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Sample records for unnecessary costs caused

  1. Escalating Health Care Cost due to Unnecessary Diagnostic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD AZAM ISHAQUE CHAUDHARY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on health care systems can improve health outcomes now and in the future. Growing economies have serious concerns on the rising cost of health, whereas, in under developed countries like Pakistan, it is not emphasized yet at all. The research is conducted to improve a unique aspect of health care systems to provide effective, patient-centred, high-standard health care while maintaining the cost effectiveness. Research is being qualified in two paradigms qualitative and quantitative. In qualitative research, expert?s interviews have been taken to get the basic knowledge of radiology based testing and their prerequisites, in quantitative research ordered are being analysed to check the frequency and if they are unnecessary or qualified medical necessity guidelines as established in qualitative method. Analysis was made on the basis of the trinity relationship of diagnosis, symptoms and respected order to determine the necessity of the order to get its impact on cost of the overall health of those patients and point out more than 50% unnecessary orders are being performed in two government hospitals. The situation is alarming and policy makers should focus on unnecessary ordering to avoid out of pocket expenses and improve quality of care. The research helps in successful application of health care system modifications and policies pertaining to one aspect of health systems, i.e. cost-effectiveness of health care.

  2. How to save costs by reducing unnecessary testing: Lean thinking in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegting, I.L.; van Beneden, M.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Thijs, A.; Kostense, P.J.; Nanayakkara, P.W.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The burden of health care expenditure on national budgets has increased dramatically over the past decade. A pilot study in our hospital demonstrated that many unnecessary diagnostic tests were performed routinely. The aim of this study was to reduce the costs of unnecessary diagnostic

  3. Decision analysis for the cost effectiveness of Sestamibi Scintimammography in minimizing unnecessary biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.W.; Hendi, P.; Schwimmer, J.; Gambhir, S.S.; Bassett, L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if breast cancer screening using sestamibi scintimammography (SSMM) in conjunction with mammography (MM) is cost effective in avoiding biopsies in healthy patients. Quantitative decision tree sensitivity analysis was used to compare the conventional MM alone strategy (strategy A) with two decision strategies for screening with SSMM; SSMM after an indeterminate mammogram (strategy B) or SSMM after both a positive and an indeterminate mammogram (strategy C). Cost effectiveness was measured by calculating the expected cost per patient and the average life expectancy per patient for baseline values as well as over a range of values for all of the variables of each strategy. Based on Medicare reimbursement values, strategies B and C showed a cost savings of $9 and $20 per patient respectively as compared to strategy A. This translates into respective savings of $189 and $420 million per year assuming 21 million females undergo screening each year. Strategies B and C did however have a loss of mean life expectancy of 0.000178 and 0.000222 years respectively as compared to strategy A due to interval progression of breast cancer in a small number of women. Strategies B and C significantly lowered the number of biopsies performed on healthy patients in the screening population by 750,063 and 1,557,915 biopsies respectively as compared to strategy A. These results quantitatively verify the potential utility of using SSMM in avoiding unnecessary biopsies

  4. Tracking unnecessary negative urinalyses to reduce healthcare costs: a transversal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmartel, A; Dutron, M; Ghasarossian, C

    2017-09-01

    About 7 million urinalyses are reimbursed yearly by the French public healthcare system, but the results of most of these tests are normal. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of negative urinalyses in ambulatory care, identify the associated factors and assess the relevance of prescriptions by general practitioners (GPs) according to French guidelines. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients over 18 coming for urinalyses in two French ambulatory laboratories. Patients received a questionnaire on their symptoms, the reason for performing urinalysis and the use of urinary dipsticks. GP who prescribed urinalyses received a questionnaire assessing their practice. A total of 510 patients were included, and 71% of urinalyses were negative. Urinalyses were prescribed to 283 patients by GPs. Compared to those of specialists, GP prescriptions were associated with fewer negative urinalyses (59 vs 86%; p GPs, the reasons of prescription were as follows: suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) (42.7%), control of bacteriological cure after UTI (24%), fever or abdominal pain (13%) and routine test (7%). About 35% of urinalyses were not indicated according to guidelines. Only 12% of patients used dipsticks before performing urinalysis although 87% of GPs were favourable to their use if they were provided by healthcare services. The annual cost of non-indicated urinalyses is estimated at 13 million euro. A systematic use of dipsticks provided by healthcare services could help to reduce health costs and the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  5. Alcohol-related hand injuries: an unnecessary social and economic cost.

    OpenAIRE

    Marston, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Severe hand injuries constitute the largest number of acute referrals to this plastic surgery unit, the admission of these patients often displacing routine admissions due to bed shortages, thus increasing waiting list time. This study showed that a high percentage of these injuries were alcohol-related and were therefore preventable. The economic cost to the unit is discussed.

  6. Evidence that Risk Adjustment is Unnecessary in Estimates of the User Cost of Money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A. Restrepo-Tobón

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Investors value the  special attributes of monetary assets (e.g.,  exchangeability, liquidity, and safety  and pay a premium for holding them in the form of a lower return rate. The user cost of holding monetary assets can be measured approximately by the difference between the  returns on illiquid risky assets and  those of safer liquid assets. A more appropriate measure should adjust this difference by the  differential risk of the  assets in question. We investigate the  impact that time  non-separable preferences has on the  estimation of the  risk-adjusted user cost of money. Using U.K. data from 1965Q1 to 2011Q1, we estimate a habit-based asset pricing model  with money  in the utility function and  find that the  risk  adjustment for risky monetary assets is negligible. Thus, researchers can dispense with risk adjusting the  user cost of money  in constructing monetary aggregate indexes.

  7. Mandatory imaging cuts costs and reduces the rate of unnecessary surgeries in the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of having appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaye, M.J.; Lambregts, D.M.J.; Mutsaers, E.; Beets-Tan, R.G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Essers, B.A.B. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Medical Technology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Breukink, S.; Beets, G.L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cappendijk, V.C. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Radiology, ' s Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether mandatory imaging is an effective strategy in suspected appendicitis for reducing unnecessary surgery and costs. In 2010, guidelines were implemented in The Netherlands recommending the mandatory use of preoperative imaging to confirm/refute clinically suspected appendicitis. This retrospective study included 1,556 consecutive patients with clinically suspected appendicitis in 2008-2009 (756 patients/group I) and 2011-2012 (800 patients/group II). Imaging use (none/US/CT and/or MRI) was recorded. Additional parameters were: complications, medical costs, surgical and histopathological findings. The primary study endpoint was the number of unnecessary surgeries before and after guideline implementation. After clinical examination by a surgeon, 509/756 patients in group I and 540/800 patients in group II were still suspected of having appendicitis. In group I, 58.5% received preoperative imaging (42% US/12.8% CT/3.7% both), compared with 98.7% after the guidelines (61.6% US/4.4% CT/ 32.6% both). The percentage of unnecessary surgeries before the guidelines was 22.9%. After implementation, it dropped significantly to 6.2% (p<0.001). The surgical complication rate dropped from 19.9% to 14.2%. The average cost-per-patient decreased by 594 EUR from 2,482 to 1,888 EUR (CL:-1081; -143). Increased use of imaging in the diagnostic work-up of patients with clinically suspected appendicitis reduced the rate of negative appendectomies, surgical complications and costs. (orig.)

  8. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, Mathieu; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. An economic (decision-tree) analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services) and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted. Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada. Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  9. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Boulin

    Full Text Available The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes.An economic (decision-tree analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted.Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada.Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  10. Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested

  11. All-Cause and Acute Pancreatitis Health Care Costs in Patients With Severe Hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nazia; Sharma, Puza P; Scott, Ronald D; Lin, Kathy J; Toth, Peter P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess health care utilization and costs related to acute pancreatitis (AP) in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (sHTG) levels. Patients with sHTG levels 1000 mg/dL or higher were identified from January 1, 2007, to June 30, 2013. The first identified incident triglyceride level was labeled as index date. All-cause, AP-related health care visits, and mean total all-cause costs in patients with and without AP were compared during 12 months postindex. A generalized linear model regression was used to compare costs while controlling for patient characteristics and comorbidities. Five thousand five hundred fifty sHTG patients were identified, and 5.4% of these patients developed AP during postindex. Patients with AP had significantly (P < 0.05) more all-cause outpatient visits, hospitalizations, longer length of stays during the hospital visits, and emergency department visits versus patients without AP. Mean (SD) unadjusted all-cause health care costs in the 12 months postindex were $25,343 ($33,139) for patients with AP compared with $15,195 ($24,040) for patients with no AP. The regression showed annual all-cause costs were 49.9% higher (P < 0.01) for patients with AP versus without AP. Patients who developed AP were associated with higher costs; managing patients with sHTG at risk of developing AP may help reduce unnecessary costs.

  12. Allocation of Load-Loss Cost Caused by Voltage Sag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the allocation of load-loss cost caused by voltage sag in the environment of electricity market. To compensate the loss of loads due to voltage sags, the load-loss cost is allocated to both sources and power consumers. On the basis of Load Drop Cost (LDC), a quantitative evaluation index of load-loss cost caused by voltage sag is identified. The load-loss cost to be allocated to power consumers themselves is calculated according to load classification. Based on the theory of power component the quantitative relation between sources and loads is established, thereby a quantitative calculation method for load-loss cost allocated to each source is deduced and the quantitative compensation from individual source to load is proposed. A simple five-bus system illustrates the main features of the proposed method.

  13. What Causes Cost Overrun in Transport Infrastructure Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette K. Skamris; Buhl, Søren L.

    cost escalation for three types of project ownership - private, state-owned enterprise and other public ownership - it is shown that the oft-seen claim that public ownership is problematic and private ownership effective in curbing cost escalation is an oversimplification. Type of accountability......This article presents results from the first statistically significant study of causes of cost escalation in transport infrastructure projects. The study is based on a sample of 258 rail, bridge, tunnel and roads projects worth US$90 billion. The focus is on the dependence of cost escalation on (1......) length of project implementation phase, (2) size of project and (3) type of project ownership. First, it is found with very high statistical significance that cost escalation is strongly dependent on length of implementation phase. The policy implications are clear: Decision makers and planners should...

  14. "Unnecessary suffering": the cornerstone of animal protection legislation considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, M

    1999-09-01

    Causing "unnecessary suffering" has been widely adopted in legislation to define criminal liability in respect of the treatment of animals. This article examines the way in which the term has been interpreted and applied by the courts, and considers its effectiveness in affording animals protection from abuse.

  15. Factors causing cost variation for constructing wastewater projects in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Fayek Aziz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cost is one of the major considerations throughout the project management life cycle and can be regarded as one of the most important parameters of a project and the driving force of project success. Despite its proven importance, it is common to see a construction project failing to achieve its objectives within the specific cost. Cost variation is a very frequent phenomenon and is almost associated with nearly constructing all wastewater projects. Maintaining steady cost projection on wastewater projects had been recently an issue of serious concern, both to the client and project contractors. Cost deviation from initial cost plan had been prevalent on construction sites. However, little or no effort has been made to curtail the phenomenon, this research work attempts to identify, investigate and rank factors perceived to affect cost variation in the Egyptian wastewater projects with respect to their relative importance so as to proffer possible ways of coping with this phenomenon. To achieve this objective, author invited practitioners and experts, comprising a statistically representative sample, to participate in a structured questionnaire survey. Brain storming was taken into consideration, through which a number of cost variation factors were identified for constructing wastewater projects. Totally 52 factors were short-listed to be made part of the questionnaire survey and the survey was conducted with experts and representatives from private, public and local general construction firms. The data were analyzed using Relative Importance Index, ranking and simple percentages. It was analytically discovered that factors such as: (1 Lowest bidding procurement method; (2 Additional work; (3 Bureaucracy in bidding/tendering method; (4 Wrong method of cost estimation; and (5 Funding problems were critical for causing cost variation, while (1 Inaccurate cost estimation; (2 Mode of financing and payment for completed work; (3 Unexpected ground

  16. [Unnecessary routine laboratory tests in patients referred for surgical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Miranda, María del Pilar; Cano-Matus, Norberto; Rodriguez-Murrieta, Margarita; Guarneros-Zapata, Idalia; Ortiz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To question the usefulness of the lab analysis considered routine testing for the identification of abnormalities in the surgical care. To determine the percentage of unnecessary laboratory tests in the preoperative assessment as well as to estimate the unnecessary expenses. A descriptive, cross-sectional study of patients referred for surgical evaluation between January 1st and March 31st 2013. The database of laboratory testing and electronic files were reviewed. Reference criteria from surgical services were compared with the tests requested by the family doctor. In 65% of the patients (n=175) unnecessary examinations were requested, 25% (n=68) were not requested the tests that they required, and only 10% of the patients were requested laboratory tests in accordance with the reference criteria (n=27). The estimated cost in unnecessary examinations was $1,129,552 in a year. The results were similar to others related to this theme, however, they had not been revised from the perspective of the first level of attention regarding the importance of adherence to the reference criteria which could prevent major expenditures. It is a priority for leaders and operational consultants in medical units to establish strategies and lines of action that ensure compliance with institutional policies so as to contain spending on comprehensive services, and which in turn can improve the medical care. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: According to the "stress-as-offense-to-self" perspective, work tasks that are considered unnecessary or unreasonable - so-called "illegitimate work tasks" - are likely to elicit stress-reactions. Previous studies, mostly cross-sectional, have shown that illegitimate tasks are associated...... with increased self-reported stress, cortisol, and counterproductive work behavior. In this article, we examine the prospective association between unnecessary work tasks, one type of illegitimate work tasks, and mental health among Danish human service workers. Further, we explore whether this association...... is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. METHODS: The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item, and assessed...

  18. Estimating two indirect logging costs caused by accelerated erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen O. Klock

    1976-01-01

    In forest areas where high soil erosion potential exists, a comparative yarding cost estimate, including the indirect costs determined by methods proposed here, shows that the total cost of using "advanced" logging methods may be less than that of "traditional" systems.

  19. Identifying factors causing cost overrun of the construction projects ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapnil P Wanjari

    Cost overrun in India; ANOVA; factor analysis; construction projects. 1. Introduction ... gramme Implementation in India [2], projects of public .... case if a respondent never came across of such factor. ..... The co-relation matrix for variables of cost overruns was ..... There are various problems observed due to communication.

  20. The Causes and Costs of Modifications to Military Construction Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-06

    issue of contract modifications in federal construction. The first was written by Henry J. Turowski at the Naval Postgraduate 3chool in Monterrey and...Postgraduate School, Monterrey , December 1980). 12. Henry J. Rowland, "The Causes and Effects of Change Orders on the Construction Process", (Master’s thesis...The creation of a separate review cell does not imply completely divorcing review from design. These functions are closely intertwined. The review

  1. Albumin supplementation for hypoalbuminemia following burns: unnecessary and costly!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinyshyn, Alex; Callum, Jeannie; Jeschke, Marc C; Cartotto, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Following fluid resuscitation, patients with major burns frequently develop prolonged hypoalbuminemia. It is not known whether this should be corrected by albumin supplementation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are any benefits associated with albumin supplementation to correct hypoalbuminemia in burned adults. We conducted a retrospective comparison of patients with burns ≥ 20% TBSA admitted to an adult regional American Burn Association-verified burn center, from May 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010, where we did not routinely supplement albumin (control group), with patients admitted from October 1, 2010, to May 30, 2011, where we had instituted a protocol in which 5% human albumin was provided to maintain serum albumin levels >20 g/L (albumin group). Comparisons were made from postburn (PB) day 2 to day 30 inclusive. There were no significant differences between control (n = 26) and albumin (n = 17) in age (48 ± 15 vs 45 ± 21 years; P = .56), burn size (33 ± 13 vs 34 ± 13 %TBSA; P = .831), or full thickness burn size (19 ± 19 vs 23 ± 19 %TBSA; P = .581). Inhalation injury was significantly more frequent in the albumin group than in controls (71% vs 31%; P = .01). The groups did not differ significantly in need for admission escharotomy, admission Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, number of surgical procedures/first 30 days, or 24 and 48 hours fluid resuscitation volume requirements. The overall mean daily serum albumin level from PB day 2 to 30 in the albumin group (26.9 ± 3.0 g/L) was significantly greater than in controls (21.9 ± 4.4 g/L; P patient per day). We conclude that routine supplementation of 5% human albumin to maintain a serum albumin level ≥ 20 g/L in burn patients is expensive and provides no benefit.

  2. Eutrophication of Lake Waters in China: Cost, Causes, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, C.; Zha, Y.; Li, Y.; Sun, D.; Lu, H.; Yin, B.

    2010-04-01

    Lake water eutrophication has become one of the most important factors impeding sustainable economic development in China. Knowledge of the current status of lake water eutrophicatoin and determination of its mechanism are prerequisites to devising a sound solution to the problem. Based on reviewing the literature, this paper elaborates on the evolutional process and current state of shallow inland lake water eutrophication in China. The mechanism of lake water eutrophication is explored from nutrient sources. In light of the identified mechanism strategies are proposed to control and tackle lake water eutrophication. This review reveals that water eutrophication in most lakes was initiated in the 1980s when the national economy underwent rapid development. At present, the problem of water eutrophication is still serious, with frequent occurrence of damaging algal blooms, which have disrupted the normal supply of drinking water in shore cities. Each destructive bloom caused a direct economic loss valued at billions of yuan. Nonpoint pollution sources, namely, waste discharge from agricultural fields and nutrients released from floor deposits, are identified as the two major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Therefore, all control and rehabilitation measures of lake water eutrophication should target these nutrient sources. Biological measures are recommended to rehabilitate eutrophied lake waters and restore the lake ecosystem in order to bring the problem under control.

  3. Medical innovation laws: an unnecessary innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bernadette

    2016-06-01

    Objective This paper aims to demonstrate that any suggestion that there is a need for specific innovation laws is flawed. Innovation is central to good medical practice and is adequately supported by current law. Methods The paper reviews the nature of medical innovation and outlines recent attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws aimed at 'encouraging' and 'supporting' innovation. The current legal framework is outlined and the role of the law in relation to medical innovation explored. Results The analysis demonstrates the cyclic relationship between medical advancement and the law and concludes that there is no requirement for specific innovation laws. Conclusions The law not only supports innovation and development in medical treatment but encourages it as central to a functioning medical system. There is no need to introduce specific laws aimed at medical innovation; to do so represents an unnecessary legal innovation and serves to complicate matters. What is known about the topic? Over recent months, there has been a great deal of discussion surrounding the law in the context of medical innovation. This was driven by the attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws in the Medical Innovation Bill. The general subject matter - negligence and the expected standard of care in the provision of treatment - is very well understood, but not in cases where the treatment can be described as innovative. The general rhetoric in both the UK and Australia around the Medical Innovation Bill demonstrates a lack of understanding of the position of the law with regards to innovative treatment. What does this paper add? This paper adds clarity to the debate. It presents the law and explains the manner in which the law can operate around innovative treatment. The paper asserts that medical innovation is both supported and encouraged by existing legal principles. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper presents an argument that can guide the policy position

  4. Cost-consequence analysis of cause of death investigation in Finland and in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Boldsen, Jesper Lier; Lalu, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    in Denmark with another cost profile. Data on cause of death investigation systems and costs were derived from Departments of Forensic Medicine, Departments of Pathology, and the National Police. Finnish and Danish autopsy rates were calculated in unnatural (accident, suicide, homicide and undetermined...

  5. 33 CFR 117.11 - Unnecessary opening of the draw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unnecessary opening of the draw. 117.11 Section 117.11 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS General Requirements § 117.11 Unnecessary opening of the draw. No...

  6. First estimates of the potential cost and cost saving of protecting childhood hearing from damage caused by congenital CMV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eleri J; Gray, Joanne; Luck, Suzanne; Atkinson, Claire; Embleton, Nicholas D; Kadambari, Seilesh; Davis, Adrian; Griffiths, Paul; Sharland, Mike; Berrington, Janet E; Clark, Julia E

    2015-11-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is an important cause of childhood deafness, which is modifiable if diagnosed within the first month of life. Targeted screening of infants who do not pass their newborn hearing screening tests in England is a feasible approach to identify and treat cases to improve hearing outcome. To conduct a cost analysis of targeted screening and subsequent treatment for cCMV-related sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in an, otherwise, asymptomatic infant, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS). Using data from the newborn hearing screening programme (NHSP) in England and a recent study of targeted screening for cCMV using salivary swabs within the NHSP, we estimate the cost (in UK pounds (£)) to the NHS. The cost of screening (time, swabs and PCR), assessing, treating and following up cases is calculated. The cost per case of preventing hearing deterioration secondary to cCMV with targeted screening is calculated. The cost of identifying, assessing and treating a case of cCMV-related SNHL through targeted cCMV screening is estimated to be £6683. The cost of improving hearing outcome for an infant with cCMV-related SNHL through targeted screening and treatment is estimated at £14 202. The costs of targeted screening for cCMV using salivary swabs integrated within NHSP resulted in an estimate of cost per case that compares favourably with other screening programmes. This could be used in future studies to estimate the full economic value in terms of incremental costs and incremental health benefits. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Does the addition of saline infusion sonohysterography to transvaginal ultrasonography prevent unnecessary hysteroscopy in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, John; Sharp, Benjamin; Elliot, Nikki; McEwing, Rachael; McGeoch, Graham; Shand, Brett; Holland, Kieran

    2016-08-01

    This observational case series in 65 premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding evaluated whether transvaginal ultrasound followed by saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) prevented unnecessary hysteroscopy. Although SIS indicated that hysteroscopy was unnecessary in eight women, this benefit was offset by the invasive nature of the scan, the number of endometrial abnormalities falsely detected by SIS and the cost of the additional investigation. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Theoretical framework of the causes of construction time and cost overruns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, K.; Abdullah, A. H.; Nagapan, S.; Suhoo, S.; Khan, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    Any construction practitioner fundamental goal is to complete the projects within estimated duration and budgets, and expected quality targets. However, time and cost overruns are regular and universal phenomenon in construction projects and the construction projects in Malaysia has no exemption from the problems of time overrun and cost overrun. In order to accomplish the successful completion of construction projects on specified time and within planned cost, there are various factors that should be given serious attention so that issues such as time and cost overrun can be addressed. This paper aims to construct a framework for the causes of time overrun and cost overrun in construction projects of Malaysia. Based on the relevant literature review, causative factors of time overrun and cost overrun in Malaysian construction projects are summarized and the theoretical frameworks of the causes of construction time overrun and cost overrun is constructed. The developed frameworks for construction time and cost overruns based on the existing literature will assist the construction practitioners to plan the efficient approaches for achieving successful completion of the projects.

  9. Overview of causes and costs of injuries in Massachusetts: a methodology for analysis of state data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, M; Cohen, B B; Rodgers, C G; Walker, D K; Friedman, D J; Ozonoff, V V

    1995-01-01

    Massachusetts has developed the first State profile of the causes and costs of injury based on the national study, "Cost of Injury in the United States: A Report to Congress." Incidence of fatal injuries is based on Massachusetts data; nonfatal hospitalized injuries, on Massachusetts age and sex rates and U.S. cause data; and nonhospitalized injuries, on U.S. rates applied to Massachusetts census data. Lifetime costs per injured person are based on national data adjusted for higher personal health care expenditures and for higher mean annual earnings in Massachusetts. The estimated total lifetime cost for the 1.4 million injuries that occurred in 1989 is $4.4 billion--$1.7 billion for health care and $2.7 billion for lost earnings. Injuries attributed to motor vehicles and falls account for more than half of the total cost. The other cause categories are poisonings, fire-burns, firearms, drowings-near drownings, and other. For every person who dies from an injury, 17 people are hospitalized, and an estimated 535 people require outpatient treatment, consultation, or restricted activity. Development of a State-based cost report can be useful in monitoring the contribution of injuries to health status and in planning effective injury prevention strategies in a community-based health care system. The methodology described in this paper can be replicated by other States through accessing their State-specific mortality and hospital discharge data bases. PMID:7610211

  10. Immunostimulation asa method limiting unnecessary antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Szczukocka-Zych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurring respiratory tract infections are typical of childhood. This results from the fact that children are exposed to pathogens, usually in groups of people, and from the immaturity of the immune system. Most upper and lower respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses. Nevertheless, antibiotics, which target bacteria, are often prescribed. Antibiotic overuse leads to increased microbial resistance to these drugs, resulting in their inefficacy. Improper treatment of respiratory infections with antibiotics ultimately leads to treatment failure. An increase in antibiotic resistance of many bacterial strains is becoming a serious global problem and makes treatment much more difficult. It is a responsibility of each physician to use antibiotics properly and implement adequate prevention of recurring respiratory tract infections. For many years, it has been attempted to find effective agents that improve immunity in children. The pharmaceutical market offers various preparations advertised as immunostimulants, such as bacterial lysates, vitamins, dietary supplements, probiotics or herbal, animal and homeopathic products. The role of immunomodulatory substances is to promote the immune system to fight pathogens, reduce the frequency of infections and decrease the demand for antibiotics. Unfortunately, most immunomodulators do not have sufficiently reliable clinical trials that would confirm their efficacy.

  11. [Necessary and unnecessary treatment options for hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zindel, Joel; Inglin, Roman; Brügger, Lukas

    2014-12-01

    Up to one third of the general population suffers from symptoms caused by hemorrhoids. Conservative treatment comes first unless the patient presents with an acute hemorrhoidal prolapse or a thrombosis. A fiber enriched diet is the primary treatment option, recommended in the perioperative period as well as a long-term prophylaxis. A timely limited application of topical ointments or suppositories and/or flavonoids are further treatment options. When symptoms persist interventional procedures for grade I-II hemorrhoids, and surgery for grade III-IV hemorrhoids should be considered. Rubber band ligation is the interventional treatment of choice. A comparable efficacy using sclerosing or infrared therapy has not yet been demonstrated. We therefore do not recommend these treatment options for the cure of hemorrhoids. Self-treatment by anal insertion of bougies is of lowrisk and may be successful, particularly in the setting of an elevated sphincter pressure. Anal dilation, sphincterotomy, cryosurgery, bipolar diathermy, galvanic electrotherapy, and heat therapy should be regarded as obsolete given the poor or missing data reported for these methods. For a long time, the classic excisional hemorrhoidectomy was considered to be the gold standard as far as surgical procedures are concerned. Primary closure (Ferguson) seems to be superior compared to the "open" version (Milligan Morgan) with respect to postoperative pain and wound healing. The more recently proposed stapled hemorrhoidopexy (Longo) is particularly advisable for circular hemorrhoids. Compared to excisional hemorrhoidectomy the Longo-operation is associated with reduced postoperative pain, shorter operation time and hospital stay as well as a faster recovery, with the disadvantage though of a higher recurrence rate. Data from Hemorrhoidal Artery Ligation (HAL)-, if appropriate in combination with a Recto-Anal Repair (HAL/RAR)-, demonstrates a similar trend towards a better tolerance of the procedure at the

  12. [The unnecessary application of central venous catheterization in surgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Keiko; Inoue, Satoki; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2018-04-06

    Perioperative physicians occasionally encounter situations where central venous catheters placed preoperatively turn out to be unnecessary. The purpose of this retrospective study is to identify the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement and determine the factors associated with the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. Using data from institutional perioperative central venous catheter surveillance, we analysed data from 1,141 patients who underwent central venous catheter placement. We reviewed the central venous catheter registry and medical charts and allocated registered patients into those with the proper or with unnecessary application of central venous catheter according to standard indications. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. In 107 patients, representing 9.38% of the overall population, we identified the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. Multivariate analysis identified emergencies at night or on holidays (odds ratio [OR] 2.109, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.021-4.359), low surgical risk (OR=1.729, 95% CI 1.038-2.881), short duration of anesthesia (OR=0.961/10min increase, 95% CI 0.945-0.979), and postoperative care outside of the intensive care unit (OR=2.197, 95% CI 1.402-3.441) all to be independently associated with the unnecessary application of catheterization. Complications related to central venous catheter placement when the procedure consequently turned out to be unnecessary were frequently observed (9/107) compared with when the procedure was necessary (40/1034) (p=0.032, OR=2.282, 95% CI 1.076-4.842). However, the subsequent multivariate logistic model did not hold this significant difference (p=0.0536, OR=2.115, 95% CI 0.988-4.526). More careful consideration for the application of central venous catheter is required in cases of emergency surgery at night or on

  13. Construction delays causing risks on time and cost - a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidambaram Ramanathan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase in the number of construction projects experiencing extensive delays leading to exceeding initial time and cost budget.  This paper reviews 41 studies around the world which surveyed the delay factors and classified them into Groups.  The main purpose of this paper is to review literature, each of which have categorized the causes that are responsible for time delays and cost overrun in projects. The collected list has 113 causes for delays categorized in to 18 different groups.  Most of the researches have analysed the responses from the Questionnaire survey.    The collected data are used to rank the problem.  The data are further used to investigate and analyse Important Index, Frequency Index, Severity Index, Relative Important Index, Relative Importance Weight, Weighted Average, Mean, Standard Deviation and Variance.  The collective comparison has revealed that the ranking given by all the researchers is not the same.  Further each and every study has different rank ratings for the different group of the delays.  This review paper attempts to provide an updated compilation of the earlier studies on ranking of the delay causers, which are never similar and constant for universal projects.  It is concluded that a separate study is required for identifying the factors causing delay for projects operated in Sabah, East Malaysia.

  14. Removing Unnecessary Variables from Horn Clause Verification Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele De Angelis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Verification conditions (VCs are logical formulas whose satisfiability guarantees program correctness. We consider VCs in the form of constrained Horn clauses (CHC which are automatically generated from the encoding of (an interpreter of the operational semantics of the programming language. VCs are derived through program specialization based on the unfold/fold transformation rules and, as it often happens when specializing interpreters, they contain unnecessary variables, that is, variables which are not required for the correctness proofs of the programs under verification. In this paper we adapt to the CHC setting some of the techniques that were developed for removing unnecessary variables from logic programs, and we show that, in some cases, the application of these techniques increases the effectiveness of Horn clause solvers when proving program correctness.

  15. Analysis of medication-related malpractice claims: causes, preventability, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Federico, Frank A; Gandhi, Tejal K; Kaushal, Rainu; Williams, Deborah H; Bates, David W

    2002-11-25

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) may lead to serious injury and may result in malpractice claims. While ADEs resulting in claims are not representative of all ADEs, such data provide a useful resource for studying ADEs. Therefore, we conducted a review of medication-related malpractice claims to study their frequency, nature, and costs and to assess the human factor failures associated with preventable ADEs. We also assessed the potential benefits of proved effective ADE prevention strategies on ADE claims prevention. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a New England malpractice insurance company claims records from January 1, 1990, to December 31, 1999. Cases were electronically screened for possible ADEs and followed up by independent review of abstracts by 2 physician reviewers (T.K.G. and R.K.). Additional in-depth claims file reviews identified potential human factor failures associated with ADEs. Adverse drug events represented 6.3% (129/2040) of claims. Adverse drug events were judged preventable in 73% (n = 94) of the cases and were nearly evenly divided between outpatient and inpatient settings. The most frequently involved medication classes were antibiotics, antidepressants or antipsychotics, cardiovascular drugs, and anticoagulants. Among these ADEs, 46% were life threatening or fatal. System deficiencies and performance errors were the most frequent cause of preventable ADEs. The mean costs of defending malpractice claims due to ADEs were comparable for nonpreventable inpatient and outpatient ADEs and preventable outpatient ADEs (mean, $64,700-74,200), but costs were considerably greater for preventable inpatient ADEs (mean, $376,500). Adverse drug events associated with malpractice claims were often severe, costly, and preventable, and about half occurred in outpatients. Many interventions could potentially have prevented ADEs, with error proofing and process standardization covering the greatest proportion of events.

  16. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter; Chisholm, Dan; Fuhr, Daniela C

    2009-06-27

    This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol, in the areas of education and information, the health sector, community action, driving while under the influence of alcohol (drink-driving), availability, marketing, pricing, harm reduction, and illegally and informally produced alcohol. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses show that policies regulating the environment in which alcohol is marketed (particularly its price and availability) are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. Enforced legislative measures to reduce drink-driving and individually directed interventions to already at-risk drinkers are also effective. However, school-based education does not reduce alcohol-related harm, although public information and education-type programmes have a role in providing information and in increasing attention and acceptance of alcohol on political and public agendas. Making alcohol more expensive and less available, and banning alcohol advertising, are highly cost-effective strategies to reduce harm. In settings with high amounts of unrecorded production and consumption, increasing the proportion of alcohol that is taxed could be a more effective pricing policy than a simple increase in tax.

  17. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F; Celi, L A; Fialho, A S; Vieira, S M; Reti, S R; Sousa, J M C; Finkelstein, S N

    2013-05-01

    To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1-3]. Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the likely information to be gained from proposed future

  18. Effective diagnostic DAQ systems to reduce unnecessary data in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taegu, E-mail: glory@nfri.re.kr; Lee, Woongryol; Hong, Jaesic; Park, Kaprai

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • When plasma shots do not successfully perform during the intended target time, the diagnostics systems continue to record these unusable data, contributing to increasing data size. • To overcome this problem, some KSTAR’s library were upgraded to monitor the plasma status in real-time. • With the real-time information of plasma status, some of the KSTAR diagnostic systems stop the acquisition process of unnecessary data. • We were able to reduce the refuse data of approximately 698 GByte in the KSTAR 7th campaign. • It was a very effective way to store useful data, and it was helpful to analysts after shot. - Abstract: The plasma status of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is measured by various diagnostics systems. The measured data size has been increasing every year due to increasing plasma pulse lengths, higher diagnostics operating frequencies, the additions of new diagnostic systems, and an increasing number of diagnostics channels. At times, when plasma shots do not successfully perform during the intended target time, the diagnostics systems continue to record these unusable data, contributing to increasing data size. In addition, the analysis time was affected, as these data need to be separated from the relevant data set. To overcome this problem, KSTAR’s Standard Framework (SFW), Real Time Monitoring (RTMON), and Pulse Automation and Scheduling System (PASS) were upgraded to monitor the plasma status in real-time. When the plasma current is less than 200kA, RTMON sends the plasma status information every second to the SFW via EPICS Channel Access. With the real-time information on plasma status, some of the KSTAR diagnostic systems stop the acquisition process of unnecessary data. This paper describes a method for reducing the storage of unnecessary data and its results in the KSTAR 7th campaign.

  19. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F.; Celi, L.A.; Fialho, A.S.; Vieira, S.M.; Reti, S.R.; Sousa, J.M.C.; Finkelstein, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Design Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Patients Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Main results Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1–3]. Conclusions Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the

  20. Improving World Health: A Least Cost Strategy. Worldwatch Paper 59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, William U.

    Least-cost health strategies designed to attack the world's leading causes of unnecessary death are explored. Section 1 emphasizes the value of primary health-care procedures--midwifery, maternal education on breastfeeding and weaning, vaccinations, oral rehydration of victims of diarrhea, and antibiotics against respiratory infections--in…

  1. [For active dermatocosmetics and free of unnecessary animal experimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1998-06-01

    At the dawn of this century, dermocosmetology is at cross-roads because new European regulations are changing its face. The proof of claims must be given and the entire composition of the product must be released. In addition, animal testing is about to be banned. Such new regulations incite to search for and validate predictive tests aiming at the objective evaluation of the activity and tolerance claimed by dermocosmetic products. Such tests must be an alternative to unnecessary animal experimentation. These aspects are scrutinized scientifically by the EEMCO experts in combination with the ECVAM and COLIPA organizations.

  2. Reduction in Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing Through Utilization Management at a US Government Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, Raymond L; Ndekwe, Paul; Jones, Genea; Schmidt, Ronald P; Trey, Marty; Baty, Eric J; Wilhite, Denise; Munshi, Imtiaz A; Sutter, Bradley M; Rao, Maddamsetti; Bashir, Chowdry M

    2016-03-01

    To implement an electronic laboratory utilization management system (laboratory expert system [LES]) to provide safe and effective reductions in unnecessary clinical laboratory testing. The LES is a set of frequency filter subroutines within the Veterans Affairs hospital and laboratory information system that was formulated by an interdisciplinary medical team. Since implementing the LES, total test volume has decreased by a mean of 11.18% per year compared with our pre-LES test volume. This change was not attributable to fluctuations in outpatient visits or inpatient days of care. Laboratory cost savings were estimated at $151,184 and $163,751 for 2012 and 2013, respectively. A significant portion of these cost savings was attributable to reductions in high-volume, large panel testing. No adverse effects on patient care were reported, and mean length of stay for patients remained unchanged. Electronic laboratory utilization systems can effectively reduce unnecessary laboratory testing without compromising patient care. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Causes, costs, and risk factors for unplanned return visits after adenotonsillectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Melanie; Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Srivastava, Rajendu; Meier, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    To review the causes, costs, and risk factors for unplanned return visits and readmissions after pediatric adenotonsillectomy (T&A). Review of administrative database of outpatient adenotonsillectomy performed at any facility within a vertically integrated health care system in the Intermountain West on children age 1-18 years old between 1998 and 2012. Data reviewed included demographic variables, diagnosis associated with return visit and costs associated with return visits. Data from 39,906 children aged 1-18 years old were reviewed. A total of 2499 (6.3%) children had unplanned return visits. The most common reasons for return visits were bleeding (2.3%), dehydration, (2.3%) and throat pain (1.2%). After multivariate analysis, the main risk factors for any type of return visits were Medicaid insurance (OR=1.64 95% CI 1.47-1.84), Hispanic race (OR=1.36 95% CI 1.13-1.64), and increased severity of illness (SOI) (OR=11.29 95% CI 2.69-47.4 for SOI=3). The only factor associated with increased odds of requiring an inpatient admission on return visit was length of time spent in PACU (prelationship was also observed between the child's age and the risk of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage. Children with increased severity of illness, those insured with Medicaid, and children of Hispanic ethnicity should be targeted with increased education and interventions in order to reduce unplanned visits after T&A. Further studies on post-tonsillectomy complications should include evaluating the effect of surgical technique and post-operative pain management on all complications and not solely post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors, costs, and causes of readmission after surgery for sinonasal cancer: a national perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Alexander N; Yang, Jason Y; Wang, Marilene B; Lee, Jivianne T; St John, Maie A; Long, Jennifer L

    2018-05-02

    Hospital readmissions are an increasingly scrutinized marker of surgical care delivery and quality. There is a paucity of information in the literature regarding the rate, risk factors, and common causes of readmission after surgery for sinonasal cancer. We analyzed the Nationwide Readmissions Database for patients who underwent surgery for a diagnosis of sinonasal cancer between 2010 and 2014. Rates, causes, and patient-, procedure-, and hospital-level risk factors for 30-day readmission were determined. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of 30-day readmission. Among the 4173 cases, the 30-day readmission rate was 11.6%, with an average cost per readmission of $18,403. The most common readmission diagnoses were wound complications (15.3%) and infections (13.4%). On multivariate regression, significant risk factors for readmission were chronic renal failure (odds ratio [OR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-6.17), involvement of the skull base or orbit (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.11-2.51), nonelective initial surgical admission (OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.42-3.89), and length of stay ≥7 days (OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.14-3.05). Through the use of a large national database, we found that approximately 1 in 9 patients undergoing surgery for sinonasal cancer was readmitted within 30 days. Readmissions were most commonly associated with wound complications and infections. Factors related to procedural complexity were more important predictors of readmission than patients' demographics or comorbidities. © 2018 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  5. Dizziness in a community hospital: central neurological causes, clinical predictors, and diagnostic yield and cost of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Hussam; Govindu, Rukma; Fouda, Ragai; Zohdy, Wael; Supsupin, Emilio

    2017-03-01

    Objectives : Neuroimaging is contributing to the rising costs of dizziness evaluation. This study examined the rate of central neurological causes of dizziness, relevant clinical predictors, and the costs and diagnostic yields of neuroimaging in dizziness assessment. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the records of 521 adult patients who visited the hospital during a 12-month period with dizziness as the chief complaint. Clinical findings were analyzed using Fisher's exact test to determine how they correlated with central neurological causes of dizziness identified by neuroimaging. Costs and diagnostic yields of neuroimaging were calculated. Results : Of the 521 patients, 1.5% had dizziness produced by central neurological causes. Gait abnormalities, limb ataxia, diabetes mellitus, and the existence of multiple neurological findings predicted central causes. Cases were associated with gait abnormalities, limb ataxia, diabetes mellitus, and the existence of multiple neurological findings . Brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in 42% and 9.5% of the examined cases, respectively, with diagnostic yields of 3.6% and 12%, respectively. Nine cases of dizziness were diagnosed from 269 brain scans, costing $607 914. Conclusion : Clinical evaluation can predict the presence of central neurological causes of dizziness, whereas neuroimaging is a costly and low-yield approach. Guidelines are needed for physicians, regarding the appropriateness of ordering neuroimaging studies. Abbreviations : OR: odds ratio; CI: confidence interval; ED: emergency department; CT: computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging; HINTS: Head impulse, Nystagmus, Test of skew.

  6. Health costs caused by oil extraction air emissions and the benefits from abatement: the case of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netalieva, Indira; Wesseler, Justus; Heijman, Wim

    2005-01-01

    The methodology and results of a cost-benefit analysis of air quality control during oil production in the Caspian Region in Kazakhstan are presented. The benefits are defined as the decrease in health costs from reduced air pollution. The health costs are the income losses which depend on the attributes of illness (duration and number of symptoms) and on respondents' characteristics such as age, education, and gender. The results are obtained by comparing two cities, one with a high rate of pollution due to oil extraction, Atyrau, and the other, Astana, without. The incremental health costs for Atyrau caused by the oil production industry are estimated to be at least 5.1 million USD per year. The annual benefits of investments into abatement technologies are at least five times higher than the virtual annual abatement costs of about 0.46 million USD

  7. Switch on the competition. Causes, consequences and policy implications of consumer switching costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomp, M.; Shestalova, V.; Rangel, L.

    2005-09-01

    The success or failure of reforms aimed at liberalising markets depends to an important degree on consumer behaviour. If consumers do not base their choices on differences in prices and quality, competition between firms may be weak and the benefits of liberalisation to consumers may be small. One possible reason why consumers may respond only weakly to differences in price and quality is high costs of switching to another firm. This report presents a framework for analysing markets with switching costs and applies the framework in two empirical case studies. The first case study analyses the residential energy market, the second focuses on the market for social health insurance. In both markets, there are indications that switching costs are substantial. The report discusses policy options for reducing switching costs and for alleviating the consequences of switching costs

  8. Switch on the competition. Causes, consequences and policy implications of consumer switching costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomp, M.; Shestalova, V.; Rangel, L.

    2005-09-15

    The success or failure of reforms aimed at liberalising markets depends to an important degree on consumer behaviour. If consumers do not base their choices on differences in prices and quality, competition between firms may be weak and the benefits of liberalisation to consumers may be small. One possible reason why consumers may respond only weakly to differences in price and quality is high costs of switching to another firm. This report presents a framework for analysing markets with switching costs and applies the framework in two empirical case studies. The first case study analyses the residential energy market, the second focuses on the market for social health insurance. In both markets, there are indications that switching costs are substantial. The report discusses policy options for reducing switching costs and for alleviating the consequences of switching costs.

  9. Promoting High-Value Practice by Reducing Unnecessary Transfusions With a Patient Blood Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Divyajot; Pratzer, Ariella; Scher, Lauren J; Saag, Harry S; Adler, Nicole; Volpicelli, Frank M; Auron, Moises; Frank, Steven M

    2018-01-01

    Although blood transfusion is a lifesaving therapy for some patients, transfusion has been named 1 of the top 5 overused procedures in US hospitals. As unnecessary transfusions only increase risk and cost without providing benefit, improving transfusion practice is an effective way of promoting high-value care. Most high-quality clinical trials supporting a restrictive transfusion strategy have been published in the past 5 to 10 years, so the value of a successful patient blood management program has only recently been recognized. We review the most recent transfusion practice guidelines and the evidence supporting these guidelines. We also discuss several medical societies' Choosing Wisely campaigns to reduce or eliminate overuse of transfusions. A blueprint is presented for developing a patient blood management program, which includes discussion of specific methods for optimizing transfusion practice.

  10. A Consultation Phone Service for Patients With Total Joint Arthroplasty May Reduce Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hällfors, Eerik; Saku, Sami A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami

    2018-03-01

    Different measures for reducing costs after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) have gained attention lately. At our institution, a free-of-charge consultation phone service was initiated that targeted patients with TJA. This service aimed at reducing unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and, thus, potentially improving the cost-effectiveness of TJAs. To our knowledge, a similar consultation service had not been described previously. We aimed at examining the rates and reasons for early postdischarge phone calls and evaluating the efficacy of this consultation service. During a 2-month period, we gathered information on every call received by the consultation phone service from patients with TJAs within 90 days of the index TJA procedure. Patients were followed for 2 weeks after making a call to detect major complications and self-initiated ED visits. Data were collected from electronic medical charts regarding age, gender, type of surgery, date of discharge, and length of hospital stay. We analyzed 288 phone calls. Calls were mostly related to medication (41%), wound complications (17%), and mobilization issues (15%). Most calls were resolved in the phone consultation. Few patients (13%) required further evaluation in the ED. The consultation service failed to detect the need for an ED visit in 2 cases (0.7%) that required further care. The consultation phone service clearly benefitted patients with TJAs. The service reduced the number of unnecessary ED visits and functioned well in detecting patients who required further care. Most postoperative concerns were related to prescribed medications, wound complications, and mobilization issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Compliance costs caused by agency action? Empirical evidence and implications for tax compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Eichfelder, Sebastian; Kegels, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The compliance costs of private taxpayers are not only affected by the tax law itself but also by its implementation through the tax authorities. In this paper we analyze the effect of the tax authorities on the burden of complying with tax regulations. Using survey data of Belgian businesses and controlling for potential endogeneity, we find empirical evidence that tax authority behavior is an important cost driver. According to our estimate, a customer-unfriendly tax administration increase...

  12. YAEC's view of the cause and control of escalating nuclear plant O and M costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haseltine, J.D.; Lessard, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides insights on this issue in terms of both the genesis and effective long-term control of O and M costs. Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC's) insights stem not only from an analysis of certain industry data, but also from its unique position within the nuclear industry in terms of its age, plant size, and organization. First, at 30 yr of age, the YAEC plant has endured the full swing of the regulatory/institutional pendulum and the associated impact on O and M costs. Second, with a size of only 185 MW(electric), YAEC's imperative since start-up has been the strict control of O and M costs while still achieving operational excellence. Finally, YAEC is an organization strictly focused on nuclear power operations and has not been distracted by fossil plant operations or other utility requirements like distribution, retail sales, etc., that may have plagued other plant operators

  13. Cost-benefit of WC/rBS oral cholera vaccine for vaccination against ETEC-caused travelers' diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Steffen, Robert; Jönsson, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The most common infectious health problem encountered by travelers to countries in the developing region is travelers' diarrhea (TD), with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) being the most common pathogen isolated. Although mild in most cases, the disease still leads to the loss of a significant part of a vacation or business trip. There is currently a lack of knowledge about the costs in relation to the benefits of vaccination against TD caused by ETEC, and the purposes of this study were to estimate and develop a cost-benefit analysis of vaccination using whole-cell/recombinant-B-subunit oral cholera vaccine. The consequences of the vaccination were identified and quantified in monetary terms. The cost-benefits for leisure and business travelers were assessed separately. The value of the travel was separated into the cost of the trip and of lost leisure time/business opportunities. A person with TD was in base case estimated to lose on average 3.5 days of a 7-day leisure trip and 2.5 days of a 4-day business trip. Results are presented for a Canadian traveler to endemic areas in year 2007 in US$. The average cost of a TD event was estimated at $1,460 and $1,996 for leisure and business travelers, respectively. The net value of the vaccination, however, varied with the risk of the disease. Through extensive literature searches, an updated ETEC map illustrating the proportion of ETEC-caused TD was created. The analysis indicated that vaccination would be considered cost-effective at incidence rates of ETEC-caused TD above about 13 and 9% for leisure and business travelers, respectively. It is, however, important to keep in mind that it is the value of the travel for the individual traveler that will decide if the vaccination provides good value for money.

  14. Estimating the opportunity costs of activities that cause degradation in tropical dry forest: Implications for REDD +

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrego, Armonia; Skutsch, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The viability of national REDD + programs will depend in part on whether funds generated from sales of carbon credits are sufficient to cover the opportunity costs (OC) of forgone uses of the forest. We present the results of a study in which OC were estimated in dry tropical forest, in western

  15. Assessment of the economic costs of damage caused by air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Cost-benefit analysis is one of the fundamental tools for the development of economic instruments for pollution control. The costs of various abatement measures are reasonably well characterised. However, assessment of the economic costs of pollutant impacts is less well developed. This paper reports on two studies carried out for DGXII of the European Commission, the ExternE-Project and the Green Accounting Research Project. Both studies have been performed by international, multi-disciplinary research teams. Analysis of the effects of emissions of PM 10 , SO 2 , NO x and VOCs (as ozone precursors) has included assessment of human health, materials, crops and other terrestrial ecosystems, and freshwater fisheries. The analysis follows the 'impact pathway' approach, linking dose-response functions, valuation data and other models. It differs significantly to earlier 'top-down' approaches that made only very limited use of the wealth of scientific data available. Most success has been achieved in analysis of impacts on human health, building materials and crops. Significant uncertainties exist for these receptors, though these have been identified and are now being addressed. Assessment of impacts on other receptors, perhaps most notably forests, is more limited. The methodology is particularly applicable for analysis of impacts on receptors for which the critical loads approach is not appropriate. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Economic costs of electrical system instability and power outages caused by snakes on the Island of Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Brown Tree Snake, Boiga irregularis, is an introduced species on Guam where it causes frequent electrical power outages. The snake's high abundance, its propensity for climbing, and use of disturbed habitats all contribute to interruption of Guam's electrical service and the activities that depend on electrical power. Snakes have caused more than 1600 power outages in the 20-yr period of 1978–1997 and most recently nearly 200 outages per year. Single outages spanning the entire island and lasting 8 or more hours are estimated to cost in excess of $3,000,000 in lost productivity, but the costs of outages that involve only parts of the island or those of shorter durations are more difficult to quantify. Costs to the island's economy have exceeded $4.5 M $4.5M"> per year over a 7-yr period without considering repair costs, damage to electrical equipment, and lost revenues. Snakes pose the greatest problem on high voltage transmission lines, on transformers, and inside electrical substations.

  17. Assessment of direct causes and costs of medical admissions in Bingham University Teaching Hospital – Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter U Bassi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available >Background: As health-care costs continue to rise and the population ages, an individual Nigerian continues to experience financial hardship in settling medical bills, especially when health insurance schemes are still far from reality for most Nigerians, making health-care financing burdensome in Nigeria like many developing countries. This has made out-of-pocket expenditure the most common form of health-care financing.Aims: This study assessed the average costs, duration, and causes of inpatient admission so as to know the direct costs associated with medical care for proper health-care planning.Settings and Design: This was a pilot study of a prospective cohort design whereby all patients were admitted to medical wards during the study period.Materials and Methods: Cost analysis was performed from the societal perspective, but included only direct medical care cost for this analysis. Patients input charts and pharmacy dispensing charts of all patients admitted to medical wards between May and July 2015 were reviewed. All costs were in local currency (Naira using the average exchange rates proposed by Central Bank of Nigeria for June 2015.Statistical sAnalysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 20.Results: A total of 293 out of 320 patients met inclusion criteria and were assessed. Female patients admitted during the study period had an overall higher mean cost of care ₦84, 303.94 ± 6860.56 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68,991.65–96,103.27 compared to male patients ₦68, 601.59 ± 57,178.37 (95% CI: 59,081.51–78,121.67 (P < 0.102. Civil servants had higher mean overall costs of care ₦90, 961.70 ± 105,175.62 (95% CI: 65,883.46–116,039.94 (P < 0.203.Conclusions: The higher prevalence of female patients with higher mean cost of inpatient care in this study suggests that Jos females may be more health conscious than their male counterparts. Overall mean cost of inpatient care stay was not proportional to

  18. An estimated cost of lost climate regulation services caused by thawing of the Arctic cryosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Goodstein, Eban S; Huntington, Henry P

    2013-12-01

    Recent and expected changes in Arctic sea ice cover, snow cover, and methane emissions from permafrost thaw are likely to result in large positive feedbacks to climate warming. There is little recognition of the significant loss in economic value that the disappearance of Arctic sea ice, snow, and permafrost will impose on humans. Here, we examine how sea ice and snow cover, as well as methane emissions due to changes in permafrost, may potentially change in the future, to year 2100, and how these changes may feed back to influence the climate. Between 2010 and 2100, the annual costs from the extra warming due to a decline in albedo related to losses of sea ice and snow, plus each year's methane emissions, cumulate to a present value cost to society ranging from US$7.5 trillion to US$91.3 trillion. The estimated range reflects uncertainty associated with (1) the extent of warming-driven positive climate feedbacks from the thawing cryosphere and (2) the expected economic damages per metric ton of CO2 equivalents that will be imposed by added warming, which depend, especially, on the choice of discount rate. The economic uncertainty is much larger than the uncertainty in possible future feedback effects. Nonetheless, the frozen Arctic provides immense services to all nations by cooling the earth's temperature: the cryosphere is an air conditioner for the planet. As the Arctic thaws, this critical, climate-stabilizing ecosystem service is being lost. This paper provides a first attempt to monetize the cost of some of those lost services.

  19. Costs resulting from premature mortality due to cardiovascular causes: A 20-year follow-up of the DRECE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Cámara, A; Pinilla-Domínguez, P; Vázquez-Fernández Del Pozo, S; García-Pérez, L; Rubio-Herrera, M A; Gómez-Gerique, J A; Gutiérrez-Fuentes, J A; Rivero-Cuadrado, A; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the leading cause of death in Spain. The DRECE study (Diet and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Spain), based on a representative cohort of the Spanish general population, analyzed nutritional habits and lifestyle and their association with morbidity and mortality patterns. We estimated the impact, in terms of loss of productivity, of premature mortality attributed to cardiovascular diseases. The loss of productivity attributed to premature mortality was calculated from 1991, based on the potential years of life lost and the potential years of working life lost. During the 20-year follow-up of a cohort of 4779 patients, 225 of these patients died (men, 152). Sixteen percent of the deaths were attributed to cardiovascular disease. The costs due to lost productivity by premature mortality exceeded 29 million euros. Of these, 4 million euros (14% of the total cost) were due to cardiovascular causes. Premature cardiovascular mortality in the DRECE cohort represented a significant social cost due to lost productivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Importance of diagnostic laboratory methods of beta hemolytic streptococcus group A in comparison with clinical findings in the diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat and unnecessary antibacterial therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Eini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus Pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is the most important cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common conditions in all ages but it is most common in children. Over diagnosis of acute pharyngitis represents one of the major causes of antibiotic abuse. The goal of this study is to make an estimate of the frequency of group A streptococcus in sore throat patients in Farshchian hospital emergency department and clinic in Hamadan. Methods: For estimation of the clinical features role in diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat, we took samples of 100 patients with average age of 32.96±29.86 years with sore throat. We took samples from pharynx and used standard methods of bacteriology in order to detect streptococcus. Results: Group A Streptococcus (GAS accounts for 3 percent of all cases of pharyngitis. Clinically, all of the patients had sore throat. The percent breakdowns are as follows: 30% had exudate, 78% had fever, 8% had lymphadenopathy and 7.7 percent of exudative pharyngitis was streptococcal. The cost for unnecessary antibiotic therapy for every single patient who had negative pharynx culture was approximately 32160 Rails. Conclusion: The low frequency of streptococcus pharyngitis in treated patients reveal that diagnosis based on clinical features is not reliable. We recommend use of other diagnostic methods such as Rapid Antigen Detection Tests (RATs. Only reliable and scientific protocols for antibiotic to therapy.

  1. Re-evaluating the relationships among filtering activity, unnecessary storage, and visual working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Stephen M; Busseri, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    The amount of task-irrelevant information encoded in visual working memory (VWM), referred to as unnecessary storage, has been proposed as a potential mechanism underlying individual differences in VWM capacity. In addition, a number of studies have provided evidence for additional activity that initiates the filtering process originating in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia, and is therefore a crucial step in the link between unnecessary storage and VWM capacity. Here, we re-examine data from two prominent studies that identified unnecessary storage activity as a predictor of VWM capacity by directly testing the implied path model linking filtering-related activity, unnecessary storage, and VWM capacity. Across both studies, we found that unnecessary storage was not a significant predictor of individual differences in VWM capacity once activity associated with filtering was accounted for; instead, activity associated with filtering better explained variation in VWM capacity. These findings suggest that unnecessary storage is not a limiting factor in VWM performance, whereas neural activity associated with filtering may play a more central role in determining VWM performance that goes beyond preventing unnecessary storage.

  2. Nuclear power unnecessary for climate protection. There are more cost-efficient alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemfert, Claudia; Oei, Pao-Yu [DIW Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Energy, Transportation, Environment; Burandt, Thorsten; Hainsch, Karlo [TU Berlin (Germany); Loeffler, Konstantin [TU Berlin (Germany); DIW Berlin (Germany); Hirschhausen, Christian von [DIW Berlin (Germany). International Infrastructure Policy and Industrial Organization

    2017-07-01

    The world needs to continue working to protect the climate - this is generally undisputed. However, there is no agreement on which technologies should be used to decarbonize the energy sector. Many international scenarios still assume a relevant role for nuclear power in the future. However, a study by the German Institute for Economic Research shows that the Paris climate protection target - limiting global warming to below two degrees - can be achieved inexpensively without nuclear power. The results of a global energy system model indicate that no new nuclear power plants have to be built in order to meet the global climate target. It would be cheaper to use a combination of renewable energy and energy storage systems.

  3. [An initiative to reduce the use of unnecessary medication in infants with bronchiolitis in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo Fernández, Marta; Benito Manrique, Iñaki; Montiel Eguía, Arantza; Benito Fernández, Javier

    2018-05-23

    Although evidence-based guidelines for acute bronchiolitis recommend primarily supportive care unnecessary treatments remain well documented. The objective of this study was to analyse a quality improvement initiative to reduce overuse of unnecessary treatments in infants with acute bronchiolitis in primary care settings. To determine the number of unnecessary treatments we reviewed the charts corresponding to infants aged initiative may be applied to the settings where the majority of infants with acute bronchiolitis are attended in western countries. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Inappropriately Timed Pediatric Orthopaedic Referrals From the Emergency Department Result in Unnecessary Appointments and Financial Burden for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Taylor J; Blumberg, Todd J; Shah, Apurva S; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2018-03-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are among the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) visits in the pediatric population. Many such injuries can be managed with a single follow-up outpatient visit. However, untimely (ie, premature) referrals by emergency physicians to orthopaedic surgeons are common and may inadvertently create need for a second visit, generating unnecessary expenditures. We sought to elucidate the cost of premature musculoskeletal follow-up visits to the patients, families, and the health care system. We performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients with acute musculoskeletal injuries referred from our ED (without a formal orthopaedic consult) to our outpatient clinic. Patients were retrospectively reviewed in a consecutive fashion. The appropriateness of the recommended follow-up time interval was determined for each patient, and the direct and indirect cost of the inappropriate services were calculated utilizing a combination of traditional cost accounting techniques and time-driven activity-based costing. The characteristics of patients with appropriate and untimely follow-up referrals were compared. Two hundred consecutive referrals from the ED were reviewed. Overall, 96.5% of the follow-up visits recommended by the ED were premature, which led 106 (53%) patients to require a second visit to complete their clinical care. Patients who required a second visit were significantly younger (P=0.005), more likely to be male (P=0.042), more likely to have a fracture (Pcost of $342.93 per patient. Untimely referrals for follow-up of acute pediatric musculoskeletal conditions are very common and represent a significant financial burden to patients, families, and the health care system. Over 40% of unnecessary visits resulted from just 3 diagnoses. Improved orthopaedic follow-up guidelines, particularly for these readily recognizable conditions, and feedback to referring providers may reduce poorly timed clinic visits and decrease costs in

  5. [Unnecessary premature and avoidable mortality in Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca Castro, Fernando; Ortún Rubio, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    With the intention of establishing economic inequities, the article analyzes the variations of the Unnecessarily Premature and Sanitarily Avoidable Mortality (MIPSE) of each of the 81 cantons of Costa Rica during 2000-2005. It is important to identify those inequities, to establish policies and strategies trying to mitigate them. It applies the MIPSE classification proposed by members of the Information and Studies Service, of the Catalunya's Sanitary Resources Headquarter, Spain. By an Indicator of Socioeconomic Development (IDSE) of a University of Costa Rica economist's team, it organised each canton in groups of quintiles (I for the richest, V for the poorest), previous people standardization. We found as a major causes of mortality MIPSE in the country: Heart Isquemic Disease (19,55% MIPSE causes), Traffic Accidents with Motor Vehicles (11,60%), Brain Vascular Disease (6,95%), Perinatal (6,92%) and Suicide (5,14%). The VIH infection - AIDS mortality, the Best Cancer in Women, Uterus Cancer, Skin Cancer and Hepatic Disease Secondary to Alcohol Consumption, affects more the cantons with better financial conditions and the Prostate Benign Hyperplasia mortality, Mothers mortality related with Pregnancy, Childbirth or Puerperal Stage and the Abdominal Hernia mortality, affects more to those with worst economic level. Two MIPSE groups were identified with similar inequality: Leukaemia and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease.

  6. Achalasia-an unnecessary long way to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebisch, S; Hadzijusufovic, E; Mehdorn, M; Müller, M; Scheuermann, U; Lyros, O; Schulz, H G; Jansen-Winkeln, B; Lang, H; Gockel, I

    2017-05-01

    Although achalasia presents with typical symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation, weight loss, and atypical chest pain, the time until first diagnosis often takes years and is frustrating for patients and nevertheless associated with high costs for the healthcare system. A total of 563 patients were interviewed with confirmed diagnosis of achalasia regarding their symptoms leading to diagnosis along with past clinical examinations and treatments. Included were patients who had undergone their medical investigations in Germany. Overall, 527 study subjects were included (male 46%, female 54%, mean age at time of interview 51 ± 14.8 years). Dysphagia was present in 86.7%, regurgitation in 82.9%, atypical chest pain in 79%, and weight loss in 58% of patients before diagnosis. On average, it took 25 months (Interquartile Range (IQR) 9-65) until confirmation of correct diagnosis of achalasia. Though, diagnosis was confirmed significantly quicker (35 months IQR 9-89 vs. 20 months IQR 8-53; p surgical myotomy. Endoscopic dilatation was realized significantly faster compared to esophageal myotomy (1 month IQR 0-4 vs. 3 months IQR 1-11; p achalasia was significantly faster in the past 15 years, it still takes almost 2 years until the correct diagnosis of achalasia is confirmed. Alarming is the fact that although esophageal manometry is known as the gold standard to differentiate primary motility disorders, only three out of four patients had undergone this diagnostic pathway during their diagnostic work-up. Better education of medical professionals and broader utilization of highly sensitive diagnostic tools, such as high-resolution manometry, are strictly necessary in order to correctly diagnose affected patients and to offer therapy faster. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. "Violence" in medicine: necessary and unnecessary, intentional and unintentional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2018-06-11

    We are more used to thinking of medicine in relation to the ways that it alleviates the effects of violence. Yet an important thread in the academic literature acknowledges that medicine can also be responsible for perpetuating violence, albeit unintentionally, against the very individuals it intends to help. In this essay, I discuss definitions of violence, emphasizing the importance of understanding the term not only as a physical perpetration but as an act of power of one person over another. I next explore the paradox of a healing profession that is permeated with violence sometimes necessary, often unintentional, and almost always unrecognized. Identifying the construct of "physician arrogance" as contributory to violence, I go on to identify different manifestations of violence in a medical context, including violence to the body; structural violence; metaphoric violence; and the practice of speaking to or about patients (and others in the healthcare system in ways that minimize or disrespect their full humanity. I further suggest possible explanations for the origins of these kinds of violence in physicians, including the fear of suffering and death in relation to vicarious trauma and the consequent concept of "killing suffering"; as well as why patients might be willing to accept such violence directed toward them. I conclude with brief recommendations for attending to root causes of violence, both within societal and institutional structures, and within ourselves, offering the model of the wounded healer.

  8. The value of a poison control center in preventing unnecessary ED visits and hospital charges: A multi-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Casey R; Malheiro, Marty C; Bennett, Heather K W; Crouch, Barbara I

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the economic value of the Utah Poison Control Center (UPCC) by examining its contribution to the reduction of unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and associated charges across multiple years. A multi-year (2009-2014) analysis of cross-sectional data was performed. Callers were asked what they would do for a poison emergency if the UPCC was not available. Healthcare charges for ED visits averted were calculated according to insurance status using charges obtained from a statewide database. Of the 10,656 survey attempts, 5018 were completed. Over 30,000 cases were managed on-site each year. Using the proportion of callers who noted they would call 911, visit an ED, or call a physician's office, between 20.0 and 24.2 thousand ED visits were potentially prevented each year of the survey. Between $16.6 and $24.4 million dollars in unnecessary healthcare charges were potentially averted annually. Compared to the cost of operation, the service UPCC provides demonstrates economic value by reducing ED visits and associated charges. As the majority of patients have private insurance, the largest benefit falls to private payers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health: a prospective analysis of Danish human service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne; Rugulies, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    According to the "stress-as-offense-to-self" perspective, work tasks that are considered unnecessary or unreasonable - so-called "illegitimate work tasks" - are likely to elicit stress-reactions. Previous studies, mostly cross-sectional, have shown that illegitimate tasks are associated with increased self-reported stress, cortisol, and counterproductive work behavior. In this article, we examine the prospective association between unnecessary work tasks, one type of illegitimate work tasks, and mental health among Danish human service workers. Further, we explore whether this association is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item, and assessed mental health using the 5-item mental health inventory from the Short form 36 questionnaire. We analyzed data using multi-level modeling, adjusting for potential confounding by sex, age, cohabitation, occupational position, and baseline mental health. Unnecessary work tasks were prospectively associated with a decreased level of mental health. This association was stronger for employees with poor baseline mental health and tended to be more pronounced among older employees. Among participants with poor baseline mental health, the association was explained by neither psychological demands nor decision latitude. Our findings suggest that the prevention of unnecessary work tasks may benefit employee mental health, particularly among employees with pre-existing mental health problems.

  10. Misdiagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia leading to unnecessary root canal treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jong-Ki; Shin, Su-Jung

    2013-08-01

    This case report demonstrates an unnecessary endodontic treatment of teeth with florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) due to a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis and emphasizes the importance of correct diagnosis to avoid unnecessary treatment. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our institution for apicoectomies of the mandibular left canine and both the lateral incisors. The periapical lesions associated with these teeth had failed to resolve after root canal treatment over a 3-year period. Radiographic examinations revealed multiple lesions on the right canine, the second premolar, and both first molars as well as the anterior region of the mandible. Based on clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations, the patient condition was diagnosed as FCOD. The patient has been monitored for 2 years. To avoid unnecessary invasive treatment, accurate diagnosis is essential before treatment is carried out in managing FCOD.

  11. The impact of evaluating platelet transfusion need by platelet mass index on reducing the unnecessary transfusions in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahvecioglu, Dilek; Erdeve, Omer; Alan, Serdar; Cakir, Ufuk; Yildiz, Duran; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2014-11-01

    Almost 95% of the platelet transfusions (PTs) conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are prophylactic transfusions. Guidelines for prophylactic PTs are based on platelet counts, but not on platelet functions. Nowadays, in order to reduce unnecessary transfusions, utilizing platelet mass index (PMI) was investigated. The aim of study is to find out whether PTs performed in our NICU during last 2 years were in accordance with the current guideline and to evaluate whether the frequency of PTs should be reduced if PMI was considered. Forty-three infants who received 96 prophylactic PTs were enrolled in the study. The guideline utilized in our NICU advocate keeping the platelet count: (a) >100 000 in pre/post-operative, (b) >50 000 in unstable and (c) >20 000 in stable patients. According to PMI criteria, PT should be performed if PMI: (a) platelet functions into account may yield lower transfusion rate, lower costs and better conservation of blood bank resources.

  12. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage manifesting as acute scrotum: timely diagnosis prevents unnecessary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Luigi; Fusillo, Mario; Ferrari, Giovanna; Chiara, Alberto; Bragheri, Romano

    2002-04-01

    Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as scrotal swelling has been reported in 17 cases, with unnecessary surgical exploration in 7. We report 2 new cases, emphasizing the knowledge of this clinical association and the role of ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis for this specific condition and in all cases of neonatal acute scrotum.

  13. 77 FR 29579 - Removing Unnecessary Office on Violence Against Women Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... now unnecessary STOP VAIW Program regulations. Higher Education Amendments of 1998 Violence against... Office on Violence Against Women Regulations AGENCY: Office on Violence Against Women, Justice. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This rule proposes to remove the regulations for the STOP Violence Against Indian...

  14. Cost Comparison of Linezolid Versus Vancomycin for Treatment of Complicated Skin and Skin-Structure Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Pettigrew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Canada, complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is usually treated with antibiotics in hospital, with a follow-up course at home for stable patients. The cost implications of using intravenous and oral linezolid instead of intravenous vancomycin in Canadian clinical practice have not been examined.

  15. Intra- and Trans-Generational Costs of Reduced Female Body Size Caused by Food Limitation Early in Life in Mites

    OpenAIRE

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Food limitation early in life may be compensated for by developmental plasticity resulting in accelerated development enhancing survival at the expense of small adult body size. However and especially for females in non-matching maternal and offspring environments, being smaller than the standard may incur considerable intra- and trans-generational costs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we evaluated the costs of small female body size induced by food limitation early in life i...

  16. Reduction in unnecessary red blood cell folate testing by restricting computerized physician order entry in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Thomas E; Gudgeon, Patrick; Yip, Paul M; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B

    2018-05-02

    Red blood cell folate is a laboratory test with limited clinical utility. Previous attempts to reduce physician ordering of unnecessary laboratory tests, including folate, have resulted in only modest success. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and impacts of restricting red blood cell folate ordering in the electronic health record. This was a retrospective observational study from January 2010 to December 2016 at a large academic healthcare network in Toronto, Canada. All inpatients and outpatients who underwent at least 1 red blood cell folate or vitamin B12 test during the study period were included. Red blood cell folate ordering was restricted to clincians in gastroenterology and hematology and was removed from other physicians' computerized order entry screen in the electronic health record in June 2013. Red blood cell folate testing decreased by 94.4% during the study, from a mean of 493.0 (SD 48.0) tests/month before intervention to 27.6 (SD 10.3) tests/month after intervention (P<.001). Restricting red blood cell folate ordering in the electronic health record resulted in a large and sustained reduction in red blood cell folate testing. Significant cost savings estimated at over a quarter-million dollars (CAD) over three years were achieved. There was no significant clinical impact of the intervention on the diagnosis of folate deficiency. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, pSMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was -1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD -0.37; pSMD, -1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits.

  18. Reply to: Mounting evidence indicates that escalating doses of allopurinol are unnecessary for cardiovascular protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Brian W; Michaud, Kaleb; Bergman, Debra A; Mikuls, Ted R

    2018-05-08

    We thank Dr. Bredemeier for his comments regarding our manuscript on allopurinol dose escalation and mortality. He raises important evidence to consider in support of an interesting hypothesis that dose escalation may be unnecessary for allopurinol's cardiovascular (CV) protection and may actually be related to adverse CV outcomes. While we agree that evidence exists suggesting that low doses of allopurinol may be sufficient for CV protection, we believe that the studies cited highlight a number of areas where knowledge gaps remain which preclude any definitive conclusions about the effect of dose escalation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Intra- and trans-generational costs of reduced female body size caused by food limitation early in life in mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Food limitation early in life may be compensated for by developmental plasticity resulting in accelerated development enhancing survival at the expense of small adult body size. However and especially for females in non-matching maternal and offspring environments, being smaller than the standard may incur considerable intra- and trans-generational costs. Here, we evaluated the costs of small female body size induced by food limitation early in life in the sexually size-dimorphic predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. Females are larger than males. These predators are adapted to exploit ephemeral spider mite prey patches. The intra- and trans-generational effects of small maternal body size manifested in lower maternal survival probabilities, decreased attractiveness for males, and a reduced number and size of eggs compared to standard-sized females. The trans-generational effects of small maternal body size were sex-specific with small mothers producing small daughters but standard-sized sons. Small female body size apparently intensified the well-known costs of sexual activity because mortality of small but not standard-sized females mainly occurred shortly after mating. The disadvantages of small females in mating and egg production may be generally explained by size-associated morphological and physiological constraints. Additionally, size-assortative mate preferences of standard-sized mates may have rendered small females disproportionally unattractive mating partners. We argue that the sex-specific trans-generational effects were due to sexual size dimorphism - females are the larger sex and thus more strongly affected by maternal stress than the smaller males - and to sexually selected lower plasticity of male body size.

  20. Intra- and Trans-Generational Costs of Reduced Female Body Size Caused by Food Limitation Early in Life in Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Food limitation early in life may be compensated for by developmental plasticity resulting in accelerated development enhancing survival at the expense of small adult body size. However and especially for females in non-matching maternal and offspring environments, being smaller than the standard may incur considerable intra- and trans-generational costs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we evaluated the costs of small female body size induced by food limitation early in life in the sexually size-dimorphic predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. Females are larger than males. These predators are adapted to exploit ephemeral spider mite prey patches. The intra- and trans-generational effects of small maternal body size manifested in lower maternal survival probabilities, decreased attractiveness for males, and a reduced number and size of eggs compared to standard-sized females. The trans-generational effects of small maternal body size were sex-specific with small mothers producing small daughters but standard-sized sons. Conclusions/Significance Small female body size apparently intensified the well-known costs of sexual activity because mortality of small but not standard-sized females mainly occurred shortly after mating. The disadvantages of small females in mating and egg production may be generally explained by size-associated morphological and physiological constraints. Additionally, size-assortative mate preferences of standard-sized mates may have rendered small females disproportionally unattractive mating partners. We argue that the sex-specific trans-generational effects were due to sexual size dimorphism – females are the larger sex and thus more strongly affected by maternal stress than the smaller males – and to sexually selected lower plasticity of male body size. PMID:24265745

  1. Intra- and trans-generational costs of reduced female body size caused by food limitation early in life in mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Walzer

    Full Text Available Food limitation early in life may be compensated for by developmental plasticity resulting in accelerated development enhancing survival at the expense of small adult body size. However and especially for females in non-matching maternal and offspring environments, being smaller than the standard may incur considerable intra- and trans-generational costs.Here, we evaluated the costs of small female body size induced by food limitation early in life in the sexually size-dimorphic predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. Females are larger than males. These predators are adapted to exploit ephemeral spider mite prey patches. The intra- and trans-generational effects of small maternal body size manifested in lower maternal survival probabilities, decreased attractiveness for males, and a reduced number and size of eggs compared to standard-sized females. The trans-generational effects of small maternal body size were sex-specific with small mothers producing small daughters but standard-sized sons.Small female body size apparently intensified the well-known costs of sexual activity because mortality of small but not standard-sized females mainly occurred shortly after mating. The disadvantages of small females in mating and egg production may be generally explained by size-associated morphological and physiological constraints. Additionally, size-assortative mate preferences of standard-sized mates may have rendered small females disproportionally unattractive mating partners. We argue that the sex-specific trans-generational effects were due to sexual size dimorphism - females are the larger sex and thus more strongly affected by maternal stress than the smaller males - and to sexually selected lower plasticity of male body size.

  2. Custos dos problemas causados pelo abuso do álcool The cost of problems caused by alcohol abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Donatti Gallassi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O abuso de álcool é considerado atualmente um dos maiores problemas de saúde devido ao impacto mundial que esta problemática gera em termos sociais e financeiros. OBJETIVOS: Discutir, a partir do referencial econômico, as conseqüências sociais do abuso do álcool e introduzir os conceitos relacionados à economia da saúde. MÉTODOS: Revisão da literatura com base nos sistemas Medline, LILACS e Scielo de artigos publicados nas línguas, portuguesa e inglesa no período de 1987 a 2007, e posterior busca manual com base na bibliografia de interesse dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados 50 artigos sobre estudos econômicos e conceitos econômicos em diversas áreas; desses, 15 diretamente relacionados ao custo social do abuso do álcool. O método de apuração dos custos e a composição dos itens de custos foram semelhantes em todos os estudos. CONCLUSÕES: Os estudos econômicos se apresentam incipientes no Brasil e avançados nos países desenvolvidos. A necessidade de pesquisas nacionais que abordem o custo social do abuso do álcool tem como uma das finalidades promover subsídios para se pensar e efetivar a construção de políticas públicas mais consistentes e que estejam em consonância com o perfil epidemiológico e socioeconômico do país.BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse is currently considered one of the largest worldwide health problems due to its social and financial impact. OBJECTIVES: To discuss the economic and social impact of alcohol abuse and to introduce concepts related to health economics. METHODS: Literature review of articles written in Portuguese and in English (published between 1987 and 2007 stored in the MEDLINE, LILACS and Scielo databases was carried out. RESULTS: Fifty articles on economic studies and economic concepts in various areas were found, among which 15 were directly related to the social costs of alcohol abuse. The costs assessment methods and the composition of cost items

  3. Natural gas price uncertainty and the cost-effectiveness of hedging against low hydropower revenues caused by drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D.; Characklis, Gregory W.; Foster, Benjamin T.

    2015-04-01

    Prolonged periods of low reservoir inflows (droughts) significantly reduce a hydropower producer's ability to generate both electricity and revenues. Given the capital intensive nature of the electric power industry, this can impact hydropower producers' ability to pay down outstanding debt, leading to credit rating downgrades, higher interests rates on new debt, and ultimately, greater infrastructure costs. One potential tool for reducing the financial exposure of hydropower producers to drought is hydrologic index insurance, in particular, contracts structured to payout when streamflows drop below a specified level. An ongoing challenge in developing this type of insurance, however, is minimizing contracts' "basis risk," that is, the degree to which contract payouts deviate in timing and/or amount from actual damages experienced by policyholders. In this paper, we show that consideration of year-to-year changes in the value of hydropower (i.e., the cost of replacing it with an alternative energy source during droughts) is critical to reducing contract basis risk. In particular, we find that volatility in the price of natural gas, a key driver of peak electricity prices, can significantly degrade the performance of index insurance unless contracts are designed to explicitly consider natural gas prices when determining payouts. Results show that a combined index whose value is derived from both seasonal streamflows and the spot price of natural gas yields contracts that exhibit both lower basis risk and greater effectiveness in terms of reducing financial exposure.

  4. Thoracic splenosis. Know it-avoid unnecessary investigations, interventions, and thoracotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.M.; Manzoor, K.; Malik, Z.; Yasim, A.; Shim, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic splenosis (TS) is autoimplantation of ectopic splenic tissue in the thoracic cavity that occurs following splenic injury. Most cases of TS are asymptomatic and are diagnosed during the course of an evaluation of incidentally discovered pulmonary lesions. Some cases may be difficult to diagnose, especially if features suggesting TS are not recognized. This may lead to an extensive workup and unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures including thoracotomy. Multiple, asymptomatic, left-sided pleura-based lesions associated with a history of thoracoabdominal injury and splenectomy are the key points that should alert one to suspect TS, which can then simply be confirmed with a 99m Tc-sulfa colloid radionuclide scan. If TS is suspected and radionuclide imaging studies are performed, further extensive investigations, such as bronchoscopy, biopsy, thoracoscopy, and thoracotomy, are not required as the radionuclide scan is definitive for diagnosis. Most cases are asymptomatic, so further treatment is rarely required; all cases are managed conservatively. We emphasize that all physicians, radiologists, pathologists, and interventionalists should recognize key features that suggest the diagnosis of TS, order appropriate imaging when it is suspected, and avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures including thoracotomy. (author)

  5. DOJ News Release: West Palm Beach Sellers of Unnecessary Septic Tank Products Plead Guilty to Wire Fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nouerand and Lincoln, in concert with other employees of FBK Products, LLC., knowingly participated in a scheme to fraudulently market and sell an unnecessary and unneeded septic treatment product to residents of various states across the country.

  6. Health hazard of the Tokai mura nuclear accident. Unnecessary fear and improper health checks should be eliminated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takebe, Hiraku

    2000-01-01

    Three workers were heavily exposed to radiations in the Tokai mura nuclear accident, and one of them died due to the acute effects of radiations. Doses for the heavily exposed persons were estimated to be 2.5, 10 and 18 Sv, according to the Science and Technology Agency. Workers who tried to stop the chain reaction by breaking the water pipe were estimated to have been exposed up to 120 mSv. Possible doses for other workers and residents in the neighborhoods were estimated to be less than 10 mSv, with a few workers with slightly higher film badge records. After the accident, many reports in mass-media warned that the exposed persons may develop cancers and leukemias in future and follow-up healthcare should be needed. Judging from our knowledge of the extensive epidemiological survey of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, these reports are very misleading. There would be absolutely no or extremely small possibility of developing any health hazard among the workers and the residents except for the three unfortunate heavily exposed workers. If so-called follow-up health checks would involve x-ray diagnosis for cancers, the radiation doses by the diagnosis would exceed the exposure by the accident. Also, the test for the DNA damage applied to some workers and residents is not reliable at all, and could cause unnecessary fear among the persons who were mistakingly said to be of high-risk. (author)

  7. A Controlled Quasi-Experimental Study of an Educational Intervention to Reduce the Unnecessary Use of Antimicrobials For Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan, Neal; Brooks, Annie; Mithoowani, Siraj; Celetti, Steve J.; Main, Cheryl; Mertz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) should only be treated in cases of pregnancy or in-patients undergoing urologic procedures; however, unnecessary treatment of ABU is common in clinical practice. Objective To identify risk factors for unnecessary treatment and to assess the impact of an educational intervention focused on these risk factors on treatment of ABU. Design Quasi-experimental study with a control group. Setting Two tertiary teaching adult care hospitals. Participants Consec...

  8. Targeting the underlying causes of undernutrition. Cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial personalized intervention in community-dwelling older adults: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pols-Vijlbrief, Rachel; Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; Bosmans, Judith E; Twisk, Jos W R; Visser, Marjolein

    2017-12-01

    Undernutrition in old age is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Treatment by caloric supplementation results in weight gain, but compliance is poor in the long run. Few studies targeted underlying causes of undernutrition in community-dwelling older adults. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial personalized intervention focused on eliminating or managing the underlying causes of undernutrition to prevent and reduce undernutrition in comparison with usual care. A randomized controlled trial was performed among 155 community-dwelling older adults receiving home care with or at risk of undernutrition. The intervention included a personalized action plan and 6 months support. The control group received usual care. Body weight, and secondary outcomes were measured in both groups at baseline and 6 months follow-up. Multiple imputation, linear regression and generalized estimating equation analyses were used to analyze intervention effects. In the cost-effectiveness analyses regression models were bootstrapped to estimate statistical uncertainty. This intervention showed no statistically significant effects on body weight, mid-upper arm circumference, grip strength, gait speed and 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey physical component scale as compared to usual care, but there was an effect on the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey mental component scale (0-100) (β = 8.940, p=0.001). Borderline significant intervention effects were found for both objective and subjective physical function measures, Short Physical Performance Battery (0-12) (β = 0.56, p=0.08) and ADL-Barthel score (0-20) (β = 0.69, p=0.09). Societal costs in the intervention group were statistically non-significantly lower than in the control group (mean difference -274; 95% CI -1111; 782). Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves showed that the probability of cost-effectiveness was 0.72 at a willingness-to-pay of 1000

  9. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  10. Influence of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI with or without SPIO particles on therapy and therapy costs for patients with focal liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.; Gregor, M.; Holzknecht, N.; Scheidler, J.; Reiser, M.; Rau, H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy and cost-benefit of contrast enhanced CT (CT) and MRI pre- and post-SPIO-particles in focal hepatic disease with consideration of therapeutic outcome. Results: In 34/52 (65.4%) of the cases the correct diagnosis was primarily stated by CT (sensitivity [se.] 85.2%, specificity [sp.] 44.0%). In additional 10/52 of the cases unenhanced MRI (se. 91.4%, sp. 75.0%) enabled correct diagnoses, and in another 6 cases the diagnosis was established only by SPIO-MRI (se. 100%, sp. 86.7%). Considering the possible therapeutic recommendation arising from each modality, CT would have induced needless therapy costs of 191,042 DM, unenhanced MRI of 171,035 DM, and SPIO-MRI of 7,311 DM. In comparison to the real therapy costs of 221,873 DM, this would have corresponded to an unnecessary increase of therapy costs of 86.1%, 77.1%, and 3.3%, respectively. In two cases (91 hemangioma, 1 regenerative nodule) all modalities failed, causing unnecessary surgery in one patient. Discussion: In this problem-oriented scenario unenhanced and SPIO-enhanced MRI proved to be superior to CT regarding diagnostic efficacy. The cost-benefit resulted mainly due to preserving patients from unnecessary surgical procedures. (orig./AJ) [de

  11. Routine preoperative blood group and save testing is unnecessary for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, A.; Shahzad, K.; Nunes, Q.; Shrotri, M.; Lunevicius, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although the practice of preoperative testing of ABO group and Rh (D) type for elective cholecystectomy has deep historical roots, it is not evidence-based. We aimed to assess the preoperative blood group and save testing practice for a cohort of patients subjected to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholecystolithiasis between January 2010 and October 2014. Methods: National Health Service (NHS) hospital based, surgical procedure-specific, retrospective study was conducted. A final group consisted of 2,079 adult patients. We estimated the incidence of perioperative blood transfusion attributable to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The results of eight other studies are presented. Results: A preoperative blood group and save test was performed in 907 patients (43.6%), whereas cross-matching was documented in 28 patients (3.1%). None required an intraoperative blood transfusion. Twelve patients (0.58%) underwent blood transfusion postoperatively following laparoscopic cholecystectomy, of which ten were transfused due to severe intra-abdominal bleeding (0.48%). There were no deaths. Conclusions: The likelihood of blood transfusion attributable to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy is 1:200. A routine preoperative blood group and save testing is unnecessary. It neither alters the management of severe hypovolemia, secondary to perioperative bleeding, nor does it lead to better outcomes. (author)

  12. A case of autoimmune cholangitis misdiagnosed for cholangiocarcinoma: How to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Igor I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune cholangitis or immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis (IAC has been recently regarded as a new clinical and histopathological entity and is a part of a complex autoimmune disorder - IgG4-related systemic disease (ISD. ISD is an autoimmune disease with multi-organic involvement, characterized with IgG4-positive plasmocytic infiltration of various tissues and organs with a consequent sclerosis, which responds well to steroid therapy. Most commonly affected organs are the pancreas (autoimmune pancreatitis, [AIP] and the common bile duct (IAC. IAC and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA share many clinical, laboratory and imaging findings. Case Outline. We present a case of a 60-year-old male with a biliary stricture of a common bile duct, which was clinically considered as a bile duct carcinoma and treated surgically. Definite histopathological findings and immunohistochemistry revealed profound chronic inflammation, showing lymphoplasmacytic IgG-positive infiltration of a resected part of a common bile duct, highly suggestive for the diagnosis of IAC. In addition, postoperative IgG4 serum levels were also increased. Conclusion. It is of primary clinical importance to make a difference between IAC and CCA, in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention. Therefore, IAC should be considered in differential diagnosis in similar cases.

  13. Clostridium difficile multidisciplinary team root cause analysis: impact on clinical care and circumvention of financial penalties posed by clinical commissioning groups, but at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Kordo; Petridou, Christina; Gray, Hazel; Dryden, Matthew; Davis-Blues, Karen; Lucero, Sheryl; Parker, Natalie; Keyser, Taryn; Matthews, Tanya; Cortes, Nick; Kidd, Stephen; Thomas, Claire; Peacock, Heather; Hornzee, Joanna; Wake, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    In Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, in addition to an on-the-spot investigation into hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by the infection prevention team, a multidisciplinary team root cause analysis (MDT-RCA) forum has been developed. The MDT-RCA aims to deliver a more thorough investigation into individual cases and the recommendation of cases to the clinical commissioning groups (CCG) appeals panel against potential financial penalties (£10,000 per breached case). We mainly aimed to investigate the financial impact of MDT-RCAs to the Trust. Over two years, 84 cases of hospital-onset CDI cases were reviewed by the MDT-RCA forum. Among this cohort, no additional learning outcomes were identified by the MDT-RCAs over those that were found by on-the-spot investigations. In total, 543 staff members attended the MDT-RCAs at a potential cost to the Trust of £23,795.74-£51,670.10. The Trust appealed against financial penalties for 27 cases and 14 were successful, i.e. £140,000 would have been avoided had targets been breached by 14 cases. However, targets were only breached by two cases, meaning only £20,000 in fines was avoided. Deducting this from the total costs of the MDT-RCA meant the Trust lost £3,795.74-£31,670.10. Over the two years reviewed, the MDT-RCA proved to be costly to the Trust, with no additional learning or quality improvement measures identified.

  14. Inadequacies of Physical Examination as a Cause of Medical Errors and Adverse Events: A Collection of Vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Abraham; Charlton, Blake; Kassirer, Jerome P; Ramsey, Meghan; Ioannidis, John P A

    2015-12-01

    Oversights in the physical examination are a type of medical error not easily studied by chart review. They may be a major contributor to missed or delayed diagnosis, unnecessary exposure to contrast and radiation, incorrect treatment, and other adverse consequences. Our purpose was to collect vignettes of physical examination oversights and to capture the diversity of their characteristics and consequences. A cross-sectional study using an 11-question qualitative survey for physicians was distributed electronically, with data collected from February to June of 2011. The participants were all physicians responding to e-mail or social media invitations to complete the survey. There were no limitations on geography, specialty, or practice setting. Of the 208 reported vignettes that met inclusion criteria, the oversight was caused by a failure to perform the physical examination in 63%; 14% reported that the correct physical examination sign was elicited but misinterpreted, whereas 11% reported that the relevant sign was missed or not sought. Consequence of the physical examination inadequacy included missed or delayed diagnosis in 76% of cases, incorrect diagnosis in 27%, unnecessary treatment in 18%, no or delayed treatment in 42%, unnecessary diagnostic cost in 25%, unnecessary exposure to radiation or contrast in 17%, and complications caused by treatments in 4%. The mode of the number of physicians missing the finding was 2, but many oversights were missed by many physicians. Most oversights took up to 5 days to identify, but 66 took longer. Special attention and skill in examining the skin and its appendages, as well as the abdomen, groin, and genitourinary area could reduce the reported oversights by half. Physical examination inadequacies are a preventable source of medical error, and adverse events are caused mostly by failure to perform the relevant examination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Re: Madsen et al. "Unnecessary work tasks and mental health: a prospective analysis of Danish human service workers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Moreau, Quentin; Loddé, Brice; Dewitte, Jean-Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Madsen et al (1) recently published a secondary analysis on data provided by the Project on Burnout, Motivation and Job Satisfaction (PUMA). The aim of their study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health was to examine the associations between unnecessary work tasks and a decreased level of mental health. Though the topic was quite novel, reading this work proved disturbing and raised issues. Based on the results of this study, the authors stated that there is an association between unnecessary work tasks (assessed by a single question) and a decreased level of mental health, idem [assessed by the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5)], in the specific population included in this PUMA survey. The authors point out a limitation of the study, namely that unnecessary work tasks were evaluated using one single question: "Do you sometimes have to do things in your job which appear to be unnecessary?". Semmer defines unnecessary work task as "tasks that should not be carried out at all because they do not make sense or because they could have been avoided, or could be carried out with less effort if things were organized more efficiently" (2). De facto, qualifying what an unnecessary task is requires stating or explaining whether the task makes sense. Making sense or not is not an objective notion. It is very difficult for either a manager or an employee to say if a task is necessary or not. Most important is that it makes sense from the worker's point of view. Making sense and being necessary are not synonyms. Some tasks do not make sense but are economically necessary (eg, when, as physicians, we are reporting our activity using ICD-10 on computers instead of being at patients' bedsides or reading this journal). Thus, there is a wide gap between Semmer's definition and the question used by the authors to evaluate his concept. A secondary analysis based on a single question is not adequate to evaluate unnecessary tasks. Nowadays, the general trend

  16. Pre-procedural scout radiographs are unnecessary for routine pediatric fluoroscopic examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creeden, Sean G.; Rao, Anil G.; Eklund, Meryle J.; Hill, Jeanne G.; Thacker, Paul G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Although practice patterns vary, scout radiographs are often routinely performed with pediatric fluoroscopic studies. However few studies have evaluated their utility in routine pediatric fluoroscopy. To evaluate the value of scout abdomen radiographs in routine barium or water-soluble enema, upper gastrointestinal (GI) series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures. We retrospectively evaluated 723 barium or water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram fluoroscopic procedures performed at our institution. We assessed patient history and demographics, clinical indication for the examination, prior imaging findings and impressions, scout radiograph findings, additional findings provided by the scout radiograph that were previously unknown, and whether the scout radiograph contributed any findings that significantly changed management. We retrospectively evaluated 723 fluoroscopic studies (368 males and 355 females) in pediatric patients. Of these, 700 (96.8%) had a preliminary scout radiograph. Twenty-three (3.2%) had a same-day radiograph substituted as a scout radiograph. Preliminary scout abdomen radiographs/same-day radiographs showed no new significant findings in 719 (99.4%) studies. New but clinically insignificant findings were seen in 4 (0.6%) studies and included umbilical hernia, inguinal hernia and hip dysplasia. No findings were found on the scout radiographs that would either alter the examination performed or change management with regard to the exam. Pre-procedural scout abdomen radiographs are unnecessary in routine barium and water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures and can be substituted with a spot fluoroscopic last-image hold. (orig.)

  17. "No zone" approach in penetrating neck trauma reduces unnecessary computed tomography angiography and negative explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Kareem; Khan, Muhammad; Rhee, Peter; Azim, Asad; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Joseph, Bellal

    2018-01-01

    The most recent management guidelines advocate computed tomography angiography (CTA) for any suspected vascular or aero-digestive injuries in all zones and give zone II injuries special consideration. We hypothesized that physical examination can safely guide CTA use in a "no zone" approach. An 8-year retrospective analysis of all adult trauma patients with penetrating neck trauma (PNT) was performed. We included all patients in whom the platysma was violated. Patients were classified into three groups as follows: hard signs, soft signs, and asymptomatic. CTA use, positive CTA (contrast extravasation, dissection, or intimal flap) and operative details were reported. Primary outcomes were positive CTA and therapeutic neck exploration (TNE) (defined by repair of major vascular or aero-digestive injuries). A total of 337 patients with PNT met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-two patients had hard signs and all of them went to the operating room, of which 59 (72%) had TNE. One hundred fifty-six patients had soft signs, of which CTA was performed in 121 (78%), with positive findings in 12 (10%) patients. The remaining 35 (22%) underwent initial neck exploration, of which 14 (40%) were therapeutic yielding a high rate of negative exploration. Ninty-nine patients were asymptomatic, of which CTA was performed in 79 (80%), with positive findings in 3 (4%), however, none of these patients required TNE. On sub analysis based on symptoms, there was no difference in the rate of TNE between the neck zones in patients with hard signs (P = 0.23) or soft signs (P = 0.51). Regardless of the zone of injury, asymptomatic patients did not require a TNE. Physical examination regardless of the zone of injury should be the primary guide to CTA or TNE in patients with PNT. Following traditional zone-based guidelines can result in unnecessary negative explorations in patients with soft signs and may need rethinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differences in All-Cause Health Care Utilization and Costs in a Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Population with and Without a History of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sander, Stephen; Kuti, Effie; Mountford, William K

    2018-03-01

    Multiple studies have reported that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and presence of T2DM and CVD increases risk of death. There is growing interest in examining the effects of antidiabetic treatments on the reduction of cardiovascular events in T2DM adults with a history of CVD and thus at higher risk of cardiovascular events. To estimate the incremental all-cause health care utilization and costs among adults with T2DM and a history of CVD compared with adults without a history of CVD, using a national linked electronic medical records (EMR) and claims database. Adults aged ≥ 18 years with evidence of at least 1 T2DM-related diagnosis code or antidiabetic medication (date of earliest occurrence was defined as the index date) in calendar year 2012 were identified. The population was divided into 2 cohorts (with and without a history of CVD) and followed until the end of their enrollment coverage, death, or 12 months, whichever came first. Multivariable generalized linear models were used to assess differences in health care utilization and per patient per month (PPPM) total costs (plan- and patient-paid amount for health care services) between the 2 groups during the post-index year, while adjusting for an a priori list of demographic and clinical characteristics. A total of 138,018 adults with T2DM was identified, of which 16,547 (12%) had a history of CVD. The unadjusted resource utilization (outpatient: 27.5 vs. 17.8; emergency room [ER]: 0.8 vs. 0.4; inpatient: 0.4 vs. 0.2 days; and total unique drug prescriptions: 10.1 vs. 8.3) and PPPM total health care costs ($2,655.1 vs. $1,435.0) were significantly higher in T2DM adults with a history of CVD versus T2DM adults without a history of CVD. The adjusted models revealed that T2DM adults with a history of CVD had a 31% higher number of ER visits (rate ratio [RR] = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.25-1.37); 27% more inpatient visits (RR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.21-1.34); 15

  19. Long Detection Programming in Single-Chamber Defibrillators Reduces Unnecessary Therapies and Mortality: The ADVANCE III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio G; Proclemer, Alessandro; Arenal, Angel; Kloppe, Axel; Martínez Ferrer, Josè B; Hersi, Ahmad S; Gulaj, Marcin; Wijffels, Maurits C E; Santi, Elisabetta; Manotta, Laura; Varma, Niraj

    2017-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of programming a long detection in single-chamber (VVI) implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in the multicenter prospective ADVANCE III (Avoid DeliVering TherApies for Non-sustained Arrhythmias in ICD PatiEnts III) trial. Programming strategies may reduce unnecessary ICD shocks and their adverse effects but to date have been described only for dual-chamber ICDs. A total of 545 subjects (85% male; atrial fibrillation 25%, left ventricular ejection fraction 31%, ischemic etiology 68%, secondary prevention indications 32%) receiving a VVI ICD were randomized to long detection (30 of 40 intervals) or standard programming (18 of 24 intervals) based on device type, atrial fibrillation history, and indication. In both arms, antitachycardia pacing (ATP) therapy during charging was programmed for episodes with cycle length 320 to 200 ms and shock only for cycle length functions enabled. Therapies delivered were compared using a negative binomial regression model. A total of 267 patients were randomized to long detection and 278 to the control group. Median follow-up was 12 months. One hundred twelve therapies (shocks and ATP) occurred in the long detection arm versus 257 in the control arm, for a 48% reduction with 30 of 40 intervals (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36 to 0.76; p = 0.002). In the long detection arm, overall shocks were reduced by 40% compared to the control arm (48 vs. 24; 95% CI: 0.38 to 0.94; p = 0.026) and appropriate shocks by 51% (34 vs. 74; 95% CI: 0.26 to 0.94; p = 0.033). Syncopal events did not differ between arms, but survival improved in the long detection arm. Among patients implanted with a VVI ICD, programming with the long detection interval significantly reduced appropriate therapies, shocks, and all-cause mortality. (Avoid DeliVering TherApies for Non-sustained Arrhythmias in ICD PatiEnts III [ADVANCEIII]; NCT00617175). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. What do hypnotics cost hospitals and healthcare? [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Kripke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypnotics (sleeping pills are prescribed widely, but the economic costs of the harm they have caused have been largely unrecognized. Randomized clinical trials have observed that hypnotics increase the incidence of infections. Likewise, hypnotics increase the incidence of major depression and cause emergency admissions for overdoses and deaths.  Epidemiologically, hypnotic use is associated with cancer, falls, automobile accidents, and markedly increased overall mortality.  This article considers the costs to hospitals and healthcare payers of hypnotic-induced infections and other severe consequences of hypnotic use. These are a probable cause of excessive hospital admissions, prolonged lengths of stay at increased costs, and increased readmissions. Accurate information is scanty, for in-hospital hypnotic benefits and risks have scarcely been studied -- certainly not the economic costs of inpatient adverse effects.  Healthcare costs of outpatient adverse effects likewise need evaluation. In one example, use of hypnotics among depressed patients was strongly associated with higher healthcare costs and more short-term disability. A best estimate is that U.S. costs of hypnotic harms to healthcare systems are on the order of $55 billion, but conceivably might be as low as $10 billion or as high as $100 billion. More research is needed to more accurately assess unnecessary and excessive hypnotics costs to providers and insurers, as well as financial and health damages to the patients themselves.

  1. External Costs of Risky Health Behaviors Associated with Leading Actual Causes of Death in the U.S.: A Review of the Evidence and Implications for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armineh Zohrabian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the evidence on external costs of risky behaviors in the U.S. and provides a framework for estimating them. External costs arise when a person does not bear all the costs of his or her behavior. They provide one of the strongest rationales for government interventions. Although the earlier estimates of external costs no longer have policy relevance, they demonstrated that the existence of external costs was an empirical question. We recommend that the estimates of external costs be updated as insurance structures, environments, and knowledge about these behaviors change. The general aspects of external costs may apply to countries other than the U.S. after taking into account differences in institutional, policy and epidemiological characteristics.

  2. A calculus of unnecessary echoes: application of management principles to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, J D; McCullough, G

    2002-01-01

    We studied the clinical utility of echocardiography in children and applied principles of business management to draw conclusions that are applicable to health care in general. A significant number (13% in this series) of expensive medical diagnostic tests could be avoided without harm to patients. Cost reduction in medicine is possible in many situations without compromising quality of care. Care pathways (i.e., practice guidelines or clinical algorithms) provide one useful modality. However, for the safety of patients, all cost reduction methods must start with practicing physicians (or involve them at conceptualization) and an escape clause must be available to the treating physician for the atypical patient. The analytic approach used--concurrent assessment of percentage cost, charge, and payor--is applicable to all components of the health care value chain. The use of "percentage of charges" as an indicator of collection effectiveness is unrealistic and should be changed to "percentage potential reimbursement" because health care is effectively a fixed-reimbursement industry rather than a system subject to standard microeconomic (supply and demand) forces. The current reimbursement structure provides conflicting incentives both to health care institutions and to providers, creating an insurmountable barrier to any effective incentive system. Colloquy between practicing physicians and experts in operations management will stimulate cost reduction and can optimize the delivery of health care.

  3. A method for selection of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transportation route considering socioeconomic cost based on contingent valuation method (CVM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sik

    2008-02-01

    A transportation of SNF may cause an additional radiation exposure to human beings. It means that the radiological risk should be estimated and managed quantitatively for the public who live near the shipments route. Before the SNF transportation is performed, the route selection is concluded based on the radiological risk estimated with RADTRAN code in existing method generally. It means the existing method for route selection is based only on the radiological health risk but there are not only the impacts related to the radiological health risk but also the socioeconomic impacts related to the cost. In this study, a new method and its numerical formula for route selection on transporting SNF is proposed based on cost estimation because there are several costs in transporting SNF. The total cost consists of radiological health cost, transportation cost, and socioeconomic cost. Each cost is defined properly to the characteristics of SNF transportation and many coefficients and variables describing the meaning of each cost are obtained or estimated through many surveys. Especially to get the socioeconomic cost, contingent valuation method (CVM) is used with a questionnaire. The socioeconomic cost estimation is the most important part of the total cost originated from transporting SNF because it is a very dominant cost in the total cost. The route selection regarding SNF transportation can be supported with the proposed method reasonably and unnecessary or exhausting controversies about the shipments could be avoided

  4. Cost reduction through system integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsing, P.

    1994-01-01

    In resent years cost reduction has been a key issue in the petroleum industry. Several findings are not economically attractive at the current cost level, and for this and other reasons some of the major oil companies require the suppliers to have implemented a cost reduction programme to prequalify for projects. The present paper addresses cost reduction through system design and integration in both product development and working methods. This is to be obtained by the combination of contracts by reducing unnecessary coordination and allow re-use of proven interface designs, improve subsystem integration by ''top down'' system design, and improve communication and exchange of experience. 3 figs

  5. The criteria for the decision of transrectal US-guided prostate biopsy: Can we reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Joon Hyung; Cho, Jae Ho; Ahn, Jay Hong; Chang, Jay Chun

    2001-01-01

    To establish the criteria which can safely reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies by comparing the transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) findings, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) in the decision of criteria for the prostatic biopsy using TRUS. Two hundred and twenty patients underwent TRUS- guided prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA and/or focal nodule on TRUS were included. Sixty five (27.5%) patients were confirmed as prostate cancer, and remained 155 (70.5%) patients were reported as benign diseases including benign prostate hyperplasia. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TRUS, PSA and PSAD were evaluated and the single criterion or the combination of the criteria which can safely reduce the unnecessary biopsies without missing prostatic cancer were investigated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TRUS, PSA (cut-off value, 4 ng/ml) and PSAD (cut-off level, 0.2 ng/ml/cm 3 ) were 78.5%/95.4%/95.4%/27.8%/51.6%/64/5%, 42.7%/64.5%/73.6%, respectively. PSAD cut-off level 0.2 ng/ml/cm 3 was the most excellent single criterion for the decision of prostatic biopsy and the number of unnecessary biopsies was 100 cases. But 3 cases of prostatic cancer which the PSAD level was below 0.2 ng/ml/cm 3 were included and in all these 3 cases, a focal nodule was detected on TRUS. Therefore, we applied these two criteria at once and the biopsies of 30 cases (13.6%) are unnecessary. With the single criterion, we could not obtain the satisfactory results but by the combinations of criteria (TRUS and PSAD), 30 (13.6%) cases are unnecessary biopsies without missing cancer. We think that the short term follow-up may be a substitute for the immediate when nodular lesion is suspicious on TRUS and serum PSAD level is below 0.2 ng/ml/cm 3 .

  6. EDTA sample contamination is common and often undetected, putting patients at unnecessary risk of harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, C L; Gilbert, C J; Cornes, M C; Ford, C; Gama, R

    2009-08-01

    Potassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a sample tube anticoagulant used for many laboratory analyses. Gross potassium EDTA contamination of blood samples is easily recognised by marked hyperkalaemia and hypocalcaemia. However, subtle contamination is a relatively common, often unrecognised erroneous cause of spurious hyperkalaemia. Potassium EDTA contamination may also cause hypomagnesaemia and hypozincaemia. There are, however, no data on the prevalence of EDTA contamination as a cause of hypocalcaemia, hypomagnesaemia and hypozincaemia. Following a recent service evaluation, we measure EDTA in serum samples from patients with unexplained hyperkalaemia (serum potassium > 6.0 mmol/l). In addition, over a 1-month period EDTA concentrations were measured in hypocalcaemic (serum adjusted calcium samples. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid contamination was detected in 31 samples, nine of which were detected by our routine screening programme. The remaining 22 samples represented 14.3% (19/133) of hypocalcaemic samples, 4.8% (5/104) of hypomagnesaemic samples and 1.4% (2/139) of hypozincaemic samples. A total of 25/31 (80.6%) of patients were re-bled, of which 23/25 (92%) results normalised. Factitious hyperkalaemia, hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia caused by potassium EDTA contamination in our studies are relatively common, and if unrecognised may adversely affect patient care and waste scarce healthcare resources. Correct order of draw of blood samples, improved education and routine laboratory screening of EDTA are necessary to prevent and identify EDTA contamination.

  7. An application of cost-effectiveness analysis to restrict the damage caused by an accidental release of radioactive material to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frittelli, L.; Tamburrano, A.

    1980-01-01

    When an accidental release of radioactive material occurs health effects in the exposed population can be mitigated by remedial actions applied to individuals or their environment. A cost-effectiveness analysis is performed by comparing the cost of remedial action with the monetary value of the collective dose avoided. (H.K.)

  8. Assessing social values for California's efforts to reduce the overuse of unnecessary medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Susan L; Backman, Desiree; Ginsburg, Marge

    2018-04-01

    A partnership of large health-care purchasers created a workgroup to reduce the overuse of harmful and wasteful medical care in California. Employ a civic engagement process to identify the social values important to the public in considering different strategies to reduce overuse. Use of deliberation techniques for 3 case examples that explore possible strategies: physician oversight, physician compensation, increased patient cost-sharing or taking no definitive action. Five themes were identified, including strong support for physicians' leadership role to reduce overuse; nuanced enthusiasm for increasing patient cost-sharing to discourage excessive demand; and marked disapproval of physician compensation as a motivator. Most but not all of the perspectives voiced by participants are congruent with efforts to reduce overuse that is being initiated or discussed at the state, provider and health plan level. As health-care policymakers and leaders consider more targeted approaches to reducing overuse, these findings will inform decision-making. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The causes of dispersal and the cost of carry-over effects for an endangered bird in a dynamic wetland landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ellen P; Fletcher, Robert J; Austin, James D

    2017-07-01

    The decision to disperse or remain philopatric between breeding seasons has important implications for both ecology and evolution, including the potential for carry-over effects, where an individual's previous history affects its current performance. Carry-over effects are increasingly documented although underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we test for potential carry-over effects and their mechanisms by uniting hypotheses for the causes and consequences of habitat selection and dispersal across space and time. We linked hypotheses regarding different types of factors and information (environmental conditions, personal and public information) predicted to impact reproductive success and dispersal for an endangered, wetland-dependent bird, the snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus). To do so, we coupled structural equation modelling with 20 years of mark-recapture and nesting data across the breeding range of this species to isolate potential direct and indirect effects of these factors. We found that water depth at nest sites explained subsequent emigration rates via an indirect path through the use of personal, not public, information. Importantly, we found that these dispersers tended to initiate nests later the following breeding season. This pattern explained a phenological mismatch of nesting with hydrological conditions, whereby immigrants tended to nest later, late nesters tended to experience lower water depths, higher nest failure occurred at lower water depths and higher nest failure explained subsequent breeding dispersal. These results identified a novel potential mechanism for carry-over effects: a phenological mismatch with environmental conditions (water depth) that occurred potentially due to time costs of dispersal. Our results also highlighted a substantial benefit of philopatry - earlier initiation of reproduction - which allows philopatric individuals to better coincide with environmental conditions that are beneficial for

  10. Unnecessary antiretroviral treatment switches and accumulation of HIV resistance mutations; two arguments for viral load monitoring in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaloff, Kim C E; Hamers, Raph L; Wallis, Carole L; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E; Mandaliya, Kishor; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S; van Vugt, Michèle; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the consequences of using clinicoimmunological criteria to detect antiretroviral treatment (ART) failure and guide regimen switches in HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. Frequencies of unnecessary switches, patterns of HIV drug resistance, and risk factors for the accumulation of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated mutations were evaluated. Cross-sectional analysis of adults switching ART regimens at 13 clinical sites in 6 African countries was performed. Two types of failure identification were compared: diagnosis of clinicoimmunological failure without viral load testing (CIF only) or CIF with local targeted viral load testing (targeted VL). After study enrollment, reference HIV RNA and genotype were determined retrospectively. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with multiple thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and NRTI cross-resistance (≥2 TAMs or Q151M or K65R/K70E). Of 250 patients with CIF switching to second-line ART, targeted VL was performed in 186. Unnecessary switch at reference HIV RNA <1000 copies per milliliter occurred in 46.9% of CIF only patients versus 12.4% of patients with targeted VL (P < 0.001). NRTI cross-resistance was observed in 48.0% of 183 specimens available for genotypic analysis, comprising ≥2 TAMs (37.7%), K65R (7.1%), K70E (3.3%), or Q151M (3.3%). The presence of NRTI cross-resistance was associated with the duration of ART exposure and zidovudine use. Clinicoimmunological monitoring without viral load testing resulted in frequent unnecessary regimen switches. Prolonged treatment failure was indicated by extensive NRTI cross-resistance. Access to virological monitoring should be expanded to prevent inappropriate switches, enable early failure detection and preserve second-line treatment options in Africa.

  11. Estimate of the Costs Caused by Adverse Effects in Hospitalised Patients Due to Hip Fracture: Design of the Study and Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cuesta-Peredo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hip fracture is a health problem that presents high morbidity and mortality, negatively influencing the patient’s quality of life and generating high costs. Structured analysis of quality indicators can facilitate decision-making, cost minimization, and improvement of the quality of care. Methods: We studied 1571 patients aged 70 years and over with the diagnosis of hip fracture at Hospital Universitario de la Ribera in the period between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016. Demographic, clinical, functional, and quality indicator variables were studied. An indirect analysis of the costs associated with adverse events arising during hospital admission was made. A tool based on the “Minimum Basic Data Set (CMBD” was designed to monitor the influence of patient risk factors on the incidence of adverse effects (AE and their associated costs. Results: The average age of the patients analysed was 84.15 years (SD 6.28, with a length of stay of 8.01 days (SD 3.32, a mean preoperative stay of 43.04 h (SD 30.81, and a mortality rate of 4.2%. Likewise, the percentage of patients with AE was 41.44%, and 11.01% of patients changed their cost as a consequence of these AEs suffered during hospital admission. The average cost of patients was €8752 (SD: 1,864 and the average cost increase in patients with adverse events was €2321 (SD: 3,164. Conclusions: Through the analysis of the main clinical characteristics and the indirect estimation of the complexity of the patients, a simple calculation of the average cost of the attention and its adverse events can be designed in patients who are admitted due to hip fracture. Additionally, this tool can fit the welfare quality indicators by severity and cost.

  12. Trial Manufacture and Evaluation of a Hologram with an unnecessary development process at 1.55 μm

    OpenAIRE

    大島, 茂

    2016-01-01

    A holographic optical element (HOE) for optical fiber coupling has been investigated. The hologram with an unnecessary development process has been manufactured at wavelength of 1.55μm. Diimonium organic dye was used for photosensitive material. Because diimonium organic dye did not stick to a plate glass, acrylic resin was used for binder resin. The thin film of the organic dye was exposed by improved equipment for high power light irradiation at wavelength of 1.55μm. The thin film became th...

  13. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, Lauren P.; Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn; Gyr, Bettina M.; Gardner, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  14. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lauren P. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Triad Radiology Associates, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gyr, Bettina M. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gardner, Alison [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  15. Experts: hospitals can improve care, save health care dollars by cracking down on unnecessary blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Leading health care quality organizations say that blood transfusions are among the most overused treatments. The problem wastes a precious resource as well as health care dollars, continues to stretch what is known to be in short supply in some parts of the country. Part of the problem is continued adherence to an outdated medical practice that calls for transfusions when they are not medically necessary. Also, experts say many guidelines are vague regarding hemoglobin triggers. However, education coupled with IT-driven interventions can help hospitals make dramatic improvements in their blood usage, potentially preserving blood products for patients who really need them. The American Red Cross says that blood use rose by 40% in the United States between 1994 and 2008. Studies show there is wide variation regarding when blood transfusions are called for by practitioners. The latest research suggests hemoglobin thresholds of 7 or 8 grams per deciliter are acceptable, although practitioners often call for transfusions when hemoglobin is at 10 grams per deciliter. Of particular importance to EDs, the lower hemoglobin triggers don't always apply to actively bleeding patients. Through a comprehensive blood conservation program, Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, ME, has been able to nearly halve the number of patients who now receive transfusions without negatively impacting patient care. Also, the program has saved the hospital more than $5 million in blood costs.

  16. Lead exposure via drinking water - unnecessary and avoidable; Bleiexposition ueber das Trinkwasser - unnoetig und vermeidbar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, M. [Univ. Bochum (Germany). Abt. Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin; Dieter, H.H. [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden-, Lufthygiene

    2003-07-01

    Despite successful reduction of the general lead exposure, this heavy metal is still a matter of public concern due to the fact that associations with intellectual impairment or delayed puberty are found to correlate with very low lead blood concentrations. Lead in tap water is still an important contribution to lead exposure which may cause health risk for infants. Therefore, lead pipes should be completely sanitated by exchange against pipes made from more healthy materials. (orig.) [German] Trotz erfolgreicher Reduktion der allgemeinen Belastung ist Blei auch heute noch umweltmedizinisch relevant, weil es moeglicherweise bei niedrigeren als bisher angenommenen Belastungen gesundheitlich nachteilige Wirkungen, insbesondere waehrend der fruehkindlichen Entwicklung des Nervensystems, ausloest. Insbesondere Blei aus bleiernen Trinkwasserleitungen ist eine Belastung, die fuer Saeuglinge und Kleinkinder nach wie vor ein gesundheitliches Risiko darstellen kann. Solche Leitungen sollten deswegen durch Austausch gegen gesundheitlich besser geeignete Materialien saniert werden. (orig.)

  17. The Relationship Between the Status of Unnecessary Accommodations Being Made to Unconfirmed Food Allergy Students and the Presence or Absence of a Doctor’s Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurika Ganaha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the current state of unnecessary children food allergy accommodation and the medical efforts to confirm the existence of food allergies in school lunch service kitchens in Okinawa, Japan, including kitchens accommodating food allergy students by requiring medical documentation at the start and during provisions being made (Double Diagnosis, requiring medical documentation at the start only (Single Diagnosis, and with no medical documentation (Non-Diagnosis. Unnecessary accommodations are being made to unconfirmed food allergy students, wherein the more medical consultation was required, the lower the food allergy incident rate was and the more food allergens were diagnosed (Non-Diagnosis > Single Diagnosis > Double Diagnosis. This study suggests the possibility that unconfirmed food allergy students may be receiving unnecessary food allergy accommodations per school lunches, and the number of unnecessary food allergy provisions being made could be reduced by requiring medical documentation at the start and during these provisions.

  18. Continued urbanization of the United States is causing the deterioration of the central city; costly suburban developments; and increases in congestion, pollution, crime, violence and alienation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that urban sprawl and the abuses of technological industries result in substantial environmental and economic costs at the expense of center city locations and populations. Socioeconomic deterioration and modification of the biosphere triggers climatic and environmental changes leading to ecosystem damage and destruction, health consequences and international conflict.

  19. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Controlled Quasi-Experimental Study of an Educational Intervention to Reduce the Unnecessary Use of Antimicrobials For Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Neal; Brooks, Annie; Mithoowani, Siraj; Celetti, Steve J; Main, Cheryl; Mertz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) should only be treated in cases of pregnancy or in-patients undergoing urologic procedures; however, unnecessary treatment of ABU is common in clinical practice. To identify risk factors for unnecessary treatment and to assess the impact of an educational intervention focused on these risk factors on treatment of ABU. Quasi-experimental study with a control group. Two tertiary teaching adult care hospitals. Consecutive patients with positive urine cultures between January 30th and April 17th, 2012 (baseline) and January 30th and April 30th, 2013 (intervention). In January 2013, a multifaceted educational intervention based on risk factors identified during the baseline period was provided to medical residents (monthly) on one clinical teaching unit (CTU) at one hospital site, with the CTU of the other hospital serving as the control. During the baseline period, 160/341 (46.9%) positive urine cultures were obtained from asymptomatic patients at the two hospitals, and 94/160 (58.8%) were inappropriately treated with antibiotics. Risk factors for inappropriate use included: female gender (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.3), absence of a catheter (OR 2.5, 1.2-5), bacteriuria versus candiduria (OR 10.6, 3.8-29.4), pyuria (OR 2.0, 1.1-3.8), and positive nitrites (OR 2.2, 1.1-4.5). In 2013, only 2/24 (8%) of ABU patients were inappropriately treated on the intervention CTU as compared to 14/29 (52%) on the control CTU (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02-0.49). A reduction was also observed as compared to baseline on the intervention CTU (OR 0.1, 0.02-0.7) with no significant change noted on the control CTU (OR 0.47, 0.13-1.7). A multifaceted educational intervention geared towards medical residents with a focus on identified risk factors for inappropriate management of ABU was effective in reducing unnecessary antibiotic use.

  1. A Controlled Quasi-Experimental Study of an Educational Intervention to Reduce the Unnecessary Use of Antimicrobials For Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Irfan

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU should only be treated in cases of pregnancy or in-patients undergoing urologic procedures; however, unnecessary treatment of ABU is common in clinical practice.To identify risk factors for unnecessary treatment and to assess the impact of an educational intervention focused on these risk factors on treatment of ABU.Quasi-experimental study with a control group.Two tertiary teaching adult care hospitals.Consecutive patients with positive urine cultures between January 30th and April 17th, 2012 (baseline and January 30th and April 30th, 2013 (intervention.In January 2013, a multifaceted educational intervention based on risk factors identified during the baseline period was provided to medical residents (monthly on one clinical teaching unit (CTU at one hospital site, with the CTU of the other hospital serving as the control.During the baseline period, 160/341 (46.9% positive urine cultures were obtained from asymptomatic patients at the two hospitals, and 94/160 (58.8% were inappropriately treated with antibiotics. Risk factors for inappropriate use included: female gender (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.3, absence of a catheter (OR 2.5, 1.2-5, bacteriuria versus candiduria (OR 10.6, 3.8-29.4, pyuria (OR 2.0, 1.1-3.8, and positive nitrites (OR 2.2, 1.1-4.5. In 2013, only 2/24 (8% of ABU patients were inappropriately treated on the intervention CTU as compared to 14/29 (52% on the control CTU (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02-0.49. A reduction was also observed as compared to baseline on the intervention CTU (OR 0.1, 0.02-0.7 with no significant change noted on the control CTU (OR 0.47, 0.13-1.7.A multifaceted educational intervention geared towards medical residents with a focus on identified risk factors for inappropriate management of ABU was effective in reducing unnecessary antibiotic use.

  2. The role of parental health care utilization in children's unnecessary utilization in China: evidence from Shaanxi province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Zhongliang; Si, Yafei

    2017-03-09

    China has a large population of children under 18 years of age, whose health is of great concern to the Chinese health care system. However, few studies have been conducted to analyze the factors associated with children's unnecessary health care utilization in China. The objective of this study is to provide some empirical evidence on this issue by investigating the role of parental health care utilization in children's unnecessary health care use. The data were obtained from the fifth Health Service Survey of Shaanxi province in 2013. We employed three dependent variables to measure children's health care utilization: the number of children's outpatient visits during the past 2 weeks, whether or not infusion was used if the child had any outpatient visits during the past 2 weeks, and the number of children's inpatient visits during last year. Based on specific characteristics of these outcome variables, negative binomial models were used for the non-negative numbers of outpatient and inpatient visits, while a probit model was used for the zero-one indicator variable showing whether infusion was used during outpatient visits. Based on a sample of 11,024 children, our results of multivariate analysis showed that children whose parents used outpatient care were estimated to have a larger number of outpatient visits than those whose parents did not have outpatient visits in the past 2 weeks (with a difference of 0.0393 visits). Among children having outpatient visits in the last 2 weeks, the probability of obtaining infusion was 57.01 percentage points higher for children whose parents used infusion in the past 2 weeks than the probability for those whose parents did not use infusion. The predicted number of inpatient visits was higher for children whose parents used inpatient services in the last year, compared with the group whose parents did not use (with a difference of 0.0567 visits). Moreover, we noted that the positive association between parental and

  3. A comparison of laws preventing unnecessary canine cosmetic surgery in Italy and in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Quartarone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many invasive procedures, including surgery (ear cropping, tail docking, and debarking in the dog, are performed on dogs for purely cosmetic reasons or convenience. These procedures, also known as “cosmetic surgery”, fall into a variety of categories from the questionably unethical to the undoubtedly criminal, because they are mostly carried out solely to alter a dog’s physical appearance. Although in several European countries these procedures are banned, except when performed by a veterinarian for medical reasons, veterinarians are often requested to perform them for various reasons. Though controversial, canine cosmetic surgery continues to be performed, reaching epidemic proportions. The authors summarize legislation, individual positions and veterinary attitudes regarding cosmetic surgery in Italy and the Czech Republic. Additionally, they explain the ways in which the law is being used in the two countries to prevent these unnecessary procedures, and how current and future anti-cruelty laws can stop unethical use of cosmetic surgery.

  4. Taiwan experience suggests that RhD typing for blood transfusion is unnecessary in southeast Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Marie

    2006-01-01

    The high frequency of RhD (D) antigen among Taiwanese persons (99.67%) often imposes unnecessary risks of under-transfusion on D- patients awaiting D- blood. Also because of the rare occurrence of anti-D among Taiwanese persons, routine pretransfusion D typing has been discontinued in the Mackay Memorial Hospital since 1988. This report is the retrospective evaluation of the outcome of abolishing RhD typing for Taiwanese. More than 10 years of alloantibody data at Mackay Memorial Hospital Blood Bank were reviewed. The cases with anti-D were further used to analyze the potency of D antigen and to observe whether there were differences in the incidence of anti-D before and after discontinuation of routine D typing among Taiwanese individuals. The incidence of anti-D before and after discontinuation of routine pretransfusion D typing has remained unchanged. The immunogenicity of D and "Mi(a)" in Taiwanese persons is found to be similar. In terms of opportunity for immunization, however, the "Mi(a)" antigen (phenotype frequency 7.3% in Taiwanese persons) has become the most important blood group antigen in Taiwan. The results strongly support the exclusion of D typing from routine compatibility testing for individuals of Taiwanese origin. Because the low incidence of D- and relatively high incidence of "Mi(a)"+ phenotypes are common findings throughout southeast Asia, and because a population genetic study revealed that the Taiwanese people are genetically related to southern Asian populations, it is suggested that RhD typing for blood transfusion is unnecessary among southeast Asian populations.

  5. Author response to letter. Ref: Madsen et al. "Unnecessary work tasks and mental health: a prospective analysis of Danish human service workers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Ida Eh; Rugulies, Reiner

    2015-03-01

    We read with interest the letter from Drs Durand-Moreau, Loddé, and Dewitte (1) regarding our article on unnecessary work tasks and mental health (2). The authors argue that: (i) the article is flawed by an imprecise one-item exposure measurement, (ii) the results may be affected by reverse causality, and (iii) ultimately the elimination of unnecessary work tasks may increase "psychic suffering". We would like to take this opportunity to address their concerns. We acknowledge, as we did in the article itself, that measuring unnecessary work tasks using only one item is less than ideal and could have increased measurement error in our analyses. The item we used to measure unnecessary work tasks assesses the employee's overall evaluation regarding the extent to which they must conduct work tasks that they, for whatever reason, deem unnecessary. We are unconvinced by the claim by Drs Durand-Moreau, Loddé, and Dewitte that this phenomenon is somehow unrelated to Semmer's definition of unnecessary tasks (3, 4), regardless of the sense-making processes underlying an individual employee's evaluation of a particular work task as unnecessary. Regarding the issue of reverse causality, the analyses were longitudinal and the effect estimates were adjusted for the baseline mental health level of the participants. Consequently, we examined changes in mental health over time, and our results cannot be explained by poorer mental health making workers think "that what they're doing is useless" as claimed in the commentary. Although causal inference is always a delicate issue when applying observational research methods, the adjustment for baseline mental health should account for reverse causality at least. Drs Durand-Moreau, Loddé, and Dewitte question that our findings suggest that the elimination of unnecessary work tasks may be beneficial to employee mental health. Instead they propose that unnecessary work tasks may be conducive to mental health because "some tasks may seem

  6. The evaluation of enhanced feedback interventions to reduce unnecessary blood transfusions (AFFINITIE): protocol for two linked cluster randomised factorial controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Suzanne; Foy, Robbie; Walwyn, Rebecca E A; Cicero, Robert; Farrin, Amanda J; Francis, Jill J; Lorencatto, Fabiana; Gould, Natalie J; Grant-Casey, John; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Glidewell, Liz; Michie, Susan; Morris, Stephen; Stanworth, Simon J

    2017-07-03

    Blood for transfusion is a frequently used clinical intervention, and is also a costly and limited resource with risks. Many transfusions are given to stable and non-bleeding patients despite no clear evidence of benefit from clinical studies. Audit and feedback (A&F) is widely used to improve the quality of healthcare, including appropriate use of blood. However, its effects are often inconsistent, indicating the need for coordinated research including more head-to-head trials comparing different ways of delivering feedback. A programmatic series of research projects, termed the 'Audit and Feedback INterventions to Increase evidence-based Transfusion practIcE' (AFFINITIE) programme, aims to test different ways of developing and delivering feedback within an existing national audit structure. The evaluation will comprise two linked 2×2 factorial, cross-sectional cluster-randomised controlled trials. Each trial will estimate the effects of two feedback interventions, 'enhanced content' and 'enhanced follow-on support', designed in earlier stages of the AFFINITIE programme, compared to current practice. The interventions will be embedded within two rounds of the UK National Comparative Audit of Blood Transfusion (NCABT) focusing on patient blood management in surgery and use of blood transfusions in patients with haematological malignancies. The unit of randomisation will be National Health Service (NHS) trust or health board. Clusters providing care relevant to the audit topics will be randomised following each baseline audit (separately for each trial), with stratification for size (volume of blood transfusions) and region (Regional Transfusion Committee). The primary outcome for each topic will be the proportion of patients receiving a transfusion coded as unnecessary. For each audit topic a linked, mixed-method fidelity assessment and cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted in parallel to the trial. AFFINITIE involves a series of studies to explore how A

  7. Does reducing unnecessary right ventricular pacing improve sympathetic activity and innervation of heart in sinus node disease patients? MVP and SafeR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mihoko; Kimura, Yuichiro; Hosoda, Junya; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Matsushita, Kohei; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular desynchronization imposed by ventricular pacing causes regional disturbances of adrenergic innervation in the left ventricular myocardium and increases the risk of heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with sinus node disease (SND). As a result, decreased iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-(123 )MIBG) uptake occurs in patients with an implanted permanent pacemaker. Fourteen SND patients with an implanted pacemaker equipped with an algorithm for reducing unnecessary right ventricular pacing (RURVP) were enrolled. Pacemakers were programmed to RURVP mode for the first 12 weeks, and then reprogrammed to DDD for the last 12 weeks. At the end of each mode, data on cumulative percent ventricular pacing (%Vp), atrial high rate episodes (%AHR), I-(123 )MIBG myocardial scintigraphy, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP), and myocardial damage indices typified by troponin T and C-reactive protein (CRP) were collected. %Vp was lower in RURVP than in DDD (0.2% versus 95.7%, P = 0.00098). BNP, hANP, troponin T, and CRP did not differ significantly between the pacing modes. However, I-(123 )MIBG findings of patients with full ventricular pacing in DDD improved in RURVP. In contrast, among patients without full ventricular pacing in DDD, their I-(123 )MIBG findings did not differ significantly between the pacing modes. In SND patients with normal cardiac function and intact atrioventricular conduction, the reduction of %Vp in RURVP was due to the reduction of ineffective pacing and fusion pacing in DDD. Therefore, these 2 types of pacing do not affect cardiac pump function.

  8. A decision aid to rule out pneumonia and reduce unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics in primary care patients with cough and fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunziker Roger

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians fear missing cases of pneumonia and treat many patients with signs of respiratory infection unnecessarily with antibiotics. This is an avoidable cause for the increasing worldwide problem of antibiotic resistance. We developed a user-friendly decision aid to rule out pneumonia and thus reduce the rate of needless prescriptions of antibiotics. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in which we enrolled patients older than 18 years with a new or worsened cough and fever without serious co-morbidities. Physicians recorded results of a standardized medical history and physical examination. C-reactive protein was measured and chest radiographs were obtained. We used Classification and Regression Trees to derive the decision tool. Results A total of 621 consenting eligible patients were studied, 598 were attending a primary care facility, were 48 years on average and 50% were male. Radiographic signs for pneumonia were present in 127 (20.5% of patients. Antibiotics were prescribed to 234 (48.3% of patients without pneumonia. In patients with C-reactive protein values below 10 μg/ml or patients presenting with C-reactive protein between 11 and 50 μg/ml, but without dyspnoea and daily fever, pneumonia can be ruled out. By applying this rule in clinical practice antibiotic prescription could be reduced by 9.1% (95% confidence interval (CI: 6.4 to 11.8. Conclusions Following validation and confirmation in new patient samples, this tool could help rule out pneumonia and be used to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in patients presenting with cough and fever in primary care. The algorithm might be especially useful in those instances where taking a medical history and physical examination alone are inconclusive for ruling out pneumonia

  9. The HEART score is useful to predict cardiovascular risks and reduces unnecessary cardiac imaging in low-risk patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siping; Huang, Bo; Zou, Yunliang; Guo, Jianbin; Liu, Ziyong; Pi, Dangyu; Qiu, Yunhong; Xiao, Chun

    2018-06-01

    The present study was to investigate whether the HEART score can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risks and reduce unnecessary cardiac imaging in China.Acute coronary syndrome patients with the thrombosis in myocardial infarction risk score risk HEART score group and 2 patients (1.5%) in the high risk HEART score group had cardiovascular events. The sensitivity of HEART score to predict cardiovascular events was 100% and the specificity was 46.7%. The potential unnecessary cardiac testing was 46.3%. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that per one category increase of the HEART score was associated with nearly 1.3-fold risk of cardiovascular events.In the low-risk acute chest pain patients, the HEART score is useful to physicians in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular events within the first 30 days. In addition, the HEART score is also useful in reducing the unnecessary cardiac imaging.

  10. Can Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies in men with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Wu, Yu-Peng; Chen, Dong-Ning; Ke, Zhi-Bin; Cai, Hai; Wei, Yong; Zheng, Qing-Shui; Huang, Jin-Bei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xue, Xue-Yi

    2018-05-01

    To explore the value of Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS v2) for predicting prostate biopsy results in patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of 4-10 ng/ml. We retrospectively reviewed multi-parameter magnetic resonance images from 528 patients with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies between May 2015 and May 2017. Among them, 137 were diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa), and we further subdivided them according to pathological results into the significant PCa (S-PCa) and insignificant significant PCa (Ins-PCa) groups (121 cases were defined by surgical pathological specimen and 16 by biopsy). Age, PSA, percent free PSA, PSA density (PSAD), prostate volume (PV), and PI-RADS score were collected. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of pathological results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to analyze the diagnostic value of PI-RADS v2 in PCa. Multivariate analysis indicated that age, PV, percent free PSA, and PI-RADS score were independent predictors of biopsy findings, while only PI-RADS score was an independent predictor of S-PCa (P PSA, and PI-RADS score were 0.570, 0.430, 0.589 and 0.836, respectively. The area under the curve for diagnosing S-PCa with respect to PI-RADS score was 0.732. A PI-RADS score of 3 was the best cutoff for predicting PCa, and 4 was the best cutoff for predicting S-PCa. Thus, 92.8% of patients with PI-RADS scores of 1-2 would have avoided biopsy, but at the cost of missing 2.2% of the potential PCa cases. Similarly, 83.82% of patients with a PI-RADS score ≤ 3 would have avoided biopsy, but at the cost of missing 3.3% of the potential S-PCa cases. PI-RADS v2 could be used to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies in patients with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml.

  11. Study of cost benefits of identification of non-problems with infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.P.; Wurzbach, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    Justifying the costs of starting and maintaining an in-house infrared thermography program is essential in ensuring continued funding and sponsorship. Cost benefit studies, whether brief and general, or strictly formalized, tend to focus on costs associated with projected equipment failure and production downtime. While these numbers can be quite dramatic, their validity rests on acceptance of the predicted failure which is inevitably the subject of some conjecture. Sometimes overlooked in these cost benefit analyses is the savings from avoided work through the optimization of routine time-directed tasks and the identification of non-problems. This includes condition based maintenance superseding preventive maintenance, and the value of including thermography in the troubleshooting process of known or suspected equipment performance problems. Using thermography inspection results to direct maintenance to the root cause of a performance problem can shorten downtime and eliminate unnecessary work and material expenditure. Cost benefit analysis of this type of inspection can be considered ''hard dollars,'' that is to say, that the money saved can be accurately calculated based on the repair costs which would normally have taken place if the information from the infrared thermography inspection had not been available. This type of savings, when presented to the administrator of the predictive maintenance program or the head of the maintenance department, represents real savings which are uncontestable in contrast to the postulated failure scenario calculations. This cost benefit analysis was done for PECO's nuclear units

  12. Prevention of unnecessary pregnancy terminations by counselling women on drug, chemical, and radiation exposure during the first trimester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren, G.; Pastuszak, A.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a new approach to counselling pregnant women concerned about antenatal exposure to drugs, chemicals, or radiation, we measured their tendency to terminate their pregnancy by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Analysis of 78 cases where women had less than 50% tendency to continue pregnancy before they were advised by us reveals that 61 decided to continue their pregnancy after the consultation (57 normal, healthy infants, four miscarriages) and 17 terminated. Women who continued their pregnancy significantly changed their tendency after we discussed relevant information with them (from 34.3 +/- 2.5% to 84.5 +/- 3.3%, P less than 0.00001), whereas most of those who eventually terminated pregnancy did not change their tendency to continue pregnancy beyond the 50% mark (from 24.8 +/- 5.4% to 45.1 +/- 9.8%) (P greater than 0.1). Only two of the women who terminated their pregnancy were exposed to teratogenic drugs; however, in most other cases, other obvious reasons, unrelated to the exposure in question, were identified by the women as leading reasons for termination. An appropriate intervention in early pregnancy can prevent unnecessary pregnancy terminations by correcting misinformation and thereby decreasing the unrealistically high perception of risk by women exposed to nonteratogens

  13. Liver AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Unnecessary for Gluconeogenesis but Protects Energy State during Nutrient Deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton M Hasenour

    Full Text Available AMPK is an energy sensor that protects cellular energy state by attenuating anabolic and promoting catabolic processes. AMPK signaling is purported to regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis and substrate oxidation; coordination of these processes is vital during nutrient deprivation or pathogenic during overnutrition. Here we directly test hepatic AMPK function in regulating metabolic fluxes that converge to produce glucose and energy in vivo. Flux analysis was applied in mice with a liver-specific deletion of AMPK (L-KO or floxed control littermates to assess rates of hepatic glucose producing and citric acid cycle (CAC fluxes. Fluxes were assessed in short and long term fasted mice; the latter condition is a nutrient stressor that increases liver AMP/ATP. The flux circuit connecting anaplerosis with gluconeogenesis from the CAC was unaffected by hepatic AMPK deletion in short and long term fasting. Nevertheless, depletion of hepatic ATP was exacerbated in L-KO mice, corresponding to a relative elevation in citrate synthase flux and accumulation of branched-chain amino acid-related metabolites. L-KO mice also had a physiological reduction in flux from glycogen to G6P. These results demonstrate AMPK is unnecessary for maintaining gluconeogenic flux from the CAC yet is critical for stabilizing liver energy state during nutrient deprivation.

  14. MRI-only lesions: application of diffusion-weighted imaging obviates unnecessary MR-guided breast biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), General Hospital Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    To assess if the application of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obviates unnecessary MR-guided biopsies in suspicious breast lesions visible only on contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective, single-centre study included 101 patients (mean age, 49.5; SD 13.9 years) who underwent additional DWI at 1.5 T prior to MRI-guided biopsy of 104 lesions classified as suspicious for malignancy and visible on CE-MRI only. An experienced radiologist, blinded to histopathologic and follow-up results, measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained from DWI. Diagnostic accuracy was investigated using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Histopathology revealed 20 malignant and 84 benign lesions. Lesions were masses in 61 (15 malignant, 24.6 %) and non-masses in 43 cases (five malignant, 11.6 %). Mean ADC values were 1.53 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in benign lesions and 1.06 ± 0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in malignant lesions. ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if ADC values were greater than 1.58 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. As a consequence, 29 false-positive biopsies (34.5 %) could have been avoided without any false-negative findings. Both in mass and in non-mass lesions, rule-in and rule-out criteria were identified using flexible ADC thresholds based on ROC analysis. Additional application of DWI in breast lesions visible only on MRI can avoid false-positive, MR-guided biopsies. Thus, DWI should be an integral part of breast MRI protocols. (orig.)

  15. High-Risk Breast Lesions: A Machine Learning Model to Predict Pathologic Upgrade and Reduce Unnecessary Surgical Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Manisha; Barzilay, Regina; Yedidia, Adam B; Locascio, Nicholas J; Yu, Lili; Lehman, Constance D

    2018-03-01

    Purpose To develop a machine learning model that allows high-risk breast lesions (HRLs) diagnosed with image-guided needle biopsy that require surgical excision to be distinguished from HRLs that are at low risk for upgrade to cancer at surgery and thus could be surveilled. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven HRLs who underwent surgery or at least 2 years of imaging follow-up from June 2006 to April 2015 were identified. A random forest machine learning model was developed to identify HRLs at low risk for upgrade to cancer. Traditional features such as age and HRL histologic results were used in the model, as were text features from the biopsy pathologic report. Results One thousand six HRLs were identified, with a cancer upgrade rate of 11.4% (115 of 1006). A machine learning random forest model was developed with 671 HRLs and tested with an independent set of 335 HRLs. Among the most important traditional features were age and HRL histologic results (eg, atypical ductal hyperplasia). An important text feature from the pathologic reports was "severely atypical." Instead of surgical excision of all HRLs, if those categorized with the model to be at low risk for upgrade were surveilled and the remainder were excised, then 97.4% (37 of 38) of malignancies would have been diagnosed at surgery, and 30.6% (91 of 297) of surgeries of benign lesions could have been avoided. Conclusion This study provides proof of concept that a machine learning model can be applied to predict the risk of upgrade of HRLs to cancer. Use of this model could decrease unnecessary surgery by nearly one-third and could help guide clinical decision making with regard to surveillance versus surgical excision of HRLs. © RSNA, 2017.

  16. Relating cause of death with place of care and healthcare costs in the last year of life for patients who died from cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia: A descriptive study using registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Annicka Gm; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Pasman, H Roeline W; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2017-04-01

    The four main diagnostic groups for palliative care provision are cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia. But comparisons of costs and care in the last year of life are mainly directed at cancer versus non-cancer or within cancer patients. Our aim is to compare the care and expenditures in their last year of life for Dutch patients with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure or dementia. Data from insurance company Achmea (2009-2010) were linked to information on long-term care at home or in an institution, the National Hospital Registration and Causes of Death-Registry from Statistics Netherlands. For patients who died of cancer ( n = 8658), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( n = 1637), heart failure ( n = 1505) or dementia ( n = 3586), frequencies and means were calculated, Lorenz curves were drawn up and logistic regression was used to compare patients with high versus low expenditures. For decedents with cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the highest costs were for hospital admissions. For decedents with heart failure, the highest costs were for the care home (last 360 days) and hospital admissions (last 30 days). For decedents with dementia, the highest costs were for the nursing home. Patients with dementia had the highest expenditures due to nursing home care. The number of dementia patients will double by the year 2030, resulting in even higher economic burdens than presently. Policy regarding patients with chronic conditions should be informed by research on expenditures within the context of preferences and needs of patients and carers.

  17. Quantifying the social costs of nuclear energy: Perceived risk of accident at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhtala, Anni; Remes, Piia

    2017-01-01

    The preferences expressed in voting on nuclear reactor licenses and the risk perceptions of citizens provide insights into social costs of nuclear power and decision making in energy policy. We show analytically that these costs consist of disutility caused by unnecessary anxiety - due to misperceived risks relating to existing reactors - and where licenses for new nuclear reactors are not granted, delayed or totally lost energy production. Empirical evidence is derived from Finnish surveys eliciting explicitly the importance of risk perceptions on preferences regarding nuclear power and its environmental and economic impacts. We show that the estimated marginal impact of a high perceived risk of nuclear accident is statistically significant and that such a perception considerably decreases the probability of a person supporting nuclear power. This result holds across a number of robustness checks including an instrumental variable estimation and a model validation by observed voting behavior of the members of Parliament. The public's risk perceptions translate into a significant social cost, and are likely to affect the revenues, costs and financing conditions in the nuclear power sector in the future. - Highlights: • Survey on preferences regarding nuclear power and its environmental and economic impacts utilized. • A high perceived risk of nuclear accident decreases support for nuclear power. • The public's risk perceptions translate into a significant social cost.

  18. Are unnecessary follow-up procedures induced by computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in mammography? Comparison of mammographic diagnosis with and without use of CAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Christiane; Malich, Ansgar; Facius, Mirjam; Grebenstein, Uta; Sauner, Dieter; Pfleiderer, Stefan O.R.; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the rate of unnecessary follow-up procedures recommended by radiologists using a CAD-system. Materials and methods: 185 patients (740 images) were consecutively selected from three groups (36 histologically proven cancers=group 1; 49 histologically proven benign lesions=group 2 and 100 screening cases (4 years-follow up=group 3). Mammograms were evaluated by a CAD system (Second Look [reg] , CADx, Canada). Five blinded radiologists assessed the images without/with CAD outputs. Diagnostic decisions were ranked from surely benign to surely malignant according to BIRADS classification, follow-up procedures were recommended for each observed lesion (a, screening; b, short interval follow-up examination in 6 months; c, pathologic clarification). Results: CAD-system detected 32/36 cancers (88.9%) (FP-rate: 1.04 massmarks and 0.27 calcmarks/image). The following values were reached by all observers without/with CAD in the mean: Sensitivity 80.6/80.0%, specificity 83.2/86.4%, PPV 53.1/58.1%, and NPV 94.6/94.7%. Observers described a similar number of additional lesions without/with the use of CAD (325/326). Whereas the number of unnecessary short-time follow up recommendations increased in all case-subgroups with CAD: 40.8/42.9% (group 1), 35.6/38.1% (group 2), 44.7/46.8% (group 3), respectively, the number of recommended biopsies decreased in all subgroups: group 1: 34.7/27.1%; group 2: 47.4/41.5%, group 3: 33.3/22.0%, respectively. Conclusion: In this rather small population additional usage of CAD led to a lower rate of unnecessary biopsies. The observed decrease of recommended unnecessary biopsies due to the usage of CAD in the screening group suggests a potential financial benefit by using CAD as diagnostic aid

  19. Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges in children with alleged cow's milk allergy: prevention of unnecessary elimination diets and determination of eliciting doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Wendy M; de Kort, Ellen H M; Blom, W Marty; Houben, Geert F; de Vries, Esther

    2013-02-08

    Children with cow's milk allergy (CMA) need a cow's milk protein (CMP) free diet to prevent allergic reactions. For this, reliable allergy-information on the label of food products is essential to avoid products containing the allergen. On the other hand, both overzealous labeling and misdiagnosis that result in unnecessary elimination diets, can lead to potentially hazardous health situations. Our objective was to evaluate if excluding CMA by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) prevents unnecessary elimination diets in the long term. Secondly, to determine the minimum eliciting dose (MED) for an acute allergic reaction to CMP in DBPCFC positive children. All children with suspected CMA under our care (Oct'05-Jun'09) were prospectively enrolled in a DBPCFC. Placebo and verum feedings were administered on two randomly assigned separate days. The MED was determined by noting the 'lowest observed adverse effect level' (LOAEL) in DBPCFC-positive children. Based on the outcomes of the DBPCFC a dietary advice was given. Parents were contacted by phone several months later about the diet of their child. 116 children were available for analysis. In 76 children CMA was rejected. In 60 of them CMP was successfully reintroduced, in 2 the parents refused introduction, in another 3 the parents stopped reintroduction. In 9 children CMA symptoms reappeared. In 40 children CMA was confirmed. Infants aged ≤ 12 months in our study group have a higher cumulative distribution of MED than older children. Excluding CMA by DBPCFC successfully stopped unnecessary elimination diets in the long term in most children. The MEDs form potential useful information for offering dietary advice to patients and their caretakers.

  20. A simple classification system (the Tree flowchart) for breast MRI can reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in MRI-only lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woitek, Ramona; Spick, Claudio; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Furtner, Julia; Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A.T. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    To assess whether using the Tree flowchart obviates unnecessary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsies in breast lesions only visible on MRI. This retrospective IRB-approved study evaluated consecutive suspicious (BI-RADS 4) breast lesions only visible on MRI that were referred to our institution for MRI-guided biopsy. All lesions were evaluated according to the Tree flowchart for breast MRI by experienced readers. The Tree flowchart is a decision rule that assigns levels of suspicion to specific combinations of diagnostic criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. To assess reproducibility by kappa statistics, a second reader rated a subset of 82 patients. There were 454 patients with 469 histopathologically verified lesions included (98 malignant, 371 benign lesions). The area under the curve (AUC) of the Tree flowchart was 0.873 (95% CI: 0.839-0.901). The inter-reader agreement was almost perfect (kappa: 0.944; 95% CI 0.889-0.998). ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if the Tree node was ≤2, potentially avoiding unnecessary biopsies in 103 cases (27.8%). Using the Tree flowchart in breast lesions only visible on MRI, more than 25% of biopsies could be avoided without missing any breast cancer. (orig.)

  1. Cost effectiveness of medication adherence-enhancing interventions: a systematic review of trial-based economic evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberje, E.J.M.; Kinderen, de R.J.A.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.; Bruin, de M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of the pressure to reduce unnecessary healthcare expenditure in the current economic climate, a systematic review that assesses evidence of cost effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions would be timely. Objective Our objective was to examine the cost effectiveness of

  2. CorVue algorithm efficacy to predict heart failure in real life: Unnecessary and potentially misleading information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfy, Julia Anna; Benezet-Mazuecos, Juan; Milla, Juan Martinez; Iglesias, Jose Antonio; de la Vieja, Juan Jose; Sanchez-Borque, Pepa; Miracle, Angel; Rubio, Jose Manuel

    2018-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) hospitalizations have a negative impact on quality of life and imply important costs. Intrathoracic impedance (ITI) variations detected by cardiac devices have been hypothesized to predict HF hospitalizations. Although Optivol™ algorithm (Medtronic) has been widely studied, CorVue™ algorithm (St. Jude Medical) long term efficacy has not been systematically evaluated in a "real life" cohort. CorVue™ was activated in ICD/CRT-D patients to store information about ITI measures. Clinical events (new episodes of HF requiring treatment and hospitalizations) and CorVue™ data were recorded every three months. Appropriate CorVue™ detection for HF was considered if it occurred in the four prior weeks to the clinical event. 53 ICD/CRT-D (26 ICD and 27 CRT-D) patients (67±1 years-old, 79% male) were included. Device position was subcutaneous in 28 patients. At inclusion, mean LVEF was 25±7% and 27 patients (51%) were in NYHA class I, 18 (34%) class II and 8 (15%) class III. After a mean follow-up of 17±9 months, 105 ITI drops alarms were detected in 32 patients (60%). Only six alarms were appropriate (true positive) and required hospitalization. Eighteen patients (34%) presented 25 clinical episodes (12 hospitalizations and 13 ER/ambulatory treatment modifications). Nineteen of these clinical episodes (76%) remained undetected by the CorVue™ (false negative). Sensitivity of CorVue™ resulted in 24%, specificity was 70%, positive predictive value of 6% and negative predictive value of 93%. CorVue™ showed a low sensitivity to predict HF events. Therefore, routinely activation of this algorithm could generate misleading information. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of incidence and causes of repeated mass miniature radiography of chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandan, S; Bhargava, S K; Sharma, H M; Ved, P K; Singh, Dhan [T.B. Demonstration and Training Centre, Agra (India)

    1976-01-01

    A study has been conducted to find out the retake rate of mass miniature radiography of chest and causes of retake. The rate has been found to be 1.96% and common causes of retake are too light or dark film and movement (motion) other than respiratory. Precautionary measures against these causes should prevent unnecessary exposure of patients to radiation and also ensure economy.

  4. Faith community nursing demonstrates good stewardship of community benefit dollars through cost savings and cost avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ameldia R; Coppola, Patricia; Giacona, Marian; Petriches, Anne; Stockwell, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Health systems seeking responsible stewardship of community benefit dollars supporting Faith Community Nursing Networks require demonstration of positive measurable health outcomes. Faith Community Nurses (FCNs) answer the call for measurable outcomes by documenting cost savings and cost avoidances to families, communities, and health systems associated with their interventions. Using a spreadsheet tool based on Medicare reimbursements and diagnostic-related groupings, 3 networks of FCNs have together shown more than 600 000 (for calendar year 2008) healthcare dollars saved by avoidance of unnecessary acute care visits and extended care placements. The cost-benefit ratio of support dollars to cost savings and cost avoidance demonstrates that support of FCNs is good stewardship of community benefit dollars.

  5. Fracture diagnostics, unnecessary travel and treatment: a comparative study before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a remote general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jac J W M; Jacobs, Jan P A M; van Sonderen, Eric; van der Molen, Thys; Sanderman, Robbert

    2015-05-06

    Teleradiology entails attainment of x-rays in one location, transfer over some distance and assessment at another location for diagnosis or consultation. This study documents fracture diagnostics, unnecessary trips to the hospital, treatment and number of x-rays for the years 2006 and 2009, before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a general practice on the island of Ameland in the north of the Netherlands. In a retrospective, descriptive, observational before and after study of the introduction of x-ray facilities in an island-based general practice, we compared the number of accurately diagnosed fractures, unnecessary trips, treatments and number of x-rays taken in 2006 when only a hospital x-ray facility was available 5 hours away with those in 2009 after an x-ray facility became available at a local general practice. All patients visiting a general practice on the island of Ameland in 2006 and 2009 with trauma and clinical suspicion of a fracture, dislocation or sprain were included in the study. The initial clinical diagnoses, including those based on the outcomes of x-rays, were compared for the two years and also whether the patients were treated at home or in hospital. A total of 316 and 490 patients with trauma visited a general practice in 2006 and 2009, respectively. Of these patients, 66 and 116 were found to have fractures or dislocations in the two years, respectively. In 2006, 83 x-rays were ordered; in 2009, this was 284. In 2006, 9 fractures were missed; in 2009, this was only 2. In 2006, 15 patients with fractures or dislocations were treated at the general practice; in 2009, this had increased to 77. Since the introduction of teleradiology the number of missed fractures in patients visiting the general practice with trauma and the number of the unnecessary trips to a hospital are reduced. In addition more patients with fractures and dislocations can be treated in the general practice as opposed to the hospital.

  6. Antibiotics may not decrease prostate-specific antigen levels or prevent unnecessary prostate biopsy in patients with moderately increased prostate-specific antigen levels: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Zhu, Yuchun; Tang, Zhuang; Chen, Yongji; Gao, Liang; Liu, Liangren; Han, Ping; Li, Xiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of empiric antibiotics on decreasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and the possibility of avoiding unnecessary prostate biopsies (PBs). A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library was performed to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effects of empiric antibiotics with no treatment or placebo on lowering PSA levels and minimizing unnecessary PBs in patients with moderately increased PSA levels. The Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager software (RevMan 5.1.4) was used for statistical analysis. The inclusion criteria for the study were met by 6 RCTs (1 placebo controlled and 5 no treatment controlled) involving 656 patients. The synthesized data from these RCTs indicated that there were no significant differences between the antibiotic and control groups in the PSA levels after treatment (mean difference [MD] = 0.15, 95% CI:-0.50 to 0.81, P = 0.65], number of patients with decreased PSA levels after treatment (relative risk [RR] = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.90-1.65, P = 0.20], prostate-specific antigen density levels after treatment (MD =-0.04, 95% CI:-0.15 to 0.07, P = 0.47), f/t% PSA after treatment (MD =-1.47, 95% CI:-4.65 to 1.71, P = 0.37), number of patients with responsive PSA (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.58-1.81, P = 0.94), and individual Pca-positiverate in these patients (RR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.53-2.16, P = 0.86), and Pca-positiverates (RR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.48-1.50, P = 0.57). However, the antibiotic group had a significant change in the net PSA decrease after treatment compared with the control group (MD = 1.44, 95% CI: 0.70-2.17, P = 0.0001). The use of empiric antibiotics may not significantly decrease PSA levels or avoid unnecessary PBs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  8. Costs of employee turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to establish a general methodology for calculating the costs incurred by employee turnover. This paper deals with identification of costs incurred by the departure of an employee, and does not deal with the cost of recruitment of a new employee. Economic calculations are adjusted to the tax policy in the Czech Republic. The costs of employee turnover (according to Bliss, 2012 include the costs of substitution of the unoccupied position, costs of conducting the exit interview and termination of the contract. The cost of an executive’s time to understand the causes of leaving and costs of the leaving employee’s training were also determined. Important factors in the costs of employee turnover also include the loss of knowledge and possibly also a loss of customers. Costs of lost employee and department productiveness represent an important part of the costs of employee turnover, as well. For all of these costs there have been proposed general calculations formulas.

  9. An examination of the causes, consequences, and policy responses to the migration of highly trained health personnel from the Philippines: the high cost of living/leaving-a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Palaganas, Erlinda; Spitzer, Denise L; Kabamalan, Maria Midea M; Sanchez, Marian C; Caricativo, Ruel; Runnels, Vivien; Labonté, Ronald; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2017-03-31

    Dramatic increases in the migration of human resources for health (HRH) from developing countries like the Philippines can have consequences on the sustainability of health systems. In this paper, we trace the outflows of HRH from the Philippines, map out its key causes and consequences, and identify relevant policy responses. This mixed method study employed a decentered, comparative approach that involved three phases: (a) a scoping review on health workers' migration of relevant policy documents and academic literature on health workers' migration from the Philippines; and primary data collection with (b) 37 key stakeholders and (c) household surveys with seven doctors, 329 nurses, 66 midwives, and 18 physical therapists. Filipino health worker migration is best understood within the context of macro-, meso-, and micro-level factors that are situated within the political, economic, and historical/colonial legacy of the country. Underfunding of the health system and un- or underemployment were push factors for migration, as were concerns for security in the Philippines, the ability to practice to full scope or to have opportunities for career advancement. The migration of health workers has both negative and positive consequences for the Philippine health system and its health workers. Stakeholders focused on issues such as on brain drain, gain, and circulation, and on opportunities for knowledge and technology transfer. Concomitantly, migration has resulted in the loss of investment in human capital. The gap in the supply of health workers has affected the quality of care delivered, especially in rural areas. The opening of overseas opportunities has commercialized health education, compromised its quality, and stripped the country of skilled learning facilitators. The social cost of migration has affected émigrés and their families. At the household level, migration has engendered increased consumerism and materialism and fostered dependency on overseas

  10. Mammographic image reject rate analysis and cause – A National Maltese Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercieca, N.; Portelli, J.L.; Jadva-Patel, H.

    2017-01-01

    Mammography is used as a first-line investigation in the detection of breast cancer and imaging is required to be of optimal quality and achieved without adverse effects on the health of individuals. Repeated images come at a cost in terms of radiation dose, discomfort to clients and unnecessary financial burdens. No studies investigating mammography quality in Malta had been previously undertaken. Hence, this research aimed to investigate whether mammography is being performed at an acceptable level, through the investigation of reject rates. Quantitative methodology was used to collect data from eight participating mammography units, which were utilising screen film (SFM), computed radiography (CR) and direct digital mammography (DDM). Data relating to the total number of images performed, rejects and causes was prospectively collected over two weeks, resulting in a sample of 2291 images. All units were also asked to answer a questionnaire which provided other data that could be used for analysis. The national mammography reject rate was found to be 2.62%; within the 3% acceptable range. Individual rates' analysis revealed unacceptably high or low reject rates in some units. Positioning was the main reject cause. No significant difference in rejection was found between different types of mammography units or radiographers' experience. Alternatively, radiographers' qualifications, employment conditions and use of rejection criteria were proven to affect reject rates. Whilst on a national level, images are being rejected at an acceptable rate, individual units revealed suboptimal rates; at the cost of extra radiation, added discomfort and financial burden. - Highlights: • The national reject rate complied with the European Guidelines. • Reject rates in different units were found to vary. • Positioning was the commonest cause for repeats. • The equipment used and radiographers' experience did not affect reject rates. • Qualifications

  11. Mastite subclínica causada por Staphylococcus aureus: custo-benefício da antibioticoterapia de vacas em lactação Subclinical mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus: cost benefit analysis of antibiotic therapy in lactating cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Zafalon

    2007-06-01

    tests. The mammary quarters were re-evaluated after 30 days. The costs with the treatment were calculated considering a S. aureus prevalence of 5% as well as expenses with antibiotic, milk disposal, tests of drug sensitivity and workload. There was loss of income of 2% and 14% in the groups 1 and 2, respectively, when compared with the values before the treatment. In such case, the treatment of bovine subclinical mastitis caused by S. aureus in the lactation was economically unviable.

  12. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Takano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  13. Acoustics SIMOPS: managing the unnecessary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanton, Samuel John [Nautronix Marine Technology Solutions, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Time is money, and offshore operations are expensive. The desire therefore, is to increase efficiency through the condensing of schedules. This inevitably leads to SIMOPS of some degree, and this paper discusses SIMOPS along with, more specifically, the challenges they provide to acoustic positioning. (author)

  14. Cost effective method for valuation of impacts caused by greenhouse gases emissions for oil and gas companies; Metodo de custo-efetividade para avaliacao de impactos causados pelas emissoes de gases de efeito estufa em empresas de oleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Elisa Vieira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, Sergio Ricardo da Silveira [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LATEC/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Mestrado em Sistemas de Gestao

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work is to apply the method of cost-effectiveness in economic evaluation of new investment projects, based on information about reducing greenhouse gases emissions. In the context of the commitment of companies with the Climate Change and Sustainability, this work is important and contributes to the oil and gas industry, because it integrates information on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in negative Net Present Value (NPV) projects, helping the portfolio manager on decision making between alternative projects. In this article, examples are given of two investment projects, in which the cost effectiveness methodology is applied, considering the reduction of emission of greenhouse gases such as additional environmental benefit, or cost avoidance, in an adjusted model of the economic viability analysis of meritorious projects. (author)

  15. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...... to facilitate resource planning and earnings forecasting. As such, this dissertation relates to the topic of firm profitability and the interpretation of cost variability. The dissertation consists of three parts that are written in the form of separate academic papers. The following section briefly summarizes...

  16. Reducing unnecessary culturing: a systems approach to evaluating urine culture ordering and collection practices among nurses in two acute care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Redwood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate ordering and acquisition of urine cultures leads to unnecessary treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB. Treatment of ASB contributes to antimicrobial resistance particularly among hospital-acquired organisms. Our objective was to investigate urine culture ordering and collection practices among nurses to identify key system-level and human factor barriers and facilitators that affect optimal ordering and collection practices. Methods We conducted two focus groups, one with ED nurses and the other with ICU nurses. Questions were developed using the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS framework. We used iterative categorization (directed content analysis followed by summative content analysis to code and analyze the data both deductively (using SEIPS domains and inductively (emerging themes. Results Factors affecting optimal urine ordering and collection included barriers at the person, process, and task levels. For ED nurses, barriers included patient factors, physician communication, reflex culture protocols, the electronic health record, urinary symptoms, and ED throughput. For ICU nurses, barriers included physician notification of urinalysis results, personal protective equipment, collection technique, patient body habitus, and Foley catheter issues. Conclusions We identified multiple potential process barriers to nurse adherence with evidence-based recommendations for ordering and collecting urine cultures in the ICU and ED. A systems approach to identifying barriers and facilitators can be useful to design interventions for improving urine ordering and collection practices.

  17. Implementation of a Computerized Order Entry Tool to Reduce the Inappropriate and Unnecessary Use of Cardiac Stress Tests With Imaging in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Zachary M; O'Donnell, William; Raina, Amresh; Balderston, Jessica R; Litwack, Andrew J; Goldberg, Lee R

    2016-10-15

    The rising use of imaging cardiac stress tests has led to potentially unnecessary testing. Interventions designed to reduce inappropriate stress testing have focused on the ambulatory setting. We developed a computerized order entry tool intended to reduce the use of imaging cardiac stress tests and improve appropriate use in hospitalized patients. The tool was evaluated using preimplementation and postimplementation cohorts at a single urban academic teaching hospital. All hospitalized patients referred for testing were included. The co-primary outcomes were the use of imaging stress tests as a percentage of all stress tests and the percentage of inappropriate tests, compared between the 2 cohorts. There were 478 patients in the precohort and 463 in the postcohort. The indication was chest pain in 66% and preoperative in 18% and was not significantly different between groups. The use of nonimaging stress tests increased from 4% in the pregroup to 15% in the postgroup (p nonimaging stress tests increased from 7% to 25% (p nonimaging cardiac stress tests and reduced the use of imaging tests yet was not able to reduce inappropriate use. Our study highlights the differences in cardiac stress testing between hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of pacing algorithms to avoid unnecessary ventricular pacing in patients with sick sinus node syndrome: a single-centre, observational, parallel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Hermine R; Jamalyan, Smbat V

    2012-10-01

    Reduction of unnecessary ventricular pacing (uVP) is an essential component in the treatment strategy in any pacing population in general. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different algorithms to reduce uVP in an adult population with sick sinus syndrome (SSS) treated outside of clinical trials. Evaluation of the relationship between different types of pacing algorithms and clinical outcomes is also provided. This was a single-centre, observational, parallel study, based on retrospective analysis of the Arrhythmology Cardiology Center of Armenia electronic clinical database. This study evaluated atrial pacing percentage (AP%), ventricular pacing percentage (VP%), and the incidence of atrial high rate episodes in 56 patients with SSS using three different pacing strategies: managed VP, search atrioventricular (AV), and fixed long AV. We did not find statistically significant differences in the amount of VP between the groups. Although the atrial high rate percentage (AHR%) tended to be higher in the fixed long AV group, this difference was not statistically significant. Mean VP% and AP% were similar in all three groups. In our study, all three programmed strategies produced the same mean AP% and VP%, and were equally efficient in uVP reduction. There was no relationship between chosen algorithms and the incidence of pacemaker syndrome, hospitalizations, or change in New York Heart Association class. The percentage of AHR was not associated with pacing strategy or co-morbidities but showed borderline correlation with left atrial size.

  19. Causes of prolonged hospitalization among general internal medicine patients of a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangkriengsin, Darat; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2014-03-01

    Unnecessary days of prolonged hospitalization may lead to the increase in hospital-related complications and costs, especially in tertiary care center Currently, there have not been many studies about the causes of prolonged hospitalization. Some identified causes could, however, be prevented and improved. To identify the prevalence, causes, predictive factors, prognosis, and economic burden of prolonged hospitalization in patients who had been in general internal medicine wards of the tertiary care center for 7 days or more. Retrospective chart review study was conducted among all patients who were admitted for 7 days or more in general internal medicine wards of Siriraj Hospital, the largest tertiary care center in Thailand. The period of this study was from 1 August 2012 to 30 September 2012. Demographic data, principle diagnosis, comorbid diseases, complications, discharge status, total costs of admission and percentage of reimbursement were collected. The causes of prolonged hospitalization at day 7, 14, 30, and 90 were assessed. Five hundred and sixty-two charts were reviewed. The average length of stay was 25.9 days. The two most common causes of prolonged admission at day 7 were treatment of main diagnosed disease with stable condition (27.6%) and waiting for completion of intravenous antibiotics administration with stable condition (19.5%). The causes of prolonged hospitalization at day 14 were unstable condition from complications (22.6%) and those waiting for completion of intravenous antibiotics administration with stable condition (15.8%). The causes of prolonged admission at day 30 were unstable conditions from complications (25.6%), difficulty weaning or ventilator dependence (17.6%), and caregiver problems (15.2%). The causes of prolonged hospitalization at day 90 were unstable condition from complications (30.0%), caregiver problems (30.0%), and palliative care (25.0%). Poor outcomes were shown in the patients admitted more than 90 days. Percentage

  20. Limitations of cost-benefit evaluation of non-systematic radiological screening of congenital dislocatable or dislocated hip in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidtman, V.; Heereman, B. von; Herrmann, F.

    1987-01-01

    Cost-benefit analyses in the field of screening procedures not only comprise economic aspects, but they also require a thorough analysis of possible health risks, which are imminent in these examinations. Many publications on this topic during the past years have proven that even in such a well investigated problem, like the dislocated or dislocatable hip, this can lead to difficulties. We encountered in Germany these questions connected to hip joint screening, when we tried to analyse the data from the German General Screening Program (GGSP). It ws found that 10 times as many children were treated than one would have expected from epidemiological data. In addition a similarly large number of tentative diagnoses was found, which in summary caused great concern amongst the interested social pediatricians. It was to be expected, that the special examinations and treatments resulting from the screening of children had caused considerable and partially useless costs and unnecessary x-ray exposures. Considerable concern was stirred by information from orthopedic clinics, which reported that still cases of hip luxations and hip dysplasias are seen past the half year margin

  1. Managing the financial cost of exception to contracting standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henschel, Rene Franz

    2008-01-01

    In managing financial cost of exception to contracting standards, the first step is to put up an intelligent contract standards exception monitoring system The next step is to maintain tailor-made, fair and transparent contracting standards The third step is to eliminate unnecessary information...... and repetitiveness in contracting standards The fourth step is to enable your organization and the customers or suppliers to handle the necessary exceptions themselves Finally you should consider the use of independent contracting standards and elimination of your own standards as a tool in managing the cost...

  2. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  3. Developing methods of controlling quality costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines issues of managing quality costs, problems of applying economic methods of quality control, implementation of progressive methods of quality costs management in enterprises with the view of improving the efficiency of their evaluation and analysis. With the aim of increasing the effectiveness of the cost management mechanism, authors introduce controlling as a tool of deviation analysis from the standpoint of the process approach. A list of processes and corresponding evaluation criteria in the quality management system of enterprises is introduced. Authors also introduce the method of controlling quality costs and propose it for the practical application, which allows them to determine useful and unnecessary costs at the existing operating plant. Implementing the proposed recommendations in the system of cost management at an enterprise will allow to improve productivity of processes operating and reduce wasted expense on the quality of the process on the basis of determining values of useful and useless costs of quality according to criteria of processes functioning in the system of quality management.

  4. Combined Clinical Parameters and Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Advanced Risk Modeling of Prostate Cancer-Patient-tailored Risk Stratification Can Reduce Unnecessary Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jan Philipp; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Kesch, Claudia; Freitag, Martin T; Alt, Celine D; Celik, Kamil; Distler, Florian; Roth, Wilfried; Wieczorek, Kathrin; Stock, Christian; Duensing, Stefan; Roethke, Matthias C; Teber, Dogu; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hohenfellner, Markus; Bonekamp, David; Hadaschik, Boris A

    2017-12-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is gaining widespread acceptance in prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis and improves significant PC (sPC; Gleason score≥3+4) detection. Decision making based on European Randomised Study of Screening for PC (ERSPC) risk-calculator (RC) parameters may overcome prostate-specific antigen (PSA) limitations. We added pre-biopsy mpMRI to ERSPC-RC parameters and developed risk models (RMs) to predict individual sPC risk for biopsy-naïve men and men after previous biopsy. We retrospectively analyzed clinical parameters of 1159 men who underwent mpMRI prior to MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy between 2012 and 2015. Multivariate regression analyses were used to determine significant sPC predictors for RM development. The prediction performance was compared with ERSPC-RCs, RCs refitted on our cohort, Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) v1.0, and ERSPC-RC plus PI-RADSv1.0 using receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs). Discrimination and calibration of the RM, as well as net decision and reduction curve analyses were evaluated based on resampling methods. PSA, prostate volume, digital-rectal examination, and PI-RADS were significant sPC predictors and included in the RMs together with age. The ROC area under the curve of the RM for biopsy-naïve men was comparable with ERSPC-RC3 plus PI-RADSv1.0 (0.83 vs 0.84) but larger compared with ERSPC-RC3 (0.81), refitted RC3 (0.80), and PI-RADS (0.76). For postbiopsy men, the novel RM's discrimination (0.81) was higher, compared with PI-RADS (0.78), ERSPC-RC4 (0.66), refitted RC4 (0.76), and ERSPC-RC4 plus PI-RADSv1.0 (0.78). Both RM benefits exceeded those of ERSPC-RCs and PI-RADS in the decision regarding which patient to receive biopsy and enabled the highest reduction rate of unnecessary biopsies. Limitations include a monocentric design and a lack of PI-RADSv2.0. The novel RMs, incorporating clinical parameters and PI-RADS, performed significantly better

  5. Teacher Costs

    OpenAIRE

    DINIS MOTA DA COSTA PATRICIA; DE SOUSA LOBO BORGES DE ARAUJO LUISA

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this technical brief is to assess current methodologies for the collection and calculation of teacher costs in European Union (EU) Member States in view of improving data series and indicators related to teacher salaries and teacher costs. To this end, CRELL compares the Eurydice collection on teacher salaries with the similar Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data collection and calculates teacher costs based on the methodology established by Statis...

  6. Clinical application of 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: "How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-09-01

    Practice of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be protected from harmful radiation exposure if 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. This can save children from potential radiation risks including development of brain cancer and leukemia. Consecutive CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children's hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, 'Justification' of CT was evaluated and then 'Optimization' was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies avoided by applying 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. A total of 1302 consecutive CT request forms were received during the study period. Some of the request forms (n=86; 6.61%) had requests for more than one (multiple) anatomical regions, hence, a total of 1392 different anatomical CT requests were received. Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were protected from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure.The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient

  7. An Unusual Cause of Hydronephroureter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, T.; Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a common method of contraception among women because of its low cost and high efficacy. Perforations are possible resulting in multiple complications including urinary complications. Obstructive hydronephrosis and hydroureter is one of the main clinical concerns in genitourinary practice leading to radiological investigations for determination of the cause. Determination of the cause leads to early treatment, hence saving the renal function. In this case report, we describe hydronephrosis and hydroureter secondary to a migrated/displaced IUCD. (author)

  8. Rehabilitation costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Arthur S [BDM Corp., VA (United States); [Bikini Atoll Rehabilitation Committee, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1986-07-01

    The costs of radioactivity contamination control and other matters relating to the resettlement of Bikin atoll were reviewed for Bikini Atoll Rehabilitation Committee by a panel of engineers which met in Berkeley, California on January 22-24, 1986. This Appendix presents the cost estimates.

  9. Rehabilitation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Arthur S.

    1986-01-01

    The costs of radioactivity contamination control and other matters relating to the resettlement of Bikin atoll were reviewed for Bikini Atoll Rehabilitation Committee by a panel of engineers which met in Berkeley, California on January 22-24, 1986. This Appendix presents the cost estimates

  10. Cost considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiel Ras; Debbie Verbeek-Oudijk; Evelien Eggink

    2013-01-01

    Original title: Lasten onder de loep The Dutch government spends almost 7 billion euros  each year on care for people with intellectual disabilities, and these costs are rising steadily. This report analyses what underlies the increase in costs that occurred between 2007 and 2011. Was

  11. Troubleshooting Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L.

    Seventy-six million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States alone. Medical and lost productivity costs of the most common pathogens are estimated to be 5.6-9.4 billion. Product recalls, whether from foodborne illness or spoilage, result in added costs to manufacturers in a variety of ways. These may include expenses associated with lawsuits from real or allegedly stricken individuals and lawsuits from shorted customers. Other costs include those associated with efforts involved in finding the source of the contamination and eliminating it and include time when lines are shut down and therefore non-productive, additional non-routine testing, consultant fees, time and personnel required to overhaul the entire food safety system, lost market share to competitors, and the cost associated with redesign of the factory and redesign or acquisition of more hygienic equipment. The cost associated with an effective quality assurance plan is well worth the effort to prevent the situations described.

  12. Cost comparisons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    How much does the LHC cost? And how much does this represent in other currencies? Below we present a table showing some comparisons with the cost of other projects. Looking at the figures, you will see that the cost of the LHC can be likened to that of three skyscrapers, or two seasons of Formula 1 racing! One year's budget of a single large F1 team is comparable to the entire materials cost of the ATLAS or CMS experiments.   Please note that all the figures are rounded for ease of reading.    CHF € $   LHC 4.6 billions 3 billions  4 billions   Space Shuttle Endeavour (NASA) 1.9 billion 1.3 billion 1.7 billion   Hubble Space Telescope (cost at launch – NASA/...

  13. Value and Transaction Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2003-01-01

    caused by transaction costs), andnew types of resources (i.e., capture and protection capabilities), clarifies the roleof contracting in the exercise of market power, and suggests that `strategizing'and `economizing' perspectives are related to a larger extent than is normallyrecognized. Refutable......AbstractWe forge linkages between the economics of property rights (Coase, Demsetz,Cheung, Barzel) and strategic management. Property rights to resources consistof the rights to consume, obtain income from, and alienate these resources.Transaction costs are the costs of exchanging, protecting...... and capturing propertyrights. We clarify the key role of transaction costs with respect to understandingvalue creation and the limitations and opportunities of strategizing relative tocompetitive forces. The economics of property rights identifies new sources ofvalue creation (i.e., reducing the dissipation...

  14. Economic and biological costs of cardiac imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picano Eugenio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical imaging market consists of several billion tests per year worldwide. Out of these, at least one third are cardiovascular procedures. Keeping in mind that each test represents a cost, often a risk, and a diagnostic hypothesis, we can agree that every unnecessary and unjustifiable test is one test too many. Small individual costs, risks, and wastes multiplied by billions of examinations per year represent an important population, society and environmental burden. Unfortunately, the appropriateness of cardiac imaging is extra-ordinarily low and there is little awareness in patients and physicians of differential costs, radiological doses, and long term risks of different imaging modalities. For a resting cardiac imaging test, being the average cost (not charges of an echocardiogram equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of a CT is 3.1x, of a SPECT 3.27x, of a Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance imaging 5.51x, of a PET 14.03x, and of a right and left heart catheterization 19.96x. For stress cardiac imaging, compared with the treadmill exercise test equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of stress echocardiography is 2.1x and of a stress SPECT scintigraphy is 5.7x. Biohazards and downstream long-term costs linked to radiation-induced oncogenesis should also be considered. The radiation exposure is absent in echo and magnetic resonance, and corresponds to 500 chest x rays for a sestamibi cardiac stress scan and to 1150 chest x rays for a thallium scan. The corresponding extra-risk in a lifetime of fatal cancer is 1 in 2000 exposed patients for a sestamibi stress and 1 in 1000 for a thallium scan. Increased awareness of economic, biologic, and environmental costs of cardiac imaging will hopefully lead to greater appropriateness, wisdom and prudence from both the prescriber and the practitioner. In this way, the sustainability of cardiac imaging will eventually improve.

  15. Developing a nomogram based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for forecasting high-grade prostate cancer to reduce unnecessary biopsies within the prostate-specific antigen gray zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiang-Ke; Li, Jun; Das, Susant Kumar; Xiong, Yan; Yang, Chao-Bing; Peng, Tao

    2017-02-01

    .001, respectively). The nomogram based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) for forecasting HGPCa is effective, which could reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies in patients with PSA 4-10 ng/ml and nomogram-based risk-score could provide a more robust parameter of assessing the aggressiveness of HGPCa in PSA gray zone.

  16. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost

  17. The high cost of low-frequency events: the anatomy and economics of surgical mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, N P; Tilney, N L; Rayner, A A; Moore, F D

    1981-03-12

    We conducted a one-year prospective survey to identify adverse outcomes due to error during care in the field of general surgery. We identified 36 such cases among 5612 surgical admissions to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, but in 23 cases the initiating mishap had occurred in another hospital before transfer. In two thirds of the cases the mishap was due to an error of commission: an unnecessary, defective or inappropriate operative procedure. Twenty of these patients died in the hospital, and in 11 death was directly attributable to the error. Five of the 16 survivors left the hospital with serious physical impairment. A satisfactory outcome was achieved in only 11 cases (31%). The average hospital stay was 42 days, with the duration ranging from one to 325 days; the total cost for the 36 patients was $1,732,432. We suggest that all hospitals develop comprehensive methods to identify and prevent these costly and unnecessary events.

  18. Fitness cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Pedersen, Thomas M.; Udekwu, Klas I.

    2012-01-01

    phage types, predominantly only penicillin resistant. We investigated whether isolates of this epidemic were associated with a fitness cost, and we employed a mathematical model to ask whether these fitness costs could have led to the observed reduction in frequency. Bacteraemia isolates of S. aureus...... from Denmark have been stored since 1957. We chose 40 S. aureus isolates belonging to phage complex 83A, clonal complex 8 based on spa type, ranging in time of isolation from 1957 to 1980 and with varyous antibiograms, including both methicillin-resistant and -susceptible isolates. The relative fitness...... of each isolate was determined in a growth competition assay with a reference isolate. Significant fitness costs of 215 were determined for the MRSA isolates studied. There was a significant negative correlation between number of antibiotic resistances and relative fitness. Multiple regression analysis...

  19. (Super Variable Costing-Throughput Costing)

    OpenAIRE

    Çakıcı, Cemal

    2006-01-01

    (Super Variable Costing-Throughput Costing) The aim of this study is to explain the super-variable costing method which is a new subject in cost and management accounting and to show it’s working practicly.Shortly, super-variable costing can be defined as a costing method which is use only direct material costs in calculate of product costs and treats all costs except these (direct labor and overhead) as periad costs or operating costs.By using super-variable costing method, product costs ar...

  20. Electrocardiogram artifact caused by rigors mimicking narrow complex tachycardia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Anne Thushara; Indrakumar, Jegarajah

    2014-02-04

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is useful in the diagnosis of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions. Rigors due to shivering can cause electrocardiogram artifacts mimicking various cardiac rhythm abnormalities. We describe an 80-year-old Sri Lankan man with an abnormal electrocardiogram mimicking narrow complex tachycardia during the immediate post-operative period. Electrocardiogram changes caused by muscle tremor during rigors could mimic a narrow complex tachycardia. Identification of muscle tremor as a cause of electrocardiogram artifact can avoid unnecessary pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention to prevent arrhythmias.

  1. A compact cost-effective beamline for a PET Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnel, M.P.; Jackle, P.; Roeder, M.; Stewart, T.; Theroux, J.; Brasile, J.P.; Sirot, P.; Buckley, K.R.; Bedue, M.

    2007-01-01

    Most commercial PET Cyclotrons have targets mounted on or near the main cyclotron vacuum chamber. There is often little or no system capability for centering or focusing the extracted beam on target to achieve maximum production. This paper describes the ion-optics, design and development of a compact cost-effective beamline comprised of low activation and radiation resistant materials. The beamline, complete with suitable diagnostic devices, permits the extracted proton beam to be centered (X-Y steering magnet), and focused (quadrupole doublet) on target eliminating unnecessary beamspill and ensuring high production

  2. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth / For Parents / Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  3. Analysis of Cost of Rework on Time and Cost Performance of Building Construction Projects in Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Chidiebere Eze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rework is a menace that leads to undesired and unnecessary loss of efforts, it degrades project cost and schedule performance of construction projects, both at design and construction phases. This study therefore, analyzed the impact of cost of rework on time and cost performance of building construction projects in Nigerian, using selected commercial building project within the country’s capital. A pro forma was adopted for gathering data on rework cost, project cost and time of selected building projects, while structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the likely measures for reducing rework incidences from construction professionals that were involved in the delivery of the identified projects. Regression analysis, relative importance index and Kruskal-Walis test were employed for data analysis. The study revealed a significant relationship between the cost of rework and initial and final project cost of delivering commercial buildings, as an average of 3.53% impact on the initial project cost, 46.60% contribution to cost overrun, and p-value of 0.000 was observed on all assessed projects. For the project delivery time, a significant relationship between the cost of rework and initial and final project duration, as an average of 7.35% impact on the initial delivery time, extra 19 days and p-value of 0.000 was observed on all assessed projects. Team building and education, management commitment, employee involvement, were some of the best possible measures to minimized rework problems.

  4. Agency costs and income taxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes agency costs and the moral hazard problem in the presence of income taxation. As basic framework, income taxes are integrated in the hidden action model of agency theory. In the case of symmetric information no agency costs occur, i.e. optimal risk-sharing can be achieved, if and only if the tax is proportional. It is well-known that asymmetric information causes a welfare loss, termed agency costs, even if no taxes are imposed. Introducing a proportional income tax now increases (decreases these agency costs if the agent exhibits decreasing (increasing absolute risk aversion. Additionally, we show that non-proportional taxes cause higher (lower agency costs than a proportional tax if the agent’s marginal tax rate exceeds (is smaller than the marginal tax rate of the principal.

  5. An Audit of Repeat Testing at an Academic Medical Center: Consistency of Order Patterns With Recommendations and Potential Cost Savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueth, Kyle D; Jackson, Brian R; Schmidt, Robert L

    2018-05-31

    To evaluate the prevalence of potentially unnecessary repeat testing (PURT) and the associated economic burden for an inpatient population at a large academic medical facility. We evaluated all inpatient test orders during 2016 for PURT by comparing the intertest times to published recommendations. Potential cost savings were estimated using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services maximum allowable reimbursement rate. We evaluated result positivity as a determinant of PURT through logistic regression. Of the evaluated 4,242 repeated target tests, 1,849 (44%) were identified as PURT, representing an estimated cost-savings opportunity of $37,376. Collectively, the association of result positivity and PURT was statistically significant (relative risk, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.3; P < .001). PURT contributes to unnecessary health care costs. We found that a small percentage of providers account for the majority of PURT, and PURT is positively associated with result positivity.

  6. Nuclear power company activity based costing management analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dan

    2012-01-01

    With Nuclear Energy Industry development, Nuclear Power Company has the continual promoting stress of inner management to the sustainable marketing operation development. In view of this, it is very imminence that Nuclear Power Company should promote the cost management levels and built the nuclear safety based lower cost competitive advantage. Activity based costing management (ABCM) transfer the cost management emphases from the 'product' to the 'activity' using the value chain analysis methods, cost driver analysis methods and so on. According to the analysis of the detail activities and the value chains, cancel the unnecessary activity, low down the resource consuming of the necessary activity, and manage the cost from the source, achieve the purpose of reducing cost, boosting efficiency and realizing the management value. It gets the conclusion from the detail analysis with the nuclear power company procedure and activity, and also with the selection to 'pieces analysis' of the important cost related project in the nuclear power company. The conclusion is that the activities of the nuclear power company has the obviously performance. It can use the management of ABC method. And with the management of the procedure and activity, it is helpful to realize the nuclear safety based low cost competitive advantage in the nuclear power company. (author)

  7. Cost restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the cost restructuring of the petroleum industry. This current decade is likely to be one of the most challenging for the petroleum industry. Though petroleum remains among the world's biggest businesses, news of consolidations, restructuring, and layoffs permeates the oil patch from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Isles. The recessionary economy has accelerated these changes, particularly in the upstream sector. Today, even the best-managed companies are transforming their cost structures, and companies that fail to do likewise probably won't survive as independent companies. Indeed, significant consolidation took place during the 1980s. More consolidations can be expected in this decade for companies that do not adapt to the economic realities of the mature business

  8. Maintenance cost models in deregulated power systems under opportunity costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, K.; Dahal, K.; Azaiez, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    In a centralized power system, the operator is responsible for scheduling maintenance. There are different types of maintenance, including corrective maintenance; predictive maintenance; preventive maintenance; and reliability-centred maintenance. The main cause of power failures is poor maintenance. As such, maintenance costs play a significant role in deregulated power systems. They include direct costs associated with material and labor costs as well as indirect costs associated with spare parts inventory, shipment, test equipment, indirect labor, opportunity costs and cost of failure. In maintenance scheduling and planning, the cost function is the only component of the objective function. This paper presented the results of a study in which different components of maintenance costs were modeled. The maintenance models were formulated as an optimization problem with single and multiple objectives and a set of constraints. The maintenance costs models could be used to schedule the maintenance activities of power generators more accurately and to identify the best maintenance strategies over a period of time as they consider failure and opportunity costs in a deregulated environment. 32 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  9. Proprietary hospitals in cost containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D A

    1985-08-23

    Any effort to control the rise in health care costs must start with analyzing the causes, which are really quite simple. Most cost control efforts fail because they do not address the causes. The causes are large subsidies in several forms that send a false message that health care is free and should be used abundantly, and expansive reimbursement programs that reward inefficient providers with higher payments. This combination of demand stimulation and cost-plus reimbursement produced the world's most expensive health care delivery system and strident calls for reform. A long overdue change in public policy took effect October 1, 1983, when Medicare payments moved from cost-plus reimbursement to fixed, prospectively determined prices. Because it addressed one of the causes of medical inflation, this change has been effective in slowing the rise in Medicare expenditures. Sponsorship of a hospital is not a determinant of its cost-effectiveness. There are examples of efficient and inefficient hospitals in both the voluntary and the investor-owned or taxpaying hospitals. The determining factor is the will of management to keep costs under control.

  10. Reduction of the unnecessary dose from the over-range area with a spiral dynamic z-collimator: comparison of beam pitch and detector coverage with 128-detector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Funama, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Mutsukazu; Awamoto, Shinichi; Kondo, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to assess the radiation dose reduction and the actual exposed scan length of over-range areas using a spiral dynamic z-collimator at different beam pitches and detector coverage. Using glass rod dosimeters, we measured the unilateral over-range scan dose between the beginning of the planned scan range and the beginning of the actual exposed scan range. Scanning was performed at detector coverage of 80.0 and 40.0 mm, with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator. The dose-saving ratio was calculated as the ratio of the unnecessary over-range dose, with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator. In 80.0 mm detector coverage without the spiral dynamic z-collimator, the actual exposed scan length for the over-range area was 108, 120, and 126 mm, corresponding to a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99, respectively. With the spiral dynamic z-collimator, the actual exposed scan length for the over-range area was 48, 66, and 84 mm with a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99, respectively. The dose-saving ratios with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator for a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99 were 35.07, 24.76, and 13.51%, respectively. With 40.0 mm detector coverage, the dose-saving ratios with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator had the highest value of 27.23% with a low beam pitch of 0.60. The spiral dynamic z-collimator is important for a reduction in the unnecessary over-range dose and makes it possible to reduce the unnecessary dose by means of a lower beam pitch.

  11. Evaluation of the causes and cost impact of returned intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the main reasons for returning intravenous (IV) medications and ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus, ... was conducted at a tertiary university teaching.

  12. Impact Injury Caused by Linear Acceleration: Mechanisms, Prevention and Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-29

    dejä decrites les blessures cerebrales, cräniennes ou cervicales . Les a tete seule, du cräne et du cerveau sont prelevees afin enomenes de masse...sujets pour lesquels le cerveau etait bien conserve et bien injecte. Ils sont au nombre de 20 en chocs frontaux et de 17 en chocs lateraux. Une

  13. What Causes SIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environment Look Like? How Can Caregivers Create a Safe Sleep Environment? Babies Need Tummy ... exactly what causes SIDS at this time. Scientists and health care providers are working very hard to find the cause or causes ...

  14. Reducing Unnecessary and Duplicate Ordering for Ovum and Parasite Examinations and Clostridium difficile PCR in Immunocompromised Patients by Using an Alert at the Time of Request in the Order Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Caitlin C; Shuptar, Susan L; Milord, Philippe; Essick, Connor J; Nevrekar, Reshma; Granovsky, Svetlana L; Seo, Susan K; Babady, N Esther; Martin, Steven C; Tang, Yi-Wei; Pessin, Melissa S

    2015-08-01

    We implemented hospital information system (HIS) alerts to deter unnecessary test orders for ovum and parasite (O&P) exams and Clostridium difficile PCR. The HIS alerts decreased noncompliant O&P orders (orders after >72 h of hospitalization) from 49.8% to 30.9%, an overall decrease of 19%, and reduced noncompliant C. difficile PCR orders (orders <7 days after a previous positive result) from 30.6% to 19.2%, an overall decrease of 31.9%. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Using business intelligence to manage supply costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunata, Ernest

    2013-08-01

    Business intelligence tools can help materials managers and managers in the operating room and procedural areas track purchasing costs more precisely and determine the root causes of cost increases. Data can be shared with physicians to increase their awareness of the cost of physician preference items. Proper use of business intelligence goes beyond price benchmarking to manage price performance over time.

  16. Psoriasis causes significant economic burden to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, A; Mattila, K; Leino, M; Koulu, L; Tuominen, R

    2014-06-01

    Psoriasis results in expenses to patients from many cost sources. Psoriasis treatments may result in considerable time and traveling costs, yet many studies fail to account for these costs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the multidimensional economic burden of psoriasis to patients. The study was based on 232 Finnish patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis visiting a tertiary level dermatological clinic during a 1-year study period between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010. The data were based on a patient questionnaire, clinical data from the medical records and reimbursement data from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution. Item costs were based on true costs charged from the patients and all time cost estimates were based on the Human Capital Approach method. 199 patients with psoriasis and 33 with psoriatic arthritis were included in the study. Total costs were higher for patients receiving traditional systemic medications or phototherapy than those not receiving such treatment. Travel costs and travel time costs accounted for more than 60% of the costs of phototherapy. Skin care at home was time consuming and thus caused significant burden to patients. The majority of the visit costs arose from hospital visits and only a small proportion were attributed to visiting primary health care providers. Visit charges and other patient co-payments were estimated to play a minor role in the total cost of psoriasis incurred by patients, while travel costs and lost time comprised the majority of the costs, which should not be omitted in future studies regarding costs of treatments.

  17. Design to Cost and Life Cycle Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    MANAGEMENT TASK ORIENTATED COST STRUCTURE 5. COSTS OF CONSTRUCTION INIFRA 2. COSTS DURING DEVELOPMENT -6. COSTS OF TRAINING 3. COSTS DURING TESi ...de r~duction des coats, ii faut disponer de ?!vyenr. performants d’eetimation des coats en main-d’oeuvre et en applrvininrinesent. Cam moyenm doivent

  18. Systematic analysis and prevention of human originated common cause failures in relation to maintenance activities at Finnish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, K. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    inspections and functional testing. Such a planning case shall include a need evaluation of both the component and system level testing at the end of work. In addition, the use of condition monitoring information helps in reducing the uncertainty about equipment operability after intrusive maintenance or modifications. An increased use of condition information for a situation specific steering of preventive maintenance actions could also help to avoid unnecessary predetermined preventive maintenance actions which have the potential to cause unnecessary failures. A more agile adjustment of work orders to correspond the new conditions identified by maintenance personnel locally during work was also found necessary to reduce human CCFs caused by e.g. missing testing or inspections. The results emphasize the responsibility and requirements of versatility and specialisation of the planning and performance of maintenance and operability verification which brings this work to a knowledge work. For instance, flexibility is needed for the adaptation to specific conditions of the equipment and work as well as adhering to the rules and procedures is required. And mostly both a specialist knowledge of the equipment and a functional overview of the system are required. The event and error analyses of the multiple and single errors would help in training the maintenance, operation and technical personnel to identify better error mechanisms and prevent undetected human CCFs and errors, too. An earlier and better defined examination of the CCF risks as a part of the failure reporting and repair and modification processes would also help to identify, investigate and prevent CCFs. Generally, operability verification of the work objects in plant equipment should be planned and implemented better as an integral part of the plant maintenance process requiring knowledge of both the maintenance and operation branches. Methods for analysis of maintenance history information, examples of presentation

  19. Systematic analysis and prevention of human originated common cause failures in relation to maintenance activities at Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, K.

    2006-12-01

    inspections and functional testing. Such a planning case shall include a need evaluation of both the component and system level testing at the end of work. In addition, the use of condition monitoring information helps in reducing the uncertainty about equipment operability after intrusive maintenance or modifications. An increased use of condition information for a situation specific steering of preventive maintenance actions could also help to avoid unnecessary predetermined preventive maintenance actions which have the potential to cause unnecessary failures. A more agile adjustment of work orders to correspond the new conditions identified by maintenance personnel locally during work was also found necessary to reduce human CCFs caused by e.g. missing testing or inspections. The results emphasize the responsibility and requirements of versatility and specialisation of the planning and performance of maintenance and operability verification which brings this work to a knowledge work. For instance, flexibility is needed for the adaptation to specific conditions of the equipment and work as well as adhering to the rules and procedures is required. And mostly both a specialist knowledge of the equipment and a functional overview of the system are required. The event and error analyses of the multiple and single errors would help in training the maintenance, operation and technical personnel to identify better error mechanisms and prevent undetected human CCFs and errors, too. An earlier and better defined examination of the CCF risks as a part of the failure reporting and repair and modification processes would also help to identify, investigate and prevent CCFs. Generally, operability verification of the work objects in plant equipment should be planned and implemented better as an integral part of the plant maintenance process requiring knowledge of both the maintenance and operation branches. Methods for analysis of maintenance history information, examples of presentation

  20. PENETAPAN TARGET TERHADAP STICKINESS COST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windyastuti Windyastuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the influence of manager targeting to the stickiness cost. The research data was amanufacturing company’s financial statements during 1999-2011 published at BEI. The research data includedcost of sales, administration and general, net sales and Price Earnings Ratio (PER. This study used adynamic panel data regression analysis. The results showed that cost of sales, administration and general weresticky. Furthermore, manager targeting caused the stickiness degree of sales, administration and general costlower. Manager targeting changed the manager’s behavior. When the net sales declined, manager reduced theresource use drastically so the cost of sales, administration and general also decreased drastically.

  1. Cutting costs without drawing blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, T

    2000-01-01

    When looking for ways to cut costs, most managers reach for the head-count hatchet, and the markets usually roar with approval. But a company can almost always create far more sustainable value by rigorously evaluating the small-ticket capital items that often get rubber-stamped. Drawing on his experience as a consultant and providing numerous anecdotes, the author contends that those "little" requests often prove to be gold plated or unnecessary. A disciplined evaluation involves asking only eight questions and conducting postmortems--regular audits of units' capital spending. But the payoff is enormous. Because cutting the capital budget increases cash flow, the author argues that a permanent cut of just 15% in the planned level of capital spending could boost some companies' market capitalization by as much as 30%. The first three questions--Is this your investment to make? Does it really have to be new? How are our competitors meeting compliance needs?--are asked of operating managers as they assemble capital project requests. The next three are asked by senior managers of themselves and their colleagues as they examine proposals: Is the left hand duplicating investments made by the right? Are trade-offs between profit and capital spending well understood? Are there signs of budget massage? At the end of the review process, senior managers ask: Are we fully using shared assets? How fine-grained are our capacity measures? The author's suggestions for the postmortem include searching for systematic problems with whole classes of expenditures and making sure audit teams come up with specific recommendations for change.

  2. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields J

    2015-06-01

    clarifying the indications for head CT after inpatient falls and validating risk models for positive and negative imaging, in order to decrease unnecessary imaging and thereby limit unnecessary cost and radiation exposure. Keywords: inpatients, falls, diagnostic imaging, health care costs, incident reporting

  3. Cost of depression in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocki, Patrik; Jönsson, Bengt; Angst, Jules; Rehnberg, Clas

    2006-06-01

    Depression is one of the most disabling diseases, and causes a significant burden both to the individual and to society. WHO data suggests that depression causes 6% of the burden of all diseases in Europe in terms of disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Yet, the knowledge of the economic impact of depression has been relatively little researched in Europe. The present study aims at estimating the total cost of depression in Europe based on published epidemiologic and economic evidence. A model was developed to combine epidemiological and economic data on depression in Europe to estimate the cost. The model was populated with data collected from extensive literature reviews of the epidemiology and economic burden of depression in Europe. The cost data was calculated as annual cost per patient, and epidemiologic data was reported as 12-month prevalence estimates. National and international statistics for the model were retrieved from the OECD and Eurostat databases. The aggregated annual cost estimates were presented in Euro for 2004. In 28 countries with a population of 466 million, at least 21 million were affected by depression. The total annual cost of depression in Europe was estimated at Euro 118 billion in 2004, which corresponds to a cost of Euro 253 per inhabitant. Direct costs alone totalled dollar 42 billion, comprised of outpatient care (Euro 22 billion), drug cost (Euro 9 billion) and hospitalization (Euro 10 billion). Indirect costs due to morbidity and mortality were estimated at Euro 76 billion. This makes depression the most costly brain disorder in Europe, accounting for 33% of the total cost. The cost of depression corresponds to 1% of the total economy of Europe (GDP). Our cost results are in good agreement with previous research findings. The cost estimates in the present study are based on model simulations for countries where no data was available. The predictability of our model is limited to the accuracy of the input data employed. As

  4. Breakdown Cause and Effect Analysis. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biały, Witold; Ružbarský, Juraj

    2018-06-01

    Every company must ensure that the production process proceeds without interferences. Within this article, the author uses the term "interferences" in reference to unplanned stoppages caused by breakdowns. Unfortunately, usually due to machine operators' mistakes, machines break, which causes stoppages thus generating additional costs for the company. This article shows a cause and effect analysis of a breakdown in a production process. The FMEA as well as quality management tools: the Ishikawa diagram and Pareto chart were used for the analysis. Correction measures were presented which allowed for a significant reduction in the number of stoppages caused by breakdowns.

  5. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain: Primary Appendagitis Epiploica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica – one of the causes of acute abdominal pain – is a self-limited rare benign inflammatory condition involving the colonic epiploic appendages. Their therapy is conservative and clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. However, being a quite rare condition is the reason they are usually neglected by both the surgeon and the radiologist. However the computed tomography (CT findings are rather characteristic and pathognomonic. Thus, to consider CT as the diagnostic modality of choice is extremely important in order to diagnose the condition and to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.             This is a paper reporting an acute abdominal pain case of primary appendicitis epiploica diagnosed using computed tomography. 

  6. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  7. What Causes COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What Causes COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Long- ... and the airways usually is the cause of COPD. In the United States, the most common irritant ...

  8. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  9. Cost effectiveness of teratology counseling - the Motherisk experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-01-01

    While the benefits of evidence-based counseling to large numbers of women and physicians are intuitively evident, there is an urgent need to document that teratology counseling, in addition to improving the quality of life of women and families, also leads to cost saving. The objective of the present study was to calculate the cost effectiveness of the Motherisk Program, a large teratology information and counseling service at The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto. We analyzed data from the Motherisk Program on its 2012 activities in two domains: 1) Calculation of cost-saving in preventing unjustified pregnancy terminations; and 2) prevention of major birth defects. Cost of pregnancy termination and lifelong cost of specific birth defects were identified from primary literature and prorated for cost of living for the year 2013. Prevention of 255 pregnancy terminations per year led to cost savings of $516,630. The total estimated number of major malformations prevented by Motherisk counseling in 2012 was 8.41 cases at a total estimated cost of $9,032,492. With an estimated minimum annual prevention of 8 major malformations, and numerous unnecessary terminations of otherwise- wanted pregnancies, a cost saving of $10 million can be calculated. In 2013 the operating budget of Motherisk counseling totaled $640,000. Even based on the narrow range of activities for which we calculated cost, this service is highly cost- effective. Because most teratology counseling services are operating in a very similar method to Motherisk, it is fair to assume that these results, although dependent on the size of the service, are generalizable to other countries.

  10. Radiation: cost or benefit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, D.

    1988-01-01

    In a previous issue of SCRAM it was argued that the apparent increased incidence of child leukaemia around nuclear power stations could have been caused by radioactive discharges into the environment. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) claim that the known levels of contamination could not be responsible for the observed cancer rates. NRPB estimates of radiation risk are, however, considered to be underestimates. The NRPB is criticised for its study of the Sellafield workforce which excluded ex-employees and which revealed, when a statistical mistake was put right, a significant excess of myeloma amongst the Windscale workforce. The radiation protection philosophy of the NRPB is based on a cost benefit analysis which balances the cost of protection against the benefits of power generation. Criticism is made of NRPB, not only for ignoring long-term risks and costs but also for suggesting that some levels of radiation exposure are acceptable. The Board is also accused of not being independent of the nuclear industry. (UK)

  11. [Macroeconomic costs of eye diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneiß, C; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2014-05-01

    Eye diseases that are relevant regarding their macroeconomic costs and their impact on society include cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related maculopathy, glaucoma and refractive errors. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of direct and indirect costs for major eye disease categories for Germany, based on existing literature and data sources. A semi-structured literature search was performed in the databases Medline and Embase and in the search machine Google for relevant original papers and reviews on costs of eye diseases with relevance for or transferability to Germany (last research date October 2013). In addition, manual searching was performed in important national databases and information sources, such as the Federal Office of Statistics and scientific societies. The direct costs for these diseases add up to approximately 2.6 billion Euros yearly for the Federal Republic of Germany, including out of the pocket payments from patients but excluding optical aids (e.g. glasses). In addition to those direct costs there are also indirect costs which are caused e.g. by loss of employment or productivity or by a reduction in health-related quality of life. These indirect costs can only be roughly estimated. Including the indirect costs for the eye diseases investigated, a total yearly macroeconomic cost ranging between 4 and 12 billion Euros is estimated for Germany. The costs for the eye diseases cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related maculopathy, glaucoma and refractive errors have a macroeconomic relevant dimension. Based on the predicted demographic changes with an ageing society an increase of the prevalence and thus also an increase of costs for eye diseases is expected in the future.

  12. Road crash costs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Road crashes result in all kinds of social costs, such as medical costs, production loss, human losses, property damage, settlement costs and costs due to congestion. Studies into road crash costs and their trends are carried out quite regularly. In 2009, the costs amounted to € 12.5 billion, or

  13. Impact of PSA density of transition zone as a potential parameter in reducing the number of unnecessary prostate biopsies in patients with psa levels between 2.6 and 10.0 ng/mL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hugo A Socrates; Iared, Wagner; Santos, José Eduardo Mourão; Solha, Raphael Sandes; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Ajzen, Sergio Aron

    2018-04-10

    To assess the accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) adjusted for the transition zone volume (PSATZ) in predicting prostate cancer by comparing the ability of several PSA parameters in predicting prostate cancer in men with intermediate PSA levels of 2.6 - 10.0 ng/mL and its ability to reduce unnecessary biopsies. This study included 656 patients referred for prostate biopsy who had a serum PSA of 2.6 - 10.0 ng/mL. Total prostate and transition zone volumes were measured by transrectal ultrasound using the prolate ellipsoid method. The clinical values of PSA, free-to-total (F/T) ratio, PSA density (PSAD) and PSATZ for the detection of prostate cancer were calculated and statistical comparisons between biopsy-positive (cancer) and biopsy-negative (benign) were conducted. Cancer was detected in 172 patients (26.2%). Mean PSA, PSATZ, PSAD and F/T ratio were 7.5 ng/mL, 0.68 ng/mL/cc. 0.25 ng/mL/cc and 0.14 in patients with prostate cancer and 6.29 ng/mL, 0.30 ng/mL/cc, 0.16 ng/mL/cc and 0.22 in patients with benign biopsies, respectively. ROC curves analysis demonstrated that PSATZ had a higher area under curve (0,838) than F/T ratio (0,806) (PPSA. Compared to other PSA related parameters, it was better in differentiating between prostate cancer and benign prostatic enlargement. Also, PSATZ could reduce a significant number of unnecessary biopsies. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  14. Not all pustules are infective in nature: acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis causing pustular eruptions in an elderly woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwah, Y C; Leow, Y H

    2005-07-01

    Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an adverse drug reaction that can occur in any age group. It is commonly mistaken as pustular psoriasis or cutaneous infection, resulting in unnecessary commencement of medications such as methotrexate and antibiotics that can cause harm to the patient or interact and adversely affect the efficacy of other medications. Early diagnosis of AGEP avoids unnecessary investigations and treatment, which not only can harm the patient but also escalate health care, as the condition is self-limiting. This case report illustrates AGEP secondary to Cefaclor occurring in a 72-year-old Chinese woman. Although the literature has documented the occurrence of AGEP with Cefaclor, the unique feature of this case is the occurrence of AGEP following repeated uneventful courses of Cefaclor. This case highlights that AGEP must never be forgotten in the work-up for pustular eruptions in an elderly patient.

  15. Analysis of Transaction Costs in Logistics and the Methodologies for Their Information Reflection for Automotive Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Evgen’evna Kovrizhnykh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transaction costs emerge in different types of logistics activities and influence the material flow and the accompanying financial and information flows; due to this fact, the information support and assessment are important tasks for the enterprise. The paper analyzes transaction costs in logistics for automotive manufacturers; according to the analysis, the level of these costs in any functional area of “logistics supply” ranges from 1.5 to 20%. These are only the official figures of transaction costs of enterprises that do not take into consideration implicit costs. Despite the growing interest in transaction costs in logistics in the latest fifteen years, this topic is covered rather poorly in Russian literature; the definition of “transaction costs” is unclear, there is no technique of their information reflection and assessment. We have developed the methods for information reflection of transaction costs that can be used by automotive enterprises. Each enterprise will have an opportunity to choose the most suitable technique for information reflection of transaction costs or to compare the level of transaction costs when using different techniques. Application of techniques for information reflection of transaction costs allows the enterprises to increase profits by optimizing and reducing costs and using their assets more effectively, to identify possible ways to improve cost parameters of their performance, to improve their efficiency and productivity; to cut out unnecessary or duplicate activities, to optimize the number of staff involved in a particular activity

  16. COST MEASUREMENT AND COST MANAGEMENT IN TARGET COSTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisello Anna Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Firms are coping with a competitive scenario characterized by quick changes produced by internationalization, concentration, restructuring, technological innovation processes and financial market crisis. On the one hand market enlargement have increased the number and the segmentation of customers and have raised the number of competitors, on the other hand technological innovation has reduced product life cycle. So firms have to adjust their management models to this scenario, pursuing customer satisfaction and respecting cost constraints. In a context where price is a variable fixed by the market, firms have to switch from the cost measurement logic to the cost management one, adopting target costing methodology. The target costing process is a price driven, customer oriented profit planning and cost management system. It works, in a cross functional way, from the design stage throughout all the product life cycle and it involves the entire value chain. The process implementation needs a costing methodology consistent with the cost management logic. The aim of the paper is to focus on Activity Based Costing (ABC application to target costing process. So: -it analyzes target costing logic and phases, basing on a literary review, in order to highlight the costing needs related to this process; -it shows, through a numerical example, how to structure a flexible ABC model – characterized by the separation between variable, fixed in the short and fixed costs - that effectively supports target costing process in the cost measurement phase (drifting cost determination and in the target cost alignment; -it points out the effectiveness of the Activity Based Costing as a model of cost measurement applicable to the supplier choice and as a support for supply cost management which have an important role in target costing process. The activity based information allows a firm to optimize the supplier choice by following the method of minimizing the

  17. [Cost at the first level of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Ríos, E; Montalvo-Almaguer, G; Salinas-Martínez, M; Guzmán-Padilla, J E; Tovar-Castillo, N H; Garza-Elizondo, M E

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the unit cost of 15 causes of demand for primary care per health clinic in an institutional (social security) health care system, and to determine the average cost at the state level. The cost of 80% of clinic visits was estimated in 35 of 40 clinics in the social security health care system in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The methodology for fixed costs consisted of: departmentalization, inputs, cost, weights and construction of matrices. Variable costs were estimated for standard patients by type of health care sought and with the consensus of experts; the sum of fixed and variable costs gave the unit cost. A computerized model was employed for data processing. A large variation in unit cost was observed between health clinics studied for all causes of demand, in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas. Prenatal care ($92.26) and diarrhea ($93.76) were the least expensive while diabetes ($240.42) and hypertension ($312.54) were the most expensive. Non-metropolitan costs were higher than metropolitan costs (p < 0.05); controlling for number of physician's offices showed that this was determined by medical units with only one physician's office. Knowledge of unit costs is a tool that, when used by medical administrators, allows adequate health care planning and efficient allocation of health resources.

  18. The Cause of Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Einstein said that gravity is an acceleration like any other acceleration. But gravity causes relativistic effects at non-relativistic speeds; so gravity could have relativistic origins. And since the strong force is thought to cause most of mass, and mass is proportional to gravity; the strong force is therefore also proportional to gravity. The strong force could thus cause relativistic increases of mass through the creation of virtual gluons; along with a comparable contraction of space ar...

  19. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  20. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2015-05-17

    Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran.‎ This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS.‎ The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department.

  1. Nuclear power plant cost underestimation: mechanisms and corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Criticisms of inaccurate nuclear power plant cost estimates have commonly focused upon what factors have caused actual costs to increase and not upon the engineering cost estimate methodology itself. This article describes two major sources of cost underestimation and suggests corrections for each which can be applied while retaining the traditional engineering methodology in general

  2. Forecasting market impact costs and identifying expensive trades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, Jacob A.; Spierdijk, L.; Hoevenaars, Roy P.M.M.; van der Sluis, Pieter Jelle

    Often, a relatively small group of trades causes the major part of the trading costs on an investment portfolio. Consequently, reducing the trading costs of comparatively few expensive trades would already result in substantial savings on total trading costs. Since trading costs depend to some

  3. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maria M; Hogue, Susan; Preblick, Ronald; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion Costs for VTE treatment are considerable and increasing faster than general inflation for medical care services, with hospitalization costs being the primary cost driver. Readmissions for VTE are generally more costly than the initial VTE admission. Further studies evaluating the economic impact of new

  4. What causes education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Why do universities not give priority to education? The article suggests a formal answer on the basis of Lacan’s four discourses. Why education? Why do we learn? Is it caused by a natural curiosity or is it caused by anxiety? Is it at all possible to control the influence that we undoubtedly have...

  5. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth / For Teens / What Causes Bad Breath? Print en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  6. CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KINGMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of occupational injuries (N = 2,365) were investigated. Accidents with machinery and hand tools were the two main causes (49.9%). 89% of the patients with occupational injuries were male. The highest risk group were in the age category of 19 years or less (51.9%). This age group also

  7. COSTS CALCULATION OF TARGET COSTING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian UNGUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cost information system plays an important role in every organization in the decision making process. An important task of management is ensuring control of the operations, processes, sectors, and not ultimately on costs. Although in achieving the objectives of an organization compete more control systems (production control, quality control, etc., the cost information system is important because monitors results of the other. Detailed analysis of costs, production cost calculation, quantification of losses, estimate the work efficiency provides a solid basis for financial control. Knowledge of the costs is a decisive factor in taking decisions and planning future activities. Managers are concerned about the costs that will appear in the future, their level underpinning the supply and production decisions as well as price policy. An important factor is the efficiency of cost information system in such a way that the information provided by it may be useful for decisions and planning of the work.

  8. Containing health costs in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, P

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, a series of policy measures affecting both demand and supply components of health care have been adopted in different Latin American and Caribbean countries, as well as in Canada and the United States. In applying these measures various objectives have been pursued, among them: to mobilize additional resources to increase operating budgets; to reduce unnecessary utilization of health services and consumption of pharmaceuticals; to control increasing production costs; and to contain the escalation of health care expenditures. In terms of demand management, some countries have established cost-recovery programmes in an attempt to offset declining revenues. These measures have the potential to generate additional operating income in public facilities, particularly if charges are levied on hospital care. However, only scant information is available on the effects of user charges on demand, utilization, or unit costs. In terms of supply management, corrective measures have concentrated on limiting the quantity and the relative prices of different inputs and outputs. Hiring freezes, salary caps, limitations on new construction and equipment, use of drug lists, bulk procurement of medicines and vaccines, and budget ceilings are among the measures utilized to control production costs in the health sector. To moderate health care expenditures, various approaches have been followed to subject providers to 'financial discipline'. Among them, new reimbursement modalities such as prospective payment systems offer an array of incentives to modify medical practice. Cost-containment efforts have also spawned innovations in the organization and delivery of health services. Group plans have been established on the basis of prepaid premiums to provide directly much or all health care needs of affiliates and their families. The issue of intrasectorial co-ordination, particularly between ministries of health and social security institutions, has much relevance for cost

  9. Statistical and cost-benefit enhancements to the DQO process for characterization decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, D.

    1996-01-01

    The costs of characterization can comprise a sizeable fraction of a remediation program budget. The DQO Process has been instituted at DOE to ensure that the investment in characterization adds net value to each remediation project. Thoughtful characterization can be very important to minimizing the total cost of a remediation. Strategic information gained by characterization can reduce the remediation costs by reducing the unproductive investment in unnecessary remediation of portions of a site that really don't need to be remediated, and strategic information can reduce remediation costs by reducing the frequency of expensive rework or emergency action that result when remediation has not been pursued to the extent that really is needed

  10. Two novel approaches used to produce biodiesel from low-cost feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X.; Chen, F. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition; Wang, X. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Biochemistry

    2010-07-01

    The cost of feedstock has a significant effect of the economic viability of biodiesel production. The paper discussed a preliminary study looking at 2 approaches used to economically produce biodiesel, one from waste cooking oil (WCO) and the other from flaked cottonseed. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis was used to produce biodiesel from WCO, and in situ transesterification was used to produce biodiesel from the flaked cottonseed. The use of WCO solves the problem of waste disposal and also generates an environmentally benign fuel while at the same time lowering the costs involved in producing biodiesel. Ultrasonification has proven to be an efficient, low-cost, energy saving means of producing biodiesel. In situ transesterification makes solvent extraction and oil cleanup prior to biodiesel synthesis unnecessary, thereby simplifying the reaction steps. Based on the results of gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography tests, both approaches are feasible for the production of biodiesel from low-cost feedstock. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Are cost-benefit analyses needed for the management of coronary artery disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Roths, U.; Schicha, H.; Lauterbach, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    Health economics has classified several levels of cost-effectiveness: Technical capacity, diagnostic impact, therapeutic impact, patient outcome, societal benefit. When clinical utility is defined in terms of percent correct diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD), nuclear cardiology is the most cost-effective initial modality in patients with an intermediate pretest likelihood of CAD. For the resources used the strategy of therapy determine the long-term costs. Myocardial perfusion SPECT yields incremental prognostic information for prediction of both cardiac death and hard events. Patient with normal or mildly abnormal scans after exercise stress may not require invasive interventions. Therefore nuclear cardiac testing is a cost-effective initial modality even on the level of therapeutic impact. The results of myocardial SPECT are used to help reduce unnecessary coronary angiography and revascularization procedures. (orig.) [de

  12. A cost analysis of family planning in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, J L; Day, L M

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a step-down cost analysis using secondary data sources from 26 Bangladesh non-government organizations (NGOs) providing family planning services under a US Agency for International Development-funded umbrella organization. The unit costs of the NGOs' Maternal-Child Health (MCH) clinics and community-based distribution (CBD) systems were calculated and found to be minimally different. Several simulations were conducted to investigate the impact of alternative cost-reduction measures. The more general financial analysis proved more insightful than the unit cost analysis in terms of identifying means by which to improve the efficiency of the family planning operations of these NGOs. The analysis revealed that 56 per cent of total expenditures in the two-tiered umbrella's organizational structure are incurred in management operations and overheads. Of the remaining 44 per cent of project expenditures, 39 per cent is spent on the CBD program and 5 per cent on the MCH clinics. Within the CBD program, most resources are spent providing 4 million contacts (two-thirds of the annual total) which do not involve contraceptive re-supply. The clinics devote more resources to providing MCH services than to providing family planning services. The findings suggest that significant savings could be generated by containing administrative costs, improving operational efficiency, and reducing unnecessary or redundant fieldworker contacts. The magnitude of the potential savings raises a fundamental question about the continued viability and sustainability of this supply-driven CBD strategy.

  13. Life cycle cost analysis rehabilitation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates data from CDOTs Cost Data books and Pavement Management Program. Cost : indices were used to normalize project data to year 2014. Data analyzed in the study was obtained from : the CDOTs Cost Data books and the Pavement Man...

  14. Process-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J; Forbes, Sarah; Redford, Linda; Swagerty, Daniel L; Taunton, Roma Lee

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how quality improvement affects costs is important. Unfortunately, low-cost, reliable ways of measuring direct costs are scarce. This article builds on the principles of process improvement to develop a costing strategy that meets both criteria. Process-based costing has 4 steps: developing a flowchart, estimating resource use, valuing resources, and calculating direct costs. To illustrate the technique, this article uses it to cost the care planning process in 3 long-term care facilities. We conclude that process-based costing is easy to implement; generates reliable, valid data; and allows nursing managers to assess the costs of new or modified processes.

  15. 3G - An Unnecessary Step Forward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En

    2004-01-01

    Today’s mobile telecommunication world is a fast changing one with many changes happening daily. What has been happening in this field is one that is both exciting and surprising. Leading the introduction of 3rd Generation mobile communication services are countries such as Japan and South Korea ...

  16. [Allergy testing in atopic dermatitis: often unnecessary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.L.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Lucassen, P.L.; Pasmans, S.G.; Bruin-Weller, M. de; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease from which many children and adults suffer. In the Netherlands, the majority of patients with AD are treated in the primary health care setting. There is no clear consensus about whether or not to conduct allergy testing in patients with

  17. [Genetically modified food--unnecessary controversy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchórz, Michał; Radoniewicz-Chagowska, Anna; Lewandowska-Stanek, Hanna; Szponar, Elzbieta; Szponar, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Fast development of genetic engineering and biotechnology allows use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) more and more in different branches of science and economy. Every year we can see an increase of food amount produced with the use of modification of genetic material. In our supermarkets we can find brand new types of plants, products including genetically modified ingredients or meat from animals fed with food containing GMO. This article presents general information about genetically modified organisms, it also explains the range of genetic manipulation, use of newly developed products and current field area for GMO in the world. Based on scientific data the article presents benefits from development of biotechnology in reference to modified food. It also presents the voice of skeptics who are extremely concerned about the impact of those organisms on human health and natural environment. Problems that appear or can appear as a result of an increase of GMO are very important not only from a toxicologist's or a doctor's point of view but first of all from the point of view of ordinary consumers--all of us.

  18. Cost implications of PSA screening differ by age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Karthik; Liang, Stella; Cardamone, Michael; Joshu, Corinne E; Marmen, Kyle; Bhavsar, Nrupen; Nelson, William G; Ballentine Carter, H; Albert, Michael C; Platz, Elizabeth A; Pollack, Craig E

    2018-05-09

    Multiple guidelines seek to alter rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening. The costs borne by payers associated with PSA-based screening for men of different age groups-including the costs of screening and subsequent diagnosis, treatment, and adverse events-remain uncertain. We sought to develop a model of PSA costs that could be used by payers and health care systems to inform cost considerations under a range of different scenarios. We determined the prevalence of PSA screening among men aged 50 and higher using 2013-2014 data from a large, multispecialty group, obtained reimbursed costs associated with screening, diagnosis, and treatment from a commercial health plan, and identified transition probabilities for biopsy, diagnosis, treatment, and complications from the literature to generate a cost model. We estimated annual total costs for groups of men ages 50-54, 55-69, and 70+ years, and varied annual prostate cancer screening prevalence in each group from 5 to 50% and tested hypothetical examples of different test characteristics (e.g., true/false positive rate). Under the baseline screening patterns, costs of the PSA screening represented 10.1% of the total costs; costs of biopsies and associated complications were 23.3% of total costs; and, although only 0.3% of all screen eligible patients were treated, they accounted for 66.7% of total costs. For each 5-percentage point decrease in PSA screening among men aged 70 and older for a single calendar year, total costs associated with prostate cancer screening decreased by 13.8%. For each 5-percentage point decrease in PSA screening among men 50-54 and 55-69 years old, costs were 2.3% and 7.3% lower respectively. With constrained financial resources and with national pressure to decrease use of clinically unnecessary PSA-based prostate cancer screening, there is an opportunity for cost savings, especially by focusing on the downstream costs disproportionately associated with

  19. An application of the Rayleigh distribution to contract cost data

    OpenAIRE

    Abernethy, Thomas S.

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Accurate cost models are essential to the proper monitoring of contract cost data. The greater the accuracy of the model, the earlier contract cost overruns can be recognized and their cause(s) ascertained. The availability of a variety of cost models allows flexibility in choosing the correct model for the particular circumstances and increases the chances of being able to select a model that can provide reliable forecasts about future c...

  20. Integrated analysis considered mitigation cost, damage cost and adaptation cost in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Lee, D. K.; Kim, H. G.; Sung, S.; Jung, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various studies show that raising the temperature as well as storms, cold snap, raining and drought caused by climate change. And variety disasters have had a damage to mankind. The world risk report(2012, The Nature Conservancy) and UNU-EHS (the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security) reported that more and more people are exposed to abnormal weather such as floods, drought, earthquakes, typhoons and hurricanes over the world. In particular, the case of Korea, we influenced by various pollutants which are occurred in Northeast Asian countries, China and Japan, due to geographical meteorological characteristics. These contaminants have had a significant impact on air quality with the pollutants generated in Korea. Recently, around the world continued their effort to reduce greenhouse gas and to improve air quality in conjunction with the national or regional development goals priority. China is also working on various efforts in accordance with the international flows to cope with climate change and air pollution. In the future, effect of climate change and air quality in Korea and Northeast Asia will be change greatly according to China's growth and mitigation policies. The purpose of this study is to minimize the damage caused by climate change on the Korean peninsula through an integrated approach taking into account the mitigation and adaptation plan. This study will suggest a climate change strategy at the national level by means of a comprehensive economic analysis of the impacts and mitigation of climate change. In order to quantify the impact and damage cost caused by climate change scenarios in a regional scale, it should be priority variables selected in accordance with impact assessment of climate change. The sectoral impact assessment was carried out on the basis of selected variables and through this, to derive the methodology how to estimate damage cost and adaptation cost. And then, the methodology was applied in Korea

  1. Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... determine how a community is designed. Consequences of Obesity More Immediate Health Risks Obesity during childhood can ...

  2. What Causes a Toothache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See a Dentist? What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Men: Looking for a Better ... sinus or ear infections and tension in the facial muscles can cause discomfort that resembles a toothache, ...

  3. Causes of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and often disabling disease of the central nervous system. > Muscular dystrophy MD is characterized by the degeneration of skeletal muscles. > Neurofibromatosis Progressive disorder of the nervous system that causes tumors on the nerves. > Post-polio ...

  4. What causes IBD?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What causes IBD? An overly aggressive cell-mediated immune response to luminal commensal bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals. Sartor, Gastroenterology 2004.

  5. Cost functions of greenhouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linderoth, H.

    2000-01-01

    The benchmark is equal to the cost (D) caused by an increase in temperature since the middle of the nineteenth century (T) of nearly 2.5 deg. C. According to mainstream economists, the benchmark is 1-2% of GDP, but very different estimates can also be found. Even though there appears to be agreement among a number of economists that the benchmark is 1-2% of GDP, major differences exist when it comes to estimating D for different sectors. One of the main problems is how to estimate non-market activities. Normally, the benchmark is the best guess, but due to the possibility of catastrophic events this can be considerable smaller than the mean. Certainly, the cost function is skewed to the right. The benchmark is just one point on the cost curve. To a great extent, cost functions are alike in greenhouse models (D = α ''.T'' λ). Cost functions are region and sector dependent in several models. In any case, both α (benchmark) and λ are rough estimates. Besides being dependent on α and λ, the marginal emission cost depends on the discount rate. In fact, because emissions have effects continuing for many years, the discount rate is clearly the most important parameter. (au) (au)

  6. Nuclear plant life cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Life cycle costs of nuclear power plants in the United States are discussed. The author argues that these costs have been mishandled or neglected. Decommissioning costs have escalated, e.g. from $328 per unit in 1991 to $370 in 1993 for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, though they still only amount to less than 0.1 cent per kWh. Waste management has been complicated in the U.S. by the decision to abandon civilian reprocessing; by the year 2000, roughly 30 U.S. nuclear power units will have filled their storage pools; dry storage has been delayed, and will be an expense not originally envisaged. Some examples of costs of major component replacement are provided. No single component has caused as much operational disruption and financial penalties as the steam generator. Operation and maintenance costs have increased steadily, and now amount to more than 70% of production costs. A strategic plan by the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (of U.S. utilities) will ensure that the ability to correctly operate and maintain a nuclear power plant is built into the original design. 6 figs

  7. Photovoltaic energy cost limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coiante, D.

    1992-01-01

    Referring to a photovoltaic system for grid connected applications, a parametric expression of kWh cost is derived. The limit of kWh cost is carried out extrapolating the values of cost components to their lowest figure. The reliability of the forecast is checked by disaggregating kWh cost in direct and indirect costs and by discussing the possible cost reduction of each component

  8. Comparing surgical trays with redundant instruments with trays with reduced instruments: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Baptiste, A; Sowerby, L J; Chin, C J; Martin, J; Rotenberg, B W

    2016-01-01

    When prearranged standard surgical trays contain instruments that are repeatedly unused, the redundancy can result in unnecessary health care costs. Our objective was to estimate potential savings by performing an economic evaluation comparing the cost of surgical trays with redundant instruments with surgical trays with reduced instruments ("reduced trays"). We performed a cost-analysis from the hospital perspective over a 1-year period. Using a mathematical model, we compared the direct costs of trays containing redundant instruments to reduced trays for 5 otolaryngology procedures. We incorporated data from several sources including local hospital data on surgical volume, the number of instruments on redundant and reduced trays, wages of personnel and time required to pack instruments. From the literature, we incorporated instrument depreciation costs and the time required to decontaminate an instrument. We performed 1-way sensitivity analyses on all variables, including surgical volume. Costs were estimated in 2013 Canadian dollars. The cost of redundant trays was $21 806 and the cost of reduced trays was $8803, for a 1-year cost saving of $13 003. In sensitivity analyses, cost savings ranged from $3262 to $21 395, based on the surgical volume at the institution. Variation in surgical volume resulted in a wider range of estimates, with a minimum of $3253 for low-volume to a maximum of $52 012 for high-volume institutions. Our study suggests moderate savings may be achieved by reducing surgical tray redundancy and, if applied to other surgical specialties, may result in savings to Canadian health care systems.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of response evaluation after chemoradiation in patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer using 18F-FDG-PET-CT and/or diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Marjolein Je; Schouten, Charlotte S; Castelijns, Jonas A; de Graaf, Pim; Comans, Emile Fi; Hoekstra, Otto S; de Bree, Remco; Coupé, Veerle Mh

    2017-04-11

    Considerable variation exists in diagnostic tests used for local response evaluation after chemoradiation in patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer. The yield of invasive examination under general anesthesia (EUA) with biopsies in all patients is low and it may induce substantial morbidity. We explored four response evaluation strategies to detect local residual disease in terms of diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness. We built a decision-analytic model using trial data of forty-six patients and scientific literature. We estimated for four strategies the proportion of correct diagnoses, costs concerning diagnostic instruments and the proportion of unnecessary EUA indications. Besides a reference strategy, i.e. EUA for all patients, we considered three imaging strategies consisting of 18 FDG-PET-CT, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI), or both 18 FDG-PET-CT and DW-MRI followed by EUA after a positive test. The impact of uncertainty was assessed in sensitivity analyses. The EUA strategy led to 96% correct diagnoses. Expected costs were €468 per patient whereas 89% of EUA indications were unnecessary. The DW-MRI strategy was the least costly strategy, but also led to the lowest proportion of correct diagnoses, i.e. 93%. The PET-CT strategy and combined imaging strategy were dominated by the EUA strategy due to respectively a smaller or equal proportion of correct diagnoses, at higher costs. However, the combination of PET-CT and DW-MRI had the highest sensitivity. All imaging strategies considerably reduced (unnecessary) EUA indications and its associated burden compared to the EUA strategy. Because the combined PET-CT and DW-MRI strategy costs only an additional €927 per patient, it is preferred over immediate EUA since it reaches the same diagnostic accuracy in detecting local residual disease while leading to substantially less unnecessary EUA indications. However, if healthcare resources are limited, DW-MRI is the strategy of choice because of lower

  10. Systemic causes of hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richard L; Garibyan, Lilit; Kimball, Alexandra B; Drake, Lynn A

    2016-09-01

    Hair loss is both a common chief complaint by patients and a clinical challenge for physicians, especially general practitioners, yet few dermatological problems yield as much patient satisfaction when resolved as hair loss. The diagnosis is often attributed to androgen-related hair loss, while other causes, some of which are life-threatening but treatable, are overlooked. We searched for relevant literature on hair loss and supported these findings with our clinical experience to identify seven major systemic etiologies of hair loss, ranging from infectious agents to consumption of unsafe supplements. Many causes are only described in the literature through case studies, though some original articles and meta-analyses are available. Careful history taking, proper examination techniques, and judicious use of laboratory tests are essential to reach at the correct diagnosis in a cost-effective manner when performing patient work-up. Such methodical evaluation of hair loss can result in the appropriate treatment plan and provide significant patient satisfaction. Key messages Hair loss is a common chief complaint and a difficult challenge for both general practitioners and dermatology consultants. We identified seven major categories of systemic hair loss etiology and present a framework for their clinical evaluation. A methodical approach to hair loss can result in the appropriate treatment plan and provide significant patient satisfaction.

  11. Cancer-causing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Holland, J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation causes cancer. That simple fact was known by the early 1900s. Further, radiation can induce cancer in almost any tissue in animals and humans. But the cancer-causing dose may vary by 20-fold for different tissues in animals. Such variation is also seen in people who are exposed, typically, to low radiation doses. Hence, the minimum dose that causes human cancer is not known. Thus, the crucial question becomes what factors, including amount of exposure, trigger cancer. Radiation is divided into two types, ionizing and nonionizing. Of the two, ionizing radiation involves higher energies. Thus by ejecting electrons from molecules, charged particles called ion pairs are formed. They are short-lived, and often break down to form highly reactive free radicals, which are molecular fragments containing unpaired electrons. Nonionizing radiation, which involves ultraviolet light and micro- and radiowaves, causes molecular excitations such as vibrations and electron movement, but produces no ions. And though ultraviolet light causes skin cancer, ionizing radiation is, by far, the more potent carcinogen

  12. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K.; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  13. Vulvovaginitis: causes and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A M; Hart, C A

    1992-01-01

    Over a period of 33 months in a paediatric accident and emergency department, the clinical pattern and possible causes of vulvovaginitis were studied prospectively in 200 girls presenting with genital discharge, irritation, pain, or redness. The major causes were poor hygiene and threadworms. The suspicion of sexual abuse arose in a few girls but no organisms of sexually transmitted disease were found. Urinary symptoms were common but only 20 patients had a significant bacteriuria and 40 had sterile pyuria. Specific skin problems occurred in 28 cases. Simple measures to improve hygiene and treatment of threadworms gave effective relief. Genital irritation caused urinary symptoms with no clinical evidence of infection, and it is advised that antibiotic treatment should await urine culture. Specific skin problems require help from a dermatologist. The possibility of sexual abuse must be considered especially if the vulvovaginitis is persistent or recurrent after adequate treatment. PMID:1580682

  14. Developing a standardized healthcare cost data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Sue L; Naessens, James M; Yawn, Barbara P; Reinalda, Megan S; Anderson, Stephanie S; Borah, Bijan J

    2017-06-12

    Research addressing value in healthcare requires a measure of cost. While there are many sources and types of cost data, each has strengths and weaknesses. Many researchers appear to create study-specific cost datasets, but the explanations of their costing methodologies are not always clear, causing their results to be difficult to interpret. Our solution, described in this paper, was to use widely accepted costing methodologies to create a service-level, standardized healthcare cost data warehouse from an institutional perspective that includes all professional and hospital-billed services for our patients. The warehouse is based on a National Institutes of Research-funded research infrastructure containing the linked health records and medical care administrative data of two healthcare providers and their affiliated hospitals. Since all patients are identified in the data warehouse, their costs can be linked to other systems and databases, such as electronic health records, tumor registries, and disease or treatment registries. We describe the two institutions' administrative source data; the reference files, which include Medicare fee schedules and cost reports; the process of creating standardized costs; and the warehouse structure. The costing algorithm can create inflation-adjusted standardized costs at the service line level for defined study cohorts on request. The resulting standardized costs contained in the data warehouse can be used to create detailed, bottom-up analyses of professional and facility costs of procedures, medical conditions, and patient care cycles without revealing business-sensitive information. After its creation, a standardized cost data warehouse is relatively easy to maintain and can be expanded to include data from other providers. Individual investigators who may not have sufficient knowledge about administrative data do not have to try to create their own standardized costs on a project-by-project basis because our data

  15. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs have led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns as well as mitigation and prevention attempts. This paper hypothesizes that one cause is that the availability of reserves may reduce incentives to control costs. We draw a comparison to the insurance concept of moral hazard, and we use actuarial techniques to better understand the increase in mission costs due to the availability of reserves. NASA's CADRe database provided the data against which we tested our hypothesis and discovered that there is correlation between the amount of available reserves and project overruns, particularly for mission hardware cost increases. We address the question of how to prevent reserves from increasing mission spending without increasing cost risk to projects.

  16. Prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairment among school children in south-western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaiyeoba, A I; Isawumi, M A; Adeoye, A O; Oluleye, T S

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and identify the causes of blindness and visual impairment in school children of Ilesa-East Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria. A total of 1144 school children in primary and secondary schools were selected using a 2-stage random sampling method and examined to determine the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairment. A total of 17 (1.48%) children were blind or visually impaired. These comprised of 11 (0.96%) children who were visually impaired and 4 (0.3%) who were severely visually impaired. Only 2 (0.15%) school children were blind. The causes of visual impairment were refractive error 10 (0.87%) and immature cataract 1 (0.08%), causes of severe visual impairment included corneal opacities 2 (0.2%), amblyopia leading to squint 1 (0.08%) and 1 cataract 1 (0.08%). The causes of blindness in school children were corneal scars presumed to be due to vitamin A deficiency 1 (0.08%) and keratoconus 1 (0.08%). Causes of blindness and visual impairment in children attending regular schools in Nigeria were treatable. Prevention, early recognition and prompt treatment of these diseases by regular screening of school children would definitely reduce unnecessary visual handicap in Nigerian school children so that they can attain their full potential in the course of their education. Also, information from this study is relevant for the purpose of planning eye care programmes for the prevention of blindness in Nigerian school children. This will go a long way in the prevention of unnecessary blindness and visual impairment in school children.

  17. Cost and Price Increases in Higher Education: Evidence of a Cost Disease on Higher Education Costs and Tuition Prices and the Implications for Higher Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombella, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    As concern over rapidly rising college costs and tuition sticker prices have increased, a variety of research has been conducted to determine potential causes. Most of this research has focused on factors unique to higher education. In contrast, cost disease theory attempts to create a comparative context to explain cost increases in higher…

  18. Implementing Replacement Cost Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    cost accounting Clickener, John Ross Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School http://hdl.handle.net/10945/17810 Downloaded from NPS Archive...Calhoun IMPLEMENTING REPLACEMENT COST ACCOUNTING John Ross CHckener NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS IMPLEMENTING REPLACEMENT COST ...Implementing Replacement Cost Accounting 7. AUTHORS John Ross Clickener READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 9. TYRE OF

  19. Landslides - Cause and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  20. Leading Causes of Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in the world. By age 80, more than half of all people in the United States either will have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Common symptoms are: Blurry vision Colors that seem faded Glare Not being able to ...

  1. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  2. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.J.L. Verkoeijen (Peter); S. Bouwmeester (Samantha)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more

  3. Infestation caused by acanthocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available An on-line case of infestation caused by M. moniliformis is descripted. This rodents’ worm, belonging to acanthocephala, can be rarely responsible of human intestinal pathology. The case is the pretext for a brief revision on this parasitosis. So, biological, epidemiological, clinical and diagnostical findings are reported.

  4. Fighting a lost cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mario Haaf

    2015-01-01

    This essay claims that the declared war on drugs has failed, it has caused more harm than good, and that a new approach is necessary. The focus of analysis lays especially on the implemented drug policies of Mexico and the United States. The goal is to point out the flaws of the current policy based

  5. The economics of recovery after pancreatic surgery: detailed cost minimization analysis of an enhanced recovery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagedan, Daniel J; Devitt, Katharine S; Tremblay St-Germain, Amélie; Ramjaun, Aliya; Cleary, Sean P; Wei, Alice C

    2017-11-01

    Clinical pathways (CPW) are considered safe and effective at decreasing postoperative length of stay (LoS), but the effect on economic costs is uncertain. This study sought to elucidate the effect of a CPW on direct hospitalization costs for patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). A CPW for PD patients at a single Canadian institution was implemented. Outcomes included LoS, 30-day readmissions, and direct costs of hospital care. A retrospective cost minimization analysis compared patients undergoing PD prior to and following CPW implementation, using a bootstrapped t test and deviation-based cost modeling. 121 patients undergoing PD after CPW implementation were compared to 74 controls. Index LoS was decreased following CPW implementation (9 vs. 11 days, p = 0.005), as was total LoS (10 vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). The mean total cost of postoperative hospitalization per patient decreased in the CPW group ($15,678.45 CAD vs. $25,732.85 CAD, p = 0.024), as was the mean 30-day cost including readmissions ($16,627.15 CAD vs. $29,872.72 CAD, p = 0.016). Areas of significant cost savings included laboratory tests and imaging investigations. CPWs may generate cost savings by reducing unnecessary investigations, and improve quality of care through process standardization and decreasing practice variation. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Controlling Healthcare Costs: Just Cost Effectiveness or "Just" Cost Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Leonard M

    2018-04-01

    Meeting healthcare needs is a matter of social justice. Healthcare needs are virtually limitless; however, resources, such as money, for meeting those needs, are limited. How then should we (just and caring citizens and policymakers in such a society) decide which needs must be met as a matter of justice with those limited resources? One reasonable response would be that we should use cost effectiveness as our primary criterion for making those choices. This article argues instead that cost-effectiveness considerations must be constrained by considerations of healthcare justice. The goal of this article will be to provide a preliminary account of how we might distinguish just from unjust or insufficiently just applications of cost-effectiveness analysis to some healthcare rationing problems; specifically, problems related to extraordinarily expensive targeted cancer therapies. Unconstrained compassionate appeals for resources for the medically least well-off cancer patients will be neither just nor cost effective.

  7. OOTW COST TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  8. The external costs of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabl, A.; Spadaro, J.V.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the ExtrenE project (external costs of electricity) of the European Commission (EC). The damage caused by pollution has been calculated through analyses of the impact pathways which involve an analysis of the emission - dispersion - dose-response function - monetary estimation chain. The results are introduced for various cycles of combustible fuels (with several technological variants), indicating the confidence intervals. The cost of the damage is particularly high for coal. For example, for the coal-fired power stations in France (with the emission levels of 1995) it is approximately equal to the sales price of electricity. For natural gas, the cost of damage is approximately one-third that of coal. On the other hand, the damage costs for nuclear fuel and most forms of renewable energy are low, at a maximum just a few percent of the electricity price. The greatest part of these costs arises from health impact, particularly premature death. In order to avoid the controversy inherent in making a monetary assessment of mortality, especially if this is imposed upon future generations, the reduction in life expectancy due to the various combustible cycles is also indicated and the risks of nuclear energy are put into perspective via several comparisons. (authors)

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle cost and cost calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiedel, P.; Schricker, W.

    1975-01-01

    Four different methods of calculating the cost of the fuel cycle are explained, starting from the individual cost components with their specific input data. The results (for LWRs) are presented in tabular form and in the form of diagrams. (RB) [de

  10. Cloxacillin: A New Cause of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Zezos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of medications can cause pill-induced esophagitis. Herein we present a case of cloxacillin-induced esophagitis. A 66-year-old male presented with an acute onset of epigastric and retrosternal pain on the 5th day of a course of oral cloxacillin prescribed for erysipelas. Initial clinical and imaging assessment was negative and he was sent home. A few days later, he returned with persistent severe retrosternal pain; endoscopy at the same day revealed a normal upper esophagus, several small stellate erosions in the midesophagus, and a normal squamocolumnar junction with a small hiatus hernia. Treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg bid and MucaineR suspension resulted in complete resolution of his symptoms. Pill-induced esophagitis may be underreported by patients, when symptoms are mild and unrecognized and/or underdiagnosed by the clinicians as a cause of retrosternal pain, odynophagia, or dysphagia. Failure of early recognition may result in unnecessary diagnostic investigations and prolongation of the patient’s discomfort. This case signifies the importance of enhancing clinician awareness for drug-associated esophageal injury when assessing patients with retrosternal pain, as well as the value of prophylaxis against this unpleasant condition by universally recommending drinking enough water in an upright position during ingestion of any oral medication.

  11. Does the Intestinal Parasite Enterobius vermicularis Cause Acute Appendicitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhan, Yavuz; Özen, Fatma Zeynep; Kılınç, Çetin; Güçkan, Rıdvan

    2017-06-01

    Although intestinal parasitic infections rarely cause acute appendicitis, they are common public health problems in undeveloped and developing countries. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis, and treatment procedures should be adopted according to the etiology. Herein we presented the cases of four patients with clinical findings of acute appendicitis. Patients were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis, and Enterobius vermicularis was detected in the pathological examinations of specimens. Pinworm infections are common parasitic infections that may mimic appendicitis. The pathology of the four cases was noted when the file of 186 patients aged between 4 and 72 years who underwent surgery for acute appendicitis in my hospital was retrospectively reviewed. When the appendectomy specimen was examined histopathologically it was understood that acute appendicitis was caused by Enterobius vermicularis parasite. In Enterobius infections, performing systemic therapy for patients and their family members is sufficient. To prevent unnecessary appendectomy, this type of infection should be made to ask in the history and clinical findings of patients.

  12. Causes of different profitability of agricultural sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Branko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work involves identification of causes of different profitability of agricultural sector done on case study of nearly identical agricultural enterprises. It shows that financial mix even in scope of similar companies can lead to various profit indicators. Through comparative financial analysis in the same industry and activity by applying methods and techniques we have concluded that company PP Ratkovo operates more stable and closer to determined norms and also shows better results in majority of the indicators. Horizontal and vertical analysis indicates that companies in Agribusiness partner group use expensive external sources of financing. We have precisely defined in which cost segment occurs highest distinction. Also we have shown reasons why PP Ratkovo in the last two years manifests great profitability measured by ebit, ebitda and net profit as well as excellent structure of material costs and wages costs in in frame of the operating income, and reasons why enterprises in Agribusiness partner group does not.

  13. Not without cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Dara L.; Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Orth, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) is a gram-negative halophillic bacterium that causes worldwide seafood-borne gastroenteritis. The prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in the environment and incidence of infection have been linked to rising water temperatures caused by global warming. Among its virulence factors, V. parahaemolyticus harbors two type III secretion systems (T3SS). Recently, we have shown that T3SS1 induces rapid cellular death that initiates with acute autophagy, as measured by LC3 lipidation and accumulation of early autophagosomal vesicles. While not the first characterized pathogen to usurp autophagy, this is the first example of an extracellular pathogen that exploits this pathway for its own benefit. Here we discuss possible roles for the induction of autophagy during infection and discuss how V. parahaemolyticus-induced autophagy provides insight into key regulatory steps that govern the decision between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:19011375

  14. Labor Informality: General Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Sandoval Betancour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the main causes of labor informality in order to verify the validity of classical theories that explain unemployment in market economies and its relationship to informality. Methodologically, the project was based, in the empirical part, on international statistics, comparing the evolution of labor market structure in a combined sample of highly industrialized countries and other less industrialized ones. Empirical evidence supports the conclusion that the classical economic theory of Marxist origin is inefficient to explain the causes of unemployment in contemporary market economies, as well as it fails to satisfactorily explain informality. On the contrary, we conclude that the theory in question is more relevant to explain informality in centrally planned economies where this phenomenon has been present even more significantly than in free market economies.

  15. The real cost of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Valdalbero, Domenico Rossetti

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have been carried out in recent years to assess the external costs (externalities) of energy, among them the European Commission's ExternE research project. An external cost occurs when the social or economic activities of one group of people have an impact on another group but that impact is not fully accounted for or compensated for by the first group. For example, a power station that generates emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases imposes an external cost if these emissions cause damage to human health (fatal or non-fatal), contribute to global warming, or have adverse effects on crops and building materials. ExternE, which was carried out during the 1990s, is the most exhaustive study to date on the evaluation of the external costs associated with the production and consumption of energy and with energy-related activities. Despite the uncertainties associated with setting a value on external costs, the ExternE project has been successful in several ways and these are summarised together with the ways in which external costs to the environment and health can be taken into account or 'internalised'. One possibility is the imposition of eco-taxes. Another option would be to encourage or subsidise cleaner technologies, thereby avoiding socio-environmental costs. Renewable energy technologies, for example, have limited external costs. The results of ExternE have already been used as a basis for European Commission guidelines on state aid for environmental protection. The project's findings are also being used to support the Council of the European Union in formulating proposals for a Directive on the limits to be set for sulphur dioxide, nitrous oxides, particulates and lead in the atmosphere. In 2000, under the EU's Fifth Research and Technological Development Framework programme, a follow-up project was initiated. The purpose of NewExt (New Elements for the Assessment of External Costs from Energy Technologies) is to refine the methodology

  16. Hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Douglas, Julia; Burgess, John; Dreyer, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is rare and endocrinopathies involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in patients with demyelinating conditions have rarely been reported. We present two cases of MS/NMOSD with associated hypothalamic-pituitary involvement and subsequent hypopituitarism, including the first report of a patient with hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism. Differential diagnoses, including alemtuzumab-related and primary pituitary pathology are discussed. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Tracing Actual Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    produce a full explanation. While related, this problem dif- fers from the problem of determining actual causes where the focus is on identifying...1987]. We prove that the decision problem for causal slices is DP1 - complete. DP1 is the class of computational problems that can be solved using an NP ...machine and a co- NP machine simultaneously. Based on this result, we further show that the decision problem for causal histories is in ΠP2 . Closely

  18. Hacking for a cause

    OpenAIRE

    Still, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of hacktivism, which is hacking for a political or social cause on the Internet. Generally hackers, even those hacking government–sponsored sites, have been negatively stereotyped as malicious thrill seekers or, worse yet, cyberterrorists. But increasingly there are more politically motivated hackers distancing themselves from cyberterrorism by engaging in hacktivism that is intent more upon disruption than disobedience. Certain hacktivists, in fact, have creat...

  19. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we consider the allocation of costs in connection networks. Agents have connection demands in form of pairs of locations they want to have connected. Connections between locations are costly to build. The problem is to allocate costs of networks satisfying all connection...... demands. We use a few axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well...... as all connection costs; (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on the estimated costs; and, (4) the planner allocates the true costs of the selected network. It turns out that an allocation rule satisfies the axioms if and only if relative...

  20. Lamb Production Costs: Analyses of Composition and Elasticities Analysis of Lamb Production Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Raineri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since lamb is a commodity, producers cannot control the price of the product they sell. Therefore, managing production costs is a necessity. We explored the study of elasticities as a tool for basing decision-making in sheep production, and aimed at investigating the composition and elasticities of lamb production costs, and their influence on the performance of the activity. A representative sheep production farm, designed in a panel meeting, was the base for calculation of lamb production cost. We then performed studies of: i costs composition, and ii cost elasticities for prices of inputs and for zootechnical indicators. Variable costs represented 64.15% of total cost, while 21.66% were represented by operational fixed costs, and 14.19% by the income of the factors. As for elasticities to input prices, the opportunity cost of land was the item to which production cost was more sensitive: a 1% increase in its price would cause a 0.2666% increase in lamb cost. Meanwhile, the impact of increasing any technical indicator was significantly higher than the impact of rising input prices. A 1% increase in weight at slaughter, for example, would reduce total cost in 0.91%. The greatest obstacle to economic viability of sheep production under the observed conditions is low technical efficiency. Increased production costs are more related to deficient zootechnical indexes than to high expenses.

  1. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis Caused by Cladosporidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Mycosis Caused by Cladosporidium presented at/published to 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference, Washington D.C., 23 May 2017 (Poster...Clinical Research Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We cannot pay for...GHSE) (SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research & Development Program (OMRDP): NIH: Congressionally

  2. Costing Practices in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Christopher; Kern, Anja; Laguecir, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    .e., Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) systems, and costing practices. DRG-based payment systems strongly influence costing practices in multiple ways. In particular, setting DRG tariffs requires highly standardized costing practices linked with specific skill sets from management accountants and brings other...... jurisdictions (e.g., clinical coding) to bear on costing practice. These factors contribute to the fragmentation of the jurisdiction of management accounting.......The rising cost of healthcare is a globally pressing concern. This makes detailed attention to the way in which costing is carried out of central importance. This article offers a framework for considering the interdependencies between a dominant element of the contemporary healthcare context, i...

  3. Cost benefit analysis cost effectiveness analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.

    1986-09-01

    The comparison of various protection options in order to determine which is the best compromise between cost of protection and residual risk is the purpose of the ALARA procedure. The use of decision-aiding techniques is valuable as an aid to selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to introduce two rather simple and well known decision aiding techniques: the cost-effectiveness analysis and the cost-benefit analysis. These two techniques are relevant for the great part of ALARA decisions which need the use of a quantitative technique. The study is based on an hypothetical case of 10 protection options. Four methods are applied to the data

  4. An Assessment Of The Effectiveness Of Collaborative Cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the effects of Collaborative Cost Reduction Model (CCRM) as a control Approach to reduce the high cost implication that causes the slow pace of migration process from IPV4 to IPV6 in Nigeria. This study reveals that CCRM can be applied to achieve Cost Reduction in collocation efforts in ...

  5. Darwin's Sacred Cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    As we are being flooded by Darwin lollipops, t-shirts, quills and stamps it is becoming increasingly difficult to be heard or seen in the commercialised celebration in 2009. Some are in the business for the science, but a lot are in it for profit. Accordingly, the Darwin industry has left the hands...... of scholarly specialists and been appropriated by money makers. One could not help thinking about this as, in the autumn of 2008, the publisher began hyping Darwin's Sacred Cause as ‘one of the major contributions to the worldwide Darwin anniversary celebrations in 2009' Udgivelsesdato: February...

  6. Fighting a lost cause

    OpenAIRE

    Haaf, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This essay claims that the declared war on drugs has failed, it has caused more harm than good, and that a new approach is necessary. The focus of analysis lays especially on the implemented drug policies of Mexico and the United States. The goal is to point out the flaws of the current policy based on prohibition and persecution by analyzing its origins and comparing the current approach with the failures of the alcohol prohibition in the 1920s in the United States. One of the main points th...

  7. [Epistaxis: causes and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwiec, H; Szymański, M; Szymańska, A; Klatka, J

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of 265 patients treated in hospital due to nasal bleeding revealed that almost half of them suffered from hypertension and in about 30% of cases it was impossible to establish the cause of epistaxis. The most frequent way to stop the bleeding was anterior nasal packing and in case of failure posterior nasal packing together with anterior one. Posterior nasal packing with Foley's catheter is relatively simple and effective procedure. Introduction of superselective embolization of maxillary artery and dermoplasty in Rendu-Osler disease was very helpful.

  8. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez MM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria M Fernandez,1 Susan Hogue,1 Ronald Preblick,2 Winghan Jacqueline Kwong2 1RTI-Health Solutions, Market Access and Outcomes Strategy, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods: Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results: Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion: Costs for VTE treatment are

  9. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  10. Realized Cost Savings 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset is provided as a requirement of OMB’s Integrated Data Collection (IDC) and links to VA’s Realized Cost Savings and Avoidances data in JSON format. Cost...

  11. Cost accounting at GKSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, R.

    1979-01-01

    The GKSS has a cost accounting system comprising cost type, cost centre and cost unit accounting which permits of a comprehensive and detailed supervision of the accural of costs and use of funds, makes price setting for outside orders possible and provides the necessary data for decision-making and planning. It fulfills the requirement for an ordered accounting system; it is therefore guaranteed that there exists between financial accounts department and cost accounting a proper demarcation and transition, that costs are accounted fully only on the basis of vouchers and only once, evaluation and distribution are unified and the principle of causation is observed. Two employees are engaged in costs and services accounting. Although we strive to effect adaptations as swiftly as possible, and constantly to adapt refinements and supplementary processes for the improvement of the system, this can only occur within the scope of, and with the exactitude necessary for the required information. (author)

  12. INTOR cost approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified cost approximation for INTOR parameter sets in a narrow parameter range is shown. Plausible constraints permit the evaluation of the consequences of parameter variations on overall cost. (orig.) [de

  13. Medicare Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicare certified institutional providers are required to submit an annual cost report to a Medicare Administrative Contractor. The cost report contains provider...

  14. A case of perforating injury of eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforating globe injury is the leading cause of monocular blindness and vision loss. A 58-year-old male was injured by acupuncture needle during acupuncture treatment for his cerebral infarction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of perforating injury of the eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture. The patient was hospitalized due to diagnosis of perforating ocular injury, traumatic cataract, and corneal and iris perforating injury. Moreover, he had to accept treatments of phacoemulsification, anterior vitrectomy along with intraocular lens implantation in the sulcus to improve his visual acuity. As acupuncture therapy has been widely performed for various diseases and achieved highly approval, the aim of this report is to remind acupuncturists operating accurately to avoid unnecessary injury during the treatment process, or the cure can also become the weapon.

  15. A case of perforating injury of eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Han; Yichun, Kong

    2016-04-01

    Perforating globe injury is the leading cause of monocular blindness and vision loss. A 58-year-old male was injured by acupuncture needle during acupuncture treatment for his cerebral infarction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of perforating injury of the eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture. The patient was hospitalized due to diagnosis of perforating ocular injury, traumatic cataract, and corneal and iris perforating injury. Moreover, he had to accept treatments of phacoemulsification, anterior vitrectomy along with intraocular lens implantation in the sulcus to improve his visual acuity. As acupuncture therapy has been widely performed for various diseases and achieved highly approval, the aim of this report is to remind acupuncturists operating accurately to avoid unnecessary injury during the treatment process, or the cure can also become the weapon.

  16. Cost accounting in ECN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wout, E.L.; Bever Donker, J.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    A five year planning is made in which the available money is distributed to the expected programmes. This five year plan is used as basis for working plan and budget for the next year. In the working plan all financial means are divided into kinds of costs, cost centres and cost units. Based on this working plan and the relevant budgets the tariffs are calculated per working centre (cost centre). The tariffs are fixed for a whole year. Up till now these tariffs are also basis for the cost unit accounting at the end of the year together with the results of the time registration. The estimated work shop services for the working centres are included in the tariffs. For the allocation of overhead costs ECN uses dynamic keys. Depreciation costs with respect to instruments, investments etc. are determined per working centre according to a computer programme. The cost unit related costs are charged directly to cost unit. This implies that project related in instruments are looked upon as running costs. In the future we will try to refine the present cost accounting system still further in this way that we will look upon a cost centre as a profit centre. Furthermore we will try to analyse the tariff and calculation deviations and under/over occupation deviations afterwards (post calculation). The information provided to the management knows a hierachic construction: project information to projectleader, programme (compound projects) information to programme coordinator, cost centre summary to department heads, attention area (compound programme) information to programme coordinator and managing director, ECN research (compound attention areas) information to general management, information re kind of costs to relevant persons, f.e. surveys of expenditure for part time personnel to personnel bureau. The information is provided by the department of Finance and Administrative Organisation. The entire scope of cost accounting is the responsibility of the head of the department

  17. What causes cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichopoulos, D.; Li, F.P.; Hunter, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer, a major killer throughout human history, changed its grasp as humankind advanced industrially and technologically. Although the risk of a few types of cancer has declined dramatically in developed countries in this century, the incidence of the most significant forms of the disease has increased. Cancers of the lung, breast, prostate and colon and rectum have all become more frequent in countries where risk factors such as cigarette smoking, unhealthful dietary habits and exposure to dangerous chemicals at work or in the environment are now more common. As industrialization has proliferated, so, too, have the suspected causes of cancer. In recent years, news accounts have been full of warnings about all manner of modern conveniences, from pharmaceuticals to cellular telephones. Meanwhile the pace of technological advance makes it more vital than ever to single out definitive causes of cancer from an ever expanding array of possibilities. For this daunting task, researchers rely heavily on epidemiology. Epidemiologists identify factors that are common to cancer victims’ history and way of life and evaluate them in the context of current biological understanding. Ultimately, the evidence may persuade researchers that one or more of these factors or characteristics “cause” the disease— that is to say, exposure to them significantly increases the odds of the illness developing

  18. Genetic Causes of Rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Sezer; Demir, Korcan; Shi, Yufei

    2017-01-01

    Rickets is a metabolic bone disease that develops as a result of inadequate mineralization of growing bone due to disruption of calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D metabolism. Nutritional rickets remains a significant child health problem in developing countries. In addition, several rare genetic causes of rickets have also been described, which can be divided into two groups. The first group consists of genetic disorders of vitamin D biosynthesis and action, such as vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR1A), vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1B (VDDR1B), vitamin D-dependent rickets type 2A (VDDR2A), and vitamin D-dependent rickets type 2B (VDDR2B). The second group involves genetic disorders of excessive renal phosphate loss (hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets) due to impairment in renal tubular phosphate reabsorption as a result of FGF23-related or FGF23-independent causes. In this review, we focus on clinical, laboratory and genetic characteristics of various types of hereditary rickets as well as differential diagnosis and treatment approaches. PMID:29280738

  19. [Tropical causes of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J

    Eighty-five percent of all epileptics live in tropical regions. Prenatal risk factors, traumatic brain injuries and different parasitic infestations of the central nervous system (CNS) are the reasons behind the high prevalence of epilepsy. This work reviews the main parasitic infestations causing epilepsy in the tropics. Neurocysticercosis is the main cause of focal epilepsy in early adulthood in endemic areas (30-50%). All the phases of cysticerci (viable, transitional and calcified) are associated with epileptic seizures. Anti-cysticercus treatment helps get rid of cysticerci faster and reduces the risk of recurrence of seizures in patients with viable cysts. Symptomatic epilepsy can be the first manifestation of neuroschistosomiasis in patients without any systemic symptoms. The pseudotumoral form can trigger seizures secondary to the presence of granulomas and oedemas in the cerebral cortex. The eggs of Schistosoma japonicum are smaller, reach the CNS more easily and trigger epileptic seizures more frequently. Toxocariasis and sparganosis are other parasitic infestations that can give rise to symptomatic seizures. The risk factors for suffering chronic epilepsy after cerebral malaria are a positive familial history of epilepsy and a history of episodes of fever and cerebral malaria that began with coma or which progressed with multiple, prolonged epileptic seizures. About 20% of patients with cerebral infarction secondary to Chagas disease present late vascular epilepsy as a complication. Very few studies have been conducted to examine the prognosis, risk of recurrence and modification of the natural course of seizures associated with tropical parasitic infestations, except for the case of neurocysticercosis.

  20. The cost of harmful alcohol use in South Africa | Matzopoulos | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reviewed existing international best-practice costing frameworks to provide the costing definitions and dimensions. We sourced data from South African costing literature or, if unavailable, estimated costs using socio-economic and health data from secondary sources. Care was taken to avoid possible causes of cost ...

  1. Cost function estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C K; Andersen, K; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    2000-01-01

    on these criteria, a two-part model was chosen. In this model, the probability of incurring any costs was estimated using a logistic regression, while the level of the costs was estimated in the second part of the model. The choice of model had a substantial impact on the predicted health care costs, e...

  2. Reactor cost driving items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Assuming that the design solutions presently perceived for NET can be extrapolated for use in a power reactor, and using costing experience with present day fusion experiments and with fission power plants, the major components of the cost of a tokamak fusion power reactor are described. The analysis shows the emphasis worth placing on various areas of plant design to reduce costs

  3. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    In the present paper we consider the allocation of cost in connection networks. Agents have connection demands in form of pairs of locations they want to be connected. Connections between locations are costly to build. The problem is to allocate costs of networks satisfying all connection demands...

  4. Environmental costs of fossil fuel energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, A.; Trebeschi, C.

    1997-01-01

    The costs of environmental impacts caused by fossil fuel energy production are external to the energy economy and normally they are not reflected in energy prices. To determine the environmental costs associated with an energy source a detailed analysis of all environmental impacts of the complete energy cycle is required. The economic evaluation of environmental damages is presented caused by atmospheric emissions produced by fossil fuel combustion for different uses. Considering the emission factors of sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides, dust and carbon dioxide and the economic evaluation of their environmental damages reported in literature, a range of environmental costs associated with different fossil fuels and technologies is presented. A comparison of environmental costs resulting from atmospheric emissions produced by fossil-fuel combustion for energy production shows that natural gas has a significantly higher environmental value than other fossil fuels. (R.P.)

  5. Distribution costs -- the cost of local delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winger, N.; Zarnett, P.; Carr, J.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the power transmission system in the province of Ontario is owned and operated as a regulated monopoly by Ontario Hydro Services Company (OHSC). Local distribution systems deliver to end-users from bulk supply points within a service territory. OHSC distributes to approximately one million, mostly rural customers, while the approximately 250 municipal utilities together serve about two million, mostly urban customers. Under the Energy Competition Act of 1998 local distribution companies will face some new challenges, including unbundled billing systems, a broader range of distribution costs, increased costs, made up of corporate taxes or payments in lieu of taxes and added costs for regulatory affairs. The consultants provide a detailed discussion of the components of distribution costs, the three components of the typical budget process (capital expenditures, (CAPEX), operating and maintenance (O and M) and administration and corporate (GA and C), a summary of some typical distribution costs in Ontario, and the estimated impacts of the Energy Competition Act (ECA) compliance on charges and rates. Various mitigation strategies are also reviewed. Among these are joint ventures by local distribution companies to reduce ECA compliance costs, re-examination of controllable costs, temporary reduction of the allowable return on equity (ROE) by 50 per cent, and/or reducing the competitive transition charge (CTC). It is estimated that either one of these two reductions could eliminate the full amount of the five to seven per cent uplift in delivered energy service costs. The conclusion of the consultants is that local distribution delivery charges will make up a greater proportion of end-user cost in the future than it has in the past. An increase to customers of about five per cent is expected when the competitive electricity market opens and unbundled billing begins. The cost increase could be mitigated by a combination of actions that would be needed for about

  6. Infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloquin, C A; Berning, S E

    1994-01-01

    To update readers on the clinical management of infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to provide a general description of the organism, culture and susceptibility testing, and clinical manifestations of the disease, and to provide several aspects of the treatment of the disease, including historical perspective, current approaches, and research opportunities for the future. The current medical literature, including abstracts presented at recent international meetings, is reviewed. References were identified through MEDLINE, MEDLARS II, Current Contents, and published meeting abstracts. Data regarding the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, culture and susceptibility testing, and treatment of tuberculosis are cited. Specific attention has been focused on the clinical management of patients with noncontagious infection and potentially contagious active disease (TB) caused by M. tuberculosis. Information contributing to the discussion of the topics selected by the authors is reviewed. Data supporting and disputing specific conclusions are presented. The incidence of TB is increasing in the US, despite the fact that available technologies are capable of controlling the vast majority of existing cases. Fueling the fire is the problem of coinfection with HIV and M. tuberculosis. Very few drugs are available for the treatment of TB, and few of these approach the potency of isoniazid and rifampin. Preventive therapy of patients exposed to multiple-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is controversial and of unknown efficacy. Treatment of active disease caused by MDR-TB requires up to four times longer, is associated with increased toxicity, and is far less successful than the treatment of drug-susceptible TB. Strategies for the management of such cases are presented. The rising incidence of TB in the US reflects a breakdown in the healthcare systems responsible for controlling the disease, which reflects the past budgetary reductions. Although TB control

  7. Current treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, J D; Sobel, R

    2018-06-22

    Clinicians are increasingly challenged by patients with refractory vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) caused by azole-resistant Candida species. Fluconazole resistant C.albicans is a growing and perplexing problem following years of indiscriminate drug prescription and unnecessary drug exposure and for which there are few therapeutic alternatives. Regrettably, although the azole class of drugs has expanded, new classes of antifungal drugs have not been forthcoming, limiting effective treatment options in patients with azole resistant Candida vaginitis. Areas covered: This review covers published data on epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment options for women with azole-resistant refractory VVC. Expert opinion: Fluconazole resistant C.albicans adds to the challenge of azole resistant non-albicans Candida spp. Both issues follow years of indiscriminate drug prescription and unnecessary fluconazole exposure. Although an understanding of azole resistance in yeast has been established, this knowledge has not translated into useful therapeutic advantage. Treatment options for such women with refractory symptoms are extremely limited. New therapeutic options and strategies are urgently needed to meet this challenge of azole drug resistance.

  8. Controlling health costs: physician responses to patient expectations for medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Tilburt, Jon C; Campbell, Eric G; Sheeler, Robert D; Egginton, Jason S; Goold, Susan D

    2014-09-01

    Physicians have dual responsibilities to make medical decisions that serve their patients' best interests but also utilize health care resources wisely. Their ability to practice cost-consciously is particularly challenged when faced with patient expectations or requests for medical services that may be unnecessary. To understand how physicians consider health care resources and the strategies they use to exercise cost-consciousness in response to patient expectations and requests for medical care. Exploratory, qualitative focus groups of practicing physicians were conducted. Participants were encouraged to discuss their perceptions of resource constraints, and experiences with redundant, unnecessary and marginally beneficial services, and were asked about patient requests or expectations for particular services. Sixty-two physicians representing a variety of specialties and practice types participated in nine focus groups in Michigan, Ohio, and Minnesota in 2012 MEASUREMENTS: Iterative thematic content analysis of focus group transcripts Physicians reported making trade-offs between a variety of financial and nonfinancial resources, considering not only the relative cost of medical decisions and alternative services, but the time and convenience of patients, their own time constraints, as well as the logistics of maintaining a successful practice. They described strategies and techniques to educate patients, build trust, or substitute less costly alternatives when appropriate, often adapting their management to the individual patient and clinical environment. Physicians often make nuanced trade-offs in clinical practice aimed at efficient resource use within a complex flow of clinical work and patient expectations. Understanding the challenges faced by physicians and the strategies they use to exercise cost-consciousness provides insight into policy measures that will address physician's roles in health care resource use.

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghei, Mahshid; Turk-Adawi, Karam; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Oh, Paul; Chessex, Caroline; Grace, Sherry L

    2017-10-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and its cost-effectiveness, it is not widely received. Arguably, capacity could be greatly increased if lower-cost models were implemented. The aims of this review were to describe: the costs associated with CR delivery, approaches to reduce these costs, and associated implications. Upon finalizing the PICO statement, information scientists were enlisted to develop the search strategy of MEDLINE, Embase, CDSR, Google Scholar and Scopus. Citations identified were considered for inclusion by the first author. Extracted cost data were summarized in tabular format and qualitatively synthesized. There is wide variability in the cost of CR delivery around the world, and patients pay out-of-pocket for some or all of services in 55% of countries. Supervised CR costs in high-income countries ranged from PPP$294 (Purchasing Power Parity; 2016 United States Dollars) in the United Kingdom to PPP$12,409 in Italy, and in middle-income countries ranged from PPP$146 in Venezuela to PPP$1095 in Brazil. Costs relate to facilities, personnel, and session dose. Delivering CR using information and communication technology (mean cost PPP$753/patient/program), lowering the dose and using lower-cost personnel and equipment are important strategies to consider in containing costs, however few explicitly low-cost models are available in the literature. More research is needed regarding the costs to deliver CR in community settings, the cost-effectiveness of CR in most countries, and the economic impact of return-to-work with CR participation. A low-cost model of CR should be standardized and tested for efficacy across multiple healthcare systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mastitis therapy: Direct and indirect costs

    OpenAIRE

    Boboš, S.; Radinović, M.; Vidić, B.; Pajić, M.; Vidić, V.; Galfi, A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important problems in milk production, causing great economic loses is certainly mastitis. In order to minimize economic losses from mastitis dairy farms introduce different mastitis management programs. These programs include mastitis therapy and prevention. In mastitis control prevention is most important and when mastitis occurs cost of therapy and milk discharge is very important. In our study we examined cost of mastitis treatment and m...

  11. Green certificates causing inconvenience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgersen, Lasse

    2002-01-01

    From early 2002, producers of green energy in selected countries have been able to benefit from generous financial support in the Netherlands. Thus, there has been increased sale of green certificates from Norway and Sweden. But the condition that physical energy delivery should accompany the certificates has caused a marked rise in the price of energy in transit through Germany to the Netherlands. This article discusses the green certificate concept and the experience gained from the Netherlands. One conclusion is that if large-scale trade with green certificates is introduced in Europe without the condition of accompanying energy delivery, then producers of hydro-electric power in Norway and Sweden may be the losers

  12. Costs of traffic injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie

    2015-01-01

    assessed using Danish national healthcare registers. Productivity costs were computed using duration analysis (Cox regression models). In a subanalysis, cost per severe traffic injury was computed for the 12 995 individuals that experienced a severe injury. RESULTS: The socioeconomic cost of a traffic...... injury was €1406 (2009 price level) in the first year, and €8950 over a 10-year period. Per 100 000 population, the 10-year cost was €6 565 668. A severe traffic injury costs €4969 per person in the first year, and €4 006 685 per 100 000 population over a 10-year period. Victims of traffic injuries...

  13. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  14. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  15. The disarmament cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, M.

    1996-01-01

    War is costly. But peace cost is even higher. The destruction of weapons (mines, nuclear weapons, chemical weapons) is much more expensive than their manufacturing. The soldiers demobilization cost is enormous, for instance in Angola, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Zimbabwe the demobilization of 270000 soldiers cost 2.5 10 9 francs. The measures intended to reduce the war risk are also expensive. That is why the arsenal of ex USSR is still intact. Today no international agency is entirely dedicated to peace building. The question is how would cost such an agency? (O.L.). 5 refs., 2 figs

  16. Cost Estimates and Investment Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emhjellen, Kjetil; Emhjellen Magne; Osmundsen, Petter

    2001-08-01

    When evaluating new investment projects, oil companies traditionally use the discounted cashflow method. This method requires expected cashflows in the numerator and a risk adjusted required rate of return in the denominator in order to calculate net present value. The capital expenditure (CAPEX) of a project is one of the major cashflows used to calculate net present value. Usually the CAPEX is given by a single cost figure, with some indication of its probability distribution. In the oil industry and many other industries, it is common practice to report a CAPEX that is the estimated 50/50 (median) CAPEX instead of the estimated expected (expected value) CAPEX. In this article we demonstrate how the practice of using a 50/50 (median) CAPEX, when the cost distributions are asymmetric, causes project valuation errors and therefore may lead to wrong investment decisions with acceptance of projects that have negative net present values. (author)

  17. The causes of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frot, J.

    2001-01-01

    For the man in the street Chernobyl epitomizes the danger of nuclear energy but when we examine the causes of this accident we see that this drama is not intrinsically linked to the production of electricity from nuclear fission. The author sees 2 components in the Chernobyl event: the accident itself and its sanitary consequences. The author considers 3 main causes to the accident: -) a design that makes the reactor difficult to control, -) a series of 6 humane failures or breaking of operating rules, and -) political reasons: the largest possible budget was dedicated to plutonium production so any improvement for safety was considered as costly and secondary, moreover the religion of secrecy which was well spread in the ancient Soviet Union, prevented any scientific from knowing all the information concerning this type of reactor. As for the sanitary consequences, the author considers direct causes and underlying causes. The lack of information for the local population, the delay taken for iodine distribution or for the interdiction of farm products consumption are included in the direct causes. The slowness of Soviet bureaucracy, tight budgets and politico-scientific disputes are quoted among the underlying causes. (A.C.)

  18. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  19. Costs associated with wheeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Wheeling costs are incurred by all companies that experience a change in power flows over their transmission lines during a specific transaction, whether or not the lines of that company are part of the contract path. The costs of providing wheeling service differ from one system to another and from one kind of wheeling transaction to another. While most transactions may be completed using existing capacity, others may require an increase in line. Depending on the situation, some cost components may be high, low, negative, or not incurred at all. This article discusses two general categories of costs; transactional and capital. The former are all operation, maintenance and opportunity costs incurred in completing a specific transaction assuming the existence of adequate capacity. Capital costs are the costs of major new equipment purchases and lines necessary to provide any increased level of transmission services

  20. 77 FR 43542 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... rule that revised Cost Accounting Standard (CAS) 412, ``Composition and Measurement of Pension Cost... Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413--Cost Accounting Standards Pension Harmonization Rule AGENCY: Cost Accounting Standards Board, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Office of...

  1. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of breast – A rare cause of breast lump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Gupta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We, here, report a case of primary breast lymphoma in a 59 years old female. The diagnosis was suspected on fine needle aspiration cytology and confirmed on excision biopsy of the tumor. Histology and immunophenotyping were in accordance with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient has been planned for adjuvant chemoradiation. The management and outcome of primary breast lymphoma and carcinoma are totally different. Early and prompt diagnosis of primary breast lymphoma is of utmost importance to avoid unnecessary mastectomies. Fine needle aspiration cytology supplemented by immuno-cytochemistry can be applied as a reliable and cost-effective tool in the early diagnosis of primary breast lymphomas, while histopathology and immunohistochemistry are conclusive.

  2. Can ureteral stones cause pain without causing hydronephrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Hernandez, Natalia; Gee, Michael S; Noble, Vicki E; Eisner, Brian H

    2016-09-01

    While computerized tomography (CT) is the gold standard for diagnosis of ureterolithiasis, ultrasound is a less costly and radiation-free alternative which is commonly used to evaluate patients with ureteral colic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency with which patients with ureteral stones and renal colic demonstrate hydronephrosis in order to better understand the evaluation of these patients. Two hundred and forty-eight consecutive patients presenting with ureteral colic and diagnosed with a single unilateral ureteral stone on CT scan in an urban tertiary care emergency department were retrospectively reviewed. Radiology reports were reviewed for stone size, diagnosis, and degree of hydronephrosis. Of the 248 patients evaluated for suspected ureteral stone, 221 (89.1 %) demonstrated any hydronephrosis, while 27 (10.9 %) did not. Hydronephrosis grade, available in 194 patients, was as follows: mild-70.6 %, moderate-27.8 %, and severe-1.5 %. Mean patient age was 47.0 years (SD 15.5), gender distribution was 35.9 % female and 64.1 % male, and mean stone axial diameter was 4.1 mm (SD 2.4). Stone location was as follows: ureteropelvic junction-4.1 %, proximal ureter-21 %, distal ureter-24.9 %, and ureterovesical junction-47.1 %. Axial stone diameter and coronal length (craniocaudal) were both significant predictors of degree of hydronephrosis (ANOVA, p hydronephrosis. In patients with ureteral stones and colic, nearly 11 % do not demonstrate any hydronephrosis and a majority (nearly 71 %) will demonstrate only mild hydronephrosis. Stone diameter appears to be related to degree of hydronephrosis, whereas age, gender, and stone location are not. The lower incidence of hydronephrosis for small stones causing renal colic may explain the lower diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound when compared to CT for detecting ureteral stones.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeat fine-needle aspiration for thyroid biopsies read as atypia of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Michael; Zanocco, Kyle; Zydowicz, Sara; Elaraj, Dina; Nayar, Ritu; Sturgeon, Cord

    2012-09-01

    The 2007 National Cancer Institute (NCI) conference on Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration (FNA) introduced the category atypia of undetermined significance (AUS) or follicular lesion of undetermined significance (FLUS). Repeat FNA in 3 to 6 months was recommended for low-risk patients. Compliance with these recommendations has been suboptimal. We hypothesized that repeat FNA would be more effective than diagnostic lobectomy, with decreased costs and improved rates of cancer detection. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in which we compared diagnostic lobectomy with repeat FNA. A Markov model was developed. Outcomes and probabilities were identified from literature review. Third-party payer costs were estimated in 2010 US dollars. Outcomes were weighted by use of the quality-of-life utility factors, yielding quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Monte Carlo simulation and sensitivity analysis were used to examine the uncertainty of probability, cost, and utility estimates. The diagnostic lobectomy strategy cost $8,057 and produced 23.99 QALYs. Repeat FNA cost $2,462 and produced 24.05 QALYs. Repeat FNA was dominant until the cost of FNA increased to $6,091. Dominance of the repeat FNA strategy was not sensitive to the cost of operation or the complication rate. The NCI recommendations for repeat FNA regarding follow-up of AUS/FLUS results are cost-effective. Improving compliance with these guidelines should lead to less overall costs, greater quality of life, and fewer unnecessary operations. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. What are the costs of Scotland's climate and renewable policies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandarajah, Gabrial; McDowall, Will

    2012-01-01

    The UK government has established ambitious policies to address climate change and promote renewable energy, and has set targets both for reducing carbon emissions and for deploying renewables. Scotland, a constituent nation of the UK, has also set its own targets for climate change mitigation and renewable electricity. This paper analyses the energy, economic and environmental implications of carbon and renewable electricity targets in Scotland and the UK using a newly developed two-region UK MARKAL energy system model, where Scotland (SCT) and rest of the UK (RUK) are the two regions. The paper shows that meeting Scotland's carbon targets does not require additional decarbonisation effort if the UK meets its own targets at least cost; and that Scotland's renewable energy ambitions do imply additional costs above the least cost path to the meeting the UK's obligations under the EU renewable energy directive. Meeting Scottish renewable electricity targets diverts investment and deployment in renewables from rest of the UK to Scotland. In addition to increased energy system cost, Scottish renewable electricity targets may also require early investment in new electricity transmission capacity between Scotland and rest of the UK. - Highlights: ► Scottish climate policy is less stringent than UK policy. ► Scottish targets would complement UK targets if UK policies fail to meet UK targets. ► The possible conclusion here is that Scottish carbon targets are unnecessary. ► Scottish renewable policy is more stringent than UK policy. ► As expected, this increased stringency leads to additional costs.

  5. Infective Causes of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonello, M; Michael, B D; Solomon, T

    2015-06-01

    A wide range of infections of the central nervous system are responsible for both acute seizures and epilepsy. The pathogenesis and clinical semiology of the seizure disorders vary widely between the infective pathogens. The exact mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood, but appear, at least in part, to relate to the pathogen; the degree of cortical involvement; delays in treatment; and the host inflammatory response. The treatment of infective causes of seizures involves both symptomatic treatment with antiepileptic drugs and direct treatment of the underlying condition. In many cases, early treatment of the infection may affect the prognosis of the epilepsy syndrome. The greatest burden of acute and long-term infection-related seizures occurs in resource-poor settings, where both clinical and research facilities are often lacking to manage such patients adequately. Nevertheless, education programs may go a long way toward addressing the stigma, leading to improved diagnosis, management, and ultimately to better quality of life. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. The cost of schizophrenia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sado M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuhiro Sado,1 Ataru Inagaki,2 Akihiro Koreki,1 Martin Knapp,3 Lee Andrew Kissane,4 Masaru Mimura,1 Kimio Yoshimura4 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, 2Center for Clinical Psychopharmacology, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 4Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Introduction: Schizophrenia is a disorder that produces considerable burdens due to its often relapsing/remitting or chronic longitudinal course. This burden is felt not only by patients themselves, but also by their families and health care systems. Although the societal burden caused by this disorder has been evaluated in several countries, the magnitude of the societal cost of schizophrenia in Japan has never been estimated. The aim of this study is to clarify the societal burden of schizophrenia by estimating the cost of schizophrenia in Japan in 2008. Methods: A human capital approach was adopted to estimate the cost of schizophrenia. The total cost of schizophrenia was calculated as the sum of the direct, morbidity, and mortality costs. Schizophrenia was defined as disorders coded as F20.0–F20.9 according to the International Classification of Diseases-10. The data required to estimate the total cost was collected from publicly available statistics or previously reported studies. Results: The total cost of schizophrenia in Japan in 2008 was JPY 2.77 trillion (USD 23.8 billion. While the direct cost was JPY 0.770 trillion (USD 6.59 billion, the morbidity and mortality costs were JPY 1.85 trillion (USD 15.8 billion and JPY 0.155 trillion (USD 1.33 billion, respectively. Conclusion: The societal burden caused by schizophrenia is tremendous in Japan, similar to that in other developed countries where published data exist. Compared with other disorders, such as depression or anxiety disorders

  7. The cost of electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donini, J.C.; Kan, J.; Szynkarczuk, J.; Hassan, T.A.; Kar, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    Electrocoagulation could be an attractive and suitable method for separating solids from waste water. The electrocoagulation of kaolinite and bentonite suspensions was studied in a pilot electrocoagulation unit to assess the cost and efficiency of the process. Factors affecting cost such as the formation of passivation layers on electrode plates and the recirculation and concentration of sodium chloride were examined. Colorimetry was used to analyze aluminum content in the suspension. The results were used to calculate the cost due to consumption of electrode material (aluminium) during the process. Total cost was assumed to comprise the energy cost and the cost of electrode material. Comparison was based on the settling properties of the treated product: turbidity, settling rate, and cake height. In most cases, aluminium efficiency averaged around 200% and material cost accounted for 80% of total cost. Although higher concentrations of sodium chloride could only slightly increase aluminium efficiency and electrode efficiency, the higher concentrations resulted in much greater total cost, due to the greater current generated by the increased suspension conductivity, which in turn dissolved a larger amount of aluminium. The recirculation loop increased the flow rate by 3-10 times, enhancing the mass transport between the electrodes and resulting in lower cost and better settling properties. Over the course of two months the electrodes coatings became thicker while efficiency decreased. The electrode efficiency was found to be as high as 94% for virgin electrodes and as low as 10% after two months. 8 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. A new costing model in hospital management: time-driven activity-based costing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öker, Figen; Özyapıcı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cost systems cause cost distortions because they cannot meet the requirements of today's businesses. Therefore, a new and more effective cost system is needed. Consequently, time-driven activity-based costing system has emerged. The unit cost of supplying capacity and the time needed to perform an activity are the only 2 factors considered by the system. Furthermore, this system determines unused capacity by considering practical capacity. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the efficiency of the time-driven activity-based costing system and to display how it can be applied in a health care institution. A case study was conducted in a private hospital in Cyprus. Interviews and direct observations were used to collect the data. The case study revealed that the cost of unused capacity is allocated to both open and laparoscopic (closed) surgeries. Thus, by using the time-driven activity-based costing system, managers should eliminate the cost of unused capacity so as to obtain better results. Based on the results of the study, hospital management is better able to understand the costs of different surgeries. In addition, managers can easily notice the cost of unused capacity and decide how many employees to be dismissed or directed to other productive areas.

  9. Psychogenic Equinovarus Caused by Dislocation of the Chopart Joint Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Tonogai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with conversion disorder (CD present with weakness or unexplained movement disorder that may evolve from inciting psychological events, but presentation with rigid deformity is rare. Only one case of CD presenting as foot deformity with atraumatic rigid psychogenic equinovarus has been reported previously. Here we describe a rare case of psychogenic equinovarus in a physically healthy 10-year-old boy. He had noticed left equinovarus deformity upon waking abruptly but had no history of preceding trauma and no relevant medical history. Computed tomography (CT images revealed dislocation of the left Chopart joint complex, but clinical examination did not suggest an organic neurologic disorder. On further history taking, he reported that he was under psychological stress because of being required to play baseball against his will. When he was given permission to withdraw from this stressful situation, the equinovarus improved without the need for surgical invention. This report highlights the importance of early and accurate diagnosis of psychogenic equinovarus, so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. This is the first report of psychogenic equinovarus caused by dislocation of the Chopart joint complex that was confirmed with CT.

  10. In Vitro Leukoagglutination: A Rare Hematological Cause of Spurious Leukopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Sultan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leukopenia secondary to leukocytic agglutination is caused by an ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA which may appear in both benign and malignant states. Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid induced platelets clumping in peripheral blood has been well established, but invitro leukocytic aggregation is very rarest hematological finding. Pseudo-leukopenia resulting from leukoagglutinins has been reported in the cirrhotic state, infections, autoimmune disorders, uremia, in immunosuppressed state or in various malignancies. Though the condition seems to be benign but very important to be detected as these artifactual findings lead to unnecessary investigations and remarkably changed the overall management plan. Here we report the case of a young patient with this rare finding who was admitted to our hospital with progressive labor pains. The analysis of ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, anticoagulated blood was done on automated hematology analyzer reveals leukopenia. The peripheral smear examination revealed multiple aggregates of leukocytes. On repeat sampling in citrate anticoagulant, the complete blood count showed total leukocytic count of 16.5x109/L with absolute neutrophilic count of 11.5x109/L. This is a rare case of spurious leukopenia secondary to in-vitro leukocytic agglutination provoked by EDTA anticoagulant.

  11. A Rare Cause of Hypothyroidism: TSH’oma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Bakiner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available TSH (tyrotiropin secreting pituitary adenomas account for <1% of all hypophyseal adenomas with a prevelance of 1/1.000.000 and is a very rare reason of hyperthyroidism (TSH’oma. In these casess free t4 and free t3 levels are elevated whereas TSH levels are normal or elevated. A 26 year old women referred to our outpatient clinic with complaints of palpitation, tremors, weight loss and dispnea for three months. Laboratory analysis showed that plasm free T3 levels (8,2 mIU/ml-normal 3,2-5,4 and TSH levels were high(5,7 mIU/ml, normal 0,3-4,9 mIU/ml, and free T4 level was on the upper limit (14,7 mIU/ml- normal 9-15 mIU/ml. Considering TSH depended hyperthyrodism the patient went under a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI which confirmed an 11 mm lesion on hypophysis which was compatible with adenoma.The patient was diagnosed with TSH’oma and went under transnasal, transsphenoidal hypophysis surgery. Although TSH secreting pituitary adenomas are rare causes of hyperthyrodism, advanced laboratory methods allow them to be diagnosed early and avoid unnecessary tests and time loss. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 499-502

  12. Environmental taxes and transaction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollebergh, Herman R.J.

    1994-06-01

    A well-known tax policy principle in the case of environmental bads holds that optimality would apply to a special class of environmental taxes, the so called Pigovian or effluent taxes (or fees or charges). However, an interesting paradox arises here for effluent taxes are seldom chosen in practical policies by governments. An explanation for this discrepancy is that effluent taxes are generally supposed to bring about the highest amount of transaction costs in order to enforce this kind of tax. This would be caused by the fact that usually large numbers of agents are involved if effluents are taken as the principal tax base. Unfortunately this explanation seems to boomerang for it brings about an impossibility result: effluent taxes can never be first best taxes if transaction costs are allowed. Up till now theoretical economics has not paid much attention to this problem. In contrast this essay offers an explanation for the discrepancy and it shows why the impossibility theorem is a paradox. As soon as one allows for transaction costs in welfare analysis, one not only has to acknowledge that such costs are attached to the internalization device but also to the initial status quo. Moreover, the amount of transaction costs is not independent of the tax contracts themselves, neither are the benefits of regulation through taxation. Accordingly a more general welfare assessment of questions where it is optimal to levy environmental taxes shows that first best Pigovian taxes need not be effluent taxes (even if abatement is possible), although in some cases effluent taxes might still be the best policy option from an economic perspective. 31 refs

  13. Environmental taxes and transaction costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollebergh, Herman R.J. [Centre for Economic Policy OCFEB, Erasmus University Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-06-01

    A well-known tax policy principle in the case of environmental bads holds that optimality would apply to a special class of environmental taxes, the so called Pigovian or effluent taxes (or fees or charges). However, an interesting paradox arises here for effluent taxes are seldom chosen in practical policies by governments. An explanation for this discrepancy is that effluent taxes are generally supposed to bring about the highest amount of transaction costs in order to enforce this kind of tax. This would be caused by the fact that usually large numbers of agents are involved if effluents are taken as the principal tax base. Unfortunately this explanation seems to boomerang for it brings about an impossibility result: effluent taxes can never be first best taxes if transaction costs are allowed. Up till now theoretical economics has not paid much attention to this problem. In contrast this essay offers an explanation for the discrepancy and it shows why the impossibility theorem is a paradox. As soon as one allows for transaction costs in welfare analysis, one not only has to acknowledge that such costs are attached to the internalization device but also to the initial status quo. Moreover, the amount of transaction costs is not independent of the tax contracts themselves, neither are the benefits of regulation through taxation. Accordingly a more general welfare assessment of questions where it is optimal to levy environmental taxes shows that first best Pigovian taxes need not be effluent taxes (even if abatement is possible), although in some cases effluent taxes might still be the best policy option from an economic perspective. 31 refs.

  14. Impact of standardized clinical assessment and management plans on resource utilization and costs in children after the arterial switch operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Rahul H; Jurgen, Brittney; Hamershock, Rose A; Friedman, Kevin G; Marshall, Audrey C; Samnaliev, Mihail; Graham, Dionne A; Jenkins, Kathy; Lock, James E; Powell, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) are a quality improvement initiative designed to reduce unnecessary utilization, decrease practice variation, and improve patient outcomes. We created a novel methodology, the SCAMP managed episode of care (SMEOC), which encompasses multiple encounters to assess the impact of the arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP on total costs. All ASO SCAMP patients (dates March 2009 to July 2015) were compared to a control group of ASO patients (January 2001 to February 2009). Patients were divided into "younger" (operation while maintaining quality of care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The great environmental restoration cost estimating shootout: A blind test of three DOE cost estimating groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemen, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The cost of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has increased steadily over the last three years and, in the process, has drawn increasing scrutiny from Congress, the public, and government agencies such as the Office of Management and Budget and the General Accounting Office. Programmatic costs have been reviewed by many groups from within the DOE as well as from outside agencies. While cost may appear to be a universally applicable barometer of project conditions, it is actually a single dimensional manifestation of a complex set of conditions. As such, variations in cost estimates can be caused by a variety of underlying factors such as changes in scope, schedule, performing organization, economic conditions, or regulatory environment. This paper will examine the subject of cost estimates by evaluating three different cost estimates prepared for a single project including two estimates prepared by project proponents and another estimate prepared by a review team. The paper identifies the reasons for cost growth as measured by the different estimates and evaluates the ability of review estimates to measure the validity of costs. The comparative technique used to test the three cost estimates will identify the reasons for changes in the estimated cost, over time, and evaluate the ability of an independent review to correctly identify the reasons for cost growth and evaluate the reasonableness of the cost proposed by the project proponents. Recommendations are made for improved cost estimates and improved cost estimate reviews. Conclusions are reached regarding the differences in estimate results that can be attributed to differences in estimating techniques, the implications of these differences for decision makers, and circumstances that are unique to environmental cost estimating. (author)

  16. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  17. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkoeijen, Peter P J L; Bouwmeester, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Recently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more money to a common project when they had to decide quickly (i.e., a decision based on intuition) than when they were instructed to reflect and decide slowly. This intuitive-cooperation effect is of high scientific and practical importance because it argues against a central assumption of traditional economic and evolutionary models. The first experiment of present study was set up to examine the generality of the intuitive-cooperation effect and to further validate the experimental task producing the effect. In Experiment 1, we investigated Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) workers' contributions to a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 while we manipulated the knowledge about the other players' contribution to the public goods game (contribution known vs. contribution unknown), the identity of the other players (humans vs. computers randomly generating contributions) and the time constraint (time pressure/intuition vs. forced delay/reflection). However, the results of Experiment 1 failed to reveal an intuitive-cooperation effect. Furthermore, four subsequent direct replications attempts with AMT workers (Experiments 2a, 2b, 2c and Experiment 3, which was conducted with naïve/inexperienced participants) also failed to demonstrate intuitive-cooperation effects. Taken together, the results of the present study could not corroborate the idea that people are intuitively cooperative, hence suggesting that the theoretical relationship between intuition and cooperation should be further scrutinized.

  18. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P J L Verkoeijen

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more money to a common project when they had to decide quickly (i.e., a decision based on intuition than when they were instructed to reflect and decide slowly. This intuitive-cooperation effect is of high scientific and practical importance because it argues against a central assumption of traditional economic and evolutionary models. The first experiment of present study was set up to examine the generality of the intuitive-cooperation effect and to further validate the experimental task producing the effect. In Experiment 1, we investigated Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT workers' contributions to a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 while we manipulated the knowledge about the other players' contribution to the public goods game (contribution known vs. contribution unknown, the identity of the other players (humans vs. computers randomly generating contributions and the time constraint (time pressure/intuition vs. forced delay/reflection. However, the results of Experiment 1 failed to reveal an intuitive-cooperation effect. Furthermore, four subsequent direct replications attempts with AMT workers (Experiments 2a, 2b, 2c and Experiment 3, which was conducted with naïve/inexperienced participants also failed to demonstrate intuitive-cooperation effects. Taken together, the results of the present study could not corroborate the idea that people are intuitively cooperative, hence suggesting that the theoretical relationship between intuition and cooperation should be further scrutinized.

  19. Prediction and analysis of the underground climatic conditions and their cause in deep mechanized Canadian metal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocsis, C.; Hardcastle, S.G. [Natural Resources Canada, Sudbury, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2010-07-01

    As mines in Canada become deeper, there is a growing need to prevent worker heat exposure. The cost of ventilation and refrigeration to control heat exposure in deep mines may be one of the key factors that determines whether existing mines can continue to be economic. Appropriate design of primary and auxiliary ventilation systems is important in order to eliminate unnecessary capital investment and increased operating costs. This paper presented the findings of a background study performed by CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories in which a generic climate model was used to predict the working conditions in a deep Canadian mine. The study examined the relative importance of the various heat sources/sinks and energy changes that occur as air descends 3,000 m into the mine and then travels to the working areas. The study showed that local factors influence actual workplace conditions more than increased depth. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs are well-noted but not well-understood, and there is little evidence that they are decreasing in frequency or amount over time. The need to control spending has led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns, and many program control efforts are being implemented to attempt to prevent or mitigate the problem (NPR 7120). However, cost overruns have not abated, and while some direct causes of increased spending may be obvious (requirements creep, launch delays, directed changes, etc.), the underlying impetus to spend past the original budget may be more subtle. Gaining better insight into the causes of cost overruns will help NASA and its contracting organizations to avoid .them. This paper hypothesizes that one cause of NASA mission cost overruns is that the availability of reserves gives project team members an incentive to make decisions and behave in ways that increase costs. We theorize that the presence of reserves is a contributing factor to cost overruns because it causes organizations to use their funds less efficiently or to control spending less effectively. We draw a comparison to the insurance industry concept of moral hazard, the phenomenon that the presence of insurance causes insureds to have more frequent and higher insurance losses, and we attempt to apply actuarial techniques to quantifY the increase in the expected cost of a mission due to the availability of reserves. We create a theoretical model of reserve spending motivation by defining a variable ReserveSpending as a function of total reserves. This function has a positive slope; for every dollar of reserves available, there is a positive probability of spending it. Finally, the function should be concave down; the probability of spending each incremental dollar of reserves decreases progressively. We test the model against available NASA CADRe data by examining missions with reserve dollars initially available and testing whether

  1. Trade Costs, Conflicts, and Defense Spending

    OpenAIRE

    Seitz, Michael; Tarasov, Alexander; Zakharenko, Roman

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a quantitative model of trade, military conflicts, and defense spending. Trade liberalization between two countries reduces probability of an armed conflict between them, causing both to cut defense spending. This in turn causes a domino effect on defense spending by other countries. As a result, both countries and the rest of the world are better off. We estimate the model using data on trade, conflicts, and military spending. We find that, after reduction of costs of tra...

  2. Equipment cost optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, E.M.; Farias, M.A.; Dreyer, S.R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Considering the importance of the cost of material and equipment in the overall cost profile of an oil company, which in the case of Petrobras, represents approximately 23% of the total operational cost or 10% of the sales, an organization for the optimization of such costs has been established within Petrobras. Programs are developed aiming at: optimization of life-cycle cost of material and equipment; optimization of industrial processes costs through material development. This paper describes the methodology used in the management of the development programs and presents some examples of concluded and ongoing programs, which are conducted in permanent cooperation with suppliers, technical laboratories and research institutions and have been showing relevant results

  3. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  4. Cost analysis guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy's (DOE's) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies

  5. Applied cost allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Smilgins, Aleksandrs

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with empirical computation of Aumann–Shapley cost shares for joint production. We show that if one uses a mathematical programing approach with its non-parametric estimation of the cost function there may be observations in the data set for which we have multiple Aumann–Shapley p...... of assumptions concerning firm behavior. These assumptions enable us to connect inefficient with efficient production and thereby provide consistent ways of allocating the costs arising from inefficiency....

  6. Uranium milling costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Basic process flowsheets are reviewed for conventional milling of US ores. Capital costs are presented for various mill capacities for one of the basic processes. Operating costs are shown for various mill capacities for all of the basic process flowsheets. The number of mills using, or planning to use, a particular process is reviewed. A summary of the estimated average milling costs for all operating US mills is shown

  7. Acute costs and predictors of higher treatment costs of trauma in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Lam, Mary; Mitchell, Rebecca; Black, Deborah; Taylor, Colman; Dickson, Cara; Jan, Stephen; Palmer, Cameron S; Langcake, Mary; Myburgh, John

    2014-01-01

    Accurate economic data are fundamental for improving current funding models and ultimately in promoting the efficient delivery of services. The financial burden of a high trauma casemix to designated trauma centres in Australia has not been previously determined, and there is some evidence that the episode funding model used in Australia results in the underfunding of trauma. To describe the costs of acute trauma admissions in trauma centres, identify predictors of higher treatment costs and cost variance in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Data linkage of admitted trauma patient and financial data provided by 12 Level 1 NSW trauma centres for the 08/09 financial year was performed. Demographic, injury details and injury scores were obtained from trauma registries. Individual patient general ledger costs (actual trauma patient costs), Australian Refined Diagnostic Related Groups (AR-DRG) and state-wide average costs (which form the basis of funding) were obtained. The actual costs incurred by the hospital were then compared with the state-wide AR-DRG average costs. Multivariable multiple linear regression was used for identifying predictors of costs. There were 17,522 patients, the average per patient cost was $10,603 and the median was $4628 (interquartile range: $2179-10,148). The actual costs incurred by trauma centres were on average $134 per bed day above AR-DRG costs-determined costs. Falls, road trauma and violence were the highest causes of total cost. Motor cyclists and pedestrians had higher median costs than motor vehicle occupants. As a result of greater numbers, patients with minor injury had comparable total costs with those generated by patients with severe injury. However the median cost of severely injured patients was nearly four times greater. The count of body regions injured, sex, length of stay, serious traumatic brain injury and admission to the Intensive Care Unit were significantly associated with increased costs (p<0.001). This

  8. Valuing productivity costs in a changing macroeconomic environment: the estimation of colorectal cancer productivity costs using the friction cost approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Koopmanschap, Marc; Sharp, Linda

    2016-06-01

    The friction cost approach (FCA) has been proposed as an alternative to the human capital approach for productivity cost valuation. However, FCA estimates are context dependent and influenced by extant macroeconomic conditions. We applied the FCA to estimate colorectal cancer labor productivity costs and assessed the impact of a changing macroeconomic environment on these estimates. Data from colorectal cancer survivors (n = 159) derived from a postal survey undertaken in Ireland March 2010 to January 2011 were combined with national wage data, population-level survival data, and occupation-specific friction periods to calculate temporary and permanent disability, and premature mortality costs using the FCA. The effects of changing labor market conditions between 2006 and 2013 on the friction period were modeled in scenario analyses. Costs were valued in 2008 euros. In the base-case, the total FCA per-person productivity cost for incident colorectal cancer patients of working age at diagnosis was €8543. In scenario 1 (a 2.2 % increase in unemployment), the fall in the friction period caused total productivity costs to decrease by up to 18 % compared to base-case estimates. In scenario 2 (a 9.2 % increase in unemployment), the largest decrease in productivity cost was up to 65 %. Adjusting for the vacancy rate reduced the effect of unemployment on the cost results. The friction period used in calculating labor productivity costs greatly affects the derived estimates; this friction period requires reassessment following changes in labor market conditions. The influence of changes in macroeconomic conditions on FCA-derived cost estimates may be substantial.

  9. Designer's unified cost model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William T.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Swanson, G. D.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model has been initiated. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state of the art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a data base and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. The approach, goals, plans, and progress is presented for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  10. Designers' unified cost model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W.; Ilcewicz, L.; Swanson, G.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Structures Technology Program Office (STPO) at NASA LaRC has initiated development of a conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state-of-the-art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a database and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. This paper presents the team members, approach, goals, plans, and progress to date for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  11. Avoidable waste management costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  12. Avoidable waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP

  13. Rethinking sunk costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capen, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    As typically practiced in the petroleum/ natural gas industry, most economic calculations leave out sunk costs. Integrated businesses can be hurt by the omission of sunk costs because profits and costs are not allocated properly among the various business segments. Not only can the traditional sunk-cost practice lead to predictably bad decisions, but a company that operates under such a policy will have no idea how to allocate resources among its operating components; almost none of its calculated returns will be correct. This paper reports that the solution is to include asset value as part of the investment in the calculation

  14. Management and cost accounting

    CERN Document Server

    Drury, Colin

    1992-01-01

    This third edition of a textbook on management and cost accounting features coverage of activity-based costing (ABC), advance manufacturing technologies (AMTs), JIT, MRP, target costing, life-cycle costing, strategic management accounting, total quality management and customer profitability analysis. Also included are revised and new end-of-chapter problems taken from past examination papers of CIMA, ACCA and ICAEW. There is increased reference to management accounting in practice, including many of the results of the author's CIMA sponsored survey, and greater emphasis on operational control and performance measurement.

  15. The Cost of Youth Suicide in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kinchin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is the leading cause of death among Australians between 15 and 24 years of age. This study seeks to estimate the economic cost of youth suicide (15–24 years old for Australia using 2014 as a reference year. The main outcome measure is monetized burden of youth suicide. Costs, in 2014 AU$, are measured and valued as direct costs, such as coronial inquiry, police, ambulance, and funeral expenses; indirect costs, such as lost economic productivity; and intangible costs, such as bereavement. In 2014, 307 young Australians lost their lives to suicide (82 females and 225 males. The average age at time of death was 20.4 years, representing an average loss of 62 years of life and close to 46 years of productive capacity. The average cost per youth suicide is valued at $2,884,426, including $9721 in direct costs, $2,788,245 as the value of lost productivity, and $86,460 as the cost of bereavement. The total economic loss of youth suicide in Australia is estimated at $22 billion a year (equivalent to US$ 17 billion, ranging from $20 to $25 billion. These findings can assist decision-makers understand the magnitude of adverse outcomes associated with youth suicide and the potential benefits to be achieved by investing in effective suicide prevention strategies.

  16. The Cost of Youth Suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Irina; Doran, Christopher M

    2018-04-04

    Suicide is the leading cause of death among Australians between 15 and 24 years of age. This study seeks to estimate the economic cost of youth suicide (15–24 years old) for Australia using 2014 as a reference year. The main outcome measure is monetized burden of youth suicide. Costs, in 2014 AU$, are measured and valued as direct costs, such as coronial inquiry, police, ambulance, and funeral expenses; indirect costs, such as lost economic productivity; and intangible costs, such as bereavement. In 2014, 307 young Australians lost their lives to suicide (82 females and 225 males). The average age at time of death was 20.4 years, representing an average loss of 62 years of life and close to 46 years of productive capacity. The average cost per youth suicide is valued at $2,884,426, including $9721 in direct costs, $2,788,245 as the value of lost productivity, and $86,460 as the cost of bereavement. The total economic loss of youth suicide in Australia is estimated at $22 billion a year (equivalent to US$ 17 billion), ranging from $20 to $25 billion. These findings can assist decision-makers understand the magnitude of adverse outcomes associated with youth suicide and the potential benefits to be achieved by investing in effective suicide prevention strategies.

  17. The COST model for calculation of forest operations costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackerman, P.; Belbo, H.; Eliasson, L.; Jong, de J.J.; Lazdins, A.; Lyons, J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the late nineteenth century when high-cost equipment was introduced into forestry there has been a need to calculate the cost of this equipment in more detail with respect to, for example, cost of ownership, cost per hour of production, and cost per production unit. Machine cost calculations

  18. Improving hospital cost accounting with activity-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y C

    1993-01-01

    In this article, activity-based costing, an approach that has proved to be an improvement over the conventional costing system in product costing, is introduced. By combining activity-based costing with standard costing, health care administrators can better plan and control the costs of health services provided while ensuring that the organization's bottom line is healthy.

  19. Matrimonial Causes Rules, 1986, 30 January 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    These Rules are made under Section 4 of the Matrimonial Causes Law, 1976 and contain provisions on applications for leave to present a petition for divorce, documents to accompany the petition, information to be contained in the petition, service of the petition, pleadings subsequent to the petition, directions for trial, security for costs, decrees, and enforcement of orders, among other things. The Rules also stipulate that when "it appears that there is a child of the marriage under the age of sixteen, the record shall show specifically that the question of provision for such child has been considered and dealt with by the Court." full text

  20. Ignoring the sacroiliac joint in chronic low back pain is costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly DW

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available David W Polly,1,2 Daniel Cher3 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA Background: Increasing evidence supports minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ fusion as a safe and effective treatment for SIJ dysfunction. Failure to include the SIJ in the diagnostic evaluation of low back pain could result in unnecessary health care expenses. Design: Decision analytic cost model. Methods: A decision analytic model calculating 2-year direct health care costs in patients with chronic low back pain considering lumbar fusion surgery was used. Results: The strategy of including the SIJ in the preoperative diagnostic workup of chronic low back pain saves an expected US$3,100 per patient over 2 years. Cost savings were robust to reasonable ranges for costs and probabilities, such as the probability of diagnosis and the probability of successful surgical treatment. Conclusion: Including the SIJ as part of the diagnostic strategy in preoperative patients with chronic low back pain is likely to be cost saving in the short term. Keywords: chronic low back pain, lumbar fusion, sacroiliac joint pain, sacroiliac joint fusion, healthcare costs, decision modeling

  1. External costs of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabl, A.; Spadaro, J.V.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a synthesis of the ExternE project (External costs of Energy) of the European community about the external costs of power generation. Pollution impacts are calculated using an 'impact pathways' analysis, i.e. an analysis of the emission - dispersion - dose-response function - cost evaluation chain. Results are presented for different fuel cycles (with several technological variants) with their confidence intervals. The environmental impact costs are particularly high for coal: for instance, in France, for coal-fired power plants it is of the same order as the electricity retail price. For natural gas, this cost is about a third of the one for coal. On the contrary, the environmental impact costs for nuclear and renewable energies are low, typically of few per cent of the electricity price. The main part of these costs corresponds to the sanitary impacts, in particular the untimely mortality. In order to avoid any controversy about the cost evaluation of mortality, the reduction of the expectation of life due to the different fuel cycles is also indicated and the risks linked with nuclear energy are presented using several comparisons. (J.S.)

  2. Supply Chain Costing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Jesper Normann; Kristensen, Jesper; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    Based Costing (ABC) på et forsyningskædeniveau – heri benævnt Supply Chain Costing (SCC). Udoverdefordelederfindesved ABCtilføjerSCCogså et økonomisk grundlag til det strategiske rationale, der ofte ligger bag opbygningen af virksomhedens forsyningskæde, og kan dermed medvirke til konkret...

  3. Resources and transaction costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2005-01-01

    from resources depends on the property rights that he or she holds and on the transaction costs of exchanging, defining, and protecting them. While transaction costs are a major source of value dissipation, reducing such dissipation may create value. Implications for the RBV analysis of sustained...

  4. Resources and Transaction Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2004-01-01

    resources depends on the propertyrights that she holds to those resources and on the transaction costs of exchanging,defining and protecting the relevant property rights. While transaction costs aremajor sources of value dissipation, value may be created by reducing suchdissipation. Implications for the RBV...

  5. Costs and Tariff

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of magnitude as construction costs. Proposed Civil Nuclear Liability Bill 2008: Reactor operators liable for accidents; must take insurance for Rs. 100-300 crores. Tariff: Despite all this, NPCIL claims it will not cost customers more than Rs. 4 per unit incl. waste disposal and decommish. It wont be easy. We wish them luck !

  6. Information at a cost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robalo, P.; Sayag, R.

    2012-01-01

    The supposed irrelevance of historical costs for rational decision making has been the subject of much interest in the economic literature. In this paper we explore whether individual decision making under risk is affected by the cost of the supplied information. Outside of the lab, it is difficult

  7. Controlling Health Care Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  8. Applied cost allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Smilgins, Aleksandrs

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with empirical computation of Aumann–Shapley cost shares for joint production. We show that if one uses a mathematical programing approach with its non-parametric estimation of the cost function there may be observations in the data set for which we have multiple Aumann–Shapley p...

  9. Managing Ongoing EVSE Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Cabell [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    The costs associated with EVSE begin with picking the best location and unit for the job, but they continue with electricity and network charges through the life of your vehicle. This presentation tells how to balance electricity demand charges and network management costs through smart planning at your program's inception.

  10. Factors affecting mining costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowell, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: investment decision-making, unit cost factors (declining ore grade, low-price contracts, ore grade/output relationship, above average cost increases). Economic, environmental, sociological and political aspects are considered. (U.K.)

  11. Common cause failure: enhancing defenses against root cause and coupling factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Poorva; Kim, Sok Chul [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A Common Cause Failure(CCF) event refers to a specific class of dependent events that result from co-existence of two main factors: Susceptibility of components to fail or become unavailable due to particular root cause of failure, and coupling factor coupling mechanism) that creates the condition for multiple components getting affected. PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) operating experience of Nuclear Power Plants have demonstrated that dependent events such as CCF events are major contributor to risk during operation. From cost-benefit consideration, putting significant design modifications in place to prevent CCF would not be desirable in terms of risk management regulatory effectiveness and efficiency. The aim of this study was to propose feasible defenses against CCF from cost benefit consideration to enhance the safety. This study provides the CDM and CFDM of EDG. Defenses employed against cause and coupling factor can be easily employed in operation and maintenance programme of NPP and are not an additional cost burden. Such enhancement of defense against the CCF can give a modest improvement in CDF. This approach is specifically helpful in plants that are already under operation and significant modifications are not economically feasible.

  12. The development of the risk-based cost-benefit analysis framework for risk-informed regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z. A.; Hwang, M. J.; Lee, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Committee) introduces the Risk-informed Regulation (RIR) to allocate the resources of NRC effectively and to reduce the unnecessary burden of utilities. This approach inherently includes the cost-benefit analysis (CBA) concept. The CBA method has been widely used for many problems in order to support the decision making by analyzing the effectiveness of the proposed plan and/or activity in the aspect of cost and benefit. However, in general, the conventional CBA method does not use the information such as risk that is the essential element of RIR. So, we developed a revised CBA framework that incorporates the risk information in analyzing the cost and benefit of the regulatory and/or operational activities in nuclear industry

  13. Networks and Transaction Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Christian; Henningsen, Geraldine; Henningsen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Based on the well-known fact that social networks can provide effective mechanisms that help to increase the trust level between two trade partners, we apply a simple game-theoretical framework to derive transaction costs as a high risk of opportunistic behavior in a repeated trade relation...... determined by the density and size of trading networks. In the empirical part of the paper we apply a two stage procedure to estimate the impact of social network structures on farm’s transaction costs observed for different input and output markets. At a first stage we estimate a multiple input...... transaction cost functions for all traded farm inputs and outputs. Estimation results based on a sample of 315 Polish farms imply a significant influence of social network structures on farm’s transaction costs. Moreover, estimated transaction costs correspond to a reasonable amount of farm specific shadow...

  14. Networks and Transaction Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Christian; Henningsen, Geraldine; Henningsen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    determined by the density and size of trading networks. In the empirical part of the paper we apply a two stage procedure to estimate the impact of social network structures on farm’s transaction costs observed for different input and output markets. At a first stage we estimate a multiple input......Based on the well-known fact that social networks can provide effective mechanisms that help to increase the trust level between two trade partners, we apply a simple game-theoretical framework to derive transaction costs as a high risk of opportunistic behavior in a repeated trade relation...... transaction cost functions for all traded farm inputs and outputs. Estimation results based on a sample of 315 Polish farms imply a significant influence of social network structures on farm’s transaction costs. Moreover, estimated transaction costs correspond to a reasonable amount of farm specific shadow...

  15. COST QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitanova Gordana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the contemporary economic conditions, enterprises might achieve a competitive advantage if only they sell goods and services with high quality and lower prices. Customers, usually, prefer quality goods with acceptable prices, while such goods create reputation with the particular brand. The perfect control system is necessary to achieve a high quality product, which the cost quality management is considered to be an indispensable part in. The cost quality is nevertheless created to ensure that customers’ requirements are being appropriately attained. The most important objective of quality costs controlling is to assist the management in enhancing the product’s value permanently. The superior cost quality control system helps the management to achieve other strategic objectives, such as: producing goods with acceptable costs and deliver the products to their customers in time.

  16. Reference costs of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terraz, N.

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of electric power production reference costs is used in France, even in the present case of over-capacity, for comparing the relative interest of the various means of power generation (nuclear plants, coal plants, hydroelectricity, gas combined cycles, etc.) and as an aid for future investment decisions. Reference costs show a sharp decrease between 1993 and 1997 due to advancements in nuclear plant operating ability and fossil fuel price decrease. Actuarial rates, plant service life, fuel costs and exchange rates are important parameters. The various costs from the research stage to the waste processing stages are discussed and the reference costs of the various power generation systems are presented and compared together with their competitiveness; the future of wind energy and cogeneration and the prospective of the renewal of nuclear plants at the 2010 horizon are also addressed

  17. Costs of Archival Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex; Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad

    2012-01-01

    to determine the costs of establishing and maintaining a preservation solution destined for long-term preservation of digital materials and to develop a tool capable of doing this operation. In order to fulfill the purposes, the project employed a combination of own and external experience as well as the OAIS......This paper presents an analysis of the cost of archival storage. The study is part of a project conducted by The Danish National Archives, The Royal Library, and The State and University Library to develop a generic cost model for digital preservation (CMDP). The purposes of the study were...... Reference Model as a framework to fully understand and identify the cost critical activities of bit-preservation as described in Archival Storage. We found that the costs of Archival Storage are obviously closely linked to the data volume, but also to the required preservation quality, especially...

  18. Transmission line capital costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs

  19. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for

  20. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Muñoz, P; Conde-Salazar, L; Vañó-Galván, S

    2014-11-01

    Contact dermatitis due to cosmetic products is a common dermatologic complaint that considerably affects the patient's quality of life. Diagnosis, treatment, and preventive strategies represent a substantial cost. This condition accounts for 2% to 4% of all visits to the dermatologist, and approximately 60% of cases are allergic in origin. Most cases are caused by skin hygiene and moisturizing products, followed by cosmetic hair and nail products. Fragrances are the most common cause of allergy to cosmetics, followed by preservatives and hair dyes; however, all components, including natural ingredients, should be considered potential sensitizers. We provide relevant information on the most frequent allergens in cosmetic products, namely, fragrances, preservatives, antioxidants, excipients, surfactants, humectants, emulsifiers, natural ingredients, hair dyes, sunscreens, and nail cosmetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Unfair agricultural prices cause hunger and resources dilapidation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, António C.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present facts and arguments trying to prove that unfair prices are the most important cause for the dilapidation of human and natural resources. In many poor countries farmers sell their products at prices below their real cost. In these countries, most often, family labour and equipment depreciation are not accounted as real costs. Although the huge technical progress occurred in the last fifty years, or because of it, many thousands of farmers in undev...

  2. Classic Bartter syndrome: a rare cause of failure to thrive in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Helena; Mendes, Leonor; Mendes, Patricia; da Silva, José Esteves

    2012-06-28

    Bartter syndrome is a group of rare autosomal-recessive disorders caused by a defect in distal tubule transport of sodium and chloride. Blood gases and plasma electrolytes raise suspicion of this diagnosis and the definitive diagnosis is made by genetic study. Early treatment improves prognosis. The authors present the case of an 11-month-old child with early failure to thrive and severe regurgitation. Blood gases revealed hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatraemia and hypokalaemia. Blood pressure was normal and polyuria was documented. She began therapy with potassium chloride supplementation and indomethacin. There was clinical improvement and plasma potassium and bicarbonate normalised. The molecular study confirmed it was the classic form of Bartter syndrome. Despite being rare in clinical practice, which may lead to unnecessary medical investigation and diagnosis delay, in a child with failure to thrive, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis and hypokalaemia, this diagnosis must be considered.

  3. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gildeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis.

  4. Environmental Pollution, Causes and Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Pham van Huong; , Huynh Thanh Dat; Nguyen Quoc Hung

    2017-01-01

    Pollution induces harmful effects on environment and health security. Main deep causes will be analyzed including natural disasters like volcanoes eruption, climate change as well as and men-caused disasters which are nuclear explosions and dioxin sprays.

  5. Drugs that may cause impotence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impotence caused by medications; Drug-induced erectile dysfunction; Prescription medicines and impotence ... Many medicines and recreational drugs can affect a man's sexual arousal and sexual performance. What causes impotence in one ...

  6. Implicit environmental costs in hydroelectric development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, A.J.; Wenstoep, F.; Strand, J.

    1992-01-01

    The ranking of hydropower projects under the Norwegian Master Plan for Water Resources is used to derive implicit government preferences for a number of environmental attributes described by ordinal scores for each project. Higher negative scores are generally associated with greater implicit willingness to pay to avoid the environmental damage tied to the attribute, caused by hydropower development. The total (ordinary economic and implicit environmental) cost for each project are derived, and the environmental costs per capacity unit are found to be on the same order as the economic costs, lower for projects ranked for early exploitation, and higher for projects to be saved permanently. An implicit long-run marginal cost curve for Norwegian hydropower development is derived, which is generally upward sloping, but not uniformly so. This can be due to the model specification problems or ranking inconsistencies, both of which are likely to be present. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of telehealth in pre-hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Alqusairi, Diaa; Kim, Junghyun; Jackson, Adria; Persse, David; Gonzalez, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Objective There has been very little use of telehealth in pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), yet the potential exists for this technology to transform the current delivery model. In this study, we explore the costs and benefits of one large telehealth EMS initiative. Methods Using a case-control study design and both micro- and gross-costing data from the Houston Fire Department EMS electronic patient care record system, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) comparing costs with potential savings associated with patients treated through a telehealth-enabled intervention. The intervention consisted of telehealth-based consultation between the 911 patient and an EMS physician, to evaluate and triage the necessity for patient transport to a hospital emergency department (ED). Patients with non-urgent, primary care-related conditions were then scheduled and transported by alternative means to an affiliated primary care clinic. We measured CBA as both total cost savings and cost per ED visit averted, in US Dollars ($USD). Results In total, 5570 patients were treated over the first full 12 months with a telehealth-enabled care model. We found a 6.7% absolute reduction in potentially medically unnecessary ED visits, and a 44-minute reduction in total ambulance back-in-service times. The average cost for a telehealth patient was $167, which was a statistically significantly $103 less than the control group ( p cost savings from the societal perspective, or $2468 cost savings per ED visit averted (benefit). Conclusion Patient care enabled by telehealth in a pre-hospital environment, is a more cost effective alternative compared to the traditional EMS 'treat and transport to ED' model.

  8. Nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    A report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat and presented to the seventh session of the Agency's General Conference says that information on nuclear power costs is now rapidly moving from the domain of uncertain estimates to that of tested factual data. As more and more nuclear power stations are being built and put into operation, more information on the actual costs incurred is becoming available. This is the fourth report on nuclear power costs to be submitted to the IAEA General Conference. The report last year gave cost information on 38 nuclear power projects, 17 of which have already gone into operation. Certain significant changes in the data given last year are included-in the present report; besides, information is given on seven new plants. The report is divided into two parts, the first on recent developments and current trends in nuclear power costs and the second on the use of the cost data for economic comparisons. Both stress the fact that the margin of uncertainty in the basic data has lately been drastically reduced. At the same time, it is pointed out, some degree of uncertainty is inherent in the assumptions made in arriving at over-all generating cost figures, especially when - as is usually the case - a nuclear plant is part of an integrated power system

  9. Drilling cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Drilling assumes greater importance in present day uranium exploration which emphasizes to explore more areas on the basis of conceptual model than merely on surface anomalies. But drilling is as costly as it is important and consumes a major share (50% to 60%) of the exploration budget. As such the cost of drilling has great bearing on the exploration strategy as well as on the overall cost of the project. Therefore, understanding the cost analysis is very much important when planning or intensifying an exploration programme. This not only helps in controlling the current operations but also in planning the budgetary provisions for future operations. Also, if the work is entrusted to a private party, knowledge of in-house cost analysis helps in fixing the rates of drilling in different formations and areas to be drilled. Under this topic, various factors that contribute to the cost of drilling per meter as well as ways to minimize the drilling cost for better economic evaluation of mineral deposits are discussed. (author)

  10. The Cost of Astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.

    Using Scopus and national sources, I have investigated the evolution of the cost of publishing in Danish astronomy on a fine scale over a number of years. I find that the number of publications per year from Danish astronomers increased by a factor of four during 15 years: naturally, the correspo......Using Scopus and national sources, I have investigated the evolution of the cost of publishing in Danish astronomy on a fine scale over a number of years. I find that the number of publications per year from Danish astronomers increased by a factor of four during 15 years: naturally......, the corresponding potential cost of publishing must have increased similarly. The actual realized cost of publishing in core journals are investigated for a high profile Danish astronomy research institutions. I argue that the situation is highly unstable if the current cost scenario continues, and I speculate...... that Danish astronomy is risking a scholarly communication collapse due to the combination of increasing subscription cost, increased research output, and increased direct publishing costs related to Open access and other page charges....

  11. The cost of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Leif Jonas

    , the opportunity cost of two children is estimated to 28-29 per cent of full income, which in monetary units is close to estimated income difference between women employed in the public and private sector. The opportunity cost of fatherhood is generally positive, but only significantly positive for men born......In this paper we estimate the opportunity cost of children. The underlying theoretical model is represented by a household production model. In the empirical analysis, we consider three different cohorts for men and women born between 1955 and 1970. For the women in the two oldest cohorts...

  12. Platform decommissioning costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, David

    1998-01-01

    There are over 6500 platforms worldwide contributing to the offshore oil and gas production industry. In the North Sea there are around 500 platforms in place. There are many factors to be considered in planning for platform decommissioning and the evaluation of options for removal and disposal. The environmental impact, technical feasibility, safety and cost factors all have to be considered. This presentation considers what information is available about the overall decommissioning costs for the North Sea and the costs of different removal and disposal options for individual platforms. 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Exploration can cause falling non-renewable resource prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, John R.

    2003-01-01

    This note shows that when marginal exploration costs are increasing in the rate of exploration that it is possible to observe non-renewable resource prices falling over a portion of the extraction profile. Thus, while the model of Pindyck (J. Polit. Econ. 86 (1978) 841) was based on an incorrect specification of the aggregate extraction cost function, its general conclusion that exploration can cause falling non-renewable resource prices is upheld. This result is in contrast to Mendelsohn and Swierzbinski (Int. Econ. Rev. 30 (1989) 175), who assumed that marginal extraction costs were constant

  14. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  15. Comparison of different strategies in prenatal screening for Down's syndrome: cost effectiveness analysis of computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekas, Jean; Gagné, Geneviève; Bujold, Emmanuel; Douillard, Daniel; Forest, Jean-Claude; Reinharz, Daniel; Rousseau, François

    2009-02-13

    To assess and compare the cost effectiveness of three different strategies for prenatal screening for Down's syndrome (integrated test, sequential screening, and contingent screenings) and to determine the most useful cut-off values for risk. Computer simulations to study integrated, sequential, and contingent screening strategies with various cut-offs leading to 19 potential screening algorithms. The computer simulation was populated with data from the Serum Urine and Ultrasound Screening Study (SURUSS), real unit costs for healthcare interventions, and a population of 110 948 pregnancies from the province of Québec for the year 2001. Cost effectiveness ratios, incremental cost effectiveness ratios, and screening options' outcomes. The contingent screening strategy dominated all other screening options: it had the best cost effectiveness ratio ($C26,833 per case of Down's syndrome) with fewer procedure related euploid miscarriages and unnecessary terminations (respectively, 6 and 16 per 100,000 pregnancies). It also outperformed serum screening at the second trimester. In terms of the incremental cost effectiveness ratio, contingent screening was still dominant: compared with screening based on maternal age alone, the savings were $C30,963 per additional birth with Down's syndrome averted. Contingent screening was the only screening strategy that offered early reassurance to the majority of women (77.81%) in first trimester and minimised costs by limiting retesting during the second trimester (21.05%). For the contingent and sequential screening strategies, the choice of cut-off value for risk in the first trimester test significantly affected the cost effectiveness ratios (respectively, from $C26,833 to $C37,260 and from $C35,215 to $C45,314 per case of Down's syndrome), the number of procedure related euploid miscarriages (from 6 to 46 and from 6 to 45 per 100,000 pregnancies), and the number of unnecessary terminations (from 16 to 26 and from 16 to 25 per 100

  16. Direct medical cost of stroke in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charmaine Shuyu; Toh, Matthias Paul Han Sim; Ng, Jiaying; Ko, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Globally, stroke is recognized as one of the main causes of long-term disability, accounting for approximately 5·7 million deaths each year. It is a debilitating and costly chronic condition that consumes about 2-4% of total healthcare expenditure. To estimate the direct medical cost associated with stroke in Singapore in 2012 and to determine associated predictors. The National Healthcare Group Chronic Disease Management System database was used to identify patients with stroke between the years 2006 and 2012. Estimated stroke-related costs included hospitalizations, accident and emergency room visits, outpatient physician visits, laboratory tests, and medications. A total of 700 patients were randomly selected for the analyses. The mean annual direct medical cost was found to be S$12 473·7, of which 93·6% were accounted for by inpatient services, 4·9% by outpatient services, and 1·5% by A&E services. Independent determinants of greater total costs were stroke types, such as ischemic stroke (P = 0·005), subarachnoid hemorrhage (P costs. Efforts to reduce inpatient costs and to allocate health resources to focus on the primary prevention of stroke should become a priority. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Exploring the preventable causes of unplanned readmissions using root cause analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluitman, K. S.; van Galen, L. S.; Merten, H

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Unplanned readmissions within 30 days are a common phenomenon in everyday practice and lead to increasing costs. Although many studies aiming to analyze the probable causes leading to unplanned readmissions have been performed, an in depth-study analyzing the human (healthcare worker...... and unpreventable readmissions. Results: Most root causes for readmission were disease-related (46%), followed by human (healthcare worker)-(33%) and patient-(15%) related root causes. Half of the readmissions studied were considered to be potentially preventable. Preventable readmissions predominantly had human......-related (coordination) failures. Conclusion and relevance: Our study suggests that improving human-related (coordinating) factors contributing to a readmission can potentially decrease the number of preventable readmissions. (C) 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights...

  18. Ventilation cost and air cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, H. D.

    The components associated with the costs of the purchase of pollution control equipment are discussed. These include the capital cost to purchase the equipment and installation, and the costs incurred to operate the control device on an annual basis. Although the capital costs can represent a significant outlay of money, typically these costs are spread out over the life of the equipment. In general, this amortized cost is combined with the operating cost and is referred to as an 'annualized cost'. The annualized cost is a commonly used indicator to demonstrate the actual year to year cost that the equipment and operation will represent. Values and methods used to estimate costs, typical cost indicators, and sources of computerized costing models are presented. A comparison of the capital cost expenditure required for a model case (a cement kiln operation), using three control device alternatives is made.

  19. Cost-of-illness studies and cost-effectiveness analyses in anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnopka, Alexander; Leichsenring, Falk; Leibing, Eric; König, Hans-Helmut

    2009-04-01

    To review cost-of-illness studies (COI) and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) conducted for anxiety disorders. Based on a database search in Pubmed, PsychINFO and NHS EED, studies were classified according to various criteria. Cost data were inflated and converted to 2005 US-$ purchasing power parities (PPP). We finally identified 20 COI and 11 CEA of which most concentrated on panic disorder (PD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Differing inclusion of cost categories limited comparability of COI. PD and GAD tended to show higher direct costs per case, but lower direct cost per inhabitant than social and specific phobias. Different measures of effectiveness severely limited comparability of CEA. Overall CEA analysed 26 therapeutic or interventional strategies mostly compared to standard treatment, 8 of them resulting in lower better effectiveness and costs than the comparator. Anxiety disorders cause considerable costs. More research on phobias, more standardised inclusion of cost categories in COI and a wider use of comparable effectiveness measures (like QALYs) in CEA is needed.

  20. Costs of endometriosis in Austria: a survey of direct and indirect costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prast, Johanna; Oppelt, Peter; Shamiyeh, Andreas; Shebl, Omar; Brandes, Iris; Haas, Dietmar

    2013-09-01

    The literature includes a wealth of medical data on endometriosis, but the economic significance of the condition has so far been neglected. An analysis of hospital costs for endometriosis in Austria was, therefore, carried out for economic purposes. Seventy-three patients with endometriosis were included in the study. A bottom-up approach was used to collect data on the average hospital costs of an endometriosis patient over a time period of 1 year. In addition, a prevalence approach was used that allows subsequent estimation of the total costs of endometriosis for the health-care system in Austria for that period. Retrospective questionnaire survey was conducted. The average annual costs of one case of endometriosis are 7,712, with 5,605.55 attributable to direct costs and 2,106.34 to indirect costs. This indicates an overall economic burden of 328 million. In-patient care (45 %) and loss of productivity (27 %) were identified as the major cost factors. The patients themselves pay for 13 % of the costs (through out-of-pocket payments). This study impressively demonstrates the financial burden on the economy and on each individually affected patient caused by the disease of endometriosis. The massive consumption of resources represents a high level of usage of the medical services provided. The question arises as to whether more timely diagnosis, followed by better-targeted treatment, might have the potential to reduce these costs. The overall economic burden of endometriosis in Austria is currently comparable with that of Parkinson's disease.

  1. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Carolyn Anne; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Labbate, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: (1) the increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes among microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials; (2) the large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity; and (3) the extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast, the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: the rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education program will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed.

  2. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: causes, consequences and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Anne Michael

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: 1/ The increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes amongst microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials. 2/ The large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity. 3/ The extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: The rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education programme will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed.

  3. Invisible costs, visible savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, G

    1999-08-01

    By identifying hidden inventory costs, nurse managers can save money for the organization. Some measures include tracking and standardizing supplies, accurately evaluating patients' needs, and making informed purchasing decisions.

  4. The geothermal KWh cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous factors can influence the cost of geothermal electricity production: the size and power of production units, the conversion technology used (Rankine cycle or water steam), the resource quality (dry vapor or water-vapor mixing), the resource depth, the drilling activity in the country and the work people costs. In the United States of America the geothermal kWh cost ranges from 2.5 to 8.5 US cents, while in Italy and Nicaragua it ranges from 3 and 10 cents and from 5.7 to 6 cents, respectively. Results of a comparative study of the kWh production cost from different energy sources is also summarized. (J.S.). 1 tab

  5. Systems/cost summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Danby, G.; Keane, J.; Spiro, J.; Sutter, D.; Cole, F.; Hoyer, E.; Freytag, K.; Burke, R.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss and develop cost-estimating methods for heavy-ion fusion accelerator systems. The group did not consider that its purpose was to make technical judgements on proposed systems, but to develop methods for making reasonable cost estimates of these systems. Such estimates will, it is hoped, provide material for systems studies, will help in guiding research and development efforts by identifying ''high-leverage'' subsystems (areas that account for a significant part of total system cost and that might be reduced in cost by further technical development) and to begin to provide data to aid in an eventual decision on the optimum type of accelerator for heavy-ion fusion

  6. Systems/cost: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Danby, G.; Keane, J.; Spiro, J.; Sutter, D.; Cole, F.; Hoyer, E.; Freytag, K.; Burke, R.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss and develop cost-estimating methods for heavy-ion fusion accelerator systems. The group did not consider that its purpose was to make technical judgments on proposed systems, but to develop methods for making reasonable cost estimates of these systems. Such estimates will, it is hoped, provide material for systems studies, will help in guiding research and development efforts by identifying high-leverage subsystems (areas that account for a significant part of total system cost and that might be reduced in cost by further technical development) and to begin to provide data to aid in an eventual decision on the optimum type of accelerator for heavy-ion fusion. The systems considered as examples are: (1) injection system; (2) Wideroe linac; (3) Alvarez linac; (4) induction linac; (5) superconducting accumulator ring; (6) synchrotron; (7) final rf bunching; and (8) final beam transport to target

  7. Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Independent Rural Health Clinic and Freestanding Federally Qualified Health Center (HCLINIC).This data...

  8. COST 516 Tribology Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronkainen, H.; Holmberg, K. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    Cost 516 Tribology action is the first joint European research action focusing on tribology, which originates in the approval of its Memorandum of understanding in February 1994. The COST 516 Tribology Symposium took place in Espoo, Finland from 14th to 15th May 1998. This was the first Symposium of the COST 516 Tribology action. The large number of research contributions at the Symposium, altogether almost SO, and their scientific and technical level, is an indication of the importance and significance of tribology research. The symposium proceedings contain papers in a wide variety of subjects, covering the three categories of the COST 516 Tribology action, namely Grease lubrication (GRIT), Tribology of renewable environmentally adapted lubricants (REAL) and Coatings and surface treatments (CAST). (orig.)

  9. Costly cables; Lange Leitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautmann, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    Connection of offshore wind turbines to the onshore power supply grid requires costly cables for HV DC power transmission. The technology is mature enough to enable low-loss power transmission, but construction times may last several years.

  10. Low Cost Benefit Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyel, Hoyt W.; McMillan, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines eight low-cost employee benefits and summarizes their relative advantages. The eight include a stock ownership program, a sick leave pool, flexible working hours, production incentives, and group purchase plans. (IRT)

  11. Costs of hospital malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Lori Jane; Bernier, Paule; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Allard, Johane; Duerksen, Donald; Gramlich, Leah; Laporte, Manon; Keller, Heather H

    2017-10-01

    Hospital malnutrition has been established as a critical, prevalent, and costly problem in many countries. Many cost studies are limited due to study population or cost data used. The aims of this study were to determine: the relationship between malnutrition and hospital costs; the influence of confounders on, and the drivers (medical or surgical patients or degree of malnutrition) of the relationship; and whether hospital reported cost data provide similar information to administrative data. To our knowledge, the last two goals have not been studied elsewhere. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on data from the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force prospective cohort study combined with administrative data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Subjective Global Assessment was used to assess the relationship between nutritional status and length of stay and hospital costs, controlling for health and demographic characteristics, for 956 patients admitted to medical and surgical wards in 18 hospitals across Canada. After controlling for patient and hospital characteristics, moderately malnourished patients' (34% of surveyed patients) hospital stays were 18% (p = 0.014) longer on average than well-nourished patients. Medical stays increased by 23% (p = 0.014), and surgical stays by 32% (p = 0.015). Costs were, on average, between 31% and 34% (p-values < 0.05) higher than for well-nourished patients with similar characteristics. Severely malnourished patients (11% of surveyed patients) stayed 34% (p = 0.000) longer and had 38% (p = 0.003) higher total costs than well-nourished patients. They stayed 53% (p = 0.001) longer in medical beds and had 55% (p = 0.003) higher medical costs, on average. Trends were similar no matter the type of costing data used. Over 40% of patients were found to be malnourished (1/3 moderately and 1/10 severely). Malnourished patients had longer hospital stays and as a result cost more than well

  12. The causes of the Chernobyl accident; Les causes de l'evenement Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frot, J. [Societe Francaise d' Energie Nucleaire (SFEN), 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-06-01

    For the man in the street Chernobyl epitomizes the danger of nuclear energy but when we examine the causes of this accident we see that this drama is not intrinsically linked to the production of electricity from nuclear fission. The author sees 2 components in the Chernobyl event: the accident itself and its sanitary consequences. The author considers 3 main causes to the accident: -) a design that makes the reactor difficult to control, -) a series of 6 humane failures or breaking of operating rules, and -) political reasons: the largest possible budget was dedicated to plutonium production so any improvement for safety was considered as costly and secondary, moreover the religion of secrecy which was well spread in the ancient Soviet Union, prevented any scientific from knowing all the information concerning this type of reactor. As for the sanitary consequences, the author considers direct causes and underlying causes. The lack of information for the local population, the delay taken for iodine distribution or for the interdiction of farm products consumption are included in the direct causes. The slowness of Soviet bureaucracy, tight budgets and politico-scientific disputes are quoted among the underlying causes. (A.C.)

  13. Cost accounting for the radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Amilcare

    2014-05-01

    Cost accounting is the branch of managerial accounting that deals with the analysis of the costs of a product or service. This article reviews methods of classifying and allocating costs and relationships among costs, volume, and revenues. Radiology practices need to know the cost of a procedure or service to determine the selling price of a product, bid on contracts, analyze profitability, and facilitate cost control and cost reduction.

  14. The cost of electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donini, J.C.; Kan, J.; Szynkarczuk, J.; Hassan, T.A.; Kar, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has shown that electrocoagulation is suitable for separating solids from waste water. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the method is feasible economically. The cost incurred, namely energy costs and aluminum electrode consumed, during electrocoagulation experiments with kaolinite and bentonite are examined. Emphasis is placed on sodium chloride concentration, flow rate with and without recirculation, formation of passivation layers, how sodium chloride affects aluminum efficiency, and electrode efficiency. Further study is required. 8 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Cost Improvement Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Cc) Ul y Cli U;ra ISO or.) . ............ t cc fl .9 it it ý I oli CC) I it cli L3 I HIM .......... 114 t4l t.r IM...Burroughz Cost AFIT/LSQ AV785-6280 Curve Programs Prof. Jeff Daneman Z-100 Cost Curve ASD/ACCR AV785- 8583 Programs Capt Arthur Mills * *- PROGRAMS CONCEPT

  16. COST BM0607

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M. de

    2009-01-01

    COST is an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology, allowing the coordination of nationally-funded research on a European level. COST contributes to reducing the fragmentation in European research investments and opening the European Research Area to cooperation worldwide. COST is specifically designed to network researchers mainly within the European Union that work on a specific topic. This COST BM0607 Action on cancer therapy using innovative targeting nanomedicines is highly multidisciplinary: nuclear medicine physicians, clinical oncologists, surgeons, physicists, radiobiologists, (in)organic chemists, radiochemists, radiopharmacists, pathologists and scientists from biomics participate in it. They define innovative new targets for cancer therapy, develop lead compounds and new radiolabelled ligands as vectors, perform molecular imaging and biologic testing, develop improved software and protocols for dosimetric calculations and select new vectors for early human use. Within the COST BM0607 more than 100 scientists from 21 countries are participating to work within 5 different working groups. Working group 1 works on the establishment of Database on Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy, working group 2 deals with the development and improvement of chemistry related to new molecules for targeted radionuclide therapy. Working group 3 is dedicated to dosimetry aspects, whereas working group 4 tries to optimize the use of new radionuclides for therapy from cyclotron, reactor and generator production. Finally, working group 5 has the aim to bring together research related to pharmacology and small animal imaging with new tracers for targeted radionuclide therapy. COST thereby organizes annual meetings of the whole group and in between dedicated meetings of the working groups. Besides organizing meetings one aim of COST is additionally to promote young researchers where short term scientific missions (STSM) are

  17. Cost and Price Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    described below which relies on questionnaires administered to subject matter experts in both cost analysis and price analysis to determine the value of...additional reports or data that the price analyst used in determining their final negotiated position. The cost analyst section of the questionnaire...an analysis at the individual element level rather than at a total price level to determine the major changes from the awarded contract to the new

  18. Real energy cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, I.

    1992-01-01

    Different methods of calculating the real power cost in the USA taking account of damage brought to the environment, public health expenses etc., are considered. Application of complex methods allowing one to directly determine the costs linked with ecology has shown that the most expensive power is generated at the new NPPs and thermal plants using coal. Activities on power saving and increasing the capacity of the existing hydroelectrotechnical equipment are considered to be the most effective from the viewpoint of expenses

  19. Tracking environmental costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahutova, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Tracking Environmental Costs and Investments in SAP will provide us with a managerial tool that will help us understand better the magnitude of the financial resources we are dedicating to environmental protection activities and investments. Environmental Cost Accounting is a new project in Slovenske Elektrarne that will be particularly valuable for the Company's environmental management initiatives, such as waste monitoring, cleaner production, eco-design and environmental management systems; its launch is expected in September. (author)

  20. The cost of reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this article the restructuring process under way in the US power industry is being revisited from the point of view of transmission system provision and reliability was rolled into the average cost of electricity to all, it is not so obvious how is this cost managed in the new industry. A new MIT approach to transmission pricing is here suggested as a possible solution [it

  1. Costing and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, K; Brignall, S

    1994-01-01

    Working for patients established a new system of contracts between providers and purchasers of healthcare, with prices based on full costs, avoiding cross-subsidization. The new regime necessitates greatly improved costing systems, to improve the efficiency of service provision by creating price competition between providers. Ken Bates and Stan Brignall argue that non-price competition also occurs, with providers 'differentiating' on quality of service/product, flexibility or innovation.

  2. Hardwood sawmill downtime costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan Wiedenbeck; Kyle Blackwell

    2003-01-01

    How time flies when you don't pay attention to it. With hardwood sawmill operating costs ranging from $4 to $25 per operating minute ($95/MBF to $335/MBF) and gross profit margins ranging from $0.10/BF to $0.35/BF, five extra minutes of downtime per day will cost a sawmill that produces an average of 20,000 BF per day (5 MMBF annually) between $21 and $73 per day...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable Language: English (US) ... and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  4. Optimum value engineering and integrated design methods for reducing the cost of R-2000 houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskiw, G. [Proskiw Engineering Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Parekh, A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Opportunities exist to reduce the incremental cost of R-2000 construction by using optimum value engineering (OVE) and integrated design (ID) techniques. OVE is a construction philosophy in which components and systems are designed to meet their intended purposes without excessive or unnecessary use of resources. This paper summarized a study that was designed to identify opportunities for reducing the costs of R-2000 houses while improving their performance. These included detailed energy and cost analysis of various OVE/ID options which were then applied to a sample of 18 representative new home designs from British Columbia, Manitoba, and New Brunswick. The paper described the OVE/ID measures studied, cost analysis, measure utilization and energy analysis. It also included a detailed discussion of individual OVE/ID measures. Examples of some of these measures were the elimination of floor system cross-bridging; support of non-load bearing partition walls; engineered wood beams; drywall clips at corners; and non-load bearing partition walls. It was concluded that significant opportunities exist to reduce the incremental cost of R-2000 houses through careful application of OVE and ID practices. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Probabilistic cost estimating of nuclear power plant construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.C.; Perry, L.W.; Postula, F.D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper shows how to identify and isolate cost accounts by developing probability trees down to component levels as justified by value and cost uncertainty. Examples are given of the procedure for assessing uncertainty in all areas contributing to cost: design, factory equipment pricing, and field labor and materials. The method of combining these individual uncertainties is presented so that the cost risk can be developed for components, systems and the total plant construction project. Formats which enable management to use the probabilistic cost estimate information for business planning and risk control are illustrated. Topics considered include code estimate performance, cost allocation, uncertainty encoding, probabilistic cost distributions, and interpretation. Effective cost control of nuclear power plant construction projects requires insight into areas of greatest cost uncertainty and a knowledge of the factors which can cause costs to vary from the single value estimates. It is concluded that probabilistic cost estimating can provide the necessary assessment of uncertainties both as to the cause and the consequences

  6. A Model of Cost Reduction and Standardization: Improved Cost Savings While Maintaining the Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Michael J; Gitelis, Matthew E; Linn, John G; Ujiki, Michael B; Waskerwitz, Matthew; Umanskiy, Konstantin; Muldoon, Joseph P

    2015-11-01

    Surgeon instrument choices are influenced by training, previous experience, and established preferences. This causes variability in the cost of common operations, such as laparoscopic appendectomy. Many surgeons are unaware of the impact that this has on healthcare spending. We sought to educate surgeons on their instrument use and develop standardized strategies for operating room cost reduction. We collected the individual surgeon instrument cost for performing a laparoscopic appendectomy. Sixteen surgeons were educated about these costs and provided with cost-effective instruments and techniques. This study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital system. Patients included those undergoing a laparoscopic appendectomy within the hospital system. Patient demographics, operating room costs, and short-term outcomes for the fiscal year before and after the education program were then compared. During fiscal year 2013, a total of 336 laparoscopic appendectomies were performed compared with 357 in 2014. Twelve surgeons had a ≥5% reduction in average cost per case. Overall, the average cost per case was reduced by 17% (p day readmissions, postoperative infections, operating time, or reoperations. This retrospective study is subject to the accuracy of the medical chart system. In addition, specific instrument costs are based on our institution contracts and vary compared with other institutions. In this study we demonstrate that operative instrument costs for laparoscopic appendectomy can be significantly reduced by informing the surgeons of their operating room costs compared with their peers and providing a low-cost standardized instrument tray. Importantly, this can be realized without any incentive or punitive measures and does not negatively impact outcomes. Additional work is needed to expand these results to more operations, hospital systems, and training programs.

  7. Development of a practical costing method for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengyu; Toyabe, Shin-Ichi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2006-03-01

    To realize an effective cost control, a practical and accurate cost accounting system is indispensable in hospitals. In traditional cost accounting systems, the volume-based costing (VBC) is the most popular cost accounting method. In this method, the indirect costs are allocated to each cost object (services or units of a hospital) using a single indicator named a cost driver (e.g., Labor hours, revenues or the number of patients). However, this method often results in rough and inaccurate results. The activity based costing (ABC) method introduced in the mid 1990s can prove more accurate results. With the ABC method, all events or transactions that cause costs are recognized as "activities", and a specific cost driver is prepared for each activity. Finally, the costs of activities are allocated to cost objects by the corresponding cost driver. However, it is much more complex and costly than other traditional cost accounting methods because the data collection for cost drivers is not always easy. In this study, we developed a simplified ABC (S-ABC) costing method to reduce the workload of ABC costing by reducing the number of cost drivers used in the ABC method. Using the S-ABC method, we estimated the cost of the laboratory tests, and as a result, similarly accurate results were obtained with the ABC method (largest difference was 2.64%). Simultaneously, this new method reduces the seven cost drivers used in the ABC method to four. Moreover, we performed an evaluation using other sample data from physiological laboratory department to certify the effectiveness of this new method. In conclusion, the S-ABC method provides two advantages in comparison to the VBC and ABC methods: (1) it can obtain accurate results, and (2) it is simpler to perform. Once we reduce the number of cost drivers by applying the proposed S-ABC method to the data for the ABC method, we can easily perform the cost accounting using few cost drivers after the second round of costing.

  8. Defining the cost of care for lobectomy and segmentectomy: a comparison of open, video-assisted thoracoscopic, and robotic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Shaun A; Wilson, Jennifer L; Wilshire, Candice L; Vallières, Eric; Farivar, Alexander S; Aye, Ralph W; Ely, Robson E; Louie, Brian E

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge about the cost of open, video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS), or robotic lung resection and drivers of cost is crucial as the cost of care comes under scrutiny. This study aims to define the cost of anatomic lung resection and evaluate potential cost-saving measures. A retrospective review of patients who had anatomic resection for early stage lung cancer, carcinoid, or metastatic foci between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Direct hospital cost data were collected from 10 categories. Capital depreciation was separated for the robotic and VATS cases. Key costs were varied in a sensitivity analysis. In all, 184 consecutive patients were included: 69 open, 57 robotic, and 58 VATS. Comorbidities and complication rates were similar. Operative time was statistically different among the three modalities, but length of stay was not. There was no statistically significant difference in overall cost between VATS and open cases (Δ = $1,207) or open and robotic cases (Δ = $1,975). Robotic cases cost $3,182 more than VATS (p depreciation. The main opportunities to reduce cost in open cases were the intensive care unit, respiratory therapy, and laboratories. Lowering operating time and supply costs were targets for VATS and robotic cases. VATS is the least expensive surgical approach. Robotic cases must be shorter in operative time or reduce supply costs, or both, to be competitive. Lessening operating time, eradicating unnecessary laboratory work, and minimizing intensive care unit stays will help decrease direct hospital costs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stranded cost recovery in electricity market reforms in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.K.; Lloyd, D.; Karimov, R.; Tishler, A.

    2003-01-01

    An important element of an electricity market reform is stranded cost recovery. This paper explains the cause of stranded costs, describes four recovery mechanisms, evaluates these mechanisms using the criteria of recovery certainty, economic efficiency and equity, reviews the financial performance of 12 utilities in the US in connection to stranded cost recovery, and shows why the mechanism used in California has contributed to the reform failure in that state. (Author)

  10. Optimal Algorithms and a PTAS for Cost-Aware Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Chen; N. Megow; R. Rischke; L. Stougie (Leen); J. Verschae

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe consider a natural generalization of classical scheduling problems in which using a time unit for processing a job causes some time-dependent cost which must be paid in addition to the standard scheduling cost. We study the scheduling objectives of minimizing the makespan and the

  11. An investigation into cost overruns for ongoing building projects in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Engineering, the Built. Environment, and .... works; identification of causes of cost overruns, as well as the control measures for .... project; poor project schedules and management; increases in the prices of .... conclusion, the magnitude of the cost overrun was reduced after ..... Research in Business, 3(11), pp. 775-780.

  12. Forecasting market impact costs and identifying expensive trades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, J.A.; Spierdijk, L.; Hoevenaars, R.P.M.M.; van der Sluis, P.J.

    Often, a relatively small group of trades causes the major part of the trading costs on an investment portfolio. For the equity trades studied in this paper, executed by the world's second largest pension fund, we find that only 10% of all trades determines 75% of total market impact costs.

  13. Predicting travel time variability for cost-benefit analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peer, S.; Koopmans, C.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Unreliable travel times cause substantial costs to travelers. Nevertheless, they are not taken into account in many cost-benefit-analyses (CBA), or only in very rough ways. This paper aims at providing simple rules on how variability can be predicted, based on travel time data from Dutch highways.

  14. National Variation in Urethroplasty Cost and Predictors of Extreme Cost: A Cost Analysis with Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Catherine R.; Osterberg, E. Charles; Sanford, Thomas; Alwaal, Amjad; Gaither, Thomas W.; McAninch, Jack W.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    To determine which factors are associated with higher costs of urethroplasty procedure and whether these factors have been increasing over time. Identification of determinants of extreme costs may help reduce cost while maintaining quality.We conducted a retrospective analysis using the 2001-2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The HCUP-NIS captures hospital charges which we converted to cost using the HCUP cost-to-charge ratio. Log cost linear ...

  15. Japanese Cost Accounting Systems - analysis of the cost accounting systems of the Japanese cost accounting standard

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Winter

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at providing an insight into Japanese cost accounting. Firstly, the development of cost accounting in Japan is delineated. Subsequently, the cost accounting systems codified in the Japanese cost accounting standard are analysed based on the classification according to Hoitsch/Schmitz. Lastly, a critical appraisal of the cost accounting systems of the Japanese cost accounting standard as well as a comparison to German and American cost accounting systems are conducted.

  16. Costs of occupational injuries and illnesses in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bađun, Marijana

    2017-03-01

    Apart from influencing the quality of life, occupational injuries and illnesses can pose a large economic burden to a society. There are many studies that estimate the costs of occupational injuries and illnesses in highly developed economies, but the evidence for other countries is scarce. This study aimed to estimate the financial costs of occupational injuries and illnesses to Croatian government and employers in 2015. Workers were excluded due to the lack of data. Costs were estimated by analysing available data sources on occupational health and safety. Financial costs were grouped in several categories: medical costs, productivity losses, disability pensions, compensation for physical impairment, administrative costs, and legal costs. Unlike in other studies, the costs of compliance with occupational safety and health regulations were also investigated. In 2015, financial costs to employers were twice higher than costs to the government (HRK 604.6 m vs HRK 297 m). Employers additionally covered around HRK 300 m of compliance costs. Taking into account that financial costs of occupational injuries and illnesses are significant, even without including the costs to workers, policy makers should put additional efforts into their prevention. A prerequisite is transparency in Croatian Health Insurance Fund's expenditures, as well as more detailed data on lost days from work by industries, causes of injury etc. Organisations in charge of occupational health and safety and policy makers should observe relevant statistics in monetary terms too.

  17. New Federal Cost Accounting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, George J.; Handzo, Joseph J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a new set of indirect cost accounting procedures which must be followed by school districts wishing to recover any indirect costs of administering federal grants and contracts. Also discusses the amount of indirect costs that may be recovered, computing indirect costs, classifying project costs, and restricted grants. (Author/DN)

  18. Applications of root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterwhite, D.G.; Meale, B.M.; Krantz, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The underlying causes for the failure of components, the root causes, can be obtained from operational data sources. This information is of value in focusing attention of the industry on the actual causes of component unavailability and, therefore, on the important contributors to plant risk. An application of this methodology to an actual plant system, and the results of this study, are presented in this paper

  19. Views of US physicians about controlling health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburt, Jon C; Wynia, Matthew K; Sheeler, Robert D; Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; James, Katherine M; Egginton, Jason S; Liebow, Mark; Hurst, Samia; Danis, Marion; Goold, Susan Dorr

    2013-07-24

    Physicians' views about health care costs are germane to pending policy reforms. To assess physicians' attitudes toward and perceived role in addressing health care costs. A cross-sectional survey mailed in 2012 to 3897 US physicians randomly selected from the AMA Masterfile. Enthusiasm for 17 cost-containment strategies and agreement with an 11-measure cost-consciousness scale. A total of 2556 physicians responded (response rate = 65%). Most believed that trial lawyers (60%), health insurance companies (59%), hospitals and health systems (56%), pharmaceutical and device manufacturers (56%), and patients (52%) have a "major responsibility" for reducing health care costs, whereas only 36% reported that practicing physicians have "major responsibility." Most were "very enthusiastic" for "promoting continuity of care" (75%), "expanding access to quality and safety data" (51%), and "limiting access to expensive treatments with little net benefit" (51%) as a means of reducing health care costs. Few expressed enthusiasm for "eliminating fee-for-service payment models" (7%). Most physicians reported being "aware of the costs of the tests/treatments [they] recommend" (76%), agreed they should adhere to clinical guidelines that discourage the use of marginally beneficial care (79%), and agreed that they "should be solely devoted to individual patients' best interests, even if that is expensive" (78%) and that "doctors need to take a more prominent role in limiting use of unnecessary tests" (89%). Most (85%) disagreed that they "should sometimes deny beneficial but costly services to certain patients because resources should go to other patients that need them more." In multivariable logistic regression models testing associations with enthusiasm for key cost-containment strategies, having a salary plus bonus or salary-only compensation type was independently associated with enthusiasm for "eliminating fee for service" (salary plus bonus: odds ratio [OR], 3.3, 99% CI, 1

  20. Low Cost Digital Vibration Meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W Vance; Geist, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the development of a low cost, digital Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) vibration meter that reports an approximation to the RMS acceleration of the vibration to which the vibration meter is subjected. The major mechanical element of this vibration meter is a cantilever beam, which is on the order of 500 µm in length, with a piezoresistor deposited at its base. Vibration of the device in the plane perpendicular to the cantilever beam causes it to bend, which produces a measurable change in the resistance of a piezoresistor. These changes in resistance along with a unique signal-processing scheme are used to determine an approximation to the RMS acceleration sensed by the device.

  1. Outage costs: who should pay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivison, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    Decisions affecting the Three Mile Island-1 and -2 reactors illustrate new an stricter standards which apply to how regulator will allocate the costs of outages. The rule allows outages for normal refueling and other normal shutdowns if return to the power grid is assured. TMI-1 was removed from the rate base one year after the accident, and was readmitted only after achieving full power in 1986. A reasonableness standard based on an analysis of the outage and utility responses is the basis for deciding for or against removal. The author cites cases in which unreasonable actions caused the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to charge utility management with imprudence. New safety standards will force utilities to reduce employee error, equipment failure, and management weakness. 19 references

  2. On Decommissioning Costs of the Ranstad Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff (NAC International (United Kingdom))

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of this study has been to extend the review of the future cost to decommission and dismantling the industrial area at the site of the old uranium mine at Ranstad in Sweden. The feedback of experience and actual costs from a decommissioning project in the United Kingdom (A26 in Springfields) has been used to help in the assessment of the reasonableness of the estimated costs for decommissioning of the old uranium mine in Ranstad. A quantitative (albeit subjective) statement about the accuracy of the Ranstad cost estimate has been developed. Also, the factors relevant to the allocation of costs between the Swedish state and the current owners of the old uranium mine site have been evaluated and presented. The study has developed the following main conclusions: - The importance of thorough characterization/radiological mapping to the selection of the optimum decommissioning approach (technique) has been reinforced very strongly. - Thorough characterization has the related consequence of being able to better define the costs of decommissioning, in terms of equipment needed, labour hours required and, importantly, the volumes of different categories of waste requiring different routes (and associated different unit costs) for ultimate disposition. - Uncertainties in the Ranstad decommissioning cost estimate nevertheless remain, in particular relating to the viability of the proposed approach to dismantling and decontaminating the acid proof bricks that line the pools in the Large Leaching Hall; a method that is acknowledged to be not proven. The outcome could have an impact on actual dismantling and decontamination costs, as well as on the costs of ultimate waste disposition. The KB2010 cost estimate report does not offer an alternative in the event that the base plan proves to be unfeasible. - On balance it would appear that the continued presence of RMA at the Ranstad site ultimately will provide a net cost benefit to the program. The extra costs

  3. On Decommissioning Costs of the Ranstad Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of this study has been to extend the review of the future cost to decommission and dismantling the industrial area at the site of the old uranium mine at Ranstad in Sweden. The feedback of experience and actual costs from a decommissioning project in the United Kingdom (A26 in Springfields) has been used to help in the assessment of the reasonableness of the estimated costs for decommissioning of the old uranium mine in Ranstad. A quantitative (albeit subjective) statement about the accuracy of the Ranstad cost estimate has been developed. Also, the factors relevant to the allocation of costs between the Swedish state and the current owners of the old uranium mine site have been evaluated and presented. The study has developed the following main conclusions: - The importance of thorough characterization/radiological mapping to the selection of the optimum decommissioning approach (technique) has been reinforced very strongly. - Thorough characterization has the related consequence of being able to better define the costs of decommissioning, in terms of equipment needed, labour hours required and, importantly, the volumes of different categories of waste requiring different routes (and associated different unit costs) for ultimate disposition. - Uncertainties in the Ranstad decommissioning cost estimate nevertheless remain, in particular relating to the viability of the proposed approach to dismantling and decontaminating the acid proof bricks that line the pools in the Large Leaching Hall; a method that is acknowledged to be not proven. The outcome could have an impact on actual dismantling and decontamination costs, as well as on the costs of ultimate waste disposition. The KB2010 cost estimate report does not offer an alternative in the event that the base plan proves to be unfeasible. - On balance it would appear that the continued presence of RMA at the Ranstad site ultimately will provide a net cost benefit to the program. The extra costs

  4. Social costs of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    There have been many studies over the past 20 years which have looked at the environmental and other impacts of energy production, conversion and use. A number of these have attempted to put a monetary value to the external costs which are not reflected in the prices charged for energy. The topic has received increased attention recently as a direct result of the recognition of the potentially large social costs that might arise from the depletion of the ozone layer, the consequences of global warming and the continued releases of acid gases from fossil fuel combustion. The determination of external costs was attempted in the report for the European Economic Community, EUR11519, ''Social Costs of Energy Consumption'', by O Hohmeyer. Due to its official sponsorship, this report has been afforded greater respect than it deserves and is being used in some quarters to claim that the external costs of nuclear power are high relative to those of fossil fuels. The remainder of this note looks at some of the serious deficiencies of the document and why its conclusions offer no meaningful guidance to policy makers. So far as the present author is aware no serious criticism of the Hohmeyer study has previously appeared. (author)

  5. Logistics costs of the enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describe a problem of specification and systematization of enterprise’s logistics costs. With in a growing division of labour, also logistics costs increase their part in enterprises total costs.Almost all decisions about products and production in general, influence logistics processes even logistics costs and performances.In present is not clear enough, which of the cost-particles are relevant fot logistics costs, because some of logistics cost-particles accounts within overhead are charged together with costs of other sorts.Substantive step in the process of the monitoring and evidence of logistics costs is definition of this, that costs of enterprise´s processes will be inclusive in logistics costs and determining points of contact with the others departments (acquisition, production, sale etc.. After the specification of meditation processes, there is a need to choose applicable parameters for the expression of logistics performances. Besides logistics costs is needed to know logistics performances equivalent herewith at a cost of, therefore from the control side have for enterprise bigger value indices expressive correlation costs and performances(e.g. share of logistics unit costs performance.At the proposal and evidence of logistics costs and performances is needed consistently entertain an individual conditions of enterprise. Because the area of processes included strongly affects the size of account logistics costs and its share part in total costs of enterprise. Logistics costs are flow line between economy and logistics of the enterprise.

  6. Stuck pipe: Causes, detection and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, L; Jomnes, T [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (UK); Belaskie, J; Orban, J; Sheppard, M [Anadrill, Sugarland, TX (USA); Houwen, O; Jardine, S; McCann, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)

    1991-10-01

    Stuck pipe remains a major headache that demands and is getting industry-wide attention. It costs the oil industry between $200 and $500 million each year, occurs in 15% of wells, and in many cases is preventable. Several operators are making determined efforts to codify the warning signs and to improve communication for all on-site drilling and service company personnel, for which the data gathering ability of a computerized information system is a necessity. Meanwhile, better rig sensors and information systems are providing rig-floor smart'' alarms to help the driller recognize trouble before it gets out of hand. The causes of stuck pipe can be divided broadly among differential sticking, formation-related sticking and mechanical sticking. One of the results of the industry's current attention is a better understanding of the events leading up to stuck pipe and their interpretationn in terms of the causes of sticking. Knowing the causes is essential for taking remedial action. 15 figs., 19 refs.

  7. Cancer Cachexia: Cause, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Todd W

    2017-10-01

    Patients with cancer frequently experience unintended weight loss due to gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction caused by the malignancy or treatment of the malignancy. However, others may present with weight loss related to other symptoms not clearly associated with identifiable GI dysfunction such as anorexia and early satiety. Cancer cachexia (CC) is a multifactorial syndrome that is generally characterized by ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without fat loss, often accompanied by anorexia, weakness, and fatigue. CC is associated with poor tolerance of antitumor treatments, reduced quality of life (QOL), and negative impact on survival. Symptoms associated with CC are thought to be caused in part by tumor-induced changes in host metabolism that result in systemic inflammation and abnormal neurohormonal responses. Unfortunately, there is no single standard treatment for CC. Nutrition consequences of oncologic treatments should be identified early with nutrition screening and assessment. Pharmacologic agents directed at improving appetite and countering metabolic abnormalities that cause inefficient nutrient utilization are currently the foundation for treating CC. Multiple agents have been investigated for their effects on weight, muscle wasting, and QOL. However, few are commercially available for use. Considerations for choosing the most appropriate treatment include effect on appetite, weight, QOL, risk of adverse effects, and cost and availability of the agent.

  8. Stuck pipe: Causes, detection and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, L.; Jomnes, T. (Schlumberger Cambridge Research (UK)); Belaskie, J.; Orban, J.; Sheppard, M (Anadrill, Sugarland, TX (USA)); Houwen, O.; Jardine, S.; McCann, D. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France))

    1991-10-01

    Stuck pipe remains a major headache that demands and is getting industry-wide attention. It costs the oil industry between $200 and $500 million each year, occurs in 15% of wells, and in many cases is preventable. Several operators are making determined efforts to codify the warning signs and to improve communication for all on-site drilling and service company personnel, for which the data gathering ability of a computerized information system is a necessity. Meanwhile, better rig sensors and information systems are providing rig-floor smart'' alarms to help the driller recognize trouble before it gets out of hand. The causes of stuck pipe can be divided broadly among differential sticking, formation-related sticking and mechanical sticking. One of the results of the industry's current attention is a better understanding of the events leading up to stuck pipe and their interpretationn in terms of the causes of sticking. Knowing the causes is essential for taking remedial action. 15 figs., 19 refs.

  9. Food waste prevention - effects on greenhouse gas emissions and costs for waste producers and actions to reduce waste volume; Elintarvikejaetteen synnyn ehkaeisy. Vaikutukset kasvihuonekaasupaeaestoeihin ja jaetteen tuottajan kohtaamiin kustannuksiin sekae keinoja maeaeraen vaehentaemiseen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teerioja, N.; Anderson, R. [HSY, Helsinki (Finland); Heino, E.; Rasi, S. [MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Jokioinen (Finland)

    2012-07-01

    Wasted food causes a lot of environmental effects during its life cycle. These effects are unnecessary if the generated waste could have been avoided. In addition, the wasted food causes redundant costs for the waste producers. The objective of this study is to assess, on the basis of existing studies, how much it is possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and costs for waste producers in the HSY area by means of food waste prevention. The waste producers considered in this study are households, public sector, retail and other private sector. Additionally, concrete measures to prevent bio-waste are studied. The impacts of food waste prevention are assessed by defining the CO{sub 2}-eq- emissions per one food waste kilogram in three different life cycle phases: the early phase (from primary production to retail), the usage phase (from retail to the end user's waste bin) and waste treatment. The costs that waste producers face include purchase costs, usage phase costs (e.g. cooking and storing) and waste fees. Moreover, the total effects of food waste prevention are analyzed in a case study which includes two different cases in the year 2020: the base case and the prevention case. In the base case, the food waste volume is growing, among other things, concurrently with the population, while in the prevention case the food and bio-waste prevention is improved in such a way that the amount of food waste is 30% lower than in 2009. According to the results, one kg of food waste causes 2.9- 5.2 kg CO{sub 2}-eq- emissions during its life cycle depending on the sector. The variation results mainly from different waste compositions in the different sectors. The majority of the emissions are generated during the early phase of the life cycle. Correspondingly, one kg of food waste causes a cost of euro 3.60-8.90 for the waste producer depending on the sector. On average, two thirds of the costs result from purchases, but there is a great deal of variation between the

  10. Understanding your health care costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this page, ... on out-of-pocket costs. Out-of-Pocket Costs The good news is there is a limit ...

  11. Meiotic faults as a major cause of offspring inviability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levitis, Daniel; Zimmerman, Kolea; Pringle, Anne

    2014-01-01

    , this result demonstrates that failures associated with meiosis are a major cause of offspring inviability not only for meiotic parthenogenesis, but for sexual reproducers such as humans. Meiosis is necessary for genetic recombination in eukaryotes, but is vestigial, and costly, in parthenogens. The question...... range of organisms....

  12. Costs of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.K.; King, M.

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed efforts throughout the world to deregulate the electricity industry, with varied results. While there have been a few qualified success stories, many challenges of deregulation have come to light. These challenges can lead to negative, even disastrous, outcomes. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper catalogues problems experienced in various deregulation efforts, and considers the application of the lessons learned from this history to Israel, which is considering deregulation. Failings of deregulation are found to center around the following problems: high set-up cost; complicated market design; inevitable spot price volatility; market power abuse; inefficient investment; difficulty in reducing generation cost; dysfunctional input markets; stranded cost; unequal distribution of benefits. We find that many of these problems are exacerbated by the particular circumstances faced by Israel, and advise any country or region considering deregulation to carefully consider these obstacles to success. (author)

  13. Decommissioning Cost Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labor, Bea

    2012-03-01

    The future costs for dismantling, decommissioning and handling of associated radioactive waste of nuclear installations represents substantial liabilities. It is the generations that benefits from the use of nuclear installations that shall carry the financial burden. Nuclear waste programmes have occasionally encountered set-backs related to the trust from society. This has resulted in delayed, redirected or halted activities, which has the common denominator of costs increases. In modern democratic countries, information sharing, knowledge transfer and open communication about costs for the management of radioactive waste are prerequisites for the task to develop modern methods for public participation and thus to develop well-founded and justified confidence for further development of nuclear energy. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role to provide unbiased information on any health, safety, financial and environmental related issues. This task requires a good understanding of the values and opinion of the public, and especially those of the younger generation

  14. Does excessive pronation cause pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, C G; Nielsen, Rasmus Gottschalk N; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal

    2008-01-01

    Excessive pronation could be an inborn abnormality or an acquired foot disorder caused by overuse, inadequate supported shoes or inadequate foot training. When the muscles and ligaments of the foot are insufficient it can cause an excessive pronation of the foot. The current treatment consist of ...

  15. On the Causes of Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A. Philip; Faigman, David L.; Fienberg, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    We welcome Professor Pearl's comment on our original article, Dawid et al. Our focus there on the distinction between the "Effects of Causes" (EoC) and the "Causes of Effects" (CoE) concerned two fundamental problems, one a theoretical challenge in statistics and the other a practical challenge for trial courts. In this…

  16. When Telomerase Causes Telomere Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glousker, Galina; Lingner, Joachim

    2018-02-05

    Telomerase counteracts telomere shortening, preventing cellular senescence. Telomerase deficiency causes telomere syndromes because of premature telomere exhaustion in highly proliferative cells. Paradoxically, in a recent issue of Cell, Margalef et al. (2018) demonstrate that telomerase causes telomere loss in cells lacking the RTEL1 helicase, which is defective in Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between degree of risk, cost and level of compliance to occupational health and safety regulations in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Olukemi Windapo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the role of statutory health and safety (H&S regulations in managing construction project risks. The study examines whether the decision made by contractors to comply with the regulations, the cost of compliance and savings of H&S regulatory requirements is influenced by the degree or level of risk, which the regulations are trying to prevent. The rationale for the examination stems from previous studies which establish that building designers and contractors perceive the cost of complying with regulations as additional burdens, which they have to conform to, and which are in some cases unnecessary, and also the fact that construction related injuries and fatalities are on the increase. Qualitative and quantitative data obtained from a descriptive survey and H&S site audit by the Master Builder Association of the Western Cape (MBAWC were used as the measurements of risk, level of compliance to regulations, cost of compliance and savings. By correlating the quantitative and qualitative data, there is empirical evidence to support a negative relationship between the degree of risk, level and cost of compliance and cost savings. Based on the study’s findings, this paper concludes that the decision made by contractors to comply with H&S regulatory requirements is influenced by the perceived cost saving on account of compliance and that cost savings are influenced by the probability of accident occurrence which is an element of the degree of risk which the regulation is trying to prevent or control. 

  18. Relationship between degree of risk, cost and level of compliance to occupational health and safety regulations in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Olukemi Windapo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the role of statutory health and safety (H&S regulations in managing construction project risks. The study examines whether the decision made by contractors to comply with the regulations, the cost of compliance and savings of H&S regulatory requirements is influenced by the degree or level of risk, which the regulations are trying to prevent. The rationale for the examination stems from previous studies which establish that building designers and contractors perceive the cost of complying with regulations as additional burdens, which they have to conform to, and which are in some cases unnecessary, and also the fact that construction related injuries and fatalities are on the increase. Qualitative and quantitative data obtained from a descriptive survey and H&S site audit by the Master Builder Association of the Western Cape (MBAWC were used as the measurements of risk, level of compliance to regulations, cost of compliance and savings. By correlating the quantitative and qualitative data, there is empirical evidence to support a negative relationship between the degree of risk, level and cost of compliance and cost savings. Based on the study’s findings, this paper concludes that the decision made by contractors to comply with H&S regulatory requirements is influenced by the perceived cost saving on account of compliance and that cost savings are influenced by the probability of accident occurrence which is an element of the degree of risk which the regulation is trying to prevent or control.

  19. Underestimation of Project Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Large projects almost always exceed their budgets. Estimating cost is difficult and estimated costs are usually too low. Three different reasons are suggested: bad luck, overoptimism, and deliberate underestimation. Project management can usually point to project difficulty and complexity, technical uncertainty, stakeholder conflicts, scope changes, unforeseen events, and other not really unpredictable bad luck. Project planning is usually over-optimistic, so the likelihood and impact of bad luck is systematically underestimated. Project plans reflect optimism and hope for success in a supposedly unique new effort rather than rational expectations based on historical data. Past project problems are claimed to be irrelevant because "This time it's different." Some bad luck is inevitable and reasonable optimism is understandable, but deliberate deception must be condemned. In a competitive environment, project planners and advocates often deliberately underestimate costs to help gain project approval and funding. Project benefits, cost savings, and probability of success are exaggerated and key risks ignored. Project advocates have incentives to distort information and conceal difficulties from project approvers. One naively suggested cure is more openness, honesty, and group adherence to shared overall goals. A more realistic alternative is threatening overrun projects with cancellation. Neither approach seems to solve the problem. A better method to avoid the delusions of over-optimism and the deceptions of biased advocacy is to base the project cost estimate on the actual costs of a large group of similar projects. Over optimism and deception can continue beyond the planning phase and into project execution. Hard milestones based on verified tests and demonstrations can provide a reality check.

  20. Costs and cost-effectiveness of pediatric inguinal hernia repair in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeson, Gareth; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Pennington, Mark; Blair, Geoffrey K

    2015-02-01

    Surgically treatable diseases contribute approximately 11% of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide yet they remain a neglected public health priority in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Pediatric inguinal hernia is the most common congenital abnormality in newborns and a major cause of morbidity and mortality yet elective repair remains largely unavailable in LMICs. This study is aimed to determine the costs and cost-effectiveness of pediatric inguinal hernia repair (PIHR) in a low-resource setting. Medical costs of consecutive elective PIHRs were recorded prospectively at two centers in Uganda. Decision modeling was used to compare two different treatment scenarios (adoption of PIHR and non-adoption) from a provider perspective. A Markov model was constructed to estimate health outcomes under each scenario. The robustness of the cost-effectiveness results in the base case analysis was tested in one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The primary outcome of interest was cost per DALY averted by the intervention. Sixty-nine PIHRs were performed in 65 children (mean age 3.6 years). Mean cost per procedure was $86.68 US (95% CI 83.1-90.2 USD) and averted an average of 5.7 DALYs each. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $12.41 per DALY averted. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 95% at a cost-effectiveness threshold of $35 per averted DALY. Results were robust to sensitivity analysis under all considered scenarios. Elective PIHR is highly cost-effective for the treatment and prevention of complications of hernia disease even in low-resource settings. PIHR should be prioritized in LMICs alongside other cost-effective interventions.

  1. Cost Warrior Moneyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    program the money? That’s Army staff business in the franchise head shed, right? The truth is that we need to know its cost, afford- ability, and...address to an Armor War - fighting Conference, Gen. Peter Chiarelli said, “If you look at any one of these systems as an individual system, you can...tainment costs. The future ain’t what it used to be. Third, change takes time and patience. Over the past 10 years, big money has been flowing. It

  2. Reduced cost of ownership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyse, W.H.; Newton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    There is common drive throughout industry towards reduced costs of ownership of plant and equipment. Rolls-Royce and Associates Ltd. has developed the systems and expertise necessary to achieve these objectives. This Paper outlines the methods being used on existing facilities, and describes a new all embracing process called Planned Lifetime Management. This process, based on the military standard Integrated Logistic Support, ensures that all aspects of support are clearly identified at the design stage and that support is monitored to allow through-life support costs to be optimized. (author)

  3. Cost-benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A critical review of the cost benefit analysis is given for the LMFBR-type reactor development program given in an environmental impact statement of AEC. Several methodological shortcomings are signalled. As compared with a HTGR-type/LWR-type mix of reactors the LMFBR-type reactor will not be competitive until the U 3 O 8 prices reach a level of $ 50/lb which is not likely to happen before the year 2020. It is recommended to review the draft of the ZEC document and include timing as one of the issues. Deferal of the LMFBR-type reactor development program if necessary will not be intolerably costly

  4. Categorization of potential project cost overrun factors in construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, P.; Abdullah, A. H.; Nagapan, S.; Sohu, S.; Kasvar, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    Cost overrun has been severely hit down the economy and reputations for many construction industry around the world. Many project management tools developed to control the budget of a project. However, the cost management is still considered poor as there are many cost overrun issues occurred in the construction industry. Thus, this paper aims to identify and cluster the potential construction project cost overrun factors according to their originating groups using the thematic approach. Basically, through literature review, all the potential factors that may cause cost overrun were screened thoroughly before they were clustered into seven (7) groups of the originating factors, namely project, contract, client, contractor, consultant, labour and external. Each potential factor was explained clearly with some examples based on the Malaysian case studies to illustrate the cost overrun scenario. These findings may aid in the future to highlight on how to mitigate the critical potential factors of cost overrun to reduce or overcome its impact on all the stakeholders involved.

  5. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmanschap Marc A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients. This paper discusses patient costs after stroke and compares costs between regular and stroke service care. Methods Costs were calculated within the framework of the evaluation of three experiments with stroke services in the Netherlands. Cost calculations are base on medical consumption data and actual costs. Results 598 patients were consecutively admitted to hospital after stroke. The average total costs of care per patient for the 6 month follow-up are estimated at €16,000. Costs are dominated by institutional and accommodation costs. Patients who die after stroke incur less costs. For patients that survive the acute phase, the most important determinants of costs are disability status and having a partner – as they influence patients' stroke careers. These determinants also interact. The most efficient stroke service experiment was most successful in co-ordinating patient flow from hospital to (nursing home, through capacity planning and efficient discharge procedures. In this region the costs of stroke service care are the same as for regular stroke care. The other experiments suffered from waiting lists for nursing homes and home care, leading to "blocked beds" in hospitals and nursing homes and higher costs of care. Costs of co-ordination are estimated at about 3% of total costs of care. Conclusion This paper demonstrates that by organising care for stroke patients in a stroke service, better health effects can be achieved with the same budget. In addition, it provides insight in need, predisposing and enabling factors that determine costs of care after stroke.

  6. Deaths: leading causes for 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2013-12-20

    This report presents final 2010 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the Division of Vital Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2010. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2010, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; Influenza and pneumonia; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These 10 causes accounted for 75% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2010 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Necrotizing enterocolitis of newborn. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and post-neonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source

  7. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-08-31

    This report presents final 2012 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2012," the National Center for Health Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2012. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2012, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These causes accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2012 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

  8. Nelson-Farrar cost indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Nelson-Farrar Cost Indexs. Topics covered include: economic analysis, petroleum refineries, petroleum industry, pumps, compressors, beat exchangers, cost estimation, productivity and wages

  9. NPP construction cost in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of capital costs during NPP construction in Canada is considered. Capital costs comprise direct costs (cost of the ground and ground rights, infrastructure, reactor equipment, turbogenerators, electrotechnical equipment, auxiliary equipment), indirect costs (construction equipment and services, engineering works and management services, insurance payments, freight, training, operating expenditures), capital per cents for the period of construction and cost of heavy water storages. It proceeds from the analysis of the construction cost structure for a NPP with the CANDU reactor of unit power of 515, 740 and 880 MW, that direct costs make up on the average 62%

  10. Primary kidney disease and post-renal transplantation hospitalization costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoddousi, K; Ramezani, M K; Assari, S; Lankarani, M M; Amini, M; Khedmat, H; Hollisaaz, M T

    2007-05-01

    This study sought to assess posttransplantation hospitalizations costs in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects to see whether diabetes mellitus (DM) as a primary cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) increased posttransplantation hospitalization costs. From 2000 to 2005, the hospitalization costs of 387 consecutive rehospitalizations of kidney recipients were retrospectively compared for two groups: patients with ESRD due to DM (n=71) and those with ESRD of non-DM etiologies (n=316). The hospitalization costs included the costs of hotel, medications, surgical procedures, paraclinical tests, imaging tests, health personnel time, special services (ie, patient transportation by ambulance), and miscellaneous costs. Societal perspective was used with costs expressed in PPP$ purchase power parity dollars (PPP$) estimated to be equal to 272 Iranian rials. Compared with the non-DM group, DM patients experienced significantly higher median costs both in total (1262 vs 870 PPP$, P=.001) and in cost components related to hotel (384 vs 215 PPP$, P=.001), health personnel time (235 vs 115 PPP$, P<.001), paraclinical tests (177 vs 149 PPP$, P=.012), and special services (100 vs 74 PPP$, P=.041). The mean of age was higher (P<.001), and the transplantation hospitalization time interval was also shorter in the DM group (median: 2.7 vs 12, P=.025). Considering DM as a leading cause of ESRD and its increasing prevalence in some countries, the association between hospitalization costs of posttransplant patients and DM may be of great economic importance to many transplantation centers.

  11. Cost analysis of hospitalized Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hübner, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: -associated diarrhea (CDAD causes heavy financial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. As with all hospital-acquired infections, prolonged hospital stays are the main cost driver. Previous cost studies only include hospital billing data and compare the length of stay in contrast to non-infected patients. To date, a survey of actual cost has not yet been conducted.Method: A retrospective analysis of data for patients with nosocomial CDAD was carried out over a 1-year period at the University Hospital of Greifswald. Based on identification of CDAD related treatment processes, cost of hygienic measures, antibiotics and laboratory as well as revenue losses due to bed blockage and increased length of stay were calculated.Results: 19 patients were included in the analysis. On average, a CDAD patient causes additional costs of € 5,262.96. Revenue losses due to extended length of stay take the highest proportion with € 2,555.59 per case, followed by loss in revenue due to bed blockage during isolation with € 2,413.08 per case. Overall, these opportunity costs accounted for 94.41% of total costs. In contrast, costs for hygienic measures (€ 253.98, pharmaceuticals (€ 22.88 and laboratory (€ 17.44 are quite low.Conclusion: CDAD results in significant additional costs for the hospital. This survey of actual costs confirms previous study results.

  12. A hospital-level cost-effectiveness analysis model for toxigenic Clostridium difficile detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoye, E; Vandecandelaere, P; De Beenhouwer, H; Coppens, G; Cartuyvels, R; Van den Abeele, A; Frans, J; Laffut, W

    2015-10-01

    Despite thorough analyses of the analytical performance of Clostridium difficile tests and test algorithms, the financial impact at hospital level has not been well described. Such a model should take institution-specific variables into account, such as incidence, request behaviour and infection control policies. To calculate the total hospital costs of different test algorithms, accounting for days on which infected patients with toxigenic strains were not isolated and therefore posed an infectious risk for new/secondary nosocomial infections. A mathematical algorithm was developed to gather the above parameters using data from seven Flemish hospital laboratories (Bilulu Microbiology Study Group) (number of tests, local prevalence and hospital hygiene measures). Measures of sensitivity and specificity for the evaluated tests were taken from the literature. List prices and costs of assays were provided by the manufacturer or the institutions. The calculated cost included reagent costs, personnel costs and the financial burden following due and undue isolations and antibiotic therapies. Five different test algorithms were compared. A dynamic calculation model was constructed to evaluate the cost:benefit ratio of each algorithm for a set of institution- and time-dependent inputted variables (prevalence, cost fluctuations and test performances), making it possible to choose the most advantageous algorithm for its setting. A two-step test algorithm with concomitant glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin testing, followed by a rapid molecular assay was found to be the most cost-effective algorithm. This enabled resolution of almost all cases on the day of arrival, minimizing the number of unnecessary or missing isolations. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Endovascular aneurysm repair delivery redesign leads to quality improvement and cost reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Horvath, Alexander J; Powell, Richard J; Columbo, Jesse A; Walsh, Teri R; Goodney, Philip P; Walsh, Daniel B; Stone, David H

    2015-08-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is now a mainstay of therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, although it remains associated with significant expense. We performed a comprehensive analysis of EVAR delivery at an academic medical center to identify targets for quality improvement and cost reduction in light of impending health care reform. All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (N = 127). Procedures were included if they met standard commercial instructions for use guidelines, used a single manufacturer, and were billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group 238 (n = 49). By use of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) quality improvement methodology (define, measure, analyze, improve, control), targets for EVAR quality improvement were identified and high-yield changes were implemented. Procedure technical costs were calculated before and after process redesign. Perioperative services and clinic visits were identified as targets for quality improvement efforts and cost reduction. Mean technical costs before the intervention were $31,672, with endograft implants accounting for 52%. Pricing redesign in collaboration with hospital purchasing reduced mean EVAR technical costs to $28,607, a 10% reduction in overall cost, with endograft implants now accounting for 46%. Perioperative implementation of instrument tray redesign reduced instrument use by 32% (184 vs 132 instruments), saving $50,000 annually. Unnecessary clinic visits were reduced by 39% (1.6 vs 1.1 clinic visits per patient) through implementation of a preclinic imaging protocol. There was no difference in mean length of stay after the intervention. Comprehensive EVAR delivery redesign leads to cost reduction and waste elimination while preserving quality. Future efforts to achieve more competitive and transparent device pricing will make EVAR more cost neutral and enhance its financial sustainability for health care systems. Copyright © 2015 Society for

  14. Study on the methodology for allocating costs of grid losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalberts, A.; Dekker, G.; Jaarsma, S.; Tieben, B.; Vlug, N.

    2011-01-01

    The research question in this report: 'Where are grid losses caused and in which (objective) manner can the costs of these grid losses be allocated to the buyers. The key questions answered in the research are: (1) In which locations of the electricity grid are losses caused and what is the volume of these losses?; (2) How are the costs of grid losses allocated to the various groups of end users?; and (3) What are alternative way(s) to allocate the costs of grid losses to the buyers?. [nl

  15. Insurance cost of Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaellstrand, Aasa.

    1992-01-01

    What happens if a reactor accident occurs? Can victims of a nuclear accident be compensated for losses? The rights of a victim of a nuclear accident to be compensated for losses are governed by international conventions. These conventions make the licensee of a nuclear plant strictly liable. However, the maximum amount of compensation is limited. In Sweden the total liability of the plant-owner is maximized to 1.2 million Swedish Crowns, that is 0.02 oere/kWh. After the accidents of Harrisburg (1979) and Chernobyl (1986), it has become clear that the amounts of the various conventions are not at all sufficient to cover the damages caused by such an accident. In spite of these facts, there are a large number of reliable sources, who think that the insurance costs are negligible in the cost of production. A cost-benefit analysis based on a study performed by Ottinger et al. in 'Environmental costs of electricity' is therefore adopted to derive the costs of the external effects of nuclear plant operation and from releases to the environment during operation. The environmental externality costs of Swedish nuclear power plant operations are in this report estimated to 18.3 oere/kWh. This figure can be compared to the insurance cost, which for the present is 0.02 oere/kWh. The 'real' insurance cost including the external effects is calculated to approximately 1.12 billion Swedish Crowns] That is 900 times larger than the insurance premium, which the licensee of a nuclear plant faces] (au)

  16. 76 FR 53378 - Cost Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs AGENCY: Cost Accounting Standards Board (Board), Office... Discontinuation of Rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP), Cost Accounting Standards... development of an amendment to Cost Accounting Standard (CAS) 416 regarding the use of the term ``catastrophic...

  17. PV O&M Cost Model and Cost Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Andy

    2017-03-15

    This is a presentation on PV O&M cost model and cost reduction for the annual Photovoltaic Reliability Workshop (2017), covering estimating PV O&M costs, polynomial expansion, and implementation of Net Present Value (NPV) and reserve account in cost models.

  18. Costs and cost-effectiveness of periviable care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, Aaron B; Burchfield, David J

    2014-02-01

    With increasing concerns regarding rapidly expanding healthcare costs, cost-effectiveness analysis allows assessment of whether marginal gains from new technology are worth the increased costs. Particular methodologic issues related to cost and cost-effectiveness analysis in the area of neonatal and periviable care include how costs are estimated, such as the use of charges and whether long-term costs are included; the challenges of measuring utilities; and whether to use a maternal, neonatal, or dual perspective in such analyses. A number of studies over the past three decades have examined the costs and the cost-effectiveness of neonatal and periviable care. Broadly, while neonatal care is costly, it is also cost effective as it produces both life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). However, as the gestational age of the neonate decreases, the costs increase and the cost-effectiveness threshold is harder to achieve. In the periviable range of gestational age (22-24 weeks of gestation), whether the care is cost effective is questionable and is dependent on the perspective. Understanding the methodology and salient issues of cost-effectiveness analysis is critical for researchers, editors, and clinicians to accurately interpret results of the growing body of cost-effectiveness studies related to the care of periviable pregnancies and neonates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Software cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the state of the art of software cost estimation (SCE). The main questions to be answered in the paper are: (1) What are the reasons for overruns of budgets and planned durations? (2) What are the prerequisites for estimating? (3) How can software development effort be

  20. Software cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, F.J.; Heemstra, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the state of the art of software cost estimation (SCE). The main questions to be answered in the paper are: (1) What are the reasons for overruns of budgets and planned durations? (2) What are the prerequisites for estimating? (3) How can software development effort be

  1. Containing contraceptive costs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    April 2015, Vol. 105, No. 4. Containing contraceptive costs. There are about 7 billion people living on our planet. In many countries resources are strained and we seek to slow down the rate of population growth. There are obviously many factors that lead to rapid population growth. Contraceptive methods are an important.

  2. Cost Is Not Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Russell T.

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of survey of 21 smaller to medium-sized (50,000-200,000 volumes) libraries which was conducted to determine factors used to make selection decisions in purchase of automated turnkey systems from established vendors. Factors examined include costs, software, hardware, and vendors for parts A (actual experience) and B (hypothetical…

  3. Controlling HR Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellig, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Controlling human resources costs is critical for a competitive advantage. More money will have to be invested in education and training because of an inadequate, ill-prepared group of entry-level workers. Commitment to employees will have to be considered in relation to the increased investment in them. (JOW)

  4. The Cost of Astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.

    Using Scopus and national sources, I have investigated the evolution of the cost of publishing in Danish astronomy on a fine scale over a number of years. I find that the number of publications per year from Danish astronomers increased by a factor of four during 15 years: naturally, the correspo...

  5. At What Cost?

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    Mar 1, 1996 ... The production of this monograph would not have been possible without the ... RITC also conveys its thanks to the staff of Creatrix Design Group for their ...... land area devoted to tobacco farming, employment in tobacco manufacturing, ...... cost to manufacture cigarettes, demographics (i.e., age, sex, race), ...

  6. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  7. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  8. Sustainability at no Cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    The presentation is dealing with some basic concept around the whole economy, and what are really the costs and the benefits. A distinction is made between professional economy, driven by money (GDP), and the amateur economy, driven by love, affection, etc. within the families, among friends, in ...

  9. [Costing nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Pavlos

    2005-01-01

    To the Editor: Referring to a recent special report about the cost analysis of twenty-nine nuclear medicine procedures, I would like to clarify some basic aspects for determining costs of nuclear medicine procedure with various costing methodologies. Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, is a new approach in imaging services costing that can provide the most accurate cost data, but is difficult to perform in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. That is because ABC requires determining and analyzing all direct and indirect costs of each procedure, according all its activities. Traditional costing methods, like those for estimating incomes and expenses per procedure or fixed and variable costs per procedure, which are widely used in break-even point analysis and the method of ratio-of-costs-to-charges per procedure may be easily performed in nuclear medicine departments, to evaluate the variability and differences between costs and reimbursement - charges.

  10. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-07-27

    This report presents final 2011 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements ‘‘Deaths: Final Data for 2011,’’ the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2011. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2011, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2011 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission

  11. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2017-11-01

    Objectives-This report presents final 2015 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2015," the National Center for Health Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Methods-Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2015. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. Results-In 2015, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Cerebrovascular diseases; Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2015 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without

  12. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2016-02-16

    This report presents final 2013 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2013," the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2013. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2013, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Cerebrovascular diseases; Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2013 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Sudden infant death syndrome; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as

  13. The Kyoto Protocol Is Cost-effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Gatto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, there is a high degree of uncertainty concerning the climate change that would result from increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Also, opponents of the Kyoto Protocol raised the key objection that reducing emissions would impose an unacceptable economic burden on businesses and consumers. Based on an analysis of alternative scenarios for electricity generation in Italy, we show that if the costs in terms of damage to human health, material goods, agriculture, and the environment caused by greenhouse gas emissions are included in the balance, the economic argument against Kyoto is untenable. Most importantly, the argument holds true even if we exclude global external costs (those due to global warming, and account for local external costs only (such as those due to acidic precipitation and lung diseases resulting from air pollution.

  14. Historical and projected costs of natural disasters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D.

    1995-04-01

    Natural disasters cause billions of dollars of damage and thousands Of deaths globally each year. While the magnitude is clear, the exact costs (in damage and fatalities) are difficult to clearly identify. This document reports on the results of a survey of data on the costs associated with significant natural disasters. There is an impressive amount of work and effort going into natural disaster research, mitigation, and relief. However, despite this effort, there are surprisingly few consistent and reliable data available regarding the effects of natural disasters. Even lacking consistent and complete data, it is clear that the damage and fatalities from natural disasters are increasing, both in the United States, and globally. Projections using the available data suggest that, in the United States alone, the costs of natural disasters between 1995 and 2010 will be in the range of $90 billion (94$) and 5000 lives.

  15. Energy and GHG abatement cost curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Rafael [BHP Billiton Base Metals (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Global warming due to various reasons but especially to emission of green house gases (GHGs) has become a cause for serious concern. This paper discusses the steps taken by BHP Billiton to reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions using cost curves. According to forecasts, global warming is expected to impact Chile badly and the rise in temperature could be between 1 and more than 5 degrees Celsius. Mining in Chile consumes a lot of energy, particularly electricity. Total energy and electricity consumption in 2007 was 13 and 36 % respectively. BHP base metals developed a set of abatement cost curves for energy and GHG in Chile and these are shown in figures. The methodology for the curves consisted of consultant visits to each mine operation. The study also includes mass energy balance and feasibility maps. The paper concludes that it is important to evaluate the potential for reducing emissions and energy and their associated costs.

  16. Governing of common cause failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    Agreed strategy is to govern common cause failures by the application of diversity, to assure that the overall plant safety objectives are met even in the case that a common cause failure of a system with all redundant trains is assumed. The presented strategy aims on the application of functional diversity without the implementation of equipment diversity. In the focus are the design criteria which have to be met for the design of independent systems in such a way that the time-correlated failure of such independent systems according a common cause can be excluded deterministically. (author)

  17. Self Service Technologies: A Cause of Unemployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otekhile Cathy-Austin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The self-service technologies (SSTs are fast changing the conventional way of transacting business by business organisations. The rapid innovation of self-service technologies and its adoption and usages in all facets of human systems is acclaimed to be fast rendering low skilled workers jobless. The major sectors of the economy in advanced economies have reached their peaks and can no longer provide new employment due to an increase in the productivity growth rate as a result of technology advances. These SSTs have in no small measure brought about an increase in productivity growth rate, cost reduction and anincrease in the speed of service delivery to customers. This paper examines if self-service technologies truly are the cause of persistent unemployment through a study of the long term metamorphosis of the major economic sectors in advanced economies. This study revealed that the SSTs presents both risks and opportunities.

  18. Cost-benefit aspects of radioisotope methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, L.

    1986-01-01

    The cost-benefit relations in the complex application of radioisotpe techniques increased in the last years to up to 1/10 to 1/15. The most essential cause of this trend is the increase of the capacity of production processes, controlled and automatized by means of radioisotopes, and the solution of qualitatively new technological problems of a high economic relevance. A collection of statistical data about the expediture and benefit of different radioisotopes techniques is presented. (author)

  19. The burden of pediatric diarrhea: a cross-sectional study of incurred costs and perceptions of cost among Bolivian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rachel M; Rebolledo, Paulina A; Embrey, Sally R; Wagner, Laura Danielle; Cowden, Carter L; Kelly, Fiona M; Smith, Emily R; Iñiguez, Volga; Leon, Juan S

    2013-08-02

    Worldwide, acute gastroenteritis represents an enormous public health threat to children under five years of age, causing one billion episodes and 1.9 to 3.2 million deaths per year. In Bolivia, which has one of the lower GDPs in South America, an estimated 15% of under-five deaths are caused by diarrhea. Bolivian caregiver expenses related to diarrhea are believed to be minimal, as citizens benefit from universal health insurance for children under five. The goals of this report were to describe total incurred costs and cost burden associated with caregivers seeking treatment for pediatric gastroenteritis, and to quantify relationships among costs, cost burden, treatment setting, and perceptions of costs. From 2007 to 2009, researchers interviewed caregivers (n=1,107) of pediatric patients (costs (e.g. medication, consult fees) and indirect costs (e.g. lost wages). Patient populations were similar across cities in terms of gender, duration of illness, and age, but familial income varied significantly (pcosts to families were significantly higher for inpatients as compared to outpatients of urban (pcosts made up a large proportion of total costs. Forty-five percent of patients' families paid ≥1% of their annual household income for this single diarrheal episode. The perception that cost was affecting family finances was more frequent among those with higher actual cost burden. This study demonstrated that indirect costs due to acute pediatric diarrhea were a large component of total incurred familial costs. Additionally, familial costs associated with a single diarrheal episode affected the actual and perceived financial situation of a large number of caregivers. These data serve as a baseline for societal diarrheal costs before and immediately following the implementation of the rotavirus vaccine and highlight the serious economic importance of a diarrheal episode to Bolivian caregivers.

  20. The economics of bladder cancer: costs and considerations of caring for this disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Holmäng, Sten; Lee, Richard; Kim, Simon P; Stenzl, Arnulf; Lotan, Yair

    2014-08-01

    Due to high recurrence rates, intensive surveillance strategies, and expensive treatment costs, the management of bladder cancer contributes significantly to medical costs. To provide a concise evaluation of contemporary cost-related challenges in the care of patients with bladder cancer. An emphasis is placed on the initial diagnosis of bladder cancer and therapy considerations for both non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and more advanced disease. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Medline (1966 to February 2011). Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for search criteria included "bladder cancer, neoplasms" OR "carcinoma, transitional cell" AND all cost-related MeSH search terms. Studies evaluating the costs associated with of various diagnostic or treatment approaches were reviewed. Routine use of perioperative chemotherapy following complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor has been estimated to provide a cost savings. Routine office-based fulguration of small low-grade recurrences could decrease costs. Another potential important target for decreasing variation and cost lies in risk-modified surveillance strategies after initial bladder tumor removal to reduce the cost associated with frequent cystoscopic and radiographic procedures. Optimizing postoperative care after radical cystectomy has the potential to decrease length of stay and perioperative morbidity with substantial decreases in perioperative care expenses. The gemcitabine-cisplatin regimen has been estimated to result in a modest increase in cost effectiveness over methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. Additional costs of therapies need to be balanced with effectiveness, and there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding optimal surveillance and treatment of both early and advanced bladder cancer. Regardless of disease severity, improvements in the efficiency of bladder cancer care to limit unnecessary interventions and optimize effective