of pain occurred in 92.9% (12/13) of patients having pain due to pancreatic tumor and in 75% (3/4) of patients having pain due to bone metastases. Major complication was gastric ulcer which developed in 5 patients of 21 patients given stomach irradiation. We concluded that unresectable pancreatic cancer would be frequently indicated for radiotherapy. (author).

  7. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo; Shi, Yuankai

    2015-06-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies.

  8. Effect of preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy on malignant molecule expression in locally advanced unresectable gastric cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy on malignant molecule expression in locally advanced unresectable gastric cancer tissue. Methods: A total of 144 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer receiving surgical resection after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our hospital between May 2012 and August 2015 were selected and randomly divided into experimental group who received preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy and control group who received preoperative intravenous systemic chemotherapy. The levels of serum tumor markers were determined after chemotherapy, and the expression levels of tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle-related molecules in tumor tissue were determined after surgical resection. Results: After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the serum G-17, TK-1, CEA, CA19-9, CA12-5, CA72-4 and CK, CK-MB, ALT, AST levels of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group; after surgical resection, the p16, p27, PTEN and TXNIP mRNA levels in tumor tissue of experimental group were significantly higher than those of control group while CyclinB2, CyclinD1, CyclinE, CDK1 and CDK2 mRNA levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy can more effectively kill gastric cancer cells, reduce tumor load, inhibit cell cycle and promote cell apoptosis.

  9. Palliative Therapy for Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer: A Meta-analysis Comparison of Gastrojejunostomy with Endoscopic Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bo Bian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both GJJ and ES are effective procedures for the treatment of GOO caused by gastric cancer. ES is associated with better short-term outcomes. GJJ is preferable to ES in terms of its lower rate of stent-related complications, re-obstruction, and reintervention. GJJ should be considered a treatment option for patients with a long life expectancy and good performance status.

  10. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, H.O.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer

  11. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, T.

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer is still a major health problem and a leading cause of cancer mortality despite a worldwide decline in incidence. Primarily due to early detection of the disease, the results of treatment for gastric cancer have improved in Japan, Korea and several specialized Western centres. Surgery offers excellent long-term survival results for early gastric cancer (EGC). In the Western world, however more than 80 % of patients at diagnosis have an advanced gastric cancer with a poor prognosis. The aim of surgery is the complete removal of the tumour (UICC R0-resection), which is known to be the only proven, effective treatment modality and the most important treatmentrelated prognostic factor. The prognosis after surgical treatment of gastric cancer remains poor. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a rising option in locally advanced gastric cancer. Adjuvant chemoradiation has been shown to be beneficial in gastric cancer patients who have undergone suboptimal surgical resection. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy alone seem to be very small, Untreated metastatic gastric cancer is associated with a median survival of only 3 - 4 months, but this can be increased to 8 - 10 months, associated with improved quality of life, with combination chemotherapy. Currently, no standard combination chemotherapy regimen exists, although regimens utilizing both cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, such as epirubicin/cisplatin/fluorouracil (ECF) or docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil (DCF) are amongst the most active. Newer chemotherapeutic agents, including irinotecan, oxaliplatin and taxanes, show promising activity, and are currently being tested with biologics in clinical trials. (author)

  12. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  13. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineur, L.; Jaegle, E.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.

    2010-01-01

    Radio-chemotherapy Gastro-intestinal inter-group study have demonstrated a convincing local control and overall survival benefit. Oncologists and GI workshops have in the present not had a major interest in the radiotherapy treatment of gastric cancer due to a number of factors. Primary because toxicities may be severe, second physicians may have low experience in definition of clinical target volume and in third perioperative chemotherapy is widely used in this indication. In Summary this issue should be used as guides for defining appropriate radiation planning treatment for the adjuvant postoperative therapy of gastric cancer. (authors)

  14. Radiation therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R.; Bagne, F.; Ajlouni, M.I.; Milligan, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is a moderately radioresponsive neoplasm. Attempts to treat patients with unresectable disease with external beam radiation therapy alone have generally failed because of problems with tumor localization and adequate dose delivery as well as the inherent radioresponsiveness of the gastric mucosa and the organs intimately related to the stomach. Combining external beam therapy and chemotherapy (acting as a systemic agent and as a radiosensitizer) seems to be of some (albeit limited) benefit in the management of unresectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Optimum combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and radiation sensitizers in this situation remain to be determined. The authors discuss strides which have been made in the treatment of gastric cancer. They also address the unanswered clinical questions which remain regarding the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of this highly lethal disease

  15. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  16. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  17. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a disease in ...

  19. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  20. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Bae; Seong, Jin Sil; Song, Si Young; Park, Seung Woo; Suh, Chang Ok

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the treatment results of concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU plus Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel for unresectable pancreatic cancer. The patients, who were diagnosed by imaging modalities or by explo-laparotomy were treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, and the total dose was 45 Gy. Patients received Gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m 2 or Paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 weekly and oral 5-FU daily. The total number of cycles of chemotherapy ranged from 1 to 39 (median, 11 cycles). The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 36 months. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Fifty-four patients between Jan. 1999 to Nov. 2001 were included in this study. Forty-two patients who completed the planned treatment were included in this analysis. The patients' age ranged from 37 to 73 years (median, 60 years) and the male to female ratio was 30:12. Treatment was interrupted for 12 patients due to; disease progression for 6 (50%), poor performance status for 4 (33.3%), intercurrent disease for 1 (8.3%), and refusal for 1 (8.3%). Response evaluation was possible for 40 patients. One patient gained complete remission and 24 patients gained partial remission, hence the response rate was 59%. The survival rates were 46.7% and 17.0% at 1 year and 2 years, respectively with a median survival time of 12 months. Patients treated with Paclitaxel showed superior outcomes compared to those patients treated with Gemcitabine, in terms of both response rate and survival rate although this difference was not statistically significant. Grade III or IV hematologic toxicity was shown in 8 patients (19%), while grade III or IV non-hematologic toxicity was shown in 5 patients (12%). Concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU and Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel improves both the response rate and survival rate in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective study should be investigated in order to improve both the patient

  1. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  2. Familial Gastric Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W; Duda, Dan G; Hong, Theodore S; Kwak, Eunice L; Mullen, John T; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-12-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%-3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. ©AlphaMed Press.

  3. The Role of Radiation Therapy in the Unresectable Rectal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Cheol; Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Unresectable rectal cancer has a grave prognosis, regardless of the therapy used and median survival is less than 1 year. Also, it is reported by many authors that 50-80% of unresectable lesions were rendered respectable by radiation therapy and the median survival time for the completely resected patients were better than that of the unresected patients. So we analyzed retrospectively our data for the better treatment outcome in these patients. Materials and Methods : From 1980 to 1992, 45 patients with initially unresectable tumors in the rectum were treated with radiation therapy with/without surgery in Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center. 10 MV radiation and multiple field technique( box or AP/PA) were used. The total dose was 8-70 Gy and median dose was 48 Gy. We evaluated the lesion status at 45-50 Gy for operability. If the lesions appeared to be respectable, the patients were operated on 4-6 weeks after radiation therapy. But if the lesions were still fixed, the radiation dose was increased to 60-65 Gy. Results : For all patients, the 2-year actuarial survival was 13.3% and median survival was 9.5 months. Of 6 patients who had received less than 45 Gy, only 17% of patients responded, but in the patients who had received more than 45 Gy, 60% of response rate was achieved. Six of the 24 patients(25%) underwent surgical resections following RT. For patients undergoing curative resection, the two-year survival was 50%, but that of the patients without resection was 9.5% (p<0.01). Survival of patients with complete response following RT was 50% at 2 years. Survival of patients with partial response, stable disease and progressive disease after RT was 13.4%, 15.4%, 0% respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggests that the efforts which can increase the response rate and aggressive surgical approach are needed to achieve the better local control and survival in unresectable rectal cancers

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  5. Helicobacter pyloriand gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... only common but is second to lung cancer as a leading cause of cancer-related ... in the developing world,4 although cancer records are not readily available for .... gastric cancers are identified at a late stage due to lack of ...

  6. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C.; Mornex, F.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  7. Surgical palliation of unresectable pancreatic head cancer in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Il; Kim, Hyung Ook; Son, Byung Ho; Yoo, Chang Hak; Kim, Hungdai; Shin, Jun Ho

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if surgical biliary bypass would provide improved quality of residual life and safe palliation in elderly patients with unresectable pancreatic head cancer. METHODS: Nineteen patients, 65 years of age or older, were managed with surgical biliary bypass (Group A). These patients were compared with 19 patients under 65 years of age who were managed with surgical biliary bypass (Group B). In addition, the results for group A were compared with those obtained from 17 patients, 65 years of age or older (Group C), who received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage to evaluate the quality of residual life. RESULTS: Five patients (26.0%) in Group A had complications, including one intraabdominal abscess, one pulmonary atelectasis, and three wound infections. One death (5.3%) occurred on postoperative day 3. With respect to morbidity, mortality, and postoperative hospitalization, no statistically significant difference was noted between Groups A and B. The number of readmissions and the rate of recurrent jaundice were lower in Group A than in Group C, to a statistically significant degree (P = 0.019, P = 0.029, respectively). The median hospital-free survival period and the median overall survival were also significantly longer in Group A (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Surgical palliation does not increase the morbidity or mortality rates, but it does increase the survival rate and improve the quality of life in elderly patients with unresectable pancreatic head cancer. PMID:19248198

  8. Intraoperative radio-frequency capacitive hyperthermia and radiation therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Yamashita, T.; Hashida, I.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have initiated intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and intraoperative radio-frequency capacitive hyperthermia (IOHT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. After gastric (corpus) resection, IORT and IOHT were conducted and gastro-duodenostomy was performed IORT was delivered with 12 meV electron (25 Gy) and 10 MV Linac x-ray (7.5 Gy). IOHT was done with 13.56 MHz capacitive equipment aiming 43 0 C for over 30 min along with concurrent administration of 500 mg 5-FU. Five cases were heated by the conventional method and two additional cases were heated with a newly fabricated applicator. Attained temperatures monitored directly from tumor were 38.5 0 C-44.3 0 C (over 43 0 C in four cases, 40 0 C in one case, and below 40 0 C in two cass.) Pain relief was achieved in most cases. Using the new applicators, the authors could avoid unexpected hot spots and insufficient heating

  9. Redefining early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Savio G; Windsor, John A

    2016-01-01

    The problem is that current definitions of early gastric cancer allow the inclusion of regional lymph node metastases. The increasing use of endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat early gastric cancer is a concern because regional lymph nodes are not addressed. The aim of the study was thus to critically evaluate current evidence with regard to tumour-specific factors associated with lymph node metastases in "early gastric cancer" to develop a more precise definition and improve clinical management. A systematic and comprehensive search of major reference databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library) was undertaken using a combination of text words "early gastric cancer", "lymph node metastasis", "factors", "endoscopy", "surgery", "lymphadenectomy" "mucosa", "submucosa", "lymphovascular invasion", "differentiated", "undifferentiated" and "ulcer". All available publications that described tumour-related factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer were included. The initial search yielded 1494 studies, of which 42 studies were included in the final analysis. Over time, the definition of early gastric cancer has broadened and the indications for endoscopic treatment have widened. The mean frequency of lymph node metastases increased on the basis of depth of infiltration (mucosa 6% vs. submucosa 28%), presence of lymphovascular invasion (absence 9% vs. presence 53%), tumour differentiation (differentiated 13% vs. undifferentiated 34%) and macroscopic type (elevated 13% vs. flat 26%) and tumour diameter (≤2 cm 8% vs. >2 cm 25%). There is a need to re-examine the diagnosis and staging of early gastric cancer to ensure that patients with one or more identifiable risk factor for lymph node metastases are not denied appropriate chemotherapy and surgical resection.

  10. Unresectable liver metastases in colorectal cancer: review of current strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Benjamin; Pellerin, Olivier; Voron, Thibault; Pointet, Anne L; Taieb, Julien; Pernot, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the treatment of colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases should be clearly defined at the outset. Potentially resectable patients should be distinguished from clearly unresectable patients. In defining resectability, it is important to take into account both anatomic characteristics and patient characteristic (comorbidities, symptoms, age). According to this evaluation, treatment should be tailored to each patient. The most widely accepted standard is doublet cytotoxic regimen plus biotherapy (anti-EGFR or anti-VEGF antibodies according to RAS status, but some patients could benefit from an intensified regimen, as triplet chemotherapy ± bevacizumab, or intraarterial treatments (hepatic arterial infusion, radioembolization or chemoembolization), in order to allow resectability. It is therefore very important to discuss the treatments with a multidisciplinary team, including an experienced surgeon, an interventional radiologist and an oncologist. On the other hand, some patients could benefit in terms of quality of life and decreased toxicity from less intense treatment when resection is not an objective. First-line monotherapy or a maintenance strategy with biotherapy and/or cytotoxics could be discussed with these patients, and treatment holidays should be considered in selected patients. Finally, in patients with secondary resection of liver metastases, specificity should be considered in choosing the best adjuvant treatment, such as response to preoperative treatment and individual risk of relapse, which many in some cases justify intensification with hepatic arterial infusion in an adjuvant setting.

  11. Gastric cancer review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Peirce Carcas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease.

  12. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually

  13. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut, E-mail: friess@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  14. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3...... the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic...

  15. and Gastric Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Celik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the relationship between esophageal and gastric cancers commonly seen in Van Lake region and the traditional eating habits of the geography. Materials and Methods. Esophageal and gastric cancer cases, who underwent surgery between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, were examined. Pathology reports of the patients and presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP were recorded. Surveys were filled by face to face meeting or telephone call. Control group was created with randomly selected individuals without any cancer diagnosis having age, gender, and socioeconomic characteristics similar to patient group. All data were analyzed using SAS.9.3 statistical programme. Results. Compared with the control group, herby cheese consumption (a component of eating habits and smoking were significantly higher in the patient group (P<0.001. Tandoor exposure is compared in terms of female gender, and significant difference was found between the groups (P=0.0013. As a result of the analysis with logistic regression more than 150 gr of herby cheese consumption per day was found to increase the cancer risk (odds ratio 1.017; 95% CI: 1.012–1.022. Conclusion. A high consumption of herby cheese, cooking bread on tandoor, and heavy smoking were seen to be important risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers.

  16. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  17. Results of Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Unresectable Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, O Kyu; Je, Hyoung Uk; Kim, Sung Bae [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and failure patterns after definitive chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced, unresectable esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: From February 1994 to December 2002, 168 patients with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable esophageal cancer were treated by definitive chemoradiation therapy. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (42-46 Gy) was delivered to the region encompassing the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes, while the supraclavicular fossa and celiac area were included in the treatment area as a function of disease location. The administered cone-down radiation dose to the gross tumor went up to 54-66 Gy, while the fraction size of the EBRT was 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction qd or 1.2 Gy/fraction bid. An optional high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (BT) boost was also administered (Ir-192, 9-12 Gy/3 -4 fx). Two cycles of concurrent FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day, days 2-6, 30-34, cisplatin 60 mg/m2/day, days 1, 29) were delivered during radiotherapy with the addition of two more cycles. Results: One hundred sixty patients were analyzable for this review [median follow-up time: 10 months (range 1-149 months)]. The number of patients within AJCC stages I, II, III, and IV was 5 (3.1%), 38 (23.8%), 68 (42.5%), and 49 (30.6%), respectively. A HDR intraluminal BT was performed in 26 patients. The 160 patients had a median EBRT radiation dose of 59.4 Gy (range 44.4-66) and a total radiation dose, including BT, of 60 Gy (range 44.4-72), while 144 patients received a dose higher than 40 Gy. Despite the treatment, the disease recurrence rate was 101/160 (63.1%). Of these, the patterns of recurrence were local in 20 patients (12.5%), persistent disease and local progression in 61 (38.1%), distant metastasis in 15 (9.4%), and concomitant local and distant failure in 5 (3.1%). The overall survival rate was 31.8% at 2 years and 14.2% at 5 years (median 11.1 months). Disease-free survival was 29

  18. Results of Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Unresectable Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, O Kyu; Je, Hyoung Uk; Kim, Sung Bae

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the treatment outcome and failure patterns after definitive chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced, unresectable esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: From February 1994 to December 2002, 168 patients with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable esophageal cancer were treated by definitive chemoradiation therapy. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (42-46 Gy) was delivered to the region encompassing the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes, while the supraclavicular fossa and celiac area were included in the treatment area as a function of disease location. The administered cone-down radiation dose to the gross tumor went up to 54-66 Gy, while the fraction size of the EBRT was 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction qd or 1.2 Gy/fraction bid. An optional high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (BT) boost was also administered (Ir-192, 9-12 Gy/3 -4 fx). Two cycles of concurrent FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day, days 2-6, 30-34, cisplatin 60 mg/m2/day, days 1, 29) were delivered during radiotherapy with the addition of two more cycles. Results: One hundred sixty patients were analyzable for this review [median follow-up time: 10 months (range 1-149 months)]. The number of patients within AJCC stages I, II, III, and IV was 5 (3.1%), 38 (23.8%), 68 (42.5%), and 49 (30.6%), respectively. A HDR intraluminal BT was performed in 26 patients. The 160 patients had a median EBRT radiation dose of 59.4 Gy (range 44.4-66) and a total radiation dose, including BT, of 60 Gy (range 44.4-72), while 144 patients received a dose higher than 40 Gy. Despite the treatment, the disease recurrence rate was 101/160 (63.1%). Of these, the patterns of recurrence were local in 20 patients (12.5%), persistent disease and local progression in 61 (38.1%), distant metastasis in 15 (9.4%), and concomitant local and distant failure in 5 (3.1%). The overall survival rate was 31.8% at 2 years and 14.2% at 5 years (median 11.1 months). Disease-free survival was 29

  19. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  20. Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0472 TITLE: Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lawrence Fong CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0473 (Ashworth) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Eric Collisson, David Quigley...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We performed the screen of gastric cancer cell lines for their

  1. Diet and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipetić Sandra B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case-control study, conducted in Serbia during the period 1998-2000, was to investigate whether diet was associated with the development of gastric cancer. The case group consisted of 131 patients with histologically confirmed gastric cancer, and the control group of 131 patients with orthopedics diseases and injuries. Cases and controls were individually matched by age (±± 2 years, gender, and place of residence. On the basis of multivariate logistic regression analysis, following factors were found as independent risk factors for gastric cancer: more frequent consumption of high-fat milk [Odds ratio (OR =1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.99-2.16]; mutton, lamb and/or calf meat (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.11-5.47, sugar (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.43-3.18, semi-white bread (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.25-3.50, and salting food (OR = 5.72, 95% CI = 2.63-12.42. Factors found as protective were: more frequent consumption of margarine (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.25-0.69, „other“ cheeses (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.77, and fish (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.19-0.76.

  2. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  3. Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0470 TITLE: Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yelena Janjigian CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical...Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0473 (Ashworth) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Eric Collisson, David

  4. Clinicopathological study of asymptomatic gastric cancer and symptomatic gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshiteru

    2008-01-01

    Gastric cancer can be classified into two categories based on the absence or presence of symptoms at diagnosis. Differences in clinicopathological features and prognoses between asymptomatic gastric cancer (ACG) and symptomatic gastric cancer (SGC) can be used to inform diagnosis strategies and ultimately improve survival rates. All cases of gastric cancer (239 AGC, 323 SGC) diagnosed in our hospital between 1997 and 1999 were used in this study. ACG patients showed significantly higher frequency of males, cases of early cancer, cases found by a mass screening program, cases treated by endoscopic resection, cases treated by curative operation, cases of type 0 macroscopic finding, cases of histologically-differentiated type, and stage I cases. By contrast, SGC patients showed significantly higher numbers of cases treated by chemotherapy alone or best support care, cases of type 2, 3, and 4 macroscopic findings, cases occupying the whole stomach, and cases of stage II, III, IV. Statistically significant differences were also found for the 5-year survival rate (83.3% in AGC, 41.2% in SGC), the incidence of early cancer (90.1% in AGC, 83.7% in SGC), and for advanced cancer (38.7% in AGC, 22.7% in SGC). The higher incidence of advanced cases in SGC than in AGC (40.0% vs. 13.0%), coupled with the low 5-year survival rate of advanced SGC (22.7%), provides strong evidence of the importance of diagnosing gastric cancer during its asymptomatic period. (author)

  5. [AFP-producing gastric cancer and hepatoid gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y K; Zhang, X T

    2017-11-23

    AFP-producing gastric cancer(AFPGC) and hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach (HAS) are two special subtypes of gastric cancer. There are both correlation and difference between them. AFPGC is usually identified as primary gastric cancer with serum AFP level more than 20 ng/ml or showed AFP positive staining by immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis of HAS is mainly dependent on the pathological character of hepatocellular carcinoma-like differentiation of gastric cancer. The morbidity of AFPGC and HAS are rather low, especially the incidence of HAS is about 1%. The prognoses of these two subtypes are poorer than that of common gastric adenocarcinoma, due to a high incidence rate of liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis. With the development of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, gastric cancers, including these two rare subtypes, are now being investigated in more detail at the molecular level. Treatment remains the biggest challenge, early diagnosis and radical resection can dramatically improve patients'prognosis. Monitoring serum AFP and abdominal imaging examination during follow-up is important for early detection of liver metastasis. In combination with local treatment methods such as transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation of liver may further extend patients'survival time. Targeted therapy owes a great potential value in the future.

  6. [Cancer of the gastric stump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Bravo, F; Montero, L

    1992-01-01

    627 cases of gastric cancer treated surgically during the last 5 years, at the Hospital Nacional "Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" from Instituto Peruano de Seguridad Social (Lima-Perú) were revised. 4 of the patients had been operated before of hemigastrectomy or antrectomy with pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer. The time between the first operation and diagnosis of cancer of the gastric stump was more than 20 years. 3 of these cases were able to be resected. The international incidence of cancer in the gastric stump is 1.1% to 9.2% according to different authors. The risk is higher after 15 years. In the pathogenesis are advocated the lower gastric acidity, biliary reflux, the presence of bacteria, the formation of nitrosamines, intestinal metaplasia, etc. Is necessary to perform periodic endoscopic survey in patients who were treated surgically of peptic ulcer with antrectomy or hemigastrectomy with more than 15 years of evolution.

  7. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do PMID:26566288

  8. External and intraoperative radiotherapy for resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer: analysis of survival rates and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hosotani, Ryo; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kokubo, Masaki; Kanamori, Shuichi; Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ohshio, Gakuji; Imamura, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masaji; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for both resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer were analyzed. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1995, 332 patients with pancreatic cancer were treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy (RT). Of the 332 patients, 157 patients were treated with surgical resection of pancreatic tumor, and the remaining 175 patients had unresectable pancreatic tumors. Among the 157 patients with resected pancreatic cancer, 62 patients were not treated with RT, while 40 patients were treated with EBRT alone (mean RT dose; 46.3 Gy) and 55 patients with IORT (25.2 Gy) ± EBRT (44.0 Gy). On the other hand, among the 175 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, 58 patients were not treated with RT, 46 patients were treated with EBRT alone (39.2 Gy), and the remaining 71 patients with IORT (29.3 Gy) ± EBRT (41.2 Gy). Results: For 87 patients with curative resection, the median survival times (MSTs) of the no-RT, the EBRT, and the IORT ± EBRT groups were 10.4, 13.0, and 15.5 months, respectively, without significant difference. For 70 patients with non curative resection, the MSTs of the no-RT, the EBRT, and the IORT ± EBRT groups were 5.3, 8.7, and 6.5 months, respectively. When the EBRT and the IORT ± EBRT groups were combined, the survival rate was significantly higher than that of the no RT group for non curatively resected pancreatic cancers (log rank test; p = 0.028). The 2-year survival probability of the IORT ± EBRT group (16%) was higher than that of the EBRT group (0%). For unresectable pancreatic cancer, the MSTs of 52 patients without distant metastases were 6.7 months for palliative surgery alone, 7.6 months for EBRT alone, and 8.2 months for IORT ± EBRT. The survival curve of the IORT ± EBRT group was significantly better than that of the no-RT group (p 2 years) were obtained by IORT ± EBRT for non curatively resected and unresectable pancreatic

  9. Telomerase activity in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, E; Yokoyama, T; Tatsumoto, N; Hiyama, K; Imamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Kodama, T; Piatyszek, M A; Shay, J W; Matsuura, Y

    1995-08-01

    Although many genetic alterations have been reported in gastric cancer, it is not known whether all gastric tumors are capable of indefinite proliferative potential, e.g., immortality. The expression of telomerase and stabilization of telomeres are concomitant with the attainment of immortality in tumor cells; thus, the measurement of telomerase activity in clinically obtained tumor samples may provide important information useful both as a diagnostic marker to detect immortal cancer cells in clinical materials and as a prognostic indicator of patient outcome. Telomerase activity was analyzed in 66 primary gastric cancers with the use of a PCR-based assay. The majority of tumors (85%) displayed telomerase activity, but telomerase was undetectable in 10 tumors (15%), 8 of which were early stage tumors. Most of the tumors with telomerase activity were large and of advanced stages, including metastases. Survival rate of patients of tumors with detectable telomerase activity was significantly shorter than that of those without telomerase activity. Alterations of telomere length (reduced/elongated terminal restriction fragments) were detected in 14 of 66 (21%) gastric cancers, and all 14 had telomerase activity. Cellular DNA contents revealed that all 22 aneuploid tumors had detectable telomerase activity. The present results indicate that telomerase activation may be required as a critical step in the multigenetic process of tumorigenesis, and that telomerase is frequently but not always activated as a late event in gastric cancer progression.

  10. Analysis of interventional therapy for progressing stage gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingde; Zhang Zijing; Ji Hongsheng; Ge Chenlin; Hao Gang; Wei Kongming; Yuan Yuhou; Zhao Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the interventional therapy and its curative effect for progressing stage gastric cancer. Methods: two hundred and twelve patients with progressing stage gastric cancer were treated with arterial perfusion and arterial embolization. Gastric cardia cancer was treated through the left gastric artery and the left inferior phrenic artery or splenic artery. Cancers of lesser and greater gastric curvature was treated either through the left and right gastric arteries or common hepatic artery or through gastroduodenal artery, right gastroomental artery or splenic artery. Gastric antrum cancers were perfused through gastroduodenal artery or after the middle segmental embolization of right gastroomental artery. Results: One hundred and ninety three cases undergone interventional management were followed up. The CR + PR of gastric cardia cancer was 53.13%; gastric body cancer 44.44%; gastric antrum cancer 10%; recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer 0. There was no significant difference in outcome between gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer (P>0.05) but significant differences were shown both between gastric cardia cancer and gastric antrum cancer, and between gastric body cancer and gastric antrum cancer (P<0.05), with 1 year and 2 years survival rates of 81% and 56% respectively. Conclusion: The interventional therapeutic effect of progressing stage gastric cancers is different due to the different sites of the lesions in the gastric tissue. The curative effect of gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer is better than that of gastric antrum cancer, recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer. (authors)

  11. Clinical results of definitive-dose (50 Gy/25 fractions) preoperative chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Osamu; Yasuda, Takushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical results of definitive-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks for unresectable esophageal cancer were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were unresectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with T4b or mediastinal lymph nodes invading to the trachea or aorta. Radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks was combined concurrently with two courses of FP therapy (CDDP 70 mg/m 2 + 5-FU 700 mg/m 2 /d x 5 days: day 1-5, day 29-33). Tumor response was evaluated 4 weeks after completion of RT. Subtotal esophagectomy was planned 6-8 weeks after RT. Thirty patients (26 male and 4 female) aged from 50-78 years (median 66) were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. The clinical stages according to the 7th edition of UICC were stages II/III/IV, 1/23/6; T1/2/3/4, 1/1/4/24; and N0/1/2/3, 3/25/1/1. All 30 patients completed RT of 50 Gy/ 25 fractions. Initial tumor responses were 21 patients with resectable disease, 7 with unresectable disease, and 2 with progressive disease. Subtotal esophagectomy was performed in 18 (60%) of the 30 patients. Pathological complete response was obtained in five (28%) patients. There were two patients with hospitalization death after surgery (11%). Six of the 7 patients who still had unresectable disease were treated with 1-3 courses of docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU. Three patients treated without surgery showed long-term survival. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate for the 30 patients were 70 and 49%, respectively. Definitive-dose preoperative CRT was feasible, and is a promising treatment strategy for unresectable esophageal cancer. (author)

  12. Diagnosis of gastric cancers by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jianbing; Gong Jianping; Huan Jian

    1999-01-01

    Forty two cases of gastric cancers were reviewed. The cancer had been examined by CT and was confirmed by operation and pathology. The diagnostic results of gastric cancers obtained by CT were compared with that from GI and fibro-gastroscopy examination. The results showed that the preparation of gastrointestinal tract before CT examination was important in the CT diagnosis of gastric cancer. CT in diagnosis of focus of gastric cancer and organ invasion is better than Gl and Fibro-gastroscopy and accuracy in diagnosis of gastric cancers is near to that of GI examination

  13. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  14. Gastric stem cells and gastric cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2013-01-01

    The gastric epithelium is continuously regenerated by gastric stem cells, which give rise to various kinds of daughter cells, including parietal cells, chief cells, surface mucous cells, mucous neck cells, and enteroendocrine cells. The self-renewal and differentiation of gastric stem cells need delicate regulation to maintain the normal physiology of the stomach. Recently, it was hypothesized that cancer stem cells drive the cancer growth and metastasis. In contrast to conventional clonal ev...

  15. Endoscopic palliation in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivieso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The integral search for improved living conditions for those patients with gastric cancer who have not received curative surgical treatment continues to challenge the knowledge, dexterity and ethical foundations of medical teams. The justification for palliative treatment must be based on a thorough consideration of the available options and the particular situation in each case. This article reviews endoscopic therapy with auto expandable prosthetics for palliative treatment of gastric cancer, as well as the scientific evidence that supports its use and the factors that determine its indication.

  16. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  17. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  18. Gastric cancer and obstructive uropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Yukihisa; Tsunoda, H.S.; Matsueda, Kiyoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshihisa; Kuramoto, Kenmei

    1990-01-01

    In recent 5 years, we have experienced 24 cases of advanced gastric cancer associated with obstructive uropathy. Included were 19 cases of undifferentiated, 3 cases of differentiated and 2 cases of unknown histological type. Obstructive uropathy is diagnosed based on the typical radiological findings such as dilatation and delayed demonstration of the upper collecting systems. Pathologically, undifferentiated type of gastric cancer had tendency to spread infiltratively along the vessels, nerves and the lymphatics without alteration of the ordinary anatomical structures. In such cases, mucosal surface of the urinary tract tended to be spared in spite of extensive tumor invasion. It was proven that several radiological findings were characteristic of urinary tract involvement secondary to gastric cancer. Either thread-like ureteral stricture by IVU or ring-like appearance of the ureter by CT is one of those typical findings. Renal sinus involvement may occur continuously to diffuse retroperitoneal invasion and it appears as a thickened wall of renal pelvis or soft tissue mass directly extending into the fatty tissue of renal sinus by CT. In such cases IVU has less diagnostic ability because of the lack of mucosal destruction. If the urinary bladder is involved, it typically shows chestnut-bur appearance by IVU and diffuse wall thickening by CT. In cases of advanced gastric cancer, particularly in cases of histologically undifferentiated type, CT and IVU images should be carefully interpreted in consideration of the infiltrative part of tumor extention. (author)

  19. Genetic Determinants of Gastric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boccia (Stefania)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractResults show that gastric cancer risk is increased by the inheritance of the variant alleles of the metabolic genes SULT1A1 and CYP2E1 *6, especially among smokers and drinkers, respectively. An additional increased risk is conferred by the inheritance of GSTT1 null variant, especially

  20. Perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab for initially unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (NAVIGATE-CRC-01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Oya, Masatoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative chemotherapy combined with surgery for liver metastases is considered an active strategy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its impact on initially unresectable, previously untreated advanced CRC, regardless of concurrent metastases, remains to be clarified. A Phase II study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab for initially unresectable advanced CRC. Patients with previously untreated advanced colon or rectal cancer initially diagnosed as unresectable advanced CRC (TNM stage IIIb, IIIc, or IV) but potentially resectable after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) were studied. Preoperatively, patients received six cycles of NAC (five cycles of neoadjuvant FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab followed by one cycle of FOLFOX4 alone). The interval between the last dose of bevacizumab and surgery was at least 5 weeks. Six cycles of adjuvant FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab were given after surgery. The completion rate of NAC and feasibility of curative surgery were the primary endpoints. An interim analysis was performed at the end of NAC in the 12th patient to assess the completion rate of NAC. The median follow-up time was 56 months. The characteristics of the patients were as follows: sex, eight males and four females; tumor location, sigmoid colon in three, ascending colon in one, and rectum (above the peritoneal reflection) in eight; stage, III in eight and IV in four (liver or lymph nodes). All patients completed six cycles of NAC. There were no treatment-related severe adverse events or deaths. An objective response to NAC was achieved in nine patients (75%), and no disease progression was observed. Eleven patients underwent curative tumor resection, including metastatic lesions. In December 2012, this Phase II study was terminated because of slow registration. Perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab is well tolerated and has a promising response rate leading to curative surgery, which offers a survival

  1. Biliary stenting and anti-cancer therapy for unresectable hilar bile duct carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroya; Hokotate, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Shyuhei; Takamura, Akio

    2007-01-01

    At present, although imaging diagnosis has been developed, most hilar bile duct cancer is still diagnosed at an advanced stage and its prognosis is generally poor. In hilar bile duct cancer, radiotherapy and other several therapies, for example-chemotherapy, arterial-infusion chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, etc-are being performed for non-operative cases. But standard therapies for this cancer has not been established yet. On the other hand, metallic stents (MS) have been widely used to relieve biliary obstructions as an alternative to plastic prostheses and conventional drainage. The use of MS offers good palliation in hilar bile duct cancer, but patients selection is a key to obtain good results. In this article we reviewed previous studies and clinical trials regarding the anti-cancer therapy and biliary stenting for unresectable hilar bile duct cancer. And optimal therapeutic strategy for hilar bile duct cancer is proposed, primarily based on present views. (author)

  2. A clinicopathological study of asymptomatic gastric cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukuma, A.; Furusawa, M.; Tomoda, H.; Seo, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The clinicopathological profiles of 419 patients with asymptomatic gastric cancer (AGC) first detected by gastric screening, were reviewed and compared with those of the 1727 patients with symptomatic gastric cancer (SGC). The incidence of AGC increased gradually and has amounted to 30% of the total resected cases in recent years. About 75% of AGC cases were of early cancer and 84% were negative for lymph node metastases. In contrast, only 33% of SGC cases were of early cancer and 57% were no...

  3. A multicenter, phase II study of bortezomib (PS-341) in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Power, Derek G; Kindler, Hedy L; Holen, Kyle D; Kemeny, Margaret M; Ilson, David H; Tang, Laura; Capanu, Marinela; Wright, John J; Kelsen, David P

    2011-12-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) is implicated in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and survival, and its inhibition by proteosome inhibition is associated with preclinical gastric cancer anti-tumor activity. We examined the single agent efficacy of bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, in gastric adenocarcinoma. We performed a phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) was administered on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was objective response rate(RR); the null hypothesis was RR <1% versus the alternative ≥15%. One response in the first stage(15 patients) was required before proceeding with an additional 18 patients. If at least 2 or more responses out of 33 were observed, further study with bortezomib was warranted. Correlative studies evaluated pre-treatment tumor expression of NFkB, IkB, p53, p21, and cyclin D1. We enrolled 16 patients (15 evaluable for response) from four institutions. No patients demonstrated an objective response(95% CI, 0-22%); one patient achieved stable disease. Fourteen out of 16 patients experienced ≥ grade 2 toxicity. The most common toxicity was fatigue in six patients (n = 4 grade 2, n = 2 grade 3). Seven patients experienced neuropathy (n = 5 grade 1, and 1 each grade 2 and 3). Seven (60%) had high cytoplasmic staining for NFkB. Single agent bortezomib is inactive in metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma and should not be pursued. Future study of proteasome inhibition in gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered in combination with targeted inhibition of other non-overlapping oncogenic pathways as a potential rational approach.

  4. Bone metastases from gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Mikito; Tonami, Norihisa; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Sui, Osamu; Hisada, Kinichi

    1983-01-01

    We have studied bone scintigrams in 60 patients with gastric cancer. Of these 60 patients, bone metastases were found in 15 patients (25 %). There were no evidence of bone metastases in polypoid lesions, cancers of the antrum, carcinomas in situ, advanced cancers without invasion to serosa, cancer with N 0 or N 1 regional lymph node metastases, highly deferenciated adenocarcinomas and papillary adenocarcinomas. On the contrary, high rates of bone metastases were seen in cancers of the corpus, advanced cancers with invasion to neighbouring structures and tubular adenocarcinomas. Of these 15 patients with bone metastasis, 3 patients showed very similar clinical features and the findings of ''diffuse bone metastases on bone scintigrams.'' Cancer of the antrum showed high rates of liver metastases, while cancers of the corpus showed high rates of bone stastases. Sixty percent of the patients with bone metastases did not have liver metastases and there seemed to be no significant relationship between liver metastases and bone metastases. From these results we suppose that non-portal tract through the vertebral venous plexus instead of portal tract may be the other route of bone metastases from gastric cancer. (author)

  5. [Conversion Therapy of Initially Unresectable Rectal Cancer with Perforation via FOLFOX4 Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chizu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Nitta, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Omoto, Hideyuki; Kamata, Shigeyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of perforated rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after FOLFOX4 chemotherapy. An 81- year-old woman was transferred to our hospital with a diagnosis of bowel perforation. She underwent emergency transverse colostomy, peritoneal lavage, and the insertion of indwelling drainage tubes, because the perforated rectal cancer was considered unresectable. After recuperation, she received chemotherapy consisting of FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab. Owing to a good response to the treatment after 4 months, rectal resection was achieved curatively. Wound dehiscence occurred as a postoperative complication. The patient chose not to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Currently, she has been alive for more than 1 year 3 months after resection without recurrence.

  6. Increased tumour ADC value during chemotherapy predicts improved survival in unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology and IVR Center, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan); Marugami, Nagaaki [Nara Medical University, Department of Endoscopy and Ultrasound, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan); Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate whether changes to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of primary tumour in the early period after starting chemotherapy can predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Subjects comprised 43 patients with histologically confirmed unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with first-line chemotherapy. Minimum ADC values in primary tumour were measured using the selected area ADC (sADC), which excluded cystic and necrotic areas and vessels, and the whole tumour ADC (wADC), which included whole tumour components. Relative changes in ADC were calculated from baseline to 4 weeks after initiation of chemotherapy. Relationships between ADC and both PFS and OS were modelled by Cox proportional hazards regression. Median PFS and OS were 6.1 and 11.0 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, sADC change was the strongest predictor of PFS (hazard ratio (HR), 4.5; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.7-11.9; p = 0.002). Multivariate Cox regression analysis for OS revealed sADC change and CRP as independent predictive markers, with sADC change as the strongest predictive biomarker (HR, 6.7; 95 % CI, 2.7-16.6; p = 0.001). Relative changes in sADC could provide a useful imaging biomarker to predict PFS and OS with chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  7. Results of combined modality treatment in patients with primary unresectable cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawecki, A.; Starosciak, S.; Towpik, E.; Jagielska, B.; Lenartowicz, B.; Pietras, M.; Szutkowski, Z.; Kiprian, D.

    2001-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve the results of treatment for primarily unresectable cancer of the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to estimate the tolerance and early results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of oral cavity cancer, with immediate reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy. 56 patients hospitalized at the Department of Head and Neck Cancer of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre - Institute of Oncology between August 1997 and June 2000 were enrolled for the purpose of the study. When tumour regresion was observed after 2-4 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, vinblastin, etoposide and leucovorin, the patients were referred for surgical resection with immediate reconstruction, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Regression of the primary tumor and lymph nodes of the neck was observed in 41 patients, all of whom were referred for radical surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The tolerance of combined treatment was acceptable. Complete regression was obtained in 37/56 patients. During observation 12 patients failed due to locoregional progression and 2 due to distant metastases. 23/56 patients (41 %) are alive without evidence of disease. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows for radical resection in a majority of patients with primarily unresectable cancer of the oral cavity. The tolerance of treatment is good. What is important, radiotherapy and chemotherapy do not impair wound healing and vascularity of musculo-cutaneous island flaps

  8. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral doxifluridine plus low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Jin Sik; Suh, Chang Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The use of oral chemotherapeutic agents in chemoradiotherapy provides several advantages. Doxifluridine, an oral 5-FU prodrug, has been shown to be effective in colorectal cancer. We attempted a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine plus a low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer patients. In this study, toxicity and efficacy were evaluated. Methods and Materials: There were 23 patients with primary unresectable rectal cancer in this trial, 21 of whom were available for analysis. The patients were treated with oral doxifluridine (900 mg/day) plus oral leucovorin (30 mg/day) from days 1 to 35, and pelvic radiation of 45 Gy over 5 weeks. Surgical resection was performed 5-6 weeks after the treatment. Results: Acute toxicity involved thrombocytopenia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, and skin reaction. All were in Grade 1/2, except diarrhea, which was not only the most frequent (7 patients, 33.3%), but also the only toxicity of Grade 3 (2 patients). The clinical tumor response was shown in 5 patients (23.8%) as a complete response and 13 patients (61.9%) as a partial response. A complete resection with negative resection margin was done in 18 patients (85.7%), in 2 of whom a pathologic complete response was shown (9.5%). The overall downstaging rate in the T- and N-stage groupings was 71.4% (15 patients). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the efficacy and low toxicity of chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine. Currently, a Phase III randomized trial of chemoradiotherapy is ongoing at our institute to compare the therapeutic efficacy of oral 5-FU with respect to i.v. 5-FU in locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

  9. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. The epidemiology of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, David M

    2002-01-01

    Gastric cancer mortality has declined markedly around the world. In South Australia, the reduction approximated 40% over the last 20 years. Possible reasons include: better refrigeration; reduced consumption of salted, smoked, and chemically preserved foods; increased intake of fruit and vegetables; and improved living standards and a greater use of antibiotics, which may have reduced Helicobacter pylori infection. Reductions generally have been greater for intestinal than diffuse histopathologies. Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, probably accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed cancers. High rates apply to Japan, China. Central and South America, Eastern Europe, and parts of the Middle East, and low rates to North America, Australia and New Zealand, Northern Europe, and India. Rates usually are higher in lower socioeconomic groups. Five-year relative survivals of around 20% or less are frequently reported. A figure of 50% or more has been cited for Japan, where there has been radiological screening, although this exceptional figure could have been affected artificially by lead-time and related effects. Male-to-female incidence ratios generally are in the 1.5-2.5 range, with higher ratios for intestinal than diffuse cancers and higher-risk populations. In South Australia, the ratio has been 1.8 to one, although higher at 4.6 to one for cardia lesions. Recent increases in cardia cancers, especially in males in populations of European extraction, often are accompanied by increases for esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is estimated that the global burden of gastric cancer could be reduced by up to 50% by dietary changes that included an increased intake of fruit and vegetables.

  11. Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    affected in subsets of these tumors. For example, mutations in BRCA1/2 were found in about 15% of gastric cancer, loss of BRCA1 protein expression...platform   Figure 4: Nuclear-RFP tagged SNU1 cell lines after 6 days in culture . (A) Phase contrast. (B) RFP. (C) Markup image of RFP confluence...Title: Cell Cultures and Xenografts from Esophagogastric, Pancreatic, Colorectal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IACUC protocol number 10-02-003, Protocol

  12. The prognostic value of the systemic inflammatory score in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Matsutani, Shinji; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2018-07-01

    Inflammation has been widely recognized as a contributor to cancer progression and several inflammatory markers have been reported as associated with the clinical outcomes in patients with various types of cancer. Recently, a novel inflammatory marker, the systemic inflammatory score (SIS), which is based on a combination of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and the serum albumin concentration has been reported as a useful prognostic marker. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of the SIS in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The retrospective cohort study included 160 patients who underwent combination chemotherapy for unresectable mCRC between January 2008 and December 2016. The SIS was used to classify the patients into three groups based on their LMR and the serum albumin concentration. Patients with high-LMR and high serum albumin level were given a score of 0; patients with low-LMR or low serum albumin level were given a score of 1; patients with low-LMR and low serum albumin level were given a score of 2. There were significant differences in the overall survival among the three SIS groups and the SIS was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival. Although the SIS was significantly associated with the overall survival rate even when using the original cut-off values, the SIS according to the new cut-off values had a more accurate prognostic value. The present study determined that the SIS was a useful biomarker for predicting the survival outcomes in patients with unresectable mCRC, although the optimum cut-off value of the SIS according to the patients' background needs to be examined in further studies.

  13. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  14. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  15. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... following are risk factors for stomach cancer: Certain medical conditions Having any of the following medical conditions ...

  16. Gastric Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie On-On Chan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the world. However, in the past 10 decades, the view of gastric cancer has been changing. This includes the unexplained decline in the incidence of the cancer, the proximal shift of the cancer in the stomach, the identification of Helicobacter pylori as an etiological agent, rapid development in molecular tumour biology, new treatment modalities and the adoption of mass screening for prevention. This article reviews the changing views of gastric cancer and the latest developments.

  17. Gastric Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Annie On-On; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu; Lam, Shiu-Kum

    2001-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the world. However, in the past 10 decades, the view of gastric cancer has been changing. This includes the unexplained decline in the incidence of the cancer, the proximal shift of the cancer in the stomach, the identification of Helicobacter pylori as an etiological agent, rapid development in molecular tumour biology, new treatment modalities and the adoption of mass screening for prevention. This article reviews the changing view...

  18. Development of functional MRI in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Shao Guoliang

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in digestive tract functional MRI can represent the functional changes of the tumor. DWI not only provides a new way to diagnosis the gastric cancer, but also reflect the pathology changes of the tumor, which has great value to predict the therapeutic effect and prognosis of the tumor. MRS is the only method to test the chemical composition of tissues in live without injury, which has great value in the early diagnosis of gastric tumor and in the research of tumor mechanism. This review is mainly focused on the status and development of functional MRI in gastric cancer. (authors)

  19. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Cover

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI. Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed.

  20. Comparison of different treatments for unresectable esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C E

    1995-01-01

    Many patient with esophageal cancer have advanced disease that in not amenable to curative treatment. For these individuals the relief of dysphagia is of utmost importance to the quality of their remaining survival time. This article reviews and compares the methods of palliation with focus on indications and contraindications, advantages as well as disadvantages of each technique, success rates, and complications. Tumor characteristics, the physician's experience, the institution's capabilities, cost, and patient preference will influence choice of palliation. Methods are often complementary rather than competitive.

  1. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B; Maithel, Shishir K; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. The study of combination therapy for arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy in unresectable gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takuma; Saito, Hiroya; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated an effective strategy of treatment for unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC) by the retrospective analysis of prognostic factors and anti-tumor therapies, especially combination therapy of arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy (AI+PT). Forty-three patients with unresectable GBC were enrolled, and prognostic factors were investigated by multivariate analysis using a proportional hazard model. In addition, we examined the indication and after-therapy by analyzing the each factor cumulative survival rates and anti-tumor effect about the AI + RT group (n=24). AI + RT and the responders to the first-line therapy were significant prognostic factors. In AI + RT group, median survival time, progression-free survival and the 1-year survival rate, the response and disease control rates was 15.5 months, 7.1 months, 62.5%. 54.2% and 95.8%, respectively; which suggested prolonged survival and high anti-tumor effect. Cumulative survival rate was significantly shorter in cases with distant metastasis except liver metastases, and has been tendency to extend in the group who underwent systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy. The treatment strategy, using the Al + RT as first-line with the systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy, suggested contribute to the prolonged survival in locally advanced and liver metastases cases of GBC. (author)

  3. Chemoradiation for unresectable gall bladder cancer: time to review historic nihilism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Reena; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Mehta, Shaesta; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Purandare, Nilendu; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Kishore Shrivastava, Shyam

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of unresectable locally advanced gallbladder cancers (LAGBC) usually consists of various palliative strategies which provide only a modest survival benefit. Here, we present a series of three patients of LAGBC-treated consecutively at our center with preoperative chemoradiation using tomotherapy and concurrent gemcitabine. All three cases were reported to be adenocarcinoma by biopsy or fine-needle aspiration cytology. All the patients underwent positron emission tomography with computerized tomography scan to rule out distant metastasis and also to map the extent of disease for radiotherapy planning. Preoperative chemoradiation consisted of gemcitabine at 300 mg/m(2) weekly and tomotherapy with daily image guidance with MVCT over 5 weeks to a dose of 57 Gy in 25 fractions to the gross tumor and 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the clinical target volume to cover the areas of microscopic spread. Complete metabolic and radiologic response was observed for 2 patients and partial response for 1 patient. Two patients underwent complete surgical excision of which 1 patient had complete pathological response and 1 patient had small residual tumor at the primary and no nodal metastasis. The third patient could not undergo surgery due to medical reasons. The clinical outcome for unresectable LAGBC with preoperative chemoradiation in terms of feasibility, safety, and survival is encouraging. This treatment strategy has a curative potential for the otherwise fatal disease.

  4. Audit of advanced gastric cancer at Ibn Sina Hospital, Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Background: Worldwide, gastric cancer is the second most common cancer (second to lung cancer). ... and age influences the clinico-pathological features of gastric cancer and to audit the outcome of ...

  5. Images of gastric cancer stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Aragon, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The present work has the objective to review the importance of the images in the preoperating stage of the gastric cancer. It has been emphasized in the modalities of transabdominal ultrasound as much as endoscopic and TAC since they are most valuable in the stage. Certainly the importance of conventional radiology (gastroduodenal series) is also valuable in the stage of the tumor, specially in considering the depth of the same one. In order to make this overhaul, the recent bibliography was consulted but, specially the published one by Japaneses since they follow a classification and methodology different from the used one in most of the countries that belong to the World-wide Organization of the Health. They made an overhaul of approximately 200 cases of patients who have been diagnosed and treated in the Center of Detection of Gastric Cancer of Cartago. In each case review the file, radiological, sonographic and pathological studies, and the cases were chosen that better illustrated the exposed subjects. (Author) [es

  6. Gastric cancer screening, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porras Alfaro, Erika

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review was made of the methods of screening (pepsinogen test, gastrin-17, anti HP, SGD and Endoscopy). The review and descriptive study of the scientific literature related to the subject was conducted in the scientific databases: Pud Med, MD Consult and Medscape, from August 2013 to March 2014. 65 articles were found related to the topic. The review has included 47 items, assigned according to the criteria of inclusion and exclusion. Available methods were defined of high cost, difficult to spread, little sensitive, little specific and invasive. Endoscopy has had limitations of cost, quality, morbidity, mortality and availability. Pepsinogen tests and helicobacter pylori have helped identify the population at risk for later sift with endoscopy; but it is a very sensitive method. Endoscopy is recommended every two years in the population at risk (patients between 50 and 70 years with a family history of gastric cancer, chronic atrophic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, patients with symptomatology of dyspepsia and with positive pepsinogen test) is a higher method than SGD in cost, sensitivity and specificity similar to invasive level. The training of the endoscopists should be strengthened in early gastric cancer detection since the detection depends on the quality of endoscopy [es

  7. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  8. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course.

  9. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitarz R

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has changed within last decades. A trend of steady decline in gastric cancer incidence rates is the effect of the increased standards of hygiene, conscious nutrition, and Helicobacter pylori eradication, which together constitute primary prevention. Avoidance of gastric cancer remains a priority. However, patients with higher risk should be screened for early detection and chemoprevention. Surgical resection enhanced by standardized lymphadenectomy remains the gold standard in gastric cancer therapy. This review briefly summarizes the most important aspects of gastric cancers, which include epidemiology, risk factors, classification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The paper is mostly addressed to physicians who are interested in updating the state of art concerning gastric carcinoma from easily accessible and credible source. Keywords: gastric cancer, epidemiology, classification, risk factors, treatment

  10. The results of palliative radiation therapy in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Yoon, Sei Chul; Kim, Yeon Sil; Chung, Su Mi

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment results and prognostic factors of palliative radiation therapy in the patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer. Thirty-seven evaluable patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer who were treated by palliative radiation therapy for pain relief at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangnam St. Mary's hospital, the Catholic University of Korea between March 1984 and February 2005 were analysed retrospectively. There were 22 men and 15 women. Age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 80 (median 57) years. Twelve patients (32.4%) had liver metastases and 22 patients (59.5%) had lymph node metastases. Radiation therapy was delivered to primary tumor and regional lymph nodes with 1 ∼ 2 cm margin, and total dose was 3,240 ∼ 5,580 cGy (median 5,040 cGy). Chemotherapy with radiotherapy was delivered in 30 patients (81%) with 5-FU alone (21 patients) or gemcitabine (9 patients). The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 44 months. Survival and prognostic factors were analysed using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test respectively. Overall mean and median survival were 11 and 8 months and 1-year survival rate was 20%. Among 33 patients who were amenable for response evaluation, 7 patients had good response and 22 patients had fail response with overall response rate of 87.9%. Mild to moderate toxicity were observed in 14 patients with nausea, vomiting, and indigestion, but severe toxicity requiring interruption of treatment were not observed. Chemotherapy didn't influence the survival and symptomatic palliation, but the group containing gemcitabine showed a tendency of longer survival (median 12 months) than 5-FU alone group (median 5.5 months) without statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). The significant prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance status and liver metastasis (ρ 0.05). Radiation therapy was effective for symptomatic palliation in the patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer and would play an

  11. Phase I clinical study of concurrent chemoradiation with hydroxycamptothecine for unresectable or locally relapsed rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Jin Jing; Li Yexiong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the maximal tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) concurrently combined with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for unresectable or locally relapsed rectal cancer. Methods: Twenty-two patients with rectal cancer were enrolled into phase I study between 2004 -2007. HCPT was intravenously administered concurrently with 3DCRT weekly, dose given from 6, 8, 10 mg/m 2 or twice a week, dose given from 4, 6, 8, 10 mg/m 2 , respectively. Total radiation dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the whole pelvis at a fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5 weeks, with 10 - 16 Gy subsequent boost to tumor area. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were defined as grade 3 or higher non-hematologic toxicity or grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Results: In the twice a week group, DLTs of grade 3 diarrhea were observed in 2 patient treated at dose of 6 mg/m 2 . In the weekly group, DLTs of grade 3 diarrhea and radiation-induced dermatitis were observed in I patient at dose of 8 mg/m 2 , and were not observed in the next 3 patients at the same dose level. However, at dose of 10 mg/m 2 , 2 patients had grade 3 diarrhea or nausea. The 5-year overall survival rate was 23% and the median survival time was 18 months. Conclusions: HCPT given concurrently with 3DCRT is safe and tolerable for patients with unresectable or locally relapsed rectal cancer. Either 8 mg/m 2 weekly or 4 mg/m 2 twice a week can be recommended for further study. The dose-limiting toxicities are grade 3 diarrhea, nausea and radiation-induced dermatitis. (authors)

  12. Gastric Metastasis of Ectopic Breast Cancer Mimicking Axillary Metastasis of Primary Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami Ilgaz Kayılıoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic breast tissue has the ability to undergo all the pathological changes of the normal breast, including breast cancer. Gastrointestinal metastasis of breast cancer is rarely observed and it is very difficult to differentiate gastric metastases from primary gastric cancer. We present a case of 52-year-old female, who suffered from abdominal pain. Physical examination showed a palpable mass in the left anterior axilla and computerized tomography revealed gastric wall thickening with linitis plastica. When gastroscopic biopsy showed no signs of malignancy, excisional biopsy was performed in the left axilla. Histological examination revealed invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast, consistent with ectopic breast cancer. Further gastroscopic submucosal biopsies and immunohistochemical studies revealed gastric metastases of invasive lobular carcinoma. Axillary ectopic breast tissue carcinomas can mimic axillary lymphadenopathies. Additionally, gastric metastasis of breast cancer is an uncommon but possible condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ectopic breast cancer with gastric metastasis.

  13. Gastric cancer-derived MSC-secreted PDGF-DD promotes gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Wang, Mei; Yang, Tingting; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Zixuan; Wu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of PDGF-DD secreted by gastric cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) in human gastric cancer progression. Gastric cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with GC-MSCs in a transwell system. The growth and migration of gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cell colony formation assay and transwell migration assay, respectively. The production of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was determined by using Luminex and ELISA. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f and siRNA interference of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was used to demonstrate the role of PDGF-DD produced by GC-MSCs in gastric cancer progression. GC-MSC conditioned medium promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Co-culture with GC-MSCs increased the phosphorylation of PDGFR-β in SGC-7901 cells. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f blocked the promoting role of GC-MSC conditioned medium in gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration. Recombinant PDGF-DD duplicated the effects of GC-MSC conditioned medium on gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs abolished its effects on gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PDGF-DD secreted by GC-MSCs is capable of promoting gastric cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Targeting the PDGF-DD/PDGFR-β interaction between MSCs and gastric cancer cells may represent a novel strategy for gastric cancer therapy.

  14. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  15. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  16. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: Edgar.Ben-Josef@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Mayekar, Sonal U. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Mandai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient’s condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  18. Gastric cancer associated with refractory cytomegalovirus gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Shimodate, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Shumpei; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Motowo

    2017-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) sometimes causes gastritis, especially in immunocompromised patients, but whether CMV gastritis promotes the development of gastric cancer is unknown. Here, we report a case of gastric cancer that developed in the presence of CMV gastritis, which had been present for at least 4 years and was refractory to treatment. An 80-year-old woman had noted epigastric discomfort and appetite loss. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a shallow geographical ulcer extending from the upper body to the pylorus. Histological findings of the biopsy and serology were suggestive of CMV gastritis. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody test was positive, suggesting co-infection with CMV and H. pylori. Her gastritis was unimproved with repeated antiviral therapy and eradication of H. pylori. Thirty months later, wide-spread gastric cancer had developed. We suggest the possibility that the addition of chronic inflammation of CMV infection to H. pylori-induced gastritis facilitated the development of gastric cancer.

  19. Epidemiological studies on gastric cancer in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Keisuke; Kawamoto, Kenji; Shimokawa, Isao; Matsuo, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayoshi

    1984-01-01

    One thousand-four hundred and twenty-four cases of gastric cancer registered at the Nagasaki Tumor Registry between 1973 and 1977 were studied. The incidence of gastric cancer tended to be higher in persons exposed to the atomic bomb within 2.0 km from the hypocenter, especially in young persons, than in non-exposed individuals, but the difference was not statistically significant. Compared with the nonexposed, the corrected relative risk of gastric cancer in persons exposed within 2.0 km from the hypocenter was 1.28 in males and 1.11 in females. In terms of histologic type or location, the incidence of gastric cancer showed no statistically significant difference between the exposed and nonexposed persons. (author)

  20. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  1. The docetaxel radiosensitization experience for the treatment of unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shoji; Maruyama, Michio; Tanami, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Docetaxel is an increasingly important drug for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The docetaxel radiosensitization has been established in cancer cell lines. The therapeutic response and toxicity of a weekly docetaxel in combination with radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer were examined. Ten patients with locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell esophageal cancer were recruited in the following protocol. The median age was 65.7 years. Patients received radiation in 2 Gy single daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy. Docetaxel (10 mg/m 2 ) was administered weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. One patient could not be evaluated. The overall response rate was 77% with 11% complete response (CR) and 66% partial response (PR). Mild grade 2 leukocytes toxicity was observed in 2/10 patients, which enforced the treatment absence for 7-14 days. Grade 2 stomatitis was noted in one patient. No severe grade 3 adverse effects were observed. It is concluded that low-dose docetaxel with radiotherapy is feasible and, a high response rate can be expected. Toxicity is modest, and this protocol may be useful for the outpatients or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (author)

  2. T Cells in Gastric Cancer: Friends or Foes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedei, Amedeo; Della Bella, Chiara; Silvestri, Elena; Prisco, Domenico; D'Elios, Mario M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for gastric cancer. As for any type of cancer, T cells are crucial for recognition and elimination of gastric tumor cells. Unfortunately T cells, instead of protecting from the onset of cancer, can contribute to oncogenesis. Herein we review the different types, “friend or foe”, of T-cell response in gastric cancer. PMID:22693525

  3. Correlation between pepsinogens and gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Mengjun; Xiao Zhijian; Yang Xizhen; Huang Xuquan; Yu Huixin; Zhang Rongjun; Tao Yonghui; Zhang Lianfen; Cai Gangming; Tan Cheng; Xiao Ye; Jin Jian; Wang Bocheng

    2001-01-01

    Pepsinogen I and Pepsinogen II (PG I and PG II) were purified from human gastric mucosa using DE-52 anion exchange chromatography, Gel filtration HPLC and Q-2 anion exchange fast pressure chromatography. The antiserums against at both PG I and PG II were established respectively by preparing 125 I-PG I and 125 I-PG II using the chloramine-T method. Serum Pepsinogen I and II levels were measured by RIA in 190 healthy controls and other gastric diseases. The results were analyzed by statistics method. Compared with healthy controls, the serum PG I levels of duodenal ulcer patients and gastric ulcer were significantly higher. The serum PG I levels of gastritis patients were significantly lower and the serum PG I levels and PG I/PG II ratio of gastric cancer patients were much more lower. After total gastrectomy, the serum PG I and PG II levels of patients with recurrence of gastric cancer were significantly higher than those without recurrence. The changes of serum PG I and PG II levels are valuable for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and detecting the recurrence of gastric cancer after total gastrectomy

  4. Correlation between pepsinogens and gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengjun, Jiang; Zhijian, Xiao; Xizhen, Yang; Xuquan, Huang; Huixin, Yu; Rongjun, Zhang; Yonghui, Tao; Lianfen, Zhang; Gangming, Cai; Cheng, Tan; Ye, Xiao; Jian, Jin; Bocheng, Wang [Jiangsu Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China). State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Pepsinogen I and Pepsinogen II (PG I and PG II) were purified from human gastric mucosa using DE-52 anion exchange chromatography, Gel filtration HPLC and Q-2 anion exchange fast pressure chromatography. The antiserums against at both PG I and PG II were established respectively by preparing {sup 125}I-PG I and {sup 125}I-PG II using the chloramine-T method. Serum Pepsinogen I and II levels were measured by RIA in 190 healthy controls and other gastric diseases. The results were analyzed by statistics method. Compared with healthy controls, the serum PG I levels of duodenal ulcer patients and gastric ulcer were significantly higher. The serum PG I levels of gastritis patients were significantly lower and the serum PG I levels and PG I/PG II ratio of gastric cancer patients were much more lower. After total gastrectomy, the serum PG I and PG II levels of patients with recurrence of gastric cancer were significantly higher than those without recurrence. The changes of serum PG I and PG II levels are valuable for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and detecting the recurrence of gastric cancer after total gastrectomy.

  5. Gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Odan, Hideki; Hinoi, Takao; Inagaki, Kazuo; Tanaka, Issei

    1992-01-01

    During 22 years from 1968 through 1989, 538 A-bomb survivors were operated on for gastric cancer, accounting for 30.9% of 1,741 surgical cases of gastric cancer during that period. To determine whether age at the time of exposure to A-bombing might influenced the occurrrence of gastric cancer, these A-bomb survivors were compared with 1,138 other non-exposed gastric cancer patients. According to age at the time of exposure, the 538 A-bomb survivors were divided into those under the age of 19 (118), those in their twenties (134), those in their thirties (178), and those over the age of 40 (108). The largest number of gastric cancer was those in their thirties at the time of exposure, followed by the twenties, 19 years or less, and 40 years or more in the exposed group. The younger A-bomb survivors were at the time of exposure, the earlier gastric cancer occurred. These findings were common to the non-exposed group. Postoperative 5-year survival rate was 72.0% in A-bomb survivors aged 19 years or less at the time of exposure, which was better than the other age groups. This may be explained by active participation in health examination for A-bomb survivors. (N.K.)

  6. A randomized study to compare sequential chemoradiotherapy with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for unresectable locally advanced esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arunima; Roy, Somnath; Majumdar, Anup; Hazra, Avijit; Mallik, Chandrani

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy can improve outcome in locally advanced esophageal cancer. This study aimed to compare efficacy and toxicity between concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) in unresectable, locally advanced, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESSC). Forty-one patients with unresectable, locally advanced ESCC were randomized into two arms. In the CCRT arm (Arm A), 17 patients received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction over 5.6 weeks along with concurrent cisplatin (75 mg m(-2) intravenously on day 1 and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg m(-2) continuous intravenous infusion on days 1-4 starting on the first day of irradiation and given after 28 days. In the SCRT arm (Arm B), 20 patients received two cycles of chemotherapy, using the same schedule, followed by radiotherapy fractionated in a similar manner. The endpoints were tumor response, acute and late toxicities, and disease-free survival. With a median follow up of 12.5 months, the complete response rate was 82.4% in Arm A and 35% in Arm B (P = 0.003). Statistically significant differences in frequencies of acute skin toxicity (P = 0.016), gastrointestinal toxicity (P = 0.005) and late radiation pneumonitis (P = 0.002) were found, with greater in the CCRT arm. A modest but non-significant difference was observed in median time to recurrence among complete responders in the two arms (Arm A 13 months and Arm B 15.5 months, P = 0.167) and there was also no significant difference between the Kaplan Meier survival plots (P = 0.641) of disease-free survival. Compared to sequential chemoradiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy can significantly improve local control rate but with greater risk of adverse reactions.

  7. Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer, mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Young Jin

    2018-03-01

    Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer is relatively rare, commonly presented among multiple metastases, several years after primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Importantly, gastric cancer that is synchronously presented with lobular breast cancer can be misdiagnosed as primary gastric cancer; therefore, accurate differential diagnosis is required. A 39-year-old woman was visited to our hospital because of right breast mass and progressive dyspepsia. Invasive lobular carcinoma of breast was diagnosed on core needle biopsy. Gastroscopy revealed a diffuse scirrhous mass at the prepyloric antrum and diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Synchronous double primary breast and gastric cancers were considered. Detailed pathological analysis focused on immunohistochemical studies of selected antibodies, including those of estrogen receptors, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2, were studied. As a result, gastric lesion was diagnosed as metastatic gastric cancer originating from breast. Right breast conserving surgery was performed, and duodenal stent was inserted under endoscopic guidance to relieve the patient's symptoms. Systemic chemotherapy with combined administration of paclitaxel and trastuzumab was initiated. Forty-one months after the diagnosis, the patient is still undergoing the same therapy. No recurrent lesion has been identified in the breast and evidence of a partial remission of gastric wall thickening has been observed on follow-up studies without new metastatic lesions. Clinical suspicion, repeat endoscopic biopsy, and detailed histological analysis, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer from the breast.

  8. Three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy combined with capecitabine chemotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yaqun; Tian Ye; Zhang Junning; Wang Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the compliance and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer. Methods: Thirty eight patients with locally advanced (T4 or recurred) rectal cancer received three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (for 46 ∼ 50Gy/5 weeks and was boosted to the tumor 16 ∼ 18Gy/2 weeks, 2Gy/fraction, 5 days/week) in combination with capecitabine 1 650mg · m -2 · d -1 , day 1-14, every 3 weeks. Results: The overall response rate was 57.9%, with CR 5 (13.2%), PR 17(44.7%), SD 10 (26.3%), PD 6 (15.8%), median survival time, the 1-year overall survival rate and the 2-year overall survival rate were 18 months, 64.43%, 18.78%, respectively. The remission rate of pain and improvement rate of performance status were 100% and 52.8%. Treatment-related toxicity mainly showed at diarrhea, neutrocytopenia and hand-foot syndrome, the incidence of grade 3 toxicity were 15.8%, 15.8%, 7.9%, respectively. there were no grade 4 toxicity and treatment-related death. Conclusion: Combination of three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy with capecitabine is active in advanced rectal cancer, It is a well-tolerated regimen. (authors)

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chuan; Yamada, Nobutaka; Wu, Yun-Lin; Wen, Min; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Matsukura, Norio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer.

  10. Antitumor activity of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in patient-derived xenograft models of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hung; Ong, Richard; Zopf, Dieter

    2015-10-29

    Unresectable gastric cancer is associated with poor outcomes, with few treatment options available after failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Clinical trials of targeted therapies have generally shown no survival benefit in gastric cancer, with the exceptions of the antibodies ramucirumab (anti-VEGFR2) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2/neu). Given the efficacy of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in other gastrointestinal tumors, we investigated its potential in gastric cancer. The antitumor activity of oral regorafenib was assessed in eight murine patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft models. Dose-response experiments assessed the efficacy and tolerability of oral regorafenib 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg/day in two models, with 10 mg/kg/day selected for further investigation in all eight models. Tumor weight and volume was monitored during treatment; tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and intracellular signaling were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting of total tumor lysates at the end of treatment. Regorafenib showed dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and was well tolerated, with no significant decreases in bodyweight or evident toxicity. Regorafenib 10 mg/kg/day significantly inhibited tumor growth in all eight models (72 to 96 %; all p Regorafenib reduced tumor angiogenesis 3- to 11-fold versus controls in all models (all p Regorafenib was effective in patient-derived models of gastric cancer of different histological subtypes, with inhibition of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and tumor-cell proliferation observed in almost all models. These findings are consistent with the observed activity of regorafenib in preclinical models of other gastrointestinal tumors, and support further clinical investigation in gastric cancer.

  11. Risk factors for the development of invasive cancer in unresected ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Clements, Karen; Hilton, Bridget; Dodwell, David J; Evans, Andrew; Kearins, Olive; Pinder, Sarah E; Thomas, Jeremy; Wallis, Matthew G; Thompson, Alastair M

    2018-04-01

    The natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains uncertain. The risk factors for the development of invasive cancer in unresected DCIS are unclear. Women diagnosed with DCIS on needle biopsy after 1997 who did not undergo surgical resection for ≥1 year after diagnosis were identified by breast centres and the cancer registry and outcomes were reviewed. Eighty-nine women with DCIS diagnosed 1998-2010 were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 75 (range 44-94) years with median follow-up (diagnosis to death, invasive disease or last review) of 59 (12-180) months. Twenty-nine women (33%) developed invasive breast cancer after a median interval of 45 (12-144) months. 14/29 (48%) with high grade, 10/31 (32%) with intermediate grade and 3/17 (18%) with low grade DCIS developed invasive cancer after median intervals of 38, 60 and 51 months. The cumulative incidence of invasion was significantly higher in high grade DCIS than other grades (p = .0016, log-rank test). Invasion was more frequent in lesions with calcification as the predominant feature (23/50 v. 5/25; p = .042) and in younger women (p = .0002). Endocrine therapy was associated with a lower rate of invasive breast cancer (p = .048). High cytonuclear grade, mammographic microcalcification, young age and lack of endocrine therapy were risk factors for DCIS progression to invasive cancer. Surgical excision of high grade DCIS remains the treatment of choice. Given the uncertain long-term natural history of non-high grade DCIS, the option of active surveillance of women with this condition should be offered within a clinical trial. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Three cases of unresectable locally advanced breast cancer treated with local injection of the new radiosensitization (KORTUC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Taijyu; Yosikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Ken; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Inomata, Taisuke

    2013-01-01

    New radiosensitization therapy named Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectabe carcinomas (KORTUC) using a new agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate is the world first treatment developed in Japan. The agent was injected into tumor two times per week under ultrasonographic guidance. Unresectable locally advanced breast cancer is radiation resistance. The local control is difficult in a conventional radiation therapy. In 3 cases, KORTUC was enforced safety, and remarkable effects was admitted. (author)

  13. Primary tumor location as a predictor of the benefit of palliative resection for colorectal cancer with unresectable metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Xin; Ma, Wen-Juan; Gu, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Tian-Qi; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Gu, Yang-Kui

    2017-07-27

    It is still under debate that whether stage IV colorectal cancer patients with unresectable metastasis can benefit from primary tumor resection, especially for asymptomatic colorectal cancer patients. Retrospective studies have shown controversial results concerning the benefit from surgery. This retrospective study aims to evaluate whether the site of primary tumor is a predictor of palliative resection in asymptomatic stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred ninety-four patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer were selected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center Database in the period between January 2007 and December 2013. All information was carefully reviewed and collected, including the treatment, age, sex, carcinoembryonic antigen, site of tumor, histology, cancer antigen 199, number of liver metastases, and largest diameter of liver metastasis. The univariate and multivariate analyses were used to detect the relationship between primary tumor resection and overall survival of unresectable stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred twenty-five received palliative resection, and 69 received only chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that primary tumor site was one of the independent factors (RR 0.569, P = 0.007) that influenced overall survival. For left-side colon cancer patients, primary tumor resection prolonged the median overall survival time for 8 months (palliative resection vs. no palliative resection: 22 vs. 14 months, P = 0.009); however, for right-side colon cancer patients, palliative resection showed no benefit (12 vs. 10 months, P = 0.910). This study showed that left-side colon cancer patients might benefit from the primary tumor resection in terms of overall survival. This result should be further explored in a prospective study.

  14. Palliative radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Kowalska, T.; Rzepecki, W.; Kociolek, D.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1990, 332 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were referred to short-time, split-course palliative thoracic radiotherapy. The group consisted of patients with locally advanced (III o ), unresectable cancer, not suitable for curative radiotherapy, asymptomatic or having only minimal symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The therapeutic plan involved two series of irradiation. Tumor dose delivered in each series was 20 Gy given in five daily fractions over five treatment days. There were four weeks interval between series. Of 332 patients initially qualified to thoracic radiotherapy only 170 patients received the treatment; the other 162 patients were not irradiated because of treatment refusal or logistic problems concerning therapy. They made the control group of the study, receiving the best possible symptomatic care. Twelve-month survivals in the radiotherapy and control groups were 32.4% and 9.3%, respectively; 24-month survivals 11.2% and 0%, respectively. Improvement of survival after palliative thoracic radiotherapy was observed only in patients with clinical stage IIIA and Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) ≥ 70. (orig.) [de

  15. Plasma pharmacokinetics after combined therapy of gemcitabine and oral S-1 for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okita Yoshihiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of gemcitabine (GEM and S-1, an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU derivative, has been shown to be a promising regimen for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods Six patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this pharmacokinetics (PK study. These patients were treated by oral administration of S-1 30 mg/m2 twice daily for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period and intravenous administration of GEM 800 mg/m2 on days 1, 15 and 29 of each course. The PK parameters of GEM and/or 5-FU after GEM single-administration, S-1 single-administration, and co-administration of GEM with pre-administration of S-1 at 2-h intervals were analyzed. Results The maximum concentration (Cmax, the area under the curve from the drug administration to the infinite time (AUCinf, and the elimination half-life (T1/2 of GEM were not significantly different between GEM administration with and without S-1. The Cmax, AUCinf, T1/2, and the time required to reach Cmax (Tmax were not significantly different between S-1 administration with and without GEM. Conclusion There were no interactions between GEM and S-1 regarding plasma PK of GEM and 5-FU.

  16. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  17. Metastatic Gastric Linitis Plastica from Bladder Cancer Mimicking a Primary Gastric Carcinoma: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Won Sun; Chung, Dong Jin; Lee, Jae Mun; Byun, Jae Ho; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2009-01-01

    Primary gastric carcinoma is the most common cause of linitis plastica. Less frequently, metastatic gastric cancer from the breast, omental metastases and non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving the stomach have been reported to show similar radiographic findings as for linitis plastica. A metastatic gastric cancer from bladder cancer is extremely rare. We present an unusual case, the first to our knowledge, of gastric linitis plastica that resulted from a metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

  18. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric cancer treatment options depend on extent of disease and may include radical surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this clinician summary.

  19. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric (stomach) cancer treatment can include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, chemoradiation, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  20. Chemotherapy of gastric cancer - a radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobaldy, S.; Hofmann-Preiss, K.; Walter, M.

    1987-01-01

    In most cases of metastatic gastric cancer, treatment with cytostatic drugs seems to be justified. Responsiveness to chemotherapy, according to the MAF-schedule (Methotrexat, Adriamycin, 5-Fluorouracil) was reported to be successful in 50% of this cancer type. (orig.) [de

  1. Early outcomes of radiofrequency ablation in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer from a tertiary cancer hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The study was carried out to evaluate the early outcomes using Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA for unresectable liver metastases in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC from an area of low endemicity. Material and Methods: 60 Patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases had undergone 88 sessions of RFA from January 2007 till December 2013. The results were retrospectively analysed to evaluate the outcomes in terms of efficacy and survival rates. Results: The median follow up of patients in our series was 24.8months. 35/52 (67.3% patients had complete response at 3 months while 8 patients were lost to follow up. Of the 17 patients who had recurrence, 4 (23.5% were at the ablated site while 13 patients (76.4% progressed elsewhere. Abdominal pain was commonest post procedural symptom (20%. There was no procedure related mortality or any major complications. Mean disease free interval and Progression free survival was 6.7 and 13.1 months. Estimated median survival in patients with liver limited disease and those with small lesion (3 cm was associated with decreased survival.

  2. Gene Regulation and Targeted Therapy in Gastric Cancer Peritoneal Metastasis: Radiological Findings from Dual Energy CT and PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bowen; Lin, Huimin; Zhang, Miao; Lu, Wei; Qu, Ying; Zhang, Huan

    2018-01-22

    Gastric cancer remains fourth in cancer incidence worldwide with a five-year survival of only 20%-30%. Peritoneal metastasis is the most frequent type of metastasis that accompanies unresectable gastric cancer and is a definitive determinant of prognosis. Preventing and controlling the development of peritoneal metastasis could play a role in helping to prolong the survival of gastric cancer patients. A non-invasive and efficient imaging technique will help us to identify the invasion and metastasis process of peritoneal metastasis and to monitor the changes in tumor nodules in response to treatments. This will enable us to obtain an accurate description of the development process and molecular mechanisms of gastric cancer. We have recently described experiment using dual energy CT (DECT) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) platforms for the detection and monitoring of gastric tumor metastasis in nude mice models. We have shown that weekly continuous monitoring with DECT and PET/CT can identify dynamic changes in peritoneal metastasis. The sFRP1-overexpression in gastric cancer mice models showed positive radiological performance, a higher FDG uptake and increasing enhancement, and the SUVmax (standardized uptake value) of nodules demonstrated an obvious alteration trend in response to targeted therapy of TGF-β1 inhibitor. In this article, we described the detailed non-invasive imaging procedures to conduct more complex research on gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis using animal models and provided representative imaging results. The use of non-invasive imaging techniques should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, monitor tumor growth, and evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions for gastric cancer.

  3. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Al-Hussaini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction.

  4. Patients' preference for radiotherapy fractionation schedule in the palliation of symptomatic unresectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J. I.; Lu, J. J.; Wong, L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The palliative radiotherapeutic management of unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer is controversial, with various fractionation (F x) schedules available. We aimed to determine patient's choice of F x schedule after involvement in a decision-making process using a decision board. A decision board outlining the various advantages and disadvantages apparent in the Medical Research Council study of F x schedules (17 Gy in two fractions vs 39 Gy in 13 fractions) was discussed with patients who met Medical Research Council eligibility criteria. Patients were then asked to indicate their preferred F x schedules, reasons and their level of satisfaction with being involved in the decision making process. Radiation oncologists (R O ) could prescribe radiotherapy schedules irrespective of patients' preferences. Of 92 patients enrolled, 55% chose the longer schedule. English-speaking patients were significantly more likely to choose the longer schedule (P 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-7.6). Longer F x was chosen because of longer survival (90%) and better local control (12%). Shorter F x was chosen for shorter overall treatment duration (80%), cost (61%) and better symptom control (20%). In all, 56% of patients choosing the shorter schedule had their treatment altered by the treating R O , whereas only 4% of patients choosing longer F x had their treatment altered (P O 's own biases.

  5. Gastric varicella: two cases in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta María Sastre-Lozano

    Full Text Available Gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus is an uncommon clinical condition where early suspicion and diagnosis are important to prevent the consequences deriving from its high morbidity and mortality, which in immunocompromised patients oscillate between 9% and 41% according to the various series. Two cases of gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus (VZV in two patients with blood cancer are reported below. Gastric lesions are usually preceded by typical papulovesicular skin lesions. When gastric involvement is the first symptom of the disease its diagnosis and management may be delayed, which may entail severe consequences for immunocompromised patients. It is therefore that we suggest its inclusion in the algorithm for immunocompromised patients with abdominal pain and ulcer-like endoscopic lesions.

  6. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilsa Mizrak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI.

  7. Metastatic Breast Cancer to the Stomach Resembling Early Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumikata Hara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastases to the stomach are very rare. As characteristics of breast cancer metastases to the stomach, metastases of lobular carcinoma, mainly with signet ring cells, are frequently observed, and they are often difficult to distinguish from a primary gastric cancer with signet ring cells. Moreover, because no characteristic symptoms are shown and they involve a submucosal lesion, it is difficult to make a radiographic diagnosis. However, if a gastric lesion is observed after breast carcinoma surgery, differentiation between a gastric primary lesion and a metastatic lesion is very important in order to determine treatment. We encountered a case that was diagnosed as early gastric cancer discovered using an endoscope 2 years after surgery and which was found to be breast cancer metastasis to the stomach by gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP and cytokeratin (CK 7/20 immunostaining of the biopsy tissue. Here, we report our findings of this unique case.

  8. Second-line treatments: moving towards an opportunity to improve survival in advanced gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salati, Massimiliano; Di Emidio, Katia; Tarantino, Vittoria; Cascinu, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death globally with approximately 723 000 deaths every year. Most patients present with advanced unresectable or metastatic disease, only amenable to palliative systemic treatment and a median survival uncommonly exceeding 12 months. Over the last years, the efficacy of chemotherapy combination has plateaued and the introduction of the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 trastuzumab has resulted in a limited survival gain in the upfront setting. After this positive experience, first-line treatment with new targeted therapies failed to improve the outcome of advanced gastric cancer. On the contrary, second-line options, including monochemotherapy with taxanes or irinotecan and the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 ramucirumab, either alone or combined with paclitaxel, opened new therapeutic rooms for an ever-increasing number of patients who maintain an acceptable performance status across multiple lines. This article provides an updated overview on the current management of advanced gastric cancer and discusses how the different treatment options available may be best combined to favourably impact the outcome of patients following the logic of a treatment strategy.

  9. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  10. Sarcopenia and Visceral Obesity in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Sarcopenia; Sarcopenic Obesity; Obesity; Visceral Obesity; Quality of Life; Surgery; Complication of Treatment; Chemotherapeutic Toxicity; Physical Activity; Oncology

  11. Radiofrequency ablation for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Molenaar, Izaak Quintus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median survival in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer lies in the range of 9–15 months. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may prolong survival, but data on its safety and efficacy are scarce. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library with the syntax ‘(radiofrequency OR RFA) AND (pancreas OR pancreatic)’ for studies published until 1 January 2012. In addition, a search of the proceedings of conferences on pancreatic disease that took place during 2009–2011 was performed. Studies with fewer than five patients were excluded as they were considered to be case reports. The primary endpoint was survival. Secondary endpoints included morbidity and mortality. Results: Five studies involving a total of 158 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with RFA fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies reported median survival after RFA of 3–33 months, morbidity related to RFA of 4–37%, mortality of 0–19% and overall morbidity of 10–43%. Pooling of data was not appropriate as the study populations and reported outcomes were heterogeneous. Crucial safety aspects included ensuring a maximum RFA tip temperature of < 90 °C and ensuring minimum distances between the RFA probe and surrounding structures. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation seems to be feasible and safe when it is used with the correct temperature and at an appropriate distance from vital structures. It appears to have a positive impact on survival. Multicentre randomized trials are necessary to determine the true effect size of RFA and to minimize the impacts of selection and publication biases. PMID:23600801

  12. Hemostatic radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    Nine patients with advanced bleeding gastric cancer are treated with 4MVC linear accelerator or cobaltotherapy inparallel opposed fields to epigastric region. The radiation therapy is employed as an hemostatic procedure and the results of treatment are analysed. The doses ranged of 1000 rad to 4000 rad, 150 to 300 rad/day, five days a week. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal

  14. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  15. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin [Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Yan, Chao [Jiaotong University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2010-03-15

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  16. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin; Yan, Chao

    2010-01-01

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  17. Serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer by SELDI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer and to screen for protein molecules closely related to gastric cancer during the onset and progression of the disease using surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Serum samples from 80 gastric ...

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    For stomach (gastric) cancer, there is no standard or routine screening test for the general U.S. population. Review the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for gastric cancer using barium-meal photofluorography, gastric endoscopy, or serum pepsinogen in this expert-reviewed summary.

  19. Familial gastric cancer: guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Plukker, John T.; de Jong, Daphne; van Krieken, J. Han; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Bleiker, Eveline; Cats, Anemieke; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R. H.; Cats, A.; Wagner, A.; Dekker, E.; Tytgat, Kristien; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Vasen, H. F. A.; Plukker, J. T.; Ligtenberg, M.; van Hillegersberg, R.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; de Jong, D.; van Krieken, J. H.; Bleiker, E.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of >80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting early

  20. Familial gastric cancer : guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Plukker, John T.; de Jong, Daphne; van Krieken, J. Han; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Bleiker, Eveline; Cats, Anemieke

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of > 80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting

  1. Multidisciplinary management of the locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kwan Ho

    2004-01-01

    Locally advanced (Stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately one third of all cases of NSCLC. Few patients with locally advanced NSCLC present with disease amenable to curative surgical resection. Historically, these patients were treated with primary thoracic radiation therapy (RT) and had poor long term survival rates, due to both progression of local disease and development of distant metastases. Over the last two decades, the use of multidisciplinary approach has improved the outcome for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Combined chemoradiotherapy is the most favored approach for treatment of locally advanced unresectable NSCLC. There are two basic treatment protocols for administering combined chemotherapy and radiation, sequential versus concurrent. The rationale for using chemotherapy is to eliminate subclinical metastatic disease while improving local control. Sequential use of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy has improved median and long term survival compared to radiation therapy alone. This approach appears to decrease the risk of distant metastases, but local failure rates remain the same as radiation alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has been studied extensively. The potential advantages of this approach may include sensitization of tumor cells to radiation by the administration of chemotherapy, and reduced overall treatment time compared to sequential therapy; which is known to be important for improving local control in radiation biology. This approach improves survival primarily as a result of improved local control. However, it doesn't seem to decrease the risk of distant metastases probably because concurrent chemoradiation requires dose reductions in chemotherapy due to increased risks of acute morbidity such as acute esophageal toxicity. Although multidisciplinary therapy has led to improved survival rates compared to radiation therapy alone and has become the new standard of care, the optimal therapy of

  2. Gastrectomy with limited surgery for elderly patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Mikami

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Gastrectomy according to the gastric treatment guidelines for elderly patients with gastric cancer is recommended. Elderly male patients with poor nutrition have poor prognosis; prognostic nutrition index <40. Limited surgery is a treatment option for such patients.

  3. Fluoropyrimidine-HAI (hepatic arterial infusion) versus systemic chemotherapy (SCT) for unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pasquali, Sandro; Nitti, Donato

    2009-07-08

    Although locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) claim the advantage of delivering higher doses of anticancer agents directly into the metastatic organ as compared to systemic chemotherapy (SCT), the benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) is unclear. We quantitatively summarized the results of randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable liver metastatic disease from colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this work is to quantitatively summarize the results of RCT comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from CRC. A systematic review of reports published until September 2008 on the findings of RCT that compared HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable CRC liver metastases was performed by searching the MEDLINE, Embase, Cancerlit, Cochrane and GoogleScholar electronic databases as well as other databanks collecting information on clinical trials. Inclusion criteria were patients with unresectable CRC liver metastases enrolled in RCT comparing HAI to SCT. The outcome measures were tumor response rate and overall survival. Two authors independently carried out study selection and assessment of methodological quality. A third author performed a concordance analysis in order to unravel potential systematic biases. Ten RCT were identified that met the eligibility criteria. HAI regimens were based on floxuridine (FUDR), 5-fluorouracil or either one of these two fluoropyrimidines in eight and one RCT, respectively. SCT consisted of FUDR or 5-fluorouracil in three and seven RCT, respectively. By pooling the summary data, tumor response rate resulted 42.9% and 18.4% for HAI and SCT, respectively (RR = 2.26; 95% CI, 1.80 to 2.84; P < 0.0001). Mean weighted median OS times were 15.9 and 12.4 months for HAI and SCT, respectively: the meta-risk of death was not statistically different between the two treatment groups (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = 0.24). Currently

  4. Image processing of early gastric cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamoto, Kazuo; Umeda, Tokuo; Inamura, Kiyonari

    1992-01-01

    Computer image processing was used to enhance gastric lesions in order to improve the detection of stomach cancer. Digitization was performed in 25 cases of early gastric cancer that had been confirmed surgically and pathologically. The image processing consisted of grey scale transformation, edge enhancement (Sobel operator), and high-pass filtering (unsharp masking). Grey scale transformation improved image quality for the detection of gastric lesions. The Sobel operator enhanced linear and curved margins, and consequently, suppressed the rest. High-pass filtering with unsharp masking was superior to visualization of the texture pattern on the mucosa. Eight of 10 small lesions (less than 2.0 cm) were successfully demonstrated. However, the detection of two lesions in the antrum, was difficult even with the aid of image enhancement. In the other 15 lesions (more than 2.0 cm), the tumor surface pattern and margin between the tumor and non-pathological mucosa were clearly visualized. Image processing was considered to contribute to the detection of small early gastric cancer lesions by enhancing the pathological lesions. (author)

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha; Blazer III, Dan G; Tyler, Douglas S; Uronis, Hope E; Czito, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for gastric cancer. Patients with gastroesophageal (GE) junction (Siewert type II and III) or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73%) had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus) tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75%) underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  7. Treatment patterns in patients with advanced gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyun Carter, Gebra; Kaltenboeck, Anna; Ivanova, Jasmina; Liepa, Astra M; San Roman, Alexandra; Koh, Maria; Rajan, Narayan; Cheng, Rebecca; Birnbaum, Howard; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-06-01

    To describe treatment patterns, outcomes and healthcare resource use in patients with metastatic and/or locally recurrent, unresectable gastric cancer (MGC) in Taiwan. Patients who had received first-line therapy (platinum and/or fluoropyrimidine) followed by second-line therapy or best supportive care (BSC) only were eligible. Participating physicians provided de-identified information from patient charts. Data were summarized descriptively and Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to describe time to events. Overall, 37 physicians contributed 122 patient charts. Of the 122 patients (median age, 61 years; 62% male), 43 (35%) received BSC only following first-line therapy, whereas 79 (65%) received second-line therapy. There was heterogeneity in second-line treatment, although fluoropyrimidine with or without a platinum agent was most frequently used. Median survival was 12.5 (interquartile range [IQR], 8.2-20.8) months from MGC diagnosis for patients receiving second-line therapy and 8.0 (IQR, 5.6-not reached) months for patients receiving BSC only. The most common treatment-related symptoms were nausea/vomiting (58%); the most common cancer-related symptoms were pain (61%), ascites (35%) and nausea/vomiting (33%). Inpatient and outpatient hospitalizations were numerically more common for patients receiving second-line therapy than for those receiving BSC only; the prevalence of hospice and skilled nursing facility stays were numerically more common for patients receiving BSC only. In this Taiwanese MGC population, 65% received active second-line therapy with heterogeneity seen in the regimen used. Clinical outcomes suggest an unmet medical need in this population. This study may help inform clinical practice and future research to ultimately improve patient outcomes in Taiwan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Absence of pepsinogen A3 gene expression in the gastric mucosa of patients with gastric cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, E J; Peña, A S; Crusius, J B; Defize, J; van der Stoop, P; Meuwissen, S G; Pals, G

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the expression of pepsinogen A3 (Pg3) encoding genes in the gastric mucosa of normal controls and subjects with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. METHODS--One hundred and fifty nine patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with sampling of gastric biopsy specimens and serum. Pg3 isoproteins were determined by electrophoresis in serum and gastric mucosal biopsy specimens. Pg3 encoding genes were assessed by PCR in DNA obtained from peripheral blood. RESULTS...

  9. Radiological evaluation of early gastric cancer: analysis of 104 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung

    1987-01-01

    During the two year period from January 1985 to December 1986, 161 cases were confirmed as early gastric cancer by pathologic mapping at Seoul National University Hospital. Among them, the authors reviewed 104 cases of early gastric cancer for the evaluation of diagnostic value of double contrast upper gastrointestinal series. Early gastric cancer was most common in 5th and 6th decade (64%) and male to female ratio was 2:1. Double contrast upper GI series could detect 97 out of 104 cases (93%). Among them, 62 cases were diagnosed as early gastric cancer, 32 as advanced gastric cancer and 3 as benign lesion. Detection rate according to the size was 100% in lesion larger than 2cm and 87% in lesion smaller than 2cm. Predictability of early gastric cancer according to size was 66% in lesion smaller than 3cm and 43% in lesion larger than 3cm. Detection rate according to the location of the tumor was almost similar between gastric body (94%) and antrum (93%), however was very low in anterior wall lesion (70%). Predictability of early gastric cancer was 69% in gastric body lesion, 52% in gastric antral lesion and 44% in greater curvature lesion. Detection rate according to the type of macrospecimen was 100% in type I, III and IIc+III. Type IIb showed the lowest detection rate (75%). Predictability of early gastric cancer was high in type IIc (68%) and low in type I (20%)

  10. The current situation for gastric cancer in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglevic, Christian; Silva, Shirley; Mahave, Mauricio; Rolfo, Christian; Gallardo, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a neoplasm with a high incidence and mortality rate in Chile where more than 3000 people die every year from this type of cancer. This study shows the clinical and epidemiological considerations of this disease, information about translational research on this pathology in Chile, the contribution of Chilean doctors to the development of gastric cancer management awareness and the general situation of gastric cancer in Chile.

  11. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m 2 /day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m 2 /day, 3 at 70 mg/m 2 /day, and 10 at 80 mg/m 2 /day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m 2 /day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m 2 /day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated

  12. Metallic stents provide better QOL than plastic stents in patients with stricture of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kazuki; Nagahara, Akihito; Iijima, Katsuyori

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the utility and safety of treatment with esophageal stents (plastic and metallic stents) for unresectable advanced esophageal cancer. Between 1992 and 2002, 14 cases of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer were treated with esophageal stents (the plastic stent group, 7 cases; and the metallic stent group, 7 cases). Of these, 10 cases had a history of chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. An improvement in oral intake and performance status (PS), survival time, periods at home, and adverse events were compared between the two groups. After stenting, oral intake and PS were significantly improved in the metallic stent group. Follow-up at home was possible in 71.4%. There was no significant difference in survival or duration of time at home between the two groups. All adverse events were controllable and there was no difference between the two groups. Stenting not only improved oral intake and PS but also allowed a stay at home, resulting in a marked improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL). Stenting was performed safely even in cases with a history of radiotherapy. There was no difference in survival, ratios of staying at home, and safety between the two groups, but QOL was significantly improved in the metallic stent group. These outcomes indicate that placement of metallic stents should be actively considered to treat stricture due to advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  13. Paclitaxel and concurrent radiation for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safran, Howard; Wanebo, Harry J.; Hesketh, Paul J.; Akerman, Paul; Ianitti, David; Cioffi, William; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Wolf, Brian; Koness, James; McAnaw, Robert; Moore, Todd; Chen, M.-H.; Radie-Keane, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the activity and toxicity of paclitaxel and concurrent radiation for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients were studied. Twenty-five had proximal gastric cancers, two had distal cancers. Eight had esophageal extension, 6 had celiac adenopathy, and 7 had retroperitoneal adenopathy. Patients received paclitaxel, 50 mg/m 2 by 3-hour intravenous (IV) infusion, weekly, on days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29. Radiation was administered concurrently to a total dose of 45.0 Gy, in 1.80 Gy fractions, for 25 treatments. Patients who were medically or surgically inoperable received a sixth week of paclitaxel with a radiation boost to 50.4 Gy. Results: Esophagitis and gastritis were the most important toxicities, Grade 3 in four patients (15%), and Grade 4 in three patients (11%). Five patients (19%) had Grade 3 nausea. The overall response rate was 56%, including three patients (11%) with a complete response. The 2-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 29% and 31%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation demonstrates substantial local-regional activity in gastric cancer. Future investigations combining paclitaxel and radiation with other local-regional and systemic treatments are warranted

  14. Gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer: upper gastrointestinal series and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Jae; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Eun Ah; Kim, Kyu Sun; Yun, Ku Sub; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae, Sang Hun; Kang, Gu; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the causes of gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer, upper gastrointestinal study was correlated with pathologic findings. We evaluated 41 cases (M:F = 1.7:1, average age = 49) of early gastric cancer, retrospectively. The gastric wall shortening were classified as Grade I; none, Grade II; intermediate, and Grade III; prominent. Pathologic findings such as size of lesions, depth of tumor invasion, degree of the submucosal fibrosis, degree of thickness of the submucosa and muscularis propria, and morphologic patterns of lesions including conversing mucosal folds were correlated with the degree of gastric wall shortening on upper gastrointestinal series. Submucosal fibrosis was present in 4 cases in Grade I (n = 21), 4 cases in Grade II (n = 6) and 8 cases in Grade III (n = 10). Positive conversing mucosal folds were seen in 5 cases in Grade I (n = 17), 0 case in Grade II (n = 2) and 9 cases in Grade III (n = 9). Gastric wall shortening was significantly associated with submucosal fibrosis and conversing mucosal folds of early gastric cancer. (ρ = 0.0001, and ρ = 0.02, respectively) Upper gastrointestinal finding of gastric wall protrusion in patients with early gastric cancer should not misinterprete as advanced gastric cancer since the finding could be a result of submucosal fibrosis

  15. Gastritis, nitrosamines, and gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmermann, G.N.; Mower, H.

    1981-01-01

    Gastritis is associated with peptic ulcer, gastroenterostomy, pernicious anemia, and exposure to nitrosamines. Once established, the process may be self-perpetuating, resulting in atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. This can be explained by the process of endogenous nitrosation of amines in the inflamed gastric mucosa. Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Several drugs given parenterally have been identified as mutagenic nitroso compounds in homogenates of human and canine antral mucosa. Nitrite for this process is apparently derived from the inflamed mucosa. Different amines appear to be nitrosated at different places in the antrum, suggesting the presence of site-specific enzymes that control these reactions.

  16. Beam angle selection for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer: are noncoplanar beam angles necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D S; Bartlett, G K; Das, I J; Cardenes, H R

    2013-09-01

    External beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT) is widely used for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Noncoplanar (NCP) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and coplanar (CP) IMRT have been reported to lower the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). The purpose of this article is to examine the utility of noncoplanar beam angles in IMRT for the management of pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients who were treated with CRT for unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or neck were re-planned using CP and NCP beams in 3DCRT and IMRT with the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Compared to CP IMRT, NCP IMRT had similar target coverage with slightly increased maximum point dose, 5,799 versus 5,775 cGy (p = 0.008). NCP IMRT resulted in lower mean kidney dose, 787 versus 1,210 cGy (p kidney dose, but did not improve other dose-volume criteria. The use of NCP beam angles is preferred only in patients with risk factors for treatment-related kidney dysfunction.

  17. Salt processed food and gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Hao; Li, Yuan-Hang; Leung, Kayee; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between salt processed food and gastric cancer, a hospital based case-control study was conducted in a high risk area of China. One hundred and seven newly diagnosed cases with histological confirmation of gastric cancer and 209 controls were recruited. Information on dietary intake was collected with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios with adjustment for other potential confounders. Comparing the high intake group with never consumption of salt processed foods, salted meat, pickled vegetables and preserved vegetables were significantly associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Meanwhile, salt taste preference in diet showed a dose-response relationship with gastric cancer. Our results suggest that consumption of salted meat, pickled and preserved vegetables, are positively associated with gastric cancer. Reduction of salt and salt processed food in diets might be one practical measure to preventing gastric cancer.

  18. Features of gastritis predisposing to gastric adenoma and early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meining, A; Riedl, B; Stolte, M

    2002-01-01

    Background/Aims: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. The results of several studies indicate that gastric adenomas, which are considered premalignant lesions, may also be associated with H pylori gastritis. However, it is not clear whether there are different patterns of gastritis in these patients compared with patients with gastric cancer or patients with H pylori gastritis alone. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the pattern...

  19. Historical Perspective on Familial Gastric CancerSummary

    OpenAIRE

    C. Richard Boland; Matthew B. Yurgelun

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease worldwide, typically associated with acquired chronic inflammation in the stomach, related in most instances to infection by Helicobacter pylori. A small percentage of cases occurs in familial clusters, and some of these can be linked to specific germline mutations. This article reviews the historical background to the current understanding of familial gastric cancer, focuses on the entity of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and also reviews the risks for ...

  20. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach (gastric) cancer. Stomach (gastric) cancer is not common in the U.S. Learn about tests that have been studied to detect or screen for stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisei Sako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered.

  4. Favoring D2-Lymphadenectomy in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavokyros, Ioannis; Michalinos, Adamantios

    2018-01-01

    The role of extended lymphadenectomy in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer has been debated for many years. So far six prospective randomized trials and a number of meta-analyses comparing D 1 - to D 2 -lymphadenectomy in open surgery have been published with contradicting results. The possible oncologic benefit of radical lymphadenectomy has been blurred by a number of reasons. In most of the trials the strategies under comparison were made similar after protocol violations. Imperfect design of the trials could not exclude the influence of cofounding factors. Inappropriate endpoints could not detect evidently the difference between the two surgical strategies. On the other hand radical lymphadenectomy was characterized by increased morbidity and mortality. This was mostly caused by the addition of pancreatico-splenectomy in all D 2 -dissections, even when not indicated. A careful analysis of the available evidence indicates that D 2 -lymphadenectomy performed by adequately trained surgeons without resection of the pancreas and/or spleen, unless otherwise indicated, decreases Gastric Cancer Related Deaths and increases Disease Specific Survival. This evidence is not compelling but cannot be ignored. D 2 -lymphadendctomy is nowadays considered to be the standard of care for resectable gastric cancer.

  5. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  6. Glycoprofiling of Early Gastric Cancer Using Lectin Microarray Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taijie; Mo, Cuiju; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan; Liu, Yinkun; Liu, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    Recently, studies have reported that protein glycosylation plays an important role in the occurrence and development of cancer. Gastric cancer is a common cancer with high morbidity and mortality owing to most gastric cancers are discovered only at an advanced stage. Here, we aim to discover novel specific serum glycanbased biomarkers for gastric cancer. A lectin microarray with 50 kinds of tumor-associated lectin was used to detect the glycan profiles of serum samples between early gastric cancer and healthy controls. Then lectin blot was performed to validate the differences. The result of the lectin microarray showed that the signal intensities of 13 lectins showed significant differences between the healthy controls and early gastric cancer. Compared to the healthy, the normalized fluorescent intensities of the lectins PWA, LEL, and STL were significantly increased, and it implied that their specifically recognized GlcNAc showed an especially elevated expression in early gastric cancer. Moreover, the binding affinity of the lectins EEL, RCA-II, RCA-I, VAL, DSA, PHA-L, UEA, and CAL were higher in the early gastric cancer than in healthy controls. These glycan structures containing GalNAc, terminal Galβ 1-4 GlcNAc, Tri/tetraantennary N-glycan, β-1, 6GlcNAc branching structure, α-linked fucose residues, and Tn antigen were elevated in gastric cancer. While the two lectins CFL GNL reduced their binding ability. In addition, their specifically recognized N-acetyl-D-galactosamine structure and (α-1,3) mannose residues were decreased in early gastric cancer. Furthermore, lectin blot results of LEL, STL, PHA-L, RCA-I were consistent with the results of the lectin microarray. The findings of our study clarify the specific alterations for glycosylation during the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The specific high expression of GlcNAc structure may act as a potential early diagnostic marker for gastric cancer.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by bronchial arterial infusion in patients with unresectable stage III squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Sen; Ni, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy administered via bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) on unresectable stage III lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This was a single-arm retrospective study of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) administered via BAI to patients with unresectable lung SCC. Data regarding the post-treatment response rate, downstage rate, and surgery rate, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), quality of life, and post-BAI side effects were collected. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and May 2014. The response rate was 72.2%, and the downstage rate was 22.2%. Among the patients who were downstaged, 16 (44.4%) patients were because of their T stage, and 5 (13.9%) patients were downstaged due to to their N stage. The surgery rate was 52.8%, the 1-year survival rate was 75.4%, and the 2-year survival rate was 52.1%. The median PFS was 14.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.4], and the median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI: 19.1-30.9). The quality of life was significantly improved, and the chemotherapy was well tolerated. Compared with intravenous neoadjuvant chemotherapy, BAI chemotherapy significantly improved the surgery rate, prolonged PFS and OS, and improved the quality of life in patients with unresectable stage III lung SCC.

  8. Distribution of lymph node metastases on FDG-PET/CT in inoperable or unresectable oesophageal cancer patients and the impact on target volume definition in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, Melanie; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Van Os, Rob M.; Hulshof, Maarten CCM; Wouterse, Sanne J.; Bennink, Roel J.; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke WM.

    2016-01-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) is standard care for localised inoperable/unresectable oesophageal tumours. Many surgical series have reported on distribution of lymph node metastases (LNM) in resected patients. However, no data is available on the distribution of at-risk LN regions in this more unfavourable patient group. This study aimed to determine the spread of LNM using FDG-PET/CT, to compare it with the distribution in surgical series and to define its impact on the definition of elective LN irradiation (ENI). FDG-PET/CT images of patients with oesophageal cancer treated with dCRT (from 2003 to 2013) were reviewed to identify the anatomic distribution of FDG-avid LNs. Tumours were divided according to proximal, mid-thoracic or distal localisation. About 105 consecutive patients entered analysis. The highest numbers of FDG-avid LNs in proximal tumours were at LN station 101R (45%) and 106recL (35%). For mid-thoracic tumours at 104R (30%) and 105 (30%). For tumours located in the distal oesophagus, the most common sites were along the lesser curvature of the stomach (21%) and the left gastric artery (21%). Except for the supraclavicular and pretracheal nodes, there were no positive locoregional LNM found outside the standard surgical resection area. Our results show a good correlation between the distribution of nodal volumes at risk in surgical series and on FDG-PET/CT. The results can be used to determine target definition in dCRT for oesophageal cancer. For mid-thoracic tumours, the current target delineation guidelines may be extended based on the risk of node involvement, but more clinical studies are needed to determine if the potential harm of expanding the CTV outweighs the potential benefit.

  9. Distribution of lymph node metastases on FDG-PET/CT in inoperable or unresectable oesophageal cancer patients and the impact on target volume definition in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Melanie; Wouterse, Sanne J; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; van Os, Rob M; Bennink, Roel J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke Wm; Hulshof, Maarten Ccm

    2016-08-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) is standard care for localised inoperable/unresectable oesophageal tumours. Many surgical series have reported on distribution of lymph node metastases (LNM) in resected patients. However, no data is available on the distribution of at-risk LN regions in this more unfavourable patient group. This study aimed to determine the spread of LNM using FDG-PET/CT, to compare it with the distribution in surgical series and to define its impact on the definition of elective LN irradiation (ENI). FDG-PET/CT images of patients with oesophageal cancer treated with dCRT (from 2003 to 2013) were reviewed to identify the anatomic distribution of FDG-avid LNs. Tumours were divided according to proximal, mid-thoracic or distal localisation. About 105 consecutive patients entered analysis. The highest numbers of FDG-avid LNs in proximal tumours were at LN station 101R (45%) and 106recL (35%). For mid-thoracic tumours at 104R (30%) and 105 (30%). For tumours located in the distal oesophagus, the most common sites were along the lesser curvature of the stomach (21%) and the left gastric artery (21%). Except for the supraclavicular and pretracheal nodes, there were no positive locoregional LNM found outside the standard surgical resection area. Our results show a good correlation between the distribution of nodal volumes at risk in surgical series and on FDG-PET/CT. The results can be used to determine target definition in dCRT for oesophageal cancer. For mid-thoracic tumours, the current target delineation guidelines may be extended based on the risk of node involvement, but more clinical studies are needed to determine if the potential harm of expanding the CTV outweighs the potential benefit. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sitarz, Robert; Skierucha, Małgorzata; Mielko, Jerzy; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Polkowski, Wojciech P

    2018-01-01

    Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has ch...

  11. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  12. Gastric cancer; Cancer de l'estomac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineur, L.; Jaegle, E. [Unite de cancerologie digestive, Institut Sainte Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, Clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France)

    2010-07-01

    Radio-chemotherapy Gastro-intestinal inter-group study have demonstrated a convincing local control and overall survival benefit. Oncologists and GI workshops have in the present not had a major interest in the radiotherapy treatment of gastric cancer due to a number of factors. Primary because toxicities may be severe, second physicians may have low experience in definition of clinical target volume and in third perioperative chemotherapy is widely used in this indication. In Summary this issue should be used as guides for defining appropriate radiation planning treatment for the adjuvant postoperative therapy of gastric cancer. (authors)

  13. Western Validation of a Novel Gastric Cancer Prognosis Prediction Model in US Gastric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yanghee; Goldner, Bryan; Son, Taeil; Song, Kijun; Noh, Sung Hoon; Fong, Yuman; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2018-03-01

    A novel prediction model for accurate determination of 5-year overall survival of gastric cancer patients was developed by an international collaborative group (G6+). This prediction model was created using a single institution's database of 11,851 Korean patients and included readily available and clinically relevant factors. Already validated using external East Asian cohorts, its applicability in the American population was yet to be determined. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) dataset, 2014 release, all patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent surgical resection between 2002 and 2012, were selected. Characteristics for analysis included: age, sex, depth of tumor invasion, number of positive lymph nodes, total lymph nodes retrieved, presence of distant metastasis, extent of resection, and histology. Concordance index (C-statistic) was assessed using the novel prediction model and compared with the prognostic index, the seventh edition of the TNM staging system. Of the 26,019 gastric cancer patients identified from the SEER database, 15,483 had complete datasets. Validation of the novel prediction tool revealed a C-statistic of 0.762 (95% CI 0.754 to 0.769) compared with the seventh TNM staging model, C-statistic 0.683 (95% CI 0.677 to 0.689), (p prediction model for gastric cancer in the American patient population. Its superior prediction of the 5-year survival of gastric cancer patients in a large Western cohort strongly supports its global applicability. Importantly, this model allows for accurate prognosis for an increasing number of gastric cancer patients worldwide, including those who received inadequate lymphadenectomy or underwent a noncurative resection. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  15. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venerito, Marino [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Kuester, Doerthe [Institute of Pathology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Harms, Caroline [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Schubert, Daniel [Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Wex, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wex@med.ovgu.de; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany)

    2011-08-08

    Leukotrienes (LT) mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC). The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2) and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91). Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97%) and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%). An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test). No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  16. Diagnoses of gastric cancer and other gastric diseases by serum pepsinogen I and II levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhijian; Jiang Mengjun

    1998-01-01

    Serum pepsinogens I and II (PGI, PGII) levels were determined by PGI and PGII-RIA kits in 84 healthy controls and 128 patients of gastric diseases including 42 patients with gastric cancer. The results showed peptic ulcer cases had elevated PGI and PGII levels. The atrophic gastritis cases had low PGI levels and the gastric cancer cases had low PGI and low PGI/PGII ratio. Using the cut-off values of PGI<35 μg/L and PGI/PGII<1.5 for clinical purpose, the sensitivity and specificity of the test for gastric cancer was 73% and 78%, respectively. Combined with endoscope examination, the serum PGI and PGII levels are valuable for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer

  17. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G A; Brawley, O W

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has generated public health interest since its identification in 1983. Past studies have suggested that the bacterium plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. More recent studies support the conclusion that the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer is causal. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence supporting the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer. We performed a critical review of the relevant literature published in the English language on H. pylori and gastric cancer using MEDLINE, Index Medicus for the years 1985 to 1997. The reference lists of selected articles also were reviewed to capture citations for further pertinent studies. H. pylori is thought to be the major cause of chronic atrophic gastritis. H. pylori gastritis is worldwide in distribution. H. pylori is now categorized by the International Agency for Cancer Research as a group 1 carcinogen, i.e., an agent that is carcinogenic to humans. Several reports from the United States have found the highest frequencies of gastric cancer in geographic areas and populations with the highest rates of acquisition of H. pylori infection. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection has been documented most notably in blacks and Hispanics, who also are at high risk for gastric cancer. New studies that focus on the epidemiology and pathology of H. pylori improve our understanding of its relationship with gastric cancer and advance the development of gastric cancer prevention and control strategies that are proposed.

  18. Expression of the EGF Family in Gastric Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Ostergaard; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. The epidermal growth factor receptors are EGFR, HER2, HER3 and HER4. Of the four epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2 are well-known oncogenes involved in gastric cancer. Little, however, is known about...... the role played by HER3 and HER4 in this disease. We obtained paired samples from the tumor and the adjacent normal tissue from the same patient undergoing surgery for gastric cancer. Using RT-qPCR, we quantified the mRNA expression of the four receptors including the HER4 splicing isoforms and all....... These results support the involvement of EGFR and HER2 in gastric cancer and suggest an interesting association of reduced HER4 expression with development of gastric cancer....

  19. Laparoscopic ultrasound and gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, T. Michael; Vu, Huan

    2001-05-01

    The management of gastrointestinal malignancies continues to evolve with the latest available therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. There are currently two driving forces in the management of these cancers: the benefits of minimally invasive surgery so thoroughly demonstrated by laparoscopic surgery, and the shift toward neoadjuvant chemotherapy for upper gastrointestinal cancers. In order to match the appropriate treatment to the disease, accurate staging is imperative. No technological advances have combined these two needs as much as laparascopic ultrasound to evaluate the liver and peritoneal cavity. We present a concise review of the latest application of laparoscopic ultrasound in management of gastrointestinal malignancy.

  20. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MA, JUNLI; SHEN, HONG; KAPESA, LINDA; ZENG, SHAN

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histol...

  1. Novel targeted agents for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Contemporary advancements have had little impact on the treatment of gastric cancer (GC, the world’s second highest cause of cancer death. Agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor mediated pathways have been a common topic of contemporary cancer research, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Trastuzumab is the first target agent evidencing improvements in overall survival in HER2-positive (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gastric cancer patients. Agents targeting vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, and other biological pathways are also undergoing clinical trials, with some marginally positive results. Effective targeted therapy requires patient selection based on predictive molecular biomarkers. Most phase III clinical trials are carried out without patient selection; therefore, it is hard to achieve personalized treatment and to monitor patient outcome individually. The trend for future clinical trials requires patient selection methods based on current understanding of GC biology with the application of biomarkers.

  2. Selection of chemotherapy for hyperthermic intraperitoneal use in gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, H. J.; Schellens, J. H.; Boot, H.; van Sandick, J. W.; Knibbe, C. A.; Boerma, D.; van Ramshorst, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have shown the potential benefit of cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in gastric cancer patients. At present the most effective chemotherapeutic regime in HIPEC for gastric cancer is unknown. The aim of this review was to

  3. A Rare Case: Gastric Cancer; Involving Primery Thoracal Vertebral Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Primery bone metastases rarely occur in gastric cancer. Bone metastases indicate that the prognosis is bad. In that article we present a case that is diagnosed as a gastric cancer with primary bone metasteses that caused pathologic thoracal vertebral fracture seenby computer ised tomography.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Therapy for the Prevention of Metachronous Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Kim, Young-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Park, Boram; Nam, Byung-Ho

    2018-03-22

    Patients with early gastric cancers that are limited to gastric mucosa or submucosa usually have an advanced loss of mucosal glandular tissue (glandular atrophy) and are at high risk for subsequent (metachronous) development of new gastric cancer. The long-term effects of treatment to eradicate Helicobacter pylori on histologic improvement and the prevention of metachronous gastric cancer remain unclear. In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, we assigned 470 patients who had undergone endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer or high-grade adenoma to receive either H. pylori eradication therapy with antibiotics or placebo. Two primary outcomes were the incidence of metachronous gastric cancer detected on endoscopy performed at the 1-year follow-up or later and improvement from baseline in the grade of glandular atrophy in the gastric corpus lesser curvature at the 3-year follow-up. A total of 396 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis population (194 in the treatment group and 202 in placebo group). During a median follow-up of 5.9 years, metachronous gastric cancer developed in 14 patients (7.2%) in the treatment group and in 27 patients (13.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the treatment group, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.94; P=0.03). Among the 327 patients in the subgroup that underwent histologic analysis, improvement from baseline in the atrophy grade at the gastric corpus lesser curvature was observed in 48.4% of the patients in the treatment group and in 15.0% of those in the placebo group (Pgastric cancer who received H. pylori treatment had lower rates of metachronous gastric cancer and more improvement from baseline in the grade of gastric corpus atrophy than patients who received placebo. (Funded by the National Cancer Center, South Korea; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02407119 .).

  5. Radioactive self-expanding stents for palliative management of unresectable esophageal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Kun

    2017-05-01

    Stent insertion is a feasible and safe palliative management for advanced unresectable esophageal cancer. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of radioactive stent for unresectable esophageal cancer compared with conventional stent. Systematic searches of the PubMed and Web of science are dated from their beginning to January 25, 2016. Studies that compared radioactive stent with conventional stent for unresectable esophageal cancer were included. The outcomes were postimplantation survival, relief of dysphagia, and complications related to stent implant. Six studies with 539 patients were included. All of them used stent equipped with radioactive iodine beads as a radioactive stent. The pooled weighted mean difference for median survival was 2.734 months (95% CI 1.710-3.775; Z = 5.21, P = 0.000) between two groups. The 1,3,6 month survival rates were higher in radioactive stents than conventional stent, with the pooled ORs 3.216 (95% CI 1.293-7.999; Z = 2.51, P = 0.012), 3.095 (95% CI 1.908-5.020; Z = 4.58, P = 0.000), and 7.503 (95% CI 2.206- 25.516; Z = 3.23, P = 0.001, respectively). The pooled hazard ratio was 0.464 (95% CI 0.328-0.655; Z = 4.35, P = 0.000) between two groups. For relief of dysphagia, two stents all have good relief of the dysphagia effect, but radioactive stent showed a better effect at 3, 6 months follow-up after implantation. For complications related to stent implant, no significant differences were found between two stents in terms of severe chest pain (30.0% vs. 35.7%, OR 0.765, 95% CI 0.490-1.196), gastroesophageal reflux (18.6% vs. 16.1%, OR 1.188, 95% CI 0.453-3.115), fever (12.1% vs. 12.1%, OR 1.014, 95% CI 0.332-3.097), bleeding (16.7% vs. 14.2%, OR 1.201, 95% CI 0.645-2.236), perforation or fistula (6.1% vs. 9.0%, OR 0.658, 95% CI 0.291-1.486), pneumonia (10.7% vs. 14.1%, OR 0.724, 95% CI 0.343-1.526), stent migration (7.0% vs. 10.2%, OR 0.651, 95% CI 0.220-1.924), and restenosis (24.2% vs. 20.6%, OR 1.228, 95% CI 0

  6. Metaplasia in the Stomach-Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroto; Hayakawa, Yoku; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  7. Metaplasia in the Stomach—Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Kinoshita

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  8. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer‐related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late‐stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new‐targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre‐clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  9. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0–2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m 2 ) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  10. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy for the Treatment of Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: Initial Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Byung Ihn; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Joo Ha [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (United States)

    2011-04-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential clinical value of concurrent chemotherapy and pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (CCHT), as well as the safety of pulsed HIFU, for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Twelve patients were treated with HIFU from October 2008 to May 2010, and three of them underwent CCHT as the main treatment (the CCHT group). The overall survival (OS), the time to tumor progression (TTP), the complications and the current performance status in the CCHT and non-CCHT groups were analyzed. Nine patients in the non-CCHT group were evaluated to determine why CCHT could not be performed more than twice. The OS of the three patients in the CCHT group was 26.0, 21.6 and 10.8 months, respectively, from the time of diagnosis. Two of them were alive at the time of preparing this manuscript with an excellent performance status, and one of them underwent a surgical resection one year after the initiation of CCHT. The TTP of the three patients in the CCHT group was 13.4, 11.5 and 9.9 months, respectively. The median OS and TTP of the non-CCHT group were 10.3 months and 4.4 months, respectively. The main reasons why the nine patients of the non-CCHT group failed to undergo CCHT more than twice were as follows: pancreatitis (n = 1), intolerance of the pain during treatment (n = 4), palliative use of HIFU for pain relief (n = 1) and a poor physical condition due to disease progression (n = 3). No major complications were encountered except one case of pancreatitis. This study shows that CCHT is a potentially effective and safe modality for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer

  11. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, John M., E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey [Division of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Jury, Robert P. [Department of Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura [Division of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hardy-Carlson, Maria [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  12. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P gastritis changed from antrum-predominant gastritis to corpus-predominant gastritis with age in both populations. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer was located in the upper part of the stomach in half of the Mongolian patients; Mongolian patients were infected with non-East-Asian-type H. pylori. PMID:26217093

  13. Molecular classification of gastric cancer: a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Klimstra, David S; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P

    2011-05-01

    Gastric cancer may be subdivided into 3 distinct subtypes--proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer--based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (National Cancer Institute, NCI #5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. Four to 6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was carried out to ensure more than 80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the 3 gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross-validation error was 0.14, suggesting that more than 85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the false discovery rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinctions are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. ©2011 AACR.

  14. Effect of pretreatment psoas muscle mass on survival for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer undergoing systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Noriko; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Akio; Miyamoto, Yuho; Yuri, Yukihisa; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Takata, Ryo; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2017-11-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there are few previous studies that have investigated the effect of decreased skeletal muscle mass (DSMM) on survival in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) who are undergoing systemic chemotherapy. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the impact of DSMM, as determined by the psoas muscle index (PMI) following computed tomography and prior to systemic chemotherapy, on the outcomes of patients with unresectable APC (n=61). The primary endpoint used was the overall survival (OS) rate. The OS rates in the PMI-High group (exceeds the median PMI value in each gender) were retrospectively compared with those in the PMI-Low group (below the median PMI value in each gender), and factors associated with OS were investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. The study cohort included 31 male and 30 female patients with a median age of 72 years, 13 of whom were stage IVA, and 48 were stage IVB. The median PMI in males was 4.3 cm 2 /m 2 (range, 1.6-8.2 cm 2 /m 2 ), while that in females was 2.3 cm 2 /m 2 (range, 0.7-6.1 cm 2 /m 2 ). The proportion of patients with performance status 0 in the PMI-High group was significantly high, compared with that in the PMI-Low group [83.3% (25/30) vs. 58.1% (18/31); P=0.0486]. Body mass index in the PMI-High group was significantly higher compared with that in the PMI-Low group (P=0.0154). The 1-year cumulative survival rate was 43.3% in the PMI-High group and 12.9% in the PMI-Low group (P=0.0027). Following multivariate analysis, PMI (P=0.0036), prothrombin time (P=0.0044) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (P=0.0451) were identified to be significant predictors of OS. In conclusion, DSMM, as determined by the PMI, could be a significant predictor of prognosis in patients with unresectable APC who are receiving systemic chemotherapy.

  15. A systematic review of the accuracy and indications for diagnostic laparoscopy prior to curative-intent resection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Pierre-Anthony; Cardoso, Roberta; Seevaratnam, Rajini; Lourenco, Laercio; Helyer, Lucy; Mahar, Alyson; Law, Calvin; Coburn, Natalie G

    2012-09-01

    Despite improved preoperative imaging techniques, patients with incurable or unresectable gastric cancer are still subjected to non-therapeutic laparotomy. Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) has been advocated by some to be essential in decision-making in gastric cancer. We aimed to identify and synthesize findings on the value of DL for patients with gastric cancer, in this era of improved preoperative imaging. Electronic literature searches were conducted using Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2009. We calculated the change in management and avoidance of laparotomy based on the addition of DL and laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS). The accuracy, agreement (kappa), sensitivity, and specificity of DL in assessing tumor extent, nodal involvement, and the presence of metastases with respect to the gold standard (pathology) were also calculated. Twenty-one articles were included. DL showed moderate to substantial agreement with final pathology for T stage, but only fair agreement for N stage. For M staging, DL had an overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity ranging from 85-98.9%, 64.3-94%, and 80-100%, respectively. The use of DL altered treatment in 8.5-59.6% of cases, avoiding laparotomy in 8.5-43.8% of cases. LUS provided additional benefit in 5.8-7.2% of cases. Despite evolving preoperative imaging techniques, diagnostic laparoscopy continues to be of substantial value in staging patients with gastric cancer and in avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. The current data support DL for all patients with advanced gastric cancer.

  16. The distinctive gastric fluid proteome in gastric cancer reveals a multi-biomarker diagnostic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Alvin KH

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overall gastric cancer survival remains poor mainly because there are no reliable methods for identifying highly curable early stage disease. Multi-protein profiling of gastric fluids, obtained from the anatomic site of pathology, could reveal diagnostic proteomic fingerprints. Methods Protein profiles were generated from gastric fluid samples of 19 gastric cancer and 36 benign gastritides patients undergoing elective, clinically-indicated gastroscopy using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on multiple ProteinChip arrays. Proteomic features were compared by significance analysis of microarray algorithm and two-way hierarchical clustering. A second blinded sample set (24 gastric cancers and 29 clinically benign gastritides was used for validation. Results By significance analysyis of microarray, 60 proteomic features were up-regulated and 46 were down-regulated in gastric cancer samples (p Conclusion This simple and reproducible multimarker proteomic assay could supplement clinical gastroscopic evaluation of symptomatic patients to enhance diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions.

  17. Incidence and mortality of gastric cancer in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. In China, based on two national mortality surveys conducted in 1970s and 1990s, there is an obvious clustering of geographical distribution of gastric cancer in the country, with the high mortality being mostly located in rural areas, especially in Gansu, Henan, Hebei, Shanxi and Shaanxi Provinces in the middle-western part of China. Despite a ...

  18. Colon cancer with unresectable synchronous metastases: the AAAP scoring system for predicting the outcome after primary tumour resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z M; Peng, Y F; Du, C Z; Gu, J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic scoring system to predict the outcome of patients with unresectable metastatic colon cancer who received primary colon tumour resection. Patients with confirmed metastatic colon cancer treated at the Peking University Cancer Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation of clinicopathological factors with overall survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were identified using a Cox proportional hazards regression model and were then combined to form a prognostic scoring system. A total of 110 eligible patients were included in the study. The median survival time was 10.4 months and the 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 21.8%. Age over 70 years, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level over 160 IU/l, ascites, a platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) above 162 and no postoperative therapy were independently associated with a shorter OS in multivariate analysis. Age, ALP, ascites and PLR were subsequently combined to form the so-called AAAP scoring system. Patients were classified into high, medium and low risk groups according to the score obtained. There were significant differences in OS between each group (P colonic cancer who underwent primary tumour resection. The AAAP scoring system may be a useful tool for surgical decision making. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa; Cho, Chi Hin; Chan, Francis Ka Leung; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G 0 /G 1 -phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D 3 and p21 Waf1 , which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G 1 -S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia.

  2. Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer

  3. Incidence trends and mortality rates of gastric cancer in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Ron; Kapiev, Andronik; Poluksht, Natan; Halevy, Ariel; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2013-04-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy worldwide. The incidence trends and mortality rates of gastric cancer in Israel have not been studied in depth. The aim of our study was to try and investigate the aforementioned issues in Israel in different ethnic groups. This retrospective study is based on the data of The Israel National Cancer Registry and The Central Bureau of Statistics. Published data from these two institutes were collected, summarized, and analyzed in this study. Around 650 new cases of gastric cancer are diagnosed yearly in Israel. While we noticed a decline during the period 1990-2007 in the incidence in the Jewish population (13.6-8.9 and 6.75-5.42 cases per 100,000 in Jewish men and women, respectively), an increase in the Arab population was noticed (7.7-10.2 and 3.7-4.2 cases per 100,000 in men and women, respectively). Age-adjusted mortality rates per 10,000 cases of gastric cancer decreased significantly, from 7.21 in 1990 to 5.46 in 2007, in the total population. The 5-year relative survival showed a slight increase for both men and women. There is a difference in the incidence and outcome of gastric cancer between the Jewish and Arab populations in Israel. The grim prognosis of gastric cancer patients in Israel is probably due to the advanced stage at which gastric cancer is diagnosed in Israel.

  4. Repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of liver metastases from gastric cancer: Local control and survival results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: T.Vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Eichler, Katrin [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Trojan, Jörg [Department of Internal Medicine I, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stephan [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Naguib, Nagy N.N. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt (Germany); Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the local tumor control and survival data after transarterial chemoembolization with different drug combinations in the palliative treatment of patients with liver metastases of gastric cancer. Materials and methods: The study was retrospectively performed. 56 patients (mean age, 52.4) with unresectable liver metastases of gastric cancer who did not respond to systemic chemotherapy were repeatedly treated with TACE in 4-week intervals. In total, 310 chemoembolization procedures were performed (mean, 5.5 sessions per patient). The local chemotherapy protocol consisted of mitomycin alone (30.4%), mitomycin and gemcitabine (33.9%), or mitomycin, gemcitabine and cisplatin (35.7%). Embolization was performed with lipiodol and starch microspheres. Local tumor response was evaluated by MRI according to RECIST. Survival data from first chemoembolization were calculated according to the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The local tumor control was: complete response in 1.8% (n = 1), partial response in 1.8% (n = 1), stable disease in 51.8% (n = 29) and progressive disease in 44.6% (n = 25) of patients. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate from the start of chemoembolization were 58%, 38%, and 23% respectively. The median and mean survival times were 13 and 27.1 months. A Statistically significant difference between patients treated with different chemotherapy protocols was noted (ρ = 0.045) with the best survival time in the mitomycin, gemcitabine and cisplatin group. Conclusion: Transarterial chemoembolization is a minimally invasive therapy option for palliative treatment of liver metastases in patients with gastric cancer.

  5. [Total gastrectomy for gastric cancer: can the type of lymphadenectomy condition the long-term results?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, N; Izzo, G; Cosenza, A; Vicenzo, L; Monaco, L; Torelli, F; Basciotti, A; Brillantino, A; Marra, A

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second tumor for frequency in the world. Surgery is still the only curative treatment. Good results in terms of long distance survival, postoperative morbidity and mortality have been achieved in the last years. The extension of lymphadenectomy is an important and discussed matter and it is not clear if lymphadenectomy may contribute to improve the surgical results. The Japanese surgeons were the first ones, in the 60's, to introduce a D2-D3 extended lymphadenectomy, but the real benefits of this technique are still being discussed. Indeed lymphonodal metastasis seem to be one of the most important prognostic factors in the gastric cancer and the level and the number of metastatic nodes are useful to predict the patients' survival. The aim of this study is to value the D2 lymphadenectomy in the patients who were treated with total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma, comparing the results both with the D1 lymphadenectomy and the D3-D4, paying attention to the survival rates related with the lymphonodal dissection. From 1998 to 2004, we studied 87 patients with gastric cancer. Out of 78 patients treated surgically, 9 were judged unresectable. Out of 69 patients treated surgically, one died before surgery and so he was put away by this study. All the patients were treated with total gastrectomy and a GI tract reconstruction by Roux's Y termino-lateral esophageal-jejunal anastomosis. In 20 patients we also made a splenectomy. We followed the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer guidelines, according to which nodes are gathered into 16 levels and divided in 4 groups (N1-N4) depending on the cancer localization. The extension of the lymphadenectomy has been classified according to the level of the removed nods. The patients were divided into 3 groups. First group: patients undergone a total gastrectomy with D1 lymphadenectomy. Second group: patients undergone D2 lymphadenectomy. Third group: patients undergone D3 and D4 lymphadenectomy

  6. Differential diagnosis of gastric adenoma and type IIa early gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchigame, T.; Ogata, Y.; Sumi, M.; Fukui, K.; Saito, R.; Nakashima, K.; Urata, J.; Arakawa, A.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The endoscopic and radiographic findings of 45 gastric adenomas in 39 patients were followed for 6 months to 13 years and compared with type IIa early gastric cancer observed in 9 patients. Difficulties in the diffential diagnosis of these disorders were evaluated. The following features were suggestive of gastric adenomas: clustered lesions; protuberance with gentle slope; smooth surface; and relatively young patients. Discrimination of adenoma from type IIa early gastric cancer is often difficult by visual observation alone; biopsy was essential in most patients. A group III adenoma verified on biopsy should be followed closely because the lesion may harbor a cancer (so-called carcinoma-in-adenoma) or a cancer may later develop. (orig.)

  7. Helicobacter pylori eradication: gastric cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Ford, Alexander Charles

    2015-12-01

    The principal effect of Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong chronic gastritis, affecting up to 20% of younger adults but 50% to 80% of adults born in resource-rich countries before 1950. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of H pylori eradication treatment on the risk of developing gastric cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 208 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 166 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 124 studies and the further review of 42 full publications. Of the 42 full articles evaluated, one systematic review was added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for two PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for one intervention based on information about the effectiveness and safety of H pylori eradication treatment for the prevention of gastric cancer.

  8. Testicular Cancer Presenting as Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is the most common solid malignancy affecting males between the ages of 15 and 35. The symptomatology caused by this tumor varies according to the site of metastasis. We present the case of a 26-year-old male who arrived to the emergency department with hematemesis. He had no previous medical history. On arrival, we noted enlargement of the left scrotal sac. There was also a mass in the left scrotum which provoked displacement of the penis and right testis. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level was 17,090 ng/mL, lactate dehydrogenase was 1480 U/L, and human chorionic gonadotropin was 287.4 IU/mL. Upper endoscopy revealed a type 1 isolated gastric varix, treated with cyanoacrylate. A CT scan showed extrinsic compression of the portal vein by lymphadenopathy along with splenic vein partial thrombosis, which caused left-sided portal hypertension. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was started with etoposide and cisplatin, and seven days later the patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. A postoperative biopsy revealed a pure testicular teratoma. Noncirrhotic left portal hypertension with bleeding from an isolated gastric varix secondary to metastasic testicular cancer has not been described before. Clinicians must consider the possibility of malignancy in the differential diagnosis of a young man presenting with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Meta-analysis of hepatic arterial infusion for unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer: the end of an era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pilati, Pierluigi; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-12-10

    The treatment of unresectable liver-confined metastatic disease from colorectal cancer (CRC) is a challenging issue. Although locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) claim the advantage of delivering higher doses of anticancer agents directly into the affected organ, the benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) is unclear. We quantitatively summarized the results of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing HAI with systemic chemotherapy (SCT). To date, 10 RCTs have been published, for a total of 1,277 patients enrolled. For tumor response rates, relative risks (RR) and their 95% CIs were obtained from raw data; for OS, hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% CIs were extrapolated from the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. HAI regimens were based on floxuridine (FUDR) in nine of 10 RCTs, whereas in one RCT, fluorouracil (FU) + leucovorin was used. SCT consisted of FUDR, FU, FU + leucovorin, or a miscellany of FU and best supportive care in three, one, four, and two studies, respectively. Pooling the data, tumor response rate was 42.9% and 18.4% for HAI and SCT, respectively (RR = 2.26; 95% CI, 1.80 to 2.84; P < .0001). Mean weighted median OS times were 15.9 and 12.4 months for HAI and SCT, respectively; the meta-risk of death was not statistically different between the two study groups (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = .24). Currently available evidence does not support the clinical or investigational use of fluoropyrimidine-based HAI alone for the treatment of patients with unresectable CRC liver metastases, at least as a first-line therapy.

  10. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron tomography is useful in evaluating the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments for so-called borderline unresectable pancreatic head cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Makoto; Katayama, Kanji; Yamaguchi, Akio; Iida, Atsushi; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Nagano, Hideki; Koneri, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Currently, computed tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate the efficacy of treatments on tumor regression in unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas. Recently, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) examination has been used for the initial diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, for diagnosis of distant metastasis, and for recurrences of pancreatic carcinomas. PET has also been used for the qualitative diagnosis of existing tumors. The current study was designed to observe if PET examination can be used to gauge the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments, and to estimate the prognosis for unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas in similar clinical stages and during therapy. This was a prospective cohort study and included 18 cases. All cases were unresectable pancreatic head cancers diagnosed as TNM classification stage 3, and had undergone identical multidisciplinary treatment regimens. The level of tumor markers, tumor-size reduction, and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were correlated with prognosis. Pearson's correlation and Kaplan-Meyer survival rate curves were used for statistical analysis. Tumor-size reduction in CTs and the transition of tumor markers were not related to patient prognosis. Cases in which post-treatment SUV max values were reduced to <3.0 were correlated with a more favorable prognosis and demonstrated extended survival rates. PET examination can be used to estimate the prognosis of unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas which have undergone multidisciplinary treatments. (author)

  11. Gastric washing by distilled water can reduce free gastric cancer cells exfoliated into the stomach lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Atsuko; Abe, Nobutsugu; Yoshimoto, Eri; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hirohisa; Nagao, Gen; Masaki, Tadahiko; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2018-04-25

    Intragastric free cancer cells in patients with gastric cancer have rarely been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection rate of intragastric free cancer cells in gastric washes using two types of solutions during endoscopic examination. We further clarified risk factors affecting the presence of exfoliated free cancer cells. A total of 175 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled. Lactated Ringer's solution (N = 89) or distilled water (DW; N = 86) via endoscopic working channel was sprayed onto the tumor surface, and the resultant fluid was collected for cytological examination. We compared the cancer-cell positivity rate between the two (Ringer and DW) groups. We also tested the correlation between cancer-cell positivity and clinicopathological factors in the Ringer group to identify risk factors for the presence of exfoliated cancer cells. The cancer-cell positivity rate was significantly higher in the Ringer group than that in the DW group (58 vs 6%). Cytomorphology in the Ringer group was well maintained, but not in the DW group. The larger tumor size (≥ 20 mm) and positive lymphatic involvement were significant risk factors of exfoliated free cancer cells. Cancer cells can be highly exfoliated from the tumor surface into the gastric lumen by endoscopic irrigation in large gastric cancer with lymphatic involvement. Gastric washing by DW can lead to cytoclasis of free cancer cells; therefore, it may minimize the possibility of cancer-cell seeding in procedures carrying potential risks of tumor-cell seeding upon transluminal communication, such as endoscopic full-thickness resection and laparoscopy-endoscopy cooperative surgery.

  12. Clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of proximal and distal gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu X

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Xuefeng Yu,1,* Fulan Hu,2,* Chunfeng Li,1 Qiang Yao,1 Hongfeng Zhang,1 Yingwei Xue1 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China; 2Department of Epidemiology, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objectives: The dismal prognosis of gastric cancer patients is a global problem. We aim to evaluate the clinicopathologic features and prognostic factors of proximal and distal gastric cancer.Materials and methods: Gastric cancer cases diagnosed and treated at the same surgical unit between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Follow-up data from all patients were collected for at least 5 years until 2015. A total of 964 patients were studied (distal gastric cancer [DG], n=777 and proximal gastric cancer [PG], n=187.Results: DG patients had a relatively higher percentage of females, more thorough therapy (R0 [D0/D1/D2], fewer combined organ resections, younger age, smaller tumors (<5 cm, shorter surgery durations, less blood loss during surgery, and a relatively lower percentage of nodal metastases and a TNM stage of 4 (p<0.05. A significantly higher 5-year survival rate was observed in DG patients compared to PG patients (DG: 51%, PG: 28%; p<0.001. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, blood loss during surgery, surgery approach of lymph node dissection, treatment with palliative surgery, histopathologic type, TNM stage, and tumor location were independent predictors of poor outcome.Conclusion: The different characteristics and prognosis of DG and PG cases have implications for the development of guiding strategies for a surgical program and assessment of prognosis of gastric cancer patients based on tumor location. Keywords: gastric cancer, tumor location, clinicopathologic features, prognosis, distal gastric cancer, proximal gastric cancer 

  13. Management of gastric cancer in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Shan, Yan-Shen; Hu, Huang-Ming; Price, Timothy J; Sirohi, Bhawna; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Sano, Takeshi; Yang, Han-Kwang; Zhang, Xiaotian; Park, Sook Ryun; Fujii, Masashi; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally, and is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. About three-quarters of newly diagnosed cases in 2008 were from Asian countries. With a high mortality-to-incidence ratio, management of gastric cancer is challenging. We discuss evidence for optimum management of gastric cancer in aspects of screening and early detection, diagnosis, and staging; endoscopic and surgical intervention; and the concepts of perioperative, postoperative, and palliative chemotherapy and use of molecularly targeted therapy. Recommendations are formulated on the basis of the framework provided by the Breast Health Global Initiative, using the categories of basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum level. We aim to provide a stepwise strategy for management of gastric cancer applicable to different levels of health-care resources in Asian countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Companion diagnostics for the targeted therapy of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Changhoon; Park, Young Soo

    2015-10-21

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and represents a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. With recent biomedical advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of gastric cancer, many genetic alterations have been identified as potential targets for its treatment. Multiple novel agents are currently under development as the demand for active agents that improve the survival of gastric cancer patients constantly increases. Based on lessons from previous trials of targeted agents, it is now widely accepted that the establishment of an optimal diagnostic test to select molecularly defined patients is of equal importance to the development of active agents against targetable genetic alterations. Herein, we highlight the current status and future perspectives of companion diagnostics in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  15. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  16. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  17. [Eleven Patients with Gastric Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy after Stent Placement for Gastric Outlet Obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shunji; Nakagawa, Tomo; Konishi, Ken; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Takeshi; Yamada, Terumasa

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is reportedly effective for gastric outlet obstructions due to advanced gastric cancer, and is less invasive than gastrojejunostomy. For patients who have good performance status, we administer chemotherapy after stent placement, although the safety and feasibility of this chemotherapy have not yet been discussed in full. Between 2011 and 2015, 15 patients at our institution underwent endoscopic gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer. Eleven of these patients were administered chemotherapy after stent placement. In our case series, we did not observe any specific adverse event caused by stent placement plus chemotherapy. Adverse events after chemotherapy included anemia of CTCAE Grade 3 in 7 patients. Stent-in-stent placement was needed in 2 patients. Neither stent migration nor perforation was observed. Therefore, chemotherapy after stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer was considered safe and feasible. Stent placement is useful not only as palliative care for patients with terminal-stage disease, but also as one of the multimodal therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  18. Clinical significance of lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jing-Yu; Liang, Han

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most common malignancies in the world, frequently reveals lymph node, peritoneum, and liver metastases. Most of gastric cancer patients present with lymph node metastasis when they were initially diagnosed or underwent surgical resection, which results in poor prognosis. Both the depth of tumor invasion and lymph node involvement are considered as the most important prognostic predictors of gastric cancer. Although extended lymphadenectomy was not considered a survival benefit procedure and was reported to be associated with high mortality and morbidity in two randomized controlled European trials, it showed significant superiority in terms of lower locoregional recurrence and disease related deaths compared to limited lymphadenectomy in a 15-year follow-up study. Almost all clinical investigators have reached a consensus that the predictive efficiency of the number of metastatic lymph nodes is far better than the extent of lymph node metastasis for the prognosis of gastric cancer worldwide, but other nodal metastatic classifications of gastric cancer have been proposed as alternatives to the number of metastatic lymph nodes for improving the predictive efficiency for patient prognosis. It is still controversial over whether the ratio between metastatic and examined lymph nodes is superior to the number of metastatic lymph nodes in prognostic evaluation of gastric cancer. Besides, the negative lymph node count has been increasingly recognized to be an important factor significantly associated with prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:24744586

  19. Prediction Model for Gastric Cancer Incidence in Korean Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Wool Eom

    Full Text Available Predicting high risk groups for gastric cancer and motivating these groups to receive regular checkups is required for the early detection of gastric cancer. The aim of this study is was to develop a prediction model for gastric cancer incidence based on a large population-based cohort in Korea.Based on the National Health Insurance Corporation data, we analyzed 10 major risk factors for gastric cancer. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to develop gender specific prediction models for gastric cancer development, and the performance of the developed model in terms of discrimination and calibration was also validated using an independent cohort. Discrimination ability was evaluated using Harrell's C-statistics, and the calibration was evaluated using a calibration plot and slope.During a median of 11.4 years of follow-up, 19,465 (1.4% and 5,579 (0.7% newly developed gastric cancer cases were observed among 1,372,424 men and 804,077 women, respectively. The prediction models included age, BMI, family history, meal regularity, salt preference, alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity for men, and age, BMI, family history, salt preference, alcohol consumption, and smoking for women. This prediction model showed good accuracy and predictability in both the developing and validation cohorts (C-statistics: 0.764 for men, 0.706 for women.In this study, a prediction model for gastric cancer incidence was developed that displayed a good performance.

  20. Comparison of colorectal and gastric cancer: Survival and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghimi-Dehkordi, Bijan; Safaee, Azadeh; Zali, Mohammad R

    2009-01-01

    Gastric and colorectal cancers are the most common gastrointestinal malignancies in Iran. We aim to compare the survival rates and prognostic factors between these two cancers. We studied 1873 patients with either gastric or colorectal cancer who were registered in one referral cancer registry center in Tehran, Iran. All patients were followed from their time of diagnosis until December 2006 (as failure time). Survival curves were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier Method and compared by the Log-rank test. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was carried out using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 1873 patients, there were 746 with gastric cancer and 1138 with colorectal cancer. According to the Kaplan-Meier method 1, 3, 5, and 7-year survival rates were 71.2, 37.8, 25.3, and 19.5%, respectively, in gastric cancer patients and 91.1, 73.1, 61, and 54.9%, respectively, in patients with colorectal cancer. Also, univariate analysis showed that age at diagnosis, sex, grade of tumor, and distant metastasis were of prognostic significance in both cancers ( P < 0.0001). However, in multivariate analysis, only distant metastasis in colorectal cancer and age at diagnosis, grade of tumor, and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer were identified as independent prognostic factors influencing survival. According to our findings, survival is significantly related to histological differentiation of tumor and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer patients and only to distant metastasis in gastric cancer patients. (author)

  1. [Significance of CEA in gastric and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, K; Miyamoto, Y; Izuo, M; Shiozaki, H; Aiba, S; Matsumoto, H

    1985-04-01

    The determination of serum CEA (Sandwich method) and CEA staining (PAP method) of excised specimens were performed in patients with gastric or colorectal cancer, and the biological characteristics of each cancer and the factors to increase serum CEA were studied with the following results: As colonic cancer has strong CEA productivity, serum CEA can be useful for the detection of cancer, and especially effective for the postoperative observation. Gastric cancer has weak CEA productivity, and serum CEA is not so useful in the detection of cancer and the judgement of resectability. The CEA positive rate of tissue with CEA staining was 80% in gastric cancer, 100% in colonic cancer, and were nearly equal to the CEA positive rate of serum in the group of terminal stage. In the mode of CEA staining of cancerous cells, IV type was observed most frequently in gastric cancer, and I type in colonic cancer. Among the resected cases showing more than 7ng/ml serum CEA, differentiated type, lymph node metastasis (+), the degree of tissue staining with CEA staining, the mode of cell staining O or I type in gastric cancer and I type in colonic cancer were observed in common.

  2. FOLFOXIRI Plus Bevacizumab as Conversion Therapy for Patients With Initially Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Petrelli, Fausto; Ghidini, Michele; Russo, Alessandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Barni, Sandro

    2017-07-13

    The combination of fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-Bev) is an established and effective first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resection rates of metastases and overall survival with this schedule have never been systematically evaluated in published studies including, but not limited to, the TRIBE (TRIplet plus BEvacizumab) trial. To assess the clinical efficacy of FOLFOXIRI-Bev, including outcomes and rates of surgical conversions. A systematic review was conducted in October 2016 in concordance with the PRISMA guidelines of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, Ovid, and EMBASE using the terms FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab and (colorectal cancer). Clinical trials, retrospective case series, and prospective case series that used FOLFOXIRI-Bev for the treatment of initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer in humans were included. Individual case reports and retrospective case series with fewer than 10 patients were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 reviewers on a predesigned, standardized form. Ultimately, data were aggregated to obtain the pooled effect size of efficacy, according to the random-effects model and weighted for the number of patients included in each trial. Median overall survival and progression-free survival, overall response rates, and rates of R0 surgical conversions and overall surgical conversions. Eleven FOLFOXIRI-Bev studies published between 2010 and 2016 met the inclusion criteria and were pooled for analysis. The studies included 889 patients, with 877 patients clinically evaluable for overall response rates. The objective response rate to FOLFOXIRI-Bev was 69% (95% CI, 65%-72%; I2 = 25%). The rate of overall surgical conversions was 39.1% (95% CI, 26.9%-52.8%), and the rate of R0 surgical conversions was 28.1% (95% CI, 18.1%-40.8%). Median pooled overall survival was 30

  3. Preoperative Quality of Life in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suk, Hyoam; Kwon, Oh Kyung; Yu, Wansik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the socio-personal and clinical factors that can affect preoperative quality of life to determine how to improve preoperative quality of life in patients with gastric cancer. Materials and Methods The preoperative quality of life data of 200 patients (68 females and 132 males; mean age 58.9?12.6 years) with gastric cancer were analyzed according to socio-personal and clinical factors. The Korean versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (E...

  4. Gastric cancer, nutritional status, and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Xuechao Liu,1,2,* Haibo Qiu,1,2,* Pengfei Kong,1,2,* Zhiwei Zhou,1,2 Xiaowei Sun1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, 2Department of Gastric Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: We aim to investigate the prognostic value of several nutrition-based indices, including the prognostic nutritional index (PNI, performance status, body mass index, serum albumin, and preoperative body weight loss in patients with gastric cancer (GC.Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,330 consecutive patients with GC undergoing curative surgery between October 2000 and September 2012. The relationship between nutrition-based indices and overall survival (OS was examined using Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression model.Results: Following multivariate analysis, the PNI and preoperative body weight loss were the only nutritional-based indices independently associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.356, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.051–1.748, P=0.019; HR: 1.152, 95% CI: 1.014–1.310, P=0.030, retrospectively. In stage-stratified analysis, multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative body weight loss was identified as an independent prognostic factor only in patients with stage III GC (HR: 1.223, 95% CI: 1.065–1.405, P=0.004, while the prognostic significance of PNI was not significant (all P>0.05. In patients with stage III GC, preoperative body weight loss stratified 5-year OS from 41.1% to 26.5%. When stratified by adjuvant chemotherapy, the prognostic significance of preoperative body weight loss was maintained in patients treated with surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy and in patients treated with surgery alone (P<0.001; P=0.003.Conclusion: Preoperative body weight loss is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with GC, especially in

  5. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomitsu Tahara

    Full Text Available The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features.A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored.The majority of EGCs (63/64 were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, P<0.0001; metaplasia, 1.68+/-0.13 vs. 0.48+/-0.1, P<0.0001. The degree of endoscopic atrophy improved in the patients with longer post-H. pylori eradication periods; however, this trend was not observed for the histological parameters, and high degrees of atrophy and metaplasia were observed in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs compared with the corpus during all periods (all P<0.05. The histological degrees of atrophy and metaplasia in the adjacent mucosa were particularly higher in the patients who underwent eradication due to gastric ulcers.Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Mismatch-Repair Deficient and Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Epstein-Barr Virus Positive; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency; Stage IB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer AJCC v7

  7. Diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer by positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Xi; Zhu, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The diagnosis of gastric cancer has been significantly improved with the broad availability of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Effective technologies for accurate staging and quantitative evaluation are still in demand to merit reasonable treatment and better prognosis for the patients presented with advanced disease. Preoperative staging using conventional imaging tools, such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography, is inadequate. Positron emission tomography (PET), using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer and integrating CT for anatomic localization, holds a promise to detect unsuspected metastasis and has been extensively used in a variety of malignancies. However, the value of FDG PET/CT in diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer is still controversial. This article reviews the current literature in diagnosis, staging, response evaluation, and relapse monitoring of gastric cancer, and discusses the current understanding, improvement, and future prospects in this area. PMID:24782610

  8. Image processings of radiographs in the gastric cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamoto, Kazuo; Yamashita, Kazuya; Morikawa, Kaoru; Takigawa, Atsushi

    1987-01-01

    For improving detectability of the gastric lesions in the X-ray examinations, the computer image processing methods were studied in radiographs of a stomach phantom and gastric cancer lesions by the A/D conversion. After several kinds of the basic processing methods were examined in the artificially made lesions in the stomach phantom and true gastric cancer lesions in 26 X-ray pictures of the 8 gastric cancer cases, we concluded that pathological changes on the edge or mucosal folds in the stomach were stressed by the image processing method using negative to positive conversion, density gradient control, edge enhancement (Sobel operation) and subtraction of the Sobel image from the original image. These methods contributed to interpretation of the gastric cancer by enhancement of the contour and mucosal pattern inside the lesion. The results were applied for follow up studies of the gastric cancer. Tumor expansions could be clarified, but it was yet difficult to catch a precancer lesion by retrospective studies. However, these methods would be expected in future application in the mass survey examination of the gastric cancer detection. (author)

  9. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junli; Shen, Hong; Kapesa, Linda; Zeng, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histological subtypes of gastric cancer proposed by the Lauren classification exhibit a number of distinct clinical and molecular characteristics, including histogenesis, cell differentiation, epidemiology, etiology, carcinogenesis, biological behaviors and prognosis. Gastric cancer exhibits varied sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs and significant heterogeneity; therefore, the disease may be a target for individualized therapy. The Lauren classification may provide the basis for individualized treatment for advanced gastric cancer, which is increasingly gaining attention in the scientific field. However, few studies have investigated individualized treatment that is guided by pathological classification. The aim of the current review is to analyze the two major histological subtypes of gastric cancer, as proposed by the Lauren classification, and to discuss the implications of this for personalized chemotherapy.

  10. IRGM gene polymorphisms and risk of gastric cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burada, F.; Plantinga, T.S.; Ioana, M.; Rosentul, D.; Angelescu, C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Saftoiu, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to assess the possible association of polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM (rs13361189 and rs4958847) with the risk of gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 102 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, 52 with chronic gastritis and 351 healthy controls were included in this

  11. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  12. Prognostic Significance of Signet Ring Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N.; Davey, Adam; Willis, Alliric I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Studies in Asia have questioned the dictum that signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) has a worse prognosis than other forms of gastric cancer. Our study determined differences in presentation and outcomes between SRC and gastric adenocarcinoma (AC) in the United States. Patients and Methods The National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was reviewed for SRC and AC from 2004 to 2007. Results We reviewed 10,246 cases of patients with gastric cancer, including 2,666 of SRC and 7,580 of AC. SRC presented in younger patients (61.9 v 68.7 years; P < .001) and less often in men (52.7% v 68.7%; P < .001). SRC patients were more frequently black (11.3% v 10.9%), Asian (16.4% v 13.2%), American Indian/Alaska Native (0.9% v 0.8%), or Hispanic (23.3% v 14.0%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be stage T3-4 (45.8% v 33.3%), have lymph node spread (59.7% v 51.8%), and distant metastases (40.2% v 37.6%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be found in the lower (30.7% v 24.2%) and middle stomach (30.6% v 20.7%; P < .001). Median survival was not different between the two (AC, 14.0 months v SRC, 13.0 months; P = .073). Multivariable analyses demonstrated SRC was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.11; P = .150). Mortality was associated with age (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02; P < .001), black race (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20; P = .026), and tumor grade. Variables associated with lower mortality risk included Asian race (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91; P < .001) and surgery (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion In the United States, SRC significantly differs from AC in extent of disease at presentation. However, when adjusted for stage, SRC does not portend a worse prognosis. PMID:22927530

  13. Chromosomal Instability in Gastric Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffiyeh Saboor Maleki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is the fifth most common cancer in the world and accounts for 7% of the total cancer incidence. The prognosis of GC is dismal in Western countries due to late diagnosis: approximately 70% of the patients die within 5 years following initial diagnosis. Recently, integrative genomic analyses led to the proposal of a molecular classification of GC into four subtypes, i.e.,microsatellite-instable, Epstein-Barr virus–positive, chromosomal-instable (CIN, and genomically stable GCs. Molecular classification of GC advances our knowledge of the biology of GC and may have implications for diagnostics and patient treatment. Diagnosis of microsatellite-instable GC and Epstein-Barr virus–positive GC is more or less straightforward. Microsatellite instability can be tested by immunohistochemistry (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 and/or molecular-biological analysis. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GC can be tested by in situ hybridization (Epstein-Barr virus encoded small RNA. However, with regard to CIN, testing may be more complicated and may require a more in-depth knowledge of the underlying mechanism leading to CIN. In addition, CIN GC may not constitute a distinct subgroup but may rather be a compilation of a more heterogeneous group of tumors. In this review, we aim to clarify the definition of CIN and to point out the molecular mechanisms leading to this molecular phenotype and the challenges faced in characterizing this type of cancer.

  14. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  15. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Zu; Chen, Hongda; Castro, Felipe A.; Hu, Jian-Kun; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection is found in a subset of gastric cancers. Previous reviews have exclusively focused on EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) positivity in gastric cancer tissues, but a comprehensive evaluation of other type of studies is lacking. We searched the PubMed database up to September, 2014, and performed a systematic review. We considered studies comparing EBV nucleic acids positivity in gastric cancer tissue with positivity in either adjacent non-tumor tissue of cancer patients or non-tumor mucosa from healthy individuals, patients with benign gastric diseases, or deceased individuals. We also considered studies comparing EBV antibodies in serum from cancer patients and healthy controls. Selection of potentially eligible studies and data extraction were performed by 2 independent reviewers. Due to the heterogeneity of studies, we did not perform formal meta-analysis. Forty-seven studies (8069 cases and 1840 controls) were identified. EBER positivity determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) was significantly higher in cancer tissues (range 5.0%–17.9%) than in adjacent mucosa from the same patients or biopsies from all control groups (almost 0%). High EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) positivity by PCR was found in gastric cancer tissues, but most were not validated by ISH or adjusted for inflammatory severity and lymphocyte infiltration. Only 4 studies tested for EBV antibodies, with large variation in the seropositivities of different antibodies in both cases and controls, and did not find an association between EBV seropositivity and gastric cancer. In summary, tissue-based ISH methods strongly suggest an association between EBV infection and gastric cancer, but PCR method alone is invalid to confirm such association. Very limited evidence from serological studies and the lack of novel antibodies warrant further investigations to identify potential risk factors of EBV for gastric cancer. PMID:25997049

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor structural alterations in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho, Cátia; Mateus, Ana R; Milanezi, Fernanda; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo

    2008-01-01

    EGFR overexpression has been described in many human tumours including gastric cancer. In NSCLC patients somatic EGFR mutations, within the kinase domain of the protein, as well as gene amplification were associated with a good clinical response to EGFR inhibitors. In gastric tumours data concerning structural alterations of EGFR remains controversial. Given its possible therapeutic relevance, we aimed to determine the frequency and type of structural alterations of the EGFR gene in a series of primary gastric carcinomas. Direct sequencing of the kinase domain of the EGFR gene was performed in a series of 77 primary gastric carcinomas. FISH analysis was performed in 30 cases. Association studies between EGFR alterations and the clinical pathological features of the tumours were performed. Within the 77 primary gastric carcinomas we found two EGFR somatic mutations and several EGFR polymorphisms in exon 20. Six different intronic sequence variants of EGFR were also found. Four gastric carcinomas showed balanced polysomy or EGFR gene amplification. We verified that gastric carcinoma with alterations of EGFR (somatic mutations or copy number variation) showed a significant increase of tumour size (p = 0.0094) in comparison to wild-type EGFR carcinomas. We demonstrate that EGFR structural alterations are rare in gastric carcinoma, but whenever present, it leads to tumour growth. We considered that searching for EGFR alterations in gastric cancer is likely to be clinically important in order to identify patients susceptible to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  17. The overmethylated genes in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa are demethylated in gastric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sang-Wook

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transitional-CpG sites between weakly methylated genes and densely methylated retroelements are overmethylated in the gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and they are undermethylated in the gastric cancers depending on the level of loss of heterozygosity (LOH events. This study delineated the transitional-CpG methylation patterns of CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes in view of the retroelements. Methods The transitional-CpG sites of eight CpG-island-containing genes and six CpG-island-lacking genes were semi-quantitatively examined by performing radioisotope-labelling methylation-specific PCR under stringent conditions. The level of LOH in the gastric cancers was estimated using the 40 microsatellite markers on eight cancer-associated chromosomes. Each gene was scored as overmethylated or undermethylated based on an intermediate level of transitional-CpG methylation common in the H. pylori-negative gastric mucosa. Results The eight CpG-island genes examined were overmethylated depending on the proximity to the nearest retroelement in the H. pylori-positive gastric mucosa. The six CpG-island-lacking genes were similarly methylated in the H. pylori-positive and -negative gastric mucosa. In the gastric cancers, long transitional-CpG segments of the CpG-island genes distant from the retroelements remained overmethylated, whereas the overmethylation of short transitional-CpG segments close to the retroelements was not significant. Both the CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes tended to be decreasingly methylated in a LOH-level-dependent manner. Conclusions The overmethylated genes under the influence of retroelement methylation in the H. pylori-infected stomach are demethylated in the gastric cancers influenced by LOH.

  18. Induced pneumoperitoneum in spiral CT evaluation of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hua; Gao Jianbo; Li Yintai; Yang Xuehua; Chen Xuejun; Guan Sheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value and clinical significance of preoperative staging in gastric cancer with induced pneumoperitoneum in spiral CT (SCTPP). Methods: Both routine SCT and SCTPP were performed in 52 lean patients suffered from gastric cancers, and comparison was made between SCT findings and surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: The accuracy of routine SCT and SCTPP in determining the T-staging was 72% and 96%, respectively (x 2 = 8.0, P 2 = 0.006, P > 0.05). The sensitivity in determining M-staging was 61% and 100%, respectively (x 2 = 0.04, P 2 6.03, P < 0.05). Conclusion: The accuracy of SCTPP in determining preoperative staging of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that of routine SCT. SCTPP has important guiding significance for the selection of the treatment strategy in gastric cancer

  19. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter

    2017-01-01

    available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed...... differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin...... safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives....

  20. Occupation and gastric cancer in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C A; Sanz, M; Marcos, G; Pita, S; Brullet, E; Vida, F; Agudo, A; Hsieh, C C

    1991-08-01

    The association between occupational exposure and stomach cancer was investigated in a multicenter case-referent study conducted in Spain on 354 histologically confirmed cases and 354 hospital referents, matched by age, gender, and residence. An increased risk of gastric cancer was found for coal mining workers [odds ratio (OR) 11.8], but the number of workers was small, and therefore the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was wide (95% CI 1.36-103). An increased risk was observed for wood and furniture workers (OR 1.76), construction workers (OR 1.68), and glass and ceramic workers (OR 2.18), but none of these risks were statistically significant. According to an occupation-exposure linkage system an increased risk was found for occupations associated with exposure to silica and mineral dust (OR 1.80, 95% CI 0.90-3.59). All of the OR estimates were adjusted for the confounding factors socioprofessional status and dietary habits. The possibility of a causal association between stomach cancer and coal and mineral dust is supported by the results.

  1. Prognostic impact of CD168 expression in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Yoshiaki, Kita; Kijima, Yuko; Kitazono, Masaki; Natsugoe, Shoji; Ueno, Shinichi; Nishizono, Yuka; Matsumoto, Masataka; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Arigami, Takaaki; Uchikado, Yasuto; Setoyama, Tetsuro; Arima, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of stromal hyaluronic acid (HA) with its binding protein RHAMM (receptor for HA-mediated motility) (CD168) have been reported to affect tumor extension and the migration of crucial molecules to promote tumor progression and metastases. Cancerous CD168 expression is correlated with aggressive biological features in several cancers. However, the clinical implications of CD168 positivity in gastric cancer have remained unclear. We examined the CD168 expression of 196 consecutive gastric cancer patients by immunohistochemistry. According to CD168 positivity, the 196 gastric cancer patients were divided into two groups (57 CD168-positive and 139 CD168-negative patients). The correlation between CD168 expression and clinicopathological factors (age, sex, histology, tumor depth, lymph node status, and vessel invasion) was evaluated according to the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma. Cancerous CD168 expression was detectable in 57 of the 196 tumors (29%). CD168 positivity was significantly correlated with the depth of invasion, nodal involvement, and vessel invasion (p < 0.01). Survival analysis of the 196 gastric cancer patients showed that the CD168-positive group had a significantly higher mortality than the CD168-negative group (p < 0.01). In terms of a correlation with CD168 positivity at separate clinical stages, a significance difference was only found in stages II and III. Multivariate analysis revealed that CD168 expression was a significant independent prognostic marker (p = 0.013) after depth of invasion (p < 0.005) and nodal involvement (p < 0.01). Our results suggest that cancerous CD168 positivity is strongly related to the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer tumors. These results suggest that cancerous CD168 expression can be used as a prognostic marker of gastric cancer owing to its interactions with stromal hyaluronic acid

  2. Splenectomy combined with gastrectomy and immunotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, H; Orita, K

    1983-06-01

    We studied the effects of a splenectomy in combination with immunotherapy on the survival of patients who had undergone a total gastrectomy. It was found that a splenectomy was not effective against advanced gastric cancer at stage III, and that the spleen should be retained for immunotherapy. Splenectomy for gastric cancer at terminal stage IV, particularly in combination with immunotherapy, produced not only augmentation of cellular immunity, but also increased survival.

  3. Incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of acute kidney injury after gastric surgery for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Seong Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI, a serious surgical complication, is common after cardiac surgery; however, reports on AKI after noncardiac surgery are limited. We sought to determine the incidence and predictive factors of AKI after gastric surgery for gastric cancer and its effects on the clinical outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 4718 patients with normal renal function who underwent partial or total gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2002 and December 2011. Postoperative AKI was defined by serum creatinine change, as per the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guideline. RESULTS: Of the 4718 patients, 679 (14.4% developed AKI. Length of hospital stay, intensive care unit admission rates, and in-hospital mortality rate (3.5% versus 0.2% were significantly higher in patients with AKI than in those without. AKI was also associated with requirement of renal replacement therapy. Multivariate analysis revealed that male gender; hypertension; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; hypoalbuminemia (<4 g/dl; use of diuretics, vasopressors, and contrast agents; and packed red blood cell transfusion were independent predictors for AKI after gastric surgery. Postoperative AKI and vasopressor use entailed a high risk of 3-month mortality after multiple adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: AKI was common after gastric surgery for gastric cancer and associated with adverse outcomes. We identified several factors associated with postoperative AKI; recognition of these predictive factors may help reduce the incidence of AKI after gastric surgery. Furthermore, postoperative AKI in patients with gastric cancer is an important risk factor for short-term mortality.

  4. How to stomach an epigenetic insult: the gastric cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Nisha; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tan, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a deadly malignancy afflicting close to a million people worldwide. Patient survival is poor and largely due to late diagnosis and suboptimal therapies. Disease heterogeneity is a substantial obstacle, underscoring the need for precision treatment strategies. Studies have identified different subgroups of gastric cancer displaying not just genetic, but also distinct epigenetic hallmarks. Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic abnormalities in gastric cancer are not mere bystander events, but rather promote carcinogenesis through active mechanisms. Epigenetic aberrations, induced by pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori, are an early component of gastric carcinogenesis, probably preceding genetic abnormalities. This Review summarizes our current understanding of the gastric cancer epigenome, highlighting key advances in recent years in both tumours and pre-malignant lesions, made possible through targeted and genome-wide technologies. We focus on studies related to DNA methylation and histone modifications, linking these findings to potential therapeutic opportunities. Lessons learned from the gastric cancer epigenome might also prove relevant for other gastrointestinal cancers.

  5. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  6. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Determination of Serum Helicobacter pylori Antibody and Pepsinogen Concentrations: ABC Method for Gastric Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhe Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer benefit from the risk stratification, but the cutoff values for H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration require further modification.

  7. Gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment guidelines 2008: Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Uganda most cancers to the exception of bladder and penis are increasing in incidence. The incidence of cancer of stomach is 5.6/100,000 from 0.8/100,000 in the 1960s a seven fold increase.The purpose of this guideline document is to highlight the salient points in gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment in the ...

  8. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer stem cell; gastric cancer; ZFX ... The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been proposed to reconcile this heterogeneity. ... Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Genetics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahrekord ...

  9. Association between gastric cancer and the Kyoto classification of gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichijo, Satoki; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Niikura, Ryota; Hayakawa, Yoku; Yamada, Atsuo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-01

    Histological gastritis is associated with gastric cancer, but its diagnosis requires biopsy. Many classifications of endoscopic gastritis are available, but not all are useful for risk stratification of gastric cancer. The Kyoto Classification of Gastritis was proposed at the 85th Congress of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society. This cross-sectional study evaluated the usefulness of the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis for risk stratification of gastric cancer. From August 2013 to September 2014, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and the gastric findings evaluated according to the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis in a total of 4062 patients. The following five endoscopic findings were selected based on previous reports: atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, enlarged folds, nodularity, and diffuse redness. A total of 3392 patients (1746 [51%] men and 1646 [49%] women) were analyzed. Among them, 107 gastric cancers were diagnosed. Atrophy was found in 2585 (78%) and intestinal metaplasia in 924 (27%). Enlarged folds, nodularity, and diffuse redness were found in 197 (5.8%), 22 (0.6%), and 573 (17%), respectively. In univariate analyses, the severity of atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, diffuse redness, age, and male sex were associated with gastric cancer. In a multivariate analysis, atrophy and male sex were found to be independent risk factors. Younger age and severe atrophy were determined to be associated with diffuse-type gastric cancer. Endoscopic detection of atrophy was associated with the risk of gastric cancer. Thus, patients with severe atrophy should be examined carefully and may require intensive follow-up. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Adjuvant VHF therapy in locally recurrent and primary unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, J.M.; Lamb, M.H.; Bayliss, E.J.; Edis, A.J.; Blackwell, J.B.; Shepherd, J.M.; Cassidy, B.

    1996-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, 434 MHz microwave therapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (VHF+RT) was compared with standard external beam radiotherapy (RT) in controlling locally recurrent or unresectable primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Independent assessors documented quality of life scores, performance status, toxicities local response to treatment, and systemic disease progression before treatment and after treatment and every 8 week thereafter. Of 75 patients randomized, 73 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Forty-three of these patients had local pelvic tumour recurrence only and 21 also had distant metastases. In addition, nine patients had primary inoperable carcinomas, two of whom also had metastases. Thirty-seven patients were randomized to RT and 36 to VHF+RT. Th median dose of radiation in the VHF+RT arm was 4275 cGy with a median fraction size of 150 cGy and median duration of therapy of 48.5 days versus 4500 cGy in the RT-only arm with a median fraction size of 180 cGy and median duration of therapy of 38 days. These doses are unlikely to be significantly different in biological effect. No significant difference between the two groups was observed in extent and duration of local control, measures of toxicity or quality of life scores. Additionally, survival and cumulative incidence of pelvic site of first progression did not differ significantly between the groups. It is concluded that VHF microwave therapy in conjunction with radiotherapy produces no therapeutic advantage over conventional radiation therapy alone in the treatment of locally recurrent rectal carcinoma. 35 refs., 8 tabs., 3 figs

  11. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  12. Prognostic value of baseline seric Syndecan-1 in initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a simple biological score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Marine; Lecomte, Thierry; Bouché, Olivier; Kim, Stefano; Dobi, Erion; Queiroz, Lise; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Etienne, Hélène; Léger, Julie; Godet, Yann; Balland, Jérémy; Lakkis, Zaher; Adotevi, Olivier; Bonnetain, Franck; Borg, Christophe; Vernerey, Dewi

    2016-11-15

    In first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), baseline prognostic factors allowing death risk and treatment strategy stratification are lacking. Syndecan-1 (CD138) soluble form was never described as a prognostic biomarker in mCRC. We investigated its additional prognostic value for overall survival (OS). mCRC patients with unresectable disease at diagnosis were treated with bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in two independent prospective clinical trials (development set: n = 126, validation set: n = 51, study NCT00489697 and study NCT00544011, respectively). Serums were collected at baseline for CD138 measurement. OS determinants were assessed and, based on the final multivariate model, a prognostic score was proposed. Two independent OS prognostic factors were identified: Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) high level (p = 0.0066) and log-CD138 high level (p = 0.0190). The determination of CD138 binary information (cutoff: 75 ng/mL) allowed the assessment of a biological prognostic score with CD138 and LDH values, identifying three risk groups for death (median OS= 38.9, 30.1 and 19.8 months for the low, intermediate and high risk groups, respectively; p value for OS, in mCRC patients. A simple biological scoring system is proposed including LDH and CD138 binary status values. © 2016 UICC.

  13. Outcome of self-expanding metal stenting followed by radiation therapy for unresectable extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Gao Li; Yu Zihao; Han Jianzhu; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the efficacy for self-expanding metal stenting followed by radiation therapy for unresectable extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Methods: From Jan 1996 to Sep 2002, 17 patients were treated with self-expanding metal stenting followed by Ir 192 high dose brachytherapy (brachytherapy group, n=5)and by external beam radiation therapy(external radiation therapy group, n=9). Brachytherapy was delivered on the same day or the following day after stenting with the total dose of DT 20- 30 Gy, twice daily, for 2-3 days. The median total dosage of external radiation therapy was 48 Gy (14-66 Gy), 2 Gy/fraction. Results: Jaundice was released after metal stenting from 71.4% to 14.3% (P=0.001), showing no significant difference between brachytherapy and external radiation therapy in terms of jaundice release(χ 2 =0.21, P=0.65). The median survival period(5-35 months)for whole groups was 12 months 1-, 2-year survival rates were 40.8% and 8.16%, respectively. No significant difference was shown for patients received either brachytherapy or external radiation therapy for 8 months, but with 1,2 year survival rate as 40.0%, 13.3%, respectively (χ 2 =1.10, P=0.29). Conclusions: Self-expanding metal stenting is able to release jaundice significantly and followed by high dose radiation therapy may further prolong the survival. (authors)

  14. Alternative RNA splicing and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) linked to diseases, especially to tumors. Recently, more and more studies focused on the relationship between AS and gastric cancer (GC). This review surveyed the hot topic from four aspects: First, the common types of AS in cancer, including exon skipping, intron retention, mutually exclusive exon, alternative 5 ' or 3' splice site, alternative first or last exon and alternative 3' untranslated regions. Second, basic mechanisms of AS and its relationship with cancer. RNA splicing in eukaryotes follows the GT-AG rule by both cis-elements and trans-acting factors regulatory. Through RNA splicing, different proteins with different forms and functions can be produced and may be associated with carcinogenesis. Third, AS types of GC-related genes and their splicing variants. In this paper, we listed 10 common genes with AS and illustrated its possible molecular mechanisms owing to genetic variation (mutation and /or polymorphism). Fourth, the splicing variants of GC-associated genes and gastric carcinogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Many studies have found that the different splicing variants of the same gene are differentially expressed in GC and its precancerous diseases, suggesting AS has important implications in GC development. Taking together, this review highlighted the role of AS and splicing variants in the process of GC. We hope that this is not only beneficial to advances in the study field of GC, but also can provide valuable information to other similar tumor research.Although we already know some gene splicing and splicing variants play an important role in the development of GC, but many phenomena and mechanisms are still unknown. For example, how the tumor microenvironment and signal transduction pathway effect the forming and function of AS? Unfortunately, this review did not cover the contents because the current study is limited. It is no doubt that clarifying the phenomena and mechanisms of these unknown may help to reveal

  15. Surgery for patients with gastric cancer in the terminal stage of the illness - TNM stage IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budisin, N I; Majdevac, I Z; Budisin, E S; Manic, D; Patrnogic, A; Radovanovic, Z

    2009-01-01

    To assess any survival advantage in patients with incurable gastric cancer who had undergone resection, bypass or exploratory surgery. In nonresectable patients with pain, the effect of celiac plexus neurolysis was assessed. We retrospectively analysed data of 330 patients, operated between 1992 and 2006. The patients were followed until death or last examination. Incurable gastric cancer was defined as TNM stage IV disease: locally advanced (LA), with solitary distant metastasis (SM) or with multiple metastases and/or peritoneal carcinomatosis (MMC). The patients were divided into these 3 groups. Their postoperative survival was calculated and compared in relation to the surgical technique used. Factors which influenced mortality and survival were identified. 131 patients (39.7%) had locally LA cancer, 98 (29.7%) SM, and 101 (30.6%) belonged to the MMC group. The surgical procedures included 138 (41.8%) exploratory laparotomies, 84 (25.5%) bypass procedures and 108 (32.7%) resections. Thirty-three (10%) unresectable patients with pain underwent celiac plexus neurolysis. The mean survival was 21.8 months after resections, 7 months after by-passes and 4.8 after exploratory laparotomies (p = 0.0001). It was 14.57 months (p=0.001) in the LA group, 12.53 (p = 0.005) in the SM group, and 5.2 in the MMC group. Survival was shorter in patients with preoperative weight loss of more than 20 kg (3.2 months, p 0.05), while significantly increased mortality occurred in patients with weight loss of over 20 kg (32%, p=0.03). Celiac plexus neurolysis was immediately effective in 30 out of 33 (91%) patients (p=0.0001), while 3 months later it was still effective in 15 (45.5%) patients (p=0.08). Resections are suggested in the LA and SM groups, and neurolysis in all nonresected patients with pain.

  16. Entirely Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Colectomy for Remnant Gastric Cancer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction and Transverse Colon Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun Il; Kim, Min Gyu

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that gastrectomy with curative intent is the best way to improve outcomes of patients with remnant gastric cancer. Recently,several investigators reported their experiences with laparoscopic gastrectomy of remnant gastric cancer. We report the case of an 83-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with remnant gastric cancer with obstruction. She underwent an entirely laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with colectomy because of direct invasion of the transverse colon. The opera...

  17. Changing Trends in Gastric Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlter Özer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death. It requires multimodal treatment and surgery is the most effective treatment modality. Radical surgery includes total or subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. The extent of lymphadenectomy still remains controversial. Eastern surgeons have performed D2 or more extended lymphadenectomy while their Western colleagues have performed more limited lymph node dissection. However, the trend has been changing in favour of D2 lymph node dissection in both hemispheres. Currently, D2 is the recommended type of lymphadenectomy in experienced centres in the west. In Japan, D2 lymph node dissection is the standard surgical approach. More extensive lymphadenectomy than D2 has not been found to be associated with improved survival and generally is not performed. Bursectomy and splenectomy are additional controversial issues in surgical performance, and trends regarding them will be discussed. The performance of bursectomy is controversial and there is no clear evidence of its clinical benefit. However, a trend toward better survival in patients with serosal invasion has been reported. Routine splenectomy as a part of lymph node dissection has largely been abandoned, although splenectomy is recommended in selected cases. Minimally invasive surgery has gained wide popularity and indications for minimally invasive procedures have been expanding due to increasing experience and improving technology. Neoadjuvant therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects and seems necessary to provide a survival benefit. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be kept in mind prior to treatment

  18. Personalizing gene therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzi, P; Cassone, M; Claudio, P P

    2006-11-01

    Gene therapy was proposed many decades ago as a more straightforward and definitive way of curing human diseases, but only recently technical advancements and improved knowledge have allowed its active development as a broad and promising research field. After the first successes in the cure of genetic and infectious diseases, it has been actively investigated as a means to decrease the burden and suffering generated by cancer. The field of gastric cancer is witnessing an impressive flourishing of studies testing the possibilities and actual efficacy of the many different strategies employed in gene therapy, and overall results seem to be two-sided: while original ideas and innovative protocols are providing extremely interesting contributions with great potential, more advanced-phase studies concluded so far have fallen short of expectations regarding efficacy, although invariably demonstrating little or no toxicity. An overview of the major efforts in this field is provided here, and a critical discussion is presented on the single strategies undertaken and on the overall balance between potentiality and pitfalls. Copyright 2006 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  19. Localized gastric amyloidosis differentiated histologically from scirrhous gastric cancer using endoscopic mucosal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata Tsugumasa

    2012-08-01

    resembling scirrhous gastric carcinoma. This case of localized gastric amyloidosis was differentiated from scirrhous gastric cancer after performing endoscopic mucosal resection without an invasive surgical resection, as endoscopic mucosal resection provided sufficient tissue specimens from the lesion to make an accurate histological evaluation.

  20. The application of nanoparticles in diagnosis and theranostics of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rutian; Liu, Baorui; Gao, Jiahui

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related death worldwide. For the diagnosis of gastric cancer, apart from regular systemic imaging, the locoregional imaging is also of great importance. Moreover, there are still other ways for the detecting of gastric cancer, including the early detection of gastric cancer by endoscopy, the detection of gastric-cancer related biomarkers and the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of gastric cancer. However, conventional diagnostic methods are usually lack of specificity and sensitivity. Nanoparticles provide many benefits in the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Besides, nanoparticles are capable of integrating the functions of diagnosis and treatment together (theranostics). In this paper, we reviewed the applications of nanoparticles in diagnosis and theranostics of gastric cancer in the above mentioned aspects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A multi-institutional phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: initial report of ECOG 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannehill, Scott P.; Froseth, Carrie; Wagner, Henry; Petereit, Dan P.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, acute toxicity, response and survival in a trial of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a t.i.d. regimen 5 days a week in an 8 hour schedule. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (pts) from 6 institutions were enrolled in this pilot trial. Pt characteristics: 24 male, 6 female; median age 67 yrs (range 47-84); ECOG PS 0 in 22 pts, 1 in 8 pts; weight loss >5% in 7 pts. Stage was II (inoperable) in 1 pt, IIIA in 12 pts, and IIIB in 17 pts. Radiation therapy (total 57.6 Gy/36 fx) encompassing gross disease and draining lymphatics to 36 Gy (1.5 Gy b.i.d., 8 hours apart) with daily off-cord concomitant boost to 21.6 Gy (1.8 Gy 4 hours after first fraction) was given over 12 treatment days (15 elapsed days). Results: (28(30)) (93%) pts completed radiation therapy on schedule without toxicity-related treatment interruptions. Two pts did not complete radiation therapy; 1 due to in-field progression and 1 due to fatal acute gastric bleed unrelated to therapy. Two additional pts died in the first 6 weeks: 1 due to a presumed acute cardiovascular event and another due to complications of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The major treatment-related toxicities were esophagitis in 6 pts (18%: 5 Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4) scored using a study specific esophagitis grading tool and 2 grade 3 dermatitis, in a total of 6 pts. Only 1 pt (3%) required hospitalization for IV hydration (Grade 4 esophagitis). Median weight loss at 6 weeks was 3 kg. Response data are pending in 2 pts and unavailable in 2 due to early death. Of the remaining 26 pts, local response analysis showed CR in 4, PR in 14, stable in 7 and progressive disease in 1 for an overall response rate of (18(26)) (69%). With a median potential follow-up of 13 months, the median survival has not yet been reached. The 1-yr actuarial survival is 63%. Exclusion of the 3 pts experiencing early death (in

  2. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are positively correlated with metastatic potential of human gastric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of gastric cancer patients is difficult to predict because of defects in establishing the surgical-pathological features. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs have been found to play prominent role in promoting tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Thus raises the hypothesis that the extent of CAFs prevalence may help to establish the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Methods Immunochemistry and realtime-PCR experiments were carried out to compare the expression of proteins which are specific markers of CAFs or secreted by CAFs in the tumor and normal tissue specimens. The extent of CAFs' prevalence was graded according to immunochemical staining, and correlation was further analyzed between CAFs' prevalence and other tumor characteristics which may influence the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Results Nearly 80 percent of normal gastric tissues were negative or weak positive for CAFs staining, while more than 60 percent of gastric cancer tissues were moderate or strong positive for CAFs staining. Realtime-PCR results also showed significant elevated expression of FAP, SDF-1 and TGF-β1 in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric tissues. Further analysis showed that CAFs' prevalence was correlated with tumor size, depth of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis or peritoneum metastasis. Conclusions Reactive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs were frequently accumulated in gastric cancer tissues, and the prevalence of CAFs was correlated with tumor size, depth of the tumor and tumor metastasis, thus give some supports for establishing the prognosis of the gastric cancer patients.

  3. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jason D.; Borum, Marie L.; Koh, Joyce M.; Stephen, Sindu

    2018-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation. PMID:29606921

  4. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencks, David S; Adam, Jason D; Borum, Marie L; Koh, Joyce M; Stephen, Sindu; Doman, David B

    2018-02-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation.

  5. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Young Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus–positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  6. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  7. Adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided versus empirical chemotherapy in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Wha; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Kim, Yong Tai; Chang, Hyun; Jeong, Jae Heon; Lee, Young Joo; Chang, Joon; Kim, Se Kyu; Jung, Minkyu; Hong, Soojung; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2009-10-01

    We retrospectively compared adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided and empirical chemotherapies for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in this case-control study. Unresectable NSCLC patients receiving ATP-CRA-guided platinum-based doublets as first-line therapy were enrolled as cases (n=27; 14 platinum-sensitive and 13 platinum-resistant patients). Performance status, stage, and chemotherapeutic regimen-matched patients receiving empirical chemotherapy were selected from the retrospective database as controls (n=93) in a case to control ratio of approximately 1:3. Response rate and survival (progression-free; overall) in both groups were not significantly different. However, the platinum-sensitive subgroup by ATP-CRA showed a higher response rate than the empirical group (71 versus 38%; p=0.023) with a trend toward longer progression-free survival (8.7 versus 4.8 months for platinum-sensitive versus empirical; p=0.223) and overall survival (not reached versus 12.6 months for platinum-sensitive versus empirical for p=0.134). ATP-CRA may be helpful in selecting platinum-responsive patients in unresectable NSCLC. We consider that nonplatinum doublets in platinum-resistant patients by ATP-CRA may be a more adapted approach than platinum-based doublets in future clinical trials.

  8. Metastatic Carcinoma Occurring in a Gastric Hyperplastic Polyp Mimicking Primary Gastric Cancer: The First Reported Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M. Groisman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic polyps of the stomach are regarded as benign. However, in rare cases they may contain incipient primary carcinomas. To our knowledge, breast carcinoma metastatic to a gastric hyperplastic polyp has not yet been reported. We describe the case of a 69-year-old woman to whom a gastric polyp was endoscopically excised. The patient had previously undergone a right mastectomy for mixed, invasive ductal and lobular carcinoma 5 years earlier. Histological sections from the gastric lesion showed typical features of hyperplastic polyp with foci of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma including signet ring cells infiltrating the lamina propria. The histologic findings were consistent with a primary gastric cancer. However, the carcinoma cells were immunopositive for estrogen and progesterone receptors and GATA3 and negative for CDX2, Hep Par 1, and MUC5AC. E-cadherin showed membranous reactivity in some of the carcinoma cells while in others it was negative. Accordingly, metastatic mixed, lobular and ductal breast carcinoma was diagnosed. We conclude that metastatic adenocarcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer can be rarely encountered in hyperplastic gastric polyps.

  9. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in remnant stomach or gastric tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishide, N; Ono, H; Kakushima, N; Takizawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsubayashi, H; Yamaguchi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Little information exists regarding the optimal treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) in a remnant stomach or gastric tube. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for EGC in a remnant stomach and gastric tube. Between September 2002 and December 2009, ESD was performed in 62 lesions in 59 patients with EGC in a remnant stomach (48 lesions) or gastric tube (14 lesions). Clinicopathological data were retrieved retrospectively to assess the en bloc resection rate, complications, and outcomes. Treatment results were assessed according to the indications for endoscopic resection, and were compared with those of ESD performed in a whole stomach during the same study period. The en bloc resection rates for lesions within the standard and expanded indication were 100 % and 93 %, respectively. Postoperative bleeding occurred in five patients (8 %). The perforation rate was significantly higher (18 %, 11 /62) than that of ESD in a whole stomach (5 %, 69 /1479). Among the perforation cases, eight lesions involved the anastomotic site or stump line, and ulcerative changes were observed in five lesions. The 3-year overall survival rate was 85 %, with eight deaths due to other causes and no deaths from gastric cancer. A high en bloc resection rate was achieved by ESD for EGC in a remnant stomach or gastric tube; however, this procedure is still technically demanding due to the high complication rate of perforation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Predictive model for survival in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshayeshi, Ladan; Hoseini, Benyamin; Yousefli, Zahra; Khooie, Alireza; Etminani, Kobra; Esmaeilzadeh, Abbas; Golabpour, Amin

    2017-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Characterized by poor prognosis, it is a frequent cause of cancer in Iran. The aim of the study was to design a predictive model of survival time for patients suffering from gastric cancer. This was a historical cohort conducted between 2011 and 2016. Study population were 277 patients suffering from gastric cancer. Data were gathered from the Iranian Cancer Registry and the laboratory of Emam Reza Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Patients or their relatives underwent interviews where it was needed. Missing values were imputed by data mining techniques. Fifteen factors were analyzed. Survival was addressed as a dependent variable. Then, the predictive model was designed by combining both genetic algorithm and logistic regression. Matlab 2014 software was used to combine them. Of the 277 patients, only survival of 80 patients was available whose data were used for designing the predictive model. Mean ?SD of missing values for each patient was 4.43?.41 combined predictive model achieved 72.57% accuracy. Sex, birth year, age at diagnosis time, age at diagnosis time of patients' family, family history of gastric cancer, and family history of other gastrointestinal cancers were six parameters associated with patient survival. The study revealed that imputing missing values by data mining techniques have a good accuracy. And it also revealed six parameters extracted by genetic algorithm effect on the survival of patients with gastric cancer. Our combined predictive model, with a good accuracy, is appropriate to forecast the survival of patients suffering from Gastric cancer. So, we suggest policy makers and specialists to apply it for prediction of patients' survival.

  11. Phase 1 Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacodynamic Study of Sorafenib With Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine in Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiorean, E. Gabriela, E-mail: gchiorea@uw.edu [Department of Medicine, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Schneider, Bryan P. [Department of Medicine, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Akisik, Fatih M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Perkins, Susan M. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Anderson, Stephen [Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Johnson, Cynthia S. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); DeWitt, John [Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Helft, Paul; Clark, Romnee; Johnston, Erica L.; Spittler, A. John [Department of Medicine, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Deluca, Jill [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bu, Guixue [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Shahda, Safi; Loehrer, Patrick J. [Department of Medicine, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Sandrasegaran, Kumar [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic effects of sorafenib with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly × 3 every 4 weeks per cycle for 1 cycle before CRT and continued for up to 4 cycles after CRT. Weekly gemcitabine 600 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously was given during concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy of 50 Gy to gross tumor volume in 25 fractions. Sorafenib was dosed orally 400 mg twice daily until progression, except during CRT when it was escalated from 200 mg to 400 mg daily, and 400 mg twice daily. The maximum tolerated dose cohort was expanded to 15 patients. Correlative studies included dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and angiogenesis genes polymorphisms (VEGF-A and VEGF-R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred during induction gemcitabine/sorafenib followed by concurrent CRT. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue, hematologic, and gastrointestinal. The maximum tolerated dose was sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. The median progression-free survival and overall survival for 25 evaluable patients were 10.6 and 12.6 months, respectively. The median overall survival for patients with VEGF-A -2578 AA, -1498 CC, and -1154 AA versus alternate genotypes was 21.6 versus 14.7 months. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated higher baseline K{sup trans} in responding patients. Conclusions: Concurrent sorafenib with CRT had modest clinical activity with increased gastrointestinal toxicity in localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Select VEGF-A/VEGF-R2 genotypes were associated with favorable survival.

  12. Phase 1 Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacodynamic Study of Sorafenib With Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine in Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Schneider, Bryan P.; Akisik, Fatih M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Anderson, Stephen; Johnson, Cynthia S.; DeWitt, John; Helft, Paul; Clark, Romnee; Johnston, Erica L.; Spittler, A. John; Deluca, Jill; Bu, Guixue; Shahda, Safi; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic effects of sorafenib with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 intravenously weekly × 3 every 4 weeks per cycle for 1 cycle before CRT and continued for up to 4 cycles after CRT. Weekly gemcitabine 600 mg/m 2 intravenously was given during concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy of 50 Gy to gross tumor volume in 25 fractions. Sorafenib was dosed orally 400 mg twice daily until progression, except during CRT when it was escalated from 200 mg to 400 mg daily, and 400 mg twice daily. The maximum tolerated dose cohort was expanded to 15 patients. Correlative studies included dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and angiogenesis genes polymorphisms (VEGF-A and VEGF-R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred during induction gemcitabine/sorafenib followed by concurrent CRT. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue, hematologic, and gastrointestinal. The maximum tolerated dose was sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. The median progression-free survival and overall survival for 25 evaluable patients were 10.6 and 12.6 months, respectively. The median overall survival for patients with VEGF-A -2578 AA, -1498 CC, and -1154 AA versus alternate genotypes was 21.6 versus 14.7 months. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated higher baseline K trans in responding patients. Conclusions: Concurrent sorafenib with CRT had modest clinical activity with increased gastrointestinal toxicity in localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Select VEGF-A/VEGF-R2 genotypes were associated with favorable survival

  13. IL-1B -31T>C promoter polymorphism is associated with gastric stump cancer but not with early onset or conventional gastric cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitarz, R.; de Leng, W. W. J.; Polak, M.; Morsink, F. H. M.; Bakker, O.; Polkowski, W. P.; Maciejewski, R.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Milne, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that interleukin-1beta (IL-1B) genes play a crucial role in the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer although there is no information about their role in different subtypes of gastric cancer. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of IL-1B in 241 gastric

  14. A novel approach for the detection of early gastric cancer: fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Zhou, Li Ya; Lin, San Ren; Li, Yuan; Chen, Mo; Geng, Qiu Ming; Li, Yu Wen

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice for early gastric cancer (EGC) screening. Gastric juice was collected from 101 participants who underwent endoscopy in the Outpatient Endoscopy Center of Peking University Third Hospital. The participants were divided into three groups: the normal mucosa or chronic non-atrophic gastritis (NM-CNAG) group (n = 35), advanced gastric cancer (AGC) group (n = 33) and EGC group (n = 33). Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis was performed in all the gastric juice samples and the maximum fluorescence intensity of the first peak (P1 FI) was measured. The mean fluorescence intensity of P1 FI of gastric juice in AGC (92.1 ± 10.7) and EGC (90.8 ± 12.0) groups was significantly higher than that in the NM-CNAG group (55.7 ± 7.5) (AGC vs NM-CNAG, P = 0.006 and EGC vs NM-CNAG, P = 0.015, respectively). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the detection of AGC and EGC were 0.681 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.553-0.810, P = 0.010) and 0.655 (95% CI 0.522-0.787, P = 0.028). With the P1 FI of ≥47.7, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting EGC were 69.7%, 57.1% and 63.2%, respectively. The enhancement of P1 FI of gastric juice occurs at the early stage of gastric cancer. Fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice may be used as a novel screening tool for the early detection of gastric cancer. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  15. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  16. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Wen, Feng; Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feng; Feng, Hong; Bi, Feng; Li, Qiu; Li, Nanjing; Wei, Wen; Yao, Wenxiu; Xie, Ke; Hu, Jiankun; Shen, Lida; Ji, Weizheng; Lu, You

    2011-01-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Analysis of 358 respondents (91%) showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines

  17. Study of gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Sadamatsu; Tadehara, Futoshi; Okusaki, Ken; Ito, Yoshiko; Ogawa, Junichiro; Kato, Masafumi; Ito, Chikako; Oyama, Hiroko; Mito, Kazuyo.

    1990-01-01

    Ten gastric cancer A-bomb survivors who had been false negative in mass screening for gastric cancer one year before the diagnosis were entered in a study determining an adequate interval of gastric mass screening for A-bomb survivors. Doubling time of cancer was determined on X-ray films. Of the 10 A-bomb survivors, 8 had entered the city after the bombing and the other two had been exposed at 1,700 m and 2,500 m, respectively, from the hypocenter. Six had early gastric cancer and the other 4 had advanced cancer. Doubling time averaged 19.1 months for early cancer and 7.6 months for advanced cancer. Three measurements of tumor diameter available for 4 A-bomb survivors revealed a very rapid increase in doubling time during the progression period from early to advanced cancer. An interval of one year seems to be adequate in mass screening to detect early cancer. (N.K.)

  18. Diagnostic significance of computed tomography in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1985-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy in Korea. Identification and evaluation of gastric mass lesions and regional-distant metastasis by abdominal CT scan are important for the treatment planning and prognostic implications of gastric cancer patients. Author reviewed CT scans of 61 cases of pathology proven gastric cancer, retrospectively, for recent 20 month from July 1983 to Feb. 1985 at Department of Radiology, Korea University, Hae Wha Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. There were 50 cases of advanced adenocarcinoma, 8 cases of early gastric cancer, 2 cases of leiomyosarcoma, and 1 case of lymphoma in total 61 cases. 2. The sex ratio of male to female was 2 : 1. Age distribution was from 24 to 75 year old and peak incidence was in 6th decade. 3. The most frequent site of involvement with gastric cancer was gastric antrum in 51% 4. 48 of 50 patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (96%) had a wall thickness greater than 1 cm, and all of 8 cases of early gastric cancer had a wall thickness less than 1 cm. Regional lymph node tumor infiltration was found in 100% of gastric wall thickness greater than 2.0 cm, in 64% of cases of 1.5 to 2.0 cm, in 50% of cases of 1.0 to 1.5 cm, and 12.5% of cases of less than 1.0 cm. 5. In a comparison of enlargement of regional lymph node by CT scan to tumor infiltration of regional lymph node by histology, sensitivity was 52%, specificity was 87%, and reliability was 66%. 6. The structure involved by distant metastasis of these cases were the retroperitoneal lymph node in 15, liver in 8, and pancreas in 3. 7. The diagnostic accuracy of CT staging was considered about 68% by correlation of the surgical and histological findings. 8. The CT scan is one of the accurate and simple tool for evaluation of size, shape, extent, as well as distant metastasis in the cases of gastric malignancies

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  20. Gastric cancer, nutritional status, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuechao; Qiu, Haibo; Kong, Pengfei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Sun, Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    We aim to investigate the prognostic value of several nutrition-based indices, including the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), performance status, body mass index, serum albumin, and preoperative body weight loss in patients with gastric cancer (GC). We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,330 consecutive patients with GC undergoing curative surgery between October 2000 and September 2012. The relationship between nutrition-based indices and overall survival (OS) was examined using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. Following multivariate analysis, the PNI and preoperative body weight loss were the only nutritional-based indices independently associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.356, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.051-1.748, P =0.019; HR: 1.152, 95% CI: 1.014-1.310, P =0.030, retrospectively). In stage-stratified analysis, multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative body weight loss was identified as an independent prognostic factor only in patients with stage III GC (HR: 1.223, 95% CI: 1.065-1.405, P =0.004), while the prognostic significance of PNI was not significant (all P >0.05). In patients with stage III GC, preoperative body weight loss stratified 5-year OS from 41.1% to 26.5%. When stratified by adjuvant chemotherapy, the prognostic significance of preoperative body weight loss was maintained in patients treated with surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy and in patients treated with surgery alone ( P nutrition-based indices.

  1. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Gwang

    2013-03-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  2. Does stomach have mesentery? Learning from gastric cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This study will first confirm the existence of mesogastrium (gastric mesentery) and then examine its architecture and suggest improvements in the surgical methods for excision of gastric cancer.Methods:By employing video laparoscopy, a number of proximal segments of dorsal mesogastrium were found being extensively scattered around the pancreas. In this study, these segments were histologically analyzed and studied.Results:The structure of the mesogastrium was identiifed intraoperatively and then conifrmed both grossly and histologically atfer the operation. Conclusion:This study suggests for the first time a “Table Model” to describe the relationship between the stomach and gastric mesenteries.

  3. Incidence of Gastric Cancer in Marrakech and Casablanca, Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. L.; Watkins, K.; Soliman, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer globally with over 70% of new cases occurring in developing countries. In Morocco, oncologists in Marrakech suspected higher frequency of gastric cancer compared to Casablanca, a city 150 kilometers away. This study calculated age-specific, sex-specific, and total incidence rates of gastric cancer in Marrakech and was compared to the Casablanca population-based cancer registry. Using medical records from Center Hospital University Mohammad VI and reports from 4 main private pathology laboratories in Marrakech, we identified 774 patients for the period 2008-2012. Comparison of rates showed higher age-specific incidence in Marrakech in nearly all age groups for both genders. A higher total incidence in Marrakech than in Casablanca was found with rates of 5.50 and 3.23 per 100,000, respectively. Incidence was significantly higher among males in Marrakech than males in Casablanca (7.19 and 3.91 per 100,000, resp.) and females in Marrakech compared to females in Casablanca (3.87 and 2.58 per 100,000, resp.). Future studies should address possible underestimation of gastric cancer in Marrakech, estimate incidence in other regions of Morocco, and investigate possible risk factors to explain the difference in rates.Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer globally with over 70% of new cases occurring in developing countries. In Morocco, oncologists in Marrakech suspected higher frequency of gastric cancer compared to Casablanca, a city 150 kilometers away. This study calculated age-specific, sex-specific, and total incidence rates of gastric cancer in Marrakech and was compared to the Casablanca population-based cancer registry. Using medical records from Center Hospital University Mohammad VI and reports from 4 main private pathology laboratories in Marrakech, we identified 774 patients for the period 2008-2012. Comparison of rates showed higher age-specific incidence in Marrakech in nearly all age groups for both

  4. Terahertz spectral unmixing based method for identifying gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuqi; Huang, Pingjie; Li, Xian; Ge, Weiting; Hou, Dibo; Zhang, Guangxin

    2018-02-01

    At present, many researchers are exploring biological tissue inspection using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) techniques. In this study, based on a modified hard modeling factor analysis method, terahertz spectral unmixing was applied to investigate the relationships between the absorption spectra in THz-TDS and certain biomarkers of gastric cancer in order to systematically identify gastric cancer. A probability distribution and box plot were used to extract the distinctive peaks that indicate carcinogenesis, and the corresponding weight distributions were used to discriminate the tissue types. The results of this work indicate that terahertz techniques have the potential to detect different levels of cancer, including benign tumors and polyps.

  5. Gastric cancer-related information on the Internet: incomplete, poorly accessible, and overly commercial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2011-02-01

    Patients increasingly use the Internet for gastric cancer information. However, the quality of the information is questionable. We evaluated the accuracy, completeness, accessibility, reliability, and readability of gastric cancer websites.

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. Z.; Chun, H. C.; Kim, I. S.; Chung, T. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Radical gastrectomy is main treatment of gastric cancer. We analyzed patients with stage III and IV stomach cancer who had radical operation and received postoperative radiation therapy combined with or without chemotherapy retrospectively. From March 1985 to June 1993, 68 patients treated with curative resection and received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy with 36Gy or more were evaluated. Median age was 60years(range 28-66 yrs). Thirty seven patients had non signet ring adenocarcinoma, 29 signet ring cell, 2 other cell. Patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, IV disease were 19, 25 and 24 respectively. Chemotherapy was given to all patients except two. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate were 36.6% and 33.6T, respectively. Recurrence was documented in 34 patients. High recurrence was seen in omentum and peritoneum with 23.5%, and remnant stomach, anastomosis site, A-loop and E-loop had also high recurrence with 13.2%. In field locoregional recurrence was 20.7% and total distant metastases were 39.7%. Total intraabdominal failure was 47.1% and extraabdominal failure was 13.2%. Treatment toxicity was considered to be acceptable. 22.1% of patients had grade 3 and only 1 patient had grade 4 leukopenia. Six patients(8.8%) had weigh loss more than 10%. Treatment toxicity was acceptable with combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence was relatively low compared to distant failure with addition of irradiation. Peritoneal and omental seeding was high. Five-year survival was increased with combined modality. Radiation may eradicate minimal residual disease and improve survival. Furthermore to reduce intraabdominal failure, role of intraabdominal chemotherapy in addition to combined chemotherapy plus radiation has to be explored. (author).

  7. Histopathology of gastric cancer in Yemen: A seven years ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastric cancer (GC) is a major contributor to the global burden of cancer morbidity and mortality. It is the fourth most commonly occurring worldwide. Objective: To describe the general pattern of primary GC in Yemen and compare the findings of patients' age, sex, histological type and degree of differentiation to ...

  8. Cancer of the esophagus and gastric cardia: recent advances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N. J.; Bartelink, H.; Bernards, R.; Giaccone, G.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Peters, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer and cancer of the gastric cardia, in particular adenocarcinomas, have shown a rapid and largely unexplained increase in incidence in many developed countries around the world. These diseases have a poor prognosis and current therapies have a modest impact on survival. This review

  9. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  10. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk factors for stomach (gastric) cancer include certain health conditions (e.g., atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia, H. pylori infection), genetic factors (e.g., Li-Fraumeni syndrome), or environmental factors (e.g., diet, smoking). Review the evidence on these and other risk factors and interventions to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  11. GTPBP4 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression via Regulating P53 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: gastric cancer is a serious health concern with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is urgent to find novel targets for gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment. Methods: qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry assays were used to detect GTPBP4 expression in gastric cancer tissues, and gastric cancer and gastric epithelial cells. Lentivirus infection was used to construct GTPBP4 stable knockdown cells. Annexin V/PI apoptosis, CCK8, EdU incorporation and cell clone formation analysis were performed to evaluate the effects of GTPBP4 on gastric cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Further RNA-based high-throughput sequencing and co-IP assays were constructed to explore the related mechanisms contributing to GTPBP4-mediated effects. Results: GTPBP4 expression was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with that in adjacent normal tissues, and positively correlated with gastric cancer stages. Meanwhile, GTPBP4 level was markedly upregulated in gastric cancer cells than in gastric epithelial cells. Additionaly, stable knockdown of GTPBP4 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, p53 and its related signaling were significantly activated in GTPBP4 stable knockdown cells. And GTPBP4 interacted with p53 in gastric cancer cells. Conclusions: our results provide insights into mechanistic regulation and linkage of the GTPBP4-p53 in gastric cancer, and also a valuable potential target for gastric cancer.

  12. KITENIN is associated with tumor progression in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ho-Seong; Park, Young-Lan; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hee; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Joo, Young-Eun

    2010-09-01

    KAI1 COOH-terminal interacting tetraspanin (KITENIN) promotes tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis in colon, bladder, head and neck cancer. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether KITENIN affects tumor cell behavior in human gastric cancer cell line and to document the expression of KITENIN in a well-defined series of gastric tumors, including complete long-term follow-up, with special reference to patient prognosis. To evaluate the impact of KITENIN knockdown on behavior of a human gastric cancer cell line, AGS, migration, invasion and proliferation assays using small-interfering RNA were performed. The expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) target genes and AP-1 transcriptional activity were evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of KITENIN and AP-1 target genes by RT-PCR and Western blotting or immunohistochemistry was also investigated in human gastric cancer tissues. The knockdown of KITENIN suppressed tumor cell migration, invasion and proliferation in AGS cells. The mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and CD44 was reduced by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS. AP-1 transcriptional activity was significantly decreased by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS cells. KITENIN expression was significantly increased in human cancer tissues at RNA and protein levels. Expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, COX-2 and CD44 were significantly increased in human gastric cancer tissues. Immunostaining of KITENIN was predominantly identified in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Expression of KITENIN was significantly associated with tumor size, Lauren classification, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and poor survival. These results indicate that KITENIN plays an important role in human gastric cancer progression by AP-1 activation.

  13. Knowledge about gastric cancer in Popayán, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Oveimar Muñoz-Ruiz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gastric cancer is the second major cause of death by malignance in the worldwide. In Colombia the department of Cauca has the major incidence rate of this disease. Objectives: To determine the degree of knowledge about main symptoms and the three principal causal factors of the gastric cancer. Moreover to determine the existence of promotion program about this disease in primary health care centers client users and workers in Popayan, Colombia, 2009-2010. Methods: In cross-section study, we interviewed 532 adults: 6 directors, 64 health workers and 462 client-users of 9 health service provider institutions of primary care. Results: 68% and 78 % of users and workers respectively know that gastric cancer is very frequent disease. The percentage of Users that know the main risk factors are: Helycobacter pylori infection (16%, excessive salt consumption (24%, food with high concentration of nitrosamines (0.3 %. We do not found significative difference by gender, age and socioeconomic status for knowledge of main symptoms of gastric cancer (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Gastric cancer is a disease that needs special attention within governmental efforts. Regardless illness has high incidence rate in the department, there is not a clear knowledge about it, in the risk population.

  14. CT Perfusion evaluation of gastric cancer. Correlation with histologic type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Joo, Ijin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    To prospectively evaluate if the perfusion parameters of gastric cancer can provide information on histologic subtypes of gastric cancer. We performed preoperative perfusion CT (PCT) and curative gastrectomy in 46 patients. PCT data were analysed using a dedicated software program. Perfusion parameters were obtained by two independent radiologists and were compared according to histologic type using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis. To assess inter-reader agreement, we used intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Inter-reader agreement for perfusion parameters was moderate to substantial (ICC = 0.585-0.678). Permeability surface value of poorly cohesive carcinoma (PCC) was significantly higher than other histologic types (47.3 ml/100 g/min in PCC vs 26.5 ml/100 g/min in non-PCC, P < 0.001). Mean transit time (MTT) of PCC was also significantly longer than non-PCC (13.0 s in PCC vs 10.3 s in non-PCC, P = 0.032). The area under the curve to predict PCC was 0.891 (P < 0.001) for permeability surface and 0.697 (P = 0.015) for MTT. Obtaining perfusion parameters from PCT was feasible in gastric cancer patients and can aid in the preoperative imaging diagnosis of PCC-type gastric cancer as the permeability surface and MTT value of PCC type gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of non-PCC. (orig.)

  15. CT Perfusion evaluation of gastric cancer. Correlation with histologic type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Joo, Ijin; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo

    2018-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate if the perfusion parameters of gastric cancer can provide information on histologic subtypes of gastric cancer. We performed preoperative perfusion CT (PCT) and curative gastrectomy in 46 patients. PCT data were analysed using a dedicated software program. Perfusion parameters were obtained by two independent radiologists and were compared according to histologic type using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis. To assess inter-reader agreement, we used intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Inter-reader agreement for perfusion parameters was moderate to substantial (ICC = 0.585-0.678). Permeability surface value of poorly cohesive carcinoma (PCC) was significantly higher than other histologic types (47.3 ml/100 g/min in PCC vs 26.5 ml/100 g/min in non-PCC, P < 0.001). Mean transit time (MTT) of PCC was also significantly longer than non-PCC (13.0 s in PCC vs 10.3 s in non-PCC, P = 0.032). The area under the curve to predict PCC was 0.891 (P < 0.001) for permeability surface and 0.697 (P = 0.015) for MTT. Obtaining perfusion parameters from PCT was feasible in gastric cancer patients and can aid in the preoperative imaging diagnosis of PCC-type gastric cancer as the permeability surface and MTT value of PCC type gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of non-PCC. (orig.)

  16. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing Gastric Cancer with Metastasis to the Scrotum: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Chung, Jae Joon; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Dae Jung; Ahn, Jhii Hyun; Cho, Eun Suk

    2010-01-01

    An alpha-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer is rare, making up only about 3% of all gastric cancers. Further, gastric cancer with metastasis to the scrotum via a transperitoneal route is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic scrotal mass in a 68-year-old man who had undergone a subtotal gastrectomy and gastroduodenostomy due to signet ring cell type gastric cancer with a description focusing on the radiologic findings

  17. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing Gastric Cancer with Metastasis to the Scrotum: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jae Joon; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Dae Jung; Ahn, Jhii Hyun; Cho, Eun Suk [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    An alpha-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer is rare, making up only about 3% of all gastric cancers. Further, gastric cancer with metastasis to the scrotum via a transperitoneal route is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic scrotal mass in a 68-year-old man who had undergone a subtotal gastrectomy and gastroduodenostomy due to signet ring cell type gastric cancer with a description focusing on the radiologic findings

  18. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  19. Novel approaches of chemoradiotherapy in unresectable stage IIIA and stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Bogart, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Approximately one third of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have unresectable stage IIIA or stage IIIB disease, and appropriate patients are candidates for chemoradiotherapy with curative intent. The optimal treatment paradigm is currently undefined. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy, compared with sequential chemotherapy and thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), results in superior overall survival outcomes as a result of better locoregional control. Recent trials have revealed efficacy for newer chemotherapy combinations similar to that of older chemotherapy combinations with concurrent TRT and a lower rate of some toxicities. Ongoing phase III trials will determine the roles of cisplatin and pemetrexed concurrent with TRT in patients with nonsquamous histology, cetuximab, and the L-BLP25 vaccine. It is unlikely that bevacizumab will have a role in stage III disease because of its toxicity. Erlotinib, gefitinib, and crizotinib have not been evaluated in stage III patients selected based on molecular characteristics. The preliminary results of a phase III trial that compared conventionally fractionated standard-dose TRT (60 Gy) with high-dose TRT (74 Gy) revealed an inferior survival outcome among patients assigned to the high-dose arm. Hyperfractionation was investigated previously with promising results, but adoption has been limited because of logistical considerations. More recent trials have investigated hypofractionated TRT in chemoradiotherapy. Advances in tumor targeting and radiation treatment planning have made this approach more feasible and reduced the risk for normal tissue toxicity. Adaptive radiotherapy uses changes in tumor volume to adjust the TRT treatment plan during therapy, and trials using this strategy are ongoing. Ongoing trials with proton therapy will provide initial efficacy and safety data.

  20. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  1. Pre-operative combined 5-FU, low dose leucovorin, and sequential radiation therapy for unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Kemeny, N.; Enker, W.E.; Kelsen, D.P.; Schwartz, G.; Saltz, L.; Dougherty, J.; Frankel, J.; Wiseberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors performed a Phase 1 trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of combined pre-operative radiation (5040 cGy) and 2 cycles (bolus daily x 5) of 5-FU and low dose LV (20 mg/m2), followed by surgery and 10 cycles of post-operative LV/5-FU in patients with unresectable primary or recurrent rectal cancer. Twelve patients were entered. The initial dose of 5-FU was 325 mg/m2. 5-FU was to be escalated while the LV remained constant at 20 mg/m2. Chemotherapy began on day 1 and radiation on day 8. The post-operative chemotherapy was not dose escalated; 5-FU: 425 mg/m2 and LV: 20 mg/m2. The median follow-up was 14 months (7--16 months). Following pre-operative therapy, the resectability rate with negative margins was 91% and the pathologic complete response rate was 9%. For the combined modality segment (preoperative) the incidence of any grade 3+ toxicity was diarrhea: 17%, dysuria: 8%, mucositis: 8%, and erythema: 8%. The median nadir counts were WBC: 3.1, HGB: 8.8, and PLT: 153000. The maximum tolerated dose of 5-FU for pre-operative combined LV/5-FU/RT was 325 mg/m2 with no escalation possible. Therefore, the recommended dose was less than 325 mg/m2. Since adequate doses of 5-FU to treat systemic disease could not be delivered until at least 3 months (cycle 3) following the start of therapy, the authors do not recommend that this 5-FU, low dose LV, and sequential radiation therapy regimen be used as presently designed. However, given the 91% resectability rate they remain encouraged with this approach. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  2. Preoperative 5-FU, low-dose leucovorin, and radiation therapy for locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Enker, Warren E.; Saltz, Leonard; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.; Kelsen, David P.; Kemeny, Nancy; Ilson, David; Bass, Joanne; Conti, John

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report the local control and survival of two Phase I dose escalation trials of combined preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), low-dose leucovorin (LV), and radiation therapy followed by postoperative LV/5-FU for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients (30 primary and 6 recurrent) received two monthly cycles of LV/5-FU (bolus daily x 5). Radiation therapy (50.40 Gy) began on day 1 in the 25 patients who received concurrent treatment and on day 8 in the 11 patients who received sequential treatment. Postoperatively, patients received a median of four monthly cycles of LV/5-FU. Results: The resectability rate with negative margins was 97%. The complete response rate was 11% pathologic and 14% clinical for a total of 25%. The 4-year actuarial disease-free survival was 67% and the overall survival was 76%. The crude local failure rate was 14% and the 4-year actuarial local failure rate was 30%. Crude local failure was lower in the four patients who had a pathologic complete response (0%) compared with those who either did not have a pathologic complete response (16%) or who had a clinical complete response (20%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data with the low-dose LV regimen reveal encouraging downstaging, local control, and survival rates. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the 5-year results. The benefit of downstaging on local control is greatest in patients who achieve a pathologic complete response

  3. Advances in molecular biomarkers for gastric cancer: miRNAs as emerging novel cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua-Hsi; Lin, Wen-chang; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2014-01-23

    Carcinoma of the stomach is one of the most prevalent cancer types in the world. Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining, the outcomes of gastric cancer patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early gastric cancer. Modern biomedical research has explored many potential gastric cancer biomarker genes by utilising serum protein antigens, oncogenic genes or gene families through improving molecular biological technologies, such as microarray, RNA-Seq and the like. Recently, the small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be critical regulators in the oncogenesis pathways and to serve as useful clinical biomarkers. This new class of biomarkers is emerging as a novel molecule for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, including gastric cancer. By translational suppression of target genes, miRNAs play a significant role in the gastric cancer cell physiology and tumour progression. There are potential implications of previously discovered gastric cancer molecular biomarkers and their expression modulations by respective miRNAs. Therefore, many miRNAs are found to play oncogenic roles or tumour-suppressing functions in human cancers. With the surprising stability of miRNAs in tissues, serum or other body fluids, miRNAs have emerged as a new type of cancer biomarker with immeasurable clinical potential.

  4. Early onset gastric cancer: on the road to unraveling gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Anya N.; Sitarz, Robert; Carvalho, Ralph; Carneiro, Fatima; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer is thought to result from a combination of environmental factors and the accumulation of specific genetic alterations due to increasing genetic instability, and consequently affects mainly older patients. Less than 10% of patients present with the disease before 45 years of age (early

  5. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MMK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew MK Chan,1,2 Katrin M Sjoquist,1,3 John R Zalcberg4 1NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW, Australia; 3Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab, inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib, and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs (eg, ramucirumab. Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. Keywords: ramucirumab, IMC-1121B, gastric cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, angiogenesis, targeted therapy

  6. Differences in gastric mucosal microbiota profiling in patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using pyrosequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Byung Kwon; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Bo Youl; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the early stage of cancer development. However, various bacteria that promote the synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be involved in the later stages. We aimed to determine the microbial composition of gastric mucosa from the patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using 454 GS FLX Titanium. Gastric mucosal biopsy samples were collected from 31 patients during endoscopy. After the extraction of genomic DNA, variable region V5 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were sequenced using 454 high-throughput sequencer. The composition, diversity, and richness of microbial communities were compared between three groups. The composition of H. pylori-containing Epsilonproteobacteria class appeared to be the most prevalent, but the relative increase in the Bacilli class in the gastric cancer group was noticed, resulting in a significant difference compared with the chronic gastritis group. By analyzing the Helicobacter-dominant group at a family level, the relative abundance of Helicobacteraceae family was significantly lower in the gastric cancer group compared with chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia groups, while the relative abundance of Streptococcaceae family significantly increased. In a UPGMA clustering of Helicobacter-dominant group based on UniFrac distance, the chronic gastritis group and gastric cancer group were clearly separated, while the intestinal metaplasia group was distributed in between the two groups. The evenness and diversity of gastric microbiota in the gastric cancer group was increased compared with other groups. In Helicobacter predominant patients, the microbial compositions of gastric mucosa from gastric cancer patients are significantly different to chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia patients. These alterations of gastric microbial composition may play an important, as-yet-undetermined role in

  7. MiR-133b is frequently decreased in gastric cancer and its overexpression reduces the metastatic potential of gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yu; Zhu, Zhenggang; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Li; Qu, Ying; Li, Jianfang; Yu, Beiqin; Yan, Min; Yu, Yingyan; Liu, Bingya

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs are involved in gastric cancer development and progression. Here we examine the role of miR-133b in gastric cancer. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was performed in 140 patient gastric cancer tissues and 8 gastric cancer cell lines. The effects of miR-133b in gastric cancer cells metastasis were examined by scratch assay, transwell migration and matrigel invasion. In vivo effects of miR-133b were examined in an intraperitoneal mouse tumor model. Targets of miR-133b were predicted by bioinformatics tools and validated by luciferase reporter analyses, western blot, and quantitative real-time PCR. MiR-133b was significantly downregulated in 70% (98/140) of gastric cancer patients. Expression of miR-133b was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer in patients. Similarly, the expression of miR-133b was significantly lower in seven tested gastric cancer cell lines than in the immortalized non-cancerous GES-1 gastric epithelial cells. Overexpression of miR-133b markedly inhibited metastasis of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the transcriptional factor Gli1 was identified as a direct target for miR-133b. Level of Gli1 protein but not mRNA was decreased by miR-133b. Activity of luciferase with Gli1 3′-untranslated region was markedly decreased by miR-133b in gastric cancer cells. Gli1 target genes, OPN and Zeb2, were also inhibited by miR133b. MiR-133b is frequently decreased in gastric cancer. Overexpression of miR-133b inhibits cell metastasis in vitro and in vivo partly by directly suppressing expression of Gli1 protein. These results suggested that miR-133b plays an important role in gastric cancer metastasis

  8. Primary colectomy in patients with stage IV colon cancer and unresectable distant metastases improves overall survival: results of a multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Mesli, Farida; Mitry, Emmanuel; Aparicio, Thomas; Des Guetz, Gaetan; DesGuetz, Gaetan; Louvet, Christophe; Landi, Bruno; Tiret, Emmanuel; Sobhani, Iradj

    2011-08-01

    Whether patients with stage IV colon cancer and unresectable distant metastases should be managed by primary colectomy followed by chemotherapy or immediate chemotherapy without resection of the primary tumor is still controversial. This study aimed to evaluate predictive factors associated with survival in patients with stage IV colon cancer and unresectable distant metastases. This large retrospective multicentric study included 6 academic hospitals. This study was conducted at 6 Paris University Hospitals (Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris; Saint Antoine, Henri Mondor, Ambroise Paré, Hôpital Europeen Gorges Pompidou, Bichat, and Avicenne). Between 1998 and 2007, 208 patients with good performance status and stage IV colon cancer with unresectable distant metastases received chemotherapy, either as initial management or after primary tumor resection. Survival was estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors associated with survival were tested by means of a log-rank test. Results were expressed as median values with 95% confidence intervals. Factors independently related to survival were tested using a Cox regression model adjusted for a propensity score. Of the 208 patients, 85 underwent colectomy before chemotherapy, whereas 123 were treated with use of primary chemotherapy with or without biotherapy. At univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with survival: primary colectomy (P = .031), secondary curative surgery (P < .001), well-differentiated primary tumor (P < .001), exclusive liver metastases (P < .027), absence of need for colonic stent (P = .009), and addition of antiangiogenic (P = .001) or anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (P = .013) drugs to chemotherapy. After Cox multivariate analysis and after adjusting for the propensity score, all of these factors, with the exception of two, colonic stent and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drug, were found to be independently associated with overall

  9. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Youzhu; Jing, Jingjing; Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Sun, Mingjun; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival.

  11. Multi-disciplinary team for early gastric cancer diagnosis improves the detection rate of early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Lianjun; Wu, Huichao; Zhu, Rong; Li, Youfeng; Wu, Xinglong; Xie, Rui; Li, Hongping; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Hua; Xiao, Hong; Chen, Hui; Zhen, Hong; Zhao, Kui; Yang, Xuefeng; Xie, Ming; Tuo, Bigung

    2017-12-06

    Gastric cancer is a frequent malignant tumor worldwide and its early detection is crucial for curing the disease and enhancing patients' survival rate. This study aimed to assess whether the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) can improve the detection rate of early gastric cancer (EGC). The detection rate of EGC at the Digestive Endoscopy Center, Affiliated Hospital, Zunyi Medical College, China between September 2013 and September 2015 was analyzed. MDT for the diagnosis of EGC in the hospital was established in September 2014. The study was divided into 2 time periods: September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2014 (period 1) and September 1, 2014 to September 1, 2015 (period 2). A total of 60,800 patients' gastroscopies were performed during the two years. 61 of these patients (0.1%) were diagnosed as EGC, accounting for 16.44% (61/371) of total patients with gastric cancer. The EGC detection rate before MDT (period 1) was 0.05% (16/29403), accounting for 9.09% (16/176) of total patients with gastric cancer during this period. In comparison, the EGC detection rate during MDT (period 2) was 0.15% (45/31397), accounting for 23% (45/195) of total patients with gastric cancer during this period (P cooperation with Department of Pathology (OR = 10.1, 95% CI 2.39-43.3, P < 0.05). MDT could improve the endoscopic detection rate of EGC.

  12. DMBT1 is frequently downregulated in well-differentiated gastric carcinoma but more frequently upregulated across various gastric cancer types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conde, Ana R; Martins, Ana P; Brito, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    in cell differentiation and protection and has been proposed as a candidate tumour suppressor for brain and epithelial cancer. One study reported a loss of DMBT1 expression in 12.5% (5/40) of gastric cancer samples. Here, we examined in more detail DMBT1 protein and mRNA expression in 78 primary gastric...... preferentially take place in well-differentiated gastric carcinoma. However, an upregulation of DMBT1 expression is more frequently found across all gastric cancer types.......Well-differentiated gastric carcinomas are considered to represent a distinct entity emerging via specific molecular changes different from those found in other gastric carcinoma types. The gene deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) at 10q25.3-q26.1 codes for a protein presumably involved...

  13. Gene expression analysis of FABP4 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkarim Yasin Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Gastric cancer has high incidence and mortality rate in several countries and is still one of the most frequent and lethal disease. In this study, we aimed to determine diagnostic markers in gastric cancer by molecular techniques; include mRNA expression analysis of FABP4 gene. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 gene encodes the fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes. The protein encoded by FABP4 are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. It is thought that FABPs roles include fatty acid uptake, transport, and metabolism. Material and Methods: Total RNA were extracted from paired tumor and normal tissues of 47 gastric cancer. The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was measured employing semi- quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR. Results: The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was significantly decreased (down- regulated. Conclusion: Down-regulation of FABP4 gene seems to occur at the initial steps of gastric cancer development. In order to confirm the relationship between the gastric tumor and FABP4 gene, further analysis like immunohistochemistry and epigenetc techniques are necessary. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 248-252

  14. Surveillance of gastric intestinal metaplasia for the prevention of gastric cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is the second leading cause of cancer related death in the world. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a recognised premalignant condition of the stomach. It has been described as occurring in up to one in five patients in western countries. Although there is a definite risk of progression from GIM to cancer, published guidelines and statements differ as to the utility and structure of surveillance programs for this condition.

  15. Treatment strategies in colorectal cancer patients with initially unresectable liver-only metastases, a study protocol of the randomised phase 3 CAIRO5 study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskens, Joost; Gulik, Thomas M van; Lienden, Krijn P van; Engelbrecht, Marc RW; Meijer, Gerrit A; Grieken, Nicole CT van; Schriek, Jonne; Keijser, Astrid; Mol, Linda; Molenaar, I Quintus; Verhoef, Cornelis; Jong, Koert P de; Dejong, Kees HC; Kazemier, Geert; Ruers, Theo M; Wilt, Johanus HW de; Tinteren, Harm van; Punt, Cornelis JA

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver-only metastases may be cured after downsizing of metastases by neoadjuvant systemic therapy. However, the optimal neoadjuvant induction regimen has not been defined, and the lack of consensus on criteria for (un)resectability complicates the interpretation of published results. CAIRO5 is a multicentre, randomised, phase 3 clinical study. Colorectal cancer patients with initially unresectable liver-only metastases are eligible, and will not be selected for potential resectability. The (un)resectability status is prospectively assessed by a central panel consisting of at least one radiologist and three liver surgeons, according to predefined criteria. Tumours of included patients will be tested for RAS mutation status. Patients with RAS wild type tumours will be treated with doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) and randomised between the addition of either bevacizumab or panitumumab, and patients with RAS mutant tumours will be randomised between doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab or triple chemotherapy (FOLFOXIRI) plus bevacizumab. Radiological evaluation to assess conversion to resectability will be performed by the central panel, at an interval of two months. The primary study endpoint is median progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints are the R0/1 resection rate, median overall survival, response rate, toxicity, pathological response of resected lesions, postoperative morbidity, and correlation of baseline and follow-up evaluation with respect to outcomes by the central panel. CAIRO5 is a prospective multicentre trial that investigates the optimal systemic induction therapy for patients with initially unresectable, liver-only colorectal cancer metastases. CAIRO 5 is registered at European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT) (2013-005435-24). CAIRO 5 is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02162563, June 10, 2014

  16. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  17. The remarkable geographical pattern of gastric cancer mortality in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Oleas, Nadia; Núñez-González, Solange; Simancas-Racines, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    This study was aimed to describe the gastric cancer mortality trend, and to analyze the spatial distribution of gastric cancer mortality in Ecuador, between 2004 and 2015. Data were collected from the National Institute of Statistics and Census (INEC) database. Crude gastric cancer mortality rates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and indirect standardized mortality rates (ISMRs) were calculated per 100,000 persons. For time trend analysis, joinpoint regression was used. The annual percentage rate change (APC) and the average annual percent change (AAPC) was computed for each province. Spatial age-adjusted analysis was used to detect high risk clusters of gastric cancer mortality, from 2010 to 2015, using Kulldorff spatial scan statistics. In Ecuador, between 2004 and 2015, gastric cancer caused a total of 19,115 deaths: 10,679 in men and 8436 in women. When crude rates were analyzed, a significant decline was detected (AAPC: -1.8%; p<0.001). ISMR also decreased, but this change was not statistically significant (APC: -0.53%; p=0.36). From 2004 to 2007 and from 2008 to 2011 the province with the highest ISMR was Carchi; and, from 2012 to 2015, was Cotopaxi. The most likely high occurrence cluster included Bolívar, Los Ríos, Chimborazo, Tungurahua, and Cotopaxi provinces, with a relative risk of 1.34 (p<0.001). There is a substantial geographic variation in gastric cancer mortality rates among Ecuadorian provinces. The spatial analysis indicates the presence of high occurrence clusters throughout the Andes Mountains. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  19. High levels of aromatic amino acids in gastric juice during the early stages of gastric cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early-stage gastric cancer is mostly asymptomatic and can easily be missed easily by conventional gastroscopy. Currently, there are no useful biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer, and their identification of biomarkers is urgently needed. METHODS: Gastric juice was obtained from 185 subjects that were divided into three groups: non-neoplastic gastric disease (NGD, advanced gastric cancer and early gastric cancer (EGC. The levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were quantitated using high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The median values (25th to 75th percentile of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were 3.8 (1.7-7.5 µg/ml, 5.3 (2.3-9.9 µg/ml and 1.0 (0.4-2.8 µg/ml in NGD; 19.4 (5.8-72.4 µg/ml, 24.6 (11.5-73.7 µg/ml and 8.3 (2.1-28.0 µg/ml in EGC. Higher levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice were observed in individuals of EGC groups compared those of the NGD group (NGD vs. EGC, P<0.0001. For the detection of EGC, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs of each biomarker were as follows: tyrosine, 0.790 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.703-0.877]; phenylalanine, 0.831 (95% CI, 0.750-0.911; and tryptophan, 0.819 (95% CI, 0.739-0.900. The sensitivity and specificity of phenylalanine were 75.5% and 81.4%, respectively, for detection of EGC. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high levels of aromatic amino acids in the gastric juice were associated with gastric cancer (adjusted β coefficients ranged from 1.801 to 4.414, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: Increased levels of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in the gastric juice samples were detected in the early phase of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in gastric juice could be used as biomarkers for the early detection of gastric cancer. A gastric juice analysis is an efficient, economical and convenient method for

  20. Incidence of Gastric Cancer in Marrakech and Casablanca, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney L. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer globally with over 70% of new cases occurring in developing countries. In Morocco, oncologists in Marrakech suspected higher frequency of gastric cancer compared to Casablanca, a city 150 kilometers away. This study calculated age-specific, sex-specific, and total incidence rates of gastric cancer in Marrakech and was compared to the Casablanca population-based cancer registry. Using medical records from Center Hospital University Mohammad VI and reports from 4 main private pathology laboratories in Marrakech, we identified 774 patients for the period 2008–2012. Comparison of rates showed higher age-specific incidence in Marrakech in nearly all age groups for both genders. A higher total incidence in Marrakech than in Casablanca was found with rates of 5.50 and 3.23 per 100,000, respectively. Incidence was significantly higher among males in Marrakech than males in Casablanca (7.19 and 3.91 per 100,000, resp. and females in Marrakech compared to females in Casablanca (3.87 and 2.58 per 100,000, resp.. Future studies should address possible underestimation of gastric cancer in Marrakech, estimate incidence in other regions of Morocco, and investigate possible risk factors to explain the difference in rates.

  1. Adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Wha; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Tai; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Chang, Joon; Kim, Se Kyu; Park, Moo Suk; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Hyoun Ju; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2007-05-01

    The study investigated correlations between adenosine triphosphate / chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) and clinical outcomes after ATP-CRA-guided platinum-based chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The authors performed an in vitro chemosensitivity test, ATP-CRA, to evaluate the chemosensitivities of anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine for chemonaive, unresectable NSCLC. The cell death rate was determined by measuring the intracellular ATP levels of drug-exposed cells compared with untreated controls. A sensitive drug was defined as a drug producing 30% or more reduction in ATP compared with untreated controls. Assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy was given to patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC. Thirty-four patients were enrolled. Thirty tumor specimens were obtained by bronchoscopic biopsies and 4 obtained surgically. The median age was 61 years and 27 patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1. The response rate was 43.8%. At a median follow-up period of 16.9 months, the median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.6 and 11.2 months, respectively. Patients were dichotomized into the platinum-sensitive (S; 20 patients) and resistant (R; 14 patients) groups. The positive/negative predictive values were 61.1% and 78.6% with a predictive accuracy of 68.8%. Although without significant differences in pretreatment parameters, the S-group showed better clinical response (P=.036), longer progression-free survival (P=.060), and longer overall survival (P=.025). Despite using bronchoscopic biopsied specimens, ATP-CRA and clinical outcomes correlated well after assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable NSCLC. There was a favorable response and survival in the platinum-sensitive vs resistant groups. Copyright (c) 2007 American Cancer Society

  2. Assessment of nutritional status in laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young-Gil; Kwon, In Gyu; Ryu, Seung Wan

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is very common in gastric cancer patients and can be detected in up to 85% of patients with gastric cancer. Malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay, poor treatment tolerance, and lower survival rate. Malnutrition also has an impact on quality of life. The early detection of nutritional risk with appropriate nutritional care can significantly reduce patient's postoperative morbidity and mortality. Because there is no gold standard tool, appropriate tools should be selected and applied depending on one's institutional conditions. And, it is recommended that nutritional assessment should be achieved for every patient at pre/post-operative period.

  3. [Nodular gastritis and gastric cancer in young adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tomoari; Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Nodular gastritis is a popular endoscopic gastritis in H. pylori-positive children and young adults. The endoscopic findings of nodular gastritis were mainly characterized by a unique, small granulated pattern in the antrum of the stomach. The cases of gastric cancer with nodular gastritis showed the same characteristics: all were diagnosed histologically as the diffuse-type and were located in the corpus with H. pylori infection. We recommended that endoscopists should carefully examine not only the antrum but also the corpus in patients with nodular gastritis, and H. pylori should be eradicated as soon as possible to prevent gastric cancer.

  4. Drug sensitivity testing platforms for gastric cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Vianne; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Ng, Christopher; Mok, Yingting; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Yan, Benedict

    2016-02-01

    Gastric cancer diagnostics has traditionally been histomorphological and primarily the domain of surgical pathologists. Although there is an increasing usage of molecular and genomic techniques for clinical diagnostics, there is an emerging field of personalised drug sensitivity testing. In this review, we describe the various personalised drug sensitivity testing platforms and discuss the challenges facing clinical adoption of these assays for gastric cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Current Status on Stem Cells and Cancers of the Gastric Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Hoffmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is still a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in spite of declining incidence. Gastric cancers are, essentially, adenocarcinomas and one of the strongest risk factors is still infection with Helicobacter pylori. Within the last years, it became clear that gastric self-renewal and carcinogenesis are intimately linked, particularly during chronic inflammatory conditions. Generally, gastric cancer is now regarded as a disease resulting from dysregulated differentiation of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to an inflammatory environment. However, the situation in the stomach is rather complex, consisting of two types of gastric units which show bidirectional self-renewal from an unexpectedly large variety of progenitor/stem cell populations. As in many other tumors, cancer stem cells have also been characterized for gastric cancer. This review focuses on the various gastric epithelial stem cells, how they contribute to self-renewal and which routes are known to gastric adenocarcinomas, including their stem cells.

  6. Gastric cancer metastasis mimicking primary lung cancer - case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Ledesma, Jorge Alberto; Urban, Linei Augusta Brolini Delle; Liu, Cristhian Bau; Reis Filho, Jorge Sergio; Oliveira Filho, Adilson Gil; Ferri, Mauricio Beller; Hossaka, Marco Aurelio

    2002-01-01

    Gastric cancer frequently presents intraperitoneal spread. Distant metastasis are rare. The authors describe a case of a 47-year-old white man, long-term cigarette smoker, who had a right upper lobe mass seen on plain films and computed tomography of the chest. A gastric adenocarcinoma was concomitantly diagnosed by endoscopic examination. A bronchoscopy guided biopsy showed that the lung mass was in fact a metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma. In this article, the imaging findings of gastric cancer and the patterns of dissemination to other organs are reviewed. (author)

  7. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Determination of Serum Helicobacter pylori Antibody and Pepsinogen Concentrations: ABC Method for Gastric Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian-Zhe; Huang, Cheng-Zhi; Hu, Wei-Xian; Liu, Ying; Yao, Xue-Qing

    2018-05-20

    Gastroscopy combined with gastric mucosa biopsies is currently regarded as a gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its application is restricted in clinical practice due to its invasive property. A new noninvasive population screening process combining the assay of anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and serum pepsinogen (PG) (ABC method) is adopted to recognize the high-risk patients for further endoscopy examination, avoiding the unnecessary gastroscopy for most population and saving the cost consumption for mass screening annually. Nevertheless, controversies exist for the grouping of ABC method and the intervals of gastroscopy surveillance for each group. In this review, we summarized these popular concerned topics for providing useful references to the healthcare practitioner in clinical practice. The PubMed databases were systematically searched from the inception dates to November 22, 2017, using the keywords "Helicobacter pylori," "Pepsinogens," and "Stomach Neoplasms." Original articles and reviews on the topics were selected. Anti-H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration showed significant changes under the different status of H. pylori infection and the progression of atrophic gastritis, which can be used for risk stratification of gastric cancer in clinic. In addition, anti-H. pylori antibody titer can be used for further risk stratification of gastric cancer contributing to determine better endoscopy surveillance interval. The early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer benefit from the risk stratification, but the cutoff values for H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration require further modification.

  8. [Clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery in South Korea: review and prospect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunchao; Zhao, Gang; Cao, Hui

    2018-02-25

    Laparoscopic technology is gradually accepted in gastric cancer surgery, whose efficacy has been demonstrated by some clinical researches. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are considered as the most important evidence to prove clinical outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. Korean gastric surgeons have made great contributions to RCT in laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery. KLASS (Korean Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group) is one of the most important forerunner and global leader of clinical trials of gastric cancer treatment. KLASS series clinical trials are attracting global attention because of the significant value of surgical treatment for gastric cancer. The RCTs in Korea involve in many aspects of laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including laparoscopy application in early gastric cancer (KLASS-01, KLASS-03 and KLASS-07), advanced gastric cancer (KLASS-02 and KLASS-06), function-preserving gastrectomy (KLASS-04,KLASS-05) and sentinel node navigation surgery (SENORITA trial). In order to share some informations of these RCTs, we review and prospect some important clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery in Korea. With the experience of Korean gastric surgeons, we can make more progress in our own clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery.

  9. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1 Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS damage. (2 Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3 Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4 Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  10. Randomized Phase II trial of paclitaxel plus valproic acid vs paclitaxel alone as second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushida S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sachio Fushida,1 Masahide Kaji,2 Katsunobu Oyama,1 Yasuo Hirono,3 Hideaki Nezuka,4 Toshiya Takeda,5 Tomoya Tsukada,1 Daisuke Fujimoto,3 Shigekazu Ohyama,6 Takashi Fujimura,7 Tetsuo Ohta1 On behalf of the Digestive Disease Support Organization (DDSO 1Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, 2Department of Surgery, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, 3First Department of Surgery, Fukui University Hospital, Fukui, 4Department of Surgery, Yatsuo General Hospital, Toyama, 5Department of Surgery, Ishikawa Matto Central Hospital, Hakusan, 6Department of Surgery, Kanazawa Medical Center, Kanazawa, 7Toyama City Hospital, Toyama, Japan Abstract: The standard regimen of second-line chemotherapy for patients with unresectable gastric cancer has not been established. However, weekly paclitaxel (wPTX has become the preferable second-line chemotherapy in Japan. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have been shown to have antiproliferative activity through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis, and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in a mouse xenograft model of gastric cancer. wPTX plus VPA as a second-line chemotherapy is expected to improve survival in gastric cancer patients. A multicenter randomized Phase II study was conducted to compare the effects of wPTX plus VPA and wPTX alone. A total of 66 patients participated in this study. The primary end point of the study was overall survival, and secondary end points were progression-free survival, response rate, and assessment of peripheral neuropathy. Keywords: valproic acid, paclitaxel, second-line therapy, advanced gastric cancer 

  11. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Choi, Ho Soon; Yang, Sun Young; Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways

  12. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer; Adenocarcinomes du pancreas localement evolues: modalites therapeutiques actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Mornex, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lyon-Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    1997-12-31

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  13. Early Relapse of Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer after Discontinuation of Gemcitabine Monotherapy Administered for 5 Years in a Patient Who Had Complete Response to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Suyama

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor shrinkage effect of gemcitabine is considered to be limited in cases of advanced gallbladder cancer, and there are few reports of complete response to gemcitabine therapy in patients with this cancer. Therefore, the treatment continuation strategy in these patients, after a complete response has been achieved, still remains to be established. Here, we present the case of a 77-year-old patient with unresectable gallbladder cancer, who after showing complete response to gemcitabine monotherapy administered for 5 years, showed early relapse within only 11 months of discontinuation of the drug. Thus, it is necessary to establish a suitable treatment continuation strategy for patients who show complete response to gemcitabine treatment.

  14. Identifying therapeutic targets in gastric cancer: the current status and future direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Beiqin; Xie, Jingwu

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Our basic understanding of gastric cancer biology falls behind that of many other cancer types. Current standard treatment options for gastric cancer have not changed for the last 20 years. Thus, there is an urgent need to establish novel strategies to treat this deadly cancer. Successful clinical trials with Gleevec in CML and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have set up an example for targeted therapy of cancer. In this review, we will summarize major progress in classification, therapeutic options of gastric cancer. We will also discuss molecular mechanisms for drug resistance in gastric cancer. In addition, we will attempt to propose potential future directions in gastric cancer biology and drug targets. PMID:26373844

  15. Plasma membrane proteomic analysis of human Gastric Cancer tissues: revealing flotillin 1 as a marker for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Wen; Xu, Jing; Wang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Long; Peng, Rui; Shu, Yongqian; Wu, Jindao; Tang, Qiyun; Zhu, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Successful early gastric cancer detection is hampered by lack of highly sensitive and specific biomarkers. Plasma membrane proteins participate and/or have a central role in the metastatic process of cancer cells and are potentially useful for cancer therapy due to easy accessibility of the targets. In the present research, TMT method followed by mass spectrometry analysis was used to compare the relative expression levels of plasma membrane proteins between noncancer and gastric cancer tissues. Of a total data set that included 501 identified proteins, about 35% of the identified proteins were found to be plasma membrane and associated proteins. Among them, 82 proteins were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated in gastric cancer compared with the adherent normal tissues. A number of markers (e.g. annexin A6, caveolin 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, integrin beta 4) were previously reported as biomarkers of GC. Additionally, several potential biomarkers participated in endocytosis pathway and integrin signaling pathways were firstly identified as differentially expressed proteins in GC samples. Our findings also supported the notion that flotillin 1 is a potential biomarker that could be exploited for molecular imaging-based detection of gastric cancer. Together, the results show that subcellular proteomics of tumor tissue is a feasible and promising avenue for exploring oncogenesis. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1343-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Clinical studies on gastric cancer and breast cancer among A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagata, S; Ohya, M; Nagusa, Y; Harada, T; Tani, T [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1977-04-01

    Fifty-five cases of gastric cancer and 14 cases of breast cancer among A-Bomb survivors, which had been treated at Dept. of Surgery, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology of Hiroshima Univ., were discussed. Both gastric cancer and breast cancer were recognized more in A-Bomb survivors of advanced age. Particularly, the number of gastric cancer in A-Bomb survivors of over 65-year old was about double the number of unexposed persons. Ratio of male to female in A-Bomb survivors with gastric cancer was 1.6:1, and the ratio of female was higher as compared to the ratio in unexposed persons (2.6:1). Gastric cancer of stage III and IV in A-Bomb survivors was 54.5%, and advanced cancer was comparatively few in A-Bomb survivors as compared to in unexposed persons (78.2%). Similarly, comparatively early stage breast cancer of stage I and II was recognized more in A-Bomb survivors. Particularly, T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in which tumor was small in size showed very high percentage of 92.9% in A-Bomb survivors. In gastric cancer in A-Bomb survivors, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma showed the highest percentage of 34.5%. However, there was no significant difference according to the exposure conditions. As to histological type of breast cancer, medullary tubular adenocarcinoma abounds mostly in both A-Bomb survivors (71.4%) and unexposed persons (75.9%). As the influence of operation, anemia was recognized before operation strongly in A-Bomb survivors with gastric cancer of over 65-year old. After the operation, transient rise of GOT and GPT was recognized in A-Bomb survivors of advanced age with gastric cancer. However, there was no difference in postoperative complications between A-Bomb survivors and unexposed persons.

  17. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Aaron T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lu, Yao [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Grossman, Stuart A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ye, Xiaobu [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah G., E-mail: sbatkoy2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 Gy × 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. Results: Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm{sup 3}) than in CRT (344.6 cm{sup 3}; P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm{sup 3} vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310-3.237; P=.002). Conclusions: SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling

  18. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  19. [Gastric cancer: epidemiologic profile 2001-2007 in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Jesús L; Carbajal, Luz A; Segura, María D; Combe, J; Akiba, S

    2012-01-01

    To describe and compare the demographic and social characteristics as well as lifestyles of patients with gastric cancer against patients with other important gastric disorders, who attended at main reference health services in Lima, Peru. Case control study, matched by sex and age + 2 years, applying a questionnaire to 96 cases with gastric cancer, and to 96 controls from September 2001 to November 2007. There were no significant differences about ethnicity; marital status; exposure to minerals, wood, and metal dusts; tobacco and alcohol; red meat consumption; salt addition; food temperature. 87, 5% of the control group had lesions in the gastric antrum, and 73% of cases group had a tubular adenocarcinoma (56%) in the gastric antrum. There was no family history of cancer in 85% patients of cases group and 59% of controls, (with significant difference). There were significant differences in low scholarship level of cases, as well as for their mothers and fathers (OR 3.75, 3.9, and 3.49 respectively), fruit or vegetables intake, milk or cheese consumption (minus of once a day) (OR 2, 3, 2, 57 and 2, 9 respectively), type of fuel for cooking (firewood, charcoal, and kerosene OR 5, 25), lack of use of refrigerator (OR 8, 4). The profile of a gastric cancer patient was to proceed from the Andean zone (high altitude +3000 meters over sea level) and jungle, low education level (low socioeconomic level), low consumption of fruits, vegetables and milk, use of firewood, charcoal, or kerosene to cook, and no use of refrigerator. The most frequent histological diagnosis in the case group was tubular adenocarcinoma.

  20. Integrated multigene expression panel to prognosticate patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Murotani, Kenta; Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Miwa, Takashi; Umeda, Shinichi; Tanaka, Chie; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hayashi, Masamichi; Hattori, Norifumi; Suenaga, Masaya; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2018-04-10

    Most of the proposed individual markers had limited clinical utility due to the inherent biological and genetic heterogeneity of gastric cancer. We aimed to build a new molecular-based model to predict prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 200 patients who underwent gastric resection for gastric cancer were divided into learning and validation cohorts using a table of random numbers in a 1:1 ratio. In the learning cohort, mRNA expression levels of 15 molecular markers in gastric tissues were analyzed and concordance index (C-index) values of all single and combinations of the 15 candidate markers for overall survival were calculated. The multigene expression panel was designed according to C-index values and the subpopulation index. Expression scores were determined with weighting according to the coefficient of each constituent. The reproducibility of the panel was evaluated in the validation cohort. C-index values of the 15 single candidate markers ranged from 0.506-0.653. Among 32,767 combinations, the optimal and balanced expression panel comprised four constituents ( MAGED2, SYT8, BTG1 , and FAM46 ) and the C-index value was 0.793. Using this panel, patients were provisionally categorized with scores of 1-3, and clearly stratified into favorable, intermediate, and poor overall survival groups. In the validation cohort, both overall and disease-free survival rates decreased incrementally with increasing expression scores. Multivariate analysis revealed that the expression score was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival after curative gastrectomy. We developed an integrated multigene expression panel that simply and accurately stratified risk of patients with gastric cancer.

  1. The relationship between selenium and gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Kuixiong; Ma Guansheng; Zhang Tingyu; Cheng Wufeng; Mao Dajuan; Pan Bixia; Xu Xiuxian

    1993-01-01

    Both sodium selenite and selenium yeast were chosen to block the MNNG mutagenesis. The inhibition rates were 66.5% and 37.9% respectively. The selenium levels in hair, serum and gastric juice, and the contents of nitrosamine in gastric juice were also determined. The results showed that the selenium levels were SG > CAG and Dys > GC (p CAG, Dyas and GC (p < 0.05). 19 cases of CAG patients treated with selenium yeast and 16 cases of the control were observed. After 10 weeks, the selenium levels in serum for the treated group were significantly increased. The symptoms of CAG patients seemed to be alleviated

  2. Dietary Flavonoids and Gastric Cancer Risk in a Korean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Dong Woo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the most common cancer among men in Korea, and dietary factors are closely associated with gastric cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using 334 cases and 334 matched controls aged 35–75 years. Significant associations were observed in total dietary flavonoids and their subclasses, with the exception of anthocyanidins and isoflavones (OR (95% CI: 0.49 (0.31–0.76, p trend = 0.007 for total flavonoids. However, these associations were not significant after further adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption (OR (95% CI: 0.62 (0.36–1.09, p trend = 0.458 for total flavonoids. Total flavonoids and their subclasses, except for isoflavones, were significantly associated with a reduced risk gastric cancer in women (OR (95% CI: 0.33 (0.15–0.73, p trend = 0.001 for total flavonoids but not in men (OR (95% CI: 0.70 (0.39–1.24, p trend = 0.393 for total flavonoids. A significant inverse association with gastric cancer risk was observed in flavones, even after additional adjustment for fruits and vegetable consumption in women. No significantly different effects of flavonoids were observed between H. pylori-positive and negative subjects. In conclusion, dietary flavonoids were inversely associated with gastric cancer risk, and these protective effects of dietary flavonoids were prominent in women. No clear differences were observed in the subgroup analysis of H. pylori and smoking status.

  3. The self-renewal signaling pathways utilized by gastric cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Li, Hui; Hao, Xishan

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Cancer stem cells are the source of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Self-renewal is a marker of cancer stem cells and also the basis of long-lasting survival and tumor progression. Although the mechanism of gastric cancer stem cell self-renewal is not clear, there are several signaling pathways and environmental factors known to be involved. This mini review describes recent developments in the self-renewal signaling pathway of gastric cancer stem cell research. Advancements made in this field of research will likely support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  4. [A comparison of proteomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastritis and gastric cancer between areas of high and low incidence of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-na; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Shi-gang; Zhong, Li Jun; Li, Guang-chuan; Shi, Yan-yan; Wang, Ye

    2011-12-18

    To identify the differentially expressed proteins of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in patients with gastritis and gastric cancer from areas of high and low incidence of gastric cancer by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), and to discuss the role of bacterial factor in pathogenesis. Hp in the endoscopic biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and gastric cancer from areas of high (Xining) and low (Beijing) incidence of gastric cancer, were separated, cultured and saved at -80°C. The bacteria were recovered. Then the whole-cell protein of the Hp were extracted and characterized by 2-DE. The different protein spots were analyzed by PDQuest analysis software and identified by electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF-MS), and searched by the Mascot database. Nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, and four protein spots were over expressed in the protein maps from gastric cancer in both areas, which were: Urease subunit alpha, chaperone protein dnaK, superoxide dismutase, DNA-directed RNA polymerase subunit alpha; two protein spots were over expressed in the protein maps from gastritis in both areas, which were: Probablethiol peroxidase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase; 60×10(3) chaperonin, and inorganic pyrophosphatase were over expressed only in the protein map from gastric cancer in Xining; S-ribosyl homocysteinelyase was over expressed only in the protein map from gastric cancer in Beijing. There are differences between proteomic analyses of Hp in patients with gastritis and gastric cancer in areas of high and low incidents of gastric cancer, but 2/3 of the protein spots over expressed in the areas are consistent. The protein spots over expressed from gastric cancer in the area with high incidence of gastric cancer are more than in the area with low incidence of gastric cancer. For the Hp extracted from patients with gastric cancer, the mechanism of gastric cancer may be similar, but the role

  5. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Sandoval-Bórquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade.

  6. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Cleva, Roberto de; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery

  7. The applicability of D2 gastrectomy in operable gastric cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi

    2013-03-07

    Mar 7, 2013 ... gastric cancer patients: A trial of Alexandria. Surgical Oncology Unit ... removal of affected organs, such as the spleen, pancreas, colon, and lateral segment of .... Bile leakage (2 cases: 6.67%) cases de- tected by bile stained ...

  8. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  9. Effect of cimetidine on survival after gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Knigge, U; Bülow, Steffen

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cimetidine on survival was investigated in 181 patients with gastric cancer. Immediately after operation or the decision not to operate, the patients were randomised in double-blind fashion to placebo or cimetidine 400 mg twice daily for two years or until death, with review every t...

  10. Serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer by SELDI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... Software (BPS) to construct the classification tree of gastric cancer. Briefly, the ..... that modulates lipid trafficking and immune responses. It is also the ... Therefore, we can not get the structures, functions of the proteins, and it ...

  11. Clinical significance of lymphadenectomy in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Dezső; Plósz, János; Török, Miklós

    2016-02-15

    Approximately thirty percent of patients with gastric cancer undergo an avoidable lymph node dissection with a higher rate of postoperative complication. Comparing the D1 and D2 dissections, it was found that there is a significant difference in morbidity, favoured D1 dissection without any difference in overall survival. Subgroup analysis of patients with T3 tumor shows a survival difference favoring D2 lymphadenectomy, and there is a better gastric cancer-related death and non-statistically significant improvement of survival for node-positive disease in patients with D2 dissection. However, the extended lymphadenectomy could improve stage-specific survival owing to the stage migration phenomenon. The deployment of centralization and application of national guidelines could improve the surgical outcomes. The Japanese and European guidelines enclose the D2 lymphadenectomy as the gold standard in R0 resection. In the individualized, stage-adapted gastric cancer surgery the Maruyama computer program (MCP) can estimate lymph node involvement preoperatively with high accuracy and in addition the Maruyama Index less than 5 has a better impact on survival, than D-level guided surgery. For these reasons, the preoperative application of MCP is recommended routinely, with an aim to perform "low Maruyama Index surgery". The sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) may decrease the number of redundant lymphadenectomy intraoperatively with a high detection rate (93.7%) and an accuracy of 92%. More accurate stage-adapted surgery could be performed using the MCP and SNB in parallel fashion in gastric cancer.

  12. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  13. Effect of cimetidine on survival after gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Knigge, U; Bülow, Steffen

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cimetidine on survival was investigated in 181 patients with gastric cancer. Immediately after operation or the decision not to operate, the patients were randomised in double-blind fashion to placebo or cimetidine 400 mg twice daily for two years or until death, with review every...

  14. HIPEC treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis in colorectal and gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, H.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the treatment of peritoneal metastases of gastric and colorectal cancer, specifically using cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). A large part of this thesis is based on retrospective analysis of patients treated with CRS

  15. Localized Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with High Energy Neutrons and Chemotherapy at Fermilab - Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroja, K. R. [Unlisted, US, IL; Cohen, Lionel [Unlisted, US, IL; Hendrickson, Frank R. [Unlisted, US, IL; Mansell, JoAnne [Fermilab

    1990-01-01

    Between January 1985 and July 1989 a total of thirty-eight patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were treated with high energy neutrons at Fermilab. Twenty-one patients received only neutrons and seventeen were given chemotherapy in addition, either concurrently or subsequently following the completion of neutron irradiation. This is a retrospective study. Data were analyzed for tolerance, complications and survival. Three of the twenty-one (14%) patients who received only neutron beam therapy developed Grade ID or greater complications in the RTOG/EORTC scale. The median survival was 6.4 months. One of these patients is alive 10 months post treatment. Of seventeen patients who also received chemotherapy, five (29%) had severe complications. However, median survival was 13.5 months. Four of these seventeen patients are still alive at the time of this analysis. The preliminary results show that there is improvement in the survival of patients treated with combined neutron irradiation and chemotherapy. A pilot study to further evaluate these results in a larger group of patients is underway. Details of complications and chemotherapy regimen will be preseqted.

  16. Implication of Gastric Cancer Molecular Genetic Markers in Surgical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, Marina V; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Tanas, Alexander S; Bykov, Igor I; Zaletaev, Dmitry V; Rudenko, Viktoria V; Glukhov, Alexander I; Kchorobrich, Tatiana V; Li, Yi; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated aberrant methylation of genes CDH1, RASSF1A, MLH1, N33, DAPK, expression of genes hTERT, MMP7, MMP9, BIRC5 (survivin), PTGS2, and activity of telomerase of 106 gastric tumor samples obtained intra-operatively and 53 gastric tumor samples from the same group of patients obtained endoscopically before surgery. Biopsy specimens obtained from 50 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis were used as a control group. Together with tissue samples obtained from different sites remote to tumors, a total of 727 samples have been studied. The selected parameters comprise a system of molecular markers that can be used in both diagnostics of gastric cancer and in dynamic monitoring of patients after surgery. Special attention was paid to the use of molecular markers for the diagnostics of malignant process in the material obtained endoscopically since the efficacy of morphological diagnostics in biopsies is compromised by intratumoral heterogeneity, which may prevent reliable identification of tumor cells in the sampling. Our data indicated that certain molecular genetic events provided more sensitive yet specific markers of the tumor. We demonstrated that molecular profiles detected in preoperative biopsies were confirmed by the material obtained intra-operatively. The use of endoscopic material facilitates gastric tumors pre-operative diagnostics, improving early detection of gastric cancer and potential effective treatment strategies.

  17. Radiologic diagnosis of gastric cancer. A new outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoy, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    In our monograph we have tried to demonstrate the infeasibility of excluding radiological diagnosis, first and foremost the traditional X-ray examination, from the algorithm for diagnosing gastric cancer. We have produced convincing evidence and explanations for the indispensability of the X-ray, which should be used along with endoscopy. The current morphological and clinical characteristics of gastric cancer suggest that only the combined use of X-ray and endoscopy can change the discouraging situation with regard to relatively early diagnosis of the disease. Radical change is also very difficult without screening. Selective screening may become a reasonable alternative in countries with limited economic potential, Russia included. It is very important to attach greater importance to outpatient services in the attempt to improve the control of the disease. Diagnosis and treatment might thus be radically facilitated. Therefore, the tendency to minimize outpatient use of X-ray examinations works against improving the diagnosis of gastric cancer. All these aspects are discussed in detail in the monograph. Although the main purpose of the monograph is to describe the current role of the X-ray examination in the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the book also covers some problems related to the epidemiology and morphology of the disease in order to disprove the existing underestimation of X-ray potential in early diagnosis. While describing radiological diagnosis, we dwell on its methodological and semeiotic principles, as well as on the special importance of each method. These include the traditional radiological and ultrasonographic methods, computed tomography, and magnetic-resonance imaging. While we value these methods, above all MRI, unlike some other researchers, we rely not only on endoscopy but also on the traditional X-ray, because we believe it greatly increases the objective value of the findings and potentials of each separate method. A special chapter in the

  18. Applications of nanotechnology in gastric cancer: detection and prevention by nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elingarami, Sauli; Liu, Ming; Fan, Jing; He, Nongyue

    2014-01-01

    New and emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, have the potential to advance nutrition science by assisting in the discovery, development, and delivery of several intervention strategies to improve health and reduce the risk and complications of several diseases, including gastric cancer. This article reviews gastric cancer in relation to nutrition, discussing gastric carcinogenesis in-depth in relation to prevention of the disease by nutrition, as well as current detection approaches using nanotechnology. The current status of molecular nutritional biomarkers for gastric cancer is also discussed, as well as future strategies for the tailored management of gastric cancer.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemoth...

  20. Cytoplasmic Drosha Is Aberrant in Precancerous Lesions of Gastric Carcinoma and Its Loss Predicts Worse Outcome for Gastric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailong; Hou, Yixuan; Xu, Liyun; Zeng, Zongyue; Wen, Siyang; Du, Yan-E; Sun, Kexin; Yin, Jiali; Lang, Lei; Tang, Xiaoli; Liu, Manran

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear localization of Drosha is critical for its function as a microRNA maturation regulator. Dephosphorylation of Drosha at serine 300 and serine 302 disrupts its nuclear localization, and aberrant distribution of Drosha has been detected in some tumors. The purpose of the present study was to assess cytoplasmic/nuclear Drosha expression in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Drosha expression and its subcellular location was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of a set of tissue microarrays composed of normal adjacent tissues (374), chronic gastritis (137), precancerous lesions (94), and gastric adenocarcinoma (829) samples, and in gastric cancer cell lines with varying differentiation by immunofluorescence and western blot assay. Gradual loss of cytoplasmic Drosha was accompanied by tumor progression in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, and was inversely associated with tumor volume (P = 0.002), tumor grade (P gastric cancer. High levels of cytoplasmic Drosha predicted longer survival (LR = 7.088, P = 0.008) in gastric cancer patients. Our data provide novel insights into gastric cancer that cytoplasmic Drosha potentially plays a role in preventing carcinogenesis and tumor progression, and may be an independent predictor of patient outcome.

  1. Predicting the Survival of Gastric Cancer Patients Using

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhani Kangi, Azam; Bahrampour, Abbas

    2018-02-26

    Introduction and purpose: In recent years the use of neural networks without any premises for investigation of prognosis in analyzing survival data has increased. Artificial neural networks (ANN) use small processors with a continuous network to solve problems inspired by the human brain. Bayesian neural networks (BNN) constitute a neural-based approach to modeling and non-linearization of complex issues using special algorithms and statistical methods. Gastric cancer incidence is the first and third ranking for men and women in Iran, respectively. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of an artificial neural network and a Bayesian neural network for modeling and predicting of probability of gastric cancer patient death. Materials and Methods: In this study, we used information on 339 patients aged from 20 to 90 years old with positive gastric cancer, referred to Afzalipoor and Shahid Bahonar Hospitals in Kerman City from 2001 to 2015. The three layers perceptron neural network (ANN) and the Bayesian neural network (BNN) were used for predicting the probability of mortality using the available data. To investigate differences between the models, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) were generated. Results: In this study, the sensitivity and specificity of the artificial neural network and Bayesian neural network models were 0.882, 0.903 and 0.954, 0.909, respectively. Prediction accuracy and the area under curve ROC for the two models were 0.891, 0.944 and 0.935, 0.961. The age at diagnosis of gastric cancer was most important for predicting survival, followed by tumor grade, morphology, gender, smoking history, opium consumption, receiving chemotherapy, presence of metastasis, tumor stage, receiving radiotherapy, and being resident in a village. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that the Bayesian neural network is preferable to an artificial neural network for

  2. Gastric Cancer: How Can We Reduce the Incidence of this Disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer remains a prevalent disease worldwide with a poor prognosis. Helicobacter pylori plays a major role in gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori colonization leads to chronic gastritis, which predisposes to atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and eventually

  3. Roadmap to eliminate gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori eradication and consecutive surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Masahiro; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, the annual number of deaths from gastric cancer is approximately 50,000 and there has been no change over the last 50 years. So far, all efforts have been directed toward improving the detection of early gastric cancer by barium X-ray and endoscopy, since early cancer has a good prognosis, resulting in Japan having the best diagnostic capability for early gastric cancer worldwide. The 5-year survival rate of gastric cancer patients exceeds 60 % in Japan and is much higher than that in Europe and the US (20 %) because of this superior diagnosis of early gastric cancer. In February 2013, national health insurance coverage for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy to treat H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis became available in Japan. H. pylori-associated gastritis leads to development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric polyps. Therefore, providing treatment for gastritis is likely to substantially decrease the prevalence of both gastric and duodenal ulcers and polyps. Because treatment for H. pylori-associated gastritis, which leads to atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, is now covered by health insurance in Japan, a strategy to eliminate gastric cancer-related deaths by taking advantage of this innovation was planned. According to this strategy, patients with gastritis will be investigated for H. pylori infection and those who are positive will receive eradication therapy followed by periodic surveillance. If this strategy is implemented, deaths from gastric cancer in Japan will decrease dramatically after 10-20 years.

  4. Helicobacter pylori dupA and gastric acid secretion are negatively associated with gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagawa, Shinobu; Ito, Masanori; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-12-01

    Few reports have described the cancer prevalence of peptic ulcer patients with long-term follow-up studies. We have conducted a long-term retrospective cohort study of Japanese peptic ulcer patients and evaluated the risk factors for the occurrence of gastric cancer (GCa). A total of 136 patients diagnosed with peptic ulcers from 1975 to 1983 were enrolled. These 136 cases [102 males and 34 females; 69 gastric ulcer (GU) and 67 duodenal ulcer (DU) patients at the time of enrollment; mean follow-up period of 14.4 years (range 1-30 years)] after being matched with a tumour registry database in Hiroshima prefecture were surveyed for GCa. We investigated Helicobacter pylori duodenal ulcer promoter gene A (dupA) using paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens in 56 cases. Gastric acid secretion and basal acid output (BAO) in 40 cases, and maximal acid output in 68 cases, had been measured at first diagnosis of peptic ulcers. GCa was detected in 24 patients (17 with GU, 7 with DU) during the follow-up. The prevalence of GCa was significantly higher in GU patients than in DU patients (log-rank test PdupA-positive H. pylori was detected not only in DU patients (9/20) but also in GU patients (9/36). Gastric acid output was significantly larger in quantity in patients with dupA-positive H. pylori than in those with dupA-negative H. pylori (PdupA-positive H. pylori and a high BAO level (log-rank test PdupA-positive H. pylori were negatively associated with GCa.

  5. Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guhyun Kang

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC, whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes and AGCs (3104 genes. A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010. The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

  6. MVP Chemotherapy and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Randomized for maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation; Preliminary Report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Euk Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Suh, Cheol Won

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of MVP chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), authors have conducted a prospective randomized study since January 1991. Stage IIIa or IIIb unresectable NSCLC patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID) up to 6500 cGY following 3 cycles of induction MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 ) and randomized for either observation or 3 cycles of maintenance MVP chemotherapy. Until August 1991, 18 patients were registered to this study. 4 cases were stage IIIa and 14 were stage IIIb. Among 18 cases 2 were lost after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and 16 were analyzed for this preliminary report. The response rate of induction chemotherapy was 62.5%; partial response, 50% and minimal response, 12.5%. Residual tumor of the one partial responder was completely disappeared after radiotherapy. Among 6 cases who were progressed during induction chemotherapy, 4 of them were also progressed after radiotherapy. All patients were tolerated BID radiotherapy without definite increase of acute complications, compared with conventional radiotherapy group. But at the time of this report, one patient expired in two month after the completion of the radiotherapy because of treatment related complication. Although the longer follow up is needed, authors are encouraged with higher response rate and acceptable toxicity of this treatment. Authors believe that this study is worthwhile to continue

  7. Analysis of adjuvant treatment with chemoradiation in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallas Solis, Elias

    2008-01-01

    The Hospital San Juan de Dios has analyzed the benefit of patients with gastric cancer who undergo surgery after receiving adjuvant chemoradiation. A retrospective study was performed reviewing records of patients during the period 1 January 2001 to December 31, 2005. These patients have been discharged with a diagnosis of gastric cancer and have received a complete resection with curative gastric malignancy and adjuvant chemoradiation according to the protocol established by Dr. MacDonald. In the study 0116. 743 patients were discharged to Hospital San Juan de Dios, 1 in 20 has been possible to diagnose gastric cancer at early stages for a total of 28 patients. The results obtained were compared at the Hospital San Juan de Dios with those published by Dr. MacDonald. The over-life of 3 years in the chemoradiation group in Hospital San Juan de Dios has been of 42.9% and 50% in the study MacDonald. The group that has not received adjuvant the over-life in the same period has been of 20 % in HSJD and 41% in the study MacDonald, being lower percentage of patients with this over-life, but greater range of difference. [es

  8. Gastric cancer perforation: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Bishnu Prasad; Singh, Yogendra; Singh, Keshav Prasad; Khakurel, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer perforation can occurs in advanced stage of the disease and is often associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Peritonitis due to perforation needs emergency laparotomy and different surgical procedures can be performed for definitive treatment. Surgical procedures largely depend on the stage of the disease and general condition of the patient. This study was carried out to evaluate the outcome and role of different surgical procedures in gastric cancer perforation. Medical record of patients with gastric perforation, who were treated during ten years period, was reviewed retrospectively. Data regarding clinical presentation, surgical procedures, staging and survival of patients were obtained. Features suggestive of diffuse peritonitis were evident in all cases. The majority of the patients underwent emergency surgery except one who died during resuscitation. The majority of patients were in stage III and stage IV. Surgical procedure includes simple closure and omental patch in five patients, simple closure and gastrojejunostomy in nine patients, gastrectomy in six patients and Devine's antral exclusion in one patient. Surgical site infection was the most common (45.5%) postoperative complication. Four patients died within one month of the surgery. Three patients who underwent gastrectomy survived for one year and one patient survived for five years. Although gastric cancer perforation usually occurs in advanced stage of the disease, curative resection should be considered as far as possible.

  9. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  10. Prognostic significance of cancer family history for patients with gastric cancer: a single center experience from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Cai, Hong; Yu, Lin; Huang, Hua; Long, Ziwen; Wang, Yanong

    2016-06-14

    Family history of cancer is a risk factor for gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the prognoses of gastric cancer patients with family history of cancer. A total of 1805 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy from 2000 to 2008 were evaluated. The clinicopathologic parameters and prognoses of gastric cancer patients with a positive family history (PFH) of cancer were compared with those with a negative family history (NFH). Of 1805 patients, 382 (21.2%) patients had a positive family history of cancer. Positive family history of cancer correlated with younger age, more frequent alcohol and tobacco use, worse differentiation, smaller tumor size, and more frequent tumor location in the lower 1/3 of the stomach. The prognoses of patients with a positive family history of cancer were better than that of patients with a negative family history. Family history of cancer independently correlated with better prognosis after curative gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients.

  11. Postoperative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Marcelo; Bustos, Marisa; Orellana, Eric; Madrid, Jorge; Galindo, Hector; Sanchez, Cesar; Pimentel, Fernando; Guzman, Sergio; Butte, Jean Michel; Alvarez, Manuel; Besa, Pelayo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Overall 5 years survival for surgically excised gastric cancer is 30%. Adjuvant treatment may improve the surgical results. Aim: To assess treatment results and toxicity in patients with surgically excised gastric cancer, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy and concomitant continuous 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Material and Methods: Forty one patients aged 32 to 73 years (29 males) with stage II-IVA gastric cancer, subjected to a total or subtotal gastrectomy and D2 nodal dissection between 1997 to 2006, were studied. They received adjuvant radiotherapy to the gastric bed and draining lymphatic nodes in a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and chemotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU, 200 mg/m2/day. Results were compared to historical controls matched according to demographic parameters and tumor characteristics. Results: Eighteen patients were in stage II, 10 in stage IIIA, nine in stage IIIB and four in stage IVA. Twelve patients had an N0 nodal status, 15 were N1, nine were N2 and five were N3. After a mean follow up of 32 months, 26 patients (63%) were alive. Five year overall survival was 49.6% for surgery plus radiochemotherapy compared to 30.7% for the historical group subjected only to surgery (p =0.002). Radiotherapy was associated with grade 1-2 toxicity and treatment was completed without interruptions in all patients. Chemotherapy was delayed temporarily in 3 patients. Conclusions: Adjuvant radio-chemotherapy improved overall survival in gastric cancer, compared to historical controls subjected only to surgical treatment

  12. Paget's disease of bone resembling bone metastasis from gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Shimoda, Yoko; Ishihara, Shingo; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tetsuro; Mochiki, Erito; Sano, Takaaki; Hirato, Junko; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-08-01

    A 74-year-old man had an endoscopic type 0'-IIc tumor in the upper gastric body on the greater curvature and biopsy showed the tumor to be a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (Group 5). He was referred to us for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Endoscopy revealed fold convergency, fold swelling, and fusion of the fold, indicating tumor invasion into the submucosa, which was outside the indications for ESD. In addition, there was an increase of serum bone-type alkaline phosphatase (ALP-III and ALP-IV) and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (a bone metabolism marker), while (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the left pelvis and Th10, suggesting bone metastases. We first diagnosed gastric cancer with bone metastases; however, the symptoms suggested pathological bone fracture and no bone pain. Therefore, a computed tomography-guided aspiration bone biopsy was performed to exclude the possibility of Paget's disease of bone. Biopsy specimens revealed no tumor and a mosaic pattern. No increased uptake of (18)F-FAMT (L-[3-(18)F] α-methyltyrosine) supported a diagnosis of no bone metastases from gastric cancer. We finally diagnosed gastric cancer accompanied by Paget's disease of bone and performed a laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy. The pathological diagnosis was U less 0-IIb, and U post 0-IIc ypT1a (M) N0H0P0M0 yp stage IA. In gastric cancer patients with suspected bone metastasis, we also need to consider Paget's disease of bone.

  13. miR-449 inhibits cell proliferation and is down-regulated in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bou Kheir, Tony; Futoma-Kazmierczak, Ewa; Jacobsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second most prevalent cause of cancer related death. The development of gastric cancer is mainly associated with H. Pylori infection leading to a focus in pathology studies on bacterial and environmental factors, and to a lesser...... malignancies. The current study is focused on identifying microRNAs involved in gastric carcinogenesis and to explore their mechanistic relevance by characterizing their targets....

  14. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of compl...

  15. Inflammatory response in laparoscopic vs. open surgery for gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Goetze, Jens Peter; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    lead to an increased susceptibility to complications and morbidity. The aim of this review was to investigate if laparoscopic surgery reduces the immunological response compared to open surgery in gastric cancer. METHODS: We conducted a literature search identifying relevant studies comparing...... laparoscopy or laparoscopic-assisted surgery with open gastric surgery. The main outcome was postoperative immunological status defined as surgical stress parameters, including inflammatory cytokines and blood parameters. RESULTS: We identified seven studies that addressed the immunological status in patients...... laparotomy. Finally, most studies reported lower levels of white blood cell count in laparoscopic patients, although this result did not reach statistical significance in a small number of studies. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy-assisted gastric surgery seems to attenuate the immune response compared to open...

  16. [Nutritional status in patients after gastrectomy due to gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomichuk, A L; Shakhovskaia, A K; Isakov, V A; Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Blokhina, L V

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate nutritional status in patients after gastrectomy due to gastric cancer. In 55 (26 males and 29 females) gastric cancer patients after gastrectomy body composition (bioimpedansometry method); resting energy expenditures and home actual nutrition (frequency analysis method) were evaluated. Blood levels of major nutrients and metabolites were assessed. Both men and women suffered from weight loss after gastrectomy (mean BMI was 19,8+/-4,7 kg/m2 in men and 20,5+/-1,9 in women). Higher BMI was positively correlated with age in women (R=0,45; pgastric cancer patients low BMI, low fat mass and energy consumption are observed even long period of time after gastrectomy. Dietary counseling and support are badly needed in patients short-term as well as long-term period after gastrectomy in men and younger women.

  17. Bone metastases from gastric cancer. Clinical evaluation on bone scintigram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Mikito; Tonami, Norihisa; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Sui, Osamu; Hisada, Kinichi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1983-07-01

    We have studied bone scintigrams in 60 patients with gastric cancer. Of these 60 patients, bone metastases were found in 15 patients (25 %). There were no evidence of bone metastases in polypoid lesions, cancers of the antrum, carcinomas in situ, advanced cancers without invasion to serosa, cancer with N/sub 0/ or N/sub 1/ regional lymph node metastases, highly differentiated adenocarcinomas and papillary adenocarcinomas. On the contrary, high rates of bone metastases were seen in cancers of the corpus, advanced cancers with invasion to neighbouring structures and tubular adenocarcinomas. Of these 15 patients with bone metastasis, 3 patients showed very similar clinical features and the findings of ''diffuse bone metastases on bone scintigrams.'' Cancer of the antrum showed high rates of liver metastases, while cancers of the corpus showed high rates of bone metastases. Sixty percent of the patients with bone metastases did not have liver metastases and there seemed to be no significant relationship between liver metastases and bone metastases. From these results we suppose that non-portal tract through the vertebral venous plexus instead of portal tract may be the other route of bone metastases from gastric cancer.

  18. Endoscopic mucosal resection for early gastric cancer. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Sporea, Ioan; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gheorghe, Liana

    2002-03-01

    European experience in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for early gastric cancer is still relatively low, since early stomach cancer is diagnosed at a much lower rate in Europe than in Japan and generally operable patients are referred to surgery for radical resection. Endoscopic mucosal resection or mucosectomy was developed as a promising technology to diagnose and treat mucosal lesions in the esophagus, stomach and colon. In contrast to surgical resection, EMR allows "early cancers" to be removed with a minimal cost, morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with hepatic cirrhosis incidentally diagnosed with an elevated-type IIa early gastric cancer. Echoendoscopy was performed in order to assess the depth of invasion into the gastric wall confirming the only mucosal involvement. We performed an EMR using "cup and suction" method. After the procedure, the patient experienced an acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the ulcer bed requiring argon plasma coagulation. The histopathological examination confirmed an early cancer, without involvement of muscularis mucosae. The patient has had an uneventful evolution being well at six months after the procedure

  19. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates the Survival of Gastric Cancer Cells by Regulating the Expression of Bcl-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Lee, Young-Suk; Baek, Sun-Yong; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jae-Bong; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The underlying molecular mechanisms of its carcinogenesis are relatively poorly characterized. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which is critical for development of various organs including the gastrointestinal tract, has been associated with gastric cancer. The present study was undertaken to reveal the underlying mechanism by which Hh signaling controls gastric cancer cell proliferation. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of Hh signaling pathway, reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Cyclopamine treatment induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase 9. Moreover, Bcl-2 expression was significantly reduced by cyclopamine treatment. These results suggest that Hh signaling regulates the survival of gastric cancer cells by regulating the expression of Bcl-2. PMID:19742123

  20. Genome-wide gene copy number and expression analysis of primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junnila, Siina; Kokkola, Arto; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Monni, Outi

    2010-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Gene copy number alterations play an important role in the development of gastric cancer and a change in gene copy number is one of the main mechanisms for a cancer cell to control the expression of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. To highlight genes of potential biological and clinical relevance in gastric cancer, we carried out a systematic array-based survey of gene expression and copy number levels in primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines and validated the results using an affinity capture based transcript analysis (TRAC assay) and real-time qRT-PCR. Integrated microarray analysis revealed altogether 256 genes that were located in recurrent regions of gains or losses and had at least a 2-fold copy number- associated change in their gene expression. The expression levels of 13 of these genes, ALPK2, ASAP1, CEACAM5, CYP3A4, ENAH, ERBB2, HHIPL2, LTB4R, MMP9, PERLD1, PNMT, PTPRA, and OSMR, were validated in a total of 118 gastric samples using either the qRT-PCR or TRAC assay. All of these 13 genes were differentially expressed between cancerous samples and nonmalignant tissues (p < 0.05) and the association between copy number and gene expression changes was validated for nine (69.2%) of these genes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, integrated gene expression and copy number microarray analysis highlighted genes that may be critically important for gastric carcinogenesis. TRAC and qRT-PCR analyses validated the microarray results and therefore the role of these genes as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer

  1. Histologic scoring of gastritis and gastric cancer in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Arlin B

    2012-01-01

    Histopathology is a defining endpoint in mouse models of experimental gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. Presented here is an overview of the histology of gastritis and gastric cancer in mice experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori or H. felis. A modular histopathologic scoring scheme is provided that incorporates relevant disease-associated changes. Whereas the guide uses Helicobacter infection as the prototype challenge, features may be applied to chemical and genetically engineered mouse models of stomach cancer as well. Specific criteria included in the combined gastric histologic activity index (HAI) include inflammation, epithelial defects, oxyntic atrophy, hyperplasia, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and dysplasia or neoplasia. Representative photomicrographs accompany descriptions for each lesion grade. Differentiation of genuine tumor invasion from pseudoinvasion is highlighted. A brief comparison of normal rodent versus human stomach anatomy and physiology is accompanied by an introduction to mouse-specific lesions including mucous metaplasia and eosinophilic droplets (hyalinosis). In conjunction with qualified pathology support, this guide is intended to assist research scientists, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and medical professionals from affiliated disciplines in the interpretation and histologic grading of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma in mouse models.

  2. A nanomaterial-based breath test for distinguishing gastric cancer from benign gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z-q; Broza, Y Y; Ionsecu, R; Tisch, U; Ding, L; Liu, H; Song, Q; Pan, Y-y; Xiong, F-x; Gu, K-s; Sun, G-p; Chen, Z-d; Leja, M; Haick, H

    2013-03-05

    Upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy and histopathological evaluation of the biopsy material is the standard method for diagnosing gastric cancer (GC). However, this procedure may not be widely available for screening in the developing world, whereas in developed countries endoscopy is frequently used without major clinical gain. There is a high demand for a simple and non-invasive test for selecting the individuals at increased risk that should undergo the endoscopic examination. Here, we studied the feasibility of a nanomaterial-based breath test for identifying GC among patients with gastric complaints. Alveolar exhaled breath samples from 130 patients with gastric complaints (37 GC/32 ulcers / 61 less severe conditions) that underwent endoscopy/biopsy were analyzed using nanomaterial-based sensors. Predictive models were built employing discriminant factor analysis (DFA) pattern recognition, and their stability against possible confounding factors (alcohol/tobacco consumption; Helicobacter pylori) was tested. Classification success was determined (i) using leave-one-out cross-validation and (ii) by randomly blinding 25% of the samples as a validation set. Complementary chemical analysis of the breath samples was performed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Three DFA models were developed that achieved excellent discrimination between the subpopulations: (i) GC vs benign gastric conditions, among all the patients (89% sensitivity; 90% specificity); (ii) early stage GC (I and II) vs late stage (III and IV), among GC patients (89% sensitivity; 94% specificity); and (iii) ulcer vs less severe, among benign conditions (84% sensitivity; 87% specificity). The models were insensitive against the tested confounding factors. Chemical analysis found that five volatile organic compounds (2-propenenitrile, 2-butoxy-ethanol, furfural, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and isoprene) were significantly elevated in patients with GC and/or peptic ulcer, as compared

  3. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  4. Identification of DNA methylation changes associated with human gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic alteration of gene expression is a common event in human cancer. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic process, but verifying the exact nature of epigenetic changes associated with cancer remains difficult. Methods We profiled the methylome of human gastric cancer tissue at 50-bp resolution using a methylated DNA enrichment technique (methylated CpG island recovery assay in combination with a genome analyzer and a new normalization algorithm. Results We were able to gain a comprehensive view of promoters with various CpG densities, including CpG Islands (CGIs, transcript bodies, and various repeat classes. We found that gastric cancer was associated with hypermethylation of 5' CGIs and the 5'-end of coding exons as well as hypomethylation of repeat elements, such as short interspersed nuclear elements and the composite element SVA. Hypermethylation of 5' CGIs was significantly correlated with downregulation of associated genes, such as those in the HOX and histone gene families. We also discovered long-range epigenetic silencing (LRES regions in gastric cancer tissue and identified several hypermethylated genes (MDM2, DYRK2, and LYZ within these regions. The methylation status of CGIs and gene annotation elements in metastatic lymph nodes was intermediate between normal and cancerous tissue, indicating that methylation of specific genes is gradually increased in cancerous tissue. Conclusions Our findings will provide valuable data for future analysis of CpG methylation patterns, useful markers for the diagnosis of stomach cancer, as well as a new analysis method for clinical epigenomics investigations.

  5. The endothelial lipase protein is promising urinary biomarker for diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xueyan; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Guoqing; Ni, Zhaohui; Suo, Jian; Cui, Juan; Cui, Ai; Yang, Qing; Xu, Ying; Li, Fan

    2013-03-19

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. Finding effective diagnostic biomarkers in urine or serum would represent the most ideal solution to detecting gastric cancer during annual physical examination. This study was to evaluate the potential of endothelial lipase (EL) as a urinary biomarker for diagnosis of gastric cancer. The expression levels of EL was measured using Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining experiments on (tissue, serum, and urine) samples of gastric cancer patients versus healthy people. We also checked the EL levels in the urine samples of other cancer types (lung, colon and rectum cancers) and benign lesions (gastritis and gastric leiomyoma) to check if EL was specific to gastric cancer. We observed a clear separation between the EL expression levels in the urine samples of 90 gastric cancer patients and of 57 healthy volunteers. It was approximately 9.9 fold average decrease of the EL expression levels in the urine samples of gastric cancer compared to the healthy controls (P cancer. Interestingly, the expression levels of EL in tissue and serum samples were not nearly as discriminative as in urine samples (P = 0.90 and P = 0.79). In immunohistochemical experiments, positive expression of the EL protein was found in 67% (8/12) of gastric adjacent noncancerous and in 58% (7/12) of gastric cancer samples. There was no significant statistical in the expression levels of this protein between the gastric cancer and the matching noncancerous tissues (P =0.67). The urinary EL as a highly accurate gastric cancer biomarker that is potentially applicable to the general screening with high sensitivity and specificity. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4527331618757552.

  6. Esophageal and gastric cancer incidence and mortality in alendronate users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Pazianas, Michael; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2011-01-01

    their esophageal or gastric location could be accurately distinguished. We conducted a register-based, open cohort study using national healthcare data for Denmark. Upper endoscopy frequency, cancer incidence and mortality was examined in 30,606 alendronate users (female, age 50 + ) and 122,424 matched controls......Recent studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the risk of esophageal cancer with oral bisphosphonates. Prior studies did not record the number of cancer deaths or endoscopy rates, which could be higher in bisphosphonate users and lead to more cancers being diagnosed at a stage when....... Primary outcomes were esophageal cancer incidence and death due to esophageal cancer. The analysis showed that alendronate users were more likely to have undergone recent upper endoscopy (4.1 vs 1.7%, p ...

  7. [An Analysis of Perforated Gastric Cancer with Acute Peritonitis in Our Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shinichi; Endo, Shunji; Chinen, Yoshinao; Itakura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Hirotoshi; Tsuda, Yujiro; Ueda, Masami; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Ohta, Katsuya; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Yamada, Terumasa

    2018-01-01

    Perforated gastric cancer is relatively rare and the incidence is reported about 1% of all the cases of gastric cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of the consecutive 12 patients with perforated gastric cancer who underwent operation in our hospital between January 2005 and December 2016. There were 5 men and 7 women, with an average age of 65.8 years old(34-87). Perforated gastric cancer occurred in the region U(1 cases), M(6 cases), L(5 cases). There were 11 cases with distant metastasis. We could successfully diagnosed as perforated gastric cancer in 8 cases before emergency operation. Gastrectomy was performed in 5 cases. However, the curative resection was performed only 1 case. Prognosis of perforated gastric cancer is poor. We considered as an appropriate two-step surgical strategy that the first step of surgery is an acute peritonitis treatment followed by radical gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy.

  8. NME2 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells to limit metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-fei Liu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and has a high rate of metastasis. We hypothesize that NME2 (Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase 2, which has previously been considered as an anti-metastatic gene, plays a role in the invasiveness of gastric cancer cells. Using a tissue chip technology and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that NME2 expression was associated with levels of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and their metastasis into the lymph nodes. When the NME2 gene product was over-expressed by ;in vitro stable transfection, cells from BGC823 and MKN45 gastric cancer cell lines had reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion through the collagen matrix, suggesting an inhibitory activity of NME2 in the propagation and invasion of gastric cancer. NME2 could, therefore, severe as a risk marker for gastric cancer invasiveness and a potential new target for gene therapy to enhance or induce NME2 expression.

  9. Will Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood Alter the Risk of Developing Gastric Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Bourke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen for gastric cancer. It is estimated that there is between a two- and sixfold increase in the risk of developing gastric cancer among infected patients. Among different populations, the risk of H pylori-infected individuals developing gastric cancer varies greatly. However, on a worldwide scale, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, H pylori eradication could help prevent up to three to four million gastric cancer deaths per year. H pylori is usually acquired in childhood. Because infected children have not harboured the organism for long enough to have developed precancerous lesions, childhood is theoretically an attractive time for H pylori eradication and, thus, could help prevent gastric cancer later in life. However, as H pylori prevalence and the incidence of gastric cancer are falling rapidly in developed nations, widespread population screening programs aimed at the eradication of H pylori in these countries would be enormously expensive. Therefore, except in groups with a high risk for development of gastric cancer (eg, Japanese or those with a strong positive family history of gastric cancer, a population-based test-and-treat policy is not justified.

  10. Laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Hisahiro; Okabe, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Hisashi; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Hisamori, Shigeo; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy has recently become accepted as a surgical option for early gastric cancer in the distal stomach, but laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) has not become widespread because of technical difficulties of esophagojejunal anastomosis and splenic hilar lymphadenectomy. Splenic hilar lymphadenectomy should be employed in the treatment of advanced proximal gastric cancer to complete D2 dissection, but laparoscopically it is technically difficult even for skilled surgeons. Based on the evidence that prophylactic combined resection of spleen in total gastrectomy increased the risk of postoperative morbidity with no survival impact, surgeons have preferred laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) for advanced tumors without metastasis to splenic hilar nodes or invasion to the greater curvature of the stomach, and reports with LSPL have been increasing rather than LTG with splenectomy. In this paper, recent reports with laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy were reviewed.

  11. [PMU therapy of recurrent gastric cancer. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, S; Yonemura, Y; Matsuki, N; Miyata, R; Noto, H; Sakuma, H; Yagi, M; Sawa, T; Ogino, S; Miyazaka, I

    1986-03-01

    A 56-year-old woman with recurrent gastric cancer treated with PMU therapy, combined CDDP 75 mg/m2 i.v. MMC 10 mg/body i.v. and UFT 400mg/body/2 alpha/day p.o., was reported. She was admitted because of cervical lymph node swelling and abdominal tumor (para-aorta lymph node swelling). She was treated two times with this therapy and induced into complete remission. The serum CEA level, more than 500 ng/ml before the treatment, was reduced to 6.7 ng/ml after treatment. She has currently been free of disease for more than four weeks. We conclude that this PMU therapy is extremely effective for indurable gastric cancer.

  12. [Patients with gastric cancer submitted to gastrectomy: an integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Bruna Schroeder; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Luzia, Melissa de Freitas

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the scientific production about patients with gastric cancer submitted to gastrectomy and describe important aspects of nursing guidelines for these patients. An integrative review was carried out using Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) databases; twenty two articles were analyzed. Retrospective cross-sectional studies were the most frequent. The scientific production of nursing is numerically small in relation to the medical area. The results show that approaches related to pre and post-operative in gastrectomy for gastric cancer resection subsidize the knowledge of issues essential for nurses to promote efficient intervention for the recovery of such patients. There is still the need for further research on the practice of nursing in the guidelines of this kind of surgery.

  13. Pilot study of human recombinant interferon gamma and accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Edward G.; Deming, Richard L.; Creagan, Edward T.; Nair, Suresh; Su, John Q.; Levitt, Ralph; Steen, Preston D.; Wiesenfeld, Martin; Mailliard, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Gamma interferon has a wide range of properties, including the ability to sensitize solid tumor cells to the effects of ionizing radiation. The North Central Cancer Treatment Group has previously completed pilot studies of accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy (AHTRT) in patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This Phase I study was designed to assess the toxicity of concomitant gamma interferon and AHTRT in a similar patient population. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and May 1992, 18 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B NSCLC were treated with daily gamma interferon (0.2 mg subcutaneously) concomitant with AHTRT (60 Gy given in 1.5 Gy twice daily fractions). All patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1 with weight loss < 5%. Eight patients had Stage IIIA and 10 had Stage IIIB disease. Results: Nine patients (50%) experienced severe, life-threatening, or fatal toxicities. Eight of the patients (44%) developed significant radiation pneumonitis, which was severe in six patients and fatal in two patients (11% treatment-related mortality). Two patients (11%) developed severe radiation esophagitis. With follow-up of 15-21 months, 2 patients are alive, and 16 have died. The median survival time and 1-year survival rate is 7.8 months and 38%, respectively. Conclusion: Gamma interferon appeared to sensitize normal lung tissue to the effects of radiation, as demonstrated by the high incidence of severe or fatal radiation pneumonitis. We do not recommend pursuing gamma interferon as a radiosensitizer in this setting

  14. Phase I study of cisplatin analogue nedaplatin, paclitaxel, and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    The standard treatment of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer is concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients in good general condition, but where the optimal chemotherapeutic regimen has not been determined. Patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel on day 1 every 4 weeks for 3-4 cycles and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions for 6 weeks) starting on day 1. The dose of paclitaxel was escalated from 120 mg/m 2 in level 1, 135 mg/m 2 in level 2 to 150 mg/m 2 in level 3. A total of 18 patients (14 males and 4 females, with a median age of 62.5 years) were evaluated in this study. Full cycles of chemotherapy were administered in 83% of patients in level 1, and in 50% of patients in levels 2 and 3. No more than 50% of patients developed grade 4 neutropenia. Transient grade 3 esophagitis and infection were noted in one patient, and unacceptable pneumonitis was noted in three (17%) patients, two of whom died of the toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), evaluated in 15 patients, noted in one of the six patients in level 1, three of the six patients in level 2 and one of the three patients in level 3. One DLT at level 2 developed later as radiation pneumonitis. Thus, the maximum tolerated dose was determined to be level 1. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 67% (41-87%) with 12 partial responses. The doses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin could not be escalated as a result of severe pulmonary toxicity. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy in stage 3, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer. Final results of a prospective randomized study of 240 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Glinski, B.; Kowalska, T.; Kulpa, J.; Zawila, K.; Reinfuss, K.; Dymek, P.; Herman, K.; Skolyszewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: to report the results of a prospective randomized study concerning the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of stage III, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer. Material and methods: between 1992 and 1996, 240 patients with stage III, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study, and sequentially randomized to one of the three treatment arms: conventional irradiation, hypo-fractionated irradiation and control group. In the conventional irradiation arm (79 patients), a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in five weeks was delivered to the primary tumor and the mediastinum. In the hypo-fractionated irradiation arm (81 patients), there were two courses of irradiation separated by an interval of four weeks. In each series, patients received 20 Gy in five fractions in five days, in the same treatment volume as the conventional irradiation group. in the control group arm, 80 patients initially did not receive radiotherapy and were only observed. Delayed palliative hypo-fractionated irradiation (20-25 Gy in four to five fractions in four to five days) was given to the primary tumor when major symptoms developed. Results: the two-year actuarial survival rates for patients in the conventional irradiation, hypo-fractionated irradiation and control group arms were 18%, 6% and 0%, with a median survival time of 12 months, nine months and six months respectively. The differences between survival rates were statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Conclusion: although irradiation provides good palliation the results are disappointing. The comparison of conventional and hypo-fractionated irradiation shows an advantage for conventional schedules. (author)

  16. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Oikawa, Hirobumi [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Iwate (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi (Japan); Kanesaka, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Tamamoto, Tetsuro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nara Medical University of Medicine, Nara (Japan); Kosugi, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Kobayashi, Masao [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takayama, Makoto [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takemoto, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Hokkaido (Japan); Imai, Michiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iwata City Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Kosaka, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Yamazaki, Hideya [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+ group and 40% for theILBT– group (P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+ group and 41% for the ILBT– group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for the ILBT+ group and 35% for the ILBT– group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+ group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the need for further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life.

  17. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Oikawa, Hirobumi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kanesaka, Naoto; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Kosugi, Takashi; Hatano, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masao; Ito, Yoshinori; Takayama, Makoto; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Imai, Michiko; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+ group and 40% for theILBT– group (P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+ group and 41% for the ILBT– group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for the ILBT+ group and 35% for the ILBT– group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+ group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the need for further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life

  18. [A case of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer is uncommon, and metastasis of colorectal cancer to the stomach is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic gastric cancer that originated from transverse colon cancer. A 52-year-old woman underwent a left hemicolectomy and D3 lymph node dissection based on a diagnosis of transverse colon cancer. The pathology results were as follows: mucinous adenocarcinoma, type 2, 6 × 11 cm, ss, ly1 v1, pm (-), dm (-), n1 (+), P0, H0, M0, Stage IIIa. The patient received XELOX as postoperative adjuvant therapy for 6 months. One year and 3 months after the left hemicolectomy, gastroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach and an incipient cancer in the cardia of the stomach, and a colonoscopy revealed an incipient cancer in the transverse colon. An endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration biopsy of the submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach was performed. Histology showed that this tumor was a mucinous adenocarcinoma similar to the primary transverse colon cancer, which led to a diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer. Distant metastasis was not detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the incipient gastric cancer was performed, as were distal gastrectomy and partial colectomy. Peritoneal dissemination and para-aortic lymph node recurrence were detected 7 months after the second surgery.

  19. Successful enteral nutrition in the treatment of esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Portanova Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Esophagojejunal fistula is a serious complication after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. This study describes the successful conservative management in 3 gastric cancer patients with esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy using total enteral nutrition. Methods Between January 2004 to December 2008, 588 consecutive patients with a proven diagnosis of gastric cancer were taken to the operation room to try a curative treatment. Of these, 173 underwent to...

  20. Prognostic nutritional index predicts postoperative complications and long-term outcomes of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Deng, Jing-Yu; Ding, Xue-Wei; Ke, Bin; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Ru-Peng; Liang, Han

    2014-08-14

    To investigate the impact of prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on the postoperative complications and long-term outcomes in gastric cancer patients undergoing total gastrectomy. The data for 386 patients with gastric cancer were extracted and analyzed between January 2003 and December 2008 in our center. The patients were divided into two groups according to the cutoff value of the PNI: those with a PNI ≥ 46 and those with a PNI gastric cancer patients.

  1. Mutation analysis of the negative regulator cyclin G2 in gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclin G2 is an unconventional cyclin which might have a potential negative role in carcinogenesis. In this study, the effect of cyclin G2 overexpression on gastric cell proliferation and expression levels of cyclin G2 in normal gastric cells and gastric cancer cells were investigated. Moreover, mutation analysis was performed ...

  2. Rising trends of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer in the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, A; Baron, J H

    2010-10-01

    The risk of dying from gastric cancer appears to have increased among consecutive generations born during the 19th century. To follow the time trends of hospitalization for gastric cancer and test whether they confirm such increase. Inpatient records of the last two centuries from four hospitals in Scotland and three US hospitals were analysed. Proportional rates of hospitalization for gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer were calculated during consecutive 5-year periods. The data from all seven cities revealed strikingly similar patterns. No hospital admissions for gastric cancer or peptic ulcer were recorded prior to 1800. Hospital admissions for gastric cancer increased in an exponential fashion throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. In a majority of cities, the rise in hospitalization for gastric cancer preceded a similar rise in hospitalization for gastric ulcer. Hospitalization for these two latter diagnoses clearly preceded hospitalization for duodenal ulcer by 20-40 years. The occurrence of gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer markedly increased during the 19th century. Improvements in hygiene may have resulted in the decline of infections by other gastrointestinal organisms that had previously kept concomitant infection by Helicobacter pylori suppressed. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satomura, Kisaku; Inamoto, Shun; Honda, Kazuo; Takahashi, Masaji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-12-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer were reported. One hundred and five cases of gastric cancer were treated by intraoperative radiotherapy. Whatever the stage of the patient was, 3-year survival rate was found to be better in the radiotherapy group than that of the control group (treated surgical resection only). Five year survival rate of the stages III and IV in the radiotherapy group was better than the control group. Unfavorable side effects were observed in 4 cases out of 105 cases. In one case, penetration of postoperative peptic ulcer into the irradiated aortic wall was found by autopsy. Two cases of bile duct stenosis and one case of ileus due to acutely developed peritonitis carcinomatosa were experienced. In conclusion, intraoperative radiotherapy immediately after surgical resection for the treatment of gastric cancer was found to be an effective method. The most effective application of the method appears to be to cases of stage II and III without liver metastasis and peritoneal disseminations (H/sub 0/P/sub 0/, M, A).

  5. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Treatment in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose L.; Ciervide, Raquel; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Miguel, Inigo; Arbea, Leire; Aristu, J. Javier; Chopitea, Ana; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Valenti, Victor; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Sola, Jesus J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the rate of pathologic response in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy with and without chemoradiation at our institution. Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2007 patients were retrospectively identified who received preoperative treatment for gastric cancer (cT3-4/ N+) with induction chemotherapy (Ch) or with Ch followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy in 5 weeks) (ChRT). Surgery was planned 4-6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Pathologic assessment was used to investigate the patterns of pathologic response after neoadjuvant treatment. Results: Sixty-one patients were analyzed. Of 61 patients, 58 (95%) underwent surgery. The R0 resection rate was 87%. Pathologic complete response was achieved in 12% of the patients. A major pathologic response (<10% of residual tumor) was observed in 53% of patients, and T downstaging was observed in 75%. Median follow-up was 38.7 months. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 36.5 months. The only patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factor associated with pathologic response was the use of preoperative ChRT. Patients achieving major pathologic response had a 3-year actuarial DFS rate of 63%. Conclusions: The patterns of pathologic response after preoperative ChRT suggest encouraging intervals of DFS. Such a strategy may be of interest to be explored in gastric cancer.

  6. Breast cancer biomarkers predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has long been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and more recently with premenopausal breast cancer risk. We previously observed that nipple aspirate fluid (n levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA were associated with obesity. Serum (s levels of adiponectin are lower in women with higher body mass index (BMI and with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective study of obese women who underwent gastric bypass surgery to determine: 1 change in n- and s-adiponectin and nPSA after surgery and 2 if biomarker change is related to change in BMI. Samples (30-s, 28-n and BMI were obtained from women 0, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Findings There was a significant increase after surgery in pre- but not postmenopausal women at all time points in s-adiponectin and at 3 and 6 months in n-adiponectin. Low n-PSA and high s-adiponectin values were highly correlated with decrease in BMI from baseline. Conclusions Adiponectin increases locally in the breast and systemically in premenopausal women after gastric bypass. s-adiponectin in pre- and nPSA in postmenopausal women correlated with greater weight loss. This study provides preliminary evidence for biologic markers to predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery.

  7. Diagnostic and prognostic value of peritoneal immunocytology in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Cosimelli, M; Tedesco, M; Giannarelli, D; Vasselli, S; Carlini, M; Garofalo, A; Natali, P G

    1998-10-01

    Among the clinical factors with a pivotal role in the prediction of outcome for patients with gastric cancer, intraperitoneal (i.p.) microscopic dissemination may represent an important cause of recurrences, even in the early stages of the disease. In this context, the cytologic examination of intraoperative peritoneal washings may be essential to identify metastatic free cells, although a number of false-negative cases may be encountered. To determine whether immunocytochemical (ICC) methods that used a panel of three monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), B72.3, AR3, and BD5, directed to gastric cancer-associated antigens can improve peritoneal cytology by providing more accurate prognostic indications, we immunocytochemically and morphologically evaluated 144 peritoneal washings sampled from patients surgically treated for gastric cancer. The ICC analysis allowed the identification of metastatic free peritoneal cells in 35% of the patients, with a 14% improvement over routine cytopathology (P < .0001). Furthermore, a 54-month survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier curves showed a statistically significant decrease in overall survival (OS) in patients with stages I through III disease with peritoneal microscopic disease detected morphologically and/or by ICC at the time of the primary surgery. Our data indicate that the use of a combination of selected MoAbs may allow the identification of cytologically false-negative cases that provide valuable prognostic information. This may be useful to stratify patients on more adequate therapeutic trials.

  8. Pathohistological classification systems in gastric cancer: diagnostic relevance and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlth, Felix; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Drebber, Uta; Hoelscher, Arnulf H; Moenig, Stefan

    2014-05-21

    Several pathohistological classification systems exist for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Many studies have investigated the correlation between the pathohistological characteristics in gastric cancer and patient characteristics, disease specific criteria and overall outcome. It is still controversial as to which classification system imparts the most reliable information, and therefore, the choice of system may vary in clinical routine. In addition to the most common classification systems, such as the Laurén and the World Health Organization (WHO) classifications, other authors have tried to characterize and classify gastric cancer based on the microscopic morphology and in reference to the clinical outcome of the patients. In more than 50 years of systematic classification of the pathohistological characteristics of gastric cancer, there is no sole classification system that is consistently used worldwide in diagnostics and research. However, several national guidelines for the treatment of gastric cancer refer to the Laurén or the WHO classifications regarding therapeutic decision-making, which underlines the importance of a reliable classification system for gastric cancer. The latest results from gastric cancer studies indicate that it might be useful to integrate DNA- and RNA-based features of gastric cancer into the classification systems to establish prognostic relevance. This article reviews the diagnostic relevance and the prognostic value of different pathohistological classification systems in gastric cancer.

  9. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1 is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6% atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  10. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Ji, Jiajia; Qian, Qirong; Lu, Lungeng; Fu, Hualin; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1) is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6%) atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  11. Synergistic immuno photothermal nanotherapy (SYMPHONY) to treat unresectable and metastatic cancers and produce and cancer vaccine effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Inman, Brant; Maccarini, Paolo; Palmer, Gregory; Liu, Yang

    2018-02-01

    Biocompatible gold nanostars (GNS) with tip-enhanced electromagnetic and optical properties have been developed and applied for multifunctional cancer diagnostics and therapy (theranostics). Their multiple sharp branches acting like "lightning rods" can convert safely and efficiently light into heat. As with other nanoparticles, GNS sizes can be controlled so that they passively accumulate in tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect of tumor vasculature. This feature improves tumor-targeting precision and permits the use of reduced laser energy required to destroy the targeted cancer cells. The ability to selectively heat tumor areas where GNS are located while keeping surrounding healthy tissues at significantly lower temperatures offers significant advantages over other thermal therapies. GNS-mediated photothermal therapy combined with checkpoint immunotherapy was shown to reverse tumor-mediated immunosuppression, leading to the treatment of not only primary tumors but also cancer metastasis as well as inducing effective long-lasting immunity, i.e. an anticancer `vaccine' effect.

  12. Probing the O-glycoproteome of Gastric Cancer Cell Lines for Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira Campos, Diana Alexandra; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana

    2015-01-01

    biomarker assays. However, the current knowledge of secreted and circulating O-glycoproteins is limited. Here, we used the COSMC KO "SimpleCell" (SC) strategy to characterize the O-glycoproteome of two gastric cancer SC lines (AGS, MKN45) as well as a gastric cell line (KATO III) which naturally expresses...... at least partially truncated O-glycans. Overall we identified 499 O-glycoproteins and 1,236 O-glycosites in gastric cancer SCs, and a total 47 O-glycoproteins and 73 O-glycosites in the KATO III cell line. We next modified the glycoproteomic strategy to apply it to pools of sera from gastric cancer...... with the STn glycoform were further validated as being expressed in gastric cancer tissue. A proximity ligation assay was used to demonstrate that CD44 was expressed with the STn glycoform in gastric cancer tissues. The study provides a discovery strategy for aberrantly glycosylated O-glycoproteins and a set...

  13. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  14. Direct costs associated with the disease management of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompen, Marjolein; Gok, Murat; Novák, Annoesjka; van Wuijtswinkel, Rob; Biesma, Bonne; Schramel, Franz; Stigt, Jos; Smit, Hans; Postmus, Pieter

    2009-04-01

    Disease management and costs of treatment of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands are not well known. A retrospective medical chart review was performed by collecting data from the time of diagnosis until the time of death or the end of the evaluation period. In addition to the demographic data, information was collected on the overall management of the patient. Hospital resource utilisation data collected included number of outpatient specialist visits, number and length of hospitalisation, type and number of diagnostic and laboratory procedures, type and number of radiotherapy cycles and detailed information on chemotherapy. To evaluate the economic impact of second-line treatment, a distinction was made between patients who received only best supportive care (BSC, group A) and those who received chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in addition to BSC (group B). The study was performed from the hospital perspective and reports on 2005 costs. Of 102 patients, 74 belonged to group A and 28 to group B. Patient management included a multidisciplinary approach, the extent of which depended on symptoms of the disease and presence of metastases. The average total treatment cost per patient per year of unresectable advanced NSCLC in The Netherlands was euro32,840 in group A and euro31,187 in group B. In both groups, hospitalisation was the major cost driver. In group B second-line chemotherapy was the second largest contributor of the costs. In spite of the difference in numbers of treatment lines provided to patients in groups A and B the total average costs per patient per year were comparable. Overall, the management of unresectable advanced NSCLC appeared to conform with current guidelines in The Netherlands. These patients show high medical resource consumption, with hospitalisation being the main cost driver in both groups. As economic arguments are becoming increasingly important in medical decision making on

  15. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  16. [Three Cases of Unresectable, Advanced, and Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Associated with Gastrointestinal Obstruction That Were Treated with Small Intestine-Transverse Colon Bypass Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Arika; Miyaki, Akira; Miyauchi, Tatsuomi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-11-01

    Herein, we report 3cases of unresectable, advanced, and recurrent colorectal cancer associated with gastrointestinal obstruction. The patients were treated with small intestine-transverse colon bypass surgery, which improved the quality of life (QOL)in all cases. Case 1 was an 80-year-old woman who presented with subileus due to ascending colon cancer. After surgery, her oral intake was reestablished, and she was discharged home. Case 2 was an 89-year-old woman whose ileus was caused by cecal cancer with multiple hepatic metastases. After surgery, the patient was discharged to a care facility. Case 3 was an 83-year-old man whose ileus was caused by a local recurrence and small intestine infiltration after surgery for rectosigmoid cancer. He underwent surgery after a colonic stent was inserted. His oral intake was re-established and he was discharged home. Small bowel-transverse colon bypass surgery can be used to manage various conditions rostral to the transverse colon. It is still possible to perform investigations in patients whose general condition is poorer than that of patients who undergo resection of the primary lesion. This avoids creating an artificial anus and allows continuation of oral intake, which are useful for improving QOL in terminal cases.

  17. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (US)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED >= 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted.

  18. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED ≥ 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted

  19. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Line

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  20. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Kalnina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  1. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  2. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Ohi, Hiromi; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Shibahara, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Tanida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl 2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl 2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results indicate that [PdCl 2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications

  3. ERC/mesothelin is expressed in human gastric cancer tissues and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomoaki; Kajino, Kazunori; Abe, Masaaki; Sato, Koichi; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Sakurada, Mutsumi; Orita, Hajime; Wada, Ryo; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Hino, Okio

    2014-01-01

    ERC/mesothelin is expressed in mesothelioma and other malignancies. The ERC/mesothelin gene (MSLN) encodes a 71-kDa precursor protein, which is cleaved to yield 31-kDa N-terminal (N-ERC/mesothelin) and 40-kDa C-terminal (C-ERC/mesothelin) proteins. N-ERC/mesothelin is a soluble protein and has been reported to be a diagnostic serum marker of mesothelioma and ovarian cancer. Gastric cancer tissue also expresses C-ERC/mesothelin, but the significance of serum N-ERC levels for diagnosing gastric cancer has not yet been studied. We examined the latter issue in the present study as well as C-ERC/mesothelin expression in human gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. We immunohistochemically examined C-ERC/mesothelin expression in tissue samples from 50 cases of gastric cancer, and we also assessed the C-ERC/mesothelin expression in 6 gastric cancer cell lines (MKN-1, MKN-7, MKN-74, NUGC-3, NUGC-4 and TMK-1) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. We also examined the N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations in the supernatants of cultured cells and in the sera of gastric cancer patients using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). N-ERC/mesothelin was detected in the supernatants of 3 gastric cancer cell lines (MKN-1, NUGC-4 and TMK-1) by ELISA, but its concentration in the sera of gastric cancer patients was almost same as that observed in the sera of the normal controls. In the gastric cancer tissues, C-ERC/mesothelin expression was associated with lymphatic invasion. N-ERC/mesothelin was secreted into the supernatants of gastric cancer cell lines, but does not appear to be a useful serum marker of gastric cancer.

  4. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future.Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern.We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Titer and Gastric Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The “ABC method” is a serum gastric cancer screening method, and the subjects were divided based on H. pylori serology and atrophic gastritis as detected by serum pepsinogen (PG: Group A [H. pylori (− PG (−], Group B [H. pylori (+ PG (−], Group C [H. pylori (+ PG (+], and Group D [H. pylori (− PG (+]. The risk of gastric cancer is highest in Group D, followed by Groups C, B, and A. Groups B, C, and D are advised to undergo endoscopy, and the recommended surveillance is every three years, every two years, and annually, respectively. In this report, the reported results with respect to further risk stratification by anti-H. pylori antibody titer in each subgroup are reviewed: (1 high-negative antibody titer subjects in Group A, representing posteradicated individuals with high risk for intestinal-type cancer; (2 high-positive antibody titer subjects in Group B, representing active inflammation with high risk for diffuse-type cancer; and (3 low-positive antibody titer subjects in Group C, representing advanced atrophy with increased risk for intestinal-type cancer. In these subjects, careful follow-up with intervals of surveillance of every three years in (1, every two years in (2, and annually in (3 should be considered.

  6. Comparison of Outcomes for Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Induction Chemotherapy Followed By Concurrent Chemoradiation vs. Concurrent Chemoradiation Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Liao Zhongxing; Cox, James D.; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melinda; Borghero, Yerko; Wei Xiong; Fossella, Frank; Herbst, Roy S.; Blumenschein, George R.; Moran, Cesar; Allen, Pamela K.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare outcomes for patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated at our institution with concurrent chemoradiation with or without induction chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 265 consecutive patients who received definitive treatment with three-dimensional conformal radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. Of these, 127 patients received induction chemotherapy before concurrent chemoradiation. Results: The two groups of patients (with induction vs. without induction chemotherapy) were similar in age, performance status, weight loss, histology, grade, and stage. Patients who received induction chemotherapy had better overall survival (median, 1.9 vs. 1.4 years; 5-year rate, 25% vs. 12%; p < 0.001) and distant metastasis-free survival (5-year rate, 42% vs. 23%; p = 0.021). Locoregional control was not significantly different between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that induction chemotherapy was the most significant factor affecting overall survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.40-0.75; p < 0.001). A planned subgroup analysis showed that induction chemotherapy was associated with a significant overall survival benefit for patients with adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma (5-year rate, 24% vs. 8%; p = 0.003) but not for those with squamous cell carcinoma. A multivariate analysis of patients with adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma confirmed that induction chemotherapy was the most significant factor associated with better overall survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.47 (95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.78; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Our retrospective analysis suggests that in combination with concurrent chemoradiation, induction chemotherapy may provide a small but significant survival benefit for patients with unresectable locally advanced adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma of the lung

  7. Current approaches to gastric cancer in Peru and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Erlan

    2017-01-01

    In Peru, the incidence of gastric cancer is reported to be around 15.8 per 100,000 inhabitants and it is the second most common oncological disease in men and the third one in women. Additionally, a high mortality index was reported, especially among poor people. To address this issue, in 2008, Peru initiated several insurance treatment plans of oncological diseases with promising results. In Mexico, there is a high predominance of gastric cancer in male gender compared to female gender, even reaching a 2/1 ratio, and the detection rate of early gastric cancer is low (10% to 20%) which results in a mainly palliative treatment with an overall survival rate in 5 years about 10% to 15% only. In Peru, the average age at diagnosis is around 62.96±14.75 years old and the most frequent symptoms includes abdominal pain, indigestion, loss of appetite, weight loss and gastrointestinal bleeding, while in Mexico, some studies reported an average age at diagnosis around 60.3±4.1 years old (range, 23-78 years old) and the most frequent symptoms were postprandial fullness (74.4%), abdominal pain (37.2%), weight loss (18.6%), and melena (4.6%). The anemia rate was 65.1% with a mean Hb level of 6.14 g/dL. In Peru, the most common gastric cancer type is the intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (around 34%), followed by the diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (18.7%), whilst among Mexicans, the diffuse-type was reported in 55.2% of cases, the intestinal-type was reported in 28.2% and the undifferentiated-type corresponded to 6%. In both, Peru and Mexico, 90% of the associated factors includes tabaquismo, diets rich in salt, smoked foods, and a sedentary lifestyle. Family inheritance and advanced age and pharmacological-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection are also important. Poverty has been heavily associated with a higher incidence of gastric cancer. The management of gastric cancer patients in Peru is carried out by general surgeons or general surgical oncologists. In recent years, efforts

  8. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  9. Comparison of patients by family history with gastric and non-gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-Fu; He, Yu-Long; Song, Wu; Peng, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Chang-Hua; Li, Wen; Wu, Hui

    2009-06-07

    To compare the gastric cancer (GC) patients by their family history with gastric and non-GC. Positive family histories within second-degree relatives and clinicopathological features were obtained for 256 patients. Of the 256 probands, 112 (76 male, 36 female) were incorporated into familial GC (FGC) group: at least two GC members; 144 (98 male, 46 female) were included in the non-FGC group (relatives only affected with non-GCs). Of 399 tumors in relatives (181 from FGC against 212 from non-FGC), GC was the most frequent, followed by esophageal, hepatocellular, and colorectal cancer. Nasopharyngeal cancer was next to lung cancer but prior to breast and urogenital cancers. Most affected members aggregated within first-degree relatives (FGC: 66 siblings, 48 fathers, 31 mothers, four offspring; non-FGC: 56 fathers, 55 siblings, 43 mothers, and 15 offspring). The ratio of males to females in affected first-degree relatives was usually higher in male probands. Paternal history of GC was a slight risk for GC in males (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.53-2.69), while risk of GC by maternal history of non-GCs was increased in females (OR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.22-0.97). Diffuse-GC was the major histological type in all subgroups. Difference in tumor sites between the two groups was derived from an excess of upper sites in non-FGC female probands. Distribution of associated non-GCs in a family history of GC may vary with geographic areas. GC may have different genetic and/or environmental etiology in different families, and a certain subtype may be inherited in a female-influenced fashion.

  10. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 and Low-Dose Cisplatin for Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kubota, Tetsuro; Kumagai, Koshi; Nakamura, Rieko; Kumai, Koichiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The results of a pilot study using S-1/low-dose cisplatin/radiotherapy led us to hypothesize that the initial chemoradiotherapy regimen would induce a 70% efficacy rate with a 10% pathologic complete response rate. Patients and Methods: Only patients with unresectable or incurable advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The patients received induction S-1 and cisplatin therapy with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Results: Of the 30 patients recruited and assessed, 29 were eligible for clinical evaluation of measurable lesions. The response rate was 65.5%, with 19 with a partial response, 8 with no change, and 2 with progressive disease of 29 patients. Of the 30 patients recruited, 10 (33.3%) underwent stomach resection and D2 LN dissections. The pathologic complete response rate was 13.3% (4 patients), and the R0 resection rate was 100% (10 patients). The survival analysis showed a median survival time of 25 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 66.7% for leukocytopenia, 33.3% for thrombocytopenia, 23.3% for nausea and appetite loss, and 6.7% for anemia, diarrhea, and renal dysfunction. Although all the patients had been hospitalized with a poor performance status with a giant tumor, 97% (29 of 30) could be discharged after the first cycle, resulting in an improvement in quality of life. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy could be a powerful regimen for controlling tumor progression in advanced gastric cancer, improving patients' quality of life with tolerable toxicity. A complete histologic response rate of >10% would be expected, even for large tumors with metastatic lesions

  11. Importance of early nutritional screening in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Cecilia; Colatruglio, Silvia; Sironi, Alessandro; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between nutritional status, disease stage and quality of life (QoL) in 100 patients recently diagnosed with gastric carcinoma. The patients' nutritional status was investigated with anthropometric, biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables; and we also evaluated the nutritional risk with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Oncological staging was standard. QoL was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire. The statistical correlation between nutritional risk score (NRS) and oncological characteristics or QoL was evaluated using both univariable and multivariable analyses. Weight loss and reduction of food intake were the most frequent pathological nutritional indicators, while biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables were in the normal range. According to NRS, thirty-six patients were malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Patients with NRS ≥ 3 presented a significantly greater percentage of stage IV gastric cancer and pathological values of C-reactive protein, while no correlation was found with the site of tumour. NRS was negatively associated with QoL (P gastric cancer malnutrition is frequent at diagnosis and this is likely due to reduction in food intake. Moreover, NRS is directly correlated with tumour stage and inversely correlated with QoL, which makes it a useful tool to identify patients in need of an early nutritional intervention during oncological treatments.

  12. Occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids in atrophic gastritis during prospective long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Purchiaroni, Flaminia; Corleto, Vito D; Di Giulio, Emilio; Annibale, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) is a risk condition for gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids. Recent studies assessing the overall risk of gastric cancer and carcinoids in AG at long-term follow up are lacking. This study aimed to investigate in a prospective cohort of AG patients the occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids at long-term follow up. A total of 200 AG patients from a prospective cohort (67% female, median age 55 years) with a follow up of 7.5 (range: 4-23.4) years were included. Inclusion criteria were presence of AG and at least one follow-up gastroscopy with biopsies at ≥4 years after AG diagnosis. Follow-up gastroscopies at 4-year intervals were performed. Overall, 22 gastric neoplastic lesions were detected (crude incidence 11%). Gastric cancer was diagnosed in four patients at a median follow up of 7.2 years (crude incidence 2%). Eleven type I gastric carcinoids were detected at a median follow up of 5.1 years (crude incidence of 5.5%). In seven patients, six low-grade and one high-grade dysplasia were found. The annual incidence rate person-year were 0.25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.067-0.63%), 0.43% (95% CI: 0.17-0.89%), and 0.68% (95% CI: 0.34-1.21%) for gastric cancer, dysplasia, and type I-gastric carcinoids, respectively. The incidence rates of gastric cancer and carcinoids were not different (p = 0.07). This study shows an annual incidence rate of 1.36% person-year for gastric neoplastic lesions in AG patients at long-term follow up. AG patients are similarly exposed to gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alexandre Andrade Dos Anjos; Lima, Enaldo Melo de; Kazzi, Ana Izabela; Chaves, Gabriela Freitas; Mendonça, Diego Cavalheiro de; Maciel, Marina Mara; Santos, José Sebastião Dos

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  14. High rates of advanced gastric cancer in community of Flushing, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinani, Amreen; Desai, Amit; Kohn, Nina; Gutkin, Ellen; Nussbaum, Michel; Somnay, Kaumudi

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer remains a major public health issue and is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 600,000 deaths annually. Over the last decades, there has been a steady decline in the incidence rates of gastric cancer. Furthermore, the incidence rates of gastric cancer in different parts of the country vary due to epidemiological and migration trends. Despite these trends, several studies that have continued to observe high rates of gastric cancer in populations that come from high-risk regions. The aim of the study was to describe the gastric cancer patients presenting NYHQ with an emphasis on those presenting at a young age and advanced disease. A subanalysis of the Asian population was also done, which is considered a high-risk group. Consecutive chart review of patients admitted with gastric cancer from January 2000 to August 2008 was extracted from the Oncology registry at NYHQ. Parameters that were evaluated were age, sex, race, type of gastric cancer, and stage of gastric cancer at initial presentation. The SAS/PC software package (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was employed for statistical analyses. Four hundred fifty-seven patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer. Approximately one third of the total patients were younger than 60 years of age. Of the Asian patients, almost half the patients (48.8%) had advanced disease of which two thirds were under the age of 60 years. The rates of advanced gastric cancer observed at NYHQ are significant and comparable to recent epidemiology literature on rates in Asian populations in Asia. Communities, like Flushing, NY, may benefit from early detection of gastric cancers, similar to those instituted in Japan and Taiwan.

  15. Gene Expression Signature Analysis Identifies Vorinostat as a Candidate Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, KyoungHyun; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Mills, Gordon B.; Cho, Jae Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer–specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A) whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. Conclusions/Significance We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment. PMID:21931799

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation in the Management of Unresectable Bile Duct and Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Palliation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Figueroa-Barojas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA has replaced photodynamic therapy for premalignant and malignant lesions of the esophagus. However, there is limited experience in the bile duct. The objective of this pilot study was to assess the safety and efficacy of RFA in malignant biliary strictures. Methods: Twenty patients with unresectable malignant biliary strictures underwent RFA with stenting between June 2010 and July 2012. Diameters of the stricture before and after RFA, immediate and 30 day complications and stent patency were recorded prospectively. Results. A total of 25 strictures were treated. Mean stricture length treated was 15.2 mm (SD = 8.7 mm, Range = 3.5–33 mm. Mean stricture diameter before RFA was 1.7 mm (SD = 0.9 mm, Range = 0.5–3.4 mm while the mean diameter after RFA was 5.2 mm (SD = 2 mm, Range = 2.6–9 mm. There was a significant increase of 3.5 mm (t = 10.8, DF = 24, P value = <.0001 in the bile duct diameter post RFA. Five patients presented with pain after the procedure, but only one developed mild post-ERCP pancreatitis and cholecystitis. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation can be a safe palliation option for unresectable malignant biliary strictures. A multicenter randomized controlled trial is required to confirm the long term benefits of RFA and stenting compared to stenting alone.

  17. Gastric cancer in young people under 30 years of age: worse prognosis, or delay in diagnosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Basave, Horacio Noé; Morales-Vásquez, Flavia; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Manuel; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Vela-Sarmiento, Itzel; Ruan, Javier Melchor; Rosciano, Alejandro E Padilla; Calderillo-Ruiz, German; Díaz-Romero, Consuelo; Herrera-Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo A

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease with nonspecific early symptoms. Its incidence and prognosis in young patients has shown considerable variability. Our objective was to retrospectively study patients from our institution aged <30 years with gastric carcinoma. The study was undertaken to describe the experience of gastric cancer in this population, and to demonstrate its specific clinical and pathological characteristics. We reviewed the cases of histologically confirmed gastric cancer between 1985 and 2006 at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of Mexico (INCan); emphasis in our review was placed on clinical presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic intervention, pathology, and the results. Thirty cases of gastric carcinoma were reviewed. The patients’ median age was 27 years (range, 18–30 years) and the male:female ratio was 1:1. Gastric cancer exhibits different behavior in patients aged, 30 years, but delay in diagnosis and the tumor’s behavior appear to be the most important factors in prognosis of the disease

  18. Development of representative models for the study of gastric cancer and evaluation of potential antitumor agents in primary gastric cancer cells and gastric metastasis in liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Chaves, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer has been the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and the leading cause of death by tumors in Costa Rica, the survival of patients is limited by difficulties in diagnosis and the lack of therapeutic options to improve life expectancy. The study has conducted a number of research models that will allow in the future to better understand the pathology of this tumor and it has evaluated the therapeutic action of naturally occurring in gastric cancer cells. A vivo model of carcinogenesis in stomachs of Wistar rats, has achieved to establish by means of chemical induction with MNNG, in which it has been possible to observe the appearance of tumors in the stratified epithelium flat keratinized starting from week 22 of experiment; while for the 40th week adenomas were observed in the simple cylindrical epithelium. Additionally, the role of Helicobacter pylori was inquired in the development of gastric cancer by inoculation of two strains of bacteria (CagA + and CagA-) in the stomach of Wistar rats, as well as the effect of his administration together with MNNG. However, the results of these models have been limited due to the lack of detection of the bacteria in the stomachs of rats inoculated. In addition, it has established an in vitro model of threedimensional cell culture, which has allowed to reproduce some of the characteristics observed in vivo in the tumors, in this case it was determined that the two gastric cancer cell lines have showed a different behavior, since the cells NCI-N87 from a in metastasis gastric liver were able to form steroids compact whereas AGS cells have been originate from a primary tumor that has formed easily dispersible structures and not compact spheroids. Finally, the effect of natural retinoids ATRA and retinoic acid 13-cis were evaluated, as well as retinamide synthetic retinoid on the viability of the cells AGS and NCI-N87. Cytotoxicity assays using MTT have allowed to observe the reduction of a variation in the

  19. [Diagnostic values of serum type III procollagen N-terminal peptide in type IV gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, S; Fujiki, T; Kanda, Y; Kumai, R; Yoshida, S

    1985-04-01

    Since increased synthesis of collagen has been demonstrated in tissue of type IV gastric cancer, we attempted to distinguish type IV gastric cancer from other cancers by measuring serum levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (type III-N-peptide). Mean serum levels in type IV gastric cancer patients without metastasis were found to be elevated above normal values and developed a tendency to be higher than those in types I, II and III gastric cancer patients without metastasis. Highly positive ratios were found in patients with liver diseases including hepatoma and colon cancer, biliary tract cancer, and esophageal cancer patients with liver, lung or bone metastasis, but only 2 out of 14 of these cancer patients without such metastasis showed positive serum levels of type III-N-peptide. Positive cases in patients with type IV gastric cancer were obtained not only in the group with clinical stage IV but also in the groups with clinical stages II and III. In addition, high serum levels of type III-N-peptide in patients with type IV gastric cancer were seen not only in the cases with liver, lung or bone metastasis but also in cases with disseminated peritoneal metastasis alone. These results suggest that if the serum level of type III-N-peptide is elevated above normal values, type IV gastric cancer should be suspected after ruling out liver diseases, myelofibrosis and liver, lung or bone metastasis.

  20. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  1. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  2. Clinicopathological correlation and prognostic significance of sonic hedgehog protein overexpression in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanyang; Li, Fang; Tang, Bo; Shi, Yan; Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein in gastric cancer, and correlated it with clinicopathological parameters. The prognostic significance of Shh protein was analyzed. Shh protein expression was evaluated in 113 cases of gastric cancer and 60 cases of normal gastric mucosa. The immunoreactivity was scored semi quantitatively as: 0 = absent; 1 = weak; 2 = moderate; and 3 = strong. All cases were further classified into two groups, namely non-overexpression group with score 0 or 1, and overexpression group with score 2 or 3. The overexpression of Shh protein was correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Survival analysis was then performed to determine the Shh protein prognostic significance in gastric cancer. In immunohistochemistry study, nineteen (31.7%) normal gastric mucosa revealed Shh protein overexpression, while eighty-one (71.7%) gastric cancer revealed overexpression. The expression of Shh protein were significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues than in normal gastric mucosa (P overexpression and non-expression groups P = 0.168 and 0.071). However, Shh overexpression emerged as a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.187, P = 0.041). Shh protein expression is upregulated and is statistically correlated with age, tumor differentiation, depth of invasion, pathologic staging, and nodal metastasis. The Shh protein overexpression is a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis in gastric cancer.

  3. Clinical relevance of occult tumor cells in lymph nodes from gastric cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doekhie, F.S.; Mesker, W.H.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Kok, N.F.; Hartgrink, H.H.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Putter, H.; Kuppen, P.J.; Tanke, H.J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2005-01-01

    The current method for staging in gastric cancer is not sufficient as even after a complete primary tumor resection, patients with node-negative gastric cancer suffer from disease recurrence. In this study, the relation between disease recurrence and the presence of occult tumor cells (OTC) in lymph

  4. Helicobacter pylori eradication and gastric cancer: when is the horse out of the barn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. C.; Kuipers, E. J.; Rauws, E. A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who

  5. Apoptosis induced by GanoPoly in human gastric cancer cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate polysaccharide effect on the cultured human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901), DNA ladder, flow cytometry and western blot were used to examine the morpholog, proliferation and apoptosis of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells when they were affected by polysaccharide. Results show that ...

  6. Actionable gene-based classification toward precision medicine in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ichikawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intertumoral heterogeneity represents a significant hurdle to identifying optimized targeted therapies in gastric cancer (GC. To realize precision medicine for GC patients, an actionable gene alteration-based molecular classification that directly associates GCs with targeted therapies is needed. Methods A total of 207 Japanese patients with GC were included in this study. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor tissues were obtained from surgical or biopsy specimens and were subjected to DNA extraction. We generated comprehensive genomic profiling data using a 435-gene panel including 69 actionable genes paired with US Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted therapies, and the evaluation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and microsatellite instability (MSI status. Results Comprehensive genomic sequencing detected at least one alteration of 435 cancer-related genes in 194 GCs (93.7% and of 69 actionable genes in 141 GCs (68.1%. We classified the 207 GCs into four The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA subtypes using the genomic profiling data; EBV (N = 9, MSI (N = 17, chromosomal instability (N = 119, and genomically stable subtype (N = 62. Actionable gene alterations were not specific and were widely observed throughout all TCGA subtypes. To discover a novel classification which more precisely selects candidates for targeted therapies, 207 GCs were classified using hypermutated phenotype and the mutation profile of 69 actionable genes. We identified a hypermutated group (N = 32, while the others (N = 175 were sub-divided into six clusters including five with actionable gene alterations: ERBB2 (N = 25, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B (N = 10, KRAS (N = 10, BRCA2 (N = 9, and ATM cluster (N = 12. The clinical utility of this classification was demonstrated by a case of unresectable GC with a remarkable response to anti-HER2 therapy in the ERBB2 cluster. Conclusions This actionable gene

  7. Apoptosis induced by GanoPoly in human gastric cancer cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... ... cancer's active therapy. Key words: Apoptosis, polysaccharide, human gastric cancer cells. ... The active components of polysaccharides are all glucans, which have a ... for the treatment of alleviated fatigue, night sweating,.

  8. Gastric tumours in hereditary cancer syndromes: clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, María; Aguayo, Cristina; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Gómez-Raposo, César; Zambrana, Francisco; Gómez-López, Miriam; Casado, Enrique

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of them are classified as sporadic, whereas the remaining 10% exhibit familial clustering. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) syndrome is the most important condition that leads to hereditary gastric cancer. However, other hereditary cancer syndromes, such as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, entail a higher risk compared to the general population for developing this kind of neoplasia. In this review, we describe briefly the most important aspects related to clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention in hereditary gastric associated to different cancer syndromes.

  9. Anatomical distribution of peptic ulcer in high incidence gastric cancer area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Alonso Cedeño-Burbano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcer makes reference to the solution of continuity of gastric or duodenal wall beyond muscularis mucosae. Previously, duodenal location was more common than gastric, in a ratio ranging from 2:1 to 4:1. Despite this, after the discovery of the association between peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori, relationship between gastric and duodenal ulcer has spread to the equality. However, in areas with high incidence of gastric cancer, peptic ulcer seems to have a different behavior, existing predominance of gastric ulcer. Department of Cauca is have the highest incidence of gastric cancer in Colombia, with an annual rate of 42.5 /100,000 for males and 28.6 / 100,000 for women; however, it is unknown how peptic ulcer anatomically are distributed. Objective: To determine the anatomical distribution of peptic ulcer at endoscopy service of San José University Hospital of Popayán-Cauca, Colombia 2006-2012. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was realized. Database of endoscopy service of San José University Hospital of Popayán was reviewed and reports with diagnosis of peptic ulcer were studied. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15. Results: Gastric ulcer was more common than duodenal ulcer. Gastric ulcer was more common in men (gastric and duodenal ulcer 1:1. In women duodenal ulcer is 1:1. Conclusion: At endoscopy service of San José University Hospital, gastric ulcer is more common than duodenal ulcer, with differences in gender, as in other areas with high incidence of gastric cancer. That fact are suggests in current literature could be related with the presence of stumps of Helicobacter pylori with combined virulence for cancer and ulcer at gastric level seems to be related to the presence in the medium of common virulence strains of Helicobacter pylori for stomach cancer and ulcer gastric, although the current literature is unclear about it, and still needs more validations.

  10. Enhanced gastric cancer growth potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from gastric cancer tissues educated by CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongman; Zhao, Xiangdong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Bin; Sun, Li; Xu, Changgen; Shen, Bo; Wang, Mei; Xu, Wenrong; Zhu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Gastric cancer mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) can promote the development of tumour growth. The tumour-promoting role of tumour-associated MSCs and T cells has been demonstrated. T cells as the major immune cells may influence and induce a pro-tumour phenotype in MSCs. This study focused on whether CD4 + T cells can affect GC-MSCs to promote gastric cancer growth. CD4 + T cells upregulation of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in GC-MSCs through the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT3) signalling pathway was confirmed by immunofluorescence, western blotting and RT-PCR. Migration of GC cells was detected by Transwell migration assay, and apoptosis of GC cells was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide double staining. CD4 + T cell-primed GC-MSCs promoted GC growth in a subcutaneously transplanted tumour model in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Gastric cancer mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by activated CD4 + T cells promoted migration of GC cells and enhanced GC growth potential in BALB/c nu/nu xenografts. PD-L1 upregulation of GC-MSCs stimulated by CD4 + T cells was mediated through the p-STAT3 signalling pathway. CD4 + T cells-primed GC-MSCs have greater GC volume and growth rate-promoting role than GC-MSCs, with cancer cell-intrinsic PD-1/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling activation. This study showed that GC-MSCs are plastic. The immunophenotype of GC-MSCs stimulated by CD4 + T cells has major changes that may influence tumour cell growth. This research was based on the interaction between tumour cells, MSCs and immune cells, providing a new understanding of the development and immunotherapy of GC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Kwangil; Ro, Sang Mi; Lee, Jieun

    2017-03-28

    Breast cancer with stomach metastasis rare with an incidence of 1% or less among metastatic breast cancer patients. We experienced a case of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach in 65-year-old female patient. She experienced dyspepsia and poor oral intake before visiting the clinic. Diffuse infiltration with nodular mucosal thickening of the stomach wall was observed, suggesting advanced gastric cancer based on gross endoscopic finding. Spread of poorly cohesive tumor cells in the gastric mucosa observed upon hematoxylin and eosin stain resembled signet ring cell carcinoma, but diffuse positive staining for GATA3 in immunohistochemical stain allowed for a conclusive diagnosis of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach. Based on the final diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy was administered instead of primary surgical resection. After 2 cycles of docetaxel administration, she showed a partial response based on abdominal computed tomography scan. This case is an unusual presentation of breast cancer metastasizing to the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Intake of wine, beer and spirits and risk of gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barstad, B.; Sørensen, T.I.A.; Tjønneland, A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to study prospectively the relation between quantity and type of alcohol and risk of gastric cancer. In a pooled database from three population studies conducted in 1964-1992, a total of 15 236 men and 13 227 women were followed for a total of 389 051 person-years. During follow......-up 122 incident cases of gastric cancer were identified. Total alcohol intake itself was not associated with gastric cancer, but type of alcohol seemed to influence risk. Compared with non-wine drinkers, participants who drank 1-6 glasses of wine had a relative risk ratio of 0.76 (95% confidence interval...... adjustment for age, gender, educational level, body mass index, smoking habits, inhalation and physical activity. There was no association between beer or spirits drinking and gastric cancer. In conclusion, the present study suggests that a daily intake of wine may prevent development of gastric cancer....

  13. Sphingosine kinase 1 is a relevant molecular target in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Hoeflmayer, Doris; Jaeger-Lansky, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1), a lipid kinase implicated in cell transformation and tumor growth, is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is linked with a poor prognosis. The biological relevance of Sphk1 expression in gastric cancer is unclear. Here, we studied the functional significance of Sphk1...... as a novel molecular target for gastric cancer by using an antisense oligonucleotide approach in vitro and in vivo. Gastric cancer cell lines (MKN28 and N87) were treated with Sphk1 with locked nucleic acid-antisense oligonucleotides (LNA-ASO). Sphk1 target regulation, cell growth, and apoptosis were...... assessed for single-agent Sphk1 LNA-ASO and for combinations with doxorubicin. Athymic nude mice xenografted with gastric cancer cells were treated with Sphk1 LNA and assessed for tumor growth and Sphk1 target regulation, in vivo. In vitro, nanomolar concentrations of Sphk1 LNA-ASO induced an approximately...

  14. Lipid Peroxidation and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Levels in Gastric Cancer at Pathologic Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Sefa; Yücel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Kemik, Ozgür

    2012-09-01

    High levels of TGF-β1 and enhanced TGF-β1 receptor signaling are related to the pathology of gastric cancer. This effect is caused by oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation products. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of TGF-β1 and lipid peroxidation products in gastric cancer patients and their correlation with pathologic stage. Lipid peroxidation products and TGF-β1 levels were studied in the serum samples of 50 gastric cancer patients and 18 control subjects. HNE-protein adducts and TGF-β1 levels were significantly higher in T2, T3 and T4 gastric cancers than in either the T1 stage or controls (p<0.001). Pathologic stage was correlated with TGF-β1 levels (r=0.702, p<0.05). These markers production may contribute to tumor angiogenesis and aid in the prognosis of the gastric cancer.

  15. Nutritional Status After Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidon, Esther Una

    2010-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death secondary to cancer in the world. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment but its clinical consequences are significant. The objective of this study is to evaluate the nutritional state of patients with a total gastrectomy secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma. We designed a descriptive study with a transversal cut in our institution. We included 22 patients which had a minimum evolution time of six months after total gastrectomy secondary to gastric cancer surgery was performed. Neither of them had metastasis. The nutritional analysis included only biochemical data. Descriptive statistics were used for statistical analysis. Eight females and 14 males were included in the study. Median age was 57 years (34 - 69 years). The 74% of the patients were underweight and none of them was overweight. The average body mass index (BMI) was 16.88 kg/m 2 . Eleven patients suffered from mild anemia (10.5 - 12 g/dl) and 5 from moderate anemia (9 - 10.5 g/dl). Only two patients presented severe anemia (less than 9 g/dl). The 58% presented hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. The main post-surgery complication was nausea (46%). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had loss of appetite. Twenty-one patients were able to walk without help and leave their homes. The incidence of anemia in these patients was very high. In most of the patients, albumin and proteins levels were affected too. So malnutrition was a relevant consequence of a total gastrectomy.

  16. INFLAMMATORY INFILTRATION IN THE GASTRIC MUCOSA OF PATIENTS WITH EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-ASSOCIATED GASTRIC DYSPLASIA AND CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. V. Vusik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of inflammatory infiltrate in the gastric mucosa of patients with gastric dysplasia (n=56 and gastric cancer (n=50 with different levels of humoral immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and EBV viral load were studied. In patients with dysplasia of the gastric mucosa, the increase in antibody titers to VCA IgG leaded to a significant decrease in the level of lymphocytes, neutrophils and macrophages and an increase in the number of eosinophils and plasma cells. When the levels of IgA to viral capsid antigen (VCA and IgG to EBV early antigens (EA were increased, the number of neutrophils in the composition of the cellular infiltrate was significantly decreased. In gastric cancer patients with different levels of humoral immune response to EBV, the number of plasma cells and eosinophils in the inflammatory infiltrate of the tumor was decreased when increasing the titers of IgG to VCA and IgA to VCA. When VCA/IgA titer was high, the number of neutrophils in a tumor was decreased and the proportion of macrophages was slightly increased. The data obtained can serve as additional criteria for indentifying markers for viral infection of the gastric mucosa.

  17. Tumorigenic hybrids between mesenchymal stem cells and gastric cancer cells enhanced cancer proliferation, migration and stemness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Jianguo; Zhu, Yuan; Sun, Zixuan; Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Wenrong; Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Yongmin; Yin, Lei; Xu, Huijuan; Zhang, Leilei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that inappropriate cell-cell fusion might contribute to cancer progression. Similarly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can also fuse with other cells spontaneously and capable of adopting the phenotype of other cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of MSCs participated cell fusion in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. We fused human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs) with gastric cancer cells in vitro by polyethylene glycol (PEG), the hybrid cells were sorted by flow cytometer. The growth and migration of hybrids were assessed by cell counting, cell colony formation and transwell assays. The proteins and genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stemness were tested by western blot, immunocytochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. The expression of CD44 and CD133 was examined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. The xenograft assay was used to evaluation the tumorigenesis of the hybrids. The obtained hybrids exhibited epithelial- mesenchymal transition (EMT) change with down-regulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of Vimentin, N-cadherin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). The hybrids also increased expression of stemness factors Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and Lin28. The expression of CD44 and CD133 on hybrid cells was stronger than parental gastric cancer cells. Moreover, the migration and proliferation of heterotypic hybrids were enhanced. In addition, the heterotypic hybrids promoted the growth abilities of gastric xenograft tumor in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that cell fusion between hucMSCs and gastric cancer cells could contribute to tumorigenic hybrids with EMT and stem cell-like properties, which may provide a flexible tool for investigating the roles of MSCs in gastric cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1780-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Molecular Basis of Alcohol-Related Gastric and Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Ja Young

    2017-05-24

    Many meta-analysis, large cohort studies, and experimental studies suggest that chronic alcohol consumption increases the risk of gastric and colon cancer. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), catalase or cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) to acetaldehyde, which is then further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Acetaldehyde has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. The acetaldehyde level in the stomach and colon is locally influenced by gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori or colonic microbes, as well as polymorphisms in the genes encoding tissue alcohol metabolizing enzymes, especially ALDH2. Alcohol stimulates the uptake of carcinogens and their metabolism and also changes the composition of enteric microbes in a way to enhance the aldehyde level. Alcohol also undergoes chemical coupling to membrane phospholipids and disrupts organization of tight junctions, leading to nuclear translocation of β-catenin and ZONAB, which may contributes to regulation of genes involved in proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Alcohol also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by suppressing the expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective enzymes and inducing expression of CYP2E1 which contribute to the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens. Besides exerting genotoxic effects by directly damaging DNA, ROS can activates signaling molecules involved in inflammation, metastasis and angiogenesis. In addition, alcohol consumption induces folate deficiency, which may result in aberrant DNA methylation profiles, thereby influencing cancer-related gene expression.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  20. Pretreatment Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Predictor in Bladder Cancer and Metastatic or Unresectable Urothelial Carcinoma Patients: a Pooled Analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuiqing; Zhao, Xiaokun; Wang, Yinhuai; Zhong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Jian; Ai, Kai; Xu, Ran

    2018-01-01

    Emerging studies have shown that the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a potential predictor in various tumors. Our study was conducted to assess the prognostic value of the pretreatment NLR in bladder cancer and metastatic or unresectable urothelial carcinoma (mUC or uUC) patients up to July 2017. The correlation between the pretreatment NLR and pathological characteristics was also evaluated in bladder cancer patients. The hazard ratio (HR) and odds ratio (OR) with the 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted or calculated from the included studies for further pooled analysis. A total of 21 studies were included in a poo