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Sample records for unperturbed-structure soil columns

  1. The effects of carbide column to swelling potential and Atterberg limit on expansive soil with column to soil drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muamar Rifa'i, Alfian; Setiawan, Bambang; Djarwanti, Noegroho

    2017-12-01

    The expansive soil is soil that has a potential for swelling-shrinking due to changes in water content. Such behavior can exert enough force on building above to cause damage. The use of columns filled with additives such as Calcium Carbide is done to reduce the negative impact of expansive soil behavior. This study aims to determine the effect of carbide columns on expansive soil. Observations were made on swelling and spreading of carbides in the soil. 7 Carbide columns with 5 cm diameter and 20 cm height were installed into the soil with an inter-column spacing of 8.75 cm. Wetting is done through a pipe at the center of the carbide column for 20 days. Observations were conducted on expansive soil without carbide columns and expansive soil with carbide columns. The results showed that the addition of carbide column could reduce the percentage of swelling by 4.42%. Wetting through the center of the carbide column can help spread the carbide into the soil. The use of carbide columns can also decrease the rate of soil expansivity. After the addition of carbide column, the plasticity index value decreased from 71.76% to 4.3% and the shrinkage index decreased from 95.72% to 9.2%.

  2. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  3. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

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    John Leju Celestino Ladu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  4. Hydraulic conductivity of indeformed soil columns determination by gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo; Moraes Cavalcante, Fabio Henrique de; Rocha, Marcos Correa da; Filho, Otavio Portezan; Quinones, Fernando Rodolfo Espinosa; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The spatial variation of the soil structure influences the water movement through its porous geometry, which could cause problems in the development of agricultural cultures and also accelerate processes of soil erosion. The gamma ray transmission method has established efficiency for the non-destructive measurement of moisture temporal and space evolution, and consequently in the determination of the hydraulic conductivity of the soil, K(θ). Columns of undisturbed soil (approximately 0.11 x 0.06 x 0.60 m) were removed from a trench in the Campus of Londrina State University. The used soil was classified like distrophic dark red soil (LRd). The indeformed soil columns were wrapped up with paraffin and gauze and were fixed on the table of measurement. The water vertical infiltration in the soil was accomplished by maintaining a water layer of approximately 0.01 m over an area of soil of 75 x 10 -4 m 2 . Layers of filter papers and foam controlled the flow of water in the soil surface. After the conclusion of the infiltration, began the process of redistribution of the water in the soil column, with the objective to determine the function K(θ) in relation to the depth in the column. The moisture profiles θ(z,t) are obtained using a radioactive source of 241 Am (3.7 x 10 9 Bq; 0.0596 MeV), spectrometric electronic chain, a 2x2'' NaI(Tl) detector and a measurements table , which allows the sample to move vertically. The hydraulic conductivity function was determined, applying the Sisson model , at 10 levels in the soil column and the results exhibit an increase of K(θ) with depth. (author)

  5. Fate of triclocarban during soil aquifer treatment: Soil column studies

    KAUST Repository

    Essandoh, H. M K

    2010-04-01

    There are current concerns about the presence of persistent chemicals in recharge water used in soil aquifer treatment systems. Triclocarban (TCC) has been reported as a persistent, high production volume chemical with the potential to bioaccumulate in the environment. It is also known to have adverse effects such as toxicity and suspected endocrine disruption. This study was carried out to study the fate of TCC in soil aquifer treatment (SAT) through laboratory simulations in a soil column. The system performance was evaluated with regards to TCC influent concentration, sand (column) depth, and residence time. Results obtained confirmed the ability of SAT to reduce TCC concentrations in wastewater. Sorption and biodegradation were responsible for TCC removal, the latter mechanism however being unsustainable. The removal efficiency was found to be dependent on concentration and decreased over time and increased with column depth. Within the duration of the experimental run, TCC negatively impacted on treatment performance through a reduction in COD removals observed in the column. © IWA Publishing 2010.

  6. Effects of the Length of Jet Grouted Columns and Soil Profile on the Settlement of Shallow Foundations

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    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of length of jet grouted columns and varying soil profile under shallow foundations of buildings constructed on the liquefiable ground was studied. The isolated shallow footing pad which supports a typical simple frame structure was constructed on the liquefiable ground. This ground was reinforced with jet grouted column rows under the shallow foundations of structure. The system was modeled as plane-strain using the FLAC 2D (Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua dynamic modelling and analysis code. This case focuses on the length of jet grouted columns in a soil profile and the effect of soil profiles of varying thickness on the settlements of building structure when the soil is liquefied during an earthquake. The results show that liquefaction-induced large settlements of shallow foundation of building decrease to tolerable limits with the increase in the length of columns. For soil profiles, with a relatively thinner liquefiable layer, a certain minimum length of columns (extended in base non liquefiable layer is required to meet the settlement tolerable limits. For soil profiles, with a relatively thicker liquefiable layer, this length should be equal to the thickness of the liquefiable layer from the footing base plus some extension in the base non liquefiable dense layer. In the soil profile with the base liquefiable layer underlying the non liquefiable layer, settlements could not be reduced to the tolerable limits even with columns of relatively larger length which may be critical.

  7. Effect of rainfall infiltration into unsaturated soil using soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A.; Mukhlisin, M.; Jaafar, O.

    2018-02-01

    Rainfall especially in tropical region caused infiltration to the soil slope. The infiltration may change pore water pressure or matric suction of the soil. The event of rainfall infiltration into soil is a complex mechanism. Therefore, the main objectives of this research paper is to study the influence of rainfall intensity and duration that changed pore water pressure to soil. There are two types of soils used in this study; forest soil and kaolin. Soil column apparatus is used for experiments. Rainfall were applied to the soil and result for 3, 6, 12, 24, 72, 120 and 168 hours were retrieved. Result shows that for the both types of soil, the negative pore water pressures were increased during wetting process and gradually decreased towards drying process. The results also show that pore water pressure at top part was increased greatly as the wetting process started compared to the middle and bottom part of the column.

  8. Behaviour of normal reinforced concrete columns exposed to different soils

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    Rasheed Laith

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete resistance to sulfate attack is one of the most important characteristics for maintaining the durability of concrete. In this study, the effect of the attack of sulfate salts on normal reinforced concrete column was investigated by burying these columns in two types of soils (sandy and clayey in two pits at a depth of 3 m in one of the agricultural areas in the holy city of Karbala, one containing sandy soil (SO3 = 10.609% and the other containing clayey soil with (SO3 = 2.61%. The tests were used (pure axial compression test of reinforced concrete columns, compressive strength test, and splitting tensile strength test, absorption, voids ratio and finally density. It`s found that the strength of RC columns decreasing by (12.51% for age (240 days, for columns buried in clayey soil, where the strength increased by (11.71% for the same period, for columns buried in sandy soils, with respect to the reference column.

  9. Stability of embankments over cement deep soil mixing columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilla Moar, P.; Melentijevic, S.

    2014-01-01

    The deep soil mixing (DSM) is one of the ground improvement methods used for the construction of embankments over soft soils. DSM column-supported embankments are constructed over soft soils to accelerate its construction, improve embankment stability, increase bearing capacity and control of total and differential settlements. There are two traditional design methods, the Japanese (rigid columns) and the scandinavian (soft and semi-rigid columns). Based on Laboratory analysis and numerical analysis these traditional approaches have been questioned by several authors due to its overestimation of the embankment stability considering that the most common failures types are not assumed. This paper presents a brief review of traditional design methods for embankments on DSM columns constructed in soft soils, studies carried out determine the most likely failure types of DSM columns, methods to decrease the overestimation when using limit equilibrium methods and numerical analysis methods that permit detect appropriate failure modes in DSM columns. Finally a case study was assessed using both limited equilibrium and finite element methods which confirmed the overestimation in the factors of safety on embankment stability over DSM columns. (Author)

  10. Stability of titania nanoparticles in soil suspensions and transport in saturated homogeneous soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jing; Shan Xiaoquan; Wen Bei; Lin Jinming; Owens, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The stability of TiO 2 nanoparticles in soil suspensions and their transport behavior through saturated homogeneous soil columns were studied. The results showed that TiO 2 could remain suspended in soil suspensions even after settling for 10 days. The suspended TiO 2 contents in soil suspensions after 24 h were positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon and clay content of the soils, but were negatively correlated with ionic strength, pH and zeta potential. In soils containing soil particles of relatively large diameters and lower solution ionic strengths, a significant portion of the TiO 2 (18.8-83.0%) readily passed through the soils columns, while TiO 2 was significantly retained by soils with higher clay contents and salinity. TiO 2 aggregate sizes in the column outflow significantly increased after passing through the soil columns. The estimated transport distances of TiO 2 in some soils ranged from 41.3 to 370 cm, indicating potential environmental risk of TiO 2 nanoparticles to deep soil layers. - TiO 2 nanoparticles could efficiently suspend in soil suspensions and potentially transport to deeper soil layers

  11. Stability of titania nanoparticles in soil suspensions and transport in saturated homogeneous soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Jing [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Shan Xiaoquan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: xiaoquan@rcees.ac.cn; Wen Bei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: bwen@rcees.ac.cn; Lin Jinming [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Owens, Gary [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2009-04-15

    The stability of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in soil suspensions and their transport behavior through saturated homogeneous soil columns were studied. The results showed that TiO{sub 2} could remain suspended in soil suspensions even after settling for 10 days. The suspended TiO{sub 2} contents in soil suspensions after 24 h were positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon and clay content of the soils, but were negatively correlated with ionic strength, pH and zeta potential. In soils containing soil particles of relatively large diameters and lower solution ionic strengths, a significant portion of the TiO{sub 2} (18.8-83.0%) readily passed through the soils columns, while TiO{sub 2} was significantly retained by soils with higher clay contents and salinity. TiO{sub 2} aggregate sizes in the column outflow significantly increased after passing through the soil columns. The estimated transport distances of TiO{sub 2} in some soils ranged from 41.3 to 370 cm, indicating potential environmental risk of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles to deep soil layers. - TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could efficiently suspend in soil suspensions and potentially transport to deeper soil layers.

  12. Evaluating equilibrium and non-equilibrium transport of bromide and isoproturon in disturbed and undisturbed soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousset, S.; Thevenot, M.; Pot, V.; Šimunek, J.; Andreux, F.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, displacement experiments of isoproturon were conducted in disturbed and undisturbed columns of a silty clay loam soil under similar rainfall intensities. Solute transport occurred under saturated conditions in the undisturbed soil and under unsaturated conditions in the sieved soil because of a greater bulk density of the compacted undisturbed soil compared to the sieved soil. The objective of this work was to determine transport characteristics of isoproturon relative to bromide tracer. Triplicate column experiments were performed with sieved (structure partially destroyed to simulate conventional tillage) and undisturbed (structure preserved) soils. Bromide experimental breakthrough curves were analyzed using convective-dispersive and dual-permeability (DP) models (HYDRUS-1D). Isoproturon breakthrough curves (BTCs) were analyzed using the DP model that considered either chemical equilibrium or non-equilibrium transport. The DP model described the bromide elution curves of the sieved soil columns well, whereas it overestimated the tailing of the bromide BTCs of the undisturbed soil columns. A higher degree of physical non-equilibrium was found in the undisturbed soil, where 56% of total water was contained in the slow-flow matrix, compared to 26% in the sieved soil. Isoproturon BTCs were best described in both sieved and undisturbed soil columns using the DP model combined with the chemical non-equilibrium. Higher degradation rates were obtained in the transport experiments than in batch studies, for both soils. This was likely caused by hysteresis in sorption of isoproturon. However, it cannot be ruled out that higher degradation rates were due, at least in part, to the adopted first-order model. Results showed that for similar rainfall intensity, physical and chemical non-equilibrium were greater in the saturated undisturbed soil than in the unsaturated sieved soil. Results also suggested faster transport of isoproturon in the undisturbed soil due

  13. Unperturbed Schelling Segregation in Two or Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmpalias, George; Elwes, Richard; Lewis-Pye, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Schelling's models of segregation, first described in 1969 (Am Econ Rev 59:488-493, 1969) are among the best known models of self-organising behaviour. Their original purpose was to identify mechanisms of urban racial segregation. But his models form part of a family which arises in statistical mechanics, neural networks, social science, and beyond, where populations of agents interact on networks. Despite extensive study, unperturbed Schelling models have largely resisted rigorous analysis, prior results generally focusing on variants in which noise is introduced into the dynamics, the resulting system being amenable to standard techniques from statistical mechanics or stochastic evolutionary game theory (Young in Individual strategy and social structure: an evolutionary theory of institutions, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1998). A series of recent papers (Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012); Barmpalias et al. in: 55th annual IEEE symposium on foundations of computer science, Philadelphia, 2014, J Stat Phys 158:806-852, 2015), has seen the first rigorous analyses of 1-dimensional unperturbed Schelling models, in an asymptotic framework largely unknown in statistical mechanics. Here we provide the first such analysis of 2- and 3-dimensional unperturbed models, establishing most of the phase diagram, and answering a challenge from Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012).

  14. Effect of pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Yol; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effect of solution pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine) in combination with batch sorption tests and column experiments. Sorption isotherms properly conformed to Freundlich model, and sorption potential of the antibiotics is as follows; sulfadimethoxine > sulfamethoxazole > sulfamethazine. Decreasing pH values led to increased sorption potential of the antibiotics on soil material in pH range of 4.0-8.0. This likely resulted from abundance of neutral and positive-charged sulfonamides species at low pH, which electrostatically bind to sorption sites on soil surface. Due to destruction of macropore channels, lower hydraulic conductivities of mobile zone were estimated in the disturbed soil columns than in the undisturbed soil columns, and eventually led to lower mobility of the antibiotics in disturbed column. The results suggest that knowledge of soil structure and solution condition is required to predict fate and distribution of sulfonamide antibiotics in environmental matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strengthening and Stabilization of the Weak Water Saturated Soils Using Stone Columns

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    Sinyakov Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers innovative modern materials and structures for strengthening of weak soils. In this paper describes a method of strengthening of weak saturated soils using stone columns. The method of calculating the physical-mechanical characteristics of reinforced soil mass is presented. Two approaches to determining the stress-strain state and timeframe of consolidation of strengthened soil foundation using the finite element technique in two-dimensional formulation are proposed. The first one approach it is a modeling of reinforced soil mass, where each pile is represented as a separate 2D stripe. The second approach is to the simulation of the strengthened mass the equivalent composite block with improved physical-mechanical characteristics. The use of the equivalent composite block can significantly reduce the time spent on the preparation of a design scheme. The results of calculations were compared. They show the allowable divergence of results of calculation by two methods were presented, and the efficiency of the strengthening of weak water saturated soils by stone column is proved.

  16. Unperturbed moderator brightness in pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batkov, K.; Takibayev, A.; Zanini, L.; Mezei, F.

    2013-01-01

    The unperturbed neutron brightness of a moderator can be defined from the number of neutrons leaving the surface of a moderator completely surrounded by a reflector. Without openings for beam extraction, it is the maximum brightness that can be theoretically achieved in a moderator. The unperturbed brightness of a cylindrical cold moderator filled with pure para-H 2 was calculated using MCNPX; the moderator dimensions were optimised, for a fixed target and reflector geometry corresponding to the present concept for the ESS spallation source. This quantity does not depend on openings for beam extraction and therefore can be used for a first-round optimisation of a moderator, before effects due to beam openings are considered. We find that such an optimisation yields to a factor of 2 increase with respect to a conventional volume moderator, large enough to accommodate a viewed surface of 12×12 cm 2 : the unperturbed neutron brightness is maximum for a disc-shaped moderator of 15 cm diameter, 1.4 cm height. The reasons for this increase can be related to the properties of the scattering cross-section of para-H 2 , to the added reflector around the exit surface in the case of a compact moderator, and to a directionality effect. This large optimisation gain in the unperturbed brightness hints towards similar potentials for the perturbed neutron brightness, in particular in conjunction with advancing the optical quality of neutron delivery from the moderator to the sample, where by Liouville theorem the brightness is conserved over the beam trajectory, except for absorption and similar type losses

  17. Transport of copper as affected by titania nanoparticles in soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Jing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Shan Xiaoquan, E-mail: xiaoquan@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Wen Bei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Lin Jinming [Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Owens, Gary [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Zhou Shuairen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the transport of Cu through four different soil columns were studied. For two soils (HB and DX), TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles acted as a Cu carrier and facilitated the transport of Cu. For a third soil (BJ) TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles also facilitated Cu transport but to a much lesser degree, but for a fourth soil (HLJ) TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles retarded the transport of Cu. Linear correlation analysis indicated that soil properties rather than sorption capacities for Cu primary governed whether TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles-facilitated Cu transport. The TiO{sub 2}-associated Cu of outflow in the Cu-contaminated soil columns was significantly positively correlated with soil pH and negatively correlated with CEC and DOC. During passage through the soil columns 46.6-99.9% of Cu initially adsorbed onto TiO{sub 2} could be 'stripped' from nanoparticles depending on soil, where Cu desorption from TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles increased with decreasing flow velocity and soil pH. - Highlights: > TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could facilitate or retard the transport of Cu in soils. > Soil properties primarily governed TiO{sub 2}-facilitated Cu transport. > Cu initially adsorbed onto TiO{sub 2} could be 'stripped' duing transport. - TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles play an important role in mediating and transporting Cu in soil columns.

  18. Prediction of the Effect of Using Stone Column in Clayey Soil on the Behavior of Circular Footing by ANN Model

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    Omar Khaleel Ismael Al-Kubaisi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Shallow foundations are usually used for structures with light to moderate loads where the soil underneath can carry them. In some cases, soil strength and/or other properties are not adequate and require improvement using one of the ground improvement techniques. Stone column is one of the common improvement techniques in which a column of stone is installed vertically in clayey soils. Stone columns are usually used to increase soil strength and to accelerate soil consolidation by acting as vertical drains. Many researches have been done to estimate the behavior of the improved soil. However, none of them considered the effect of stone column geometry on the behavior of the circular footing. In this research, finite element models have been conducted to evaluate the behavior of a circular footing with different stone column configurations. Moreover, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model has been generated for predicting these effects. The results showed a reduction in the bending moment, the settlement, and the vertical stresses with the increment of the stone column length, while both the horizontal stress and the shear force were increased. ANN model showed a good relationship between the predicted and the calculated results.

  19. Effect of sulfate fertilization on soil biota in grassland columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoyi, Israel; Donohue, John; Fowler, Andrew; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur (S) is an important macronutrient element in plant nutrition as a component of protein, enzymes, enzyme cofactors as well as being the major constituent of the amino acids cysteine and methionine. Organically bound S is the predominant form of S in the soil constituting up to 95% of S in agricultural soils. The most important form of S in terms of plant nutrition is inorganic sulfate which forms only about 5% of the total soil S content. Air pollution was the major source of S (as SO2) for plants, with up to 80% of the S obtained from this source. However, common effects of S limitation on crops such as chlorosis, yield reduction, and decrease in crop quality are becoming increasingly evident as atmospheric S supply has decreased in recent years. Recent research has shown that organically-bound S in soils is also plant-bioavailable, likely due to interconversion of organic S forms to inorganic sulfate by soil microbes. In this study, soil columns were setup in a greenhouse using moderate S (equivalent to Wisconsin S soil availability index of below 30) soils. The columns were planted with Lolium perenne and fertilized with 0 (control), 5 (low), 10 (medium) and 20 (high) kg/ha sulfate S alongside a full complement of other nutrients. Results after 14 weeks of management show a significant decrease (Pbacterial abundance of heterotrophs and aromatic sulfonate-utilizing bacteria upon S fertilization. In addition, soil from the top 20 cm of the column had significantly higher sulfatase activity compared to the bottom 20 cm. The medium and high S treatments had significantly higher grass dry matter yield compared to the control and low S treatments. All S treatments significantly shifted the bacterial community structure compared to the control. Overall, our preliminary results suggest that applying 5 kg/ ha S had similar effects on the soil biota as the control while the application of medium and high S had similar effects on most parameters. Moreover, this study

  20. Practical issues relating to soil column chromatography for sorption parameter determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Erping; Schmidt, Torsten C; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2010-08-01

    Determination of sorption distribution coefficients (K(d)) of organic compounds by a dynamic soil column chromatography (SCC) method was developed and validated. Eurosoil 4, quartz, and alumina were chosen as exemplary packing materials. Heterocyclic aromatic compounds were selected in the validation of SCC. The prerequisites of SCC with regard to column dimension, packing procedure, and sample injection volume are discussed. Reproducible soil column packing was achieved by addition of a pre-column and an HPLC pump for subsequent compression of the packed material. Various methods to determine retention times from breakthrough curves are discussed and the use of the half mass method is recommended. To dilute soil with inert material can prevent column-clogging and help to complete experiments in a reasonable period of time. For the chosen probe compounds, quartz rather than alumina proved a suitable dilution material. Non-equilibrium issue can be overcome by conducting the experiments under different flowrates and/or performing numerical simulation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproducibility of up-flow column percolation tests for contaminated soils.

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    Tetsuo Yasutaka

    Full Text Available Up-flow column percolation tests are used at laboratory scale to assess the leaching behavior of hazardous substance from contaminated soils in a specific condition as a function of time. Monitoring the quality of these test results inter or within laboratory is crucial, especially if used for Environment-related legal policy or for routine testing purposes. We tested three different sandy loam type soils (Soils I, II and III to determine the reproducibility (variability inter laboratory of test results and to evaluate the difference in the test results within laboratory. Up-flow column percolation tests were performed following the procedure described in the ISO/TS 21268-3. This procedure consists of percolating solution (calcium chloride 1 mM from bottom to top at a flow rate of 12 mL/h through softly compacted soil contained in a column of 5 cm diameter and 30 ± 5 cm height. Eluate samples were collected at liquid-to-solid ratio of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 L/kg and analyzed for quantification of the target elements (Cu, As, Se, Cl, Ca, F, Mg, DOC and B in this research. For Soil I, 17 institutions in Japan joined this validation test. The up-flow column experiments were conducted in duplicate, after 48 h of equilibration time and at a flow rate of 12 mL/h. Column percolation test results from Soils II and III were used to evaluate the difference in test results from the experiments conducted in duplicate in a single laboratory, after 16 h of equilibration time and at a flow rate of 36 mL/h. Overall results showed good reproducibility (expressed in terms of the coefficient of variation, CV, calculated by dividing the standard deviation by the mean, as the CV was lower than 30% in more than 90% of the test results associated with Soil I. Moreover, low variability (expressed in terms of difference between the two test results divided by the mean was observed in the test results related to Soils II and III, with a variability lower than 30

  2. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

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    Csorba Szilveszter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS, while three were kept under drought-stressed conditions (S. The SWAP model was successfully calibrated against measured values of potential evapotranspiration (PET, potential evaporation (PE and total amount of water (TSW in the soil columns. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (N-S for TWS for the stressed columns was 0.92. For the NS treatment, we applied temporally variable soil hydraulic properties because of soil consolidation caused by regular irrigation. This approach improved the N-S values for the wetting-drying cycle from -1.77 to 0.54. We concluded that the model could be used for assessing the effects of climate change on soil water regime. Our results indicate that soil water balance studies should put more focus on the time variability of structuredependent soil properties.

  3. Monitoring changes in soil water content on adjustable soil slopes of a soil column using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Zakaria Wan Muhd Tahir; Lakam Anak Mejus; Johari Abdul Latif

    2004-01-01

    Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is one of non-destructive methods and widely used in hydrology and soil science for accurate and flexible measurement of soil water content The TDR technique is based on measuring the dielectric constant of soil from the propagation of an electromagnetic pulse traveling along installed probe rods (parallel wire transmission line). An adjustable soil column i.e., 80 cm (L) x 35 cm (H) x 44 cm (W) instrumented with six pairs of vertically installed CS615 reflectometer probes (TDR rods) was developed and wetted under a laboratory simulated rainfall and their sub-surface moisture variations as the slope changes were monitored using TDR method Soil samples for gravimetric determination of water content, converted to a volume basis were taken at selected times and locations after the final TDR reading for every slope change made of the soil column Comparisons of water contents by TDR with those from grawmetric samples at different slopes of soil column were examined. The accuracy was found to be comparable and to some extent dependent upon the variability of the soil. This study also suggests that the response of slope (above 20 degrees) to the gradual increase in water content profile may cause soil saturation faster and increased overland flow (runoff especially on weak soil conditions

  4. Influence of plant roots on electrical resistivity measurements of cultivated soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloteau, Sophie; Blanchy, Guillaume; Javaux, Mathieu; Garré, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity methods have been widely used for the last 40 years in many fields: groundwater investigation, soil and water pollution, engineering application for subsurface surveys, etc. Many factors can influence the electrical resistivity of a media, and thus influence the ERT measurements. Among those factors, it is known that plant roots affect bulk electrical resistivity. However, this impact is not yet well understood. The goals of this experiment are to quantify the effect of plant roots on electrical resistivity of the soil subsurface and to map a plant roots system in space and time with ERT technique in a soil column. For this research, it is assumed that roots system affect the electrical properties of the rhizosphere. Indeed the root activity (by transporting ions, releasing exudates, changing the soil structure,…) will modify the rhizosphere electrical conductivity (Lobet G. et al, 2013). This experiment is included in a bigger research project about the influence of roots system on geophysics measurements. Measurements are made on cylinders of 45 cm high and a diameter of 20 cm, filled with saturated loam on which seeds of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. are sowed. Columns are equipped with electrodes, TDR probes and temperature sensors. Experiments are conducted at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, in a growing chamber with controlled conditions: temperature of the air is fixed to 20° C, photoperiod is equal to 14 hours, photosynthetically active radiation is equal to 200 μmol m-2s-1, and air relative humidity is fixed to 80 %. Columns are fully saturated the first day of the measurements duration then no more irrigation is done till the end of the experiment. The poster will report the first results analysis of the electrical resistivity distribution in the soil columns through space and time. These results will be discussed according to the plant development and other controlled factors. Water content of the soil will also be detailed

  5. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P., E-mail: pierre.crancon@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Pili, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique (LGIT-OSUG), University of Grenoble-I, UMR5559-CNRS-UJF, BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2010-04-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the < 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean porewater velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  6. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Charlet, L. [Univ Grenoble 1, Lab Geophys Interne and Tectonophys LGIT OSUG, CNRS, UJF, UMR5559, F-38041 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podsolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the {<=} 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean pore-water velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source. (authors)

  7. Flow of gasoline-in-water microemulsion through water-saturated soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Y.; Mansell, R.S.; Rhue, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    Much consideration has been given to the use of surfactants to clean up nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from contaminated soil and ground water. Although this emulsification technique has shown significant potential for application in environmental remediation practices, a major obstacle leading to low washing efficiency is the potential formation of macroemulsion with unfavorable flow characteristics in porous media. This study investigated influences of the flow of leaded-gasoline-in-water (LG/W) microemulsion upon the transport of gasoline and lead (Pb) species in water-saturated soil columns. Two experiments were performed: (1) the immiscible displacement of leaded gasoline and (2) the miscible displacement of LG/W microemulsion through soil columns, followed by sequentially flushing with NaCl solution and a water/surfactant/cosurfactant (W/S/CoS) mixture. Comparison of breakthrough curves (BTC) for gasoline between the two experiments shows that about 90% of gasoline and total Pb were removed from the soil columns by NaCl solution in the LG/W microemulsion experiment as compared to 40% removal of gasoline and 10% removal of total Pb at the same process in the leaded gasoline experiment. Results indicate that gasoline and Pb species moved much more effectively through soil during miscible flow of LG/W microemulsion than during immiscible flow of leaded gasoline. In contrast to the adverse effects of macroemulsion on the transport of NAPLs, microemulsion was found to enhance the transport of gasoline through water-saturated soil. Mass balance analysis shows that the W/S/CoS mixture had a high capacity for removing residual gasoline and Pb species from contaminated soil. Comparison of water-pressure differences across the soil columns for the two experiments indicates that pore clogging by gasoline droplets was greatly minimized in the LG/W microemulsion experiment

  8. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E.; Charlet, L.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the 238 U initially present in the soil column and 233 U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  9. Quantifying vertical stress transmission and compaction-induced soil structure using sensor mat and X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    tillage. In this study, partially confined uniaxial compression tests were carried out on intact topsoil columns placed on subsoil columns. Two methods were employed for estimation of stress transmission in soil: (i) soil deformation patterns were quantified using X-ray CT and converted to stress......Accurate estimation of stress transmission in soil and quantification of compaction-induced soil pore structure is important for efficient soil use and management. Continuum mechanics have so far mostly been applied for agricultural soils, even if topsoil structure is aggregated due to regular...... distributions, and (ii) a tactile sensor mat was employed for measuring stresses at the interface of the topsoil and subsoil columns. The resulting soil pore structure under applied stresses was quantified using X-ray CT and by air-permeability measurements. In topsoil discrete stress transmission patterns were...

  10. Translocation of labelled fertilizer nitrogen in soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunold, E.; Zvara, J.

    1975-01-01

    The translocation of 15 labeled ammonium and nitrate fertilizer was studied under normal weather conditions for two years in columns filled with different soils. At the end of the experimental period, which usually lasted for 9 months, between 5.9-10.3% of the ammonium fertilizer was leached out, 33.7-50.1% remained in the soil and 39.5-59.7% was lost as gas. For nitrate nitrogen the figures were: 22.6-47.3% leached out, 16.7-40% remaining in the soil, 12.7-60.0% lost as gas. The ammonium fertilizer moving through the soil interchanged with 1-13% of the soil nitrogen, the nitrate fertilizer with only 0.5-2%

  11. Calculating carbon mass balance from unsaturated soil columns treated with CaSO₄₋minerals: test of soil carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Soo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2014-12-01

    Renewed interest in managing C balance in soils is motivated by increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and consequent climate change. Here, experiments were conducted in soil columns to determine C mass balances with and without addition of CaSO4-minerals (anhydrite and gypsum), which were hypothesized to promote soil organic carbon (SOC) retention and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) precipitation as calcite under slightly alkaline conditions. Changes in C contents in three phases (gas, liquid and solid) were measured in unsaturated soil columns tested for one year and comprehensive C mass balances were determined. The tested soil columns had no C inputs, and only C utilization by microbial activity and C transformations were assumed in the C chemistry. The measurements showed that changes in C inventories occurred through two processes, SOC loss and SIC gain. However, the measured SOC losses in the treated columns were lower than their corresponding control columns, indicating that the amendments promoted SOC retention. The SOC losses resulted mostly from microbial respiration and loss of CO2 to the atmosphere rather than from chemical leaching. Microbial oxidation of SOC appears to have been suppressed by increased Ca(2+) and SO4(2)(-) from dissolution of CaSO4 minerals. For the conditions tested, SIC accumulation per m(2) soil area under CaSO4-treatment ranged from 130 to 260 g C m(-1) infiltrated water (20-120 g C m(-1) infiltrated water as net C benefit). These results demonstrate the potential for increasing C sequestration in slightly alkaline soils via CaSO4-treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing Bioremediation of Oil-contaminated Soils by Controlling Nutrient Transport using Dual Characteristics of Soil Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Y.; Suetsugu, A.; Matsumoto, Y.; Fujihara, A.; Suyama, K.; Miyamoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    Soil structure is heterogeneous with cracks or macropores allowing bypass flow, which may lead to applied chemicals avoiding interaction with soil particles or the contaminated area. We investigated the bioremediation efficiency of oil-contaminated soils by applying suction at the bottom of soil columns during bioremediation. Unsaturated flow conditions were investigated so as to avoid bypass flow and achieve sufficient dispersion of chemicals in the soil column. The boundary conditions at the bottom of the soil columns were 0 kPa and -3 kPa, and were applied to a volcanic ash soil with and without macropores. Unsaturated flow was achieved with -3 kPa and an injection rate of 1/10 of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The resultant biological activities of the effluent increased dramatically in the unsaturated flow with macropores condition. Unsaturated conditions prevented bypass flow and allowed dispersion of the injected nutrients. Unsaturated flow achieved 60-80% of saturation, which enhanced biological activity in the soil column. Remediation results were better for unsaturated conditions because of higher biological activity. Moreover, unsaturated flow with macropores achieved uniform remediation efficiency from upper through lower positions in the column. Finally, taking the applied solution volume into consideration, unsaturated flow with -3 kPa achieved 10 times higher efficiency when compared with conventional saturated flow application. These results suggest that effective use of nutrients or remediation chemicals is possible by avoiding bypass flow and enhancing biological activity using relatively simple and inexpensive techniques.

  13. Vertical migration of some herbicides through undisturbed and homogenized soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wasim Aktar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted by using three herbicides, two from dinitroaniline group and one from thiocarbamate group to know their degree of downward movement (leachability through soil columns and their contribution in ground water contamination. Soil columns were loaded with Pendimethalin, Benthiocarb and Oryzalin @ 10.0, 10.0 and 7.7 kg a.i. ha-1, respectively. After 30 days soil samples were analyzed from each segments (i.e. 0-6, 6-12, 12-18, and 18-24 and 24-30 cm for Benthiocarb and Pendimethalin by GLC equipped with Ni63 electron capture detector (ECD and for Oryzalin by HPLC coupled with UV-VIS detector. The results obtained in the present study reveal that the residues of the three herbicides under investigation were predominantly confined to the upper soil layer (0-6 cm. Comparatively, low mobility of these herbicides in soils could be due to strong adsorption of these chemical to soil colloids.

  14. Vertical migration of some herbicides through undisturbed and homogenized soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Md. Wasim; Sengupta, Dwaipayan; Purkait, Swarnali; Chowdhury, Ashim

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted by using three herbicides, two from dinitroaniline group and one from thiocarbamate group to know their degree of downward movement (leachability) through soil columns and their contribution in ground water contamination. Soil columns were loaded with Pendimethalin, Benthiocarb and Oryzalin at doses of 10.0, 10.0 and 7.7 kg/ha, respectively. After 30 days soil samples were analyzed from each segments (i.e. 0–6, 6–12, 12–18, 18–24 and 24–30 cm) for Benthiocarb and Pendimethalin by GLC equipped with Ni63 electron capture detector (ECD) and for Oryzalin by HPLC coupled with UV-VIS detector. The results obtained in the present study reveal that the residues of the three herbicides under investigation were predominantly confined to the upper soil layer (0–6 cm). Comparatively, low mobility of these herbicides in soils could be due to strong adsorption of these chemical to soil colloids. PMID:21218121

  15. Vertical migration of some herbicides through undisturbed and homogenized soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wasim Aktar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted by using three herbicides, two from dinitroaniline group and one from thiocarbamate group to know their degree of downward movement (leachability through soil columns and their contribution in ground water contamination. Soil columns were loaded with Pendimethalin, Benthiocarb and Oryzalin @ 10.0, 10.0 and 7.7 kg a.i. ha-1, respectively. After 30 days soil samples were analyzed from each segments (i.e. 0-6, 6-12, 12-18, and 18-24 and 24-30 cm for Benthiocarb and Pendimethalin by GLC equipped with Ni63 electron capture detector (ECD and for Oryzalin by HPLC coupled with UV-VIS detector. The results obtained in the present study reveal that the residues of the three herbicides under investigation were predominantly confined to the upper soil layer (0-6 cm. Comparatively, low mobility of these herbicides in soils could be due to strong adsorption of these chemical to soil colloids.

  16. X-ray CT Scanning Reveals Long-Term Copper Pollution Effects on Functional Soil Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Homstrup, Martin

    Soil structure plays the main role in the ability of the soil to fulfill essential soil functions such as the root growth, rate of water infiltration and retention, transport of gaseous and chemicals/pollutants through the soil. Soil structure is a dynamic soil property and affected by various...... factors such as soil type, land use, and soil contamination. In this study, we quantified the soil structure using X-ray CT scanning and revealed the effect of a long history of Copper (Cu) pollution on it. A fallow field at Hygum Denmark provides this opportunity as it had a long history of Copper...... sulphate contamination in a gradient with Cu content varies from 21 mg kg-1 to 3837 mg kg-1. Total 20 intact soil columns (diameter of 10 cm and height of 8 cm) were sampled at five locations along the Cu-gradient from a depth of 5 to 15 cm below surface level. The soil columns were scanned at a voxel...

  17. Determination of solute organic concentration in contaminated soils using a chemical-equilibrium soil column system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Jesper; Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    using two soils with different content of organic carbon (f(oc) of 1.5 and 6.5%, respectively). A quadruple blind test of the ER-V system using glass beads in stead of soil showed an acceptable recovery (65-85%) of all of the 11 VOCs tested. Only for the most volatile compound (heptane, K-H similar...... to 80) an unacceptable recovery was found (9%). The contact time needed for obtaining chemical equilibrium was tested in the ER-H system by performing five test with different duration (1, 2, 4, 7 and 19 days) using the low organic carbon soil. Seven days of contact time appeared sufficient...... for determination of solute concentration in a contaminated soil were developed; (1) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Volatile organic chemicals (ER-V) and (2) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Hydrophobic organic chemicals (ER-H). The two test systems were evaluated...

  18. Determination of the hydraulic conductivity in column of undeformed soil by gamma rays transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson C.; Cavalcante, Fabio H.M.; Portezan Filho, Otavio; Coimbra, Melayne M.; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The water infiltration process in undeformed soil column and the measurement of redistribution process by gamma rays transmission in different depth allow the determination of Hydraulic Conductivity K(Θ) function, using the Sisson et al. (1980) method. A LRd (dystrophic dark red soil) soil column with 60 cm of height, 10 cm of width and 5 cm of thickness, was analyzed in laboratory, reproducing the field conditions concerning to the water infiltration and redistribution in the soil. The soil moisture content data was obtained with a radioactivity source 241 Am (100 mCi; 59,6 keV), NaI (Tl) 2x2 detector, coupled to an gamma rays spectrometric electronic chain and a measurement table that allowed the vertical displacement of the soil column. The results indicate a growing behavior for K(Θ) in relation to the depth. The collimators had 2 mm and 5 mm diameter for radioactivity source and detector respectively. (author)

  19. ACCUMULATION OF POLY-B-HYDROXYBUTYRATE IN A METHANE- ENRICHED, HALOGENATED, HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING SOIL COLUMN: IMPLICATIONS FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prokarotic, endogenous storage polymer poly--hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulated in soil from a methane-enriched, halogenated hydrocarbon-degrading soil column. Based on phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid (PLFA) profiles, this mocrocosm has been previously reported to be sign...

  20. Deposition of gamma emitters from Chernobyl accident and their transfer in lichen-soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Jukka; Paatero, Jussi; Pehrman, Reijo; Kulmala, Seija; Suksi, Juhani; Koivula, Teija; Jaakkola, Timo

    2008-10-01

    Lichen-soil column samples were taken from several locations in the Southern Finland between 1986 and 2006. Columns were divided into three parts, upper lichen, lower lichen and underlying soil, and their gamma emitting radionuclides, 134Cs, 137Cs, 103Ru, 95Zr, 106Ru, 110mAg, 125Sb and 144Ce, were measured with gamma spectrometry. Deposition values were calculated as Bq/m2 for each sampling site. Distribution of various radionuclides in the three compartments as a function of time was determined. Both effective and ecological half-lives of all radionuclides were calculated for upper lichen, whole lichen and whole lichen-soil column. A linear relation was derived between the physical half-lives and effective half-lives for whole lichen and for whole lichen-soil column. Reindeer meat activity concentrations of various radionuclides and ensuing radiation doses to reindeer-herding people were also estimated for a hypothetical case where a similar high radioactive pollution, as was taken place in the Southern Finland, would have occurred in the reindeer-herding areas in the Finnish Lapland.

  1. Implications of soil mixing for NAPL source zone remediation: Column studies and modeling of field-scale systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mitchell R; Sale, Tom C

    2015-01-01

    Soil remediation is often inhibited by subsurface heterogeneity, which constrains contaminant/reagent contact. Use of soil mixing techniques for reagent delivery provides a means to overcome contaminant/reagent contact limitations. Furthermore, soil mixing reduces the permeability of treated soils, thus extending the time for reactions to proceed. This paper describes research conducted to evaluate implications of soil mixing on remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The research consisted of column studies and subsequent modeling of field-scale systems. For column studies, clean influent water was flushed through columns containing homogenized soils, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Within the columns, NAPL depletion occurred due to dissolution, followed by either column-effluent discharge or ZVI-mediated degradation. Complete removal of TCE NAPL from the columns occurred in 6-8 pore volumes of flow. However, most of the TCE (>96%) was discharged in the column effluent; less than 4% of TCE was degraded. The low fraction of TCE degraded is attributed to the short hydraulic residence time (10 m) and reducing permeability by one-or-more orders of magnitude, the residence time could be greatly extended, potentially for periods of years to decades. Model output indicates that the fraction of TCE degraded can be increased to >99.9%, given typical post-mixing soil permeability values. These results suggest that remediation performance can be greatly enhanced by combining contaminant degradation with an extended residence time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita; Veith, Tamie L; Laegdsmand, Mette

    2016-12-15

    Animal manure application to agricultural land provides beneficial organic matter and nutrients but can spread harmful contaminants to the environment. Contamination of fresh produce, surface water and shallow groundwater with the manure-borne pollutants can be a critical concern. Leaching and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns at a rate of 50 t ha -1 and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h -1 after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils. In contrast, NO 3 -N leaching from the intact soil was higher for all events except the first event, probably due to a lower nitrification rate in the disturbed soil. A week after the last irrigation event, the redistribution of all slurry constituents except NO 3 -N in most of the sections of the soil column was higher for the disturbed soil. Total recovery of E. coli was significantly higher from the disturbed soil and total leaching of mineral nitrogen was significantly

  3. Stability of embankments over cement deep soil mixing columns; Estabilidad de terraplenes sobre columnas de suelo-cemento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morilla Moar, P.; Melentijevic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The deep soil mixing (DSM) is one of the ground improvement methods used for the construction of embankments over soft soils. DSM column-supported embankments are constructed over soft soils to accelerate its construction, improve embankment stability, increase bearing capacity and control of total and differential settlements. There are two traditional design methods, the Japanese (rigid columns) and the scandinavian (soft and semi-rigid columns). Based on Laboratory analysis and numerical analysis these traditional approaches have been questioned by several authors due to its overestimation of the embankment stability considering that the most common failures types are not assumed. This paper presents a brief review of traditional design methods for embankments on DSM columns constructed in soft soils, studies carried out determine the most likely failure types of DSM columns, methods to decrease the overestimation when using limit equilibrium methods and numerical analysis methods that permit detect appropriate failure modes in DSM columns. Finally a case study was assessed using both limited equilibrium and finite element methods which confirmed the overestimation in the factors of safety on embankment stability over DSM columns. (Author)

  4. The Effects of Subsurface Bioremediation on Soil Structure, Colloid Formation, and Contaminant Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, X.; Zhuang, J.; Radosevich, M.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic bioremediation is widely applied to create anaerobic subsurface conditions designed to stimulate microorganisms that degrade organic contaminants and immobilize toxic metals in situ. Anaerobic conditions that accompany such techniques also promotes microbially mediated Fe(III)-oxide mineral reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) could potentially cause soil structure breakdown, formation of clay colloids, and alternation of soil surface chemical properties. These processes could then affect bioremediation and the migration of contaminants. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of anaerobic bioreduction on soil structure, hydraulic properties, colloid formation, and transport of three tracers (bromide, DFBA, and silica shelled silver nanoparticles). Columns packed with inoculated water stable soil aggregates were placed in anaerobic glovebox, and artificial groundwater media was pumped into the columns to simulate anaerobic bioreduction process for four weeks. Decent amount of soluble Fe(II) accompanied by colloids were detected in the effluent from bioreduction columns a week after initiation of bioreduction treatment, which demonstrated bioreduction of Fe(III) and formation of colloids. Transport experiments were performed in the columns before and after bioreduction process to assess the changes of hydraulic and surface chemical properties through bioreduction treatment. Earlier breakthrough of bromide and DFBA after treatment indicated alterations in flow paths (formation of preferential flow paths). Less dispersion of bromide and DFBA, and less tailing of DFBA after treatment implied breakdown of soil aggregates. Dramatically enhanced transport and early breakthrough of silica shelled silver nanoparticles after treatment supported the above conclusion of alterations in flow paths, and indicated changes of soil surface chemical properties.

  5. Biological nitrogen removal using soil columns for the reuse of reclaimed water: Performance and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaji; Chen, Lei; Rene, Eldon R; Hu, Qian; Ma, Weifang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2018-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to remove nitrogen compounds from reclaimed water and reuse the water in semi-arid riverine lake systems. In order to assess the nitrogen removal efficiencies in different natural environments, laboratory scale column experiments were performed using sterilized soil (SS), silty clay (SC), soil with submerged plant (SSP) and biochar amendment soil (BCS). The initial concentration of NO 3 - -N and the flow rate was maintained constant at 15 mg L -1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 m d -1 , respectively. Among the tested columns, both SSP and BCS were able to achieve NO 3 - -N levels <0.2 mg L -1 in the treated reclaimed water. The results from bacterial community structure analysis, using 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA genes, showed that the dominant denitrifier was Bacillus at the genera level. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of soil moisture and treatment volume on bentazone mobility in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Guimont, Sophie; Perrin-Ganier, Corinne; Real, Benoit; Schiavon, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Soil moisture affects the leaching behaviour of pesticides by inducing their physical entrapment in the soil structure. Columns containing soil aggregates were dampened to specific initial moisture levels. Bentazon was dripped onto surface aggregates in different volumes. The columns were then percolated after an equilibration period. Soil water from the columns was divided arbitrarily among mobile and immobile regions in order to describe the herbicide redistribution processes in the soil. W...

  7. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry.

  8. Ureic nitrogen transformation in multi-layer soil columns treated with urease and nitrification inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Camilla; Garcia-Mina, Josè M; Ciavatta, Claudio; Marzadori, Claudio

    2009-06-10

    The use of N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), as a urease inhibitor, is one of the most successful strategies utilized to increase the efficiency of urea-based fertilization. To date, NBPT has been added to the soil incorporated in fertilizers containing either urea or the inhibitor at a fixed percentage on the urea weight. The possibility of using NBPT physically separated from urea-based fertilizers could make its use more flexible. In particular, a granulated product containing NBPT could be utilized in soils treated with different urea-based fertilizers including livestock urine, the amount depending on soil characteristics and/or the urea source (e.g., mineral fertilizer, organo-mineral fertilizer, or animal slurry). In this study, a multilayer soil column device was used to investigate the influence of an experimental granular product (RV) containing NBPT and a garlic extract, combining the ability to protect NBPT by oxidation and nitrification inhibition activity, on (a) spatial variability of soil urease and nitrification activities and (b) timing of urea hydrolysis and mineral-N form accumulation (NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+)) in soil treated with urea. The results clearly demonstrated that RV can, effectively, inhibit the soil urease activity along the soil column profile up to 8-10 cm soil layer depth and that the inhibition power of RV was dependent on time and soil depth. However, nitrification activity is not significantly influenced by RV addition. In addition, the soil N transformations were clearly affected by RV; in fact, RV retarded urea hydrolysis and reduced the accumulation of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N ions along the soil profile. The RV product was demonstrated to be an innovative additive able to modify some key ureic N trasformation processes correlated with the efficiency of the urea-based fertilization, in a soil column higher than 10 cm.

  9. Feedback of the behaviour of a silo founded on a compressible soil improved by floating stone columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Ramdane

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The coastal city of Bejaia, located 250 kilometers east of the capital Algiers, Algeria, is characterized by soft soils. The residual grounds encountered on the first 40 meters usually have a low bearing capacity, high compressibility, insufficient strength, and subject to the risk of liquefaction. These unfavorable soil conditions require deep foundations or soil improvement. Since late 1990s, stone columns technique is used to improve the weak soils of the harbor area of the city. A shallow raft foundation on soft soil improved by stone columns was designed for a heavy storage steel silo and two towers. The improvement of 18m depth have not reached the substratum located at 39m depth. The stresses transmitted to the service limit state are variable 73 to 376 kPa. A rigorous and ongoing monitoring of the evolution of loads in the silo and settlements of the soil was carried out during 1400 days that is from the construction of foundations in 2008 to 2012. After the loading of the silo in 2010, settlement occurred affecting the stability of the towers due to excessive differential settlements. Consequently, the towers were inclined and damaged the transporter. This paper presents and discusses the experience feedback of the behavior of these structures. Numerical calculations by finite elements have been carried and the results are compared with the measurements.

  10. Dynamic chemical characteristics of soil solution after pig manure application: a column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongmei; Sun, Lei; Li, Lianzhen; Zhang, Hailin

    2008-06-01

    When manures from intensive livestock operations are applied to agricultural or vegetable fields at a high rate, large amounts of salts and metals will be introduced into soils. Using a column leaching experiment, this study assessed the leaching potential of the downward movement of Cu and Zn as well as some salt ions after an intensive farm pig manure at rates of 0%, 5% and 10% (w/w) were applied to the top 20 cm of two different textured soils (G soil -sandy loam soil; H soil-silty clay loam soil), and investigated the growth of amaranth and Cu and Zn transfer from soil to amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor). Soil solutions were obtained at 20, 40 and 60 cm depth of the packed column and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved organic matter (DOC) and Cu and Zn concentrations. The results indicated that application of pig manure containing Cu and Zn to sandy loam soil might cause higher leaching and uptake risk than silty clay loam soil, especially at high application rates. And manure amendment at 5% and 10% significantly decreased the biomass of amaranth, in which the salt impact rather than Cu and Zn toxicity from manures played more important role in amaranth growth. Thus the farmer should avoid application the high rate of pig manure containing metal and salt to soil at a time, especially in sandy soil.

  11. Bacteria transport and retention in intact calcareous soil columns under saturated flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokhian Firouzi Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of bacterial transport and retention in soil is important for various environmental applications such as groundwater contamination and bioremediation of soil and water. The main objective of this research was to quantitatively assess bacterial transport and deposition under saturated conditions in calcareous soil. A series of leaching experiments was conducted on two undisturbed soil columns. Breakthrough curves of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Cl were measured. After the leaching experiment, spatial distribution of bacteria retention in the soil columns was determined. The HYDRUS-1D one- and two-site kinetic models were used to predict the transport and deposition of bacteria in soil. The results indicated that the two-site model fits the observed data better than one-site kinetic model. Bacteria interaction with the soil of kinetic site 1 revealed relatively fast attachment and slow detachment, whereas attachment to and detachment of bacteria from kinetic site 2 was fast. Fast attachment and slow detachment of site 1 can be attributed to soil calcium carbonate that has favorable attachment sites for bacteria. The detachment rate was less than 0.02 of the attachment rate, indicating irreversible attachment of bacteria. High reduction rate of bacteria was also attributed to soil calcium carbonate.

  12. Nondestructive measurement for radionuclide concentration distribution in soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hiromichi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-01-01

    A nondestructive method has been studied for determining the concentration of radionuclide (Cs-137) distributed in a soil column. The concentration distribution was calculated from the counting rate distribution using the efficiency matrix of a detector. The concentration distribution obtained by this method, with measuring efficiencies of theoretical calculation, coincides well with that obtained by the destructive sampling method. This method is, therefore, found to be effective for the measurement of one dimensional concentration distribution. The measuring limit of this method is affected not only by the radionuclide concentration but also by the shape of concentration distribution in a soil column and also by the way it is divided into concentration blocks. It is found that, the radioactive concentration up to 2.6 x 10 -4 μCi/g (9.62 Bq/g), and also the distribution up to where the concentration reduces to half at every 1 cm of depth, can be measured by this system. The concentration blocks can be divided into 1 cm of thickness as a minimum value. (author)

  13. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of framed structures including soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, M.N.; Ahmed, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of oil-structure interaction on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete structures is investigated in this paper. A finite element approach has been adopted to model the interaction system that consists of the reinforced concrete plane frame, soil deposit and interface which represents the frictional between foundation of the structure and subsoil. The analysis is based on the elasto-plastic behavior of the frame members (beams and columns) that is defined by the ultimate axial force-bending moment interaction curve, while the cap model is adopted to govern the elasto-plastic behavior of the soil material. Mohr-Coulomb failure law is used to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to occur when the stresses at the interface becomes tension stresses. New-Mark's Predictor-Corrector algorithm is adopted for nonlinear dynamic analysis. The main aim of present work is to evaluate the sensitivity of structures to different behavior of the soil and interface layer when subjected to an earthquake excitation. Predicted results of the dynamic analysis of the interaction system indicate that the soil-structure interaction problem can have beneficial effects on the structural behavior when different soil models (elastic and elasto-plastic) and interface conditions (perfect bond and permitted slip)are considered. (author)

  14. Nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions from a riparian wetland soil: An undisturbed soil column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Leoz, Borja [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Antigueedad, Inaki [Department of Geodynamic, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Garbisu, Carlos [Department of Ecosystems, NEIKER-Tecnalia, E-48160 Derio (Spain); Ruiz-Romera, Estilita, E-mail: estilita.ruiz@ehu.es [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Riparian wetlands bordering intensively managed agricultural fields can act as biological filters that retain and transform agrochemicals such as nitrate and pesticides. Nitrate removal in wetlands has usually been attributed to denitrification processes which in turn imply the production of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O). Denitrification processes were studied in the Salburua wetland (northern Spain) by using undisturbed soil columns which were subsequently divided into three sections corresponding to A-, Bg- and B2g-soil horizons. Soil horizons were subjected to leaching with a 200 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -} L{sup -1} solution (rate: 90 mL day{sup -1}) for 125 days at two different temperatures (10 and 20 {sup o}C), using a new experimental design for leaching assays which enabled not only to evaluate leachate composition but also to measure gas emissions during the leaching process. Column leachate samples were analyzed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) were determined in the undisturbed soil columns. The A horizon at 20 {sup o}C showed the highest rates of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal (1.56 mg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O production (5.89 mg CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1} and 55.71 {mu}g N-N{sub 2}O kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}). For the Salburua wetland riparian soil, we estimated a potential nitrate removal capacity of 1012 kg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}, and potential greenhouse gas emissions of 5620 kg CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} and 240 kg N-N{sub 2}O ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. - Research Highlights: {yields}A new experimental design is proposed for leaching assays to simulate nitrogen transformations in riparian wetland soil. {yields}Denitrification is the main process responsible for nitrate removal in the riparian zone of Salburua wetland. {yields

  15. Transport and survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi H.; Enemark, Heidi; Olsen, Annette

    The widespread waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is frequently transmitted to humans via contaminated drinking and recreational water. Nearly all drinking water in Denmark is groundwater, which can be contaminated with oocysts e.g. from application of contaminated manure to the field...... in the leachates from soil columns to which Cryptosporidium positive slurry had been injected. Although recovery rates were low, regardless of slurry type, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns. Variations in the leachate patterns were recorded between soil columns added raw and liquid slurry...

  16. Transport and survival of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Soil Columns Following Applications of Raw and Separated Liquid Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H.H.; Enemark, Heidi L.; Olsen, A.

    The widespread waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is primarily transmitted to humans via contaminated drinking and recreational water. Nearly all drinking water in Denmark is groundwater, but this can be contaminated with oocysts from application of contaminated manure to the field. Oocysts...... in the leachates from soil columns to which Cryptosporidium positive slurry had been injected. Although recovery rates were low, regardless of slurry type, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns. Variations in the leachate patterns were recorded between soil columns added raw and liquid slurry...

  17. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi Huus; Enemark, Heidi L.; Olsen, Annette

    2012-01-01

    to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for ground water contamination as compared to application of raw slurry.......The potential for transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a four week period......, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method although recovery rates were low (liquid slurry leached 73% and 90% more oocysts compared with columns with injected and surface applied raw slurry, respectively...

  18. Long-term flow rates and biomat zone hydrology in soil columns receiving septic tank effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, C D; Gardner, E A; Kirchhof, G; Menzies, N W

    2006-07-01

    Soil absorption systems (SAS) are used commonly to treat and disperse septic tank effluent (STE). SAS can hydraulically fail as a result of the low permeable biomat zone that develops on the infiltrative surface. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the hydraulic properties of biomats grown in soils of different textures, to investigate the long-term acceptance rates (LTAR) from prolonged application of STE, and to assess if soils were of major importance in determining LTAR. The STE was applied to repacked sand, Oxisol and Vertisol soil columns over a period of 16 months, at equivalent hydraulic loading rates of 50, 35 and 8L/m(2)/d, respectively. Infiltration rates, soil matric potentials, and biomat hydraulic properties were measured either directly from the soil columns or calculated using established soil physics theory. Biomats 1 to 2 cm thick developed in all soils columns with hydraulic resistances of 27 to 39 d. These biomats reduced a 4 order of magnitude variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) between the soils to a one order of magnitude variation in LTAR. A relationship between biomat resistance and organic loading rate was observed in all soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity influenced the rate and extent of biomat development. However, once the biomat was established, the LTAR was governed by the resistance of the biomat and the sub-biomat soil unsaturated flow regime induced by the biomat. Results show that whilst initial soil K(s) is likely to be important in the establishment of the biomat zone in a trench, LTAR is determined by the biomat resistance and the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity, not the K(s) of a soil. The results call into question the commonly used approach of basing the LTAR, and ultimately trench length in SAS, on the initial K(s) of soils.

  19. Transformations of the perturbed two-body problem to unperturbed harmonic oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szebehely, V; Bond, V

    1983-05-01

    Singular, nonlinear, and Liapunov unstable equations are made regular and linear through transformations that change the perturbed planar problem of two bodies into unperturbed and undamped harmonic oscillators with constant coefficients, so that the stable solution may be immediately written in terms of the new variables. The use of arbitrary and special functions for the transformations allows the systematic discussion of previously introduced and novel anomalies. For the case of the unperturbed two-body problem, it is proved that if transformations are power functions of the radial variable, only the eccentric and the true anomalies (with the corresponding transformations of the radial variable) will result in harmonic oscillators. The present method significantly reduces computation requirements in autonomous space operations. 11 references.

  20. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esther Phillip; Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2012-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  1. Soft soil strengthening by stone columns: case of the embankment under the bridge “Moulay Youssef” (Rabat/Salé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehab Noura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The soil is generally a heterogeneous material presenting very variable characteristics. In a general way, the main problems related to soils are: low bearing capacity, deformations under static or dynamic loads, large displacements and large settlements of soft soil where the soil moves according to a fixed ground water table. The development of soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering has led to the amelioration of a wide range of soil improvement techniques. These techniques consist in modifying the characteristics of the ground by physical action or by incorporating columnar inclusions made of highly compacted gravel or granular material into the original soil. Stone column is one of the soft ground improvement methods, applicable to a wide range of soil strata and an economical method of support in compressible and cohesive soils. However, there are many difficulties in quantitative analysis of soil column interaction due to the fact that bearing capacity and consolidation behavior of stone column-mat foundation system is affected by various parameters. In the present study, mechanism and various parameters of stone column behavior are investigated by loading tests. Also, tests results are compared to the finite element numerical modeling “Plaxis 2D” (case study: the embankment under the bridge “Moulay Youssef, Rabat/Salé”.

  2. Dynamic Characteristics of Saturated Silty Soil Ground Treated by Stone Column Composite Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A shaking table model test was carried out to develop an understanding of the performance improvement of saturated silty soil ground using stone column composite foundation as reinforcement. It is found that at less than 0.161 g loading acceleration, soil between piles has not yet been liquefied, the response acceleration scarcely enlarges, and the shear displacement almost does not appear in silty soil. At 0.252 g loading acceleration, as a result of liquefaction of soil between piles, the response acceleration increases rapidly and reaches its peak, and the shear displacement of silty soil increases significantly. At 0.325 g loading acceleration, the integral rigidity of foundation decreases greatly, which reduces its capability of vibration transmission and result in the response acceleration amplification coefficient is less than that at the former loading acceleration, but the shear displacement of silty soil further increases. The stone column composite foundation can greatly reduce both the shear displacement and the settlement of ground compared with untreated foundation. Under the condition of 7-degree seismic fortification, the design meets seismic resistance requirements.

  3. Biodegradation of No. 2 diesel fuel in the vadose zone: A soil column study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widrig, D.L.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Packed soil columns were used to simulate and investigate in situ biological remediation of soil contaminated with diesel fuel. The authors investigated and evaluated several operating strategies, including continuous flooding of the column soil with nutrient solution, and periodic operating cycles consisting of flooding followed by draining and aeration. The objectives were: (a) to determine the extent of diesel fuel degradation in soil columns under four operating conditions (biologically inhibited control; continuous saturation with nitrogen and phosphorus amendments; periodic operation, consisting of flooding with nitrogen and phosphorus, followed by draining and forced aeration; and periodic operation, consisting of flooding with nitrogen phosphorus, and calcium and magnesium amendments, followed by draining and forced aeration); (b) to evaluate CO 2 production and oxygen consumption as indicators of biodegradation; (c) to monitor hydraulic conductivity under different operating strategies; and (d) to examine the system requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus. The results showed that periodic operation promoted higher rates of biodegradation of diesel fuel in soil and minimized the use of water containing nutrient amendments, and consequently the possible need to collect and treat such water. The authors believe that monitoring CO 2 and O 2 levels in situ may provide a means of optimizing the timing of flooding and aeration events to increase degradation rates. Results of this laboratory study will aid in improving the design and operation of field-scale bioremediation systems

  4. Column leaching of chromium and nickel from a contaminated soil using EDTA and citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Soro, Liliane; Bordas, François; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the column leaching of a soil contaminated mainly with Cr and Ni by using two chelants: citric acid (biodegradable) and EDTA (non-biodegradable) followed with water rinse. The chelants lead to Cr and Ni leaching, in addition to major elements (Ca, Fe, Mg, Al, Mn and Zn) showing the dissolution of soil mineral constituents. EDTA leaches more major elements and Ni than citric acid related to the respective stability of metal–chelant complexes; citric acid leaches more Cr than EDTA, certainly because of a substitution reaction with Cr(VI). In the case of alternating chelant/water applications, leaching occurs during the chelant applications, but also during water applications. In the case of chelant/water applications followed by continuous water application, both Cr and Ni leach over time. This increased mobility could be due to the residual chelant present in soil as well as to the dissolution/mobilization of mineral or organic soil fractions. - Highlights: ► Column leaching of an industrial soil contaminated with chromium and nickel. ► Citric acid or EDTA were used alternatively or followed with water rinse. ► Chelants lead to Cr and Ni leaching and the dissolution of soil mineral constituents. ► Leaching of these two metals proceeds continuously during water rinse. ► Chelants deeply impacted Cr and Ni mobility. - Citric acid or EDTA application deeply impact Cr and Ni mobility during column leaching of a contaminated soil.

  5. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  6. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9-1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5-1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5-1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions.

  7. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangbao Xia

    Full Text Available Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL, soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC and absolute soil solution concentration (CS decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9-1.2 m and shallow water levels (0.6 m respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5-1.8 m.The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5-1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions.

  8. Batch soil adsorption and column transport studies of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jennifer D; Mark, Noah W; Taylor, Susan; Šimunek, J; Brusseau, M L; Dontsova, Katerina M

    2017-04-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is currently a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet the new sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and human exposure potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate and transport of DNAN in soil, with specific focus on sorption processes. Batch and column experiments were conducted using soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. In the batch rate studies, change in DNAN concentration with time was evaluated using the first order equation, while adsorption isotherms were fitted using linear and Freundlich equations. Solution mass-loss rate coefficients ranged between 0.0002h -1 and 0.0068h -1 . DNAN was strongly adsorbed by soils with linear adsorption coefficients ranging between 0.6 and 6.3Lg -1 , and Freundlich coefficients between 1.3 and 34mg 1 - n L n kg -1 . Both linear and Freundlich adsorption coefficients were positively correlated with the amount of organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the soil, indicating that similar to TNT, organic matter and clay minerals may influence adsorption of DNAN. The results of the miscible-displacement column experiments confirmed the impact of sorption on retardation of DNAN during transport. It was also shown that under flow conditions DNAN transforms readily with formation of amino transformation products, 2-ANAN and 4-ANAN. The magnitudes of retardation and transformation observed in this study result in significant attenuation potential for DNAN, which would be anticipated to

  9. Batch soil adsorption and column transport studies of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jennifer D.; Mark, Noah W.; Taylor, Susan; Šimunek, J.; Brusseau, M. L.; Dontsova, Katerina M.

    2017-04-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is currently a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet the new sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and human exposure potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate and transport of DNAN in soil, with specific focus on sorption processes. Batch and column experiments were conducted using soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. In the batch rate studies, change in DNAN concentration with time was evaluated using the first order equation, while adsorption isotherms were fitted using linear and Freundlich equations. Solution mass-loss rate coefficients ranged between 0.0002 h- 1 and 0.0068 h- 1. DNAN was strongly adsorbed by soils with linear adsorption coefficients ranging between 0.6 and 6.3 L g- 1, and Freundlich coefficients between 1.3 and 34 mg1 - n Ln kg- 1. Both linear and Freundlich adsorption coefficients were positively correlated with the amount of organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the soil, indicating that similar to TNT, organic matter and clay minerals may influence adsorption of DNAN. The results of the miscible-displacement column experiments confirmed the impact of sorption on retardation of DNAN during transport. It was also shown that under flow conditions DNAN transforms readily with formation of amino transformation products, 2-ANAN and 4-ANAN. The magnitudes of retardation and transformation observed in this study result in significant attenuation potential for DNAN, which would be anticipated to

  10. Continuous treatment of heavy metal contaminated clay soils by extraction in stirred tanks and in a countercurrent column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, B.J.W.; Tels, M.

    1991-01-01

    Extn. of metals from 2 contaminated waste site clay soils by 0.1-0.3 N HCl solns. was tested in 3 lab. scale, continuous processes: 2 stirred tank reactors (CSTR' s) in series; a countercurrent sieve-plate column fed with flocculated clay soil materials; and a combination of tank reactor and column.

  11. Experimental and modelling studies of radionuclide uptake in vegetated soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, J. K.; Butler, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations are currently being conducted at Imperial College into the upward migration of radionuclides from a contaminated water table and their subsequent uptake by plant root systems. This programme includes both experimental studies and related mathematical modelling. Previous work has been primarily with lysimeters. However, these experiments are expensive and somewhat lengthy and the alteration of key features is difficult. Therefore, an experimental research programme using smaller scale columns where conditions can be readily altered has been set up under a NERC studentship. This paper presents both the observed and simulated results from some preliminary column experiments involving the movement of two different radionuclides. It will be shown that physically-based mathematical models developed for field scale problems are readily applicable at the scale of the experimental columns. Work is currently in hand to demonstrate the validity of the column experiments for determining parameters associated with various soil, plant and radionuclide types. (author)

  12. The response of soil biota to phosphate fertilization in grassland columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoyi, Israel; Winstanley, Henry; Fowler, Andrew; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2017-04-01

    The United Nations has predicted that food production is expected to rise by 50% in the year 2020 to feed the increasing world population. Grasslands play significant roles in food production and occupy about 70% of the world's agricultural land. However, intensive use of inorganic fertilizers often associated with increased food production can lead to poor soil quality and environmental pollution. For instance, excessive phosphorus (P) application can lead to eutrophication in surface waters. Although P plays vital roles in many metabolic processes in plants, its primary source rock phosphate is finite. Consequently, the development of more P efficient agricultural systems is paramount. P cycling within the microbial biomass is essential to the P cycle within the soil with its key pathways for P mobilization and mineralization from various soil pools into plant available forms. In this study, soil columns were setup in a greenhouse using a P deficient Irish soil (P index 1). The columns were planted with Lolium perenne and fertilized with 0, 5, 10 and 20 kg/ha inorganic P representing control, low, medium and high rates respectively alongside a full complement of other nutrients. Each treatment was replicated six times and managed for 14 weeks. Results after 14 weeks showed that the weekly measurements of phosphate at different soil depths identified only traces of P in soil solution for the duration of 14 weeks, even after P application. There was a significant increase in alkaline and acid phosphatase activities with the high P compared to the control but no significant effect on plant shoot and root biomass, abundances of cultivable calcium phosphate-, phytate- and phosphonate-utilizing bacteria upon P fertilization. L. perenne rhizosphere of the highest P treatment had significantly lower abundance of bacterial phoD genes, mycorrhizal hyphal and arbuscular colonization rates compared to the control. Likewise, the abundance of bacterial- and fungal

  13. Adsorption and desorption for dynamics transport of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, J.

    2017-12-01

    Batch experiments have been carried out to study the adsorption of heavy metals in soils, and the migration and transformation of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in the soil of a vegetable base were studied by dynamic adsorption and desorption soil column experiments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of initial concentration and pH value on the adsorption process of Cr(Ⅵ). Breakthrough curve were used to evaluate the capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption in soil columns. The results show that the higher the initial concentration, the worse the adsorption capacity of Cr(Ⅵ). The adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) was strongly sensitive to pH value. The capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption is maximized at very low pH value. This may be due to changes in pH that cause a series of complex reactions in Cr(Ⅵ). In a strongly acidic environment, the reaction of Cr(Ⅵ) with hydrogen ions is accompanied by the formation of Cr3+, which reacts with the soil free iron-aluminum oxide to produce hydroxide in the soil. The results of the desorption experiments indicate that Cr(Ⅵ) is more likely to leach from this soil, but if the eluent is strong acid solution, the leaching process will be slow and persistent. The program CXTFIT was used to fit the breakthrough curve to estimate parameters. The results of the calculation of the dispersion coefficient (D) can be obtained by this program. The two-site model fit the breakthrough curve data of Cr(Ⅵ) well, and the parameters calculated by CXTFIT can be used to explain the behavior of Cr(Ⅵ) migration and transformation in soil columns. When pH=2, the retardation factor (R) reach at 79.71 while the value of the R is generally around 10 in other experiments. The partitioning coefficient β shows that more than half of the adsorption sites are rate-limited in this adsorption process and non-equilibrium effects the Cr(Ⅵ) transport process in this soil.

  14. Phosphorus vertical migration in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorous application rate: a soil column leaching experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Muqiu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Quanlai; Lu, Caiyan

    2009-01-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to study the vertical migration of phosphorus in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorus fertilization rates. The results showed that total dissolved phosphorus concentration in the leachates from the two soils was nearly the same, but dissolved inorganic phosphorus concentration was obviously different. In all fertilization treatments, aquic brown soil had a higher content of phosphorus in calcium chloride extracts compared with light chernozem. But Olsen phosphorus content was higher at the soil depth beneath 0-20 cm, and increased with increasing phosphorus application rate.

  15. Two approaches for sequential extraction of radionuclides in soils: batch and column methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, M.; Rauret, G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-step sequential extraction designed by Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) is applied to two types of soil (sandy and sandy-loam) which had been previously contaminated with a radionuclide aerosol containing 134 Cs, 85 Sr and 110m Ag. This scheme is applied using both batch and column methods. The radionuclide distribution obtained with this scheme depends both on the method and on soil type. Compared with the batch method, column extraction is an inadvisable method. Kinetic aspects seem to be important, especially in the first and third fractions. The radionuclide distribution shows that radiostrontium has high mobility, radiocaesium is highly retained by clay minerals whereas Fe/Mn oxides and organic matter have an important role in radiosilver retention. (Author)

  16. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values......The influence of clay content in soil-pore structure development and the relative importance of macroporosity in governing convective fluid flow are two key challenges toward better understanding and quantifying soil ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil-water...... retention and air permeability) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning were combined and used from two scales on intact soil columns (100 and 580 cm3). The columns were sampled along a natural clay gradient at six locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 and L6 with 0.11, 0.16, 0.21, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.46 kg kg−1...

  17. Control structure selection for energy integrated distillation column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.E.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    This paper treats a case study on control structure selection for an almost binary distillation column. The column is energy integrated with a heat pump in order to transfer heat from the condenser to the reboiler. This integrated plant configuration renders the possible control structures somewhat...... different from what is usual for binary distillation columns. Further the heat pump enables disturbances to propagate faster through the system. The plant has six possible actuators of which three must be used to stabilize the system. Hereby three actuators are left for product purity control. An MILP...

  18. The hydraulic diffusivity and conductivity determination of structured purple soil and purple latosol by vertical infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appoloni, C.R.; Souza, A.D.B. de; Fante Junior, L.; Oliveira Junior, J.M. de; Oliveira, J.C.M. de.

    1990-01-01

    The hydraulic diffusivity and conductivity functions of LR (purple latosol) and TE (structured purple soil) (levels A and B) soil samples from the Londrina-PR region were calculated by means of the moisture profile and data from the time evolution of the wet front, taken through measurements of the water infiltration in a soil column and a variational of the vertical flow. The wet front data were taken in a acrylic column coupled in bits base with a porous plate that permitted the water flow against the gravitational field with a suitable velocity of 0.12 cm/min. The moisture profile data were obtained by the gamma ray attenuation method, with a 60 Co source and a Na I (TL) scintillation detector. With a vertical and horizontal measurement table the moisture profile data θ (z,t) were taken in many points of the soil column. (author)

  19. Influence of soil surface structure on simulated infiltration and subsequent evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verplancke, H.; Hartmann, R.; Boodt, M. de

    1983-01-01

    A laboratory rainfall and evaporation experiment was conducted to study the effectiveness of the soil surface structure on infiltration and subsequent evaporation. The stability of the surface layer was improved through the application of synthetic additives such as bituminous emulsion and a prepolymer of polyurea (Uresol). The soil column where the soil surface was treated with a bituminous emulsion shows a decrease in depth of wetting owing to the water repellency of that additive, and consequently an increased runoff. However, the application of Uresol to the surface layer improved the infiltration. The main reason for these differences is that in the untreated soils there is a greater clogging of macropores originating from aggregate breakdown under raindrop impact in the top layer. The evaporation experiment started after all columns were wetted to a similar soil-water content and was carried out in a controlled environmental tunnel. Soil-water content profiles were established during evaporation by means of a fully automatic γ-ray scanner. It appears that in both treatments the cumulative evaporation was less than in the untreated soil. This was due to the effect of an aggregated and stabilized surface layer. Under a treated soil surface the evaporation remains constant during the whole experiment. However, under an untreated soil surface different evaporation stages were recorded. From these experiments the impression is gained that the effect of aggregating the soil surface is an increase of the saturated hydraulic conductivity under conditions near saturation. On the other hand, a finely structured layer exhibits a greater hydraulic conductivity during evaporation in the lower soil-water potential range than a coarsely aggregated layer. So it may be concluded that, to obtain the maximum benefit from the available water - optimal water conservation - much attention must be given to the aggregation of the top soil and its stability. (author)

  20. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  1. Infiltration of water in disturbed soil columns as affected by clay dispersion and aggregate slaking

    OpenAIRE

    Amezketa, E.; Aragües, R.; Gazol, R.

    2004-01-01

    Soil crusting negatively affects the productivity and sustainability of irrigated agriculture, reducing water infiltration and plant emergence, and enhancing surface runoff and erosion. Clay dispersion and slaking of the aggregates at the soil surface are the main processes responsible for crusting. The infiltration rates (IR) of ten arid-zone soils in disturbed soil columns were measured and their relative susceptibilities to dispersion and slaking were determined. It was also examined wheth...

  2. Unsaturated transport of inorganic cations in undisturbed soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, P.M.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    The unsaturated transport of Sr, Co, and Ca were studied in undisturbed soil columns (14 x 40 cm) of saprolitic shale to evaluate the significance of time dependent mass transfer and multispecies competitive exchange during transport. Observed breakthrough curves (BTCs) for Sr and Co were delayed relative to nonreactive Br BTC indicating that the former tracers were adsorbed by the soil. Effluent concentrations of Sr and Co were modeled with the classical convective dispersive (CD) equation and nonequilibrium mass transfer considerations did not appear necessary. Cation exchange equilibria relationships obtained from both shake batch and miscible displacement methods adequately described the thermodynamic processes which were prevalent during transport. These results suggest that the preferential transport of a reactive tracer is negligible for the realistic unsaturated conditions used in the study, and that the massive saprolite within the soil is a chemically active constituent during transport of reactive solutes. The implications of these findings for modeling in-situ subsurface contaminant transport are discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs

  3. Managed aquifer recharge: the fate of pharmaceuticals from infiltrated treated wastewater investigated through soil column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Selke, Stephanie; Balsaa, Peter; Wefer-Roehl, Annette; Kübeck, Christine; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL addresses water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. Within this framework, column experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of pharmaceuticals when secondary treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated through a natural soil (organic matter content 6.8%) being considered for MAR. Three parallel experiments were run under conditions of continuous infiltration (one column) and wetting-drying cycles (two columns, with different analytes) over a 16 month time period. The pharmaceuticals diclofenac, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, naproxen, gemfibrozil, and fenoprofen, as well as the antibiotics doxycycline, sulfadimidine, and sulfamethoxazole, are commonly present in treated wastewater in varying concentrations. For the experiments, concentration variability was reduced by spiking the column inflow water with these compounds. Concentrations were periodically analyzed at different depths in each column and the mass passing each depth over the duration of the experiment was calculated. At the end of the experiments, sorbed pharmaceuticals were extracted from soil samples collected from different depths. A pressurized liquid extraction method was developed and resulted in recoveries from spiked post-experiment soil samples ranging from 64% (gemfibrozil) to 82% (carbamazepine) for the six non-antibiotic compounds. Scaling results by these recovery rates, the total mass of pharmaceuticals sorbed to the soil in the columns was calculated and compared to the calculated attenuated mass (i.e. mass that left the water phase). The difference between the attenuated mass and the sorbed mass is considered to be mass that degraded. Results for continuous infiltration conditions indicate that for carbamazepine and diclofenac, sorption is the primary attenuation mechanism, with missing (i.e. degraded) mass lying within the propagated

  4. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  5. Improved removal of iodine-125 from effluents by the soil column method using a laterite soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, S H [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1997-02-01

    The soil column experiments were conducted to treat the liquid wastes from hospitals containing {sup 125}I. Three sorbent samples of laterite clay materials with different content of iron oxides (geothite, {alpha}-FeOOH) and hydroxides were used to sorb anionic iodate. Post-treatment of the liquid wastes with sodium hypochlorite (redox reagent) oxidized the iodide to the desirable iodate ion. pH after treatment ranges between 4.8 to 5.8 that is not very much different from the initial value pH4.5. The results show that 90 to 97% sorption of iodine with the decontamination factor between 10-32 could be obtained after the first two hours of experiments. The concentration has decreased from an initial value of 10 Bq{center_dot}mL{sup -1} to the concentration ranges 0.3 to 0.9 Bq{center_dot}mL{sup -1}. For the soil at pH between 4.5 to 6.0, positive charges predominated on the kaolinite, geothite and aluminum hydroxides. The negative {sup 125}I anions were electrostatically held by the positive charges on the mineral components of the laterite clay materials. The treated effluents could be released to the environment safely after further dilution and decay. The storage period will decrease tremendously providing better management for the disposal of the wastes by generators. The batch experiments conducted using different sorbent masses of soils, show that there was a drop in sorption where the mass of soils falls below approximately between 0 to 0.25 g. The sorption remains constant with the soil mass above 0.25 g. Another batch experiment using different concentration, shows that adsorption capacity of the laterite soil was 1.1 {mu}Ci/g. The adsorption is about 96% with a distribution coefficient of 1170. The experiments conducted show that anionic iodate in the liquid wastes can be removed by the laterite soil material. The column treatment method was more effective, easy to handle, and has low a capital and maintenance cost. (author). 9 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Stone column settlement performance in structured anisotropic clays: the influence of creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Sexton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed elasto-viscoplastic Creep-SCLAY1S model has been used in conjunction with PLAXIS 2D to investigate the effectiveness of vibro-replacement in a creep-prone clay. The Creep-SCLAY1S model accounts for anisotropy, bonding, and destructuration, and uses the concept of a constant rate of viscoplastic multiplier to calculate creep strain rate. A comparison of settlement improvement factors with and without creep indicates that ‘total’ settlement improvement factors (primary plus creep are lower than their ‘primary’ counterparts (primary settlement only. The lowest settlement improvement factors arise for analyses incorporating the effect of bonding and destructuration. Examination of the variations of vertical stress with time and depth has indicated that vertical stress is transferred from the soil to the column as the soil creeps. This results in additional column yielding. In addition, the radial and hoop stresses in the soil are lower for the ‘creep’ case. The reduced radial stresses lead to additional column bulging and hence more settlement, whereas the hoop stress reductions appear to be a secondary effect, caused by additional plastic deformation for the ‘creep’ case.

  7. Modeling Stone Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jorge

    2017-07-11

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the "unit cell", longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  8. Evaluation of soil-structure interaction for structures subjected to earthquake loading with different types of foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwi Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available However though the structures are supported on soil, most of the designers do not consider the soil structure interaction and its subsequent effect on structure during an earthquake. Different soil properties can affect seismic waves as they pass through a soil layer. When a structure is subjected to an earthquake excitation, it interacts the foundation and soil, and thus changes the motion of the ground. It means that the movement of the whole ground structure system is influenced by type of soil as well as by the type of structure. Tall buildings are supposed to be of engineered construction in sense that they might have been analyzed and designed to meet the provision of relevant codes of practice and building bye-laws. IS 1893: 2002 “Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures” gives response spectrum for different types of soil such as hard, medium and soft. An attempt has been made in this paper to study the effect of Soil-structure interaction on multi storeyed buildings with various foundation systems. Also to study the response of buildings subjected to seismic forces with Rigid and Flexible foundations. Multi storeyed buildings with fixed and flexible support subjected to seismic forces were analyzed under different soil conditions like hard, medium and soft. The buildings were analyzed by Response spectrum method using software SAP2000. The response of building frames such as Lateral deflection, Story drift, Base shear, Axial force and Column moment values for all building frames were presented in this paper.

  9. Stiff Columns as Liquefaction Mitigation Measure for Retrofit of Existing Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ground reinforcement with jet grouted columns under shallow foundations of existing buildings was analysed using numerical modelling. This study is related with ground reinforcement by installing stiff jet grouted columns around the shallow foundations of existing building when the foundation soil is liquefied during an earthquake. The isolated shallow square footing pad supporting a typical simple frame structure was constructed on the reinforced ground with stiff jet grouted column rows at the shallow depth from the ground surface. This soil-structure system was modelled and analyzed as plane-strain using the FLAC (Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua 2D dynamic modelling and analysis software. The results showed that liquefaction-induced large settlement of shallow foundation of existing building can be reduced to tolerable limits by applying ground reinforcement with continuous rows vertical jet grouted columns adjacent to footing pad.

  10. Ground improvement using soil–cement columns: Experimental investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farouk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of heavy structures on soils of low relative density is a challenging task. The inclusion of soil–cement columns produced by the deep mixing method is one of the soil stabilizing techniques that could be applied successfully to overcome this challenge. Nevertheless, this technique did not receive a considerable attention in Egypt yet. In the first part of this study, two different natural silty sand soils extracted from the Delta of the River Nile were mixed with cement to prepare samples of different cement doses and different water cement ratios. After curing, the hardened samples were tested and their unconfined compressive strength was investigated. The second part of this study investigates the interaction between a strip footing model and Nile deltaic soil improved by a group of soil–cement columns. Results of the first part of this study showed that the compressive strength of the investigated Nile delta soils could be increased even at lower values of cement doses. Results extracted from the second part of this study showed that a considerable settlement reduction up to 80% could be achieved depending on both the number and the length of the soil–cement columns that is used to improve the soil.

  11. Land application of sewage sludge: A soil columns study | Gascó ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sewage sludge was mixed into the top 100 mm of each column at the rates of 357 (H), 223 (M) and 22 Mg·ha-1 (L). Treatment H was calculated according to the critical soil concentration and treatments M and L were calculated according to the amount of metals which may be added to agricultural land on 10 yr average

  12. The influence of mass transfer on solute transport in column experiments with an aggregated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul V.; Goltz, Mark N.; Summers, R. Scott; Crittenden, John C.; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter

    1987-06-01

    The spreading of concentration fronts in dynamic column experiments conducted with a porous, aggregated soil is analyzed by means of a previously documented transport model (DFPSDM) that accounts for longitudinal dispersion, external mass transfer in the boundary layer surrounding the aggregate particles, and diffusion in the intra-aggregate pores. The data are drawn from a previous report on the transport of tritiated water, chloride, and calcium ion in a column filled with Ione soil having an average aggregate particle diameter of 0.34 cm, at pore water velocities from 3 to 143 cm/h. The parameters for dispersion, external mass transfer, and internal diffusion were predicted for the experimental conditions by means of generalized correlations, independent of the column data. The predicted degree of solute front-spreading agreed well with the experimental observations. Consistent with the aggregate porosity of 45%, the tortuosity factor for internal pore diffusion was approximately equal to 2. Quantitative criteria for the spreading influence of the three mechanisms are evaluated with respect to the column data. Hydrodynamic dispersion is thought to have governed the front shape in the experiments at low velocity, and internal pore diffusion is believed to have dominated at high velocity; the external mass transfer resistance played a minor role under all conditions. A transport model such as DFPSDM is useful for interpreting column data with regard to the mechanisms controlling concentration front dynamics, but care must be exercised to avoid confounding the effects of the relevant processes.

  13. Remobilization of americium in soil columns under experimental rhizo-spheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrier, T.; Martin-Garin, A.; Morello, M. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The biogeochemical behaviour of americium in subsurface soils plays a dominant role on the potential migration of this actinide, but is currently poorly known. The identification and understanding of these processes is of major concern for this highly (radio)toxic element and can allow the determination of its impact on the natural media. This research investigates the relevant processes controlling americium biogeochemical speciation in the rhizosphere of an agricultural soil. Lixiviation tests were performed on columns packed with a 2 mm-sieved calcareous soil contaminated with {sup 241}Am (500 Bq.g{sup -1}), under steady-state unsaturated or saturated hydric flow conditions. The columns were percolated with soil solution of varied compositions, containing citrate and/or glucose simulating root exudates in non-sterile conditions. The physico-chemical parameters of the outlet solution (pH, conductivity, major ions, organic acids) were monitored, as well as the microbial activity. Inorganic and organic speciation of {sup 241}Am is supported by geochemical modeling with JChess, using a thermodynamic database based on NEA database and the latest PSI recommendations. The percolation of a solution in equilibrium with the soil released small amount of americium (<5 mBq/cm{sup 3}), as predicted by the high {sup 241}Am K{sub d} values. 10{sup -4} M concentrations of citrate, glucose or both combined did not enhance remobilization either. Poor remobilization was also observed at high glucose concentrations (10{sup -2} M), despite an effective glucose microbial degradation, the production of ligands such as acetate, and important changes in the chemistry of the solution. On the contrary, high concentrations of citrate (10{sup -2} M) released 1000 times more americium, which is in accordance with previous studies. Even greater releases (10000 times) were observed when 10{sup -2} M glucose was added to 10{sup -2} M citrate. The remobilization of americium resulting from the

  14. Gamma ray transmission for hydraulic conductivity measurement of undisturbed soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Camargo Moreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work had the objective to determine the Hydraulic Conductivity K(theta function for different depth levels z, of columns of undisturbed soil, using the gamma ray transmission technique applied to the Sisson method. The results indicated a growing behavior for K(theta and a homogeneous soil density, both in relation to the increase of the depth. The methodology of gamma ray transmission showed satisfactory results on the determination of the hydraulic conductivity in columns of undisturbed soil, besides being very reliable and a nondestructive method.O estudo da condutividade hidráulica para solos não saturados é essencial quando aplicado às situações relacionadas à irrigação, drenagem e transporte de nutrientes no solo, é uma importante propriedade para desenvolvimentos de culturas agrícolas. Este trabalho tem o objetivo de determinar a função Condutividade Hidráulica K(teta, em diferentes níveis z de profundidade, em colunas de solo indeformado, utilizando a transmissão de raios gama aplicada ao método de Sisson. Os resultados indicam um comportamento crescente para K(teta e uma densidade de solo homogênea, ambos em relação ao aumento da profundidade. A metodologia de transmissão de raios gama mostrou resultados bastante satisfatórios na determinação da condutividade hidráulica em colunas de solo indeformado, além de ser muito confiável e não destrutivo.

  15. Migration of Co and Cs radionuclides through a loam soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Hakimi Sakuma bin Syed Ahmad; Shimooka, K.

    1990-01-01

    A soil column experiment was conducted to determine the migration of Co and Cs radionuclides through a loam soil. The different migration rates of the radionuclides at low and high concentrations were determined at pH 7. Retardation factor (Rf) both the radionuclides at low and high concentrations were determined by fitting adsorbed concentration distribution equations to observed values. The calculation shows that the Rf1=500 and Rf2=3 for Co at high and low concentrations, respectively. For Cs, the Rf1=600 and Rf2=5 at high and low concentrations, respectively. The results shows that major portions of both the radionuclides were adsorbed onto the soil layer at the top by ion exchange mechanism which resulted in the high retardation factor values. Minor portions had migrated downwards as insoluble cations, pseudocolloids and very fine silt particles resulting in the low retardation factor

  16. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dousset, S., E-mail: sylvie.dousset@limos.uhp-nancy.f [Nancy-Universite, CNRS, LIMOS, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Thevenot, M. [Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, Geosystemes, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schrack, D. [INRA-SAD ASTER, 88500 Mirecourt (France); AFSSA, Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches en Hydrologie, 54000 Nancy (France); Gouy, V.; Carluer, N. [UR Milieux Aquatiques, Ecologie et Pollution, Cemagref, 69336 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  18. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, S.; Thevenot, M.; Schrack, D.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  19. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  20. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousset, S; Thévenot, M; Schrack, D; Gouy, V; Carluer, N

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. HETP evaluation of structured packing distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Orlando Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Several tests with a hydrocarbon mixture of known composition (C8-C14, obtained from DETEN Chemistry S.A., have been performed in a laboratory distillation column, having 40mm of nominal diameter and 2.2m high, with internals of Sulzer DX gauze stainless steel structured packing. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate HETP of a structured packing laboratory scale distillation column, operating continuously. Six HETP correlations available in the literature were compared in order to find out which is the most appropriate for structured packing columns working with medium distillates. Prior to the experimental tests, simulation studies using commercial software PRO/II® were performed in order to establish the optimum operational conditions for the distillation, especially concerning operating pressure, top and bottom temperatures, feed location and reflux ratio. The results of PRO/II® were very similar to the analysis of the products obtained during continuous operation, therefore permitting the use of the properties calculated by that software on the theoretical models investigated. The theoretical models chosen for HETP evaluation were: Bravo, Rocha and Fair (1985; Rocha, Bravo and Fair (1993, 1996; Brunazzi and Pagliant (1997; Carlo, Olujić and Pagliant (2006; Olujić et al., (2004. Modifications concerning calculation of specific areas were performed on the correlations in order to fit them for gauze packing HETP evaluation. As the laboratory distillation column was operated continuously, different HETP values were found by the models investigated for each section of the column. The low liquid flow rates in the top section of the column are a source of error for HETP evaluation by the models; therefore, more reliable HETP values were found in the bottom section, in which liquid flow rates were much greater. Among the theoretical models, Olujić et al. (2004 has shown good results relative to the experimental tests. In addition, the

  2. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  3. MODEL TESTS AND 3D ELASTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR STEEL PIPE PILES WITH WINGS IN STALLED IN SOIL CEMENT COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Toshiyuki; Teramoto, Shuntarou; Kimura, Makoto

    Steel pipe piles with wings installed in soil cement column is a composite foundation of pile consisting of soil improvement with cement and steel pipe with wings. This type of pile shows higher vertical bearing capacity when compared to steel pipe piles that are installed without soil cement. It is thought the wings contribute to higher bearing capacity of this type of piles. The wings are also thought to play the role of structural unification of pile foundations and load transfer. In this study, model test and 3D elastic finite element analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the effect of wings on the structural unification of pile foundation and the load transfer mechanism. Firstly, the model test was carried out in order to grasp the influence of pile with and without wings, the shape of wings of the pile and the unconfined compression strength of the soil cement on the structural unification of the pile foundation. The numerical analysis of the model test was then carried out on the intermediate part of the pile foundation with wings and mathematical model developed. Finally load tran sfer mechanism was checked for the entire length of the pile through this mathematical model and the load sharing ratio of the wings and stress distribution occurring in the soil cement clarified. In addition, the effect of the wing interval on the structural unification of the pile foundation and load transfer was also checked and clarified.

  4. Column leaching from a Danish forest soil amended with wood ashes: fate of major and trace elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Hansen, M.; Ingerslev, M.

    2018-01-01

    Application of wood ashes onto two Danish forest soil horizons (A- and O-horizons) was investigated through a series of column experiments for ash dosages of 3, 9 and 30 Mg ha−1. Developments in the composition of the percolating soil solutions were investigated both in a short- (below 0.5 m3 m−2...

  5. Nitrogen effects on mobility and plant uptake of heavy metals in sewage sludge applied to soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, P.M.; Mortvedt, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Cation movement in soil under leaching conditions has been associated with N fertilization. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine whether the mobility of some heavy metals applied in the inorganic form or in sewage sludge is enhanced in the presence of various sources of N. Columns of heavy metal-amended soil in plastic well casings were cropped with tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and leached three times with deionized H/sub 2/O. Heavy metal concentrations above check values were not detected in leachates from any column. Mobility of the heavy metals from the inorganic sources was slightly greater than that from the sewage sludge. Nitrogen fertilization did not affect the downward movement of Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb, or Ni in soil but enhanced uptake of these metals by fescue because of increased growth. These results suggest that heavy metal contamination of ground water is not likely in heavy textured soils when sewage sludge applications are accompanied by N fertilization, at least for short periods of time. 11 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  6. An elastoplastic homogenization procedure for predicting the settlement of a foundation on a soil reinforced by columns

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELKRIM, Malek; DE BUHAN, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an elastoplastic homogenization method applied to a soil reinforced by regularly distributed columns. According to this method, the composite reinforced soil is regarded, from a macroscopic point of view, as a homogeneous anisotropic continuous medium, the elastic as well as plastic properties of which can be obtained from the solution to an auxiliary problem attached to the reinforced soil representative cell. Based upon an approximate solution to this problem, in which p...

  7. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  8. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Paulo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical non-equilibrium dual-porosity type formulation for solute transport. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach was used in which the unknown parameters were estimated with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method through implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Sensitivity coefficients were examined in order to determine the most meaningful measurements for identifying the unknown hydraulic and transport parameters. Results obtained using the measured pressure head and solute concentration data collected during the unsaturated soil column experiment revealed the robustness of the proposed approach.

  9. Leaching of Uranium from pit-water application to soil columns. Effect of vegetation, phosphate fertilizer and amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, Juan P.

    2006-01-01

    Pit-water accumulated in the San Rafael uranium (U) Mining and Processing Facility (CMFSR) poses a risk of contaminant dispersion and hinders mining labours in the flooded pits. Soil application of the pit-water may be a way of eliminating it through evapotranspiration, but it requires minimization of U migration to the subsurface water courses in order to be considered an adequate disposal practice. The pH > 7 and carbonate content of the soil may induce the formation of uranyl-carbonate complexes, which have high mobility in soils. Furthermore, its physical and chemical characteristics suggest low metal retention capabilities. A 30 cm long soil column experiment was carried out irrigating pit-water on CMFSR soil with the aim of knowing its U retention capacity, as well as the effect of a phosphate fertilizer, an organic amendment and of vegetation cover on such retention. It was concluded that soil alone was able to retain 60 % of the applied U mass in its first 3 centimeters, leaching 0,6 %. Plant presence enhanced U mobility. However, reduced leachate volume caused by higher evapotranspiration rates balanced this mobility, producing a decrease in the mass of leached U. Phosphate fertilizer incorporated to the soil increased U retention in tits upper centimeters. It also increased vegetation growth, and, accordingly, evapotranspiration in the columns. On the contrary, the use of ground plant material as soil amendment increased U migration. (author) [es

  10. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, M. G. Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita

    2016-01-01

    at a rate of 50 t ha(-1) and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h(-1) after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed...... macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect...... of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils...

  11. Seismic response of elevated rectangular water tanks considering soil structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuvasam, J.; Simon, J.; Packiaraj, J. S.; Agarwal, R.; Goyal, L.; Dhingra, V.

    2017-11-01

    The overhead staged water tanks are susceptible for high lateral forces during earthquakes. Due to which, the failure of beam-columns joints, framing elements and toppling of tanks arise. To avoid such failures, they are analyzed and designed for lateral forced induced by devastating earthquakes assuming the base of the structures are fixed and considering functional needs, response reduction, soil types and severity of ground shaking. In this paper, the flexible base was provided as spring stiffness in order to consider the effect of soil properties on the seismic behaviour of water tanks. A linear time history earthquake analysis was performed using SAP2000. Parametric studies have been carried out based on various types of soils such as soft, medium and hard. The soil stiffness values highly influence the time period and base shear of the structure. The ratios of time period of flexible to fixed base and base shear of flexible to fixed base were observed against capacities of water tank and the overall height of the system. The both responses are found to be increased as the flexibility of soil medium decreases

  12. The leaching of trifloxysulfuron-sodium and pyrithiobac-sodium in soil columns as a function of soil liming - doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v35i2.16349

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Guerra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scarce research has been published concerning the effect of soil pH on the leaching potential of herbicides in tropical soils. Thus, we designed this study to evaluate the influence of soil liming on the leaching of trifloxysulfuron-sodium and pyrithiobac-sodium after simulated rainfall depths in soil columns. In the study, two trials were conducted simultaneously; the first experiment evaluated trifloxysulfuron-sodium (7.5 g ha-1, while the second experiment evaluated pyrithiobac-sodium (70 g ha-1. Both experiments were conducted in a randomized block design with a 2 x 4 x 5 factorial scheme and four replications. The design’s factors corresponded to 2 soil liming conditions (with or without liming, 4 simulated rainfall depths (0, 15, 30, and 45 mm and 5 depths in the soil column (0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, and 20-25 cm. The trials were repeated, and only the source for the soil neutralization was changed, i.e., dolomitic limestone in Experiment 1 and calcium oxide in Experiment 2. Compared to trifloxysulfuron-sodium, the herbicide pyrithiobac-sodium indicated a greater potential for leaching. With more acidic soils, the leaching potential in limed soils was greater for both herbicides. Only the liming that used calcium oxide provided a significant leaching of trifloxysulfuron-sodium for depths greater than 20 cm. Simulated rainfall ≥ 15 mm provided leaching of pyrithiobac-sodium to a depth of 25 cm at near-neutral soil pH values.

  13. Nonlinear coupling of the resistive tearing modes under the unperturbed shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Kazuhiro

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the unperturbed shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is studied. In the case of single helicity, the shear flow activates the unstable mode which finally saturates to a rigid rotor state. In the case of multiple helicity, a variety of flow patterns is created depending on parameters, and always forms the current bubble soon after the collapse of the 3/2 magnetic island. (author)

  14. Uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters for structured soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of dual permeability models (DPM) to predict contaminant transport is contingent upon measured or inversely estimated soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters. The difficulty in unique identification of parameters for the additional macropore- and matrix-macropore interface regions, and knowledge about requisite experimental data for DPM has not been resolved to date. Therefore, this study quantifies uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters of experimental soil columns with different macropore distributions (single macropore, and low- and high-density multiple macropores). Uncertainty evaluation is conducted using adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (AMCMC) and conventional Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithms while assuming 10 out of 17 parameters to be uncertain or random. Results indicate that AMCMC resolves parameter correlations and exhibits fast convergence for all DPM parameters while MH displays large posterior correlations for various parameters. This study demonstrates that the choice of parameter sampling algorithms is paramount in obtaining unique DPM parameters when information on covariance structure is lacking, or else additional information on parameter correlations must be supplied to resolve the problem of equifinality of DPM parameters. This study also highlights the placement and significance of matrix-macropore interface in flow experiments of soil columns with different macropore densities. Histograms for certain soil hydraulic parameters display tri-modal characteristics implying that macropores are drained first followed by the interface region and then by pores of the matrix domain in drainage experiments. Results indicate that hydraulic properties and behavior of the matrix-macropore interface is not only a function of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macroporematrix interface (Ksa) and macropore tortuosity (lf) but also of other parameters of the matrix and macropore domains.

  15. LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes at 100 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''maximum'' unperturbed, steady state thermal neutron flux for LANSCE is calculated to be 2 /times/ 10 13 n/cm 2 -s for 100 μA of 800-MeV protons. This LANSCE neutron flux is a comparable entity to a steady state reactor thermal neutron flux. LANSCE perturbed steady state thermal neutron fluxes have also been calculated. Because LANSCE is a pulsed neutron source, much higher ''peak'' (in time) neutron fluxes can be generated than at a steady state reactor source. 5 refs., 5 figs

  16. Root induced changes of effective 1D hydraulic properties in a soil column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, P; Leitner, D; Kammerer, G; Loiskandl, W; Kaul, H-P; Bodner, G

    Roots are essential drivers of soil structure and pore formation. This study aimed at quantifying root induced changes of the pore size distribution (PSD). The focus was on the extent of clogging vs. formation of pores during active root growth. Parameters of Kosugi's lognormal PSD model were determined by inverse estimation in a column experiment with two cover crops (mustard, rye) and an unplanted control. Pore dynamics were described using a convection-dispersion like pore evolution model. Rooted treatments showed a wider range of pore radii with increasing volumes of large macropores >500 μm and micropores <2.5 μm, while fine macropores, mesopores and larger micropores decreased. The non-rooted control showed narrowing of the PSD and reduced porosity over all radius classes. The pore evolution model accurately described root induced changes, while structure degradation in the non-rooted control was not captured properly. Our study demonstrated significant short term root effects with heterogenization of the pore system as dominant process of root induced structure formation. Pore clogging is suggested as a partial cause for reduced pore volume. The important change in micro- and large macropores however indicates that multiple mechanic and biochemical processes are involved in root-pore interactions.

  17. Microwave assisted solvent extraction and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection use of an analytical restricted-access-medium column for the efficient multi-residue analysis of acidic pesticides in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoom, E A; Huls, R; Dijkman, E; Hoogerbrugge, R

    2001-12-14

    A screening method has been developed for the determination of acidic pesticides in various types of soils. Methodology is based on the use of microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE) for fast and efficient extraction of the analytes from the soils and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC-LC) with UV detection at 228 nm for the instrumental analysis of uncleaned extracts. Four types of soils, including sand, clay and peat, with a range in organic matter content of 0.3-13% and ten acidic pesticides of different chemical families (bentazone, bromoxynil, metsulfuron-methyl, 2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, 2,4-DP, 2,4,5-T, 2,4-DB and MCPB) were selected as matrices and analytes, respectively. The method developed included the selection of suitable MASE and LC-LC conditions. The latter consisted of the selection of a 5-microm GFF-II internal surface reversed-phase (ISRP, Pinkerton) analytical column (50 x 4.6 mm, I.D.) as the first column in the RAM-C18 configuration in combination with an optimised linear gradient elution including on-line cleanup of sample extracts and reconditioning of the columns. The method was validated with the analysis of freshly spiked samples and samples with aged residues (120 days). The four types of soils were spiked with the ten acidic pesticides at levels between 20 and 200 microg/kg. Weighted regression of the recovery data showed for most analyte-matrix combinations, including freshly spiked samples and aged residues, that the method provides overall recoveries between 60 and 90% with relative standard deviations of the intra-laboratory reproducibility's between 5 and 25%; LODs were obtained between 5 and 50 microg/kg. Evaluation of the data set with principal component analysis revealed that the parameters (i) increase of organic matter content of the soil samples and (ii) aged residues negatively effect the recovery of the analytes.

  18. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Paulo H S; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Orlande, Helcio R B; Cotta, Renato M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical

  19. Sustainable materials used as stone column filler: A short review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukri, Azhani; Nazir, Ramli

    2018-04-01

    Stone columns (also known as granular piles) are one of the methods for soft soil stabilization and typically used to increase bearing capacity and stability of slope.; Apart from decreasing the compressibility of loose and fine graded soils, it also accelerates the consolidation effect by improving the drainage path for pore water pressure dissipation and reduces the liquefaction potential of soils during earthquake event. Stone columns are probably the most “natural” ground treatment method or foundation system in existence to date. The benefit of stone columns is owing to the partial replacement of compressible soil by more competent materials such as stone aggregate, sand and other granular materials. These substitutes also act as reinforcement material, hence increasing overall strength and stiffness of the soft soil. Nowadays, a number of research has been conducted on the behaviour and performance of stone columns with various materials utilized as column filler replacing the normal aggregate. This paper will review extensively on previously conducted research on some of the materials used as stone column backfill materials, its suitability and the effectiveness as a substitute for regular aggregates in soft soil improvement works.

  20. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  1. A long-term soil structure observatory for post-compaction soil structure evolution: design and initial soil structure recovery observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas; Colombi, Tino; Ruiz, Siul; Grahm, Lina; Reiser, René; Rek, Jan; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Schymanski, Stanislaus; Walter, Achim; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Soil compaction due to agricultural vehicular traffic alters the geometrical arrangement of soil constituents, thereby modifying mechanical properties and pore spaces that affect a range of soil hydro-ecological functions. The ecological and economic costs of soil compaction are dependent on the immediate impact on soil functions during the compaction event, and a function of the recovery time. In contrast to a wealth of soil compaction information, mechanisms and rates of soil structure recovery remain largely unknown. A long-term (>10-yr) soil structure observatory (SSO) was established in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland, to quantify rates and mechanisms of structure recovery of compacted arable soil under different post-compaction management treatments. We implemented three initial compaction treatments (using a two-axle agricultural vehicle with 8 Mg wheel load): compaction of the entire plot area (i.e. track-by-track), compaction in wheel tracks, and no compaction. After compaction, we implemented four post-compaction soil management systems: bare soil (BS), permanent grass (PG), crop rotation without mechanical loosening (NT), and crop rotation under conventional tillage (CT). BS and PG provide insights into uninterrupted natural processes of soil structure regeneration under reduced (BS) and normal biological activity (PG). The two cropping systems (NT and CT) enable insights into soil structure recovery under common agricultural practices with minimal (NT) and conventional mechanical soil disturbance (CT). Observations include periodic sampling and measurements of soil physical properties, earthworm abundance, crop measures, electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar imaging, and continuous monitoring of state variables - soil moisture, temperature, CO2 and O2 concentrations, redox potential and oxygen diffusion rates - for which a network of sensors was installed at various depths (0-1 m). Initial compaction increased soil bulk density

  2. Structure-soil-structure interaction of nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, M.D.; Shaw, D.E.; Hall, J.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structure-to-structure interaction resulting from coupling of the foundations through the soil has traditionally been neglected in the seismic analysis of nuclear power plants. This paper examines the phenomenon and available methods of analytical treatment, including finite element and lumped parameter methods. Finite element techniques have lead to the treatment of through soil coupling of structural foundations using two dimensional plane strain models owing to the difficulty of considering three dimensional finite element models. The coupling problem is treated by means of a lumped parameter model derived from elastic half-space considerations. Consequently, the method is applicable to the interaction of any number of foundations and allows the simultaneous application of tri-directional excitation. The method entails the idealization of interacting structures as lumped mass/shear beams with lumped soil springs and dampers beneath each foundation plus a coupling matrix between the interacting foundations. Utilizing classical elastic half-space methods, the individual foundation soil springs and dampers may be derived, accounting for the effects of embedment and soil layering, analogous to the methods used for single soil-structure, interaction problems. The coupling matrix is derived by generating influence coefficients based on the geometric relationship of the structures using classical half-space solutions. The influence coefficients form the coupling flexibility matrix which is inverted to yield the coupling matrix for the lumped parameter model

  3. Experimental Verification of the Structural Glass Beam-Columns Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešek, Ondřej; Melcher, Jindřich; Balázs, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with experimental research of axially and laterally loaded members made of structural (laminated) glass. The purpose of the research is the evaluation of buckling strength and actual behaviour of the beam-columns due to absence of standards for design of glass load-bearing structures. The experimental research follows the previous one focusing on measuring of initial geometrical imperfections of glass members, testing of glass beams and columns. Within the frame of the research 9 specimens were tested. All of them were of the same geometry (length 2000 mm, width 200 mm and thickness 16 mm) but different composition - laminated double glass made of annealed glass or fully tempered glass panes bonded together by PVB or EVASAFE foil. Specimens were at first loaded by axial force and then by constantly increasing bending moment up to failure. During testing lateral deflections, vertical deflection and normal stresses at mid-span were measured. A maximum load achieved during testing has been adopted as flexural-lateral-torsional buckling strength. The results of experiments were statistically evaluated according to the European standard for design of structures EN 1990, appendix D. There are significant differences between specimens made of annealed glass or fully tempered glass. Differences between specimens loaded by axial forces 1 kN and 2 kN are negligible. The next step was to determine the design strength by calculation procedure based on buckling curves approach intended for design of steel columns and develop interaction criterion for glass beams-columns.

  4. Interpretation of the lime column penetration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liyanapathirana, D S; Kelly, R B

    2010-01-01

    Dry soil mix (DSM) columns are used to reduce the settlement and to improve the stability of embankments constructed on soft clays. During construction the shear strength of the columns needs to be confirmed for compliance with technical assumptions. A specialized blade shaped penetrometer known as the lime column probe, has been developed for testing DSM columns. This test can be carried out as a pull out resistance test (PORT) or a push in resistance test (PIRT). The test is considered to be more representative of average column shear strength than methods that test only a limited area of the column. Both PORT and PIRT tests require empirical correlations of measured resistance to an absolute measure of shear strength, in a similar manner to the cone penetration test. In this paper, finite element method is used to assess the probe factor, N, for the PORT test. Due to the large soil deformations around the probe, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) based finite element formulation has been used. Variation of N with rigidity index and the friction at the probe-soil interface are investigated to establish a range for the probe factor.

  5. Dynamical soil-structure interactions: influence of soil behaviour nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomzadeh, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of the soil with the structure has been largely explored the assumption of material and geometrical linearity of the soil. Nevertheless, for moderate or strong seismic events, the maximum shear strain can easily reach the elastic limit of the soil behavior. Considering soil-structure interaction, the nonlinear effects may change the soil stiffness at the base of the structure and therefore energy dissipation into the soil. Consequently, ignoring the nonlinear characteristics of the dynamic soil-structure interaction (DSSI) this phenomenon could lead to erroneous predictions of structural response. The goal of this work is to implement a fully nonlinear constitutive model for soils into a numerical code in order to investigate the effect of soil nonlinearity on dynamic soil structure interaction. Moreover, different issues are taken into account such as the effect of confining stress on the shear modulus of the soil, initial static condition, contact elements in the soil-structure interface, etc. During this work, a simple absorbing layer method based on a Rayleigh/Caughey damping formulation, which is often already available in existing Finite Element softwares, is also presented. The stability conditions of the wave propagation problems are studied and it is shown that the linear and nonlinear behavior are very different when dealing with numerical dispersion. It is shown that the 10 points per wavelength rule, recommended in the literature for the elastic media is not sufficient for the nonlinear case. The implemented model is first numerically verified by comparing the results with other known numerical codes. Afterward, a parametric study is carried out for different types of structures and various soil profiles to characterize nonlinear effects. Different features of the DSSI are compared to the linear case: modification of the amplitude and frequency content of the waves propagated into the soil, fundamental frequency, energy dissipation in

  6. Experimental investigation on full scale RC beam-column joint of NPP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thandavamoorthy, T.S.; Lakshmanan, N.; Reddy, G.R.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures in India are constructed using reinforced concrete. The beam-column joint in these structures are critical sub-assemblages because they ensure continuity of a structure and transfer forces from one element to another. Under seismic excitation, the beam-column joint region is subjected to horizontal and vertical shear forces whose magnitudes are typically many times higher than those within the adjacent beams and columns. In view of the increased incidence of seismicity in the country, the safety of these structures against earthquake loading assumes greater significance. There is a growing need to look into the seismic safety aspect of existing RC frame type structures in NPPs, which have been designed as per codes prevalent at the time of their construction. Seismic performance of such joints has not been studied extensively in India. Therefore experimental testing of full scale joint identical to those available in the existing NPP structures, was carried out to study its behaviour and evaluate its capacity. The size of the beam of the joint was 2000 mm x 610 mm x 915 mm and column 2915 mm x 610 mm x 915 mm. The percentage reinforcement of the beam was 4.95 and column 1.5. Such full scale and heavily reinforced concrete joint was cast successfully in the laboratory and tested under monotonic loading. The paper presents a complete description of the experimental testing, observations made during testing as for cracking, deflection and rotation of joint, discussion of results obtained, etc. Conclusions drawn from the investigation are also presented. (author)

  7. Optimization of the bending stiffness of beam-to-column and column-to-foundation connections in precast concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. R. COSTA

    Full Text Available Abstract This work involved the structural optimization of precast concrete rigid frames with semi-rigid beam-to-column connections. To this end, several frames were simulated numerically using the Finite Element Method. Beams and columns were modeled using bar elements and their connections were modeled using spring elements, with variable bending stiffness. The objective function was based on the search of the least stiff connection able to ensure the global stability of the building. Lastly, a connection model with optimal stiffness was adopted to design the frame. Semi-rigid beam-to-column connections with a constraint factors of 0.33 sufficed to ensure the maximum allowable horizontal displacement and bending moment of the connection, with a global stability parameter of 1.12. This confirms that even connections with low constraints generate significant gains from the structural standpoint, without affecting construction and assembly-related aspects.

  8. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarime, Nur'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%-63% and 46%-54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50-2.59 and 2.45-2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35-5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32-5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%-0.34% and 0.39%- 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m2/g-21.93 m2/g and 25.76 m2/g-26.83 m2/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  9. Crossing Phenomena in Overhead Line Equipment (OHLE) Structure in 3D Space Considering Soil-Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Baniotopoulos, Charalampos; Papaelias, Mayorkinos

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the electric train becomes one of the efficient railway systems that are lighter, cleaner, quieter, cheaper and faster than a conventional train. Overhead line equipment (OHLE), which supplies electric power to the trains, is designed on the principle of overhead wires placed over the railway track. The OHLE is supported by mast structure which located at the lineside along the track. Normally, mast structure is a steel column or truss structure which supports the overhead wire carrying the power. Due to the running train and severe periodic force, such as an earthquake, in surrounding area may cause damage to the OHLE structure especially mast structure which leads to the failure of the electrical system. The mast structure needs to be discussed in order to resist the random forces. Due to the vibration effect, the natural frequencies of the structure are necessary. This is because when the external applied force occurs within a range of frequency of the structure, resonance effect can be expected which lead to the large oscillations and deflections. The natural frequency of a system is dependent only on the stiffness of the structure and the mass which participates with the structure, including self-weight. The modal analysis is used in order to calculate the mode shapes and natural frequencies of the mast structure during free vibration. A mast structure with varying rotational soil stiffness is used to observe the influence of soil-structure action. It is common to use finite element analysis to perform a modal analysis. This paper presents the fundamental mode shapes, natural frequencies and crossing phenomena of three-dimensional mast structure considering soil-structure interaction. The sensitivity of mode shapes to the variation of soil-structure interaction is discussed. The outcome of this study will improve the understanding of the fundamental dynamic behaviour of the mast structure which supports the OHLE. Moreover, this study will be a

  10. Measuring and modeling three-dimensional water uptake of a growing faba bean (Vicia faba) within a soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Katrin; Koebernick, Nicolai; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vetterlein, Doris; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    A faba bean was grown in a column filled with a sandy soil, which was initially close to saturation and then subjected to a single drying cycle of 30 days. The column was divided in four hydraulically separated compartments using horizontal paraffin layers. Paraffin is impermeable to water but penetrable by roots. Thus by growing deeper, the roots can reach compartments that still contain water. The root architecture was measured every second day by X-ray CT. Transpiration rate, soil matric potential in four different depths, and leaf area were measured continously during the experiment. To investigate the influence of the partitioning of available soil water in the soil column on water uptake, we used R-SWMS, a fully coupled root and soil water model [1]. We compared a scenario with and without the split layers and investigated the influence on root xylem pressure. The detailed three-dimensional root architecture was obtained by reconstructing binarized root images manually with a virtual reality system, located at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre [2]. To verify the properties of the root system, we compared total root lengths, root length density distributions and root surface with estimations derived from Minkowski functionals [3]. In a next step, knowing the change of root architecture in time, we could allocate an age to each root segment and use this information to define age dependent root hydraulic properties that are required to simulate water uptake for the growing root system. The scenario with the split layers showed locally much lower pressures than the scenario without splits. Redistribution of water within the unrestricted soil column led to a more uniform distribution of water uptake and lowers the water stress in the plant. However, comparison of simulated and measured pressure heads with tensiometers suggested that the paraffin layers were not perfectly hydraulically isolating the different soil layers. We could show compensation efficiency of

  11. Soil structural behaviour of flooded soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to: identify factors determining of the structural behaviour of flooded soils, as compared to those acting in upland soils; analyse the influence of reductive processes on aggregate stabilising agents; discuss mechanisms of structural deterioration and recovery during the flooding-drying cycle, on the basis of a case study: cattle trampling effects in the flooding Pampa of Argentina. Flooded soils, now known as Hydric soils, are characteristic of wetlands and irrigated fields cropped to rice (paddy soils). In them, water covers the soil, or is present either at or near the surface of the soil all year or for varying periods of time during the year. Hydric soils belong to different taxa of the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map (2000). Fluvisols, Planosols and Gleysols are widespread distributed in the globe. The generation of redoximorphic features is due to different causes in each of them. Fluvisols are covered part of the year by surface water from river overflows; Planosols are soils having an impervious Bt horizon, supporting perched water during short periods; and Gleysols are soils affected by stagnant water tables during long periods

  12. Prediction of axial limit capacity of stone columns using dimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaruddin A., T.; Mohamed, Zainab; Mohd Azizul, L.; Hafez M., A.

    2017-08-01

    Stone column is the most favorable method used by engineers in designing work for stabilization of soft ground for road embankment, and foundation for liquid structure. Easy installation and cheaper cost are among the factors that make stone column more preferable than other method. Furthermore, stone column also can acts as vertical drain to increase the rate of consolidation during preloading stage before construction work started. According to previous studied there are several parameters that influence the capacity of stone column. Among of them are angle friction of among the stones, arrangement of column (two pattern arrangement most applied triangular and square), spacing center to center between columns, shear strength of soil, and physical size of column (diameter and length). Dimensional analysis method (Buckingham-Pi Theorem) has used to carry out the new formula for prediction of load capacity stone columns. Experimental data from two previous studies was used for analysis of study.

  13. Microbial Community and Functional Structure Significantly Varied among Distinct Types of Paddy Soils But Responded Differently along Gradients of Soil Depth Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Bai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Paddy rice fields occupy broad agricultural area in China and cover diverse soil types. Microbial community in paddy soils is of great interest since many microorganisms are involved in soil functional processes. In the present study, Illumina Mi-Seq sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 4.2 techniques were combined to investigate soil microbial communities and functional gene patterns across the three soil types including an Inceptisol (Binhai, an Oxisol (Leizhou, and an Ultisol (Taoyuan along four profile depths (up to 70 cm in depth in mesocosm incubation columns. Detrended correspondence analysis revealed that distinctly differentiation in microbial community existed among soil types and profile depths, while the manifest variance in functional structure was only observed among soil types and two rice growth stages, but not across profile depths. Along the profile depth within each soil type, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes increased whereas Cyanobacteria, β-proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia declined, suggesting their specific ecophysiological properties. Compared to bacterial community, the archaeal community showed a more contrasting pattern with the predominant groups within phyla Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota largely varying among soil types and depths. Phylogenetic molecular ecological network (pMEN analysis further indicated that the pattern of bacterial and archaeal communities interactions changed with soil depth and the highest modularity of microbial community occurred in top soils, implying a relatively higher system resistance to environmental change compared to communities in deeper soil layers. Meanwhile, microbial communities had higher connectivity in deeper soils in comparison with upper soils, suggesting less microbial interaction in surface soils. Structure equation models were developed and the models indicated that pH was the most representative characteristics of soil type and

  14. Microbial Community and Functional Structure Significantly Varied among Distinct Types of Paddy Soils But Responded Differently along Gradients of Soil Depth Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ren; Wang, Jun-Tao; Deng, Ye; He, Ji-Zheng; Feng, Kai; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Paddy rice fields occupy broad agricultural area in China and cover diverse soil types. Microbial community in paddy soils is of great interest since many microorganisms are involved in soil functional processes. In the present study, Illumina Mi-Seq sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 4.2) techniques were combined to investigate soil microbial communities and functional gene patterns across the three soil types including an Inceptisol (Binhai), an Oxisol (Leizhou), and an Ultisol (Taoyuan) along four profile depths (up to 70 cm in depth) in mesocosm incubation columns. Detrended correspondence analysis revealed that distinctly differentiation in microbial community existed among soil types and profile depths, while the manifest variance in functional structure was only observed among soil types and two rice growth stages, but not across profile depths. Along the profile depth within each soil type, Acidobacteria , Chloroflexi , and Firmicutes increased whereas Cyanobacteria , β -proteobacteria , and Verrucomicrobia declined, suggesting their specific ecophysiological properties. Compared to bacterial community, the archaeal community showed a more contrasting pattern with the predominant groups within phyla Euryarchaeota , Thaumarchaeota , and Crenarchaeota largely varying among soil types and depths. Phylogenetic molecular ecological network (pMEN) analysis further indicated that the pattern of bacterial and archaeal communities interactions changed with soil depth and the highest modularity of microbial community occurred in top soils, implying a relatively higher system resistance to environmental change compared to communities in deeper soil layers. Meanwhile, microbial communities had higher connectivity in deeper soils in comparison with upper soils, suggesting less microbial interaction in surface soils. Structure equation models were developed and the models indicated that pH was the most representative characteristics of soil type and

  15. Simultaneous determination of iodide and iodate in soil solution samples by HPLC with electrochemical detection and post-column reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun' ichi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tsukada, Hirofumi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University, Fukushima 960-1196 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Iodine-129 (half-life 1.6 x 10{sup 7} y) discharged into the atmosphere from nuclear facilities (e.g., a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant) is partly deposited on land and introduced into soil. Stable iodine ({sup 127}I) can be used as a natural analogue to predict the long-term behavior of {sup 129}I in the terrestrial environment. Iodine in soil mainly exists as I{sup -}, IO{sub 3}{sup -}, and organic iodine. Because the mobilities of these species in soil are quite different, iodine speciation in soil solution is a key for predicting the behavior of iodine in soil. We developed a new speciation method suitable for routine analysis of many soil solution samples, and successfully applied the method to real samples. The method involves determining the concentration of total iodine and then separately measuring the I{sup -} and IO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations with an HPLC system. The HPLC system (Nano-space SI-2; Shiseido, Tokyo, Japan) consisted of a UV/Vis spectrometer and an electrochemical (amperometric) detector (50 mV Ag/AgCl). Two reverse-phase columns (2.0 x 50 mm Capcel Pak DD C8 and 2.0 x 250 mm Capcel Pak MGII C18; Shiseido) were serially connected, and a switching valve was set between them. I{sup -} and IO{sub 3}{sup -} in the sample solution were separated from each other in the DD C8 column. IO{sub 3}{sup -} eluted first from the column, while I{sup -} was retained. After IO{sub 3}{sup -} was further separated from other halogen acids with the C18 column, IO{sub 3}{sup -} was reacted with KBr and o-dianisidine in a thermos-reactor (90 deg. C), and absorption at 450 nm was measured with the UV/Vis spectrometer. The concentration of I{sup -} eluted from the first column was determined with the electrochemical detector. To determine the concentration of total iodine in the sample solution, organic iodine was decomposed by UV irradiation (UV digester 705; Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for 30 min at 20 deg. C. The iodine in the solution was reduced to I

  16. A study on soil structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuylenborgh, van J.

    1947-01-01

    As soils differ in capacity to form a structure, it is necessary to distinguish between intrinsic structure and actual structure. Intrinsic structure is the capacity of a soil to form a certain structure. Actual structure is the structure of the soil at a certain moment.

    Using experiments and

  17. Transport of sulfadiazine in soil columns — Experiments and modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrhan, Anne; Kasteel, Roy; Simunek, Jirka; Groeneweg, Joost; Vereecken, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotics, such as sulfadiazine, reach agricultural soils directly through manure of grazing livestock or indirectly through the spreading of manure or sewage sludge on the field. Knowledge about the fate of antibiotics in soils is crucial for assessing the environmental risk of these compounds, including possible transport to the groundwater. Transport of 14C-labelled sulfadiazine was investigated in disturbed soil columns at a constant flow rate of 0.26 cm h - 1 near saturation. Sulfadiazine was applied in different concentrations for either a short or a long pulse duration. Breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine and the non-reactive tracer chloride were measured. At the end of the leaching period the soil concentration profiles were determined. The peak maxima of the breakthrough curves were delayed by a factor of 2 to 5 compared to chloride and the decreasing limbs are characterized by an extended tailing. However, the maximum relative concentrations differed as well as the eluted mass fractions, ranging from 18 to 83% after 500 h of leaching. To identify relevant sorption processes, breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine were fitted with a convective-dispersive transport model, considering different sorption concepts with one, two and three sorption sites. Breakthrough curves can be fitted best with a three-site sorption model, which includes two reversible kinetic and one irreversible sorption site. However, the simulated soil concentration profiles did not match the observations for all of the used models. Despite this incomplete process description, the obtained results have implications for the transport behavior of sulfadiazine in the field. Its leaching may be enhanced if it is frequently applied at higher concentrations.

  18. Influence of granular material characteristics in the behaviour of “Bouregreg Valley” soft ground improved with stone columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehab Noura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis has become widespread in geotechnical practice as means of optimizing engineering tasks; it can be easily applied to the treated areas by stone columns, which are a method of improving the soil having low geotechnical properties and likely to deform significantly under load action, by incorporating granular material (commonly called ballast compacted by remounting passes, so they act mainly as inclusions with a higher stiffness, shear strength than the natural soil. Moreover the stone columns are highly permeable and act as vertical drains facilitating consolidation of the soft soil improving the performance of the foundation. However the characteristics of this granular material influence the behavior of soft soils treated by the stone columns technique, especially: the friction angle, the cohesion, the modular ratio and the constitutive model. The choice of the constitutive model depends on many factors but, in general, it is related to the type of analysis that we intend to perform. Numerical modeling must consider the diversity of the materials nature, the complex geometry of structures-land and the behavior of materials generally nonlinear (permanent deformation. It is a simple and effective alternative to approach the real behavior of soils reinforced by stone columns and the influence of materials characteristics, it allows settlement analysis, lateral deformation, vertical and horizontal stresses in order to understand the behavior of columns and soil. It also has the advantage of integrating the settlements of the underlying layers. This paper aims to study the mechanisms of functioning and interactions of stone columns with the surrounding ground, and vis-à-vis the various parameters characterizing the granular material "ballast" and the surrounding soil, which influence the behavior of the improved soil, The paper presents, in the first part, soil conditions and the parameters associated with

  19. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity using soil morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Karahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been conducted to predict soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks by parametric soil properties such as bulk density and particle-size distribution. Although soil morphological properties have a strong effect on Ks, studies predicting Ks by soil morphological properties such as type, size, and strength of soil structure; type, orientation and quantity of soil pores and roots and consistency are rare. This study aimed at evaluating soil morphological properties to predict Ks. Undisturbed soil samples (15 cm length and 8.0 cm id. were collected from topsoil (0-15 cm and subsoil (15-30 cm (120 samples with a tractor operated soil sampler at sixty randomly selected sampling sites on a paddy field and an adjecent grassland in Central Anatolia (Cankırı, Turkey. Synchronized disturbed soil samples were taken from the same sampling sites and sampling depths for basic soil analyses. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured on the soil columns using a constant-head permeameter. Following the Ks measurements, the upper part of soil columns were covered to prevent evaporation and colums were left to drain in the laboratory. When the water flow through the column was stopped, a subsample were taken for bulk density and then soil columns were disturbed for describing the soil morphological properties. In addition, soil texture, bulk density, pH, field capacity, wilting point, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, aggregate stability, organic matter, and calcium carbonate were measured on the synchronized disturbed soil samples. The data were divided into training (80 data values and validation (40 data values sets. Measured values of Ks ranged from 0.0036 to 2.14 cmh-1 with a mean of 0.86 cmh-1. The Ks was predicted from the soil morphological and parametric properties by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Soil structure class, stickiness, pore-size, root-size, and pore-quantity contributed to the Ks prediction

  20. Evaluation of granular soil properties in seismic analysis of nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, A.; Riera, J.D.; Nanni, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    The seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures founded on soils, as well as related soil-structure interaction studies, are often made by means of 'equivalent' linear models of soil behavior, represented by effective values of damping and of Young's modulus. Such approach requires resorting to iteration on the material properties, thus leading to a 'multilinear' analysis which can be justified in practice on account of the scarce knowledge of constitutive equations applicable to soils under a general three-dimensional stress state. It is therefore important to establish bounds on the applicability of the multilinear solutions, and to develop reliable procedures for the evaluation of the soil properties to be used in seismic analyses. The paper focuses attention on the dynamic properties of sandy soils. To that effect, an extensive program was conducted using a triaxial dynamic testing apparatus developed at the UFRGS, and the results compared with existing experimental evidence, including data from resonant-column testing. Linear and nonlinear regression techniques applied to the experimental data led to new equations relating damping and soil stiffness to the dependent variables, and permitted as well the determination of the expected error of the estimated parameters. It was found that an increasing frequency, slightly increases both Young's modulus and the effective damping ratio. In addition, the influence of the content of fines was found to be significant. This variable does not appear in several available empirical equations, which only consider the confining pressure, the void ratio and the amplitude of the cyclic shear deformations as relevant variables. (orig.)

  1. The Hitrex Programme: unperturbed HTR lattice and control rod measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beynon, A J; Nunn, D L

    1972-06-15

    Reactivity, power distributions, plutonium production and fast neutron graphite damage are being studied at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL) on the HTR 'Hitrex' reactor under cold clean conditions. Rod interactions, important in assessing local criticality hazards, are receiving special attention in the measurements. The proposals for the first two series of measurements on Hitrex are discussed in this note, Hitrex 1a being the unperturbed reactor, and Hitrex 1b the same fuel array but with a number of different control absorber loadings in it. Common to both series will be cross pin, cross block and cross core measurements of power rating, thermal spectrum and damage dose distributions, so that these will be known as functions of the fuel, reflector and absorber environment.

  2. Numerical Simulation Of The Treatment Of Soil Swelling Using Grid Geocell Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattah Mohammed Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for the treatment of the swelling of expansive soil is numerically simulated. The method is simply based on the embedment of a geogrid (or a geomesh in the soil. The geogrid is extended continuously inside the volume of the soil where the swell is needed to be controlled and orientated towards the direction of the swell. Soils with different swelling potentials are employed: bentonite base-Na and bentonite base-Ca samples in addition to kaolinite mixed with bentonite. A numerical analysis was carried out by the finite element method to study the swelling soil's behavior and investigate the distribution of the stresses and pore water pressures around the geocells beneath the shallow footings. The ABAQUS computer program was used as a finite element tool, and the soil is represented by the modified Drucker-Prager/cap model. The geogrid surrounding the geocell is assumed to be a linear elastic material throughout the analysis. The soil properties used in the modeling were experimentally obtained. It is concluded that the degree of saturation and the matric suction (the negative pore water pressure decrease as the angle of friction of the geocell column material increases due to the activity of the sand fill in the dissipation of the pore water pressure and the acceleration of the drainage through its function as a drain. When the plasticity index and the active depth (the active zone is considered to be equal to the overall depth of the clay model increase, the axial movement (swelling movement and matric suction, as a result of the increase in the axial forces, vary between this maximum value at the top of the layer and the minimum value in the last third of the active depth and then return to a consolidation at the end of the depth layer.

  3. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%–63% and 46%–54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50–2.59 and 2.45–2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35–5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32–5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%–0.34% and 0.39%– 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m 2 /g–21.93 m 2 /g and 25.76 m 2 /g–26.83 m 2 /g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes

  4. Soil structural quality assessment for soil protection regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Soil quality assessment is rapidly developing worldwide, though mostly focused on the monitoring of arable land and soil fertility. Soil protection regulations assess soil quality differently, focusing on priority pollutants and threshold values. The soil physical properties are weakly considered, due to lack of consensus and experimental difficulties faced with characterization. Non-disputable, easy to perform and inexpensive methods should be available for environmental regulation to be applied, which is unfortunately not the case. As a consequence, quantitative soil physical protection regulation is not applied, and inexpensive soil physical quality indicators for arable soil management are not available. Overcoming these limitations was the objective of a research project funded by the Swiss federal office for environment (FOEN). The main results and the perspectives of application are given in this presentation. A first step of the research was to characterize soils in a good structural state (reference soils) under different land use. The structural quality was assessed with field expertise and Visual Evaluation of the Soil Structure (VESS), and the physical properties were assessed with Shrinkage analysis. The relationships between the physical properties and the soil constituents were linear and highly determined. They represent the reference properties of the corresponding soils. In a second step, the properties of physically degraded soils were analysed and compared to the reference properties. This allowed defining the most discriminant parameters departing the different structure qualities and their threshold limits. Equivalent properties corresponding to these parameters but inexpensive and easy to determine were defined and tested. More than 90% of the samples were correctly classed with this method, which meets, therefore, the requirements for practical application in regulation. Moreover, result-oriented agri-environmental schemes for soil quality

  5. Leaching of radiostrontium in undisturbed columns of calcareous alluvial soil as affected by level of activity applied and rate of high calcium water of Tigris river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahad, A.A.; Razaq, I.B.; Ali, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching of 85 Sr in calcareous alluvial medium textured soil was undertaken for 126 days. Radiostrontium in three levels of 4.62(L1), 9.25(L2), and 18.50(L3) MBq column -1 was applied to undisturbed soil columns, 110cm long and 12cm inner diameter. Irrigation water of Tigris river was used as a leaching solution supplied automatically in 1.4, 2.0, and 3.0cm day -1 by rain simulator systems. Gamma radiation along the soil columns was scanned periodically during the course of leaching. Leaching of Sr from the surface layer was in two stages. The first stage covered the first 22 days and the second included the following 104 days. Strontium retained (y) as a function of time (x) fitted reasonably well (r>0.96) to the equations y=a+mlnx and lny=a+mx for the first and the second stage, respectively. Tigris river irrigation water was found as effective as the dilute Ca solution (proposed by some investigators) in displacing Sr. The leaching with 3.0cm day -1 for 126 days resulted in 23, 23, and 21 per cent of total Sr remaining in the upper 5 cm of soil columns under L1, L2 and L3, respectively. However, the area under the distribution curves followed the ratio 1.0:2.4:3.7 under L1, L2, and L3, respectively. The pattern of Sr distribution in calcareous alluvial soil depended not only on the rate and amount of water application but also on the level of Sr applied. Although the soil columns were leached with 378 cm of water for 126 days, the Sr front did not pass the 30 cm depth. This finding indicates the high retention of this soil for Sr and the potential hazard of radiostrontium arising from its existence in the layer of maximum root density. (author). 18 refs., 2 figures, 2 tables

  6. Non-linear soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic equation of motion to analyse the interaction of a non-linear structure and an irregular soil with the linear unbounded soil is formulated in the time domain. The contribution of the unbounded soil involves convolution integrals of the dynamic-stiffness coefficients in the time domain and the corresponding motions. As another possibility, a flexibility formulation fot the contribution of the unbounded soil using the dynamic-flexibility coefficients in the time domain, together with the direct-stiffness method for the structure and the irregular soil can be applied. As an example of a non-linear soil-structure-interaction analysis, the partial uplift of the basemat of a structure is examined. (Author) [pt

  7. Characteristics of Soil Structure Interaction for Reactor Building of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Moon Joo; Jung, Rae Young; Hyun, Chang Hun; Kim, Moon Soo; Lim, Nam Hyoung

    2010-01-01

    On 16 July 2007, the Nigataken-chuetsu-oki earthquake registering a moment magnitude of 6.8 occurred at a depth of about 15 km. As a result of this earthquake, noticeable shaking exceeding the design ground motion was measured at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station (KKN), the biggest nuclear power plant in the world, located at about 16 km away from the epicenter. This earthquake triggered a fire at an electrical transformer and insignificant damage on some parts of facilities. This event gave an impulse to study on the damage and safety margin of nuclear power plant due to the strong earthquake exceeding design basis. As a part of those efforts, KARISMA (KAshiwazaki-Kariwa Research Initiative for Seismic Margin Assessment) benchmark study was launched by the IAEA in terms of an international collaborative research. The main objectives of this research are to estimate the structural behavior and to evaluate the seismic margin of reactor building considering the effects of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI). This paper presents verification of structural model developed here and validation of soil foundation characteristics through soil-column analysis. It has also been demonstrated that the spring constants and damping coefficient obtained from impedance analysis represent well the soil foundation characteristics

  8. Evaluation of Structural Robustness against Column Loss: Methodology and Application to RC Frame Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yihai; Main, Joseph A; Noh, Sam-Young

    2017-08-01

    A computational methodology is presented for evaluating structural robustness against column loss. The methodology is illustrated through application to reinforced concrete (RC) frame buildings, using a reduced-order modeling approach for three-dimensional RC framing systems that includes the floor slabs. Comparisons with high-fidelity finite-element model results are presented to verify the approach. Pushdown analyses of prototype buildings under column loss scenarios are performed using the reduced-order modeling approach, and an energy-based procedure is employed to account for the dynamic effects associated with sudden column loss. Results obtained using the energy-based approach are found to be in good agreement with results from direct dynamic analysis of sudden column loss. A metric for structural robustness is proposed, calculated by normalizing the ultimate capacities of the structural system under sudden column loss by the applicable service-level gravity loading and by evaluating the minimum value of this normalized ultimate capacity over all column removal scenarios. The procedure is applied to two prototype 10-story RC buildings, one employing intermediate moment frames (IMFs) and the other employing special moment frames (SMFs). The SMF building, with its more stringent seismic design and detailing, is found to have greater robustness.

  9. Soil Retaining Structures : Development of models for structural analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the development of models for the structural analysis of soil retaining structures. The soil retaining structures being looked at are; block revetments, flexible retaining walls and bored tunnels in soft soil. Within this context typical structural behavior of these

  10. Monod kinetics rather than a first-order degradation model explains atrazine fate in soil mini-columns: Implications for pesticide fate modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheyns, K.; Mertens, J.; Diels, J.; Smolders, E.; Springael, D.

    2010-01-01

    Pesticide transport models commonly assume first-order pesticide degradation kinetics for describing reactive transport in soil. This assumption was assessed in mini-column studies with associated batch degradation tests. Soil mini-columns were irrigated with atrazine in two intermittent steps of about 30 days separated by 161 days application of artificial rain water. Atrazine concentration in the effluent peaked to that of the influent concentration after initial break-through but sharply decreased while influx was sustained, suggesting a degradation lag phase. The same pattern was displayed in the second step but peak height and percentage of atrazine recovered in the effluent were lower. A Monod model with biomass decay was successfully calibrated to this data. The model was successfully evaluated against batch degradation data and mini-column experiments at lower flow rate. The study suggested that first-order degradation models may underestimate risk of pesticide leaching if the pesticide degradation potential needs amplification during degradation. - Population dynamics of pesticide degrading population should be taken into account when predictions of pesticide fate are made to avoid underestimation of pesticide break-through towards groundwater.

  11. Effect of freeze-thaw cycles on greenhouse gas fluxes from peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H. D.; Rezanezhad, F.; Markelov, I.; McCarter, C. P. R.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2017-12-01

    The ongoing displacement of climate zones by global warming is increasing the frequency and intensity of freeze-thaw cycles in middle and high latitude regions, many of which are dominated by organic soils such as peat. Repeated freezing and thawing of soils changes their physical properties, geochemistry, and microbial community structure, which together govern the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. In this presentation, we focus on how freeze-thaw cycles influence greenhouse gas fluxes from peat using a newly developed experimental soil column system that simulates realistic soil temperature profiles during freeze-thaw cycles. We measured the surface and subsurface changes to gas and aqueous phase chemistry to delineate the diffusion pathways and quantify soil greenhouse gas fluxes during freeze-thaw cycles using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) as a conservative tracer. Three peat columns were assembled inside a temperature controlled chamber with different soil structures. All three columns were packed with 40 cm of undisturbed, slightly decomposed peat, where the soil of two columns had an additional 10 cm layer on top (one with loose Sphagnum moss and one with an impermeable plug). The results indicate that the release of SF6 and CO2 gas from the soil surface was influenced by the recurrent development of a physical ice barrier, which prevented gas exchange between the soil and atmosphere during freezing conditions. With the onset of thawing a pulse of SF6 and CO2 occurred, resulting in a flux of 3.24 and 2095.52 µmol/m2h, respectively, due to the build-up of gases in the liquid-phase pore space during freezing. Additionally, we developed a model to determine the specific diffusion coefficients for each peat column. These data allow us to better predict how increased frequency and intensity of freeze-thaw cycles will affect greenhouse gas emissions in northern peat soils.

  12. Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a multi-element contaminated soil profile assessed by in-situ soil pore water sampling, column leaching and sequential extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Luke; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Clemente, Rafael; Lepp, Nicholas; Dickinson, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Three methods for predicting element mobility in soils have been applied to an iron-rich soil, contaminated with arsenic, cadmium and zinc. Soils were collected from 0 to 30 cm, 30 to 70 cm and 70 to 100 cm depths in the field and soil pore water was collected at different depths from an adjacent 100 cm deep trench. Sequential extraction and a column leaching test in the laboratory were compared to element concentrations in pore water sampled directly from the field. Arsenic showed low extractability, low leachability and occurred at low concentrations in pore water samples. Cadmium and zinc were more labile and present in higher concentrations in pore water, increasing with soil depth. Pore water sampling gave the best indication of short term element mobility when field conditions were taken into account, but further extraction and leaching procedures produced a fuller picture of element dynamics, revealing highly labile Cd deep in the soil profile. - Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a polluted soil can be realistically interpreted by in-situ soil pore water sampling.

  13. Some considerations on the dynamic structure-soil-structure interactions analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthees, W.

    1979-01-01

    A mixed method has been developed for the approximate analysis of soil-structure or structure-soil-structure interaction problems due to earthquakes. In order to produce comparable results of interaction problems as well as for shallow and for deep soils due to the same earthquake excitation (accelerogram) situated always at the lower bedrock boundary, the analysis is performed in two steps: 1) Calculation of the complex transfer function and the response of the upper interior boundary of a layered soil-system which is connected at its top to a soil-structure-system, using the one-dimensional deconvolution. 2) By making a complete interaction analysis of the surface soil-structure-system using the interior boundary excitation of the calculated response from step 1. The depth of the soil-structure-system must be chosen large enough to exclude interaction effects down to the layered soil-system's interior boundary. (orig.)

  14. Basic Aspects of Deep Soil Mixing Technology Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Alexandra A.; Rybak, Jarosław; Stefaniuk, Damian; Zajączkowski, Przemysław

    2017-10-01

    Improving a soil is a process of increasing its physical/mechanical properties without changing its natural structure. Improvement of soil subbase is reached by means of the knitted materials, or other methods when strong connection between soil particles is established. The method of DSM (Deep Soil Mixing) columns has been invented in Japan in 1970s. The main reason of designing cement-soil columns is to improve properties of local soils (such as strength and stiffness) by mixing them with various cementing materials. Cement and calcium are the most commonly used binders. However new research undertaken worldwide proves that apart from these materials, also gypsum or fly ashes can also be successfully implemented. As the Deep Soil Mixing is still being under development, anticipating mechanical properties of columns in particular soils and the usage of cementing materials in formed columns is very difficult and often inappropriate to predict. That is why a research is carried out in order to find out what binders and mixing technology should be used. The paper presents several remarks on the testing procedures related to quality and capacity control of Deep Soil Mixing columns. Soil improvement methods, their advantages and limitations are briefly described. The authors analyse the suitability of selected testing methods on subsequent stages of design and execution of special foundations works. Chosen examples from engineering practice form the basis for recommendations for the control procedures. Presented case studies concerning testing the on capacity field samples and laboratory procedures on various categories of soil-cement samples were picked from R&D and consulting works offered by Wroclaw University of Science and Technology. Special emphasis is paid to climate conditions which may affect the availability of performing and controlling of DSM techniques in polar zones, with a special regard to sample curing.

  15. Evaluation of soil structure in the framework of an overall soil quality rating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, L; Shepherd, T G; Schindler, U

    2013-01-01

    Soil structure is an important aspect of agricultural soil quality, and its preservation and improvement are key to sustaining soil functions. Methods of overall soil quality assessment which include visual soil structure information can be useful tools for monitoring and managing the global soil...... resource. The aim of the paper is: (i) to demonstrate the role of visual quantification of soil structure within the procedure of the overall soil quality assessment by the Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating (M-SQR), (ii) to quantify the magnitude and variability of soil structure and overall M......-SQR on a number of agricultural research sites and (iii) to analyse the correlations of soil quality rating results with crop yields. We analysed visual soil structure and overall soil quality on a range of 20 experimental sites in seven countries. To assess visual soil structure we utilised the Visual Soil...

  16. A generalised age- and phase-structured model of human tumour cell populations both unperturbed and exposed to a range of cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Britta; Ubezio, Paolo

    2007-07-01

    We develop a general mathematical model for a population of cells differentiated by their position within the cell division cycle. A system of partial differential equations governs the kinetics of cell densities in certain phases of the cell division cycle dependent on time t (hours) and an age-like variable tau (hours) describing the time since arrival in a particular phase of the cell division cycle. Transition rate functions control the transfer of cells between phases. We first obtain a theoretical solution on the infinite domain -infinity infinity. We then assume that age distributions at time t=0 are known and write our solution in terms of these age distributions on t=0. In practice, of course, these age distributions are unknown. All is not lost, however, because a cell line before treatment usually lies in a state of asynchronous balanced growth where the proportion of cells in each phase of the cell cycle remain constant. We assume that an unperturbed cell line has four distinct phases and that the rate of transition between phases is constant within a short period of observation ('short' relative to the whole history of the tumour growth) and we show that under certain conditions, this is equivalent to exponential growth or decline. We can then gain expressions for the age distributions. So, in short, our approach is to assume that we have an unperturbed cell line on t

  17. Hybrid modelling of soil-structure interaction for embedded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Penzien, J.

    1981-01-01

    The basic methods currently being used for the analysis of soil-structure interaction fail to properly model three-dimensional embedded structures with flexible foundations. A hybrid model for the analysis of soil-structure interaction is developed in this investigation which takes advantage of the desirable features of both the finite element and substructure methods and which minimizes their undesirable features. The hybrid model is obtained by partitioning the total soil-structure system into a nearfield and a far-field with a smooth hemispherical interface. The near-field consists of the structure and a finite region of soil immediately surrounding its base. The entire near-field may be modelled in three-dimensional form using the finite element method; thus, taking advantage of its ability to model irregular geometries, and the non-linear soil behavior in the immediate vicinity of the structure. (orig./WL)

  18. The relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Angilè, F. E.; Ashton, P.; Benton, S. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Fissel, L. M.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hennebelle, P.; Klein, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Korotkov, A. L.; Martin, P. G.; Matthews, T. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Santos, F. P.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2017-07-01

    We statistically evaluated the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) at 250, 350, and 500 μm, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.´0 that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondencebetween (a) the trends in relative orientation between the column density structures and the projected magnetic field; and (b) the shape of the column density probability distribution functions (PDFs). In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", where the high-column density tails of the PDFs are flatter, we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", where the maximum values of the column density are smaller than in the ridge-like sub-regions and the high-column density

  19. Microbial community changes at a terrestrial volcanic CO2 vent induced by soil acidification and anaerobic microhabitats within the soil column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Janin; Oppermann, Birte I; Gwosdz, Simone; Möller, Ingo; Herrmann, Martina; Krüger, Martin

    2013-04-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in deep geological formations is one option currently evaluated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, the impact of a possible CO2 leakage from a storage site into surface environments has to be evaluated. During such a hypothetical leakage event, the CO2 migrates upwards along fractures entering surface soils, a scenario similar to naturally occurring CO2 vents. Therefore, such a natural analogue site at the Laacher See was chosen for an ecosystem study on the effects of high CO2 concentrations on soil chemistry and microbiology. The microbial activities revealed differences in their spatial distribution and temporal variability for CO2 -rich and reference soils. Furthermore, the abundance of several functional and group-specific gene markers revealed further differences, for example, a decrease in Geobacteraceae and an increase in sulphate-reducing prokaryotes in the vent centre. Molecular-biological fingerprinting of the microbial communities with DGGE indicated a shift in the environmental conditions within the Laacher See soil column leading to anaerobic and potentially acidic microenvironments. Furthermore, the distribution and phylogenetic affiliation of the archaeal 16S rRNA genes, the presence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and the biomarker analysis revealed a predominance of Thaumarchaeota as possible indicator organisms for elevated CO2 concentrations in soils. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantifying and modeling soil structure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterization of soil structure has been a topic of scientific discussions ever since soil structure has been recognized as an important factor affecting soil physical, mechanical, chemical, and biological processes. Beyond semi-quantitative soil morphology classes, it is a challenge to describe ...

  1. Association between stride time fractality and gait adaptability during unperturbed and asymmetric walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Scott W; Liddy, Joshua J; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Busa, Michael A; Claxton, Laura J; van Emmerik, Richard E A

    2018-04-01

    Human locomotion is an inherently complex activity that requires the coordination and control of neurophysiological and biomechanical degrees of freedom across various spatiotemporal scales. Locomotor patterns must constantly be altered in the face of changing environmental or task demands, such as heterogeneous terrains or obstacles. Variability in stride times occurring at short time scales (e.g., 5-10 strides) is statistically correlated to larger fluctuations occurring over longer time scales (e.g., 50-100 strides). This relationship, known as fractal dynamics, is thought to represent the adaptive capacity of the locomotor system. However, this has not been tested empirically. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if stride time fractality during steady state walking associated with the ability of individuals to adapt their gait patterns when locomotor speed and symmetry are altered. Fifteen healthy adults walked on a split-belt treadmill at preferred speed, half of preferred speed, and with one leg at preferred speed and the other at half speed (2:1 ratio asymmetric walking). The asymmetric belt speed condition induced gait asymmetries that required adaptation of locomotor patterns. The slow speed manipulation was chosen in order to determine the impact of gait speed on stride time fractal dynamics. Detrended fluctuation analysis was used to quantify the correlation structure, i.e., fractality, of stride times. Cross-correlation analysis was used to measure the deviation from intended anti-phasing between legs as a measure of gait adaptation. Results revealed no association between unperturbed walking fractal dynamics and gait adaptability performance. However, there was a quadratic relationship between perturbed, asymmetric walking fractal dynamics and adaptive performance during split-belt walking, whereby individuals who exhibited fractal scaling exponents that deviated from 1/f performed the poorest. Compared to steady state preferred walking

  2. SSI [soil-structure interactions] and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, ''Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes'', currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to ''cut-off'' depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils

  3. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23 μg (mg cells)- 1) and methane (0.14 and 8.4 μg (mg cells)- 1) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1 × 10- 2 ± 1.7 × 10- 3 d- 1 and 6.5 × 10- 1 ± 7.1 × 10- 1 d- 1 for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  4. Application of column tests and electrical resistivity methods for leachate transport monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowaniak Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the human civilization leads to the pollution of environment. One of the contamination which are a real threat to soil and groundwater are leachates from landfills. In this paper the solute transport through soil was considered. For this purpose, the laboratory column tests of chlorides tracer and leachates transport on two soil samples have been carried out. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied as auxiliary tool to follow the movements of solute through the soil column what allowed to compare between the results obtained with column test method and electrical resistivity measurements. Breakthrough curves obtained by conductivity and resistivity methods represents similar trends which leads to the conclusion about the suitability of electrical resistivity methods for contamination transport monitoring in soil-water systems.

  5. [Removal of volatile organic compounds in soils by soil vapor extraction (SVE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fu-xiang; Zhang, Sheng-tian; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Ke; Lin, Yu-suo

    2011-05-01

    An experiment study has been carried out to investigate effects of the diameter of soil columns, the size of soil particulate and different contaminants on efficiency of simulated soil vapor extraction (SVE). Experiments with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and n-propylbenzene contaminated soils showed that larger bottom area/soil height (S/H) of the columns led to higher efficiency on removal of contaminants. Experiments with contaminated soils of different particulate size showed that the efficiency of SVE decreased with increases in soil particulate size, from 10 mesh to between 20 mesh and 40 mesh and removal of contaminants in soils became more difficult. Experiments with contaminated soils under different ventilation rates suggested that soil vapor extraction at a ventilation rate of 0.10 L x min(-1) can roughly remove most contaminants from the soils. Decreasing of contaminants in soils entered tailing stages after 12 h, 18 h and 48 h for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively. Removal rate of TVOCs (Total VOCs) reached a level as high as 99.52%. The results of the experiment have indicated that molecule structure and properties of the VOCs are also important factors which have effects on removal rates of the contaminants. Increases in carbon number on the benzene ring, decreases in vapor pressure and volatile capability resulted in higher difficulties in soil decontamination. n-propylbenzene has a lower vapor pressure than toluene and ethylbenzene which led to a significant retard effect on desorption and volatilization of benzene and ethylbenzene.

  6. Column-to-column packing variation of disposable pre-packed columns for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Susanne; Hinterberger, Stephan; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-12-08

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, pre-packed columns are the standard for process development, but they must be qualified before use in experimental studies to confirm the required performance of the packed bed. Column qualification is commonly done by pulse response experiments and depends highly on the experimental testing conditions. Additionally, the peak analysis method, the variation in the 3D packing structure of the bed, and the measurement precision of the workstation influence the outcome of qualification runs. While a full body of literature on these factors is available for HPLC columns, no comparable studies exist for preparative columns for protein chromatography. We quantified the influence of these parameters for commercially available pre-packed and self-packed columns of disposable and non-disposable design. Pulse response experiments were performed on 105 preparative chromatography columns with volumes of 0.2-20ml. The analyte acetone was studied at six different superficial velocities (30, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 500cm/h). The column-to-column packing variation between disposable pre-packed columns of different diameter-length combinations varied by 10-15%, which was acceptable for the intended use. The column-to-column variation cannot be explained by the packing density, but is interpreted as a difference in particle arrangement in the column. Since it was possible to determine differences in the column-to-column performance, we concluded that the columns were well-packed. The measurement precision of the chromatography workstation was independent of the column volume and was in a range of±0.01ml for the first peak moment and±0.007 ml 2 for the second moment. The measurement precision must be considered for small columns in the range of 2ml or less. The efficiency of disposable pre-packed columns was equal or better than that of self-packed columns. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of feed water dissolved organic carbon concentration and composition on organic micropollutant removal and microbial diversity in soil columns simulating river bank filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelkamp, C; van der Hoek, J P; Schoutteten, K; Hulpiau, L; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Cabo, A J; Callewaert, C; Boon, N; Löwenberg, J; Singhal, N; Verliefde, A R D

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated organic micropollutant (OMP) biodegradation rates in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating river bank filtration (RBF) processes. The dosed OMP mixture consisted of 11 pharmaceuticals, 6 herbicides, 2 insecticides and 1 solvent. Columns were filled with soil from a RBF site and were fed with four different organic carbon fractions (hydrophilic, hydrophobic, transphilic and river water organic matter (RWOM)). Additionally, the effect of a short-term OMP/dissolved organic carbon (DOC) shock-load (e.g. quadrupling the OMP concentrations and doubling the DOC concentration) on OMP biodegradation rates was investigated to assess the resilience of RBF systems. The results obtained in this study imply that - in contrast to what is observed for managed aquifer recharge systems operating on wastewater effluent - OMP biodegradation rates are not affected by the type of organic carbon fraction fed to the soil column, in case of stable operation. No effect of a short-term DOC shock-load on OMP biodegradation rates between the different organic carbon fractions was observed. This means that the RBF site simulated in this study is resilient towards transient higher DOC concentrations in the river water. However, a temporary OMP shock-load affected OMP biodegradation rates observed for the columns fed with the river water organic matter (RWOM) and the hydrophilic fraction of the river water organic matter. These different biodegradation rates did not correlate with any of the parameters investigated in this study (cellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP), DOC removal, specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), richness/evenness of the soil microbial population or OMP category (hydrophobicity/charge). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION EFFECTS ON MULTISTOREY R/C STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muberra ESER AYDEMIR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the behavior of multistorey structures considering soil structure interaction under earthquake excitation. For this purpose, sample 3, 6, 9 storey RC frames are designed based on Turkish Seismic Design Code and analyzed in time domain with incremental dynamic analysis. Strength reduction factors are investigated for generated sample plane frames for 64 different earthquake motions recorded on different site conditions such as rock, stiff soil, soft soil and very soft soil. According to the analysis result, strength reduction factors of sample buildings considering soil structure interaction are found to be almost always smaller than design strength reduction factors given in current seismic design codes, which cause an unsafe design and nonconservative design forces.

  9. How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points...

  10. Analysis of Pumphouse RCC Frame Structure for Soil Structure Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mr A.S. Thombare; Prof. V.P. Kumbhar; Prof. A.H. Kumbhar

    2016-01-01

    When structure is built on ground some elements of structure are direct contact with soil. When loads are applied on structure internal forces are developed in both the structure as well as in soil. It results in deformation of both the components which are independent to each other. This are called soil structure interaction. The analysis is done by using (Bentley STAAD.Pro V8i Version 2007) software. The analysis carried out been pump house structure R.C.C. frame structure find ...

  11. Pressure Jumps during Drainage in Macroporous Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soto, Diego; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Corral, A

    2018-01-01

    Tensiometer readings obtained at high resolution during drainage of structured soil columns revealed pressure jumps with long range correlations and burst sequences with a hierarchical structure. The statistical properties of jumps are similar to Haines jumps described in invasion percolation...... processes at pore scale, but they are much larger in amplitude and duration. Pressure jumps can result from transient redistribution of water potential in internal regions of soil and can be triggered during drainage by capillary displacements at the scale of structural pores....

  12. Soil compaction: Evaluation of stress transmission and resulting soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    strength. As soon as the applied load is lower than the aggregate strength, the mode of stress transmission is discrete as stresses were mainly transmitted through chain of aggregates. With increasing applied load soil aggregates start deforming that transformed heterogeneous soil into homogenous......, as a result stress transmission mode was shifted from discrete towards more like a continuum. Continuum-like stress transmission mode was better simulated with Boussinesq (1885) model based on theory of elasticity compared to discrete. The soil-pore structure was greatly affected by increasing applied...... and compaction-resulted soil structure at the same time. Stress transmission was quantified using both X-ray CT and Tactilus sensor mat, and soil-pore structure was quantified using X-ray CT. Our results imply that stress transmission through soil highly depends on the magnitude of applied load and aggregate...

  13. Evaluation of natural attenuation, bioventing, bioaugmentation and bioaugmentation-bioventing techniques, for the biodegradation of diesel in a sandy soil, through column experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muskus Morales, Angelica Maria; Santoyo Munoz, Claudia; Plata Quintero, Luijesmarth Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The present study was developed within an inter-institutional agreement between the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, UPB-BBGA and the Colombian Petroleum Institute-ICP, in order to provide a solution to an environmental problem that occurs in areas where hydrocarbons are handled and where sandy soils have been found to be contaminated with diesel fuel with concentrations up to 6% at a maximum depth of 80 cm. For this study, the soil samples were artificially contaminated with diesel fuel in order to evaluate Natural Attenuation, Bioventing, Bioaugmentation and Bioaugmentation-Bioventing soil remediation techniques through the use of column experiments. The design parameters, column dimensions, inflow, diesel concentration, dissolved oxygen, bacterial growth, and monitoring was defined. Bioaugmentation was performed inoculating a bacterial consortium produced by the ICP. The experimental setup was assembled in triplicate and was monitored through a period of four months. The experimental results showed that Bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 97% diesel removal from the contaminated soil; with the Bioaugmentation - Bioventing, diesel fuel removal percentage was 75%, and the Natural Attenuation and Bioaugmentation techniques resulted in diesel fuel removal percentages not greater than 48%. This study showed that the microbial consortium evaluated and provided by the Colombian Petroleum Institute proved to be not efficient for potentializing bioremediation processes of sandy soils contaminated with diesel fuel.

  14. Mathematical solution of the stone column effect on the load bearing capacity and settlement using numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madun, A.; Meghzili, S. A.; Tajudin, SAA; Yusof, M. F.; Zainalabidin, M. H.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Dan, M. F. Md; Ismail, M. A. M.

    2018-04-01

    The most important application of various geotechnical construction techniques is for ground improvement. Many soil improvement project had been developed due to the ongoing increase in urban and industrial growth and the need for greater access to lands. Stone columns are one of the best effective and feasible techniques for soft clay soil improvement. Stone columns increase the bearing capacity and reduce the settlement of soil. Finite element analyses were performed using the program PLAXIS 2D. An elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive relation, based on the Mohr–Coulomb criterion, governs the soft clay and stone column behaviour. This paper presents on how the response surface methodology (RSM) software is used to optimize the effect of the diameters and lengths of column on the load bearing capacity and settlement of soft clay. Load tests through the numerical modelling using Plaxis 2D were carried out on the loading plate at 66 mm. Stone column load bearing capacity increases with the increasing diameter of the column and settlement decreases with the increasing length of the column. Results revealed that the bigger column diameter, the higher load bearing capacity of soil while the longer column length, the lower settlement of soil. However, the optimum design of stone column was varied with each factor (diameter and length) separately for improvement.

  15. Optimum Design of Braced Steel Space Frames including Soil-Structure Interaction via Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization and Harmony Search Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse T. Daloglu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum design of braced steel space frames including soil-structure interaction is studied by using harmony search (HS and teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO algorithms. A three-parameter elastic foundation model is used to incorporate the soil-structure interaction effect. A 10-storey braced steel space frame example taken from literature is investigated according to four different bracing types for the cases with/without soil-structure interaction. X, V, Z, and eccentric V-shaped bracing types are considered in the study. Optimum solutions of examples are carried out by a computer program coded in MATLAB interacting with SAP2000-OAPI for two-way data exchange. The stress constraints according to AISC-ASD (American Institute of Steel Construction-Allowable Stress Design, maximum lateral displacement constraints, interstorey drift constraints, and beam-to-column connection constraints are taken into consideration in the optimum design process. The parameters of the foundation model are calculated depending on soil surface displacements by using an iterative approach. The results obtained in the study show that bracing types and soil-structure interaction play very important roles in the optimum design of steel space frames. Finally, the techniques used in the optimum design seem to be quite suitable for practical applications.

  16. Dynamic soil-structure interactions on embedded buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobarg, J.; Werkle, H.; Henseleit, O.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic soil-structure interaction on the horizontal seismic excitation is investigated on two typical embedded auxiliary buildings of a nuclear power plant. The structure and the soil are modelled by various analytical and numerical methods. Under the condition of the linear viscoelastic theory, i.e. soil characteristic constant in time and independent of strain, the interaction influences between a homogenous soil layer and a structure are analysied for the following parameters: 4) mathematical soil modells; 4) mathematical structure modells; 4) shear wave velocities; 3) embedment conditions; 4) earthquake time histories. (orig.) [de

  17. Design and research of seal structure for thermocouple column assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Qiqi; Li Na; Zhao Wei; Ma Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The new seal structure was designed to satisfy the function of thermocouple column assembly and the reactor structure. This seal structure uses the packing graphite ring and adopts the self-sealing principle. Cone angle is brought to the seal face of seal structure which is conveniently to assembly and disassembly. After the sealing principle analysis and stress calculation of graphite ring which adopt the cone angle, the cone angle increases the radial force of seal structure and improves the seal effect. The stress analysis result shows the seal structure strength satisfies the regulation requirement. The cold and hot function test results shows the sealing effect is good, and the design requirement is satisfied. (authors)

  18. X-ray structure analysis of soil compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillaev, T.; Kalonov, M.; Kuziev, Sh.; Khatamov, Sh.; Suvanov, M.

    1998-01-01

    The analytic characteristics of techniques developed to analyse soil structure by means of X-ray diffraction method are presented. Presence of 8 minerals in Fergana valley soils have been established. It is shown that X-ray structure analysis of soils gives rise to new original possibilities to determine not only their structure but also quantative content and type of chemical compound of element in soil. (author)

  19. Two stage approach to dynamic soil structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, I.

    1981-01-01

    A two stage approach is used to reduce the effective size of soil island required to solve dynamic soil structure interaction problems. The ficticious boundaries of the conventional soil island are chosen sufficiently far from the structure so that the presence of the structure causes only a slight perturbation on the soil response near the boundaries. While the resulting finite element model of the soil structure system can be solved, it requires a formidable computational effort. Currently, a two stage approach is used to reduce this effort. The combined soil structure system has many frequencies and wavelengths. For a stiff structure, the lowest frequencies are those associated with the motion of the structure as a rigid body. In the soil, these modes have the longest wavelengths and attenuate most slowly. The higher frequency deformational modes of the structure have shorter wavelengths and their effect attenuates more rapidly with distance from the structure. The difference in soil response between a computation with a refined structural model, and one with a crude model, tends towards zero a very short distance from the structure. In the current work, the 'crude model' is a rigid structure with the same geometry and inertial properties as the refined model. Preliminary calculations indicated that a rigid structure would be a good low frequency approximation to the actual structure, provided the structure was much stiffer than the native soil. (orig./RW)

  20. Soil compaction: Evaluation of stress transmission and resulting soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas; Lamande, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of stress transmission and resultant deformation in soil profiles is a prerequisite for the development of predictive models and decision support tools for preventing soil compaction. Numerous studies have been carried out on the effects of soil compaction, whilst relatively few studies have focused on the cause (mode of stress transmission in the soil). We have coupled both cause and effects together in the present study by carrying out partially confined compression tests on (1) wet aggregates, (2) air dry aggregates, and (3) intact soils to quantify stress transmission and compaction-resulted soil structure at the same time. Stress transmission was quantified using both X-ray CT and Tactilus sensor mat, and soil-pore structure was quantified using X-ray CT. Our results imply that stress transmission through soil highly depends on the magnitude of applied load and aggregate strength. As soon as the applied load is lower than the aggregate strength, the mode of stress transmission is discrete as stresses were mainly transmitted through chain of aggregates. With increasing applied load soil aggregates start deforming that transformed heterogeneous soil into homogenous, as a result stress transmission mode was shifted from discrete towards more like a continuum. Continuum-like stress transmission mode was better simulated with Boussinesq (1885) model based on theory of elasticity compared to discrete. The soil-pore structure was greatly affected by increasing applied stresses. Total porosity was reduced 5-16% and macroporosity 50-85% at 620 kPa applied stress for the intact soils. Similarly, significant changes in the morphological indices of the macropore space were also observed with increasing applied stresses.

  1. Radionuclide migration test using undisturbed aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    As one of the most important part of safety assessment on the shallow land disposal of lowlevel radioactive waste, the radionuclide migration was studied using undisturbed soil samples, in order to evaluate an exact radionuclide migration in an aerated soil layer. Soil samples used in the migration test were coastal sand and loamy soil which form typical surface soil layers in Japan. The aqueous solution containing 60 CoCl 2 , 85 SrCl 2 and 137 CsCl was fed into the soil column and concentration of each radionuclide both in effluent and in soil was measured. Large amount of radionuclides was adsorbed on the surface of soil column and small amount of radionuclides moved deep into the soil column. Difference in the radionuclide profile was observed in the low concentration portion particularly. It is that some fractions of 60 Co and 137 Cs are stable in non-ionic form and move downward through the soil column together with water. The radionuclide distribution in the surface of soil column can be fairly predicted with a conventional migration equation for ionic radionuclides. As a result of radionuclide adsorption, both aerated soil layers of coastal sand and loamy soil have large barrier ability on the radionuclide migration through the ground. (author)

  2. Asymptotic Structure of the Seismic Radiation from an Explosive Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rosales-Vera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of the seismic radiation in the far field produced by an explosive column. Using an asymptotic solution for the far field of vibration (Heelan’s solution, we find analytical expressions to the peak particle velocity (PPV diagrams. These results are extended to the case of a charge with finite velocity of detonation.

  3. The central column structure in SPHEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duck, R.C.; French, P.A.; Browning, P.K.; Cunningham, G.; Gee, S.J.; al-Karkhy, A.; Martin, R.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    SPHEX is a gun injected spheromak in which a magnetised Marshall gun generates and maintains an approximately axisymmetric toroidal plasma within a topologically spherical flux conserving vessel. The central column has been defined as a region of high mean floating potential, f > up to ∼ 150 V, aligned with the geometric axis of the device. It has been suggested that this region corresponds to the open magnetic flux which is connected directly to the central electrode of the gun and links the toroidal annulus (in which f > ∼ 0 V). Poynting vector measurements have shown that the power required to drive toroidal current in the annulus is transmitted out of the column by the coherent 20 kHz mode which pervades the plasma. Measurements of the MHD dynamo in the column indicate an 'antidynamo' electric field due to correlated fluctuations in v and B at the 20 kHz mode frequency which is consistent with the time-averaged Ohm's Law. On shorting the gun electrodes, the density in the column region decays rapidly leaving a 'hole' of radius R c ∼ 7 cm. This agrees with the estimated dimension of the open flux from mean internal B measurements and axisymmetric force-free equilibrium modelling, but is considerably smaller than the radius of ∼ 13 cm inferred from the time-averaged potential. In standard operating conditions the gun delivers a current of I G ∼ 60 kA at V G ∼ 500 V for ∼ 1 ms, driving a toroidal current of I t ∼ 60 kA. Ultimately we wish to understand the mechanism which drives toroidal current in the annulus; the central column is of interest because of the crucial role it plays in this process. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  4. Afforestation alters community structure of soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jennifer K; Gleeson, Deirdre B; Clipson, Nicholas; Murphy, Daniel V

    2010-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the effect of afforestation on soil fungal communities. This study demonstrated that afforestation altered fungal community structure and that changes were correlated to pools of soil C. Pasture at three locations on the same soil type was afforested with Eucalyptus globulus or Pinus pinaster. The structure of fungal communities under the three land uses was measured after 13y using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Afforestation significantly altered the structure of fungal communities. The effect of location on the structure of fungal communities was limited to pasture soils; although these contained the same plant species, the relative composition of each species varied between locations. Differences in the structure of fungal communities between pasture, E. globulus and P. pinaster were significantly correlated with changes in the amount of total organic C and microbial biomass-C in soil. Afforestation of patches of agricultural land may contribute to conserving soil fungi in agricultural landscapes by supporting fungal communities with different composition to agricultural soils. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonlinear seismic soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, J.K.; Setlur, A.V.; Pathak, D.V.

    1977-01-01

    The heterogeneous and nonlinear soil medium and the detailed three-dimensional structure are synthesized to determine the seismic response to soil-structure systems. The approach is particularly attractive in a design office environment since it: a) leads to interactive motion at the soil-structure interface; b) uses existing public domain programs such as SAPIV, LUSH and FLUSH with marginal modifications; and c) meets current regulatory requirements for soil-structure interaction analysis. Past methods differ from each other depending on the approach adopted for soil and structure representations and procedures for solving the governing differential equations. Advantages and limitations of these methods are reviewed. In the current approach, the three-dimensional structure is represented by the dynamic characteristics of its fixed base condition. This representation is ideal when structures are designed to be within elastic range. An important criterion is the design of the nuclear power plant structures. Model damping coefficients are varied to reflect the damping properties of different structural component materials. The detailed structural model is systematically reduced to reflect important dynamic behavior with simultaneous storing of intermediate information for retrieval of detailed structural response. Validity of the approach has been established with simple numerical experiments. (Auth.)

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of warm mix asphalt through resonant column testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Non-destructive testing has been used for decades to characterize engineering properties of hot-mix asphalt. Among such tests is the resonant column (RC) test, which is commonly used to characterize soil materials. The resonant column device at Penn ...

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mahmoudpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite element method and scaled boundary finite element method is applied. Finite element method is used to analyze the structure, and scaled boundary finite element method is applied in the analysis of unbounded soil region. Due to analytical solution in the radial direction, the radiation condition is satisfied exactly. The material behavior of soil and structure is assumed to be linear. The soil region is considered as a homogeneous half-space. The analysis is performed in time domain. A computer program is prepared to analyze the soil-structure system. Comparing the results with those in literature shows the exactness and competency of the proposed method.

  8. Partial Prestress Concrete Beams Reinforced Concrete Column Joint Earthquake Resistant On Frame Structure Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astawa, M. D.; Kartini, W.; Lie, F. X. E.

    2018-01-01

    Floor Building that requires a large space such as for the meeting room, so it must remove the column in the middle of the room, then the span beam above the room will be long. If the beam of structural element with a span length reaches 15.00 m, then it is less effective and efficient using a regular Reinforced Concrete Beam because it requires a large section dimension, and will reduce the beauty of the view in terms of aesthetics of Architecture. In order to meet these criteria, in this design will use partial prestressing method with 400/600 mm section dimension, assuming the partial Prestressed Beam structure is still able to resist the lateral force of the earthquake. The design of the reinforcement has taken into account to resist the moment due to the gravitational load and lateral forces. The earthquake occurring on the frame structure of the building. In accordance with the provisions, the flexural moment capacity of the tendon is permitted only by 25% of the total bending moment on support of the beam, while the 75% will be charged to the reinforcing steel. Based on the analysis result, bring ini 1 (one) tendon contains 6 strand with diameter 15,2 mm. On the beam pedestal, requires 5D25 tensile reinforcement and 3D25 for the compression reinforcement, for shear reinforcement on the pedestal using Ø10-100 mm. Dimensional column section are 600/600 mm with longitudinal main reinforcement of 12D25, and transverse reinforcement Ø10-150. At the core of the beam-column joint, use the transversal reinforcement Ø10-100 mm. The moment of Column versus Beam Moment ∑Me > 1.2 Mg, with a value of 906.99 kNm > 832.25 kNm, qualify for ductility and Strong Columns-weak beam. Capacity of contribution bending moment of Strand Tendon’s is 23.95% from the total bending moment capacity of the beam, meaning in accordance with the provisions. Thus, the stability and ductility structure of Beam-Column joint is satisfy the requirements of SNI 2847: 2013 and ACI 318-11.

  9. GFRP seismic strengthening and structural heath monitoring of Portage Creek Bridge concrete columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffman, S.; Bagchi, A.; Mufti, A.; Neale, K.; Sargent, D.; Rivera, E.

    2006-01-01

    Located in Victoria British Columbia (BC), Canada, the Portage Creek Bridge is a 124m long, three-span structure with a reinforced concrete piers and abutments on H piles. The bridge was designed prior to the introduction of current bridge seismic design codes and construction practices. Therefore it was not designed to resist the earthquake forces as required by today's standards. The bridge is on a route classified as a Municipal Disaster Route scheduled to be retrofitted to prevent collapse during a design seismic event, with a return period of 475 years (i.e., an event with 105 probability of exceedance in 50 years). Conventional materials and methods were used to retrofit most of the bridge. The dynamic analysis of the bridge predicted the two tall columns of Pier No. 1 will form plastic hinges under an earthquake resulting an additional shear to the short columns of Pier No. 2. A non-liner static pushover analysis indicated the short columns will not be able to form plastic hinges prior to failure in shear. The innovative solution of Fiber Reinforced Polymer wraps (FRPs) was chosen to strengthen the short columns for shear without increasing the moment capacity. The FRP wraps and the bridge were instrumented as one of 36 demonstration projects across Canada sponsored by ISIS (Intelligent Sensing for Innovative Structure) Canada, federally funded Network of Centers of Excellence, to access the performance of FRP and the use of FOS (Fiber Optic Sensors) for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The two columns of the bridge pier were strengthened with GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) wraps with eight bi-directional rosette type strain gauges and four long gauge fiber optic sensors attached to the outer layer of the wraps. In addition, two 3-D Crossbow accelerometers are installed on the pier cap above the columns and a traffic web-cam mounted above the deck at the pier location. The data is collected through high sped internet line to an interactive web page

  10. pH dependence and unsuitability of fluorescein dye as a tracer for pesticide mobility studies in acid soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Peterson

    2009-01-01

    The mobility of fluorescein and bromide used as tracers in packed soil columns was investigated.Five different soils were used in two application methods: soil surface application and soil incorporation, both of which simulate accepted methods of soil application of termiticides to prevent structural infestation. The...

  11. Soil-structure interaction analysis by Green function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Nakahara, Mitsuharu.

    1985-01-01

    Using the method of discretized Green function which had been suggested by the authors, the parametric study of the effects of base mat foundation thickness and soil stiffness were conducted. There was no upper structure effects from the response and reaction stress of the soil by employing different base mat foundation thicknesses. However, the response stress of base mat itself had considerable effect on the base mat foundation stress. The harder the soil, became larger accelerations, and smaller displacements on the upper structure. The upper structure lines of force were directed onto the soil. In the case of soft soil, the reaction soil stress were distributed evenly over the entire reactor building area. Common characteristics of all cases, in-plane shear deformation of the upper floor occured and in-plane acceleration and displacement at the center of the structure become larger. Also, the soil stresses around the shield wall of the base mat foundation became large cecause of the effect of the shield wall bending. (Kubozono, M.)

  12. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  13. EPRI research on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper briefly discusses the background of soil-structure interaction research and identifies the nuclear industry's need for a realistic, experimentally qualified soil-structure interaction analysis methodology for nuclear power plant design to reduce excessive conservatism and stabilize the licensing process. EPRI research and joint research efforts between EPRI and Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, Taiwan Power Company, and the Japanese Century Research Institute for Electric Power Industry are outlined. As a result of these and other research efforts, improvement in soil-structure interactions methodologies is being realized

  14. Extension of the renormalizability criterion to the case of arbitrary unperturbed Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozin, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Extension of the renormalizability criterium of the perturbation theory is generalized in the case, when an unperturbed lagrangian is not a lagrangian of free fields L 0 . The derivating functional of the Green function, written in the form of a function integral is disintegrated by the perturbed lagrangian L 1 when building the perturbation theory. Described are ultraviolet divergences and possibilities of their elimination in eucledian space. The criterion permits to state extension renormalizability of the perturbation theory for eVery point L 0 and the direction L 1 assigned in this point in linear space of different lagrangians. According to the Weinberg theorem the grade asymptotics of Green functions is not changed at slight shift from the initial point in the supernormalized direction. For any point and any direction the extension of the perturbation theory is supernormalized in this space

  15. Estimation of apparent soil resistivity for two-layer soil structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassereddine, M.; Rizk, J.; Nagrial, M.; Hellany, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    High voltage (HV) earthing design is one of the key elements when it comes to safety compliance of a system. High voltage infrastructure exposes workers and people to unsafe conditions. The soil structure plays a vital role in determining the allowable and actual step/touch voltage. This paper presents vital information when working with two-layer soil structure. It shows the process as to when it is acceptable to use a single layer instead of a two-layer structure. It also discusses the simplification of the soil structure approach depending on the reflection coefficient. It introduces the reflection coefficient K interval which determines if single layer approach is acceptable. Multiple case studies are presented to address the new approach and its accuracy.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudpour, Sanaz; Attarnejad, Reza; Behnia, Cambyse

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite el...

  17. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machelski Czesław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces, as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell’s span, geometry (static scheme and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure’s characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  18. Methane Transmission and Oxidation throughout the Soil Column from Three Central Florida Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Fansler, S.; Becker, K. E.; Hinkle, C. R.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    When methane (CH4) is generated in anoxic soil sites, it may be subsequently re-oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2). Understanding the controls on, and magnitudes of, these processes is necessary to accurately represent greenhouse gas production and emission from soils. We used a laboratory incubation to examine the influence of variable conditions on methane transmission and oxidation, and identify critical reaction zones throughout the soil column. Sandy soils were sampled from three different sites at Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP), Florida, USA: a depression marsh characterized by significant surface organic matter accumulation, a dry pine flatwood site with water intrusion and organic horizon at depth (200+ cm); and an intermediate-drainage site. Contiguous, 30-cm long cores were sampled from N=4 random boreholes at each site, from the surface to the water table (varying from 90 to 240 cm). In the lab, each core was monitored for 50 hours to quantify baseline (pretreatment) gas fluxes before injection with 6 ml CH4 (an amount commensurate with previous field collar measurements) at the base of each core. We then monitored CH4 and CO2 evolution for 100 hours after injection, calculating per-gas and total C evolution. Methane emissions spiked ~10 hours after injection for all cores, peaking at 0.001 μmol/g soil/hr, ~30x larger than pre-injection flux rates. On a C basis, CO2 emissions were orders of magnitude larger, and rose significantly after injection, with elevated rates generally sustained throughout the incubation. Cores from the depression marsh and shallower depths had significantly higher fluxes of both gases. We estimate that 99.1% of the original CH4 injection was oxidized to CO2. These findings suggest either that the methane measured in the field at DWP originates from within a few centimeters of the surface, or that it is produced in much larger quantities deeper in the profile before most is subsequently oxidized. This highlights the need for

  19. Feedbacks Between Soil Structure and Microbial Activities in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, V. L.; Smith, A. P.; Fansler, S.; Varga, T.; Kemner, K. M.; McCue, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure provides the physical framework for soil microbial habitats. The connectivity and size distribution of soil pores controls the microbial access to nutrient resources for growth and metabolism. Thus, a crucial component of soil research is how a soil's three-dimensional structure and organization influences its biological potential on a multitude of spatial and temporal scales. In an effort to understand microbial processes at scale more consistent with a microbial community, we have used soil aggregates as discrete units of soil microbial habitats. Our research has shown that mean pore diameter (x-ray computed tomography) of soil aggregates varies with the aggregate diameter itself. Analyzing both the bacterial composition (16S) and enzyme activities of individual aggregates showed significant differences in the relative abundances of key members the microbial communities associated with high enzyme activities compared to those with low activities, even though we observed no differences in the size of the biomass, nor in the overall richness or diversity of these communities. We hypothesize that resources and substrates have stimulated key populations in the aggregates identified as highly active, and as such, we conducted further research that explored how such key populations (i.e. fungal or bacterial dominated populations) alter pathways of C accumulation in aggregate size domains and microbial C utilization. Fungi support and stabilize soil structure through both physical and chemical effects of their hyphal networks. In contrast, bacterial-dominated communities are purported to facilitate micro- and fine aggregate stabilization. Here we quantify the direct effects fungal versus bacterial dominated communities on aggregate formation (both the rate of aggregation and the quality, quantity and distribution of SOC contained within aggregates). A quantitative understanding of the different mechanisms through which fungi or bacteria shape aggregate

  20. A Pilot Study On A Moment Carrying Beam-column Connection For Precast Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Vedat

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a moment carrying beam-column connection detail for precast structures has been investigated in the experimental and analytical manner. The 1/2 scaled beam-column test specimen is representing a real exterior precast connection detail. The cast-in-situ welded connection is applied at bottom face of the beams and additional re-bars and cast-in-situ concrete is introduced at the upper part of the beams. The experimental study is conducted in the form of varying beam top diplaceme...

  1. Laboratory study on leachability of five herbicides in South Australian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, G G; Williams, B

    2000-03-01

    Norflurazon, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen, trifluralin and simazine are herbicides widely used in the vineyards of the Barossa Valley, South Australia. The leaching behaviour of norflurazon, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen and trifluralin was investigated on four key soils in the Barossa Valley. Leaching potential on packed soil columns and actual mobility using intact soil columns were investigated. On the packed soil columns, norflurazon was the most leachable herbicide. More of the herbicides were detected in the leachates from the sandy soils (Mountadam and Nuriootpa) than from the clayey soils (Lyndoch and Tanunda). Organic matter is generally low in soils in the Barossa region. Porosity and saturated conductivity significantly affect herbicide movement and in the sandy Mountadam and Nuriootpa soils, the water flux is greater than for the higher clay content Lyndoch and Tanunda soils. Increasing the time interval between herbicide application and the incidence of "rainfall" reduced the amounts of herbicides found in the leachates. The use of intact soil columns and including simazine for comparison showed that both norflurazon and simazine were present in the leachates. Simazine was the first herbicide to appear in leachates. Sectioning of the intact soil columns after leaching clearly demonstrated that norflurazon and simazine reached the bottom of the soil columns for all soils studied. Greater amounts of norflurazon were retained in the soil columns compared with simazine. The other herbicides were mostly retained in the initial sections of the soil columns.

  2. Earthquake response analysis considering structure-soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, T.; Takahashi, K.; Oguro, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper proposes a numerical method of earthquake response analysis considering the structure-soil-structure interaction between two adjacent buildings. In this paper an analytical study is presented in order to show some typical features of coupling effects of two reactor buildings of the BWR-type nuclear power plant. The technical approach is a kind of substructure method, which at first evaluates the compliance properties with the foundation-soil-foundation interaction and then uses the compliance in determining seismic responses of two super-structures during earthquake motions. For this purpose, it is assumed that the soil medium is an elastic half space for modeling and that the rigidity of any type of structures such as piping facilities connecting the adjacent buildings is negligible. The technical approach is mainly based on the following procedures. Supersturcture stiffness is calculated by using the method which has been developed in our laboratory based on the Thin-Wall Beam Theory. Soil stiffness is expressed by a matrix with 12 x 12 elements as a function of frequency, which is calculated using the soil compliance functions proposed in Dr. Tajimi's Theory. These stiffness values may be expressed by complex numbers for modeling the damping mechanism of superstructures. We can solve eigenvalue problems with frequency dependent stiffness and the large-scale matrix using our method which is based on condensing the matrix to the suitable size by Rayleigh-Ritz method. Earthquake responses can be solved in the frequency domain by Fourier Transform. (orig./RW)

  3. Effects of Salt Accumulation in Soil by Evaporation on Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Soil salinization is one type of soil degradation caused by saline groundwater evaporation. Salt accumulation in the soil will change the pore structure of soil, which should change the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties including the soil water characteristic curve (SWCC). To investigate the effect of salt accumulation on the SWCC and find the best suitable SWCC model to characterize the relationship of soil moisture and soil matrix potential, we have conducted laboratory SWCC experiments with the soil columns saturated by NaCl solution with different concentration (deionized water, 3 g/L, 15 g/L, 50 g/L, 100 g/L and 200 g/L). As the concentration of initial solution increases, the matrix potential corresponding to the same moisture increases. As the water was evaporated, the salt would precipitate in soil continuously, which would decrease the porosity of soils and increase the negative pressure of soils. With higher initial concentration, the more salt accumulation caused the more residual water content in the soils. For van Genuchten-Mualem model, the residual water contents θr were 0.0159, 0.0181, 0.0182, 0.0328, 0.0312, 0.0723, 0.0864 in the columns initially saturated by deionized water, 3 g/L, 15 g/L, 50 g/L, 100 g/L and 200 g/L, respectively. The van Genuchten-Mualem model, Fredlund-Xing model, Gardern model, Mckee-Bumb model and Brooks-Corey model were fitted by MATLAB with the experiments data, and the fitted coefficients were compared. The Fredlund-Xing model has the best fitting coefficients and the calculated value was consistent with the observed data.

  4. Influence of the soil-atmosphere exchange on the hydric profile induced in soil-structure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al Qadad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere exchange leads to a moisture change in the soil. This can cause major damage to engineering structures due to the soil expansion and shrinkage. The soil-atmosphere exchange is related to several parameters, in particular the soil characteristics and climate conditions. The presence of an engineering structure causes a variation of the hydraulic profile in the soil, which can lead to heterogeneous soil movement and consequently to structural damage. This paper presents a coupled numerical model based on the consideration of both water flow in unsaturated soils and soil-atmosphere exchange. After the validation of the model, the paper presents its use for the analysis of the influence of the presence of structures on moisture change induced under climatic conditions recorded in a semi-arid region. Analysis shows that the presence of the structure leads to important change in the moisture distribution, in particular in the vicinity of the structure.

  5. Influence of foundation settlements in load redistribution on columns in a monitoring construction - Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Savaris

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present the results obtained in a study on the interaction between the behavior of the structure and the foundation settlements and verify the influence of normal load distribution on the columns. In this mechanism, known as structure soil interaction (SSI, as the building is constructed, a transfer of loads occurs from the columns which tend to settle more to those that tend to settle less. The study was conducted in a building which had its settlements monitored from the beginning of construction. For this purpose, a linear tridimensional numerical model was constructed and numerical analysis was performed, using the finite elements method. In these analyses, numerical models corre- sponding to the execution of each floor were used, considering the settlements measured in each stage of the construction. The results of analy- ses showed that the effect of SSI are significant for calculating the normal efforts on the columns, particularly on those located in the first floors.

  6. Predicting recovery from acid rain using the micro-spatial heterogeneity of soil columns downhill the infiltration zone of beech stemflow: introduction of a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Torsten W; Muras, Alexander

    Release of stored sulfur may delay the recovery of soil pH from Acid Rain. It is hypothesized that analyzing the micro-spatial heterogeneity of soil columns downhill of a beech stem enables predictions of soil recovery as a function of historic acid loads and time. We demonstrated in a very simplified approach, how these two different factors may be untangled from each other using synthetic data. Thereafter, we evaluated the stated hypothesis based upon chemical soil data with increasing distance from the stem of beech trees. It is predicted that the top soil will recover from acid deposition, as already recorded in the infiltration zone of stemflow near the base of the stem. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed.

  7. How do peat type, sand addition and soil moisture influence the soil organic matter mineralization in anthropogenically disturbed organic soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säurich, Annelie; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Don, Axel; Burkart, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from agriculture. As a consequence of both drainage induced mineralization and anthropogenic sand mixing, large areas of former peatlands under agricultural use contain soil organic carbon (SOC) at the boundary between mineral and organic soils. Studies on SOC dynamics of such "low carbon organic soils" are rare as the focus of previous studies was mainly either on mineral soils or "true" peat soil. However, the variability of CO2 emissions increases with disturbance and therefore, we have yet to understand the reasons behind the relatively high CO2 emissions of these soils. Peat properties, soil organic matter (SOM) quality and water content are obviously influencing the rate of CO2 emissions, but a systematic evaluation of the hydrological and biogeochemical drivers for mineralization of disturbed peatlands is missing. With this incubation experiment, we aim at assessing the drivers of the high variability of CO2 emissions from strongly anthropogenically disturbed organic soil by systematically comparing strongly degraded peat with and without addition of sand under different moisture conditions and for different peat types. The selection of samples was based on results of a previous incubation study, using disturbed samples from the German Agricultural Soil Inventory. We sampled undisturbed soil columns from topsoil and subsoil (three replicates of each) of ten peatland sites all used as grassland. Peat types comprise six fens (sedge, Phragmites and wood peat) and four bogs (Sphagnum peat). All sites have an intact peat horizon that is permanently below groundwater level and a strongly disturbed topsoil horizon. Three of the fen and two of the bog sites have a topsoil horizon altered by sand-mixing. In addition the soil profile was mapped and samples for the determination of soil hydraulic properties were collected. All 64 soil columns (including four additional reference samples) will be installed

  8. Cylindrical fabric-confined soil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard A.

    A cylindrical fabric-soil structural concept for implementation on the moon and Mars which provides many advantages is proposed. The most efficient use of fabric is to fashion it into cylindrical tubes, creating cylindrical fabric-confined soil structures. The length, diameter, and curvature of the tubes will depend on the intended application. The cylindrical hoop forces provide radial confinement while end caps provide axial confinement. One of the ends is designed to allow passage of the soil into the fabric tube before sealing. Transportation requirements are reduced due to the low mass and volume of the fabric. Construction requirements are reduced due to the self-erection capability via the pneumatic exoskeleton. Maintenance requirements are reduced due to the passive nature of the concept. The structure's natural ductility is well suited for any seismic activity.

  9. Use of a Packed-Column Bioreactor for Isolation of Diverse Protease-Producing Bacteria from Antarctic Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wery, Nathalie; Gerike, Ursula; Sharman, Ajay; Chaudhuri, Julian B.; Hough, David W.; Danson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Seventy-five aerobic heterotrophs have been isolated from a packed-column bioreactor inoculated with soil from Antarctica. The column was maintained at 10°C and continuously fed with a casein-containing medium to enrich protease producers. Twenty-eight isolates were selected for further characterization on the basis of morphology and production of clearing zones on skim milk plates. Phenotypic tests indicated that the strains were mainly psychrotrophs and presented a high morphological and metabolical diversity. The extracellular protease activities tested were optimal at neutral pH and between 30 and 45°C. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses showed that the bioreactor was colonized by a wide variety of taxons, belonging to various bacterial divisions: α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria; the Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides group; and high G+C gram-positive bacteria and low G+C gram-positive bacteria. Some strains represent candidates for new species of the genera Chryseobacterium and Massilia. This diversity demonstrates that the bioreactor is an efficient enrichment tool compared to traditional isolation strategies. PMID:12620829

  10. Transport of sewage molecular markers through saturated soil column and effect of easily biodegradable primary substrate on their removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolad, Mahsa; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiangyong

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and artificial sweeteners (ASs) are emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) in the aquatic environment. The presence of PPCPs and ASs in water bodies has an ecologic potential risk and health concern. Therefore, it is needed to detect the pollution sources by understanding the transport behavior of sewage molecular markers in a subsurface area. The aim of this study was to evaluate transport of nine selected molecular markers through saturated soil column experiments. The selected sewage molecular markers in this study were six PPCPs including acetaminophen (ACT), carbamazepine (CBZ), caffeine (CF), crotamiton (CTMT), diethyltoluamide (DEET), salicylic acid (SA) and three ASs including acesulfame (ACF), cyclamate (CYC), and saccharine (SAC). Results confirmed that ACF, CBZ, CTMT, CYC and SAC were suitable to be used as sewage molecular markers since they were almost stable against sorption and biodegradation process during soil column experiments. In contrast, transport of ACT, CF and DEET were limited by both sorption and biodegradation processes and 100% removal efficiency was achieved in the biotic column. Moreover, in this study the effect of different acetate concentration (0-100mg/L) as an easily biodegradable primary substrate on a removal of PPCPs and ASs was also studied. Results showed a negative correlation (r(2)>0.75) between the removal of some selected sewage chemical markers including ACF, CF, ACT, CYC, SAC and acetate concentration. CTMT also decreased with the addition of acetate, but increasing acetate concentration did not affect on its removal. CBZ and DEET removal were not dependent on the presence of acetate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water and dissolved carbon transport in an eroding soil landscape using column experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieckh, Helene; Gerke, Horst; Glæsner, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    In the hummocky ground moraine soil landscape, a spatial continuum of more or less eroded soils developed from till under intensive agricultural cultivation. Water flow and solute transport are affected by the variable soil structural and pedological developments, which are posing a challenge...... for flux estimation. The objective of this study was to investigate transport of water, dissolved organic (DOC), and particulate carbon (PC) through soil profiles of an eroded Haplic Luvisol and a heavily eroded Haplic Regosol. We studied 5 soil horizons in three replicates each: Ap (0-20 cm) and E (20...... boundary. Breakthrough curves for a pre-applied tracer (Br-) on the soil surface and a tracer applied with irrigation water (3H2O) were modeled analytically using CXTFIT. The heterogeneity of the Luvisol horizons was generally higher than that of the Regosol horizons, which relates to the higher...

  12. Simulation of chloride transport based description soil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood-ul-Hassan, M.; Akhtar, M.S.; Gill, S.M.; Nabi, G.

    2003-01-01

    There is a need of environmental implications of rapid appearance of surface by applying chemical at depths below the vadose zone (tile line or shallow groundwater) for developing better insight into solute flow mechanism through the arable lands. Transport of chloride, a representative non-adsorbing solute, through a moderately structured silty clay loam soil (Gujranwala series, Typic Ustochrepts) and an un-structured sandy loam soil (Nabipur series, Typic Camborthid) was characterized and two existing models viz. convection dispersion equation (CDE) and preferential flow models were tested. The flux average of solute concentration in the outflow as a function of cumulative drainage was fitted to the models. The CDE fitted, relatively, better in the non-structured soil than in the moderately structured soil. Dispersivity value determined by CDE was very high for the structured soil which is physically not possible. The preferential flow model fitted well in the Gujranwala soil, but not in the Nabipur soil. The breakthrough characteristics i.e. drainage to peak concentration (Dp), symmetry coefficient (SC), skewness, and kurtosis were compared. Chloride breakthrough was earlier than expected based on piston flow. It indicated preferential flow in both the soils, yet, immediate appearance of the tracer in the Gujranwala soil demonstrated even larger magnitude of the preferential flow. Breakthrough curves' parameters indicated a large amount of the solute movement through the preferred pathways by passing the soil matrix in the Gujranwala soil. The study suggests that some soil structure parameters (size/shape and degree of aggregation) should be incorporated in the solute transport models.(author)

  13. Material dynamics in polluted soils with different structures - comparative investigations of general soil and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In structured soils, a small-scale heterogeneity of physical and chemical properties will develop which results in a reduced availability of the reaction sites of the soil matrix. In view of the lack of knowledge on the conditions within the individual aggregates were carried out for characterizing the aggregates and comparing them with the soil in, general soil samples were taken from natural structure of a podzolic soil and a podazolic brown earth from two sites in the Fichtelgebirge mountains as well as a parabraun earth from East Holstein. The horizons differed with regard to their texture and structure; silty material tends to have a subpolyhedral structure and calyey material a polyhedral structure. The general soil samples and aggregate samples from the three B horizons were subjected, with comparable experimental conditions, to percolation experiments inducing a multiple acid load. The soil solution from the secondary pore system and aggregate pore system is more heterogeneus for the higher-structured subpolyhedral texture of the perdzolic soil than for the less strongly aggregated subpolyhedral structured of the podzolic brown earth. (orig.) [de

  14. Seismic simulation analysis of nuclear reactor building by soil-building interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Motohashi, S.; Kusano, N.; Mizuno, N.; Sugiyama, N.

    1981-01-01

    Seismic simulation analysis were performed for evaluating soil-structure interaction effects by an analytical approach using a 'Lattice Model' developed by the authors. The purpose of this paper is to check the adequacy of this procedure for analyzing soil-structure interaction by means of comparing computed results with recorded ones. The 'Lattice Model' approach employs a lumped mass interactive model, in which not only the structure but also the underlying and/or surrounding soil are modeled as descretized elements. The analytical model used for this study extends about 310 m in the horizontal direction and about 103 m in depth. The reactor building is modeled as three shearing-bending sticks (outer wall, inner wall and shield wall) and the underlying and surrounding soil are divided into four shearing sticks (column directly beneath the reactor building, adjacent, near and distant columns). A corresponding input base motion for the 'Lattice Model' was determined by a deconvolution analysis using a recorded motion at elevation -18.5 m in the free-field. The results of this simulation analysis were shown to be in reasonably good agreement with the recorded ones in the forms of the distribution of ground motions and structural responses, acceleration time histories and related response spectra. These results showed that the 'Lattice Model' approach was an appropriate one to estimate the soil-structure interaction effects. (orig./HP)

  15. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: Effect of soil type and macropores

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  16. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: effect of soil type and macropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of the silica nanoparticles (NPSiO2 on the stabilization and transport of hazardous nanoparticle suspensions into landfill soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluates the stability and transport behaviors of hazardous nanoparticles into soil landfills using experimental procedures to simulate the effects of natural silica nanoparticle suspensions during their percolation into the soil layers of municipal waste landfills. For this, we prepared stabilized suspensions of nanoparticle oxides containing silicon (NPSiO2, titanium (NPTiO2, copper (NPCuO and zinc (NPZnO, which are recognized as hazardous to the environment, and we conducted leaching experiments within the soil column by simulating landfills layers and simulating the capture and attenuation of nanomaterials into municipal waste landfills. The results demonstrated that the presence of NPSiO2 in suspensions increases the stable concentrations of copper, zinc and titanium oxides and strongly decreases soil layer effectiveness. In contrast, NPZnO improves effectiveness due to its ability to promote agglomeration and setting conditions, allowing further complexation.

  18. Evaluation of Fire Resistance for H-Section Columns Made of Rolled Steels for General Structures and for Welded Structures by Analytic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, In-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Fire resistance is an important factor in sustaining the structural stability of steel framed buildings on fire. However, evaluation of the fire resistance of steel columns has been conducted using rolled steels for general structures, SS 400. Recently, rolled steels for welded structures, such as SM 400 and SM 490, have been used frequently because they have better performance of welding than the SS 400. However, there has been doubt about how much fire resistance SM 400 and SM 490 have. To evaluate by calculation the fire resistance of an H-section column made of SS 400 its mechanical and thermal properties were derived and suggested respectively in the form of regressive equations and the analysis was done based on heat transfer and thermal stress analysis. In this study, the results of the evaluation of H-section columns made of SS 400 with loaded fire tests turned out to be conservative. As a result, a new guideline is required to get the exact fire resistance of another structural steel.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual dodecane in soil columns. 2. Mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, L.M.; Dekker, T.J.; Pennell, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. The model incorporates aqueous-phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance for the organic phase. Rate-limited solubilization and surfactant sorption are represented by a linear driving force expression and a Langmuir isotherm, respectively. The model is implemented in a one-dimensional Galerkin finite element simulator which idealizes the entrapped residual organic as a collection of spherical globules. Soil column data for the solubilization of residual dodecane by an aqueous solution of polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate are used to evaluate the conceptual model. Input parameters were obtained, where possible, from independent batch experiments. Calibrated model simulations exhibit good agreement with measured effluent concentrations, supporting the utility of the conceptual modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses explore the influence of surfactant concentration and flushing strategy on NAPL recovery. 45 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Performance of soft clay stabilized with sand columns treated by silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samueel Zeena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many road construction projects, if weak soil exists, then uncontrollable settlement and critical load carrying capacity are major difficult problems to the safety and serviceability of roads in these areas. Thus ground improvement is essential to achieve the required level of performance. The paper presents results of the tests of four categories. First category was performed on saturated soft bed of clay without any treatment, the second category shed light on the improvement achieved in loading carrying capacity and settlement as a result of reinforcing with conventional sand columns at area replacement ratio = 0.196. The third set investigates the bed reinforced by sand columns stabilized with dry silica fume at different percentages (3, 5 and 7% and the fourth set investigates the behavior of sand columns treated with slurry silica fume at two percentages (10 and 12%. All sand columns models were constructed at (R.D= 60%. Model tests were performed on bed of saturated soil prepared at undrained shear strength between 16-20 kPa for all models. For all cases, the model test was loaded gradually by stress increments up to failure. Stress deformation measurements are recorded and analyzed in terms of bearing improvement ratio and settlement reduction ratio. Optimum results were indicated from soil treated with sand columns stabilized with 7% dry silica fume at medium state reflecting the highest bearing improvement ratio (3.04 and the settlement reduction ratio (0.09 after 7 days curing. While soil treated with sand columns stabilized with 10% slurry silica fume provided higher bearing improvement ratio 3.13 with lower settlement reduction ratio of 0.57 after 7-days curing.

  1. An impedance function approach for soil-structure interaction analyses including structure-to-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, A.; Kamil, H.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic soil-structure and structure-to-structure interaction effects may be determined in one of the two ways: by modeling the entire soil-structure system by a finite-element model, or by using a frequency-dependent (or frequency-independent) impedance function approach. In seismic design of nuclear power plant structures, the normal practice is to use the first approach because of its simplicity and easy availability of computer codes to perform such analyses. However, in the finite-element approach, because of the size and cost restrictions, the three-dimensional behavior of the entire soil-structure system and the radiation damping in soil are only approximately included by using a two-dimensional finite-element mesh. In using the impedance function approach, the soil-structure analyses can be performed in four steps: (a) determination of the dynamic properties of the fixed base superstructure, (b) determination of foundation and structure impedance matrices and input motions, (c) evaluation of foundation motion, (d) analysis of the fixed base superstructure using computed foundation motion. (orig./RW)

  2. Dynamics Coefficient for Two-Phase Soil Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrana Bogumił

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates a description of energy dissipation within saturated soils-diffusion of pore-water. Soils are assumed to be two-phase poro-elastic materials, the grain skeleton of which exhibits no irreversible behavior or structural hysteretic damping. Description of motion and deformation of soil is introduced as a system of equations consisting of governing dynamic consolidation equations based on Biot theory. Selected constitutive and kinematic relations for small strains and rotation are used. This paper derives a closed form of analytical solution that characterizes the energy dissipation during steady-state vibrations of nearly and fully saturated poro-elastic columns. Moreover, the paper examines the influence of various physical factors on the fundamental period, maximum amplitude and the fraction of critical damping of the Biot column. Also the so-called dynamic coefficient which shows amplification or attenuation of dynamic response is considered.

  3. Comparative Mapping of Soil Physical-Chemical and Structural Parameters at Field Scale to Identify Zones of Enhanced Leaching Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow and particle-facilitated transport through macropores contributes significantly to the transport of strongly sorbing substances such as pesticides and phosphorus. The aim of this study was to perform a field-scale characterization of basic soil physical properties like clay...... and organic carbon content and investigate whether it was possible to relate these to derived structural parameters such as bulk density and conservative tracer parameters and to actual particle and phosphorus leaching patterns obtained from laboratory leaching experiments. Sixty-five cylindrical soil columns...... of 20 cm height and 20 cm diameter and bulk soil were sampled from the topsoil in a 15 m  15 m grid in an agricultural loamy field. Highest clay contents and highest bulk densities were found in the northern part of the field. Leaching experiments with a conservative tracer showed fast 5% tracer...

  4. Soil structure characterized using computed tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanqi Cheng; Stephen H. Anderson; Clark J. Gantzer; J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Fractal analysis of soil structure is a relatively new method for quantifying the effects of management systems on soil properties and quality. The objective of this work was to explore several methods of studying images to describe and quantify structure of soils under forest management. This research uses computed tomography and a topological method called Multiple...

  5. Why is the influence of soil macrofauna on soil structure only considered by soil ecologists ?

    OpenAIRE

    Bottinelli, N.; Jouquet, Pascal; Capowiez, Y.; Podwojewski, Pascal; Grimaldi, Michel; Peng, X.

    2015-01-01

    These last twenty years have seen the development of an abundant literature on the influence of soil macrofauna on soil structure. Amongst these organisms, earthworms, termites and ants are considered to play a key role in regulating the physical, chemical and microbiological properties of soils. Due to these influential impacts, soil ecologists consider these soil macro-invertebrates as ‘soil engineers’ and their diversity and abundance are nowadays considered as relevant bioindi...

  6. A study on the behavior of beam-column connections in precast concrete structures: experimental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Kataoka

    Full Text Available Due to the large increase in the use of precast concrete structures in multistory buildings, this work covers a study on the behavior of beam-column connection with emphasis on the continuity provided by the slab reinforcement. Two prototypes were tested, each one with a different detail of the continuity reinforcement distribution. In both connections, the steel area used on the concrete cover of the hollow core slab was the same, varying the amount of bars that passed through the column and the ones that were placed adjacent to the column. The experimental results showed that the connection with bars adjacent to the column presented stiffness increase and a better cracking control. According to the classification the two tested connections can be considered semi-rigid.

  7. Circular Raft Footings Strengthened by Stone Columns under Static Loads

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ziaie Moayed; B. Mohammadi-Haji

    2016-01-01

    Stone columns have been widely employed to improve the load-settlement characteristics of soft soils. The results of two small scale displacement control loading tests on stone columns were used in order to validate numerical finite element simulations. Additionally, a series of numerical calculations of static loading have been performed on strengthened raft footing to investigate the effects of using stone columns on bearing capacity of footings. The bearing capacity of single and group of ...

  8. Influence of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on the structure of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria communities in a soil microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Peinado, M del Mar; González-López, Jesús; Martínez-Toledo, M Victoria; Pozo, Clementina; Rodelas, Belén

    2010-03-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is the most used anionic surfactant in a worldwide scale and is considered a high-priority pollutant. LAS is regarded as a readily biodegradable product under aerobic conditions in aqueous media and is mostly removed in wastewater treatment plants, but an important fraction (20-25%) is immobilized in sewage sludge and persists under anoxic conditions. Due to the application of the sludge as a fertilizer, LAS reaches agricultural soil, and therefore, microbial toxicity tests have been widely used to evaluate the influence of LAS on soil microbial ecology. However, molecular-based community-level analyses have been seldom applied in studies regarding the effects of LAS on natural or engineered systems, and, to our knowledge, there are no reports of their use for such appraisals in agricultural soil. In this study, a microcosm system is used to evaluate the effects of a commercial mixture of LAS on the community structure of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in an agricultural soil. The microcosms consisted of agricultural soil columns (800 g) fed with sterile water (8 ml h(-1)) added of different concentration of LAS (10 or 50 mg l(-1)) for periods of time up to 21 days. Sterile water was added to control columns for comparison. The structures of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria communities were analyzed by a cultivation independent method (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) separation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes). Relevant populations were identified by subsequent reamplification, DNA sequencing, and database comparisons. Cluster analysis of the TGGE fingerprints taking into consideration both the number of bands and their relative intensities revealed that the structure of the Alphaproteobacteria community was significantly changed in the presence of LAS, at both concentrations tested. The average number of bands was significantly

  9. Nonlinear Time Domain Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) Deep Soil Site Methodology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, Robert Edward; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry perform seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis using equivalent linear numerical analysis tools. For lower levels of ground motion, these tools should produce reasonable in-structure response values for evaluation of existing and new facilities. For larger levels of ground motion these tools likely overestimate the in-structure response (and therefore structural demand) since they do not consider geometric nonlinearities (such as gaping and sliding between the soil and structure) and are limited in the ability to model nonlinear soil behavior. The current equivalent linear SSI (SASSI) analysis approach either joins the soil and structure together in both tension and compression or releases the soil from the structure for both tension and compression. It also makes linear approximations for material nonlinearities and generalizes energy absorption with viscous damping. This produces the potential for inaccurately establishing where the structural concerns exist and/or inaccurately establishing the amplitude of the in-structure responses. Seismic hazard curves at nuclear facilities have continued to increase over the years as more information has been developed on seismic sources (i.e. faults), additional information gathered on seismic events, and additional research performed to determine local site effects. Seismic hazard curves are used to develop design basis earthquakes (DBE) that are used to evaluate nuclear facility response. As the seismic hazard curves increase, the input ground motions (DBE's) used to numerically evaluation nuclear facility response increase causing larger in-structure response. As ground motions increase so does the importance of including nonlinear effects in numerical SSI models. To include material nonlinearity in the soil and geometric nonlinearity using contact (gaping and sliding) it is necessary to develop a nonlinear time domain methodology. This

  10. Probabilistic frequency variations of structure-soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.W.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    During earthquakes, structure-soil systems act as filters greatly amplifying the response of equipment whose frequencies are at or near their natural frequencies. Thus, the estimation of these structure-soil system frequencies assumes significant importance both for safety and cost. Actual in-situ frequencies of structures differ from calculated frequencies due both to variations in mathematical modelling techniques and to variations of material properties. This paper studies the second source only. This variability is usually gauged by the 'worst case' analyses technique in which extreme high- and low- parameter values are assumed and the associated frequencies are used as upper and lower bounds. This approach is not entirely satisfactory because it does not provide any indication of the probability of these limits being exceeded, of the distribution between these limits, or of the level of conservation introduced into the design process. The present approach provides this additional information. The emphasis in this part is both on developing the methodology and on the results obtained. It covers both the fixed-base structure and the effects of soil-structure interaction. Empirical data on concrete proerties were obtained from previously published results. Much less is known about variability of soil properties, so the soil structure interaction coefficients are assumed to be normally distributed. As data on the variation of soil properties become available, they can be readily incorporated via the methodology developed here. (Auth.)

  11. Effect of groundwater on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kassir, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results of a parametric study performed to investigate the effect of pore water in saturated soils on the response of nuclear containment structures to seismic motions. The technique employed uses frequency domain algorithm which incorporates impedances for both dry and saturated soils into an SSI model. A frequency domain time history analysis is carried out using the computer code CARES for a typical PWR containment structure. Structural responses presented in terms of floor response spectra indicate that considering the presence of the pore water in soils could benefit the design of massive nuclear containment structures

  12. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure method eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption -regarding type and direction of earthquake waves- required in the direct method. The substructure method is computationally efficient because the two substructures-the structure and the soil region- are analyzed separately; and, more important, it permits taking advantage of the important feature that response to earthquake ground motion is essentially contained in the lower few natural modes of vibration of the structure on fixed base. For sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no obvious rigid boundary such as a soil-rock interface, numerical results for earthquake response of a nuclear reactor structure are presented to demonstrate that the commonly used finite element method may lead to unacceptable errors; but the substructure method leads to reliable results

  13. Immobilization of Cd, Zn, and Pb from Soil Treated by Limestone with Variation of pH Using a Column Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wook Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decades of mining in South Korea have resulted in the contamination of large amounts of soil by metals. The most feasible approach to site restoration requires the use of a stabilization agent to reduce metal mobility. This study examined the leaching characteristics of limestone used as a stabilization agent when subjected to solutions of differing pH. In a laboratory-scale column test, solutions with pH values of 3.5, 4.6, and 5.6, representing acidic to nonacidic rainfall, were applied to soil mixed with limestone. Test results indicate that metal components can be released with the addition of acidic solutions, even if the soil is highly alkaline. Cd and Zn, in particular, exhibited abrupt or continuous leaching when exposed to acid solutions, indicating the potential for contamination of water systems as metal-laden soils are exposed to the slightly acidic rainfall typical of South Korea. Treatment using stabilization agents such as limestone may reduce leaching of metals from the contaminated soil. Stabilizing metal-contaminated farmland is an economical and feasible way to reduce pollutants around abandoned metal mines.

  14. Soil Structure - A Neglected Component of Land-Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Or, D.; Walko, R. L.; Vereecken, H.; Kollet, S. J.; Young, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Hengl, T.; Agam, N.; Avissar, R.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure is largely absent in most standard sampling and measurements and in the subsequent parameterization of soil hydraulic properties deduced from soil maps and used in Earth System Models. The apparent omission propagates into the pedotransfer functions that deduce parameters of soil hydraulic properties primarily from soil textural information. Such simple parameterization is an essential ingredient in the practical application of any land surface model. Despite the critical role of soil structure (biopores formed by decaying roots, aggregates, etc.) in defining soil hydraulic functions, only a few studies have attempted to incorporate soil structure into models. They mostly looked at the effects on preferential flow and solute transport pathways at the soil profile scale; yet, the role of soil structure in mediating large-scale fluxes remains understudied. Here, we focus on rectifying this gap and demonstrating potential impacts on surface and subsurface fluxes and system wide eco-hydrologic responses. The study proposes a systematic way for correcting the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions—accounting for soil-structure—with major implications for near saturated hydraulic conductivity. Modification to the basic soil hydraulic parameterization is assumed as a function of biological activity summarized by Gross Primary Production. A land-surface model with dynamic vegetation is used to carry out numerical simulations with and without the role of soil-structure for 20 locations characterized by different climates and biomes across the globe. Including soil structure affects considerably the partition between infiltration and runoff and consequently leakage at the base of the soil profile (recharge). In several locations characterized by wet climates, a few hundreds of mm per year of surface runoff become deep-recharge accounting for soil-structure. Changes in energy fluxes, total evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity

  15. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  16. Combined Study of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Transport and Toxicity on Microbial Nitrifying Communities under Single and Repeated Exposures in Soil Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Martins, Jean M F; Uzu, Gaëlle; Vince, Erwann; Richaume, Agnès

    2016-10-04

    Soils are exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of their increasing use in many commercial products. Adverse effects of NPs on soil microorganisms have been reported in several ecotoxicological studies using microcosms. Although repeated exposures are more likely to occur in soils, most of these previous studies were performed as a single exposure to NPs. Contrary to single contamination, the study of multiple NP contaminations in soils requires the use of specialized setups. Using a soil column experiment, we compared the influence of single and repeated exposures (one, two, or three exposures that resulted in the same final concentration applied) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) NPs through soil and the effect of these different exposure scenarios on the abundance and activity of soil nitrifying microbial communities after a 2 month incubation. The transport of TiO 2 NPs was very limited under both single and repeated exposures and was highest for the lowest concentration injected during the first application. Significant decreases in nitrification activity and ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria populations were observed only for the repeated exposure scenario (three TiO 2 NP contaminations). These results suggest that, under repeated exposures, the transport of TiO 2 NPs to deep soil layers and groundwater is limited and that a chronic contamination is more harmful for the soil microbiological functioning than a single exposure.

  17. Green roof soil system affected by soil structural changes: A project initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, Vladimíra; Dohnal, Michal; Šácha, Jan; Šebestová, Jana; Sněhota, Michal

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic soil systems and structures such as green roofs, permeable or grassed pavements comprise appreciable part of the urban watersheds and are considered to be beneficial regarding to numerous aspects (e.g. carbon dioxide cycle, microclimate, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). Expected performance of these systems is significantly affected by water and heat regimes that are primarily defined by technology and materials used for system construction, local climate condition, amount of precipitation, the orientation and type of the vegetation cover. The benefits and potencies of anthropogenic soil systems could be considerably threatened in case when exposed to structural changes of thin top soil layer in time. Extensive green roof together with experimental green roof segment was established and advanced automated monitoring system of micrometeorological variables was set-up at the experimental site of University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings as an interdisciplinary research facility of the Czech Technical University in Prague. The key objectives of the project are (i) to characterize hydraulic and thermal properties of soil substrate studied, (ii) to establish seasonal dynamics of water and heat in selected soil systems from continuous monitoring of relevant variables, (iii) to detect structural changes with the use of X-ray Computed Tomography, (iv) to identify with the help of numerical modeling and acquired datasets how water and heat dynamics in anthropogenic soil systems are affected by soil structural changes. Achievements of the objectives will advance understanding of the anthropogenic soil systems behavior in conurbations with the temperate climate.

  18. 2-D Row-Column CMUT Arrays with an Open-Grid Support Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Dahl-Petersen, Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of 64 + 64 2-D row-column addressed CMUT arrays with 250 μm element pitch and 4.4 MHz center frequency in air incorporating a new design approach is presented. The arrays are comprised of two wafer bonded, structured silicon-on-insulator wafers featuring an opengr...

  19. Soil-structure interaction in fuel handling building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaidi, B.M.; Eissa, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an accurate three-dimensional seismic soil-structure interaction analysis for large structures. The method is applied to the fuel building in nuclear power plants. The analysis is performed numerically in the frequency domain and the responses are obtained by inverse Fourier transformation. The size of the structure matrices is reduced by transforming the equation of motion to the modal coordinate system. The soil is simulated as a layered media on top of viscoelastic half space. Soil impedance matrices are calculated from the principles of continuum mechanics and account for soil stiffness and energy dissipation. Effects of embedment on the field equations is incorporated through the scattering matrices or by simply scaling the soil impedance. Finite element methods are used to discretize the concrete foundation for the generation of the soil interaction matrices. Decoupling of the sloshing water in the spent fuel pools and the free-standing spent fuel racks is simulated. The input seismic motions are defined by three artificial time history accelerations. These input motions are generated to match the ground design basis response spectra and the target power spectral density function. The methods described in this paper can handle arbitrary foundation layouts, allows for large structural models, and accurately represents the soil impedance. Time history acceleration responses were subsequently used to generate floor response spectra at applicable damping values. (orig.)

  20. Soil 137Cs activity in a tropical deciduous ecosystem under pasture conversion in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Oliva, F.; Maass, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Soil profiles of 137 Cs were measured in a tropical deciduous ecosystem under pasture conversion on the Pacific Coast of Mexico. Soil samples were taken from unperturbed forest, and from pasture plots following forest conversion. The average total 137 Cs areal activity of non-eroded forest sites indicated a base level of 5 315 ± 427 Bq m -2 . On average, total areal activity on hill-tops was significantly higher (range 10-47%) in the forest than in the pastures. A significant correlation was found between the total 137 Cs areal activity and soil organic matter content (r 2 = 0.16). This correlation can be explained by a soil physical-protection hypothesis. The redistribution of 137 Cs in the landscape is explained by soil erosion processes. (author)

  1. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  2. Modelling soil-water dynamics in the rootzone of structured and water-repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hamish; Carrick, Sam; Müller, Karin; Thomas, Steve; Sharp, Joanna; Cichota, Rogerio; Holzworth, Dean; Clothier, Brent

    2018-04-01

    In modelling the hydrology of Earth's critical zone, there are two major challenges. The first is to understand and model the processes of infiltration, runoff, redistribution and root-water uptake in structured soils that exhibit preferential flows through macropore networks. The other challenge is to parametrise and model the impact of ephemeral hydrophobicity of water-repellent soils. Here we have developed a soil-water model, which is based on physical principles, yet possesses simple functionality to enable easier parameterisation, so as to predict soil-water dynamics in structured soils displaying time-varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Our model, WEIRDO (Water Evapotranspiration Infiltration Redistribution Drainage runOff), has been developed in the APSIM Next Generation platform (Agricultural Production Systems sIMulation). The model operates on an hourly time-step. The repository for this open-source code is https://github.com/APSIMInitiative/ApsimX. We have carried out sensitivity tests to show how WEIRDO predicts infiltration, drainage, redistribution, transpiration and soil-water evaporation for three distinctly different soil textures displaying differing hydraulic properties. These three soils were drawn from the UNSODA (Unsaturated SOil hydraulic Database) soils database of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). We show how preferential flow process and hydrophobicity determine the spatio-temporal pattern of soil-water dynamics. Finally, we have validated WEIRDO by comparing its predictions against three years of soil-water content measurements made under an irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) trial. The results provide validation of the model's ability to simulate soil-water dynamics in structured soils.

  3. Impact of land management on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodešová, R.; Jirků, V.; Nikodem, A.; Mühlhanselová, M.; Žigová, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2010) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010. 02.05.2010-07.05.2010, Wienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0434 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : land management * soil structure * soil hydraulic properties * micromorphology Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  4. Reliability evaluation of containments including soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1985-12-01

    Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability assessment of containment structures are examined. The probability-based method for reliability evaluation of nuclear structures developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is extended to include soil-structure interaction effects. In this method, reliability of structures is expressed in terms of limit state probabilities. Furthermore, random vibration theory is utilized to calculate limit state probabilities under random seismic loads. Earthquake ground motion is modeled by a segment of a zero-mean, stationary, filtered Gaussian white noise random process, represented by its power spectrum. All possible seismic hazards at a site, represented by a hazard curve, are also included in the analysis. The soil-foundation system is represented by a rigid surface foundation on an elastic halfspace. Random and other uncertainties in the strength properties of the structure, in the stiffness and internal damping of the soil, are also included in the analysis. Finally, a realistic reinforced concrete containment is analyzed to demonstrate the application of the method. For this containment, the soil-structure interaction effects on; (1) limit state probabilities, (2) structural fragility curves, (3) floor response spectra with probabilistic content, and (4) correlation coefficients for total acceleration response at specified structural locations, are examined in detail. 25 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs

  5. Influence of amendments on soil structure and soil loss under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macromolecule polymers are significant types of chemical amendments because of their special structure, useful functions and low cost. Macromolecule polymers as soil amendment provide new territory for studying China's agricultural practices and for soil and water conservation, because polymers have the ability to ...

  6. Factors mediating the restoration of structurally degraded soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    with the ability of soils to perform these functions. The present study examines the roles of clay mineralogy, native organic matter, and exogenous organic material on the restoration of structurally degraded soils. Totally seven soils from Denmark and Ghana - five soils dominated by illites, one kaolinitic soil...... the incubation period, structural stability estimated as the amount of water-dispersible clay decreased with prevailing moisture content, and native organic matter. Also, microbial activity significantly increased with addition of exogenous organic matter. At the end of incubation, there was significant...... macroaggregation, decreased bulk density, and increased equivalent pore diameter and tortuosity (derived from measurements of soil-gas diffusivity and soil-air permeability) for all soils. Although aggregate friability was not affected by clay type, aggregate workability was highest for the kaolinitic soil...

  7. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of the Microbial Community of Winogradsky Columns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Esteban

    Full Text Available Winogradsky columns are model microbial ecosystems prepared by adding pond sediment to a clear cylinder with additional supplements and incubated with light. Environmental gradients develop within the column creating diverse niches that allow enrichment of specific bacteria. The enrichment culture can be used to study soil and sediment microbial community structure and function. In this study we used a 16S rRNA gene survey to characterize the microbial community dynamics during Winogradsky column development to determine the rate and extent of change from the source sediment community. Over a period of 60 days, the microbial community changed from the founding pond sediment population: Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Nitrospirae, and Planctomycetes increased in relative abundance over time, while most Proteobacteria decreased in relative abundance. A unique, light-dependent surface biofilm community formed by 60 days that was less diverse and dominated by a few highly abundant bacteria. 67-72% of the surface community was comprised of highly enriched taxa that were rare in the source pond sediment, including the Cyanobacteria Anabaena, a member of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum, and a member of the Chloroflexi class Anaerolinea. This indicates that rare taxa can become abundant under appropriate environmental conditions and supports the hypothesis that rare taxa serve as a microbial seed bank. We also present preliminary findings that suggest that bacteriophages may be active in the Winogradsky community. The dynamics of certain taxa, most notably the Cyanobacteria, showed a bloom-and-decline pattern, consistent with bacteriophage predation as predicted in the kill-the-winner hypothesis. Time-lapse photography also supported the possibility of bacteriophage activity, revealing a pattern of colony clearance similar to formation of viral plaques. The Winogradsky column, a technique developed early in the history of microbial ecology to enrich soil

  8. Time-domain soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Justin L.; Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50 Appendix S requires consideration of soil-structure interaction (SSI) in nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis and design. Soil-structure interaction analysis for NPPs is routinely carried out using guidance provided in the ASCE Standard 4-98 titled “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary”. This Standard, which is currently under revision, provides guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities using deterministic and probabilistic methods. A new appendix has been added to the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 to provide guidance for time-domain, nonlinear SSI (NLSSI) analysis. Nonlinear SSI analysis will be needed to simulate material nonlinearity in soil and/or structure, static and dynamic soil pressure effects on deeply embedded structures, local soil failure at the foundation-soil interface, nonlinear coupling of soil and pore fluid, uplift or sliding of the foundation, nonlinear effects of gaps between the surrounding soil and the embedded structure and seismic isolation systems, none of which can be addressed explicitly at present. Appendix B of ASCE Standard 4 provides general guidance for NLSSI analysis but will not provide a methodology for performing the analysis. This paper provides a description of an NLSSI methodology developed for application to nuclear facilities, including NPPs. This methodology is described as series of sequential steps to produce reasonable results using any time-domain numerical code. These steps require some numerical capabilities, such as nonlinear soil constitutive models, which are also described in the paper.

  9. Functioning of metal contaminated garden soil after remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelusic, Masa; Grcman, Helena; Vodnik, Dominik; Suhadolc, Metka; Lestan, Domen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of remediation using three EDTA doses (10, 30, 60 mmol kg −1 ) on soil functioning was assessed using column experiment and Brassica rapa. Soil washing removed up to 77, 29 and 72% of metals from soil contaminated with 1378, 578 and 8.5 mg kg −1 of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively. Sequential extraction indicated removal from the carbonate soil fraction. Metal oral-accessibility from the stomach phase was reduced by up to 75 and from the small intestine by up to 79% (Pb). Part of metals (up to 0.8% Cd) was lost due to leaching from columns. Remediation reduced toxic metal soil-root transfer by up to 61% but did not prevent metal accumulation in leaves. The fitness of plants grown on EDTA washed soils (gas exchange, fluorescence) was not compromised. Remediation initially reduced the soil DNA content (up to 29%, 30 mmol kg −1 EDTA) and changed the structure of microbial population. -- Highlights: ► Toxic metals contaminated garden soil was remediated in a pilot-scale. ► EDTA washing reduced soil Pb, Zn and Cd content and bioavailability. ► Remediated soil preserved the function of plant and microbial substrate. ► Remediation didn't prevent the accumulation of toxic metals in the test plant. -- EDTA soil washing effectively removed toxic metals and reduced their transfer from the soil to plant roots but did not prevent their accumulation in leaves

  10. Mobilization and transport of soil colloids as influenced by texture, organic matter, and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    The thin layer of soil on the Earth’s surface has major environmental and socioeconomic impacts. The soils sustain our life and society, and do not act only as a growth medium for food, feed and fuel. Soil is an invaluable resource and the processes within it are responsible for waste disposal...... was mainly seen as an impact on soil organic carbon. Results from the column leaching experiments from three sites likewise indicate that basic soil properties, such as the clay content, were the main drivers of colloid mobilization and transport. Effects of management and cropping system seemed secondary......, purification and recharge of groundwater aquifers. Many environmental contaminants are broken down through their passage through the soil and slow percolation through the soil cleanses rainwater before it reaches the groundwater. Strongly sorbing environmental contaminants cannot be assumed to be immobile...

  11. [Intersection point rule for the retention value with mobile phase composition and boiling point of the homologues and chlorobenzenes in soil leaching column chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F; Liang, X; Lin, B; Su, F

    1999-03-01

    Based on the linear retention equation of the logarithm of the capacity factor (logk') vs. the methanol volume fraction (psi) of aqueous binary mobile phase in soil leaching column chromatography, the intersection point rule for the logk' of homologues and weak polar chlorobenzenes, with psi, as well as with boiling point, has been derived due to existence of the similar interactions among solutes of the same series, stationary phase (soil) and eluent (methanol-water). These rules were testified by experimental data of homologues (n-alkylbenzenes, methylbenzenes) and weak polar chlorobenzenes.

  12. Autoclave treatment of pig manure does not reduce the risk of transmission and transfer of tetracycline resistance genes in soil: successive determinations with soil column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yijun; Gu, Xian; Hao, Yangyang; Hu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of antibiotics, especially tetracycline, in livestock feed adversely affects animal health and ecological integrity. Therefore, approaches to decrease this risk are urgently needed. High temperatures facilitate antibiotic degradation; whether this reduces transmission risk and transfer of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRBs) and tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) in soil remains unknown. Successive experiments with soil columns evaluated the effects of autoclaving pig manure (APM) on soil TRB populations and TRGs over time at different soil depths. The data showed sharp increases in TRB populations and TRGs in each subsoil layer of PM (non-APM) and APM treatments within 30 days, indicating that TRBs and TRGs transferred rapidly. The level of TRBs in the upper soil layers was approximately 15-fold higher than in subsoils. TRBs were not dependent on PM and APM levels, especially in the late phase. Nevertheless, higher levels of APM led to rapid expansion of TRBs as compared to PM. Moreover, temporal changes in TRB frequencies in total culturable bacteria (TCBs) were similar to TRBs, indicating that the impact of PM or APM on TRBs was more obvious than for TCBs. TRBs were hypothesized to depend on the numbers of TRGs and indigenous recipient bacteria. In the plough layer, five TRGs (tetB, tetG, tetM, tetW, and tetB/P) existed in each treatment within 150 days. Selective pressure of TC may not be a necessary condition for the transfer and persistence of TRGs in soil. High temperatures might reduce TRBs in PM, which had minimal impact on the transmission and transfer of TRGs in soil. Identifying alternatives to decrease TRG transmission remains a major challenge.

  13. Management-induced Soil Structure Degradation: Organic Matter Depletion and Tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, B.D.; Munkholm, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Soil structure is an important element of soil quality since changes in structural characteristics can cause changes in the ability of soil to fulfil different functions and services. Emphasis in this chapter is placed on the role of soil structure in biological productivity of agroecosystems. Combinations of management practices in which the extent of the degradation of soil structure caused by one practice is balanced or exceeded by the extent of regeneration by other practices will help su...

  14. A mixed implicit/explicit procedure for soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunar, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient method for the solution of dynamic soil-structure interaction problems. The method which combines implicit and explicit time integration procedures is ideally suited to problems in which the structure is considered linear and the soil non-linear. The equations relating to the linear structures are integrated using an unconditionally stable implicit scheme while the non-linear soil is treated explicitly. The explicit method is ideally suited to non-linear calculations as there is no need for iterative techniques. The structural equations can also be integrated explicitly, but this generally requires a time step that is much smaller than that for the soil. By using an unconditionally stable implicit algorithm for the structure, the complete analysis can be performed using the time step for the soil. The proposed procedure leads to economical solutions with the soil non-linearities handled accurately and efficiently. (orig.)

  15. Finite-Length Diocotron Modes in a Non-neutral Plasma Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel; Dubin, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Diocotron modes are 2D distortions of a non-neutral plasma column that propagate azimuthally via E × B drifts. While the infinite-length theory of diocotron modes is well-understood for arbitrary azimuthal mode number l, the finite-length mode frequency is less developed (with some exceptions), and is naturally of relevance to experiments. In this poster, we present an approach to address finite length effects, such as temperature dependence of the mode frequency. We use a bounce-averaged solution to the Vlasov Equation, in which the Vlasov Equation is solved using action-angle variables of the unperturbed Hamiltonian. We write the distribution function as a Fourier series in the bounce-angle variable ψ, keeping only the bounce-averaged term. We demonstrate a numerical solution to this equation for a realistic plasma with a finite Debye Length, compare to the existing l = 1 theory, and discuss possible extensions of the existing theory to l ≠ 1 . Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership Grants PHY1414570 and DESC0002451.

  16. Which soil tillage is better in terms of the soil organic matter and soil structure changes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMÍR ŠIMANSKÝ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate effects of minimum (MT and conventional tillage (CT on soil organic matter and soil structure in haplic Chernozems and mollic Fluvisols. The content of soil organic carbon (Corg as well as parameters of stability and vulnerability of soil structure were quantified. The results showed that soil type had statistically significant influence on Corg. In haplic Chernozems the Corg content near the surface (0–0.1 m was significantly higher under MT (by 6% compared to CT, however, in layer 0–0.3 m under CT the average Corg content was by 16% higher than under MT. In mollic Fulvisols under MT, the average Corg content (17.5 ± 5.4 g*kg-1 was significantly less for the 0–0.3 m layer than the CT (22.7 ± 0.4 g*kg-1. In Chernozems, total content of water-stable micro-aggregates (WSAmi was higher in MT (90.8% than in CT (69.5%. In mollic Fluvisols, the average content of WSAmi was higher in CT (62.5% than in MT (53.2%. The low aggregate stability and the high structure vulnerability were reflected also due to the high contents of WSAmi in both soils. The stability of aggregates was a higher in mollic Fluvisols than in haplic Chernozems. In haplic Chernozems, better soil structure stability was under CT than MT, on the other hand, in mollic Fluvisols, the average value of coefficient of aggregate stability was lower by 32% in CT than MT.

  17. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption-regarding type and direction of earthquake waves-required in the direct method. (Auth.)

  18. Beech cupules as keystone structures for soil fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melguizo-Ruiz, Nereida; Jiménez-Navarro, Gerardo; Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Facilitative or positive interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a fundamental role in the configuration of ecological communities. In particular, habitat modification and niche construction, in which one organism locally modifies abiotic conditions and favours other organisms by buffering the effects of adverse environmental factors, are among the most relevant facilitative interactions. In line with this, 'keystone structures', which provide resources, refuge, or advantageous services decisive for other species, may allow the coexistence of various species and thus considerably contribute to diversity maintenance. Beech cupules are woody husks harbouring beech fruits that remain in the forest soil for relatively long periods of time. In this study, we explored the potential role of these cupules in the distribution and maintenance of the soil fauna inhabiting the leaf litter layer. We experimentally manipulated cupule availability and soil moisture in the field to determine if such structures are limiting and can provide moist shelter to soil animals during drought periods, contributing to minimize desiccation risks. We measured invertebrate abundances inside relative to outside the cupules, total abundances in the leaf litter and animal body sizes, in both dry and wet experimental plots. We found that these structures are preferentially used by the most abundant groups of smaller soil animals-springtails, mites and enchytraeids-during droughts. Moreover, beech cupules can be limiting, as an increase in use was found with higher cupule densities, and are important resources for many small soil invertebrates, driving the spatial structure of the soil community and promoting higher densities in the leaf litter, probably through an increase in habitat heterogeneity. We propose that fruit woody structures should be considered 'keystone structures' that contribute to soil community maintenance. Therefore, beech trees may indirectly facilitate soil fauna

  19. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  20. Movement of 14 C-trifluralin labelled herbicide premerlin 600 CE in several soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storino, Moises.

    1993-12-01

    The mobility behavior of the herbicide premerlin 600 CE (trifluralin was studied by using two different methodologies, i.e., soil thin layer chromatography and soil leaching columns. In the study soil thin layer chromatography were used six different Brazilian oxysols, being two sandy soils and four clayer soils. In the soil leaching columns study were used one sandy and one clayey soil. The distribution of 14 C-premerlin in the different granulometric soil fractions was determined after carried out columns experiments. Under all conditions imposed by these experiment, the herbicide 14 C-premerlin shown to be immobile being located on the surface of the soils columns. No effects of pH, concentration, metabolites or soil type were observed. (author). 46 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Development of a soil water dispersion index (SOWADIN) for testing the effectiveness of a soil-wetting agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Y.; Aylmore, L.A.G.; Hainsworth, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Computer-assisted tomography (CAT) applied to gamma-ray attenuation measurement has been used to develop an index termed the soil water dispersion index (SOWADIN), which describes quantitatively the amount and distribution of water in soil columns. The index, which is determined by classifying pixels in a scanned slice into three categories according to their attenuation coefficients, contains two numerical values. The first value corresponds to the water content of the scanned slice and the second value is a measure of the dispersion of the water throughout the slice. Artificially wetted zones were created in soil columns to give one-third of the scanned layer wetted with various patterns of wetted-area distribution. The SOWADIN values obtained accurately reflected the differences in water distribution associated with the different patterns. Application of SOWADIN to columns of a water-repellent sand before and after treatment with a soil-wetting agent clearly illustrates both the increase in water content and improvement in water distribution in the soil column following treatment. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Structural performance of circular columns confined by recycled GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Sayed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, Egyptian government investment has been directed to the infrastructure projects. Water supply and water drainage networks are among those projects which are very costly; therefore they are designed with a life span of about one hundred years. There is a new trend toward the use of durable and maintenance free systems. The “GFRP” pipes are one of the economic solutions if the project life span is taken into consideration. A number of investors currently produce the “GFRP” pipes in the Egyptian market and although they follow the latest technologies in their production lines, they still suffer 2–5% deficiency of their produced pipes which consequently regarded as rejected pipes. This percentage has a negative impact on the environmental and economical issues. This research is a trial to investigate the behavior of circular columns confined by GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions. A number of waste pipes were randomly selected and sliced to be used as circular column transverse reinforcement. An experimental program consisting of ten short circular columns was designed to study the effect of corrosion, high degrees of temperature, and sulfate attack on the structural behavior of the axially loaded short circular columns. The experimental results showed that columns laterally reinforced by GFRP slices have a comparable behavior to conventionally reinforced concrete columns especially for those columns exposed to corrosion and sulfate attack.

  3. Impact of regression methods on improved effects of soil structure on soil water retention estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Minh; De Pue, Jan; Le, Khoa Van; Cornelis, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Increasing the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), an indirect method for predicting non-readily available soil features such as soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), is of crucial importance for large scale agro-hydrological modeling. Adding significant predictors (i.e., soil structure), and implementing more flexible regression algorithms are among the main strategies of PTFs improvement. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the improved effect of categorical soil structure information on estimating soil-water content at various matric potentials, which has been reported in literature, could be enduringly captured by regression techniques other than the usually applied linear regression. Two data mining techniques, i.e., Support Vector Machines (SVM), and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), which have been recently introduced as promising tools for PTF development, were utilized to test if the incorporation of soil structure will improve PTF's accuracy under a context of rather limited training data. The results show that incorporating descriptive soil structure information, i.e., massive, structured and structureless, as grouping criterion can improve the accuracy of PTFs derived by SVM approach in the range of matric potential of -6 to -33 kPa (average RMSE decreased up to 0.005 m3 m-3 after grouping, depending on matric potentials). The improvement was primarily attributed to the outperformance of SVM-PTFs calibrated on structureless soils. No improvement was obtained with kNN technique, at least not in our study in which the data set became limited in size after grouping. Since there is an impact of regression techniques on the improved effect of incorporating qualitative soil structure information, selecting a proper technique will help to maximize the combined influence of flexible regression algorithms and soil structure information on PTF accuracy.

  4. Nonelastic soil-structure interaction by BE- and FE-methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjikov, L.; Dineva, P.; Rangelov, T.

    1987-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to study the soil-structure interaction for multilayered, nonlineary physically soil system with arbitrary geometric form of boundaries between the layers, accounting the topographic specifics on the free surface. The behaviour of the structure is described by the finite element method (FEM). For the description of the propagation of the seismic waves in the soil the boundary element method (BEM) is used. The numerical results for the behaviour of the soil-structure interaction for nuclear power plant on a real geological site are obtained. The influence of the nonelastic soil and structure properties and the influence of the topographic specifities of the geological region are investigated. (orig./HP)

  5. Virus movement in soil during saturated and unsaturated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, J C; Gerba, C P

    1984-02-01

    Virus movement in soil during saturated and unsaturated flow was compared by adding poliovirus to sewage water and applying the water at different rates to a 250-cm-long soil column equipped with ceramic samplers at different depths. Movement of viruses during unsaturated flow of sewage through soil columns was much less than during saturated flow. Viruses did not move below the 40-cm level when sewage water was applied at less than the maximum infiltration rate; virus penetration in columns flooded with sewage was at least 160 cm. Therefore, virus movement in soils irrigated with sewage should be less than in flooded groundwater recharge basins or in saturated soil columns. Management of land treatment systems to provide unsaturated flow through the soil should minimize the depth of virus penetration. Differences in virus movement during saturated and unsaturated flow must be considered in the development of any model used to simulate virus movement in soils.

  6. Soil structure and microbial activity dynamics in 20-month field-incubated organic-amended soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2014-01-01

    to determine compressive strength. During incubation, the amount of WDC depended on soil carbon content while the trends correlated with moisture content. Organic amendment only yielded modest decreases (mean of 14% across all sampling times and soils) in WDC, but it was sufficient to stimulate the microbial......Soil structure formation is essential to all soil ecosystem functions and services. This study aims to quantify changes in soil structure and microbial activity during and after field incubation and examine the effect of carbon, organic amendment and clay on aggregate characteristics. Five soils...... community (65–100% increase in FDA). Incubation led to significant macroaggregate formation (>2 mm) for all soils. Friability and strength of newly-formed aggregates were negatively correlated with clay content and carbon content, respectively. Soil workability was best for the kaolinite-rich soil...

  7. Diuron mobility through vineyard soils contaminated with copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Astrid R; Dousset, Sylvie; Guichard, Nathalie; Baveye, Philippe; Andreux, Francis

    2005-11-01

    The herbicide diuron is frequently applied to vineyard soils in Burgundy, along with repeated treatments with Bordeaux mixture (a blend of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide) that result in elevated copper concentrations. Cu could in principle affect the fate and transport of diuron or its metabolites in the soil either directly by complexation or indirectly by altering the populations or activity of microbes involved in their degradation. To assess the effect of high Cu concentrations on diuron transport, an experiment was designed with ten undisturbed columns of calcareous and acidic soils contaminated with 17--509 mg kg(-1) total Cu (field-applied). Grass was planted on three columns. Diuron was applied to the soils in early May and in-ground lysimeters were exposed to outdoor conditions until November. Less than 1.2% of the diuron applied was found in the leachates as diuron or its metabolites. Higher concentrations were found in the effluents from the grass-covered columns (0.1--0.45%) than from the bare-soil columns (0.02--0.14%), and they were correlated with increases in dissolved organic carbon. The highest amounts of herbicide were measured in acidic-soil column leachates (0.98--1.14%) due to the low clay and organic matter contents of these soils. Cu also leached more readily through the acidic soils (32.8--1042 microg) than in the calcareous soils (9.5--63.4 microg). Unlike in the leachates, the amount of diuron remaining in the soils at the end of the experiment was weakly related to the Cu concentrations in the soils.

  8. A sensitivity study for soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunar, R.R.; White, D.C.; Ashdown, M.J.; Waker, C.H.; Daintith, D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study in which the sensitivity of a containment building typical of one type of construction used in the nuclear reprocessing industry is examined for variations in soil data and seismic input. A number of dynamic soil-structure interaction analyses are performed on the structure and its foundations using parametric variations of the depth of soil layer, soil material properties, bedrock flexibility, seismic input location and time and phase characteristics of the earthquake excitation. Previous experience is combined with the results obtained to gneralise conclusions regarding the conditions under which each of the uncertainties will be significant enough to merit proper statistical treatment. (orig.)

  9. A study on the behavior of beam-column connections in precast concrete structures: experimental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka,M. N.; Ferreira,M. A.; El Debs,A. L. H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large increase in the use of precast concrete structures in multistory buildings, this work covers a study on the behavior of beam-column connection with emphasis on the continuity provided by the slab reinforcement. Two prototypes were tested, each one with a different detail of the continuity reinforcement distribution. In both connections, the steel area used on the concrete cover of the hollow core slab was the same, varying the amount of bars that passed through the column and...

  10. TECHNICAL NOTES SEISMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    SEISMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AS A POTENTIAL TOOL FOR. ECONOMICAL ... ground motion at the interface with the rock. The soil can .... half space have an elastic modulus of E and a mass density of ρ . .... The trial solution to.

  11. Soil-structure interaction analysis of ZPR6 reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Ahmed, H.U.

    1981-01-01

    Due to the computer storage limitation and economic concern, the current practice of soil-structure interaction analysis is limited to two dimensional analysis. The 2-D plane strain finite element program, FLUSH, is one often most used program in the analysis. Seismic response of soil and basement can be determined very well by FLUSH. The response of the structure above ground level, however, is often underestimated. This is mainly due to the three dimensional characteristics of the structures. This paper describes a detailed soil-structure interaction analysis of a rectangular embedded structure in conjunction with FLUSH program. The objective of the analysis is to derive the mean interaction motions at the structure base and the soil dynamic forces exerted on the basement lateral walls. The base motions and lateral soil dynamic forces are the specified boundary conditions for the later 3-D building response analysis. (orig./RW)

  12. Application of wastewater with high organic load for saline-sodic soil reclamation focusing on soil purification ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Kameli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fresh water source scarcity in arid and semiarid area is limitation factor for saline-sodic soil reclamation. The reusing of agricultural drainage and industrial wastewater are preferred strategies for combating with this concern. The objective of current study was evaluation in application of industrial sugar manufacture wastewater due to high soluble organic compounds in saline-sodic and sodic soil. Also soil ability in wastewater organic compounds removal was second aim of present study. Saline-sodic and sodic soil sample was leached in soil column by diluted wastewater of amirkabir sugar manufacture in Khuzestan Province of Iran at constant water head. Sodium, electric conductivity and chemical oxygen demand of soil column leachate were measured per each pore volume. The experimental kinetics of wastewater organic compounds on two saline-sodic and sodic soil were also investigated by three pseudo second order, intra particle diffusion and elovich model. The results of current study showed that electric conductivity of saline-sodic soil was decreased to 90% during 3 initial pore volumes, from other side exchangeable sodium percent of saline-sodic and sodic soil decreased 30 and 71 percent, respectively. There were no significant different between wastewater chemical oxygen demand removal by saline-sodic and sodic soil in both batch and column studies. Wastewater chemical oxygen demand was decreased to 35% during pass through soil column. The results showed that the adsorption kinetics of wastewater organic compounds were best fitted by the pseudo-second order model with 99 percent correlation coefficient (r2=0.99%.

  13. Composite structures of steel and concrete beams, slabs, columns, and frames for buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R P

    2008-01-01

    This book sets out the basic principles of composite construction with reference to beams, slabs, columns and frames, and their applications to building structures. It deals with the problems likely to arise in the design of composite members in buildings, and relates basic theory to the design approach of Eurocodes 2, 3 and 4.The new edition is based for the first time on the finalised Eurocode for steel/concrete composite structures.

  14. Evaluation of Soil Media for Stormwater Infiltration Best Management Practices (BMPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project will improve the performance of structural management practices, and provide guidance that will allow designers to balance infiltration rates with sorption capacity. This project will also perform a standard column test procedure for evaluating candidate soil media.

  15. Examination of Technetium Transport Through Soils Under Contrasting Redox Conditions: Batch and Column Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, R.; Montgomery, D.; Wylie, E. M.; Dogan, M.; Moysey, S. M.; Powell, B. A.; Martinez, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were performed under various reducing conditions to evaluate the transport behavior of technetium-99 (99Tc) in the presence of sandy clay loam soil from the Savannah River Site (SRS) and goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, which were selected for their increasing reducing potential. The experiments were conducted to investigate how redox reaction equilibria and rates affect the overall mobility of 99Tc as it transitions between the mobile Tc(VII) and immobile Tc(IV). Under oxygen-rich conditions, batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the concentration range 0.5 to 50 μg/L were linear with distribution coefficients (Kd) of 0.78 mL/g or lower, with decreasing sorption for goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, respectively. Addition of Na2S resulted in a marked increase in apparent 99Tc sorption to the solid phase, with Kd of 43 mL/g, 35 mL/g, and 29 mL/g, following the same mineral trend as previously. The increased Kd values are possibly due to reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), resulting in the formation of TcO2(s). SRS soil batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the same concentration range were also linear, with Kd of 0.7 mL/g for unadjusted pH, 5.1 mL/g for pH of around 6, and 6.7 mL/g for pH of around 4. Kinetic batch sorption tests showed less than 10% 99Tc sorption in an oxidizing environment and greater than 95% sorption in a reducing environment, with both reactions occurring on the order of minutes. In contrast, desorption experiments initiated by transferring the samples from a reducing environment (0.1% H2(g)/99.9% N2(g)) to atmospheric conditions resulted in a slow desorption step on the order of days. Column experiments conducted with the SRS sands indicate a retardation factor of 1.17 for 99Tc under oxygen rich conditions. Additional column experiments are being conducted to evaluate 99Tc transport dependencies on transitions between oxygen rich and poor conditions.

  16. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated

  17. Radionuclide diffusion in soils. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipakova, A.; Szabova, T.

    1988-01-01

    Samples were taken of five soil types for determining diffusion coefficients, namely chernozem, illimerized brown soil, degraded chernozem, gleizated brown soil and heavy loamy brown soil. 5 layers of soil having a thickness of 1 cm each were placed in diffusion columns. 20 ml of water with 0.45 MBq 85 Sr of distilled water was poured over the columns. 10 ml of distilled water was poured over the columns every 5 days for monitoring the effect of the amount of precipitation and its distribution - a similarity with rainfall in the driest month, 41 ml of distilled water was then poured over the column every 5 days or 82 ml of distilled water every 10 days - imitating the month with the highest rainfall level. The effect of salts and various concentrations of salt mixtures on the value of the diffusion coefficient were monitored in solutions of NaNO 3 , KNO 3 and Ca(NO 3 ) 2 with added activity 0.45 MGq of 85 SrCl 2 . Diffusion was monitored for 101 days. All measured values are tabulated. The smallest diffusion coefficient was found in chernozem in the presence of H 2 O and the highest value was found in illimerized brown soil in the presence of 0.15 M of KNO 3 . (E.S.). 2 tabs., 10 refs

  18. Hemifield columns co-opt ocular dominance column structure in human achiasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olman, Cheryl A; Bao, Pinglei; Engel, Stephen A; Grant, Andrea N; Purington, Chris; Qiu, Cheng; Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Tjan, Bosco S

    2018-01-01

    In the absence of an optic chiasm, visual input to the right eye is represented in primary visual cortex (V1) in the right hemisphere, while visual input to the left eye activates V1 in the left hemisphere. Retinotopic mapping In V1 reveals that in each hemisphere left and right visual hemifield representations are overlaid (Hoffmann et al., 2012). To explain how overlapping hemifield representations in V1 do not impair vision, we tested the hypothesis that visual projections from nasal and temporal retina create interdigitated left and right visual hemifield representations in V1, similar to the ocular dominance columns observed in neurotypical subjects (Victor et al., 2000). We used high-resolution fMRI at 7T to measure the spatial distribution of responses to left- and right-hemifield stimulation in one achiasmic subject. T 2 -weighted 2D Spin Echo images were acquired at 0.8mm isotropic resolution. The left eye was occluded. To the right eye, a presentation of flickering checkerboards alternated between the left and right visual fields in a blocked stimulus design. The participant performed a demanding orientation-discrimination task at fixation. A general linear model was used to estimate the preference of voxels in V1 to left- and right-hemifield stimulation. The spatial distribution of voxels with significant preference for each hemifield showed interdigitated clusters which densely packed V1 in the right hemisphere. The spatial distribution of hemifield-preference voxels in the achiasmic subject was stable between two days of testing and comparable in scale to that of human ocular dominance columns. These results are the first in vivo evidence showing that visual hemifield representations interdigitate in achiasmic V1 following a similar developmental course to that of ocular dominance columns in V1 with intact optic chiasm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The structural response and manner of progressive collapse in RC buildings under the blast and Provide approaches to retrofitting columns against blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GholamReza Havaei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In accidents caused by explosion, the initial damage is usually caused by direct hit blast that it causes damage and serious destruction of structural components. In this state, the collapse of structural components and the subsequent progressive collapse may cause an increase in damages and eventually collapse of the structure. On the other hand, observations show that most of these buildings designed and built without consideration of their vulnerability to such events. In this study, global and local response of reinforced concrete buildings and their damages evaluated against explosion. First the global stability of building using SAP2000 is evaluated against explosion and then the amount and behaviour of damages in The key structural components of the building after the explosion is investigated using LS DYNA. The study involved four important areas in structural engineering that includes blast load determination, numerical modelling with FEM techniques, material performance under high strain rate and non-linear dynamic analysis. Two types of design methods are recommended for RC columns to provide superior residual capacities. They are RC columns detailing with additional steel reinforcement cages and a composite columns including a central structural steel core. The results showed that the use of this type of columns compared to typical RC column against explosion can have a significant impact in increasing the bearing capacity of structural components against gravity loads after the explosion.

  20. 3D Structure of Tillage Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torre, Iván; Losada, Juan Carlos; Falconer, Ruth; Hapca, Simona; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure may be defined as the spatial arrangement of soil particles, aggregates and pores. The geometry of each one of these elements, as well as their spatial arrangement, has a great influence on the transport of fluids and solutes through the soil. Fractal/Multifractal methods have been increasingly applied to quantify soil structure thanks to the advances in computer technology (Tarquis et al., 2003). There is no doubt that computed tomography (CT) has provided an alternative for observing intact soil structure. These CT techniques reduce the physical impact to sampling, providing three-dimensional (3D) information and allowing rapid scanning to study sample dynamics in near real-time (Houston et al., 2013a). However, several authors have dedicated attention to the appropriate pore-solid CT threshold (Elliot and Heck, 2007; Houston et al., 2013b) and the better method to estimate the multifractal parameters (Grau et al., 2006; Tarquis et al., 2009). The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the algorithm applied in the multifractal method (box counting and box gliding) and the cube size on the calculation of generalized fractal dimensions (Dq) in grey images without applying any threshold. To this end, soil samples were extracted from different areas plowed with three tools (moldboard, chissel and plow). Soil samples for each of the tillage treatment were packed into polypropylene cylinders of 8 cm diameter and 10 cm high. These were imaged using an mSIMCT at 155keV and 25 mA. An aluminium filter (0.25 mm) was applied to reduce beam hardening and later several corrections where applied during reconstruction. References Elliot, T.R. and Heck, R.J. 2007. A comparison of 2D and 3D thresholding of CT imagery. Can. J. Soil Sci., 87(4), 405-412. Grau, J, Médez, V.; Tarquis, A.M., Saa, A. and Díaz, M.C.. 2006. Comparison of gliding box and box-counting methods in soil image analysis. Geoderma, 134, 349-359. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and

  1. Nitrate Leaching from Winter Cereal Cover Crops Using Undisturbed Soil-Column Lysimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, John J; Ricigliano, Kristin A

    2017-05-01

    Cover crops are important management practices for reducing nitrogen (N) leaching, especially in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which is under total maximum daily load (TMDL) restraints. Winter cereals are common cool-season crops in the Bay watershed, but studies have not directly compared nitrate-N (NO-N) leaching losses from these species. A 3-yr cover crop lysimeter study was conducted in Beltsville, MD, to directly compare NO-N leaching from a commonly grown cultivar of barley ( L.), rye ( L.), and wheat ( L.), along with a no-cover control, using eight tension-drained undisturbed soil column lysimeters in a completely randomized design with two replicates. The lysimeters were configured to exclude runoff and to estimate NO-N leaching and flow-weighted NO-N concentration (FWNC). The temporal pattern of NO-N leaching showed a consistent highly significant ( leaching with cover crops compared with no cover but showed only small and periodically significant ( leaching was more affected by the quantity of establishment-season (mid-October to mid-December) precipitation than by cover crop species. For example, compared with no cover, winter cereal covers reduced NO-N leaching 95% in a dry year and 50% in wet years, with corresponding reductions in FWNC of 92 and 43%, respectively. These results are important for scientists, nutrient managers, and policymakers because they directly compare NO-N leaching from winter cereal covers and expand knowledge for developing management practices for winter cereals that can improve water quality and increase N efficiency in cropping systems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Comparison study for the CCME reference method for determination of PHC in soil by using internal and external standard methods and by using silica gel column cleanup and in-situ silica gel cleanup methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.; Sigouin, L.; Yang, C.; Hollebone, B.

    2003-01-01

    The assessment, cleanup, and remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is covered in the Reference Method for Canada-Wide Standard for Petroleum Hydrocarbons-Tier 1 Method. It replaces several analytical methods used in the past by some laboratories and jurisdictions in Canada. The authors conducted two comparative evaluations to validate the Tier 1 Analytical Method. The first compared the Internal and External Standard Methods, and the second compared the Silica Gel Column Cleanup Method with the In-situ Silica Gel Cleanup Method. The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) Tier 1 Method recommends and requires the External Standard Method to determine petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in soil samples. The Internal Method is widely used to quantify various organic and inorganic pollutants in environmental samples. The Tier 1 Method offers two options for the same extract cleanup. They are: Option A - In-situ Silica Gel Cleanup, and Option B - Silica Gel Column Cleanup. Linearity, precision, and PHC quantification results were the parameters considered for diesel and motor oil solutions, for diesel spiked soil samples, and for motor oil spiked soil samples. It was concluded that both the External and Internal Standard Methods for gas chromatograph (GC) determination of PHC in soil possess their own advantages. The PHC results obtained using the In-Situ Silica Gel Cleanup Method were lower than those obtained with the Silica Gel Column Cleanup Methods. The more efficient and effective sample cleanup method proved to be the Silica Gel Column Method. 13 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs

  3. Use of radioactive sodium-22 to study the processes of soil salinization and desalinization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzubaidi, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with the salinization of four undisturbed soil columns of silt loam soil, collected with special plexiglass columns. The salinization was effected by adding a certain volume of salt solution consisting of a mixture of NaCl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 and containing 0.5 mCi of sodium-22. The salt solution was added to the surface of the first two columns and then the soil columns were leached with distilled water, while for the other two columns, the salt solution was added from the bottom of the columns using a syphon technique. The first two columns represent a model for the desalinization process of saline soils, while the latter two columns represent a model for the salinization process under the effect of high groundwater table. The downward and upward movements of sodium through the soil columns were recorded by measuring sodium radioactivity periodically, using a special scanner which continuously and automatically detected the radioactivity of sodium with the help of a gamma spectrometer. The final distribution curves for sodium movement throughout these soil columns versus time were obtained by computer. The data obtained indicate that radioactive sodium can be used with success to study the movement of salts in soil. The results also bring a new and better understanding of the nature of the salt movement during the processes of salinization and desalinization, the most important soil processes in the arid and semi-arid regions. (author)

  4. The combined effects of urea application and simulated acid rain on soil acidification and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmei; Zhou, Jian; Li, Wanlu; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to test the effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) at different pHs, when applied to fertilized and unfertilized soils, on the leaching of soil cations (K, Ca, Mg, Na) and Al. Their effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+) and microbial community structure were also determined. A Paleudalfs soil was incubated for 30 days, with and without an initial application of urea (200 mg N kg(-1)soil) as nitrogen (N) fertilizer. The soil was held in columns and leached with SAR at three pH levels. Six treatments were tested: SAR of pH 2.5, 4.0 and 5.6 leaching on unfertilized soil (T1, T2 and T3), and on soils fertilized with urea (T4, T5 and T6). Increasing acid inputs proportionally increased cation leaching in both unfertilized and fertilized soils. Urea application increased the initial Ca and Mg leaching, but had no effect on the total concentrations of Ca, Mg and K leached. There was no significant difference for the amount of Na leached between the different treatments. The SAR pH and urea application had significant effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+). Urea application, SAR treated with various pH, and the interactions between them all had significant impacts on total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). The highest concentration of total PLFAs occurred in fertilized soils with SAR pH5.6 and the lowest in soils leached with the lowest SAR pH. Soils pretreated with urea then leached with SARs of pH 4.0 and 5.6 had larger total PLFA concentrations than soil without urea. Bacterial, fungal, actinomycete, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs had generally similar trends to total PLFAs.

  5. Linear Transformation of the Polarization Modes in Coiled Optical Spun-Fibers with Strong Unperturbed Linear Birefringence. I. Nonresonant Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2018-03-01

    A linear transformation of orthogonal polarization modes in coiled optical spun-fibers with strong unperturbed linear birefringence, which causes the emergence of the dependences of the integrated elliptical birefringence and the ellipticity and azimuth of the major axis of the ellipse, as well as the polarization state of radiation (PSR), on the length of optical fiber has been considered. Optical spun-fibers are subjected to a strong mechanical twisting, which is frozen into the structure of the optical fiber upon cooling, in the process of being drawn out from the workpiece. Since the values of the local polarization parameters of coiled spunwaveguides vary according to a rather complex law, the calculations were carried out by numerical modeling of the parameters of the Jones matrices. Since the rotation speed of the axes of the birefringence is constant on a relatively short segment of a coiled optical spun-fiber in the accompanying torsion (helical) coordinate system, the so-called "Ginzburg helical polarization modes" (GHPMs)—two mutually orthogonal ellipses with the opposite directions of traversal, the axis of which rotate relative to the fixed coordinate system uniformly and unidirectionally—are approximately the local normal polarization modes of such optical fiber. It has been shown that, despite the fact that the unperturbed linear birefringence of the spun-fibers significantly exceeds the linear birefringence, which is caused by the winding on a coil, the integral birefringence of an extended segment of such a fiber coincides in order of magnitude with the linear birefringence, which is caused by the winding on the coil, and the integral polarization modes tend asymptotically to circular ones. It has been also shown that the values of the circular birefringence of twisted single-mode fibers, which were calculated in a nonrotating and torsion helical coordinate systems, differ significantly. It has been shown that the polarization phenomena occur

  6. Diuron mobility through vineyard soils contaminated with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Astrid R.; Dousset, Sylvie; Guichard, Nathalie; Baveye, Philippe; Andreux, Francis

    2005-01-01

    The herbicide diuron is frequently applied to vineyard soils in Burgundy, along with repeated treatments with Bordeaux mixture (a blend of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide) that result in elevated copper concentrations. Cu could in principle affect the fate and transport of diuron or its metabolites in the soil either directly by complexation or indirectly by altering the populations or activity of microbes involved in their degradation. To assess the effect of high Cu concentrations on diuron transport, an experiment was designed with ten undisturbed columns of calcareous and acidic soils contaminated with 17-509 mg kg -1 total Cu (field-applied). Grass was planted on three columns. Diuron was applied to the soils in early May and in-ground lysimeters were exposed to outdoor conditions until November. Less than 1.2% of the diuron applied was found in the leachates as diuron or its metabolites. Higher concentrations were found in the effluents from the grass-covered columns (0.1-0.45%) than from the bare-soil columns (0.02-0.14%), and they were correlated with increases in dissolved organic carbon. The highest amounts of herbicide were measured in acidic-soil column leachates (0.98-1.14%) due to the low clay and organic matter contents of these soils. Cu also leached more readily through the acidic soils (32.8-1042 μg) than in the calcareous soils (9.5-63.4 μg). Unlike in the leachates, the amount of diuron remaining in the soils at the end of the experiment was weakly related to the Cu concentrations in the soils. - Cu accumulation, from Bordeaux mixture, in vineyard soils may be affecting microbial activity and thus slightly increasing the persistence of diuron in the soils

  7. Diuron mobility through vineyard soils contaminated with copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Astrid R. [UMR INRA 1229 Microbiologie-Geochimie des Sols, Centre des Sciences de la Terre, Universite de Bourgogne, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France) and Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, 1002 Bradfield Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)]. E-mail: arj5@cornell.edu; Dousset, Sylvie [UMR INRA 1229 Microbiologie-Geochimie des Sols, Centre des Sciences de la Terre, Universite de Bourgogne, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Guichard, Nathalie [UMR CNRS 5561 Biogeosciences, Centre des Sciences de la Terre, Universite de Bourgogne, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Baveye, Philippe [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, 1002 Bradfield Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Andreux, Francis [UMR INRA 1229 Microbiologie-Geochimie des Sols, Centre des Sciences de la Terre, Universite de Bourgogne, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France)

    2005-11-15

    The herbicide diuron is frequently applied to vineyard soils in Burgundy, along with repeated treatments with Bordeaux mixture (a blend of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide) that result in elevated copper concentrations. Cu could in principle affect the fate and transport of diuron or its metabolites in the soil either directly by complexation or indirectly by altering the populations or activity of microbes involved in their degradation. To assess the effect of high Cu concentrations on diuron transport, an experiment was designed with ten undisturbed columns of calcareous and acidic soils contaminated with 17-509 mg kg{sup -1} total Cu (field-applied). Grass was planted on three columns. Diuron was applied to the soils in early May and in-ground lysimeters were exposed to outdoor conditions until November. Less than 1.2% of the diuron applied was found in the leachates as diuron or its metabolites. Higher concentrations were found in the effluents from the grass-covered columns (0.1-0.45%) than from the bare-soil columns (0.02-0.14%), and they were correlated with increases in dissolved organic carbon. The highest amounts of herbicide were measured in acidic-soil column leachates (0.98-1.14%) due to the low clay and organic matter contents of these soils. Cu also leached more readily through the acidic soils (32.8-1042 {mu}g) than in the calcareous soils (9.5-63.4 {mu}g). Unlike in the leachates, the amount of diuron remaining in the soils at the end of the experiment was weakly related to the Cu concentrations in the soils. - Cu accumulation, from Bordeaux mixture, in vineyard soils may be affecting microbial activity and thus slightly increasing the persistence of diuron in the soils.

  8. Centrifuge modelling of seismic soil structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, B.; Madabhushi, S.P.G.

    2007-01-01

    Proper understanding of the role of unbounded soil in the evaluation of dynamic soil structure interaction (SSI) problem is very important for structures used in the nuclear industry. In this paper, the results from a series of dynamic centrifuge tests are reported. These tests were performed on different types of soil stratifications supporting a rigid containment structure. Test results indicate that accelerations transmitted to the structure's base are dependent on the stiffness degradation in the supporting soil. Steady build up of excess pore pressure leads to softening of the soil, which decreases the shear modulus and shear strength and subsequently changes the dynamic responses. It is also shown that the presence of the structure reduces the translational component of the input base motion and induces rocking of the structure. The test results are compared with some standard formulae used for evaluating interaction in the various building codes. It was concluded that the dynamic shear modulus values used should be representative of the site conditions and can vary dramatically due to softening. Damping values used are still very uncertain and contain many factors, which cannot be accounted in the experiments. It is emphasized that simplified design processes are important to gain an insight into the behaviour of the physical mechanism but for a complete understanding of the SSI effects sophisticated methods are necessary to account for non-linear behaviour of the soil material

  9. Characterization of wet aggregate stability of soils by ¹H-NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, C; Meyer, M; Schaumann, G E

    2015-09-01

    For the assessment of soil structural stability against hydraulic stress, wet sieving or constant head permeability tests are typically used but rather limited in their intrinsic information value. The multiple applications of several tests is the only possibility to assess important processes and mechanisms during soil aggregate breakdown, e.g. the influences of soil fragment release or differential swelling on the porous systems of soils or soil aggregate columns. Consequently, the development of new techniques for a faster and more detailed wet aggregate stability assessment is required. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry ((1)H-NMR relaxometry) might provide these requirements because it has already been successfully applied on soils. We evaluated the potential of (1)H-NMR relaxometry for the assessment of wet aggregate stability of soils, with more detailed information on occurring mechanisms at the same time. Therefore, we conducted single wet sieving and constant head permeability tests on untreated and 1% polyacrylic acid-treated soil aggregates of different textures and organic matter contents, subsequently measured by (1)H-NMR relaxometry after percolation. The stability of the soil aggregates were mainly depending on their organic matter contents and the type of aggregate stabilization, whereby additional effects of clay swelling on the measured wet aggregate stability were identified by the transverse relaxation time (T2) distributions. Regression analyses showed that only the percentage of water stable aggregates could be determined accurately from percolated soil aggregate columns by (1)H-NMR relaxometry measurements. (1)H-NMR relaxometry seems a promising technique for wet aggregate stability measurements but should be further developed for nonpercolated aggregate columns and real soil samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A review of experimental soil-structure interaction damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    In soil-structure interaction analysis, the foundation soil is usually represented by impedance springs and dampers. The impedance damping includes the effect of both the material damping and the radiation damping. Because the impedance theory normally assumes a rigid structural base and an elastic bond between the soil and structure, it is generally held that the radiation damping has been overestimated by the theory. There are some published information on the dynamic tests of footings and structures that allow direct or indirect assessments of the validity of the analytical radiation damping. An overview of such information is presented here. Based on these limited test data, it is concluded that for horizontal soil-structure interaction analysis the analytical radiation damping alone is sufficient to represent the combined material and radiation damping in the field. On the other hand, for vertical analysis it appears that the theory may have overestimated the radiation damping and certain reduction is recommended. (orig.)

  11. Applications in soil-structure interactions. Final report, June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhaveri, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    Complex phenomenon of soil-structure interaction was assessed. Relationships between the characteristics of the earthquake ground motions, the local soil and geologic conditions, and the response of the structures to the ground motions were studied. (I) The use of the explicit finite-difference method to study linear elastic soil-structure interaction is described. A linear two-dimensional study of different conditions that influence the dynamic compliance and scattering properties of foundations is presented. (II) The FLUSH computer code was used to compute the soil-structure interaction during SIMQUAKE 1B, an experimental underground blast excitation of a 1/12-scale model of a nuclear containment structure. Evaluation was performed using transient excitation, applied to a finite-difference grid. Dynamic foundation properties were studied. Results indicate that the orientation and location of the source relative to the site and the wave environment at the site may be important parameters to be considered. Differences between the computed and experimental recorded responses are indicated, and reasons for the discrepancy are suggested. (III) A case study that examined structural and ground response data tabulated and catalogued from tests at the Nevada Test Site for its applicability to the soil-structure interaction questions of interest is presented. Description, methods, and evaluation of data on soil-structure interaction from forced vibration tests are presented. A two-dimensional finite-difference grid representing a relatively rigid structure resting on uniform ground was analyzed and monitored. Fourier spectra of monitored time histories were also evaluated and are presented. Results show clear evidence of soil-structure interaction and significant agreement with theory. 128 figures, 18 tables

  12. Bacterial phylogeny structures soil resistomes across habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Gibson, Molly K.; Lauber, Christian L.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-05-01

    Ancient and diverse antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have previously been identified from soil, including genes identical to those in human pathogens. Despite the apparent overlap between soil and clinical resistomes, factors influencing ARG composition in soil and their movement between genomes and habitats remain largely unknown. General metagenome functions often correlate with the underlying structure of bacterial communities. However, ARGs are proposed to be highly mobile, prompting speculation that resistomes may not correlate with phylogenetic signatures or ecological divisions. To investigate these relationships, we performed functional metagenomic selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from 18 agricultural and grassland soils. The 2,895 ARGs we discovered were mostly new, and represent all major resistance mechanisms. We demonstrate that distinct soil types harbour distinct resistomes, and that the addition of nitrogen fertilizer strongly influenced soil ARG content. Resistome composition also correlated with microbial phylogenetic and taxonomic structure, both across and within soil types. Consistent with this strong correlation, mobility elements (genes responsible for horizontal gene transfer between bacteria such as transposases and integrases) syntenic with ARGs were rare in soil by comparison with sequenced pathogens, suggesting that ARGs may not transfer between soil bacteria as readily as is observed between human pathogens. Together, our results indicate that bacterial community composition is the primary determinant of soil ARG content, challenging previous hypotheses that horizontal gene transfer effectively decouples resistomes from phylogeny.

  13. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis of SIMQUAKE II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.K.; Isenberg, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an analytic method for modeling of soil-structure interaction (SSI) for nuclear power plants in earthquakes and discusses its application to SSI analyses of SIMQUAKE II. The method is general and can be used to simulate a three-dimensional structural geometry, nonlinear site characteristics and arbitrary input ground shaking. The analytic approach uses the soil island concept to reduce SSI models to manageable size and cost. Nonlinear constitutive behavior of the soil is represented by the nonlinear, kinematic cap model. In addition, a debonding-rebonding soil-structure interface model is utilized to represent nonlinear effects which singificantly alter structural response in the SIMQUAKE tests. STEALTH, an explicit finite difference code, is used to perform the dynamic, soil-structure interaction analyses. Several two-dimensional posttest SSI analyses of model containment structures in SIMQUAKE II are performed and results compared with measured data. These analyses qualify the analytic method. They also show the importance of including debonding-rebonding at the soil-structure interface. Sensitivity of structural response to compaction characteristics of backfill material is indicated

  14. Bioretention column study of bacteria community response to salt-enriched artificial stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, Theodore; Burke, David J; Burchhardt, Kathleen M; Fabian, Mark W; Kretzer, Annette M

    2012-01-01

    Cold climate cities with green infrastructure depend on soil bacteria to remove nutrients from road salt-enriched stormwater. Our research examined how bacterial communities in laboratory columns containing bioretention media responded to varying concentrations of salt exposure from artificial stormwater and the effect of bacteria and salt on column effluent concentrations. We used a factorial design with two bacteria treatments (sterile, nonsterile) and three salt concentrations (935, 315, and 80 ppm), including a deionized water control. Columns were repeatedly saturated with stormwater or deionized and then drained throughout 5 wk, with the last week of effluent analyzed for water chemistry. To examine bacterial communities, we extracted DNA from column bioretention media at time 0 and at week 5 and used molecular profiling techniques to examine bacterial community changes. We found that bacterial community taxa changed between time 0 and week 5 and that there was significant separation between taxa among salt treatments. Bacteria evenness was significantly affected by stormwater treatment, but there were no differences in bacterial richness or diversity. Soil bacteria and salt treatments had a significant effect on the effluent concentration of NO, PO, Cu, Pb, and Zn based on ANOVA tests. The presence of bacteria reduced effluent NO and Zn concentrations by as much as 150 and 25%, respectively, while having a mixed effect on effluent PO concentrations. Our results demonstrate how stormwater can affect bacterial communities and how the presence of soil bacteria improves pollutant removal by green infrastructure. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellezi, Lindita

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop alternative methods of analyzing problems in dynamic soil-structure-interaction. The main focus is the major difficulty posed by such an analysis - the phenomenon of waves which radiate outward from the excited structures towards infinity....... In numerical calculations, only a finite region of the foundation metium is analyzed and something is done to prevent the outgoing radiating waves to reflect from the regions's boundary. The prosent work concerns itself with the study of such effects, using the finite element method, and artificial...... transmitting boundary at the edges of the computational mesh. To start with, an investigation of the main effects of the interaction phenomena is carried out employing a widely used model, considering dynamic stiffness of the unbounded soil as frequency independent. Then a complete description...

  16. Advanced Seismic Fragility Modeling using Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandu [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talaat, Mohamed [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States); Hashimoto, Philip [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this effort is to compare the seismic fragilities of a nuclear power plant system obtained by a traditional seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) and an advanced SPRA that utilizes Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction (NLSSI) analysis. Soil-structure interaction (SSI) response analysis for a traditional SPRA involves the linear analysis, which ignores geometric nonlinearities (i.e., soil and structure are glued together and the soil material undergoes tension when the structure uplifts). The NLSSI analysis will consider geometric nonlinearities.

  17. A novel back-up control structure to manage nonroutine steam upsets in industrial methanol distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udugama, Isuru A.; Zander, Cornina; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Industrial methanol production plants have extensive heat integration to achieve energy efficient operations where steam generated from these heat integration operations are used to provide reboiler duty for methanol distillation columns that purify crude methanol produced into industrial AA grade...... supervisory layer to control the column during these non-routine process upsets. These control schemes were tested against realistic reboiler duty disturbances that can occur in an industrial process. The tests revealed that both the MPC and supervisory systems control structures are able to regulate...... the process, even during sudden drops in reboiler duty. However, the cost of implementation and the relative simplicity will likely favour the implementation of the supervisory control structure in an industrial environment....

  18. Soil structure changes evaluated with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate in millimetric scale changes in soil bulk density and porosity, using the gamma-ray computed tomography in soil samples with disturbed structure due to wetting and drying (W-D) cycles. Soil samples with 98.1 cm 3 were sieved using a 2 mm mesh and homogeneously packed in PVC cylinders. Soil samples were submitted to 1, 2, and 3 W-D cycles. Control samples were not submitted to W-D cycles. After repetitions of W-D cycles, soil sample porosity decreased and soil layers became denser. Computed tomography allowed a continuous analysis of soil bulk density and also soil porosity along millimetric (0.08 cm) layers, what cannot be provided by traditional methods used in soil physics. (author)

  19. Modeling of soil-water-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian

    as the developed nonlinear soil displacements and stresses under monotonic and cyclic loading. With the FVM nonlinear coupled soil models as a basis, multiphysics modeling of wave-seabed-structure interaction is carried out. The computations are done in an open source code environment, OpenFOAM, where FVM models...

  20. Assessment of soil/structure interaction analysis procedures for nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.A.; Wei, B.C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents an assessment of two state-of-the-art soil/structure interaction analysis procedures that are frequently used to provide seismic analyses of nuclear power plant structures. The advantages of large three-dimensional, elastic, discrete mass models and two-dimensional finite element models are compared. The discrete mass models can provide three-dimensional response capability with economical computer costs but only fair soil/structure interaction representation. The two-dimensional finite element models provide good soil/structure interaction representation, but cannot provide out-of-plane response. Three-dimensional finite element models would provide the most informative and complete analyses. For this model, computer costs would be much greater, but modeling costs would be approximately the same as those required for three-dimensional discrete mass models

  1. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure

  2. Limited transport of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in two natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasel, Daniela; Bradford, Scott A.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Pütz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry; Klumpp, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Column experiments were conducted in undisturbed and in repacked soil columns at water contents close to saturation (85–96%) to investigate the transport and retention of functionalized 14 C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in two natural soils. Additionally, a field lysimeter experiment was performed to provide long-term information at a larger scale. In all experiments, no breakthrough of MWCNTs was detectable and more than 85% of the applied radioactivity was recovered in the soil profiles. The retention profiles exhibited a hyper-exponential shape with greater retention near the column or lysimeter inlet and were successfully simulated using a numerical model that accounted for depth-dependent retention. In conclusion, results indicated that the soils acted as a strong sink for MWCNTs. Little transport of MWCNTs is therefore likely to occur in the vadose zone, and this implies limited potential for groundwater contamination in the investigated soils. -- Highlights: •Investigation of undisturbed soil columns and lysimeter. •Transport experiments under water-unsaturated conditions. •Retention profiles were measured and numerically modeled. •Complete retention of MWCNT in undisturbed and repacked soil columns. -- In undisturbed columns and a lysimeter study, complete retention of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was found in two soils at environmentally relevant conditions

  3. Site response - a critical problem in soil-structure interaction analyses for embedded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, H.B.; Lysmer, J.

    1986-01-01

    Soil-structure interaction analyses for embedded structures must necessarily be based on a knowledge of the manner in which the soil would behave in the absence of any structure - that is on a knowledge and understanding of the spatial distribution of motions in the ground within the depth of embedment of the structure. The nature of these spatial variations is discussed and illustrated by examples of recorded motions. It is shown that both the amplitude of peak acceleration and the form of the acceleration response spectrum for earthquake motions will necessarily vary with depth and failure to take these variations into account may introduce an unwarranted degree of conservatism into the soil-structure interaction analysis procedure

  4. Estimating fate and transport of multiple contaminants in the vadose zone using a multi-layered soil column and three-phase equilibrium partitioning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)

  5. Impact of tillage intensity on clay loam soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraghmeh, Omar; Petersen, Carsten; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    Soil structure and structural stability are key parameters in sustainable soil management and optimum cropping practices. Locally and temporally adapted precision tillage may improve crop performance while at the same time reduce environmental impacts. The main objective of this study...... was to improve the knowledge of precision tillage practices through characterizing the effect of varied tillage intensities on structural properties of a clay loam soil. A field experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with two main factors, i.e. operational speed (OS, 2 levels......) and rotovating speed (RS, 3 levels). The tillage was conducted using a PTO-driven rotovator equipped to measure angular velocity. The effect of traffic compaction, made directly after tillage, was measured on soil taken from wheel track (WT) compared with soil outside wheel track (NWT). Soil samples from 0-3 cm...

  6. The effects of soil-structure interaction modeling techniques on in-structure response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Wesley, D.A.; Almajan, I.T.

    1977-01-01

    The structure considered for this investigation consisted of the reactor containment building (RCB) and prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) for a HTGR plant. A conventional lumped-mass dynamic model in three dimensions was used in the study. The horizontal and vertical response, which are uncoupled due to the symmetry of the structure, were determined for horizontal and vertical excitation. Five different site conditions ranging from competent rock to a soft soil site were considered. The simplified approach to the overall plant analysis utilized stiffness proportional composite damping with a limited amount of soil damping consistent with US NRC regulatory guidelines. Selected cases were also analyzed assuming a soil damping value approximating the theoretical value. The results from the simplified approach were compared to those determined by rigorously coupling the structure to a frequency independent half-space representation of the soil. Finally, equivalent modal damping ratios were found by matching the frequency response at a point within the coupled soil-structure system determined by solution of the coupled and uncoupled equations of motion. The basis for comparison of the aforementioned techniques was the response spectra at selected locations within the soil-structure system. Each of the five site conditions was analyzed and in-structure response spectra were generated. The response spectra were combined to form a design envelope which encompasses the entire range of site parameters. Both the design envelopes and the site-by-site results were compared

  7. Analysis of Multi-Loop Control Structures of Dividing-Wall Distillation Columns Using a Fundamental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Tututi-Avila

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dividing-wall columns (DWCs have significant potential as energy-efficient processes for the separation of multicomponent mixtures. However, in addition to an efficient steady state design, dynamics and control also play a major part for the success of a technology. This is especially so for complex distillation systems. This paper investigates the dynamics of a dividing wall column used for the separation of ternary mixtures. A detailed dynamic first principles-based model of the column I s developed in gPROMS. The model is used to generate data used for control loop pairing via the Relative Gain Array (RGA, and controller parameters are found by using Internal Model Control (IMC tuning. The best control structures for DWC systems, involving four different ternary mixtures, and two different feed compositions for each mixture, are investigated.

  8. Near-field soil-structure interaction analysis using nonlinear hybrid modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Chen, C.; Lee, Y.J.; Jean, W.Y.; Penzien, J.

    1989-01-01

    The hybrid modeling method (Gupta and Penzien 1980) and associated analysis procedure for solving a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction problem was developed by Gupta and Penzien (1981) and Gupta et al.(1982). Subsequently, successive modifications have been made to the original modeling method and analysis procedure allowing more general treatment of the SSI problem (Penzien, 1988). Through many correlation studies of field test data obtained under forced-vibration and earthquake-excitation conditions, it has been shown that the HASSI programs can effectively predict the dynamic response of a soil-structure system, if realistic soil parameters are adopted. In the above, the entire structure-foundation system is considered to respond in a linear fashion. Since the reflected three-dimensional waves at the soil-structure interface decays very rapidly with distance away from the structure (Katayama, 1987 (a)), the response of the soil close to the base of the structure may greatly affect its response; therefore, proper modeling of the non-linear soil behavior characteristic is essential. The nonlinear behavior of near-field soil has been taken into consideration in HASSI-7 by the standard equivalent linearization procedures used in programs SHAKE and FLUSH

  9. Optimization of mathematical models for soil structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallenas, J.M.; Wong, C.K.; Wong, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Accounting for soil-structure interaction in the design and analysis of major structures for DOE facilities can involve significant costs in terms of modeling and computer time. Using computer programs like SASSI for modeling major structures, especially buried structures, requires the use of models with a large number of soil-structure interaction nodes. The computer time requirements (and costs) increase as a function of the number of interaction nodes to the third power. The added computer and labor cost for data manipulation and post-processing can further increase the total cost. This paper provides a methodology to significantly reduce the number of interaction nodes. This is achieved by selectively increasing the thickness of soil layers modeled based on the need for the mathematical model to capture as input only those frequencies that can actually be transmitted by the soil media. The authors have rarely found that a model needs to capture frequencies as high as 33 Hz. Typically coarser meshes (and a lesser number of interaction nodes) are adequate

  10. Consolidation Theory for a Stone Column Composite Foundation under Multistage Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenggen Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The consolidation theories considering instant load cannot fully reveal the consolidation mechanism of a stone column composite foundation used in the expressway embankments due to the time effect of loading; that is, the expressway embankments are often constructed in several stages for a long time. Meanwhile, owing to the special property that the pile-soil stress ratio is larger than 1, the consolidation theory for sand drain well foundation cannot be used directly in the consolidation analysis of stone column composite foundation. Based on the principle that the vertical load applied on the composite foundation is shared by the stone column and the surrounding soil, the governing solutions for the stone column composite foundation under a multistage load are established. By virtue of the separation of variables, the corresponding solutions of degree of consolidation for loading stage and maintaining load stage are derived separately. According to the Carrillo theorem, the solution for the average total degree of consolidation of entire composite foundation is also obtained. Finally, the reasonableness of the present solution has been verified by comparing the consolidation curve calculated by the present solution with that measured by site test.

  11. Discussion on the Influence of Various Technological Parameters on Jet Grouting Columns Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bzówka Joanna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most popular elements created by using jet grouting technology are columns. During designing such columns, it is a problem of estimating their shape and dimensions. The main factors that influence on columns geometry are soil characteristic and technological parameters. At the frame of Authors scientific research, following technological factors were taken into account: system of jet grouting, injection pressure, dimension of nozzles and rotation speed during injection. In the paper some results of the field tests of jet grouting columns are presented

  12. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  13. Impact of soil-structure interaction on the probabilistic frequency variation of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.; Hamilton, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Earthquake response of equipment in nuclear power plants is characterized by floor response spectra. Since these spectra peak at the natural frequencies of the structure, it is important, both from safety and cost standpoints, to determine the degree of the expected variability of the calculated structural frequencies. A previous work is extended on the variability of the natural frequencies of structures due to the variations of concrete properties and a rigorous approach is presented to evaluate frequency variations based on the probability distributions of both the structural and soil parameters and jointly determine the distributions of the natural frequencies. It is assumed that the soil-structure interaction coefficients are normally distributed. With the proper choice of coordinates, the simultaneous random variations of both the structural properties and the interaction coefficients can be incorporated in the eigenvalue problem. The key methodology problem is to obtain the probability distribution of eigenvalues of matrices with random variable elements. Since no analytic relation exists between the eigenvalues and the elements, a numerical procedure had to be designed. It was found that the desired accuracy can be best achieved by splitting the joint variation into two parts: the marginal distribution of soil variations and the conditional distribution of structural variations at specific soil fractiles. Then after calculating the actual eigenvalues at judiciously selected paired values of soil and structure parameters, this information is recombined to obtain the desired cumulative distribution of natural frequencies

  14. An experimental study on soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Akira; Kumagai, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    The soil-structure interaction effects play an important role in the earthquake response of large scale structures such as nuclear power plants. Recent decades, many experimental and analytical studies have been conducted. Even though sophisticated analytical tools are ready to use, complicated soil-structure interaction problems such as those with a complex geometry can not be solved yet. For such problems a laboratory experiment is a powerful alternative. In the laboratory experiment, a device to absorb the reflected waves is always necessary to be attached on the boundaries of the soil model to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. But unfortunately absorbing devices currently available are far from satisfactory. In this paper, a new experimental method is employed for soil-structure interaction problems to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. The present method utilizes the characteristics of transient response to an impulse load so that no special treatment on the boundaries of the soil model is required. This technique is applicable to a linear elastic system whose impulse response decreases to a small enough value before observing the reflected waves. (author)

  15. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele C ePereira e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively, and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 µgN.h-1.gdw-1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 µgN.h-1.gdw-1. Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10% the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%. Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step towards defining a NOR for soil nitrification. Moreover, the clear effect of soil texture established here suggests that the NOR should be defined in a soil-type-specific manner.

  16. Collapse of tall granular columns in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna; Soga, Kenichi; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches, landslides, and debris flows are geophysical hazards, which involve rapid mass movement of granular solids, water, and air as a multi-phase system. In order to describe the mechanism of immersed granular flows, it is important to consider both the dynamics of the solid phase and the role of the ambient fluid. In the present study, the collapse of a granular column in fluid is studied using 2D LBM - DEM. The flow kinematics are compared with the dry and buoyant granular collapse to understand the influence of hydrodynamic forces and lubrication on the run-out. In the case of tall columns, the amount of material destabilised above the failure plane is larger than that of short columns. Therefore, the surface area of the mobilised mass that interacts with the surrounding fluid in tall columns is significantly higher than the short columns. This increase in the area of soil - fluid interaction results in an increase in the formation of turbulent vortices thereby altering the deposit morphology. It is observed that the vortices result in the formation of heaps that significantly affects the distribution of mass in the flow. In order to understand the behaviour of tall columns, the run-out behaviour of a dense granular column with an initial aspect ratio of 6 is studied. The collapse behaviour is analysed for different slope angles: 0°, 2.5°, 5° and 7.5°.

  17. Soil Overconsolidation Changes Caused by Dynamic Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotr, Kanty; Sławomir, Kwiecień; Jerzy, Sękowski

    2017-10-01

    In the dynamic replacement method (DR) the soil is improved by initially dropping a large weight (typically 8-20 t) pounder from a significant height up to 25 m. The created crater is filled with a stronger material (gravel, rubble, stone aggregate, debris), and the pounder is dropped once or multiple times again. The construction of dynamic replacement pillars influences the parameters of the adjacent soil. It results from the energy generated by dropping a pounder into the soil. In the current practice, these changes are not taken into the account during the design. This paper focuses on the changes of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) and in situ coefficient of lateral earth pressure (K) values estimated base on cone penetration test (CPTU) and Dilatometric test (DMT) performed at a test site. A single column was constructed and the ground around the column was examined using CPTU and DMT, performed at different distances from the column centre (2, 3, 4 and 6 m) and at different time intervals (during construction and 1, 8, 30 days later). The column was constructed in so-called transition soils (between cohesive and non-cohesive). While interpreting the results of the research, the authors addressed the matter of choosing the procedure of OCR and K indication for transition soils (in this case described as silts and/or sandy silts). Overconsolidation changes may differ depending on the chosen analysis procedure (for cohesive or non-cohesive soils). On the basis of the analysis presented in the paper and the observation of soil (acknowledged as cohesive according to macroscopic observations) during column excavation, it was decided that for more detailed analyses methods dedicated to cohesive soils should be applied. Generally, it can be stated that although the changes were complex, DR pillar formation process resulted in the increase of these parameters. The average increases of OCR and K values were 25% and 10% respectively. The post installation values are not

  18. On-column ligand exchange for structure-based drug design: a case study with human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Wenying; Judge, Russell A.; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Solomon, Larry R.; Harlan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    An on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes for an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-HSD1 after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. An interesting byproduct of the method was the observation of artificial trimers in the crystal structures. Successfully forming ligand–protein complexes with specific compounds can be a significant challenge in supporting structure-based drug design for a given protein target. In this respect, an on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes of an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. This report describes the on-column exchange method and an unexpected byproduct of the method in which artificial trimers were observed in the structures

  19. Organic amendments and nutrient leaching in soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lack of nutrient build up in reclaimed coal mine soils would therefore require additional inputs to maintain plant productivity and establishment of a healthy ecosystem. In a greenhouse experiment, reclaimed coal mine soil were amended with fresh and composted poultry manure at the rates based ...

  20. Graph Modelling Approach: Application to a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovelaque, V.; Commault, C.; Bahar, Mehrdad

    1997-01-01

    Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks.......Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks....

  1. Removal and co-transport of Zn, As(V), and Cd during leachate seepage through downgradient mine soils: A batch sorption and column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juhee [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seung Mo [Korea Testing and Research Institute, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Seunghun, E-mail: soilhyun@korea.ac.kr [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    The removal of Zn, As(V), and Cd during the leachate seepage process was measured in single, binary, and ternary solute systems by batch sorption and 1-D column flow experiments, followed by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP). In single-solute systems, sorption (K{sub d}{sup ⁎}) occurred in the order of As(V) > Zn ≫ Cd, and this sequence did not change in the presence of other solutes. In multi-solute systems, the sorption of Zn (~ 20%) and Cd (~ 27%) was enhanced by As(V), while Zn and Cd suppressed the sorption of each other. In all cases, As(V) sorption was not affected by the cations, indicating that As(V) is prioritized by sorption sites to a much greater degree than Zn and Cd. Element retention by column soils was strongly correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.77) with K{sub d}{sup ⁎}. Across column segments, mass retention was in the order of inlet (36–54%) > middle (26–35%) > outlet (20–31%), except for Cd in the Zn–Cd binary system. The result of SEP revealed that most of the retained Cd (98–99%) and Zn (56–71%) was in the labile fraction (e.g., the sum of F1 and F2) while only 9–12% of As(V) was labile and most (> 55%) was specifically adsorbed to Fe/Al oxides. Plots of the labile fraction (f{sub labile}) and the fast sorption fraction (f{sub fast}) suggested that the kinetics of specific As(V) sorption occur rapidly (f{sub fast} > f{sub labile}), whereas labile Zn and Cd sorption occurs slowly (f{sub labile} > f{sub fast}), indicating the occurrence of kinetically limited labile sorption sites, probably due to Zn–Cd competition. In conclusion, the element leaching potential of mine leachate can be greatly attenuated during downgradient soil seepage. However, when assessing the soil attenuation process, the impact of sorption competitors and the lability of adsorbed elements should first be considered. - Highlights: • During soil seepage, element leaching potential is reduced as As(V) > Zn > Cd. • Element removal during leachate seepage

  2. Soil Respiration and Bacterial Structure and Function after 17 Years of a Reciprocal Soil Transplant Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bolton, Harvey; Fansler, Sarah; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Liu, Chongxuan; McCue, Lee Ann; Smith, Jeffrey; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The effects of climate change on soil organic matter-its structure, microbial community, carbon storage, and respiration response-remain uncertain and widely debated. In addition, the effects of climate changes on ecosystem structure and function are often modulated or delayed, meaning that short-term experiments are not sufficient to characterize ecosystem responses. This study capitalized on a long-term reciprocal soil transplant experiment to examine the response of dryland soils to climate change. The two transplant sites were separated by 500 m of elevation on the same mountain slope in eastern Washington state, USA, and had similar plant species and soil types. We resampled the original 1994 soil transplants and controls, measuring CO2 production, temperature response, enzyme activity, and bacterial community structure after 17 years. Over a laboratory incubation of 100 days, reciprocally transplanted soils respired roughly equal cumulative amounts of carbon as non-transplanted controls from the same site. Soils transplanted from the hot, dry, lower site to the cooler and wetter (difference of -5°C monthly maximum air temperature, +50 mm yr-1 precipitation) upper site exhibited almost no respiratory response to temperature (Q10 of 1.1), but soils originally from the upper, cooler site had generally higher respiration rates. The bacterial community structure of transplants did not differ significantly from that of untransplanted controls, however. Slight differences in local climate between the upper and lower Rattlesnake locations, simulated with environmental control chambers during the incubation, thus prompted significant differences in microbial activity, with no observed change to bacterial structure. These results support the idea that environmental shifts can influence soil C through metabolic changes, and suggest that microbial populations responsible for soil heterotrophic respiration may be constrained in surprising ways, even as shorter- and

  3. Effects of wastewater irrigation on soil sodicity and nutrient leaching in calcareous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalali, M.; Merikhpour, H.; Kaledhonkar, M.J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2008-01-01

    Soil column studies were conducted with two soils to assess the effects of irrigation with wastewater on soil and groundwater quality. Upon the application of wastewater, exchange occurred between solution sodium (Na+) and exchangeable cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+), whereby these cations were released

  4. Response of steel box columns in fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Yahyai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of elevated temperatures on the mechanical properties of steel, brings the importance of investigating the effect of fire on the steel structures anxiously. Columns, as the main load-carrying part of a structure, can be highly vulnerable to the fire. In this study, the behavior of steel gravity columns with box cross section exposed to fire has been investigated. These kinds of columns are widely used in common steel structures design in Iran. In current study, the behavior of such columns in fire conditions is investigated through the finite element method. To perform this, the finite element model of a steel column which has been previously tested under fire condition, was prepared. Experimental loading and boundary conditions were considered in the model and was analyzed. Results were validated by experimental data and various specimens of gravity box columns were designed according to the Iran’s steel buildings code, and modeled and analyzed using Abaqus software. The effect of width to thickness ratio of column plates, the load ratio and slenderness on the ultimate strength of the column was investigated, and the endurance time was estimated under ISO 834 standard fire curve. The results revealed that an increase in width to thickness ratio and load ratio leads to reduction of endurance time and the effect of width to thickness ratio on the ultimate strength of the column decreases with temperature increase.

  5. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  6. Soil-structure interaction - a general method to calculate soil impedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farvacque, M.; Gantenbein, F.

    1983-01-01

    A correct analysis of the seismic response of nuclear power plant buildings needs to take into account the soil structure interaction. The most classical and simple method consists in characterizing the soil by a stiffness and a damping function for each component of the translation and rotation of the foundation. In a more exact way an impedance function of the frequency may be introduced. Literature provides data to estimate these coefficients for simple soil and foundation configurations and using linear hypothesis. This paper presents a general method to calculate soil impedances which is based on the computation of the impulsive response of the soil using an axisymmetric 2D finite element Code (INCA). The Fourier transform of this response is made in the time interval before the return of the reflected waves on the boundaries of the F.E. domain. This procedure which limits the perturbing effects of the reflections is improved by introducing absorbing boundary elements. A parametric study for homogeneous and layered soils has been carried out using this method. (orig.)

  7. Computation of wave fields and soil structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysmer, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The basic message of the lecture is that the determination of the temporal and spatial variation of the free-field motions is the most important part of any soil-structure interaction analysis. Any interaction motions may be considered as small aberrations superimposed on the free-field motions. The current definition of the soil-structure interaction problem implies that superposition must be used, directly or indirectly, in any rational method of analysis of this problem. This implies that the use of nonlinear procedures in any part of a soil-structure interaction analysis must be questioned. Currently the most important part of the soil-structure interaction analysis, the free-field problem, cannot be solved by nonlinear methods. Hence, it does not seem reasonable to spend a large effort on trying to obtain nonlinear solutions for the interaction part of the problem. Even if such solutions are obtained they cannot legally be superimposed on the free-field motions to obtain the total motions of the structure. This of course does not preclude the possibility that such an illegal procedure may lead to solutions which are close enough for engineering purposes. However, further research is required to make a decision on this issue

  8. MODELING A ROCKET ELASTIC STRUCTURE AS A BECK’S COLUMN UNDER FOLLOWER FORCE

    OpenAIRE

    Brejão, Leandro Forne; Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. F.

    2017-01-01

    It is intended, in this paper, to develop a mathematical model of an elastic space rocket structure as a Beck’s column excited by a follower (or circulatory) force. This force represents the rocket motor thrust that should be always in the direction of the tangent to the structure deformed axis at the base of the vehicle. We present a simplified two degree of freedom rigid bars discrete model. Its system of two second order nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion are derived via L...

  9. Bacterial community structure at the microscale in two different soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michelland, R.; Thioulouse, J.; Kyselková, Martina; Grundmann, G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2016), s. 717-724 ISSN 0095-3628 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : abundancy-occupancy relationship * bacteria community structure * frequency-occupancy relationship * microscale in soil * soil microbial diversity * soil structure Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.630, year: 2016

  10. Mass Transport within Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend

  11. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Bello-López, Juan M.; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Luna-Guido, Marco L.; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)) accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485) inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100%) > earthworms applied (92%) > organic material applied (77%) > untreated soil (57%) > surfactant applied (34%) after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes), Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil, but the

  12. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Delgado-Balbuena

    Full Text Available Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826 accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485 inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100% > earthworms applied (92% > organic material applied (77% > untreated soil (57% > surfactant applied (34% after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil

  13. Flow of microemulsion through soil columns contaminated with asphaltic residue; Fluxo de microemulsoes atraves do solo contaminado com residuos asfalticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia C.K.; Oliveira, Jose F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Oliveira, Roberto C.G.; Gonzalez, Gazpar [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2004-07-01

    Nowadays, soil contamination with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as petroleum hydrocarbons is a major environmental problem. Significant efforts have been devoted to the development of processes to remediate sites contaminated with NAPLs. Unfortunately, most of the developed processes proved to be inefficient to remove the organic heavy fraction present in the NAPLs. Nevertheless, in our preliminary bench scale tests it was observed that, due to their high solubilization capacity and stability, microemulsions are able to remove organic heavy fractions like asphaltenes and resins, typically present in crude oils. The present work was dimensioned to evaluate, under up-flow condition, the performance of different microemulsions specially designed to remove asphaltenes fractions from soils using a column test set-up. The contaminant residual concentration was quantified by UV spectroscopy and the microemulsion efficiency determined using mass balance. The results showed that the microemulsions tested have a high capacity for removing asphaltenes fractions from contaminated soils. It was also observed that the predominant removal mechanism, solubilization or mobilization, depends essentially on the microemulsion's chemical formulation. Finally it was verified that microemulsion's formulations based on natural solvents compounds are also efficient for removing asphaltic residues. (author)

  14. Bulk density and aggregate stability assays in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. М. Хордан

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The restoration technologies in areas degraded by extractive activities require the use of their own mine spoils. Reducing deficiencies in physical properties, organic matter, and nutrients with a contribution of treated sewage sludge is proposed. This experiment was based on a controlled study using columns. The work was done with two mine spoils, both very rich in calcium carbonate. Two sewage sludge doses were undertaken (30,000 and 90,000 kg/ha of sewage sludge in addition to a different mine spoils used as restoration substrates. The water contribution was provided by a device that simulated short duration rain. The leached water was collected 24 hours after the last application. The experiment saw the bulk density decrease and the aggregate stability increase, thereby improving the structure. The improved soil structure decreases its vulnerability to degradation processes such as erosion and compaction.

  15. An Experimental Study on Solute Transport in One-Dimensional Clay Soil Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaheer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solute transport in low-permeability media such as clay has not been studied carefully up to present, and we are often unclear what the proper governing law is for describing the transport process in such media. In this study, we composed and analyzed the breakthrough curve (BTC data and the development of leaching in one-dimensional solute transport experiments in low-permeability homogeneous and saturated media at small scale, to identify key parameters controlling the transport process. Sodium chloride (NaCl was chosen to be the tracer. A number of tracer tests were conducted to inspect the transport process under different conditions. The observed velocity-time behavior for different columns indicated the decline of soil permeability when switching from tracer introducing to tracer flushing. The modeling approaches considered were the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE, Two-Region Model (TRM, Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW, and Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation (FADE. It was found that all the models can fit the transport process very well; however, ADE and TRM were somewhat unable to characterize the transport behavior in leaching. The CTRW and FADE models were better in capturing the full evaluation of tracer-breakthrough curve and late-time tailing in leaching.

  16. Inert carriers for column extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katykhin, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    Inert carriers used in column extraction chromatography are reviewed. Such carriers are devided into two large groups: hydrophilic carriers which possess high surface energy and are well wetted only with strongly polar liquids (kieselguhrs, silica gels, glasses, cellulose, Al 2 O 3 ) and water-repellent carriers which possess low surface energy and are well wetted with various organic solvents (polyethylene, polytetrafluorethylene polytrifluorochlorethylene). Properties of various carriers are presented: structure, chemical and radiation stability, adsorption properties, extracting agent capacity. The effect of structure and sizes of particles on the efficiency of chromatography columns is considered. Ways of immovable phase deposition on the carrier and the latter's regeneration. Peculiarities of column packing for preparative and continuous chromatography are discussed

  17. Fate of triclocarban during soil aquifer treatment: Soil column studies

    KAUST Repository

    Essandoh, H. M K; Tizaoui, Chedly; Mohamed, Mostafa H A; Amy, Gary L.; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2010-01-01

    There are current concerns about the presence of persistent chemicals in recharge water used in soil aquifer treatment systems. Triclocarban (TCC) has been reported as a persistent, high production volume chemical with the potential to bioaccumulate

  18. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Soil With Ferrous and Bisulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K.; Lee, W.

    2008-12-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of concentration of reductants, contact time to activate reductive capacity, and pH on reductive dechlorination by soil with Fe(II) and HS- in this study. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target organic compound. Sorption kinetic and isotherm tests were performed to investigate the influence of adsorption on the soil surface. Target compound in the soil suspension reached sorption equilibrium in 4 hours and the type of isotherm was well fitted by a linear type isotherm. In batch experiment, kinetic rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of CT increased with increasing the concentration of the reductants (Fe(II) and HS-). However, Fe(II) was a much more effective reductant, producing higher k values than those of HS-. The contact time of one day for the soil with HS- and that of four hours with Fe(II) showed the highest reaction rates. Additionally, the rate constants increased with the increase of pH in soil suspension with Fe(II) (5.2~8) and HS- (8.3~10.3), respectively. In column experiment, the soil column with Fe(II) showed larger bed volumes (13.76) to reach a column breakthrough than that with HS- indicating the treatment of Fe(II) is more effective for the reductive dechlorination of CT. To enhance reductive capacity of soil column under an acidic condition, CaO addition to the column treated with Fe(II) showed better results for the reductive dechlorination of CT than that of HS-. Fe(II) showed better CT dechlorination than HS- in batch and column reactors therefore, it can be used as an effective reducing agent for the treatment of soil contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds.

  19. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schlüter

    Full Text Available Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3. We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  20. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  1. Influence of soil-structure interaction on floor response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Miller, C.A.; Curreri, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the influence of soil-structure interaction on floor response spectra developed in typical nuclear power plant structures. A horizontal earthquake time history, whose spectra envelops the Regulatory Guide 1.60 criteria and is scaled to a log peak acceleration, was used as input to structural models. Two different structural stick models were used, representing typical BWR and PWR facilities. By varying the structural and soil stiffness parameters, a wide range of system behaviors were investigated. Floor response spectra, required to assess equipment qualification, were of primary interest. It was found from a variation of parameter study that the interaction soil parameters, particularly radiation damping, greatly affect the nature of the calculated responses. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Influence of soil-structure interaction on floor response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Miller, C.A.; Curreri, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the influence of soil-structure interaction on floor response spectra developed in typical nuclear power plant structures. A horizontal earthquake time history, whose spectra envelops the Reg. Guide 1.60 criteria and is scaled to a 1 g peak acceleration, was used as input to structural models. Two different structural stick models were used, representing typical BWR and PWR facilities. By varying the structural and soil stiffness parameters, a wide range of system behaviors were investigated. Floor response spectra, required to assess equipment qualification, were of primary interest. It was found from a variation of parameter study that the interaction soil parameters, particularly radiation damping, greatly affect the nature of the calculated responses. (orig.)

  3. Posterior column reconstruction improves fusion rates at the level of osteotomy in three-column posterior-based osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen J; Mohanty, Chandan; Gazendam, Aaron M; Kato, So; Keshen, Sam G; Lewis, Noah D; Magana, Sofia P; Perlmutter, David; Cape, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    To determine the incidence of pseudarthrosis at the osteotomy site after three-column spinal osteotomies (3-COs) with posterior column reconstruction. 82 consecutive adult 3-COs (66 patients) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. All cases underwent posterior 3-COs with two-rod constructs. The inferior facets of the proximal level were reduced to the superior facets of the distal level. If that was not possible, a structural piece of bone graft either from the local resection or a local rib was slotted in the posterior column defect to re-establish continual structural posterior bone across the lateral margins of the resection. No interbody cages were used at the level of the osteotomy. There were 34 thoracic osteotomies, 47 lumbar osteotomies and one sacral osteotomy with a mean follow-up of 52 (24-126) months. All cases underwent posterior column reconstructions described above and the addition of interbody support or additional posterior rods was not performed for fusion at the osteotomy level. Among them, 29 patients underwent one or more revision surgeries. There were three definite cases of pseudarthrosis at the osteotomy site (4%). Six revisions were also performed for pseudarthrosis at other levels. Restoration of the structural integrity of the posterior column in three-column posterior-based osteotomies was associated with > 95% fusion rate at the level of the osteotomy. Pseudarthrosis at other levels was the second most common reason for revision following adjacent segment disease in the long-term follow-up.

  4. Assessment of seismic wave effects on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuter, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    One of the most common hypotheses made for soil-structure interaction analyses is that the earthquake input motion is identical at all points beneath the structure. Several papers have recently shown that this assumption may be overly conservative and that the effect of wave passage is extremely important. These studies typically employ a relatively simple model, namely, the basemat is represented by a rectangular rigid foundation resting on top of the soil and connected to the soil by a continuously distributed set of soil springs. The seismic input is applied at the base of the soil springs and is assumed to be traveling at a constant wave velocity across the site. It ispossible to improve on the soil/structure model by use of finite element methods; however, little is known about how to model the input seismic energy and typically a simple travelling wave is used. In this paper, the author examines the available data to determine: (i) the appropriate wave velocity to use, and (ii) if the currently availble analytic models are adequate. (Auth.)

  5. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macro-porosity by combining laboratory measurements and X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    -porosity (R2 = 0.80 for air permeability: R2= 0.61 for 5% arrival time) and macro-porosity of the restricting layer (R2=0.83 for air permeability: R2= 0.71 for 5% arrival time) over air-filled porosity and all the correlations were positive. The high positive correlation these air and water transport...... functions with macro-porosity stressed the importance of continuity and tortuosity of pores in air, water and solute flow and transport through the soils. Negative correlations of air permeability, 5% arrival time of tracer and macro-porosity were obtained with bulk density whereas with other soil physical......With an objective to link the hydraulic properties of soil with the soil structural properties, air permeability and 5% arrival time of a conservative tracer was measured for large undisturbed soil columns from the same agricultural field. The same soil columns were scanned with a medical scanner...

  6. Response of soil microorganisms to radioactive oil waste: results from a leaching experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitskaya, P.; Biktasheva, L.; Saveliev, A.; Ratering, S.; Schnell, S.; Selivanovskaya, S.

    2015-06-01

    Oil wastes produced in large amounts in the processes of oil extraction, refining, and transportation are of great environmental concern because of their mutagenicity, toxicity, high fire hazardousness, and hydrophobicity. About 40% of these wastes contain radionuclides; however, the effects of oil products and radionuclides on soil microorganisms are frequently studied separately. The effects on various microbial parameters of raw waste containing 575 g of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) kg-1 waste, 4.4 of 226Ra, 2.8 of 232Th, and 1.3 kBq kg-1 of 40K and its treated variant (1.6 g kg-1 of TPH, 7.9 of 226Ra, 3.9 of 232Th, and 183 kBq kg-1 of 40K) were examined in a leaching column experiment to separate the effects of hydrocarbons from those of radioactive elements. The raw waste sample (H) was collected from tanks during cleaning and maintenance, and a treated waste sample (R) was obtained from equipment for oil waste treatment. Thermal steam treatment is used in the production yard to reduce the oil content. The disposal of H waste samples on the soil surface led to an increase in the TPH content in soil: it became 3.5, 2.8, and 2.2 times higher in the upper (0-20 cm), middle (20-40 cm), and lower (40-60cm) layers, respectively. Activity concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th increased in soil sampled from both H- and R- columns in comparison to their concentrations in control soil. The activity concentrations of these two elements in samples taken from the upper and middle layers were much higher for the R-column compared to the H-column, despite the fact that the amount of waste added to the columns was equalized with respect to the activity concentrations of radionuclides. The H waste containing both TPH and radionuclides affected the functioning of the soil microbial community, and the effect was more pronounced in the upper layer of the column. Metabolic quotient and cellulase activity were the most sensitive microbial parameters as their levels were changed 5

  7. Numerical investigation of soil and buried structures using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Shirzad Shahrivar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today the important of studying soil effect on behavior of soil  contacted structures such as foundations, piles,  retaining wall and other similar structures is so much that neglecting of soil-structure interaction effect can cause to untrue results. In this paper soil-structure interaction simulation was done by using Finite element method analysis with ABAQUS version 6.13-14.The results has been presented based on pile function in contact with soil, vertical stresses in soil and structures, pore pressure in drained and undrained condition and underground water level.Final conclusions revealed that pore pressure effect is not uniform on all parts of pile and amount of pore pressure increment in top elements is lower than down elements of  pile.Further it was proven that average amount of vertical stress on end of pile is    of this stress on top of the pile. thus it was concluded that 70% of pile bearing capacity is depend on friction of soil and pile contact surface.

  8. Investigating the Effect of Column Geometry on Separation Efficiency using 3D Printed Liquid Chromatographic Columns Containing Polymer Monolithic Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Beirne, Stephen; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2018-01-16

    Effect of column geometry on the liquid chromatographic separations using 3D printed liquid chromatographic columns with in-column polymerized monoliths has been studied. Three different liquid chromatographic columns were designed and 3D printed in titanium as 2D serpentine, 3D spiral, and 3D serpentine columns, of equal length and i.d. Successful in-column thermal polymerization of mechanically stable poly(BuMA-co-EDMA) monoliths was achieved within each design without any significant structural differences between phases. Van Deemter plots indicated higher efficiencies for the 3D serpentine chromatographic columns with higher aspect ratio turns at higher linear velocities and smaller analysis times as compared to their counterpart columns with lower aspect ratio turns. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of a basic monolithic structure indicated 44%, 90%, 100%, and 118% higher flow through narrow channels in the curved monolithic configuration as compared to the straight monolithic configuration at linear velocities of 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mm s -1 , respectively. Isocratic RPLC separations with the 3D serpentine column resulted in an average 23% and 245% (8 solutes) increase in the number of theoretical plates as compared to the 3D spiral and 2D serpentine columns, respectively. Gradient RPLC separations with the 3D serpentine column resulted in an average 15% and 82% (8 solutes) increase in the peak capacity as compared to the 3D spiral and 2D serpentine columns, respectively. Use of the 3D serpentine column at a higher flow rate, as compared to the 3D spiral column, provided a 58% reduction in the analysis time and 74% increase in the peak capacity for the isocratic separations of the small molecules and the gradient separations of proteins, respectively.

  9. Soil-structure interaction - an engineering evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The two methods of analysis for structure interaction, the impedance and the finite element methods, are reviewed with regard to their present capabilities to address the significant factors of the problem. The objective of the paper is to evaluate if an adequate engineering solution to the problem is provided by either approach. Questions related to the reduction of seismic motions with depth scattering of incident waves, the three-dimensionality of the real problem, soil damping, strain dependency of soil properties and the uncertainties associated with all of the above are discussed in sufficient detail. All conclusions made are based on referenced material. It appears that both methods as presently practised have not yet completely solved the problem, the impedance approach has come closer to addressing the more significant issues. Because of this finding, in addition to its simplicity and low cost, the impedance approach is the perfect engineering method for soil-structure interaction. (Auth.)

  10. Preliminary assessment of laboratory techniques for measurement of volatiles through soils at hazardous waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckenridge, R.P.; Case, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if an inexpensive laboratory screening technique could be developed to detect the presence of hazardous volatile compounds without disturbing the soil over buried waste. A laboratory investigation was designed to evaluate the movement of two volatile organics through packed soil columns. Six soil columns were filled with three different soils. Two volatile organics, trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloroethylene (1, 2 DCE), were placed at the base of the columns as a saturated water solution. Column headspace analysis was performed by purging the top of the columns with nitrogen gas and bubbling this gas through a pentane trap. Samples in the air space were also collected using 25 and 100 microliter gas tight syringes. All samples were analyzed using Electron Capture Detector (ECD) by gas chromatography. Results indicate that the volatile organic compounds can be detected through a five foot column of soil in concentrations down to parts-per-billion (ppb) for both TCE and DCE. Distribution coefficients (Kd) experiments were also conducted to assess breakthrough time and related concentration with soil type

  11. Effects of past copper contamination and soil structure on copper leaching from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, M; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Copper contamination affects biological, chemical, and physical soil properties and associated ecological functions. Changes in soil pore organization as a result of Cu contamination can dramatically affect flow and contaminant transport in polluted soils. This study assessed the influence of soil...... structure on the movement of water and Cu in a long-term polluted soil. Undisturbed soil cores collected along a Cu gradient (from about 20 to about 3800 mg Cu kg−1 soil) were scanned using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Leaching experiments were performed to analyze tracer transport, colloid leaching......, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Cu losses. The 5% arrival time (t0.05) and apparent dispersivity (λapp) for tracer breakthrough were calculated by fitting the experimental data to a nonparametric, double-lognormal probability density function. Soil bulk density, which did not follow the Cu gradient...

  12. Nanoparticles within WWTP sludges have minimal impact on leachate quality and soil microbial community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durenkamp, Mark; Pawlett, Mark; Ritz, Karl; Harris, Jim A.; Neal, Andrew L.; McGrath, Steve P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main pathways by which engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) enter the environment is through land application of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) sewage sludges. WWTP sludges, enriched with Ag and ZnO ENPs or their corresponding soluble metal salts during anaerobic digestion and subsequently mixed with soil (targeting a final concentration of 1400 and 140 mg/kg for Zn and Ag, respectively), were subjected to 6 months of ageing and leaching in lysimeter columns outdoors. Amounts of Zn and Ag leached were very low, accounting for <0.3% and <1.4% of the total Zn and Ag, respectively. No differences in total leaching rates were observed between treatments of Zn or Ag originally input to WWTP as ENP or salt forms. Phospholipid fatty acid profiling indicated a reduction in the fungal component of the soil microbial community upon metal exposure. However, overall, the leachate composition and response of the soil microbial community following addition of sewage sludge enriched either with ENPs or metal salts was very similar. - Highlights: • Adding nanoparticles (NPs) to influent of a WWTP provides a realistic exposure route. • ZnO and Ag NP and metal salt soil/sludges were aged 6 months in outdoor columns. • Amounts of Zn and Ag leached were very low in NP and metal salt treatments. • Both types of metal exposure reduced the fungal component of the soil microbial community. • Responses in NP and metal salt soil/sludges were very similar overall. - The fate and effects of ENPs are studied under realistic conditions: ENPs were added to the influent of a Waste Water Treatment Plant and the resulting sewage sludges mixed with soil in lysimeters.

  13. Soil-structure interaction in nuclear power plants: a comparison of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, L.H.

    1976-06-01

    We performed an extensive parametric survey to analyze the differences between two methods of calculating soil-structure interaction. One method involves discretizing the soil-structure system and solving for the complete response with the LUSH computer code. The other method solves for the lumped mass structural response with Whitman soil springs. Twelve soil-structure interaction problems are solved by each of these methods. Representative results are presented and discussed. The debate within the nuclear industry in the United States over the relative merits of various methods of calculating soil-structure interaction has intensified over the last three years. The debate is largely the result of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's position generally favoring the finite element approach. Certain sectors of the industry claim that this ruling is without technical basis, that it requires unnecessary expense, and that it inhibits the judgment of the analyst. We have addressed each of these points through lumped mass and finite element calculations on a set of twelve soil-structure interaction problems. The results of these calculations indicate some of the consequences of the choice of method

  14. Relative influence of soil chemistry and topography on soil available micronutrients by structural equation modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongfen; Zhao, Ying; Nan, Feng; Duan, Yonghong; Bi, Rutian

    2016-01-01

    Soil chemical and topographic properties are two important factors influencing available micronutrient distribution of soil in the horizontal dimension. The objective of this study was to explore the relative influence of soil chemistry (including soil pH, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium) and topography (including elevation, slope, aspect, and wetness index) on the availability of micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B) using structural equati...

  15. Development of soil-structure interaction analysis method (II) - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Park, H. K. and others

    1994-02-01

    This project includes following six items : free field analysis for the determination of site input motions, impedance analysis which simplifies the effects of soil-structure interaction by using lumped parameters, soil-structure interaction analysis including the material nonlinearity of soil depending on the level of strains, strong geometric nonlinearity due to the uplifting of the base, seismic analysis of underground structure such as varied pipes, seismic analysis of liquid storage tanks. Each item contains following contents respectively : state-of-the-art review on each item and data base construction on the past researches, theoretical review on the technology of soil-structure interaction analysis, proposing preferable technology and estimating the domestic applicability, proposing guidelines for evaluation of safety and analysis scheme

  16. Impact of monovalent cations on soil structure. Part II. Results of two Swiss soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Elham; Emami, Hojat; Keller, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of adding solutions with different potassium and sodium concentrations on dispersible clay, water retention characteristics, air permeability, and soil shrinkage behaviour using two agricultural soils from Switzerland with different clay content but similar organic carbon to clay ratio. Three different solutions (including only Na, only K, and the combination of both) were added to soil samples at three different cation ratio of soil structural stability levels, and the soil samples were incubated for one month. Our findings showed that the amount of readily dispersible clay increased with increasing Na concentrations and with increasing cation ratio of soil structural stability. The treatment with the maximum Na concentration resulted in the highest water retention and in the lowest shrinkage capacity. This was was associated with high amounts of readily dispersible clay. Air permeability generally increased during incubation due to moderate wetting and drying cycles, but the increase was negatively correlated with readily dispersible clay. Readily dispersible clay decreased with increasing K, while readily dispersible clay increased with increasing K in Iranian soil (Part I of our study). This can be attributed to the different clay mineralogy of the studied soils (muscovite in Part I and illite in Part II).

  17. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-02

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation.

  18. Soil-structure interaction analysis of NPP containments: substructure and frequency domain methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio-Filho, F.; Almeida, M.C.F.; Ferreira, W.G.; De Barros, F.C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Substructure and frequency domain methods for soil-structure interaction are addressed in this paper. After a brief description of mathematical models for the soil and of excitation, the equations for dynamic soil-structure interaction are developed for a rigid surface foundation and for an embedded foundation. The equations for the frequency domain analysis of MDOF systems are provided. An example of soil-structure interaction analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties is given and examples of identification of foundation impedance functions and soil properties are presented. (orig.)

  19. Sorption and Transport of Ranitidine in Natural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, A. J.; Vulava, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    -horizon than to A-horizon soils, implying a strong preference for soils higher in clay content. Freundlich model (q = Kf Cn, where Kf and n are fitting parameters) fit the sorption isotherms. Glass chromatography columns packed with soil were used for column experiments. Ranitidine tracer was injected into saturated soil columns and the breakthrough tracer concentrations were plotted as a function of time. The shape of these breakthrough curves indicated that there were two distinct sorption sites on soils - organic matter and clay minerals - which influenced tracer transport. A two-region, nonequilibrium transport code was used to model the breakthrough curves. These experiments indicate that ranitidine sorbs more strongly to clay-rich soils than to organic-rich soils. The presence of amine functional groups in ranitidine's chemical structure results in its acidic behavior in the soil solution. In acidic solutions, the cationic form of ranitidine likely forms ionic bonds with negatively charged clay surfaces. Other components of ranitidine are likely to form covalent bonds with organic matter. The data shows the complex nature of ranitidine in interactions with environmental surfaces.

  20. The influence of surface incorporated lime and gypsiferous by-products on surface and subsurface soil acidity. I. Soil solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Hedley, M.J.; Bolan, N.S.; Horne, D.J. [New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    1999-04-01

    Lime, fluidised bed boiler ash (FBA) and flue gas desulfurisation gypsum (FGDG) were incorporated in the top 50 mm of repacked columns of either an Allophanic (the Patua sand loam) or an Ultic (the Kaawa clay loam) soil, at rates containing calcium equivalent to 5000 kg/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. After leaching with water, the columns were sliced into sections for chemical analysis. In the columns of the variable-charged, allophanic Patua soil, topsoil-incorporated FBA ameliorated top and subsurface soil acidity through liming and the `self liming effect` induced by sulfate sorption, respectively. The soil solution pH of the top and subsurface layers of the Patua soil were raised to pH 6.40 and 5.35, respectively, by the FBA treatment. Consequently , phytotoxic labile monomeric aluminium (Al) concentration in the soil solution of the FBA treatment was reduced to {lt} 0.1 {mu}M Al. FGDG had a similar `self-liming effect` on subsurface of the Patua soil, but not the topsoil. Whereas FBA raised the pH of the Kaawa topsoil, no `self-liming effect` of subsurface soil by sulfate sorption was observed on the Kaawa subsurface soil, which is dominated by permanently charged clay minerals. Application of FBA and FGDG to both soils, however, caused significantly leaching of native soil Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +}.

  1. Soil-structure Interaction in the Seismic Response of Coupled Wall-frame Structures on Pile Foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonari, S.; Dezi, F.; Leoni, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response of coupled wall-frame structures founded on piles. A complete soil-structure interaction analysis is carried out with reference to a case study. Three different soils and seven real accelerograms are considered. Local site response analyses are performed in order to evaluate the incoming free-field motion at different depths and the ground motion amplifications. A numerical model, accounting for the pile-soil-pile interaction and for material and radiation damping, is used to evaluate the impedance matrix and the foundation input motion. The domain decomposition technique is adopted to perform time-domain seismic analyses introducing Lumped Parameter Models to take into account the impedance of the soil-structure system. Applications show that the rocking phenomena affect the behaviour of the structure by changing the base shear distribution within the wall and the frame and by increasing the structural displacements

  2. Effect of Soil Passage and Ozonation on Dissolved Organic Carbon and Microbial Quantification in Wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Elaf A.

    2013-05-01

    Water quality data are presented from a laboratory bench scale soil columns study, to simulate an aquifer recharge system injected with MBR wastewater effluent. This study investigates the effect of soil filtration and ozonation on the dissolved organic carbon and bacterial count in the wastewater. Flow Cytometry was used to quantify microorganisms in water samples. Other analytical tests were conducted as well, such as seven anions, fluorescence spectroscopy (FEEM), ultraviolet absorption (UV 254 nm) and dissolved organic carbon measurement (DOC). Influent in this study was injected into two identical soil columns. One of the columns was injected with treated wastewater combined with ozonation called SC1, The second column was injected with treated wastewater only and called SC2. Passing the wastewater through a deeper depth in the soil column showed a reduction in the DOC concentration. Removal of DOC was 53.7 % in SC1 and 53.8 % in SC2. UV 254 nm results demonstrated that the majority of the UV absorbing compounds were removed after the first 30 cm in the soil columns. FEEM results revealed that soil column treatment only doesn\\'t remove humic-like and fulvic-like substances. However, combining soil column treatment with ozonation was capable of removing humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like substances from the wastewater. Flow Cytometry results showed a bacteria removal of 52.5 %-89.5 % in SC1 which was higher than SC2 removal of 29.1 %-56.5 %.

  3. Field assessment of soil structural quality - a development of the Peerlkamp test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, B C; Batey, T; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2007-01-01

    properties (bulk density, penetration resistance and porosity) and crop growth. Indicative thresholds of soil management are suggested. The assessment should be viewed as complementary to conventional laboratory assessments of soil structure. Visual soil structure assessment can indicate to the soil......Increased awareness of the role of soil structure in defining the physical fertility or quality of soil has led to the need for a simple assessment relevant to the environmental and economic sustainability of soil productivity. A test is required that is usable by farmer, consultant and researcher...... alike. Here an assessment of soil structure quality (Sq) is described which is based on a visual key linked to criteria chosen to be as objective as possible. The influences of operator, tillage and crop type on Sq value were tested. The test takes 5-15 min per location and enough replicates were...

  4. Application of Nonlinear Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis for Identification of Seismic Margins at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Amit H.; Seo, Jungil; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) methods and approaches at nuclear power plants (NPP) were first developed in the 1970s and aspects of them have matured over time as they were applied and incrementally improved. SPRA provides information on risk and risk insights and allows for some accounting for uncertainty and variability. As a result, SPRA is now used as an important basis for risk-informed decision making for both new and operating NPPs in the US and in an increasing number of countries globally. SPRAs are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in some instances the current SPRA approach contains large uncertainties, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). INL has an advanced SPRA research and development (R&D) activity that will identify areas in the calculation process that contain significant uncertainties. One current area of focus is the use of nonlinear soil-structure interaction (NLSSI) analysis methods to accurately capture: 1) nonlinear soil behavior and 2) gapping and sliding between the NPP and soil. The goal of this study is to compare numerical NLSSI analysis results with recorded earthquake ground motions at Fukushima Daichii (Great Tohuku Earthquake) and evaluate the sources of nonlinearity contributing to the observed reduction in peak acceleration. Comparisons are made using recorded data in the free-field (soil column with no structural influence) and recorded data on the NPP basemat (in-structure response). Results presented in this study should identify areas of focus for future R&D activities with the goal of minimizing uncertainty in SPRA calculations. This is not a validation activity since there are too many sources of uncertainty that a numerical analysis would need

  5. Assessment of soil-structure interaction effects based on simple modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Soil-structure interaction effects are investigated using a simple mathematical model which employs three degrees-of-freedom. The foundation is approximated by a homogeneous, isotropic, elastic half-space. Harmonic functions and a recorded earthquake are used to represent the free-field input motion. Variations of the response characteristics due to structural and interaction parameters are demonstrated. Response spectra are presented that display the magnitude of the maximum structural response for a range of fixed-base structural frequencies, interaction frequencies and damping. Conclusions are obtained regarding the behavior of the response of the soil-structure system. The findings reported herein can be used for the interpretation of the results of soil-structure interaction analyses of nuclear plant structures that are performed with available computer codes

  6. Kinetic modeling of antimony(III) oxidation and sorption in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongbing; Mi, Yuting; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-05

    Kinetic batch and saturated column experiments were performed to study the oxidation, adsorption and transport of Sb(III) in two soils with contrasting properties. Kinetic and column experiment results clearly demonstrated the extensive oxidation of Sb(III) in soils, and this can in return influence the adsorption and transport of Sb. Both sorption capacity and kinetic oxidation rate were much higher in calcareous Huanjiang soil than in acid red Yingtan soil. The results indicate that soil serve as a catalyst in promoting oxidation of Sb(III) even under anaerobic conditions. A PHREEQC model with kinetic formulations was developed to simulate the oxidation, sorption and transport of Sb(III) in soils. The model successfully described Sb(III) oxidation and sorption data in kinetic batch experiment. It was less successful in simulating the reactive transport of Sb(III) in soil columns. Additional processes such as colloid facilitated transport need to be quantified and considered in the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Visual assessment of soil structure quality in an agroextractivist system in Southeastern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernanda Simões da Silva, Laura; Stuchi Boschi, Raquel; Ortega Gomes, Matheus; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Soil structure is considered a key factor in the functioning of soil, affecting its ability to support plant and animal life, and moderate environmental quality. Numerous methods are available to evaluate soil structure based on physical, chemical and biological indicators. Among the physical indicators, the attributes most commonly used are soil bulk density, porosity, soil resistance to penetration, tensile strength of aggregates, soil water infiltration, and available water. However, these methods are expensive and generally time costly for sampling and laboratorial procedures. Recently, evaluations using qualitative and semi-quantitative indicators of soil structure quality have gained importance. Among these methods, the method known as Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007; Guimarães et al., 2011) can supply this necessity in temperate and tropical regions. The study area is located in the Piranheira Praialta Agroextrativist Settlement Project in the county of Nova Ipixuna, Pará, Brazil. Two toposequences were chosen, one under native forest and the other under pasture. Pits were opened in different landscape positions (upslope, midslope and downslope) for soil morphological, micromorphological and physical characterization. The use of the soil visual evaluation method (SVE) consisted in collecting an undisturbed soil sample of approximately 25 cm in length, 20 cm in width and 10 cm in depth. 12 soil samples were taken for each land use. The samples were manually fragmented, respecting the fracture planes between the aggregates. The SVE was done comparing the fragmented sample with a visual chart and scores were given to the soil structure. The categories that define the soil structure quality (Qe) vary from 1 to 5. Lower scores mean better soil structure. The final score calculation was done using the classification key of Ball et al. (2007) adapted by Guimarães (2011). A change in soil structure was observed between forest and

  8. Laser surface wakefield in a plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, L.M.; Mora, P.; Ramazashvili, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the wakefield in a plasma column, produced by a short intense laser pulse, propagating through a gas affected by tunneling ionization is investigated. It is shown that besides the usual plasma waves in the bulk part of the plasma column [see Andreev et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 3999 (2002)], the laser pulse also generates electromagnetic surface waves propagating along the column boundary. The length of the surface wake wave substantially exceeds the length of the plasma wake wave and its electromagnetic field extends far outside the plasma column

  9. Influence of moisture content on radon diffusion in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Ramola, R.C.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Radon diffusion from soil has been studied as a function of the moisture content of the soil. A few simple experiments showed that up to a certain moisture content the radon diffusion increased with increasing moisture. A sharp rise in radon concentration occurred as the moisture was increased from the completely dry state to 13% water by weight. The radon flux was measured for columns of dry, moist and water saturated soil. The highest flux came from the column filled with moist soil. Water saturated soil gave the lowest flux because of the much lower diffusion coefficient of radon through water. (author)

  10. Effects of flexibility and soil-structure interaction on a completely buried structure with a heavily loaded roof system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.C.; Maryak, M.E.; Mulliken, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A completely buried structure with a heavily loaded roof system has been analyzed for seismic forces. The seismic input was a site-specific spectrum shape anchored at 0.2g zero period acceleration in the horizontal directions, and the vertical input was prescribed at two thirds of the horizontal input. Models of the structure were developed to account for the flexibility of the base mat, walls, and roof, and were analyzed for the above seismic input with uncertainties in the soil properties considered. The results indicate that horizontal rigid body soil-structure interaction effects are negligible and the seismic amplifications are dominated by the soil-structure system natural frequencies. In addition, the analysis shows that the flexibility of the structure and soil-structure interaction cause considerable amplification of the vertical structural response of the facility's roof system. Finally it was shown that the computer program SASSI can be used to predict the soil-structure interaction responses of a completely buried structure

  11. Studies on Pounding Response Considering Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction under Seismic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pounding phenomena considering structure–soil–structure interaction (SSSI under seismic loads are investigated in this paper. Based on a practical engineering project, this work presents a three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation method using ANSYS software. According to Chinese design code, the models of adjacent shear wall structures on Shanghai soft soil with the rigid foundation, box foundation and pile foundation are built respectively. In the simulation, the Davidenkov model of the soil skeleton curve is assumed for soil behavior, and the contact elements with Kelvin model are adopted to simulate pounding phenomena between adjacent structures. Finally, the dynamic responses of adjacent structures considering the pounding and SSSI effects are analyzed. The results show that pounding phenomena may occur, indicating that the seismic separation requirement for adjacent buildings of Chinese design code may not be enough to avoid pounding effect. Pounding and SSSI effects worsen the adjacent buildings’ conditions because their acceleration and shear responses are amplified after pounding considering SSSI. These results are significant for studying the effect of pounding and SSSI phenomena on seismic responses of structures and national sustainable development, especially in earthquake prevention and disaster reduction.

  12. The Vertical Structure of Urban Soils and Their Convergence Across Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The theoretical patterns for vertical soil structure (e.g., A-B-C ordering of horizons) are a basis for research methods and our understanding of ecosystem structure and function in general. A general understanding of how urban soils differ from non-urban soils vertically is need...

  13. Seismic soil structure interaction: analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    A method for non-linear dynamic effective stress analysis is introduced which is applicable to soil-structure interaction problems. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors are included which must be considered when computing dynamic soil response. An experimental investigation was conducted using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models in order to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically-induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results show clearly the pronounced effect that increasing pore water pressures have on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress non-linear analysis. Based on preliminary results, it appears that the pore water pressure effects can be predicted

  14. Seismic soil-structure interaction: Analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for nonlinear dynamic effective stress analysis applicable to soil-structure interaction problems is introduced. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors that must be considered when computing dynamic soil response are included. An experimental investigation using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models was conducted to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. The centrifuge tests were conducted in the Geotechnical Centrifuge at Cambridge University, England. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results clearly show the pronounced effect of increasing pore water pressures on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress nonlinear analysis. On the basis of preliminary results, it appears that the effects of pore water pressure can be predicted. (orig.)

  15. Substructure method of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H. G.; Joe, Y. H. [Industrial Development Research Center, Univ. of Incheon, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    Substructure method has been preferably adopted for soil-structure interaction analysis because of its simplicity and economy in practical application. However, substructure method has some limitation in application and does not always give reliable results especially for embedded structures or layered soil conditions. The objective of this study to validate the reliability of the soil-structure interaction analysis results by the proposed substructure method using lumped-parameter model and suggest a method of seismic design of nuclear power plant structures with specific design conditions. In this study, theoretic background and modeling technique of soil-structure interaction phenomenon have been reviewed and an analysis technique based on substructure method using lumped-parameter model has been suggested. The practicality and reliability of the proposed method have been validated through the application of the method to the seismic analysis of the large-scale seismic test models. A technical guide for practical application and evaluation of the proposed method have been also provided through the various type parametric.

  16. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007–2014 of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8, near-neutral (pH 6.8 or alkaline (pH 8.4 Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (% of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%, Actinobacteria (19.7%, Chloroflexi (15.3% and Acidobacteria (12.6%; the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%, Planctomycetes (4.8%, Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%, Firmicutes (3.4%, Cyanobacteria (2.1%, Nitrospirae (1.8%, and candidate division TM7 (1

  17. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuting; Shen, Hong; He, Xinhua; Thomas, Ben W; Lupwayi, Newton Z; Hao, Xiying; Thomas, Matthew C; Shi, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007-2014) of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8), near-neutral (pH 6.8) or alkaline (pH 8.4) Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (%) of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%), Actinobacteria (19.7%), Chloroflexi (15.3%) and Acidobacteria (12.6%); the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%), Planctomycetes (4.8%), Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%), Firmicutes (3.4%), Cyanobacteria (2.1%), Nitrospirae (1.8%), and candidate division TM7 (1

  18. Full scale heavily reinforced concrete beam-column joints of NPP structures-quality assurance and construction in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thandavamoorthy, T.S.; Vimalanandam, V.; Anandavalli, N.; Reddy, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    Under the current design philosophy, reactor structures are to be designed to withstand large inelastic deformation caused by strong and severe ground motion. The design of the main structural elements and their connections are to be such that they always fail in ductile mode. This will ensure large energy absorption capacity of the structures under seismic excitation and avoid sudden and brittle failure of the structure. Over the years, a number of experimental investigations have been carried out on RC beam- column joints to study their behaviour and strength. However, these studies mostly pertain to small scale joints of moment resisting frame of residential buildings and commercial complexes. Information on full scale joints existing in NPP structures are scanty. Therefore, experimental programme was planned in the laboratory to construct identical large sized joints with the same reinforcement percentage and detail as that of the existing joints in NPP structures built in 1960's. The cross-sectional dimensions of the beam and column of the joint were 610 mm x 915 mm. The beam was reinforced with 24 numbers of 36 mm bars. Column was reinforced with 4 numbers of 36 mm diameter bars and various other sizes. M25 grade concrete was used for casting of the specimen. The mix proportion was 1:1.657:2.63. The slump achieved was 75 mm to 100 mm. The health of the specimen was monitored by conducting ultrasonic testing with TICO instrument. The paper presents details of the size of the specimen and reinforcement, testing of steel bars for the evaluation of their mechanical properties, procedure of casting of specimen and its health monitoring. (author)

  19. On the structural factors of soil humic matter related to soil water repellence in fire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, G.; González-Vila, F. J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; Knicker, H.; De la Rosa, J. M.; Dettweiler, C.; Hernández, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In order to elucidate the impact of forest fires on physical and chemical properties of the soils as well as on the chemical composition of the soil organic matter, samples from two Mediterranean soils with contrasted characteristics and vegetation (O horizon, Lithic Leptosols under Quercus ilex and Pinus pinaster) and one agricultural soil (Ap horizon, Luvisol) were heated at 350 °C in laboratory conditions for three successive steps up to 600 s. The C- and N-depletion in the course of the heating showed small changes up to an oxidation time of 300 s. On the other side, and after 600 s, considerable C-losses (between 21% in the Luvisol and 50% in the Leptosols) were observed. The relatively low N-depletion ca. 4% (Luvisol) and 21% (Leptosol under pine) suggested preferential loss of C and the subsequent relative enrichment of nitrogen. Paralleling the progressive depletion of organic matter, the Leptosols showed a significant increase of both pH and electrical conductivity. The former change paralleled the rapid loss of carboxyl groups, whereas the latter point to the relative enrichment of ash with a bearing on the concentration of inorganic ions, which could be considered a positive effect for the post-fire vegetation. The quantitative and qualitative analyses by solid-state 13C NMR spectra of the humic fractions in the samples subjected to successive heating times indicate significant concentration of aromatic structures newly-formed in the course of the dehydration and cyclization of carbohydrates (accumulation of black carbon-type polycyclic aromatic structures), and probably lipids and peptides. The early decarboxylation, in addition to the depletion of O-alkyl hydrophilic constituents and further accumulation of secondary aromatic structures resulted in the dramatic increase in the soil water drop penetration time. It was confirmed that this enhancement of the soil hydrophobicity is not related to an increased concentration of soil free lipid, but is

  20. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  1. Soil-structure interaction analysis by finite element methods - state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, H.B.; Lysmer, J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of soil-structure interaction effects during earthquakes for nuclear power plant structures are usually made by one of two methods-either by means of an idealized complete interaction analysis involving consideration of a compatible variation of motion in the structure and the adjacent soil, or by means of an inertial interaction analysis in which the motions in the adjacent soil are assumed to be the same at all points above the foundation depth. For embedded structures, consideration of the variation of motions with depth is essential if adequate evaluations of soil and structural response are to be obtained without undue conservatism. The finite element analysis procedure is particularly well suited for evaluating the response of embedded structures since it can readily provide consideration of the variation of soil characteristics with depth, the different non-linear deformation and energy absorbing capacities of the various soil strata, the variation of motions with depth in accordance with the general principles of engineering mechanics, the three-dimensional nature of the problem and the effects of adjacent structures on each other. (Auth.)

  2. Soil-structure interaction analysis by finite element methods state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, H.B.; Lysmer, J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of soil-structure interaction effects during earthquakes for nuclear power plant structures are usually made by one of two methods - either by means of an idealized complete interaction analysis involving consideration of a compatible variation of motions in the structure and the adjacent soil, or by means of an inertial interaction analysis in which the motions in the adjacent soil are assumed to be the same at all points above the foundation depth. For surface structures, the distribution of free-field motions with depth in the underlying soils has no influence on the structural response and thus, provided the analyses are made in accordance with good practice, good results may be obtained by either method of approach. For embedded structures, however, consideration of the variation of motions with depth is essential if adequate evaluations of soil and structural response are to be obtained without undue conservatism. The finite element analysis procedure is particularly well suited for evaluating the response of embedded structures since it can readily provide consideration of the variation of soil characteristics with depth, the different non-linear deformation and energy absorbing capacities of the various soil strata, the variation of motions with depth in accordance with the general principles of engineering mechanics, the three-dimensional nature of the problem and the effects of adjacent structures on each other

  3. Earthquake response analysis of embedded reactor building considering soil-structure separation and nonlinearity of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1987-01-01

    In the earthquake response analysis for a rigid and massive structure as a nuclear reactor building, it is important to estimate the effect of soil-structure interaction (SSI) appropriately. In case of strong earthquakes, the nonlinearity, such as the wall-ground separation, the base mat uplift of sliding, makes the behavior of the soil-structure system complex. But, if the nuclear reactor building is embedded in a relatively soft ground with surface layer, the wall-ground separation plays the most important role in the response of soil-structure system. Because, it is expected that the base uplift and slide would be less significant due to the effect of the embedment, and the wall-ground friction is usually neglected in design. But, the nonlinearity of ground may have some effect on the wall-ground separation and the response of the structure. These problems have been studied by use of FEM. Others used joint elements between the ground and the structure which does not resist tensile force. Others studied the effect of wall-ground separation with non-tension springs. But the relationship between the ground condition and the effect of the separation has not been clarified yet. To clarify the effect the analyses by FE model and lumped mass model (sway-rocking model) are performed and compared. The key parameter is the ground profile, namely the stiffness of the side soil

  4. Leaching of Added Selenium in Soils Low in Native Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Hamdy, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A soil column experiment was performed to evaluate the influence of organic matter and lime on the leaching and distribution of added selenite. 75Se-labeled Na2SeO3 was added to water-saturated soil columns with a diameter of 4.25 cm and a length of 16-20 cm. Leaching started immediately, one l...... water being added per column during the course of 1 wk. Most of the selenite did not move through the soil, and only a few per cent were found in the leaching water. Leaching was greatest in sandy soil. It was increased by the addition of lime, but decreased by addition of organic matter. Most...... of the leaching took place within the 1st few days. In other experiments, selenite fixation in soils took several days to reach equilibrium. Leaching of the selenite added to mineral soils under Danish field conditions was insignificant in the short time-cycle of Se in the environment....

  5. Migration characteristics of cobalt-60 through sandy soil in high pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Migration characteristics of 60 Co through sandy soil in high pH solution has been investigated by both column and batch techniques. The association of 60 Co with the sandy soil and its components were studied by sequential extraction techniques. The concentration profile of 60 Co in the sandy soil column was composed of two exponential curves showing that 60 Co would consist of immobile and mobile fractions. The immobile 60 Co was retained by the sandy soil and was distributed near the top. Though the mobile 60 Co was little sorbed by soil and migrated through the soil column, maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents decreased slightly with increasing path length of the soil column. The sequential extraction of 60 Co from the sandy soil and from its components showed that 60 Co was sorbed by both manganese oxide and clay minerals. And manganese oxide is one of the responsible soil components for the observed decrease in the maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents. Although the content of manganese oxide in the sandy soil was 0.13%, manganese oxide is the important component to prevent from the migration of 60 Co in the high pH solution. (author)

  6. Slow reaction of soil structure to conservation agriculture practices in Veneto silty soils (North-Easter Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Ilaria; Camarotto, Carlo; Lazzaro, Barbara; Furlan, Lorenzo; Morari, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Soil structure plays a pivotal role in soil functioning and can inform of the degradation of the soil ecosystem. Intensive and repeated tillage operations have been known to negatively affect the soil structure characteristics while conservation agriculture (CA) practices were demonstrated to improve soil structure and related ecosystem services. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of conservation agriculture practices on total porosity, pore size distribution, pore architecture and morphology on silty soils of Veneto low-lying plain (North-Eastern Italy). Experimental design was established in 2010 on 4 farms in North-Eastern Italy to compare conventional intensive tillage system "IT" versus conservation agriculture "CA" (no-tillage, cover-crop and residue retention). 96 samples were collected in 2015 at four depths down to 50 cm depth, and investigated for porosity from micro to macro by coupling mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) (0.0074-100 µm) and x-ray computed microtomography (µCT) (>26 µm). Pore morphology and architecture were studied from 3D images analysis and MIP pore size curve. Ultramicroporosity class (0.1-5 μm) positively responded to CA after 5-yr of practices adoption while no significant effects were observed in the x-ray µCT domain (> 26 µm). Silty soils of Veneto plain showed a slow reaction to conservation agriculture because of the low soil organic carbon content and poor aggregate stability. Nevertheless the positive influence of CA on ultramicroporosity, which is strictly linked to soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization, indicated that a virtuous cycle was initiated between SOC and porosity, hopefully leading to well-developed macropore systems and, in turn, enhanced soil functions and ecosystem services.

  7. Adsorption behavior of endosulfan on alluvial soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.; Sherazi, S.T.H.; Nizamani, S.M.; Bhanger, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the behavior of endosulfan pesticide in alluvial soil under laboratory conditions. Sandy loam soil was studied to evaluate the fate of applied endosulfan with respect to soil properties. Known amount of endosulfan was added on alluvial soil in PVC column and eluted with 1000 ml of water. Eluents were collected in 10 parts, each of 100 ml. The soil in the column was divided in to three equal parts, each of 10 cm. Each part of the soil and eluents were analyzed for the determination of Endosulfan level using GC- mu ECD and GC-MS techniques. The kinetic and equilibrium adsorption characteristics of endosulfan on sandy loam soil was also studied and found that it follows Ho's pseudo second order and Freundlich isotherm. The present study revealed that a-and beta-Endosulfan was determined efficiently with their degraded products in alluvial soil under laboratory conditions with above mentioned instruments. (author)

  8. Three Dimensional Response Spectrum Soil Structure Modeling Versus Conceptual Understanding To Illustrate Seismic Response Of Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touqan, Abdul Razzaq

    2008-01-01

    Present methods of analysis and mathematical modeling contain so many assumptions that separate them from reality and thus represent a defect in design which makes it difficult to analyze reasons of failure. Three dimensional (3D) modeling is so superior to 1D or 2D modeling, static analysis deviates from the true nature of earthquake load which is ''a dynamic punch'', and conflicting assumptions exist between structural engineers (who assume flexible structures on rigid block foundations) and geotechnical engineers (who assume flexible foundations supporting rigid structures). Thus a 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction is a step that removes many of the assumptions and thus clears reality to a greater extent. However such a model cannot be analytically analyzed. We need to anatomize and analogize it. The paper will represent a conceptual (analogical) 1D model for soil structure interaction and clarifies it by comparing its outcome with 3D dynamic soil-structure finite element analysis of two structures. The aim is to focus on how to calculate the period of the structure and to investigate effect of variation of stiffness on soil-structure interaction

  9. The general packed column : an analytical solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, J.L.W.

    2000-01-01

    The transient behaviour of a packed column is considered. The column, uniformly packed on a macroscopic scale, is multi-structured on the microscopic level: the solid phase consists of particles, which may differ in incidence, shape or size, and other relevant physical properties. Transport in the

  10. Continuum soil modeling in the static analysis of buried structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.; Marlow, R.S.; Moore, C.J.; Day, J.P.; Dyrness, A.D.

    1993-10-01

    Soil loading traditionally has been modeled as a hydrostatic pressure, a practice acceptable for many design applications. In the analyses of buried structure with predictive goals, soil compliance and load redistribution in the presence of soil plasticity are important factors to consider in determining the appropriate response of the structure. In the analysis of existing buried waste-storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, three soil-tank interaction modeling considerations are addressed. First, the soil interacts with the tank as the tank expands and contracts during thermal cycles associated with changes in the heat generated by the waste material as a result of additions and subtractions of the waste. Second, the soil transfers loads from the surface to the tank and provides support by resisting radial displacement of the tank haunch. Third, conventional finite-element mesh development causes artificial stress concentrations in the soil associated with differential settlement

  11. Microbial Life in a Winogradsky Column: From Lab Course to Diverse Research Experience ?

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, Samantha T.

    2015-01-01

    Many traditional lab courses include both standard and inquiry-based experiments, yet lack cooperative and authentic lab experiences.  Such experiences are important for microbiology students and burgeoning researchers.  In a novel lab environment, students constructed Winogradsky columns using common soil and water sources.  During initial column incubation, students learned methods for identification of microbial isolates including staining, microscopy, biochemistry and 16S-rRNA sequencing....

  12. Gravity Effects on the Free Vibration of a Graphite Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dong-Ok; Kim, Jong-Bum; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The gravity effects on the free vibration of a graphite column are studied. Graphite block is a key component of a HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor). The major core elements, such as the fuel blocks and neutron reflector blocks, of HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor, Japan) and GT-MHR (Gas Turbine- Modular Helium Reactor, USA) consist of stacked hexagonal graphite blocks forming a group of columns. The vibration of the columns induced by earthquakes may lead to solid impacts between graphite blocks and structural integrity problems. The study of free vibration characteristics of the graphite block column is the first step in the core internal structure dynamic analysis. Gravity force bring a negative stiffness term to the transverse vibration analysis of heavy long column structures, and results in natural frequency reductions. Generally it is not considered in the not so tall structure cases, because the gravity term makes the analysis and design complicated. Therefore it is important to check whether the gravity effect is severe or not

  13. Analysing Structure Dynamics in Arable Soils using X-ray Micro-Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, S.; Weller, U.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Structure is a dynamic property of soil. It interacts with many biotic and abiotic features and controls various soil functions. We analyzed soil structure within different plots of the ''Static Fertilisation Experiment'' at the agricultural research station in Bad Lauchstaedt (Germany) using X-ray micro tomography. The aim was to investigate in how far different levels of organic carbon, increased microbial activity and enhanced plant growth affects structural properties of an arable soil. Since 106 years one plot has experienced a constant application of farmyard manure and fertilisers, whereas the other has never been fertilised in this period. Intact soil cores from the chernozem soil at the two plots were taken from a depth of 5 to 15 cm (Ap-horizon) and 35 to 45 cm (Ah-horizon) to analyse structural changes with depth and in two different seasons (spring and summer) to investigate structure dynamics. The pore structure was analysed by quantifying the mean geometrical and topological characteristics of the pore network as a function of pore size. This was done by a combination of Minkowski functionals and morphological size distibution. For small structural features close to the image resolution the results clearly depend on the applied filtering technique and segmentation thresholds. Therefore the application of different image enhancement techniques is discussed. Furthermore, a new method for an automated determination of grey value thesholds for the segmentation of CT-images into pore space and solid is developed and evaluated. We highlight the relevance of image resolution for structure analysis. Results of the structure analysis reveal that the spring samples of the ploughed layer (Ap-horizon) from the fertilised plot have significantly higher macroporosities (P connectivity of the pore network is better in the fertilised plot and the pore size distribution was found to be different, too. The differences in porosity and pore connectivity increase from

  14. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which...

  15. Analytical study on model tests of soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, M.; Suzuki, S.; Akino, K.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are stiff, heavy and partly-embedded, the behavior of those structures during an earthquake depends on the vibrational characteristics of not only the structure but also the soil. Accordingly, seismic response analyses considering the effects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) are extremely important for seismic design of NPP structures. Many studies have been conducted on analytical techniques concerning SSI and various analytical models and approaches have been proposed. Based on the studies, SSI analytical codes (computer programs) for NPP structures have been improved at JINS (Japan Institute of Nuclear Safety), one of the departments of NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center) in Japan. These codes are soil-spring lumped-mass code (SANLUM), finite element code (SANSSI), thin layered element code (SANSOL). In proceeding with the improvement of the analytical codes, in-situ large-scale forced vibration SSI tests were performed using models simulating light water reactor buildings, and simulation analyses were performed to verify the codes. This paper presents an analytical study to demonstrate the usefulness of the codes

  16. Multi-functional smart aggregate-based structural health monitoring of circular reinforced concrete columns subjected to seismic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Haichang; Song, Gangbing; Moslehy, Yashar; Mo, Y L; Sanders, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a recently developed multi-functional piezoceramic-based device, named the smart aggregate, is used for the health monitoring of concrete columns subjected to shake table excitations. Two circular reinforced concrete columns instrumented with smart aggregates were fabricated and tested with a recorded seismic excitation at the structural laboratory at the University of Nevada—Reno. In the tests, the smart aggregates were used to perform multiple monitoring functions that included dynamic seismic response detection, structural health monitoring and white noise response detection. In the proposed health monitoring approach, a damage index was developed on the basis of the comparison of the transfer function with the baseline function obtained in the healthy state. A sensor-history damage index matrix is developed to monitor the damage evolution process. Experimental results showed that the acceleration level can be evaluated from the amplitude of the dynamic seismic response; the damage statuses at different locations were evaluated using a damage index matrix; the first modal frequency obtained from the white noise response decreased with increase of the damage severity. The proposed multi-functional smart aggregates have great potential for use in the structural health monitoring of large-scale concrete structures

  17. Forest canopy structural controls over throughfall affect soil microbial community structure in an epiphyte-laden maritime oak stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, J. T., II; Rosier, C. L.; Schrom, J. O.; Wu, T.; Reichard, J. S.; Kan, J.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying spatiotemporal influences on soil microbial community (SMC) structure is critical to understanding of patterns in nutrient cycling and related ecological services. Since forest canopy structure alters the spatiotemporal patterning of precipitation water and solute supplies to soils (via the "throughfall" mechanism), is it possible changes in SMC structure variability could arise from modifications in canopy elements? Our study investigates this question by monitoring throughfall water and dissolved ion supply to soils beneath a continuum of canopy structure: from a large gap (0% cover) to heavy Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) canopy (>90% cover). Throughfall water supply diminished with increasing canopy cover, yet increased washoff/leaching of Na+, Cl-, PO43-, and SO42- from the canopy to the soils (p < 0.01). Presence of T. usneoides diminished throughfall NO3-, but enhanced NH4+, concentrations supplied to subcanopy soils. The mineral soil horizon (0-10 cm) from canopy gaps, bare canopy, and T. usneoides-laden canopy significantly differed (p < 0.05) in soil chemistry parameters (pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, CEC). PCR-DGGE banding patterns beneath similar canopy covers (experiencing similar throughfall dynamics) also produced high similarities per ANalyses Of SIMilarity (ANO-SIM), and clustered together when analyzed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS). Correlation analysis of DGGE banding patterns, throughfall dynamics, and soil chemistry yielded significant correlations (p < 0.05) between fungal communities and soil chemical properties significantly differing between canopy cover types (pH: r2 = 0.50; H+ %-base saturation: r2 = 0.48; Ca2+ %-base saturation: r2 = 0.43). Bacterial community structure correlated with throughfall NO3-, NH4+, and Ca2+ concentrations (r2 = 0.37, p = 0.16). These results suggest that modifications of forest canopy structures are capable of affecting mineral-soil horizon SMC structure via the throughfall mechanism when

  18. Influence of ground water on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The basic problem consists of a liner flexible structure situated at or near the surface of a soil half-space. In keeping with typical small strain seismic analyses, the soil skeleton is represented as a linear medium in which all potential nonlinearities are at most lumped together into an equivalent hysteretic damping modulus. In addition, the ground water level is located at some depth relatively close to the structure, and in a position to impact on the seismic response of the facility. In order to estimate the response of this oil-water system, the two-phased medium formulation of Biot was used to treat the response of the solids and water as two separate linear media, coupled together through soil permeability and volume effects. (orig./HP)

  19. Seismic evaluation of a cooling water reservoir facility including fluid-structure and soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analyses and structural evaluations were performed for a cooling water reservoir of a nuclear reactor facility. The horizontal input seismic motion was the NRC Reg. guide 1.60 spectrum shape anchored at 0.20g zero period acceleration. Vertical input was taken as two-thirds of the horizontal input. Soil structure interaction and hydrodynamic effects were addressed in the seismic analyses. Uncertainties in the soil properties were accounted for by considering three soil profiles. Two 2-dimensional SSI models and a 3-dimensional static model. Representing different areas of the reservoir structures were developed and analyzed to obtain seismic forces and moments, and accelerations at various locations. The results included in this paper indicated that both hydrodynamic and soil-structure interaction effects are significant contributors to the seismic responses of the water-retaining walls of the reservoir

  20. Lateral force resisting mechanisms in slab-column connections: An analytical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Drakatos, Iaonnis; Beyer, Katrin; Muttoni, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    In many countries reinforced concrete (RC) flat slabs supported on columns is one of the most commonly used structural systems for office and industrial buildings. To increase the lateral stiffness and strength of the structure, RC walls are typically added and carry the largest portion of the horizontal loads generated during earthquakes. While the slab-column system is typically not relevant with regard to the lateral stiffness and strength of the structure, each slab-column connection has ...

  1. Performance of Elaeis Guineensis Leaves Compost in Filter Media for Stormwater Treament Through Column Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaijudin, H.; Ghani, A. A.; Zakaria, N. A.; Tze, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    Compost based materials arv e widely used in filter media for improving soil capability and plant growth. The aim of this paper is to evaluate different types of compost materials used in engineered soil media through soil column investigation. Three (3) column, namely C1 (control), C2 and C3 had different types compost (10%) which were, commercial compost namely PEATGRO, Compost A and Compost B were prepared with 60% medium sand and 30% of topsoil. The diluted stormwater runoff was flushed to the columns and it was run for six (6) hour experiment. The influent and effluent samples were collected and tested for Water Quality Index (WQI) parameters. The results deduced that C3 with Elaeis Guineensis leaves compost (Compost B) achieved 90.45 (Class II) better than control condition which accomplished 84 (Class II) based on WQI Classification. C3 with Compost A (African Mahogany Leaves Compost) obtained only 59.39 (Class III). C3 with the composition of Compost B effectively removed most pollutants, including Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N), were reduced by 89±4% and 96.6±0.9%, respectively. The result concluded that Elaeis Guineensis leaves compost is recommended to be used as part of engineered soil media due to its capabilities in eliminating stormwater pollutants.

  2. Tillage-induced changes to soil structure and organic carbon fractions in New Zealand soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, T. G.; Saggar, S.; Ross, C. W.; Dando, J. L.; Newman, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of increasing cropping and soil compaction on aggregate stability and dry-sieved aggregate-size distribution, and their relationship to total organic C (TOC) and the major functional groups of soil organic carbon, were investigated on 5 soils of contrasting mineralogy. All soils except the allophanic soil showed a significant decline in aggregate stability under medium- to long-term cropping. Mica-rich, fine-textured mineral and humic soils showed the greatest increase in the mean weight diameter (MWD) of dry aggregates, while the oxide-rich soils, and particularly the allophanic soils, showed only a slight increase in the MWD after long-term cropping. On conversion back to pasture, the aggregate stability of the mica-rich soils increased and the MWD of the aggregate-size distribution decreased, with the humic soil showing the greatest recovery. Aggregate stability and dry aggregate-size distribution patterns show that soil resistance to structural degradation and soil resilience increased from fine-textured to coarse-textured to humic mica-rich soils to oxide-rich soils to allophanic soils. Coarse- and fine-textured mica-rich and oxide-rich soils under pasture contained medium amounts of TOC, hot-water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), and acid hydrolysable carbohydrate (AHC), all of which declined significantly under cropping. The rate of decline varied with soil type in the initial years of cropping, but was similar under medium- and long-term cropping. TOC was high in the humic mica-rich and allophanic soils, and levels did not decline appreciably under medium- and long-term cropping. 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance evidence also indicates that all major functional groups of soil organic carbon declined under cropping, with O-alkyl C and alkyl C showing the fastest and slowest rate of decline, respectively. On conversion back to pasture, both WSC and AHC returned to levels originally present under long-term pasture. TOC recovered to original pasture

  3. Coupling of impedance functions to nuclear reactor building for soil-structure interaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, R.; Delinic, K.; Trbojevic, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    Finite element model of a nuclear reactor building is coupled to complex soil impedance functions and soil-structure-interaction analysis is carried out in frequency domain. In the second type of analysis applied in this paper, soil impedance functions are used to evaluate equivalent soil springs and dashpots of soil. These are coupled to the structure model in order to carry out the time marching analysis. Three types of soil profiles are considered: hard, medium and soft. Results of two analyzes are compared on the same structural model. Equivalent soil springs and dashpots are determined using new method based on the least square approximation. (author)

  4. Structural properties of dissolved organic carbon in deep soil horizons of an arable and temporarily grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaud, A.; Chabbi, A.; Croue, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the bio-available fraction of the largest amount of soil organic matter (SOM), even if it does represent only a very small proportion. Because most of the studies on DOC dynamics were mainly restricted to forest soils, studies on the factors governing the dynamics of DOC in deep soil horizons (>1 m) in arable system are still very little limited. The objective of this work is to better define the proportion of DOC in deep soil horizons and indicate their main characteristics and structural properties. The study was conducted on the long term observatory for environmental research- biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity Lusignan site). DOC collected using lysimeters plates inserted to a depth of 105 cm was fractionated into 3 fractions using the two column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The HPO (hydrophobic) fraction (i.e. humic substances) isolated from the XAD-8 resin, the TPH (Transphilic) fraction from the XAD-4 resin and the HPI (hydrophilic) fraction which corresponds to the DOC that does not adsorbed onto the two resins under the acid condition used (pH 2). DOM adsorbed onto the resins is recovered with a 75%/25% acetonitrile/water mixture and lyophilized. Depend on the amount of material; the chemical composition of DOC was performed using UV254 nm, fluorescence EEM, NMR and HPSEC/UV/COD. The results show that the concentration and structural properties of DOC in deep soil horizon were similar to those of groundwater (low SUVA (1.2 m-1.L.mg C-1), structures composed mainly of low molecular weight). Because of the relatively recent establishment of the treatment, the monitoring of the dynamics of the DOC concentrations did not show significant differences between arable and grassland. However, the temporal dynamic shows a slight increase in the DOC content regardless of the of land use. DOC concentrations between winter and the middle of spring tend to double going from 1 to 2.5 mg / L and then

  5. Seismic analysis of the frame structure reformed by cutting off column and jacking based on stiffness ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. K.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-11-01

    The cutting off column and jacking technology is a method for increasing story height, which has been widely used and paid much attention in engineering. The stiffness will be changed after the process of cutting off column and jacking, which directly affects the overall seismic performance. It is usually necessary to take seismic strengthening measures to enhance the stiffness. A five story frame structure jacking project in Jinan High-tech Zone was taken as an example, and three finite element models were established which contains the frame model before lifting, after lifting and after strengthening. Based on the stiffness, the dynamic time-history analysis was carried out to research its seismic performance under the EL-Centro seismic wave, the Taft seismic wave and the Tianjin artificial seismic wave. The research can provide some guidance for the design and construction of the entire jack lifting structure.

  6. Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability evaluation of reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1986-01-01

    The probability-based method for the seismic reliability assessment of nuclear structures, which has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is extended to include the effects of soil-structure interaction. A reinforced concrete containment building is analyzed in order to examine soil-structure interaction effects on: (1) structural fragilities; (2) floor response spectra statistics; and (3) correlation coefficients for total acceleration responses at specified structural locations

  7. Migration through soil of organic solutes in an oil-shale process water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Stuber, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The migration through soil of organic solutes in an oil-shale process water (retort water) was studied by using soil columns and analyzing leachates for various organic constituents. Retort water extracted significant quantities of organic anions leached from ammonium-saturated-soil organic matter, and a distilled-water rinse, which followed retort-water leaching, released additional organic acids from the soil. After being corrected for organic constitutents extracted from soil by retort water, dissolved-organic-carbon fractionation analyses of effluent fractions showed that the order of increasing affinity of six organic compound classes for the soil was as follows: hydrophilic neutrals nearly equal to hydrophilic acids, followed by the sequence of hydrophobic acids, hydrophilic bases, hydrophobic bases, and hydrophobic neutrals. Liquid-chromatographic analysis of the aromatic amines in the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-base fractions showed that the relative order of the rates of migration through the soil column was the same as the order of migration on a reversed-phase, octadecylsilica liquid-chromatographic column.

  8. An innovative bio-engineering retaining structure for supporting unstable soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Bella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new prefabricated bio-engineering structure for the support of unstable soil. This prefabricated structure is made of a steel frame which is completely filled with soil and a face made of tree trunks among which scions or autochthonous bushes are planted. Due to the difficulties in interpreting the complex interaction between soil and structure during the installation and lifetime, an in situ test was carried out in order to evaluate the state of stress in the steel frame and to understand the global behavior of the structure under service loads. On the basis of the obtained results, a procedure for checking the structure safety was proposed and discussed. An easy design method was developed during the research. Moreover, the use of this type of prefabricated structure shows several advantages, such as good performances in terms of stabilizing effects, and easy assembly and transport.

  9. Evaluating the effect of tillage on soil structural properties using the pedostructure concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pedostructure (PS) concept is a physically-based method of soil characterization that defines a soil based on its structure and the relationship between structure and soil water behavior. There are fifteen unique pedostructure parameters that define the macropore and micropore soil water behavio...

  10. Effects of heavy metals and soil physicochemical properties on wetland soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang; Nie, Shuang; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Haipeng; Hua, Shanshan; Liu, Jiayu; Yuan, Yujie; Xiao, Haibing; Deng, Linjing; Xiang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals (HMs) contamination is a serious environmental issue in wetland soil. Understanding the micro ecological characteristic of HMs polluted wetland soil has become a public concern. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of HMs and soil physicochemical properties on soil microorganisms and prioritize some parameters that contributed significantly to soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure. Bacterial community structure was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Relationships between soil environment and microorganisms were analyzed by correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). The result indicated relationship between SMB and HMs was weaker than SMB and physicochemical properties. The RDA showed all eight parameters explained 74.9% of the variation in the bacterial DGGE profiles. 43.4% (contain the variation shared by Cr, Cd, Pb and Cu) of the variation for bacteria was explained by the four kinds of HMs, demonstrating HMs contamination had a significant influence on the changes of bacterial community structure. Cr solely explained 19.4% (pstructure, and Cd explained 17.5% (pstructure changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Soil-gas phase transport and structure parameters for soils under different management regimes and at two moisture levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of diffusive and convective gas transport parameters can be used to describe soil functional architecture and reveal key factors for soil structure development. Undisturbed 100-cm(3) soil samples were sampled at the Long-term Research on Agricultural Systems experiment located...... displayed markedly lower D-P/D-0 values at similar air-filled porosity, illustrating soil structure effects on D-P/D-0. The Currie tortuosity-connectivity parameter, X=Log(D-P/D-0)/Log(epsilon), decreased with increasing bulk density in the intact samples at both moisture conditions, suggesting less...

  12. Numerical Simulation for the Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction under Seismic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Luan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piles are widely used as reinforcement structures in geotechnical engineering designs. If the settlement of the soil is greater than the pile, the pile is pulled down by the soil, and negative friction force is produced. Previous studies have mainly focused on the interaction of pile-soil under static condition. However, many pile projects are located in earthquake-prone areas, which indicate the importance of determining the response of the pile-soil structure under seismic load. In this paper, the nonlinear, explicit, and finite difference program FLAC3D, which considers the mechanical behavior of soil-pile interaction, is used to establish an underconsolidated soil-pile mode. The response processes of the pile side friction force, the pile axial force, and the soil response under seismic load are also analyzed.

  13. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Q p model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Q p model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm(3)/cm(3) better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm(3)/cm(3) better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  14. Evaporation From Soil Containers With Irregular Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Narkis, Kfir

    2017-11-01

    Evaporation from bare soils under laboratory conditions is generally studied using containers of regular shapes where the vertical edges are parallel to the flow lines in the drying domain. The main objective of this study was to investigate the impact of irregular container shapes, for which the flow lines either converge or diverge toward the surface. Evaporation from initially saturated sand and sandy loam soils packed in cones and inverted cones was compared to evaporation from corresponding cylindrical columns. The initial evaporation rate was higher in the cones, and close to potential evaporation. At the end of the experiment, the cumulative evaporation depth in the sand cone was equal to that in the column but higher than in the inverted cone, while in the sandy loam, the order was cone > column > inverted cone. By comparison to the column, stage 1 evaporation was longer in the cones, and practically similar in the inverted cones. Stage 2 evaporation rate decreased with the increase of the evaporating surface area. These results were more pronounced in the sandy loam. For the sand column, the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 evaporation occurred when the depth of the saturation front was approximately equal to the characteristic length of the soil. However, for the cone and the inverted cone, it occurred for a shallower depth of the saturation front. It seems therefore that the concept of the characteristic length derived from the soil hydraulic properties is related to drying systems of regular shapes.

  15. Simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium by on-line column enrichment and HPLC with 2,4-dihydroxybenzylidenethiorhodanine as pre-column derivatization reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xuechang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium ions as metal-DHBTR chelates was developed. The palladium, platinum and rhodium ions were pre-column derivatized with 2,4-dihydroxybenzylidenethiorhodanine (DHBTR to form colored chelates. The Pd-DHBTR, Pt-DHBTR and Rh-DHBTR chelates can be absorbed onto the front of the enrichment column when they were injected into the injector and sent to the enrichment column with a 0.05 mol L-1 sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer solution (pH 3.5 as mobile phase. After the enrichment had finished, by switching the six ports switching valve, the retained chelates were back-flushed by mobile phase and traveling towards the analytical column. These chelates separation on the analytical column was satisfactory with 62% (v/v acetonitrile (containing 0.05 mol L-1 of pH 3.5 sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer salt and 0.1% (m/v of tritonX-100 as mobile phase. The Limits of detection of palladium, platinum and rhodium are 3.6 ng L-1, 3.2 ng L-1 and 4.5 ng L-1, respectively. This method was applied to the determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in water, urine and soil samples with good results.

  16. Calcium Stabilized And Geogrid Reinforced Soil Structures In Seismic Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimoldi, Pietro; Intra, Edoardo

    2008-01-01

    In many areas of Italy, and particularly in high seismic areas, there is no or very little availability of granular soils: hence embankments and retaining structures are often built using the locally available fine soil. For improving the geotechnical characteristics of such soils and/or for building steep faced structures, there are three possible techniques: calcium stabilization, geogrid reinforcement, and the combination of both ones, that is calcium stabilized and reinforced soil. The present paper aims to evaluate these three techniques in terms of performance, design and construction, by carrying out FEM modeling and stability analyses of the same reference embankments, made up of soil improved with each one of the three techniques, both in static and dynamic conditions. Finally two case histories are illustrated, showing the practical application of the above outlined techniques

  17. Soil structure restoration by wet/dry cycles assessed by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Some studies have shown that soil structures can be restored through the sequence of wetting and drying cycles. These cycles causes changes in the soil pore system, which is very important to agriculture, because directly affect plant growth by root penetration, retention and movement of water and gases. The aim of this study was to follow by gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) the effect of soil wetting/drying process on the soil structure repairing of samples collected in cylinders. A first-generation tomograph with an {sup 241}Am source and a 7.62 x 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube was employed. Image analysis and tomographic unit profiles show that CT can provide an insight to sample structure restoration, which helps to have a better comprehension of soil physical hydraulic phenomena. (author)

  18. Soil structure restoration by wet/dry cycles assessed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, L.F.

    2005-01-01

    Some studies have shown that soil structures can be restored through the sequence of wetting and drying cycles. These cycles causes changes in the soil pore system, which is very important to agriculture, because directly affect plant growth by root penetration, retention and movement of water and gases. The aim of this study was to follow by gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) the effect of soil wetting/drying process on the soil structure repairing of samples collected in cylinders. A first-generation tomograph with an 241 Am source and a 7.62 x 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube was employed. Image analysis and tomographic unit profiles show that CT can provide an insight to sample structure restoration, which helps to have a better comprehension of soil physical hydraulic phenomena. (author)

  19. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; Sánchez-Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez-Vázquez, Arturo; Caplan, Joshua S.; Danjon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots). The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14 ± 5% (mean ± standard deviation). Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil. PMID:23844412

  20. Jatropha curcas L. root structure and growth in diverse soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; Sánchez-Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez-Vázquez, Arturo; Caplan, Joshua S; Danjon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots). The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14 ± 5% (mean ± standard deviation). Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  1. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  2. Terrestrial exposure of oilfield flowline additives diminish soil structural stability and remediative microbial function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, S.J.; Sherbone, J.; Hinz, C.; Tibbett, M.

    2011-01-01

    Onshore oil production pipelines are major installations in the petroleum industry, stretching many thousands of kilometres worldwide which also contain flowline additives. The current study focuses on the effect of the flowline additives on soil physico-chemical and biological properties and quantified the impact using resilience and resistance indices. Our findings are the first to highlight deleterious effect of flowline additives by altering some fundamental soil properties, including a complete loss of structural integrity of the impacted soil and a reduced capacity to degrade hydrocarbons mainly due to: (i) phosphonate salts (in scale inhibitor) prevented accumulation of scale in pipelines but also disrupted soil physical structure; (ii) glutaraldehyde (in biocides) which repressed microbial activity in the pipeline and reduced hydrocarbon degradation in soil upon environmental exposure; (iii) the combinatory effects of these two chemicals synergistically caused severe soil structural collapse and disruption of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. - Highlights: → Effects of flowline additives on soil structure and microbial function highlighted. → Phosphonate salts (in scale inhibitor) were found to disrupt soil physical structure. → Glutaraldehyde (in biocides) caused significant reduction of hydrocarbon degradation in soil. → Flowline additive chemicals synergistically affects soil structure and remediative microbial function. - Scale inhibitor and biocide oilfield flowline additives interactively affect soil physical and microbial properties

  3. Structure of Fungal Communities in Sub-Irrigated Agricultural Soil from Cerrado Floodplains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elainy Cristina A. M. Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the influence of soybean cultivation on the fungal community structure in a tropical floodplain area. Soil samples were collected from two different soybean cropland sites and a control area under native vegetation. The soil samples were collected at a depth of 0–10 cm soil during the off-season in July 2013. The genetic structure of the soil fungal microbial community was analyzed using the automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA technique. Among the 26 phylotypes with abundance levels higher than 1% detected in the control area, five were also detected in the area cultivated for five years, and none of them was shared between the control area and the area cultivated for eight years. Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM revealed differences in fungal community structure between the control area and the soybean cropland sites, and also between the soybean cropland sites. ANOSIM results were confirmed by multivariate statistics, which additionally revealed a nutrient-dependent relation for the fungal community structure in agricultural soil managed for eight consecutive years. The results indicated that land use affects soil chemical properties and richness and structure of the soil fungal microbial community in a tropical floodplain agricultural area, and the effects became more evident to the extent that soil was cultivated for soybean for more time.

  4. Soil contamination of toxic metals from zinc carbon batteries inadequate disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazano, Vanessa Santos Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the concentration of Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, and Ni in an oxisol column contaminated with zinc-carbon batteries. Two control and two contaminated columns, and batteries alone were leached for a periods of six months and one year with aqueous solution of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:1, pH 4,0) to simulate rainwater. The metal concentrations in effluent and soil were measured by means of ICP-OES technique. Results from the contaminated column showed enhanced concentrations in both effluent and soil (mainly zinc, manganese and lead). In addition, the total amount of metals in effluent and soil showed similar sequence order as observed for batteries alone (Zn > Mn > Pb > Cr > Cu > Ni > Cd) indicating that batteries can be considered the main source of contamination. We also observed migration of Zn and Mn from the top to the lower layers of the soil columns. The study gives further evidence that batteries can significantly contaminate the soil with metals like Zn, Mn and Pb, and maybe Cd too. This soil contamination combined with the enhanced concentrations found in the effluent can point out a probable groundwater contamination. (author)

  5. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  6. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found. Control...

  7. Stability analysis of roadway embankments supported by stone columns with the presence of water table under short-term and long-term conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadhim Shaymaa Tareq

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of stone column technique to improve soft foundation soils under roadway embankments has proven to increase the bearing capacity and reduce the potential settlement. The potential contribution of stone columns to the stability of roadway embankments against general (i.e. deep-seated failure needs to be thoroughly investigated. Therefore, a two-dimensional finite difference model implemented by FLAC/SLOPE 7.0 software, was employed in this study to assess the stability of a roadway embankment fill built on a soft soil deposit improved by stone column technique. The stability factor of safety was obtained numerically under both short-term and long-term conditions with the presence of water table. Two methods were adopted to convert the three-dimensional model into plane strain condition: column wall and equivalent improved ground methods. The effect of various parameters was studied to evaluate their influence on the factor of safety against embankment instability. For instance, the column diameter, columns’ spacing, soft soil properties for short-term and long-term conditions, and the height and friction angle of the embankment fill. The results of this study are developed in several design charts.

  8. Heavy metal displacement in chelate-irrigated soil during phytoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, F.; Liphadzi, M. S.; Kirkham, M. B.

    2003-03-01

    Heavy metals in wastewater sewage sludge (biosolids), applied to land, contaminate soils. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to clean up toxic heavy metals, might remove them. Chelating agents are added to soil to solubilize the metals for enhanced phytoextraction. Yet no studies follow the displacement and leaching of heavy metals in soil with and without roots following solubilization with chelates. The objective of this work was to determine the mobility of heavy metals in biosolids applied to the surface of soil columns (76 cm long; 17 cm diam.) with or without plants (barley; Hordeum vulgare L.). Three weeks after barley was planted, all columns were irrigated with the disodium salt of the chelating agent, EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) (0.5 g/kg soil). Drainage water, soil, and plants were analyzed for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Total concentrations of the heavy metals in all columns at the end of the experiment generally were lower in the top 30 cm of soil with EDTA than without EDTA. The chelate increased concentrations of heavy metals in shoots. With or without plants, the EDTA mobilized Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which leached to drainage water. Drainage water from columns without EDTA had concentrations of these heavy metals below detection limits. Only Cu did not leach in the presence of EDTA. Even though roots retarded the movement of Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn through the EDTA-treated soil from 1 d (Cd) to 5 d (Fe), the drainage water from columns with EDTA had concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb that exceeded drinking water standards by 1.3, 500, 620, and 8.6 times, respectively. Because the chelate rendered Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn mobile, it is suggested that the theory for leaching of soluble salts, put forward by Nielsen and associates in 1965, could be applied to control movement of the heavy metals for maximum uptake during chelate-assisted phytoremediation.

  9. Strengthing of Beams and Columns using GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C. B.; Tade, M. K.; Thakare, S. B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays infrastructure development is raising its pace. Many reinforced high concrete and masonry buildings are constructed annually around the globe. There are large numbers of structures which deteriorate or become unsafe to use because of changes in use, changes in loading condition, change in the design configuration, inferior building material used or natural calamities. Thus repairing and retrofitting of these structures for safe usage of has a great market. There are several situations in which a civil structure would require strengthening due to lack of strength, stiffness, ductility and durability. Beams, columns may be strengthened in flexure by using GFRP in tension zone. In this present work comparative study will be made with and without GFRP circular bars in a beam and column. An experiment study will be carried out to study the change in the structural behavior of beams & columns with GFRP circular bars of different thickness, varying span to depth ratio.

  10. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of

  11. Engineering characterization of ground motion. Task II: Soil structure interaction effects on structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luco, J E; Wong, H L [Structural and Earthquake Engineering Consultants, Inc., Sierra Madre, CA (United States); Chang, C -Y; Power, M S; Idriss, I M [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1986-08-01

    This report presents the results of part of a two-task study on the engineering characterization of earthquake ground motion for nuclear power plant design. The overall objective of this research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is to develop recommendations for methods for selecting design response spectra or acceleration time histories to be used to characterize motion at the foundation level of nuclear power plants. Task I of the study, which is presented in Vol. 1 of NUREG/CR-3805, developed a basis for selecting design response spectra taking into account the characteristics of free-field ground motion found to be significant in causing structural damage. Task II incorporates additional considerations of effects of spatial variations of ground motions and soil-structure interaction on foundation motions and structural response. The results of Task II are presented in Vols. 2 through of NUREG/CR-3805 as follows: Vol. 2 effects of ground motion characteristics on structural response considering localized structural nonlinearities and soil-structure interaction effects; Vol. 3 observational data on spatial variations of earthquake ground motions; Vol. 4 soil-structure interaction effects on structural response; and Vol. 5, summary based on Tasks I and II studies. This report presents the results of the Vol. 4 studies.

  12. Reliability assessment of slender concrete columns at the stability failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valašík, Adrián; Benko, Vladimír; Strauss, Alfred; Täubling, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The European Standard for designing concrete columns within the use of non-linear methods shows deficiencies in terms of global reliability, in case that the concrete columns fail by the loss of stability. The buckling failure is a brittle failure which occurs without warning and the probability of its formation depends on the columns slenderness. Experiments with slender concrete columns were carried out in cooperation with STRABAG Bratislava LTD in Central Laboratory of Faculty of Civil Engineering SUT in Bratislava. The following article aims to compare the global reliability of slender concrete columns with slenderness of 90 and higher. The columns were designed according to methods offered by EN 1992-1-1 [1]. The mentioned experiments were used as basis for deterministic nonlinear modelling of the columns and subsequent the probabilistic evaluation of structural response variability. Final results may be utilized as thresholds for loading of produced structural elements and they aim to present probabilistic design as less conservative compared to classic partial safety factor based design and alternative ECOV method.

  13. Using dye tracer for visualizing roots impact on soil structure and soil porous system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodešová, R.; Němeček, K.; Žigová, Anna; Nikodem, A.; Fér, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 11 (2015), s. 1439-1443 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0434 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : field sections * macro-scale * micro-scale, * micromorphological images * plant * ponding dye infiltration * roots * soil structure Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 0.719, year: 2015

  14. The parameters controlling the strength of soil-steel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhordari, M. A.; Abdel-Sayed, G.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper examines the ultimate load carrying capacity of soil-steel structures taking into consideration the sequence of the developments of plastic hinges, their location, and their sustained plastic moment. Non-linear analysis has been conducted using a micro-computer program in which a structural model is applied with the soil replaced by normal and tangential springs acting at the nodal points of a polygon representing the conduit wall. A comparative study has been conducted for the parameters which affect the load carrying capacity of soil-steel structure, leading to the following conclusions: (1) the load carrying capacity of the composite structure is significantly affected by the shear stiffness (or friction) of the surrounding soil; (2) the conduit span may be used when calculating the buckling load rather than the local radius of the conduit wall; (3) circular arches with sector angle of less than 180 d eg have higher load carrying capacity than equivalent re-entrant arches, i.e. arches with sector angle of more than 180 d eg; (4) the buckling load of the conduit is slightly affected by the rigidity of the lower zone of the conduit wall; (5) eccentric application of the load has practically little effect on its load carrying capacity

  15. Influence of ground water on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Lung, R.H.; Graves, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The study of structural response to seismic inputs has been extensively studied and, particularly with the advent of the growth of digital computer capability, has lead to the development of numerical methods of analysis which are used as standard tools for the design of structures. One aspect of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) process which has not been developed to the same degree of sophistication is the impact of ground water (or pure water) on the response of the soil-structure system. There are very good reasons for his state of affairs, however, not the least of which is the difficulty of incorporating the true constitutive behavior of saturated soils into the analysis. At the large strain end of the spectrum, the engineer is concerned with the potential development of failure conditions under the structure, and is typically interested in the onset of liquefaction conditions. The current state of the art in this area is to a great extent based on empirical methods of analysis which were developed from investigations of limited failure data from specific sites around the world. Since it is known that analytic solutions are available for only the simplest of configurations, a numerical finite element solution process was developed. Again, in keeping with typical SSI analyses, in order to make the finite element approach yield resonable results, a comparable transmitting boundary formulation was included in the development. The purpose of the transmitting boundary is, of course, to allow for the treatment of extended soil/water half-space problems. For the calculations presented herein, a simple one dimensional transmitting boundary model was developed and utilized

  16. Mobility and leachability of zinc in two soils treated with six organic zinc complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J M; Novillo, J; Obrador, A; López-Valdivia, L M

    2001-08-01

    A study of soil columns was conducted to evaluate Zn movement potential in two reconstructed soil profiles. Zn-phenolate, Zn-EDDHA, Zn-EDTA, Zn-lignosulfonate, Zn-polyflavonoid, and Zn-heptagluconate were applied in the upper zone of the column. The different physicochemical properties of the two soils and the micronutrient source may influence Zn leaching, the distribution of Zn among soil fractions, and the Zn available to the plant in the depth of the layers. In Aquic Haploxeralf soil, the application of six fertilizers produced little migration and very small leaching of Zn in the soil profiles. In Calcic Haploxeralf soil, Zn-EDTA migrated and was distributed throughout the soil columns. This Zn chelate produces a loss of Zn by leaching, which was 36% of the added Zn. In the latter soil, Zn leached very little with the other five fertilizer treatments. The same as for these organic Zn complexes, the retention of added Zn indicated the potential of metal accumulation in the A(p) horizons of the two soil profiles. A large portion of applied Zn was available to plants [diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Mehlich-3 extractable Zn] in the depths reached by the different commercial formulations. The relationship between the two methods was highly significant (Mehlich-3-Zn = 1.25 + 1.13 DTPA-Zn, R(2) = 99.19%). When Zn was added as Zn-EDTA, the amounts of the most labile fractions (water-soluble plus exchangeable and organically complexed Zn) increased throughout the entire profile column in comparison with the control columns, although in the B(t) horizon of the Aquic Haploxeralf soil they increased only slightly.

  17. Predictive geochemical modeling of uranium and other contaminants in laboratory columns in relatively oxidizing, carbonate-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmire, P.; Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate heap leaching of uranium-contaminated soils and sediments represents a viable, cost-effective remediation technology. Column experiments have been conducted using 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 M Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 solutions for leaching uranium from soils located adjacent to an incinerator at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Results from column experiments and geochemical modeling are used to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of heap leaching. Leach efficiencies of up to 72 wt.% of total uranium in CaO-agglomerated soil result from dissolution of uranium (U(VI)-dominated) minerals, formation of the soluble complex UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- , and uranium desorption from clay minerals, ferric hydroxides, and humic acids. Parameters that control the extent of uranium extraction include pH, Eh, temperature, carbonate concentration, lixiviant-flow rate, pore-solution chemistry, solid phases, and soil texture

  18. NON-LINEAR ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL JOINT OF COLUMN AND BEAMS OF ARMED CONCRETE-STEEL COLUMN FOR FRAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson López

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the nonlinear behavior of a real-scale experimental joint (node is studied, consisting of three reinforced concrete elements, one column and two beams joined to a structural steel column at the upper level. In the numerical analysis the model of the union was analyzed in the inelastic range, this model was elaborated with the finite element program based on fibers, SeismoStruct to analyze as a function of time, the traction and compression efforts in the confined area and not confined area of the concrete column and in the longitudinal reinforcement steel, as well as verification of the design of the base plate that joins the two columns. The results showed that tensile stresses in the unconfined zone surpassed the concrete breaking point, with cracking occurring just below the lower edge of the beams; in the confined area the traction efforts were much lower, with cracks occurring later than in the non-confined area. The concrete column-steel column joint behaved as a rigid node, so the elastic design was consistent with the calculation methodology of base plates for steel columns.

  19. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report

  20. Do diatoms percolate through soil and can they be used for tracing the origin of runoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, Lenka; Cammeraat, Erik; Pfister, Laurent; Wetzel, Carlos; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Tracers are widely used to study the movement of water in a catchment. Because of depletion of scientific possibilities with most common tracer types, we proposed the use of diatoms as a natural tracer. Paradoxical results on the contribution of surface runoff to the storm hydrograph were obtained in pioneer research on this idea. Diatom transport via the subsurface flow to the stream would explain this paradox. Prerequisite for this is vertical transport of diatoms through soils, which is the topic of this study. Emphasis is on percolation behavior (speed of percolation, speed of percolation over time, and species distribution) of Pseudostaurosira sp. and Melosira sp. (Bacillariophyceae) through undisturbed soil columns of contrasting substrates. Co-objective is to study the flowpaths of water through the soil columns. Natural undisturbed soil columns were sampled in the Attert basin (Luxembourg) on schist, marl and sandstone substrates. Rain simulation experiments were performed to study vertical diatom transport. Rhodamine dye experiments were carried out to gain insight in the active flowpaths of water, and breakthrough experiments were performed to study the responses of the soil columns to applied water. Diatoms were transported through the soil columns of the three substrates. A vast majority of diatom percolation took place within the first 15 minutes, percolation hereafter was marginal but nevertheless present. Peaks in diatom percolation corresponded with a high flux caused by the addition of the diatom culture, but seepage of diatoms along the sides is unlikely according to the species distribution and the rhodamine dye experiment. Pseudostaurosira sp. percolated significantly better than Melosira sp. Significantly more diatoms percolated through the marl columns compared to the schist columns and variance within the sandstone group was very high. Absolute differences between substrates however, were marginal. Most preferential flowpaths were observed in

  1. Embedment Effect test on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasuda, Toshiaki; Akino, Kinji; Izumi, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A project consisting of laboratory test and field test has been conducted to clarify the embedment effect on soil-structure interaction. The objective of this project is to obtain the data for improving and preparing seismic analysis codes regarding the behavior of embedded reactor buildings during earthquakes. This project was planned to study the effect of soil-structure interaction using small size soil-structure models as well as the large scale models. The project was started in April, 1986, and is scheduled to end in March, 1994. The laboratory test models and field test models, and the measurement with accelerometers and others are described. As the interim results, the natural frequency and damping factor increased, and the amplitude decreased by the embedment of the test models. Some earthquakes were recorded in a soft rock site. The epicenters of the earthquakes occurred in 1989 are shown. The field tests were carried out in three sites. Two sites were used for the dynamic test with four test models having 8 m x 8 m plane size and 10 m height. One site was used for the static test with one concrete block as a specimen. Two models represent BWR type reactor buildings, and two models represent PWR type buildings. (K.I.)

  2. Immobilization of Lead from Pb-Contaminated Soil Amended with Peat Moss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ji Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of lead (Pb using soil amendments can reduce Pb toxicity and bioavailability in soil. This study evaluated Pb immobilization in a Pb-contaminated soil by using peat moss through various tests. The Pb-contaminated soil (2000 mg Pb·kg−1 was amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss to immobilize Pb in the soil. The immobilization properties of Pb in the contaminated soil were evaluated by a column leaching experiment, a microcosm test, and a batch incubation test. Peat moss significantly reduced the Pb leaching in all of the experiments and more effectively reduced mobility and toxicity of Pb in the column leaching and microcosm tests than bioavailability in the batch incubation test. The immobilized lead from the soils amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss was 37.9%, 87.1%, and 95.4% from the column leaching test, 18.5%, 90.9%, and 96.4% from the microcosm test, and 2.0%, 36.9%, and 57.9% from the NH4NO3 extraction method, respectively, indicating that peat moss can be effectively used for the remediation of Pb-contaminated soil.

  3. Earthquake response analyses of soil-structure system considering kinematic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Yokono, K.; Miura, S.; Ishii, K.

    1985-01-01

    Improvement of soil-structure interaction analysis has been one of major concerns in earthquake engineering field, especially in nuclear industries, to evaluate the safety of structure accurately under earthquake events. This research aims to develop a rational analytical tool which considers effect of the 'kinematic interaction' satisfactory with a proposed simple low-pass filter. In this paper, first the effect of the kinematic interaction is investigated based on earthquake response analysis of a reactor building using the practical design models: the spring-mass-dashpot system and the 'lattice model', in which a building and soil medium are modeled by a system of lumped masses. Next, the filter is developed based on parametrical studies with various sizes of depth and width of foundations embedded in two-layers soil, which represents more general soil condition in practical designs compared with a homogeneous soil medium. (orig.)

  4. Opportunities and future directions for visual soil evaluation methods in soil structure research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes, R.M.L.; Lamandé, Mathieu; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    to provide spatial information for soil process models, e.g. compaction models. VSE could be combined with sensing techniques at the field or landscape scale for better management of fields in the context of precision farming. Further work should be done to integrate plant vigour, roots and soil fauna......As the use of visual soil evaluation (VSE) methods has spread globally, they have been exposed to different climatic and pedological scenarios, resulting in the need to elucidate limitations, encourage refinements and open up new avenues of research. The main objective of this paper is to outline...... the potential of VSE methods to develop novel soil structure research and how this potential could be developed and integrated within existing research. We provide a brief overview of VSE methods in order to summarize the soil information that is obtained by VSE. More detailed VSE methods could be developed...

  5. Soil-structure interaction Vol.3. Influence of ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantino, C J

    1986-04-01

    This study has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The study was conducted during the fiscal year 1965 on the program entitled 'Benchmarking of Structural Engineering Problems' sponsored by NRC. The program considered three separate but complementary problems, each associated with the soil-structure interaction (551) phase of the seismic response analysis of nuclear plant facilities. The reports, all entitled Soil-Structure Interaction, are presented in three separate volumes, namely: Vol. 1 Influence of Layering by AJ Philippacopoulos, Vol. 2 Influence of Lift-Off by C.A. Miller, Vol. 3 Influence of Ground Water by C.J. Costantino. The two problems presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were conducted at the City University of New York (CUNY) under subcontract to BNL. This report, Volume 3 of the report, presents a summary of the first year's effort on the subject of the influence of foundation ground water on the SSI phenomenon. A finite element computer program was developed for the two-phased formulation of the combined soil-water problem. This formulation is based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion for both the solid and fluid phases of a typical soil. Frequency dependent interaction coefficients were generated for the two-dimensional plane problem of a rigid surface footing moving against a saturated linear soil. The results indicate that interaction coefficients are significantly modified as compared to the comparable values for a dry soil, particularly for the rocking mode of response. Calculations were made to study the impact of the modified interaction coefficients on the response of a typical nuclear reactor building. The amplification factors for a stick model placed atop a dry and saturated soil were computed. It was found that pore water caused the rocking response to decrease and translational response to increase over the frequency range of interest, as

  6. Generation of Earthquake Ground Motion Considering Local Site Effects and Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of Ancient Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Kwan; Lee, J. S.; Yang, T. S.; Cho, J. R.; R, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    In order to establish a correct correlation between them, mechanical characteristics of the ancient structures need to be investigated. Since sedimentary basins are preferred dwelling sites in ancient times, it is necessary to perform SSI analysis to derive correct correlation between the damage and ground motion intensity. Contents of Project are as follows: (1) Generation of stochastic earthquake ground motion considering source mechanism and site effects. (2) Analysis of seismic response of sedimentary basin. (3) Soil-structure interaction analysis of ancient structures (4) Investigation of dynamic response characteristics of ancient structure considering soil-structure interaction effects. A procedure is presented for generation of stochastic earthquake ground motion considering source mechanism and site effects. The simulation method proposed by Boore is used to generate the outcropping rock motion. The free field motion at the soil site is obtained by a convolution analysis. And for the study of wood structures, a nonlinear SDOF model is developed. The effects of soil-structure interaction on the behavior of the wood structures are found to be very minor. But the response can be significantly affected due to the intensity and frequency contents of the input motion. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 31 figs. (author)

  7. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  8. Effects of non-structural components and soil-structure interaction on the seismic response of framed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Iacovino, Chiara; Nigro, Antonella; Carlo Ponzo, Felice

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, several nonlinear numerical models of reinforced concrete framed structures have been defined in order to evaluate the effects of non-structural elements and soil-structure interaction on the elastic dynamic behaviour of buildings. In the last few years, many and various studies have highlighted the significant effects derived from the interaction between structural and non-structural components on the main dynamic characteristics of a building. Usually, structural and non-structural elements act together, adding both masses and stiffness. The presence of infill panels is generally neglected in the design process of structural elements, although these elements can significantly increase the lateral stiffness of a structure leading to a modification in the dynamic properties. Particularly, at the Damage Limit State (where an elastic behaviour is expected), soil-structure interaction effects and non-structural elements may further affect the elastic natural period of buildings, changing the spectral accelerations compared with those provided by seismic codes in case of static analyses. In this work, a parametric study has been performed in order to evaluate the elastic fundamental period of vibration of buildings as a function of structural morphology (height, plan area, ratio between plan dimensions), infills presence and distribution and soil characteristics. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring'' and by the "Centre of Integrated Geomorphology for the Mediterranean Area - CGIAM" within the Framework Agreement with the University of Basilicata "Study, Research and Experimentation in the Field of Analysis and Monitoring of Seismic Vulnerability of Strategic and Relevant Buildings for the purposes of Civil Protection and Development of Innovative Strategies of Seismic Reinforcement".

  9. Community structure and soil pH determine chemoautotrophic carbon dioxide fixation in drained paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi-En; Yao, Huaiying; Wang, Juan; Huang, Ying; Singh, Brajesh K; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-06-16

    Previous studies suggested that microbial photosynthesis plays a potential role in paddy fields, but little is known about chemoautotrophic carbon fixers in drained paddy soils. We conducted a microcosm study using soil samples from five paddy fields to determine the environmental factors and quantify key functional microbial taxa involved in chemoautotrophic carbon fixation. We used stable isotope probing in combination with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and molecular approaches. The amount of microbial (13)CO2 fixation was determined by quantification of (13)C-enriched fatty acid methyl esters and ranged from 21.28 to 72.48 ng of (13)C (g of dry soil)(-1), and the corresponding ratio (labeled PLFA-C:total PLFA-C) ranged from 0.06 to 0.49%. The amount of incorporationof (13)CO2 into PLFAs significantly increased with soil pH except at pH 7.8. PLFA and high-throughput sequencing results indicated a dominant role of Gram-negative bacteria or proteobacteria in (13)CO2 fixation. Correlation analysis indicated a significant association between microbial community structure and carbon fixation. We provide direct evidence of chemoautotrophic C fixation in soils with statistical evidence of microbial community structure regulation of inorganic carbon fixation in the paddy soil ecosystem.

  10. A Theory of How Columns in the Neocortex Enable Learning the Structure of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Hawkins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical regions are organized into columns and layers. Connections between layers run mostly perpendicular to the surface suggesting a columnar functional organization. Some layers have long-range excitatory lateral connections suggesting interactions between columns. Similar patterns of connectivity exist in all regions but their exact role remain a mystery. In this paper, we propose a network model composed of columns and layers that performs robust object learning and recognition. Each column integrates its changing input over time to learn complete predictive models of observed objects. Excitatory lateral connections across columns allow the network to more rapidly infer objects based on the partial knowledge of adjacent columns. Because columns integrate input over time and space, the network learns models of complex objects that extend well beyond the receptive field of individual cells. Our network model introduces a new feature to cortical columns. We propose that a representation of location relative to the object being sensed is calculated within the sub-granular layers of each column. The location signal is provided as an input to the network, where it is combined with sensory data. Our model contains two layers and one or more columns. Simulations show that using Hebbian-like learning rules small single-column networks can learn to recognize hundreds of objects, with each object containing tens of features. Multi-column networks recognize objects with significantly fewer movements of the sensory receptors. Given the ubiquity of columnar and laminar connectivity patterns throughout the neocortex, we propose that columns and regions have more powerful recognition and modeling capabilities than previously assumed.

  11. Soil-Framed Structure Interaction Analysis - A New Interface Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dalili Shoaei

    Full Text Available AbstractInterfacial behavior between soil and shallow foundation has been found so influential to combined soil-footing performance and redistribution of forces in the superstructure. This study introduces a new thin-layer interface element formulated within the context of finite element method to idealize interfacial behavior of soil-framed structure interaction with new combination of degrees of freedom at top and bottom sides of the interface element, compatible with both isoparametric beam and quadrilateral element. This research also tends to conduct a parametric study on respective parameters of the new joint element. Presence of interface element showed considerable changes in the performance of the framed structure under quasi-static loading.

  12. Freeze-Thaw Cycles and Soil Biogeochemistry: Implications for Greenhouse Gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Milojevic, T.; Oh, D. H.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2016-12-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles represent a major natural climate forcing acting on soils at middle and high latitudes. Repeated freezing and thawing of soils changes their physical properties, geochemistry, and microbial community structure, which together govern the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. In this presentation, we focus on how freeze-thaw cycles regulate carbon and nitrogen cycling and how these transformations influence greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. We present a novel approach, which combines the acquisition of physical and chemical data in a newly developed experimental soil column system. This system simulates realistic soil temperature profiles during freeze-thaw cycles.