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Sample records for unlabeled antibody enzyme

  1. Intraperitoneal delivery of monoclonal antibodies: enhanced regional delivery advantage using intravenous unlabeled anti-mouse antibody

    Wahl, R.L.; Fisher, S.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) delivered intraperitoneally expose cells in contact with peritoneal fluid to considerably higher levels of MAb than if the MAb dose were given intravenously. This regional delivery advantage for intact MAb is present mainly due to the relatively slow exit of MAb from the peritoneal fluid to the blood. Eventually, following i.p. injection, blood levels of MAb rise resulting in exposure of the animal to high systemic MAb levels and potential toxicity. In this series of experiments, systemic exposure was minimized by the administration of unlabeled goat polyclonal anti-mouse antibody intravenously from 1 1/2 to 6 h following i.p. MAb injection. This maneuver results in the formation of immune complexes with their subsequent clearance and dehalogenation by the reticuloendothelial system, thus minimizing systemic MAb exposure. This approach, of increasing systemic clearance of MAb, did not alter intraperitoneal MAb levels and thus significantly increased the regional delivery advantage to the peritoneal cavity by 70-100%. This approach provides an immunologic rationale for the further enhancement of MAb delivery to i.p. foci of malignant disease and may have diagnostic and therapeutic utility. (author)

  2. Effect of unlabelled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) on biodistribution of /sup 111/Indium labelled (MoAb)

    Lamki, L M; Murray, J L; Rosenblum, M G; Patt, Y Z; Babaian, Richard; Unger, M W

    1988-08-01

    We have evaluated immunoscintigraphy in cancer patients using four /sup 111/In-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb): 96.5 (anti-P97 of melanoma), ZME-018 (anti-high molecular weight antibody of melanoma), ZCE-025 (anti-CEA for colon cancer) and PAY-276 (anti-prostatic acid phosphatase for prostatic cancer). The effect of increasing the doses of unlabelled MoAb (co-infused with 1 mg labelled MoAb) on the relative body distribution of each labelled MoAb was assessed. Localization in the liver decreased significantly in all cases, with increasing MoAb dose, except for ZME-018. Localization in other organs increased significantly as the liver activity decreased. The spleen activity, however, fell in the case of MoAb ZME-018. Blood-pool activity increased with MoAb dose in all four MoAbs. These findings correlated with the rise in the detection rate of metastases, the plasma half-life, and other pharmacokinetic parameters. However, the dose level at which this correlation occurred varied with each antibody. These data demonstrate the co-infusion of unlabelled MoAb with /sup 111/In-labelled MoAb could alter the organ distribution, pharmacokinetics and tumour uptake in a favourable manner, though the degree to which this occurs depends on the antibody in question.

  3. A radioisotope dilution assay for unlabelled vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex employing the binding intrinsic factor antibody: probable evidence for two types of binding antibody

    Jacob, E.; O'Brien, H.A.W.; Mollin, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A new radioisotope dilution assay for vitamin B 12 -intrinsic factor complex is described. The method is based on the use of the binding type intrinsic antibody (the binding reagent), which when combined with the intrinsic factor-vitamin B 12 complex (labelled ligand), is quantitatively adsorbed onto zirconium phosphate gel pH 6.25. The new assay has been shown to provide a measure of intrinsic factor comparable with other intrinsic factor assays, but it has the important advantage of being able to measure the unlabelled vitamin B 12 -intrinsic factor complex (unlabelled ligand), and will, therefore, be valuable in the study of physiological events in the gastrointestinal tract. During the study, it was found that there is some evidence for at least two types of binding intrinsic factor antibody: One which combines preferentially with the intrinsic factor-vitamin B 12 complex and one which combines equally well with this complex or with free intrinsic factor. (author)

  4. The influence of proteasome inhibitor MG132, external radiation and unlabeled antibody on the tumor uptake and biodistribution of 188Re-labeled anti-E6 C1P5 antibody in cervical cancer in mice

    Phaeton, Rébécca; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered a necessary step for the development of cervical cancer and >95% of all cervical cancers have detectable HPV sequences. We have recently demonstrated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) which targeted viral oncoprotein E6 in treatment of experimental cervical cancer We hypothesized that pre-treatment of tumor cells with various agents which cause cell death and/or elevation of E6 levels would increase the accumulation of radiolabeled antibodies to E6 in cervical tumors. Methods HPV-16 positive CasKi cells were treated in vitro with up to 6 Gy of external radiation, or proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or unlabeled anti-E6 antibody C1P5 and cell death was assessed. Biodistribution of 188Rhenium (188Re)-labeled C1P5 antibody was performed in both control and radiation MG-132 treated CasKi tumor-bearing nude mice. Results . 188Re-C1P5 antibody demonstrated tumor specificity and very low uptake and fast clearance from the major organs. The amount of tumor uptake was enhanced by MG-132 but was unaffected by pre-treatment with radiation. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated an unanticipated effect of unlabeled antibody on the amount of cell death, a finding that was suggested by our previous in vivo studies in CasKi tumor model. Conclusion We demonstrated that pre-treatment of cervical tumors with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and with unlabeled antibody to E6 can serve as a means to generate non-viable cancer cells and to elevate the levels of target oncoproteins in the cells for increasing the accumulation of targeted radiolabeled antibodies in tumors. These results favor further development of RIT of cervical cancers targeting viral antigens. PMID:20127955

  5. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.; Suzuki, M.; Adachi, S.

    1983-01-01

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity

  6. Using Unlabeled Data to Improve Text Classification

    Nigam, Kamal P

    2001-01-01

    .... This dissertation demonstrates that supervised learning algorithms that use a small number of labeled examples and many inexpensive unlabeled examples can create high-accuracy text classifiers...

  7. A murine monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for almond (Prunus dulcis L.) detection.

    Su, Mengna; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Liu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2013-11-13

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-almond soluble protein rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and murine monoclonal antibody 4C10 as the detection antibodies was developed. The assay is specific and sensitive (3-200 ng almond protein/mL) for almond detection. The standardized assay is accurate (assay variability assay did not register any cross-reactivity with the tested food matrices, suggesting the assay to be almond amandin specific. The assay could detect the presence of declared almond in the tested matched commercial samples. Further, the assay reliably detected the presence of almonds in the laboratory prepared food samples spiked with almond flour.

  8. Oligopeptide-based enzyme immunoassay for ovine lentivirus antibody detection.

    Kwang, J; Torres, J V

    1994-01-01

    Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) is a lentivirus which causes a progressive disease in sheep. Immunodominant epitopes have been identified in the envelope gp40 glycoprotein. Synthetic peptides representing these regions are able to detect the presence of OPPV antibodies in 96% of infected sheep.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against human angiotensinogen, their characterization and use in an angiotensinogen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    Rubin, I; Lykkegaard, S; Olsen, A A; Selmer, J; Ballegaard, M

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human angiotensinogen. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using a high affinity monoclonal antibody as catching antibody and a polyclonal rabbit anti human angiotensinogen antibody as detecting antibody in a "sandwich" ELISA. Linear range of the ELISA was 15-450 pmol/l of human angiotensinogen. Intra- and inter- assay variation coefficients were in the range of 2% to 8%. A correlation coefficient, r = 0.97, (n = 20), with values obtained by radioimmunoassay. This correlation coefficient, obtained by using both normal and pregnant sera, confirmed that the ELISA fulfill the requirements for clinical useful assay. Characterization of the antibodies were performed with respect to affinity constant and epitopes.

  10. Evaluation Of Antibody Elisa, Coproscopy And Serum Enzyme ...

    Le titrage avec immunoadsorbant lié à une enzyme (ELISA), la sédimentation fécale et les tests de l'action de l'enzyme du sérum ont été faits sur des échantillons de fèces et de sérum recueillis de 134 bovins (55 positifs et 79 négatifs pour les lésions dues à la douve du foie) lors de l'inspection de viande en Ethiopie.

  11. Immobilization of enzyme and antibody by low energy electron beam polymerization

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru

    1987-01-01

    Immobilization of glucoamylase and AFP-antibody was studied using an electron beam of relatively low energy. A thin polymer membrane formed by irradiation of monomer enzyme mixture in a buffer, which had a considerable enzymatic activity. A membrane of almost the same thickness and activity was obtained by repeated irradiation. The effect of irradiation conditions on the immobilization and the variations of irradiation method for immobilization were investigated. The immobilization of antibody was carried out in similar ways as for enzyme, and the product also showed a considerable activity. (author)

  12. Enhancement of breast CADx with unlabeled data.

    Jamieson, Andrew R; Giger, Maryellen L; Drukker, Karen; Pesce, Lorenzo L

    2010-08-01

    Unlabeled medical image data are abundant, yet the process of converting them into a labeled ("truth-known") database is time and resource expensive and fraught with ethical and logistics issues. The authors propose a dual-stage CADx scheme in which both labeled and unlabeled (truth-known and "truth-unknown") data are used. This study is an initial exploration of the potential for leveraging unlabeled data toward enhancing breast CADx. From a labeled ultrasound image database consisting of 1126 lesions with an empirical cancer prevalence of 14%, 200 different randomly sampled subsets were selected and the truth status of a variable number of cases was masked to the algorithm to mimic different types of labeled and unlabeled data sources. The prevalence was fixed at 50% cancerous for the labeled data and 5% cancerous for the unlabeled. In the first stage of the dual-stage CADx scheme, the authors term "transductive dimension reduction regularization" (TDR-R), both labeled and unlabeled images characterized by extracted lesion features were combined using dimension reduction (DR) techniques and mapped to a lower-dimensional representation. (The first stage ignored truth status therefore was an unsupervised algorithm.) In the second stage, the labeled data from the reduced dimension embedding were used to train a classifier toward estimating the probability of malignancy. For the first CADx stage, the authors investigated three DR approaches: Laplacian eigen-maps, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), and principal component analysis. For the TDR-R methods, the classifier in the second stage was a supervised (i.e., utilized truth) Bayesian neural net. The dual-stage CADx schemes were compared to a single-stage scheme based on manifold regularization (MR) in a semisupervised setting via the LapSVM algorithm. Performance in terms of areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of the CADx schemes was evaluated in leave-one-out and .632+ bootstrap analyses on a by

  13. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay to Detect Chicken Parvovirus Specific Antibodies

    Here we report the development and application of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect parvovirus-specific antibodies in chicken sera. We used an approach previously described for other parvoviruses to clone and express viral structural proteins in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus...

  14. Selective cytotoxicity of an oxygen-radical-generating enzyme conjugated to a monoclonal antibody.

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Grassi, G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1988-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody 8A, which recognizes a human plasma cell-associated antigen, was covalently linked to xanthine oxidase in a conjugate maintaining both immunological and enzymatic properties. A significant degree of target cell lysis was obtained at an enzyme concentration that was ineffective on non-target cells and on myeloid staminal cells (CFU-GM). The cytotoxic activity was abolished by an excess of antibody, by allopurinol and by superoxide dismutase and catalase. A possible use of the conjugate for bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients is suggested.

  15. Single-dilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of antigen-specific salmonid antibody

    Alcorn, S.W.; Pascho, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed on the basis of testing a single dilution of serum to quantify the level of antibody to the p57 protein of Renibaclerium salmoninarum in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The levels of antibody were interpolated from a standard curve constructed by relating the optical densities (OD) produced by several dilutions of a high-titer rainbow trout (O. mykiss) antiserum to the p57 protein. The ELISA OD values produced by as many as 36 test sera on each microplate were compared with the standard curve to calculate the antigen-specific antibody activity. Repeated measurements of 36 samples on 3 microplates on each of 6 assay dates indicated that the mean intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.68% (range, 0-23%) and the mean interassay CV was 8.29% (range, 4-16%). The antibody levels determined for the serum sample from 24 sockeye salmon vaccinated with a recombinant p57 protein generally were correlated with the levels determined by endpoint titration (r2 = 0.936) and with results from another ELISA that was based on extrapolation of antibody levels from a standard curve (r2 = 0.956). The single-dilution antibody ELISA described here increases the number of samples that can be tested on each microplate compared with immunoassays based on analysis of several dilutions of each test serum. It includes controls for interassay standardization and can be used to test fish weighing <3 g.

  16. Rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Aspergillus fumigatus antibodies.

    Richardson, M D; Stubbins, J M; Warnock, D W

    1982-01-01

    A rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) where component incubation periods were shortened to one hour, was compared with agar gel double diffusion (AGDD) and a standard ELISA procedure for detecting antibodies to Aspergillus fumigatus in 28 asthmatic patients with suspected allergic aspergillosis. Using two A fumigatus antigens the rapid ELISA compared well with AGDD and the standard ELISA method. Eleven sera that reacted with both antigens in AGDD were all positive against antigen ...

  17. Bluetongue virus: comparative evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunodiffusion, and serum neutralization for detection of viral antibodies.

    Poli, G; Stott, J; Liu, Y S; Manning, J S

    1982-01-01

    Comparative studies on the detection of bovine serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to bluetongue virus with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an immunodiffusion method, and a serum neutralization assay demonstrated complete concordance between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the serum neutralization assay results. However, the immunodiffusion method failed to detect bluetongue virus antibody in a substantial number of sera found to possess bluetongue virus immunoglobulin G with th...

  18. A sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for chlorpyrifos residue determination in Chinese agricultural smaples

    A monoclonal antibody-based competitive antibody-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and optimized for determining chlorpyrifos residue in agricultural products. The IC50 and IC10 of this ELISA were 3.3 ng/mL and 0.1 ng/mL respectively. The average recoveries recovery rate...

  19. Quantification of patient specific assay interference in different formats of enzyme linked immunoassays for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    Grebenchtchikov, N.J.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Heijmen, L.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Thijs, A.M.J.; Span, P.N.; Sweep, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundThe use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for clinical purposes has significantly increased in recent years, and so has the need to monitor antibody concentrations. This may be achieved using the well-established enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) methods; however, these assays are

  20. Quantification of patient-specific assay interference in different formats of enzyme-linked immunoassays for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    Grebenchtchikov, Nicolai; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J.; Heijmen, Linda; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Herpen, Carla M. L.; Thijs, Annemarie M. J.; Span, Paul N.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for clinical purposes has significantly increased in recent years, and so has the need to monitor antibody concentrations. This may be achieved using the well-established enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) methods; however, these assays are subject to a

  1. Antibody screening by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using pooled soluble HLA in renal transplant candidates.

    Zaer, F; Metz, S; Scornik, J C

    1997-01-15

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using HLA class I molecules purified from pooled platelets has the potential to detect HLA antibodies with increased efficiency without sacrificing sensitivity or specificity. This test, which was originally developed in our institution, has been independently validated by recent studies and is now commercially available. We now present evidence of its usefulness as a routine HLA antibody screening test for renal transplant patients. A total of 515 patients were tested monthly by ELISA (13.9 tests/patient) and by antiglobulin-enhanced panel reactivity (6.3 tests/patient). In patients found to be unsensitized, the incidence of false-positive results was less for ELISA than for the panel studies. In patients who were highly sensitized, both tests performed equally well, whereas discordant results were registered mainly in cases of mild sensitization. Because 66% of our patients were not sensitized, the ELISA was effective in reducing the number of more involved tests aimed at characterizing the antibodies. These results provide a foundation to use the pooled platelet HLA ELISA on a routine basis for HLA antibody screening.

  2. Detection of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay

    Aziz, Khalil A.; Fzizal, Abul A.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies are a group of autoantibodies that are directed against various components of the cell nucleus. Antibodies to these antigens are closely associated with connective tissue disease. Early diagnosis of these diseases can prove very difficult and therefore clinicians rely on the use of anti-ENA antibody testing for the exclusion. Old methods of testing are time consuming and require great skills. For these reasons clinical immunology laboratories are switching to testing for anti-ENA antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The latter assays are more sensitive and require little skills. In the present study we have investigated a number of different ELISA preparations. The study was conducted at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital during the period 2003. We tested a number of ENA-positive and negative samples using 3 different commercial ELISA preparations and compared the results with traditional CCIE-assay. The present study revealed that some ELISA preparations can be more sensitive than CCIE method. Laboratories still using later method should switch to ELISA. However it is important that laboratories evaluate a long range of different ELISA preparations before selecting the most optimal one. In addition it is recommended that laboratories then audit results in order to determine true significance of such results. Finally until the true significance of ELISA generated results is known, positive ENA-results should be interpreted in conjunction with the clinical picture and this would require close liaison in between the clinical immunology laboratory and clinicians

  3. Design of a single-step immunoassay principle based on the combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a hydrogel copolymerized with a fluorescent enzyme substrate in a microfluidic capillary device.

    Wakayama, Hideki; Henares, Terence G; Jigawa, Kaede; Funano, Shun-ichi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2013-11-21

    A combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a novel fluorescent enzyme substrate-copolymerized hydrogel in a microchannel for a single-step, no-wash microfluidic immunoassay is demonstrated. This hydrogel discriminates the free enzyme-conjugated antibody from an antigen-enzyme-conjugated antibody immunocomplex based on the difference in molecular size. A selective and sensitive immunoassay, with 10-1000 ng mL(-1) linear range, is reported.

  4. Validation of a KHV antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    Bergmann, S M; Wang, Q; Zeng, W; Li, Y; Wang, Y; Matras, M; Reichert, M; Fichtner, D; Lenk, M; Morin, T; Olesen, N J; Skall, H F; Lee, P-Y; Zheng, S; Monaghan, S; Reiche, S; Fuchs, W; Kotler, M; Way, K; Bräuer, G; Böttcher, K; Kappe, A; Kielpinska, J

    2017-11-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) causes KHV disease (KHVD). The virus is highly contagious in carp or koi and can induce a high mortality. Latency and, in some cases, a lack of signs presents a challenge for virus detection. Appropriate immunological detection methods for anti-KHV antibodies have not yet been fully validated for KHV. Therefore, it was developed and validated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect KHV antibodies. The assay was optimized with respect to plates, buffers, antigens and assay conditions. It demonstrated high diagnostic and analytical sensitivity and specificity and was particularly useful at the pond or farm levels. Considering the scale of the carp and koi industry worldwide, this assay represents an important practical tool for the indirect detection of KHV, also in the absence of clinical signs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus

    Sudarisman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum neutralisation test (SNT has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine distemper virus as coating antigen. Rabbit anti canine IgG labelled with horse radish peroxidase was used as the conjugate, while phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD was used as the substrate. The ELISA results were then compared with the results of the SNT, using the sera of 312 random-source dogs from West Java. The two test-results had a high degree of correlation. Very few discrepancies occurred and most of these were at the lower limits of each test. When the sera were tested at 1 : 100 dilutions, there was a 95.5% agreement between the ELISA and SNT. Their sensitivity and spesificity were 83.9 and 98.4%. Titrated SNT and ELISA also were performed on sera from 7 dogs whose lifetime medical histories were known. The antibodies were inclining up after two months of post vaccination, where the titre was not in zero/lower position at the day of vaccination. However, antibody zero or low position were found at 28 days post vaccination. All of the results indicated that ELISA can be used for evaluating antibody to canine distemper virus response, replacing the SNT.

  7. Use of Unlabeled Samples for Mitigating the Hughes Phenomenon

    Landgrebe, David A.; Shahshahani, Behzad M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of unlabeled samples in improving the performance of classifiers is studied. When the number of training samples is fixed and small, additional feature measurements may reduce the performance of a statistical classifier. It is shown that by using unlabeled samples, estimates of the parameters can be improved and therefore this phenomenon may be mitigated. Various methods for using unlabeled samples are reviewed and experimental results are provided.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food. PMID:26040610

  9. Challenges for bovine viral diarrhoea virus antibody detection in bulk milk by antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays due to changes in milk production levels

    Foddai, Alessandro; Enøe, Claes; Stockmarr, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is considered eradicated from Denmark. Currently, very few (if any) Danish cattle herds could be infected with BVD virus (BVDV). The Danish antibody blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been successfully used during the Danish BVD eradica...

  10. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogonal...... light scatter. The method was optimized using the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and K-562. Samples of 10(5) ethanol-fixed cells were treated with pepsin/HCl and stained as a nuclear suspension with anti-BrdUrd antibody, FITC-conjugated secondary antibody, and propidium iodide. Labelled mitoses could...

  11. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detecting antibody to Trichomonas vaginalis: use of whole cells and aqueous extract as antigen.

    Alderete, J F

    1984-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting antibody to antigenic Trichomonas vaginalis macromolecules has been identified using whole cells or an aqueous protein extract as antigen. The test was developed under optimum conditions using serum samples from experimental animals. The sensitivity of the ELISA was equal to or greater than that obtained by radioimmunoprecipitation and electrophoresis-fluorography techniques. The ELISA was capable of assessing antibody responses durin...

  12. Differentiation of ruminal bacterial species by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using egg yolk antibodies from immunized chicken hens.

    Ricke, S C; Schaefer, D M; Cook, M E; Kang, K H

    1988-01-01

    Cross-reactivity among four species of ruminal bacteria was examined by using egg yolk antibodies from immunized Leghorn laying hens and an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. The effects of the four species on the hens were compared on various days postimmunization. Hens injected with the same bacterial species had similar apparent antibody levels over the entire postimmunization period, but only Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4) and Selenomonas ruminantium D antigens elicited early increases in a...

  13. Identification of a Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus by Using Monoclonal Antibodies in an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay †

    Wright, Sara F.; Morton, Joseph B.; Sworobuk, Janis E.

    1987-01-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were no...

  14. Improvement of an enzyme immunosorbent assay for detecting antibodies against Dioctophyma renale.

    Pedrassani, Daniela; do Nascimento, Adjair Antonio; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2015-09-15

    An available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was studied for the detection of anti-Dioctophyma renale antibodies in the sera of dogs using, detection of parasite eggs in urine sediment as a reference test. ELISA uses a soluble antigenic preparation of esophagus of D. renale and the optimal dilutions of the antigen, serum and conjugate were determined by means of checker board titration, using positive (n=13) and negative (n=27) reference serum. The specificity and sensitivity of the ELISA were 93.8% and 92.3% respectively and the kappa index was good (0.76). These results suggest that ELISA described may prove to be an effective serological test for detecting dogs infected and exposed to this parasite mainly dogs that are not eliminating parasite eggs through their urine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fast conversion of scFv to Fab antibodies using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Sanmark, Hanna; Huovinen, Tuomas; Matikka, Tero; Pettersson, Tiina; Lahti, Maria; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2015-11-01

    Single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries are widely used for developing novel bioaffinity reagents, although Fab or IgG molecules are the preferred antibody formats in many final applications. Therefore, rapid conversion methods for combining multiple DNA fragments are needed to attach constant domains to the scFv derived variable domains. In this study we describe a fast and easy cloning method for the conversion of single framework scFv fragments to Fab fragments using type IIS restriction enzymes. All cloning steps excluding plating of the Fab transformants can be done in 96 well plates and the procedure can be completed in one working day. The concept was tested by converting 69 scFv clones into Fab format on 96 well plates, which resulted in 93% success rate. The method is particularly useful as a high-throughput tool for the conversion of the chosen scFv clones into Fab molecules in order to analyze them as early as possible, as the conversion can significantly affect the binding properties of the chosen clones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma exchange to remove HIT antibodies: dissociation between enzyme-immunoassay and platelet activation test reactivities.

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Sheppard, Jo-Ann I; Chu, F Victor; Kapoor, Anil; Crowther, Mark A; Gangji, Azim

    2015-01-01

    Repeated therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been advocated to remove heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) IgG antibodies before cardiac/vascular surgery in patients who have serologically-confirmed acute or subacute HIT; for this situation, a negative platelet activation assay (eg, platelet serotonin-release assay [SRA]) has been recommended as the target serological end point to permit safe surgery. We compared reactivities in the SRA and an anti-PF4/heparin IgG-specific enzyme immunoassay (EIA), testing serial serum samples in a patient with recent (subacute) HIT who underwent serial TPE precardiac surgery, as well as for 15 other serially-diluted HIT sera. We observed that post-TPE/diluted HIT sera-when first testing SRA-negative-continue to test strongly positive by EIA-IgG. This dissociation between the platelet activation assay and a PF4-dependent immunoassay for HIT antibodies indicates that patients with subacute HIT undergoing repeated TPE before heparin reexposure should be tested by serial platelet activation assays even when their EIAs remain strongly positive. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. [Use of monoclonal antibodies against horse immunoglobulin in an enzyme immunoassay of bacterial toxins and anatoxins].

    Burkin, M A; Gal'vidis, I A; Iakovleva, I V; Sviridov, V V

    2007-01-01

    Immunization of BALB/c mice by horse antiserum against diphtheria made it possible to obtain IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) 2B7E4 specific for light chains of horse immunoglobulin (Ig). Unlike commercial preparations of anti-horse immunoglobulin antibodies, which are specific for the whole Ig molecule or its Fc-fragment, the peroxidase (HRP) conjugate of the MoAb, 2B7E4-HRP did not interact with human, mouse, rabbit, and sheep Igs, or horse albumin. The conjugate obtained was used with MoAbs against bacterial toxins and commercial horse anatoxins, as a universal reagent in sandwich enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) for bacterial toxins and anatoxins. The detection sensitivity of diphtheria toxin/anatoxin equaled 0.0005 Lf/ml; tetanus toxin and anatoxin were detected with sensitivities of 20 LD50/ml and 0.005 UI/ml, respectively. A similar sandwich ELISA for botulinum anatoxins (group measurement) allowed types A, B, and E to be detected at 0.02, 0.002, and 0.001 UI/ml, respectively; selective measurement was only possible in the case of type E anatoxin (0.001 UI/ml).

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of equine antibodies specific to Sarcocystis neurona surface antigens.

    Hoane, Jessica S; Morrow, Jennifer K; Saville, William J; Dubey, J P; Granstrom, David E; Howe, Daniel K

    2005-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM.

  19. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Equine Antibodies Specific to Sarcocystis neurona Surface Antigens†

    Hoane, Jessica S.; Morrow, Jennifer K.; Saville, William J.; Dubey, J. P.; Granstrom, David E.; Howe, Daniel K.

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM. PMID:16148170

  20. An enzyme-linked immuno-filtration assay used to compare infant and maternal antibody profiles in toxoplasmosis.

    Pinon, J M; Thoannes, H; Gruson, N

    1985-02-28

    Enzyme-linked immuno-filtration assay is carried out on a micropore membrane. This doubly analytical technique permits simultaneous study of antibody specificity by immunoprecipitation and characterisation of antibody isotypes by immuno-filtration with enzyme-labelled antibodies. Recognition of the same T. gondii antigenic constituent by IgG, IgA, IgM or IgE antibodies produces couplets (IgG-IgM; IgG-IgA) or triplets (IgG-IgM-IgA; IgG-IgM-IgE) which identify the functional fractions of the toxoplasmosis antigen. In acquired toxoplasmosis, the persistence of IgM antibody long after infestation puts in question the implication of recent infestation normally linked to detection of this isotype. For sera of comparable titres, comparison of immunological profiles by the method described demonstrates disparities in the composition of the specific antibody content as expressed in international units. Use of the same method to detect IgM antibodies or distinguish between transmitted maternal IgG and IgG antibodies synthesised by the foetus or neonate makes a diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis possible in 85% of cases during the first few days of life. With the method described the diagnosis may be made on average 5 months earlier than with classical techniques. In the course of surveillance for latent congenital toxoplasmosis, the appearance of IgM or IgE antibodies raises the possibility of complications (hydrocephalus, chorioretinitis). After cessation of treatment, a rise in IgG antibodies indicating persistence of infection is detected earlier by the present than by classical methods.

  1. Positive-unlabeled learning for the prediction of conformational B-cell epitopes

    2015-01-01

    Background The incomplete ground truth of training data of B-cell epitopes is a demanding issue in computational epitope prediction. The challenge is that only a small fraction of the surface residues of an antigen are confirmed as antigenic residues (positive training data); the remaining residues are unlabeled. As some of these uncertain residues can possibly be grouped to form novel but currently unknown epitopes, it is misguided to unanimously classify all the unlabeled residues as negative training data following the traditional supervised learning scheme. Results We propose a positive-unlabeled learning algorithm to address this problem. The key idea is to distinguish between epitope-likely residues and reliable negative residues in unlabeled data. The method has two steps: (1) identify reliable negative residues using a weighted SVM with a high recall; and (2) construct a classification model on the positive residues and the reliable negative residues. Complex-based 10-fold cross-validation was conducted to show that this method outperforms those commonly used predictors DiscoTope 2.0, ElliPro and SEPPA 2.0 in every aspect. We conducted four case studies, in which the approach was tested on antigens of West Nile virus, dihydrofolate reductase, beta-lactamase, and two Ebola antigens whose epitopes are currently unknown. All the results were assessed on a newly-established data set of antigen structures not bound by antibodies, instead of on antibody-bound antigen structures. These bound structures may contain unfair binding information such as bound-state B-factors and protrusion index which could exaggerate the epitope prediction performance. Source codes are available on request. PMID:26681157

  2. Identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus by using monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Wright, S F; Morton, J B; Sworobuk, J E

    1987-09-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were nonreactive with the monoclonal antibodies. A single spore of G. occultum was detectable in the presence of high numbers of spores of other vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Variation in the reaction of G. occultum isolates from West Virginia, Florida, and Colombia suggests that monoclonal antibodies may differentiate strains.

  3. Novel enzyme immunoassay system for simultaneous detection of six subclasses of antiphospholipid antibodies for differential diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Nojima, Junzo; Motoki, Yukari; Hara, Kazusa; Sakata, Toshiyuki; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2017-06-01

    : Antiphospholipid syndrome, which often complicates systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), features high occurrence of arterial and/or venous thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss. However, which antibody subclass contributes to which clinical event remains uncertain. We newly developed an up-to-date enzyme immunoassay system using the AcuStar automated analyzer (Instrumentation Laboratory, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA) for parallel detection of six subclasses of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs): anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) of IgG, IgM, and IgA and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI) of IgG, IgM, and IgA. They were measured in 276 healthy volunteers and 138 patients with SLE: 45 with thromboembolic complications (29 arterial; 16 venous) and 93 without. Lupus anticoagulant activity in their plasma was measured according to the guidelines recommended by the Subcommittee on Lupus Anticoagulant/Phospholipid-Dependent Antibodies. aCL/β2GPI was measured with a standard ELISA kit commonly used in Japan. The positive results of IgG aCL, IgA aCL, and IgG aβ2GPI were closely associated with thromboembolic complications, whereas IgM aCL and IgM aβ2GPI were not. receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the accuracy of predicting thromboembolic complications based on the composite test results of the former three antibodies were obviously higher than by each alone. Regarding agreement with the test results of lupus anticoagulant activity, IgG aβ2GPI showed the closest match. Patients with SLE frequently possess various combinations of the six aPL subclasses, and this antibody spectrum is closely associated with thromboembolic events in these patients. This new automated enzyme immunoassay system allows simultaneous analysis of the profile of aPL subclasses for the differential diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in its early stage.

  4. Enzyme

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  5. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detecting antibody to Trichomonas vaginalis: use of whole cells and aqueous extract as antigen.

    Alderete, J F

    1984-06-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting antibody to antigenic Trichomonas vaginalis macromolecules has been identified using whole cells or an aqueous protein extract as antigen. The test was developed under optimum conditions using serum samples from experimental animals. The sensitivity of the ELISA was equal to or greater than that obtained by radioimmunoprecipitation and electrophoresis-fluorography techniques. The ELISA was capable of assessing antibody responses during the development of lesions in animals inoculated subcutaneously and it reproducibly measured the individual classes immunoglobulins directed at T vaginalis. The colorimetric assay was also suitable for showing cross reactivity between trichomonal species as well as between different strains of T vaginalis. Conditions established for monitoring antibody to trichomanads in immunised rabbits or infected mice were equally effective for human materials, such as serum or vaginal washes. Serum from experimental animals or infected people showed high concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody to trichomonads. Only antibodies of the IgG and IgA class were detected in vaginal washes from women with acute trichomoniasis. No IgE antibody to trichomonads was found under a variety of conditions in serum samples from patients or experimental animals.

  6. Improved quantification of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody.

    Gono, Takahisa; Okazaki, Yuka; Murakami, Akihiro; Kuwana, Masataka

    2018-04-09

    To compare the quantitative performance for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody titer of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems: an in-house ELISA and the commercial MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test. Anti-MDA5 antibody titer was measured in sera from 70 patients with dermatomyositis using an in-house ELISA and the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test side-by-side. For the commercial ELISA kit, serum samples diluted 1:101 were used according to the manufacturer's protocol, but serial dilutions of sera were also examined to identify the optimal serum dilution for quantification. The anti-MDA5 antibody titers measured by the in-house and commercial ELISAs were positively correlated with each other (r = 0.53, p = .0001), but the antibody titer measured by the commercial ELISA was less sensitive to change after medical treatment, and 37 (80%) of 46 anti-MDA5-positive sera had antibody titer exceeding the quantification range specified by the manufacturer (≥150 index). Experiments using diluted serum samples revealed that diluting the sera 1:5050 improved the quantitative performance of the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test, including a better correlation with the in-house ELISA results and an increased sensitivity to change. We improved the ability of the commercial ELISA kit to quantify anti-MDA5 antibody titer by altering its protocol.

  7. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT).

    Francis, R J; Mather, S J; Chester, K; Sharma, S K; Bhatia, J; Pedley, R B; Waibel, R; Green, A J; Begent, R H J

    2004-08-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99mTc-carbonyl [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+ (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99mTc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins.

  8. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT)

    Francis, R.J.; Chester, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Bhatia, J.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; Begent, R.H.J.; Mather, S.J.; Waibel, R.

    2004-01-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99m Tc-carbonyl [ 99m Tc(H 2 O) 3 (CO) 3 ] + (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99m Tc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins. (orig.)

  9. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring the concentration of, and detection of antibodies to, Aujeszky's disease virus.

    Kardi, V; Szegletes, E; Perényi, T; Pergel, I; Smal, Z

    1990-01-01

    A double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for measuring Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) antigen concentration and an inhibition technique based on the former was developed for detection of antibodies to ADV. The results were checked by determining the cytopathic and serum neutralization titres. The correlation was satisfactory in both cases, with correlation coefficients above 0.8. When measuring ADV antigen concentration, the lower limit of detection was 10(3) TCID 50/0.2 ml. The sensitivity of ELISA in detecting antibodies to ADV was found to be superior to that of the serum neutralization test and, thus, enabled the testing of rabbit and guinea-pig sera.

  10. Detection of antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 12 in pig serum using a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Klausen, Joan; Barfod, Kristen

    2002-01-01

    and from herds declared free of infection with Ap. The Ap serotype 12 blocking ELISA showed a herd sensitivity of 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.88) and a herd specificity of 1.00 (0.95-1.00) with a cut-off value at 40% relative absorbance or 60% inhibition. The assay may be used advantageously......The objective was to develop a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap) serotype 12 in pig serum. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Ap serotype 12 was purified and used as antigen in the assay. Antibodies to the LPS antigen...... in samples of pig serum were detected by inhibition of the binding of polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against Ap serotype 12. The assay was evaluated against sera from experimentally infected pigs, from pig herds naturally infected with Ap and from herds declared free of Ap serotypc 12 infection...

  11. Multicentric Evaluation of New Commercial Enzyme Immunoassays for the Detection of Immunoglobulin M and Total Antibodies against Hepatitis A Virus▿

    Arcangeletti, M. C.; Dussaix, E.; Ferraglia, F.; Roque-Afonso, A. M.; Graube, A.; Chezzi, C.

    2011-01-01

    A multicentric clinical study was conducted on representative sera from 1,738 European and U.S. subjects for the evaluation of new anti-hepatitis A virus enzyme immunoassays from Bio-Rad Laboratories. Comparison with reference DiaSorin S.p.A. tests confirmed the good performance of Bio-Rad assays (99.85% and 99.47% overall agreement in detecting total antibodies and IgM, respectively). PMID:21653739

  12. Validation of 2 commercial Neospora caninum antibody enzyme linked immunosorbent assays

    Wu, John T.Y.; Dreger, Sally; Chow, Eva Y.W.; Bowlby, Evelyn E.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract This is a validation study of 2 commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against Neospora caninum in bovine serum. The results of the reference sera (n = 30) and field sera from an infected beef herd (n = 150) were tested by both ELISAs and the results were compared statistically. When the immunoblotting results of the reference bovine sera were compared to the ELISA results, the same identity score (96.67%) and kappa values (K) (0.93) were obtained for both ELISAs. The sensitivity and specificity values for the IDEXX test were 100% and 93.33% respectively. For the Biovet test 93.33% and 100% were obtained. The corresponding positive (PV+) and negative predictive (PV−) values for the 2 assays were 93.75% and 100% (IDEXX), and 100% and 93.75% (Biovet). In the 2nd study, competitive inhibition ELISA (c-ELISA) results on bovine sera from an infected herd were compared to the 2 sets of ELISA results. The identity scores of the 2 ELISAs were 98% (IDEXX) and 97.33% (Biovet). The K values calculated were 0.96 (IDEXX) and 0.95 (Biovet). For the IDEXX test the sensitivity and specificity were 97.56% and 98.53%, whereas for the Biovet assay 95.12% and 100% were recorded, respectively. The corresponding PV+ and PV− values were 98.77% and 97.1% (IDEXX), and 100% and 94.44% (Biovet). Our validation results showed that the 2 ELISAs worked equally well and there was no statistically significant difference between the performance of the 2 tests. Both tests showed high reproducibility, repeatability and substantial agreement with results from 2 other laboratories. A quality assurance based on the requirement of the ISO/IEC 17025 standards has been adopted throughout this project for test validation procedures. PMID:12418782

  13. Development of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative ELISAs targeting insulin-degrading enzyme

    Dickson Dennis W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a widely studied zinc-metalloprotease implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease (AD and varicella zoster virus infection. Despite more than six decades of research on IDE, progress has been hampered by the lack of well-characterized reagents targeting this biomedically important protease. To address this important need, we generated and characterized new mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs targeting natively folded human and rodent IDE. Results Eight monoclonal hybridoma cell lines were derived in house from mice immunized with full-length, natively folded, recombinant human IDE. The mAbs derived from these lines were shown to detect IDE selectively and sensitively by a wide range of methods. Two mAbs in particular—designated 6A1 and 6H9—proved especially selective for IDE in immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical applications. Using a variety of methods, we show that 6A1 selectively detects both human and rodent IDE, while 6H9 selectively detects human, but not rodent, IDE, with both mAbs showing essentially no cross reactivity with other proteins in these applications. Using these novel anti-IDE mAbs, we also developed sensitive and quantitative sandwich ELISAs capable of quantifying IDE levels present in human brain extracts. Conclusion We succeeded in developing novel mAbs that selectively detect rodent and/or human IDE, which we have shown to be suitable for a wide range of applications, including western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative sandwich ELISAs. These novel anti-IDE mAbs and the assays derived from them constitute important new tools for addressing many unresolved questions about the basic biology of IDE and its role in multiple highly prevalent human diseases.

  14. Phytochrome quantitation in crude extracts of Avena by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibodies

    Shimazaki, Y; Cordonnier, M M; Pratt, L H

    1983-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which uses both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies to phytochrome, has been adapted for quantitation of phytochrome in crude plant extracts. The assay has a detection limit of about 100 pg phytochrome and can be completed within 10 h. Quantitation of phytochrome in crude extracts of etiolated oat seedlings by ELISA gave values that agreed well with those obtained by spectrophotometric assay. When etiolated oat seedlings were irradiated continuously for 24 h, the amount of phytochrome detected by ELISA and by spectrophotometric assay decreased by more than 1000-fold and about 100-fold, respectively. This discrepancy indicates that phytochrome in light-treated plants may be antigenically distinct from that found in fully etiolated plants. When these light-grown oat seedlings were kept in darkness for 48 h, phytochrome content detected by ELISA increased by 50-fold in crude extracts of green oat shoots, but only about 12-fold in extracts of herbicide-treated oat shoots. Phytochrome reaccumulation in green oat shoots was initially more rapid in the more mature cells of the primary leaf tip than near the basal part of the shoot. The inhibitory effect of Norflurazon on phytochrome accumulation was much more evident near the leaf tip than the shoot base. A 5-min red irradiation of oat seedlings at the end of a 48-h dark period resulted in a subsequent, massive decrease in phytochrome content in crude extracts from both green and Norflurazon-bleached oat shoots. These observations eliminate the possibility that substantial accumulation of chromophore-free phytochrome was being detected and indicate that Norflurazon has a substantial effect on phytochrome accumulation during a prolonged dark period. 25 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Development of Two Antibody Detection Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Serodiagnosis of Human Chronic Fascioliasis

    Cabán-Hernández, Kimberly; Gaudier, José F.; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Coprological examination based on egg detection in stool samples is currently used as the gold standard for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. However, this method is not effective during the acute phase of the disease and has poor sensitivity during the chronic phase. Serodiagnosis has become an excellent alternative to coprological examination in efforts to combat the effects of fascioliasis on human and animal health. Two novel recombinant Fasciola hepatica proteins, i.e., a ferritin (FhFtn-1) and a tegument-associated protein (FhTP16.5), were used as antigens to develop in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The assays were optimized and validated using 152 serum samples from humans with a known infection status, including healthy subjects, patients with chronic fascioliasis, and patients with other parasitic diseases. The FhFtn-1 ELISA was shown to be 96.6% sensitive and 95.7% specific; the respective parameters for the FhTP16.5 ELISA were 91.4% and 92.4%. The performances of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs were compared with that of an available commercial test (the DRG test) using a subset of serum samples. Our in-house tests were slightly more sensitive than the DRG test in detecting antibodies against F. hepatica, but the differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the potential of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs as diagnostic tools for human fascioliasis, as might be implemented in conjunction with standard assays for large-scale screenings in areas where the disease is endemic and for the detection of occasional cases in clinical laboratories. PMID:24353000

  16. Development of two antibody detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for serodiagnosis of human chronic fascioliasis.

    Cabán-Hernández, Kimberly; Gaudier, José F; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb; Espino, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Coprological examination based on egg detection in stool samples is currently used as the gold standard for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. However, this method is not effective during the acute phase of the disease and has poor sensitivity during the chronic phase. Serodiagnosis has become an excellent alternative to coprological examination in efforts to combat the effects of fascioliasis on human and animal health. Two novel recombinant Fasciola hepatica proteins, i.e., a ferritin (FhFtn-1) and a tegument-associated protein (FhTP16.5), were used as antigens to develop in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The assays were optimized and validated using 152 serum samples from humans with a known infection status, including healthy subjects, patients with chronic fascioliasis, and patients with other parasitic diseases. The FhFtn-1 ELISA was shown to be 96.6% sensitive and 95.7% specific; the respective parameters for the FhTP16.5 ELISA were 91.4% and 92.4%. The performances of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs were compared with that of an available commercial test (the DRG test) using a subset of serum samples. Our in-house tests were slightly more sensitive than the DRG test in detecting antibodies against F. hepatica, but the differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the potential of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs as diagnostic tools for human fascioliasis, as might be implemented in conjunction with standard assays for large-scale screenings in areas where the disease is endemic and for the detection of occasional cases in clinical laboratories.

  17. Active learning in the presence of unlabelable examples

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new active learning framework where the expert labeler is allowed to decline to label any example. This may be necessary because the true label is unknown or because the example belongs to a class that is not part of the real training problem. We show that within this framework, popular active learning algorithms (such as Simple) may perform worse than random selection because they make so many queries to the unlabelable class. We present a method by which any active learning algorithm can be modified to avoid unlabelable examples by training a second classifier to distinguish between the labelable and unlabelable classes. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the method on two benchmark data sets and a real-world problem.

  18. Enhancement of breast CADx with unlabeled data1

    Jamieson, Andrew R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Drukker, Karen; Pesce, Lorenzo L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Unlabeled medical image data are abundant, yet the process of converting them into a labeled (“truth-known”) database is time and resource expensive and fraught with ethical and logistics issues. The authors propose a dual-stage CADx scheme in which both labeled and unlabeled (truth-known and “truth-unknown”) data are used. This study is an initial exploration of the potential for leveraging unlabeled data toward enhancing breast CADx. Methods: From a labeled ultrasound image database consisting of 1126 lesions with an empirical cancer prevalence of 14%, 200 different randomly sampled subsets were selected and the truth status of a variable number of cases was masked to the algorithm to mimic different types of labeled and unlabeled data sources. The prevalence was fixed at 50% cancerous for the labeled data and 5% cancerous for the unlabeled. In the first stage of the dual-stage CADx scheme, the authors term “transductive dimension reduction regularization” (TDR-R), both labeled and unlabeled images characterized by extracted lesion features were combined using dimension reduction (DR) techniques and mapped to a lower-dimensional representation. (The first stage ignored truth status therefore was an unsupervised algorithm.) In the second stage, the labeled data from the reduced dimension embedding were used to train a classifier toward estimating the probability of malignancy. For the first CADx stage, the authors investigated three DR approaches: Laplacian eigenmaps, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), and principal component analysis. For the TDR-R methods, the classifier in the second stage was a supervised (i.e., utilized truth) Bayesian neural net. The dual-stage CADx schemes were compared to a single-stage scheme based on manifold regularization (MR) in a semisupervised setting via the LapSVM algorithm. Performance in terms of areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of the CADx schemes was evaluated in leave-one-out and .632

  19. Direct Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).

    Kohl, Thomas O; Ascoli, Carl A

    2017-07-05

    The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (cELISA; also called an inhibition ELISA) is designed so that purified antigen competes with antigen in the test sample for binding to an antibody that has been immobilized in microtiter plate wells. The same concept works if the immobilized molecule is antigen and the competing molecules are purified labeled antibody versus antibody in a test sample. Direct cELISAs incorporate labeled antigen or antibody, whereas indirect assay configurations use reporter-labeled secondary antibodies. The cELISA is very useful for determining the concentration of small-molecule antigens in complex sample mixtures. In the direct cELISA, antigen-specific capture antibody is adsorbed onto the microtiter plate before incubation with either known standards or unknown test samples. Enzyme-linked antigen (i.e., labeled antigen) is also added, which can bind to the capture antibody only when the antibody's binding site is not occupied by either the antigen standard or antigen in the test samples. Unbound labeled and unlabeled antigens are washed away and substrate is added. The amount of antigen in the standard or the test sample determines the amount of reporter-labeled antigen bound to antibody, yielding a signal that is inversely proportional to antigen concentration within the sample. Thus, the higher the antigen concentration in the test sample, the less labeled antigen is bound to the capture antibody, and hence the weaker is the resultant signal. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Detection by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of coronavirus antibodies in bovine serum and lacteal secretions.

    Rodak, L; Babiuk, L A; Acres, S D

    1982-07-01

    The sensitivity of a radioimmunoassay (RIA), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a serum neutralization assay (SN) for detecting antibodies to bovine coronavirus in serum and colostrum were compared. Although there proved to be a good correlation among all three assays (r = 0.915 and 0.964 for RIA with SN and ELISA, respectively), RIA and ELISA proved to be at least 10 times more sensitive than neutralization tests. By using these techniques, it was possible to detect a time-dependent decrease in antibody levels in bovine colostrum after parturition. Using ELISA, we demonstrated that 12 of 12 herds in Saskatchewan, and 109 of 110 animals tested, and antibody to bovine coronavirus. There was no elevated antibody response in serum or lacteal secretions of cows vaccinated once or twice with a commercially available modified live rota-coronavirus vaccine. In addition to being more sensitive than SN, ELISA and RIA proved to have other advantages for measuring antibody levels to bovine coronavirus and therefore warrant wider use as tools in diagnostic virology.

  1. Iodoacetyl-functionalized pullulan: A supplemental enhancer for single-domain antibody-polyclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of survivin.

    Matsushita, Takahiko; Arai, Hidenao; Koyama, Tetsuo; Hatano, Ken; Nemoto, Naoto; Matsuoka, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Survivin, an inhibitor of the apoptosis protein family, is a potent tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the methods that has been used for detection of survivin. However, ELISA has several disadvantages caused by the use of conventional antibodies, and we have therefore been trying to develop a novel ELISA system using camelid single-domain antibodies (VHHs) as advantageous replacements. Here we report a supplemental approach to improve the VHH-polyclonal antibody sandwich ELISA for survivin detection. Iodoacetyl-functionalized pullulan was synthesized, and its thiol reactivity was characterized by a model reaction with l-cysteine. The thiophilic pullulan was applied to an immunoassay asan additive upon coating of standard assay plates with an anti-survivin VHH fusion protein with C-terminal cysteine. The results showed that the mole ratio of the additive to VHH had a significant effect on the consequent response. Mole ratios of 0.07, 0.7, and 7 led to 90% lower, 15% higher, and 69% lower responses, respectively, than the response of a positive control in which no additive was used. The background levels observed in any additive conditions were as low as that of a negative control lacking both VHH and the additive. These results indicate the applicability of the thiol-reactive pullulan as a response enhancer to VHH-based ELISA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  3. [Establishment of chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for detecting antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in swine].

    Cui, Chen; Huang, Ligang; Li, Jing; Zou, Xingqi; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Lei; Zhao, Qizu; Yang, Limin; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-11-25

    Recombinant structural protein VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O was expressed in Escherichia coli and then purified using Nickel affinity chromatography. A chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) method was established using the purified recombinant protein as coating antigen to detect antibody of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in swine. The specificity of VP1-CLEIA method is 100%. The coefficients of variation in the plate and between plates are 1.10%-6.70% and 0.66%-4.80%, respectively. Comparing with the commercial indirect ELISA kit or liquid phase block ELISA kit, the calculated coincidence rate is 93.50% or 94.00%. The high specificity and stability suggested this detection method can be used to monitor the antibody level of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in swine.

  4. Influenza A plasma and serum virus antibody detection comparison in dogs using blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    H. T. Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The influenza A virus (IAV is an important zoonotic pathogen with infections also reported in dogs. IAV infections can be detected through the presence of antibodies using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Serum is the only standard sample source; however, there is no information on the availability of other sample sources for IAV antibody detection in dogs. Compared with serum, plasma is more widely employed in most animal hospitals. The object of this study is to investigate whether plasma collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA tubes (EDTA plasma or heparin tubes (heparin plasma could be used in the ELISA protocol instead of serum for IAV antibody detection in dogs. Materials and Methods: Totally, 82 matched EDTA plasma and serum sample pairs and 79 matched heparin plasma and serum sample pairs were employed using blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA. The agreement and correlation between the plasma (EDTA or heparin plasma and serum were assessed using the agreement index kappa (kD calculation and Pearson correlation coefficient, respectively. Results: The agreement index kD of EDTA plasma and serum was 1.0, and that of heparin plasma and serum was 0.85. The Pearson correlation coefficient of EDTA plasma and serum was 0.87 (p<0.01, and that of heparin plasma and serum was 0.82 (p<0.01. Conclusion: The results proved that plasma, especially EDTA plasma, could be substituted for serum in the bELISA test. This might greatly expand the clinical applicability of IAV antibody detection in dogs.

  5. Development of a novel ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay for human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibody.

    Numata, Satoshi; Katakami, Hideki; Inoue, Shinobu; Sawada, Hirotake; Hashida, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel, ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay (immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay) for determination of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody concentrations in serum samples from patients with type 2 diabetes. We developed an immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and measured glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody from 22 patients with type 1 diabetes, 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 32 healthy controls. A conventional ELISA kit identified 10 patients with type 1 diabetes and one patient with type 2 diabetes as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive, whereas 15 patients with type 1 diabetes and six patients with type 2 diabetes were identified as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive using immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay. Immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay is a highly sensitive and specific assay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and might be clinically useful for diabetic onset prediction and early diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for total sennosides using anti-sennside A and anti-sennoside B monoclonal antibodies.

    Morinaga, Osamu; Uto, Takuhiro; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Total sennosides concentration is a very important factor when rhubarb and senna will be used as crude drugs. However, one-step analytical technique for total sennosides has not been reported except HPLC. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for total sennosides concentration by using the combination of anti-sennoside A (SA) and anti-sennoside B (SB) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in a single assay has been investigated. Total sennosides concentration in rhubarb and senna samples determined by newly developed assay system showed good agreement with those analyzed by ELISA using anti-SA MAb and anti-SB MAb, respectively.

  7. Development and application of radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassays in microbiological and immunological diagnosis. 3. Comparative studies for the detection of virus antibodies with passive hemagglutination test, radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay, resp

    Lauf, H; Struy, H; Morenz, J [Medizinische Akademie, Magdeburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1982-06-01

    Radioimmuno- and enzyme immunoassays (solid phase RIA and ELISA) developed by the authors for the determination of antibodies of adeno-2- and parainfluenza-1-viruses are described and the detection sensibility for antibodies is compared with that of the conventional passive hemagglutination test. The sensibility of the radioimmunoassay for the detection of IgG antibodies against adeno-2-viruses is nearly 10 times higher than that of the passive hemagglutination. RIA and ELISA show no essential differences in their detection sensibilities in the detection of IgG antibodies against parainfluenza-1-viruses.

  8. Influence of gamma radiation on antibodies fixation on polystyrene. Application to ELISA enzyme immunoassay

    Esterlin, S.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is divided into two parts: the first part includes a description of the ELISA test, a comparative analysis of the main supports (polystyrene microtitration trays) used for this technique and an evaluation of gamma radiation effects on the quality of the supports. The study was carried out with the following antigens: Spiroplasma citri R8A2, a tymovirus and Tristeza virus. The second part dealt with the effects of gamma radiations on antibodies and antibody-support system (interaction immobilized immunoglobulins-plastic support) [fr

  9. Personalized Resource Recommendations using Learning from Positive and Unlabeled Examples

    Priyank Thakkar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel approach for recommending social resources using learning from positive and unlabeled examples. Bookmarks submitted on social bookmarking system delicious1 and artists on online music system last.fm2 are considered as social resources. The foremost feature of this problem is that there are no labeled negative resources/examples available for learning a recommender/classifier. The memory based collaborative filtering has served as the most widely used algorithm for social resource recommendation. However, its predictions are based on some ad hoc heuristic rules and its success depends on the availability of a critical mass of users. This paper proposes model based two-step techniques to learn a classifier using positive and unlabeled examples to address personalized resource recommendations. In the first step of these techniques, naïve Bayes classifier is employed to identify reliable negative resources. In the second step, to generate effective resource recommender, classification and regression tree and least square support vector machine (LS-SVM are exercised. A direct method based on LS-SVM is also put forward to realize the recommendation task. LS-SVM is customized for learning from positive and unlabeled data. Furthermore, the impact of feature selection on our proposed techniques is also studied. Memory based collaborative filtering as well as our proposed techniques exploit usage data to generate personalized recommendations. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques outperform existing method appreciably.

  10. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody “Combination” Enzyme Linked ...

    Conclusion: We conclude that although this assay depicts high sensitivity and specificity in detecting antibodies to HCV, it seems not to add further benefit in our study population to detect HCV infections by enhanced sensitivity due the potential contingency to trace viral capsid antigens. Keywords: Ag-Ab Combination assay ...

  11. Validation of a KHV antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)

    Bergmann, S M; Wang, Q; Zeng, W

    2017-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) causes KHV disease (KHVD). The virus is highly contagious in carp or koi and can induce a high mortality. Latency and, in some cases, a lack of signs presents a challenge for virus detection. Appropriate immunological detection methods for anti-KHV antibodies have not yet be...

  12. Evaluation of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit for the detection of Babesia bovis antibodies in cattle in Argentina

    Echaide, S; Echaide, I E; Mangold, A J; Lugaresi, C I; Guglielmone, A A [Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria, Rafaela, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gaido, A B [Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Salta, Salta (Argentina)

    1998-11-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to Babesia bovis was evaluated by using sera of 874 cattle carrying B. bovis antibodies, 700 sera of uninfected cattle, and 357 sera from calves from 16 herds subjected to different B. bovis inoculation rates. The seropositive/ seronegative cut-off point set as double the mean percent positivity of negative cattle sera (= 16%). The sensitivity of the ELISA (four trials) ranged from 97.1% to 100% and the specificity (three trials) varied from 92.0% to 97.0%. The agreement between ELISA and immunofluorescent antibody test was {>=} 90.0% in 18 of 23 evaluations and it ranged from 86.0% to 88.0% in the remainder. The correlation coefficient between percentage of sera positive to ELISA and IFA test in 16 herds was 0.9958 (P<0.001). The ELISA has the advantages of a high sensitivity, objectivity and capacity to test large number of samples in short period of time and could replace the IFA test specially for epidemiological studies. (author) 11 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Antibody-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ABELLA) for the sialylated recombinant human erythropoietin present in culture supernatant.

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Lee, Seung Jae; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2008-11-04

    The terminal sialic acid of human erythropoietin (hEPO) is essential for in vivo activity. The current resorcinol and HPLC methods for analyzing alpha2,3-linked sialic acid require more than a microgram of purified rhEPO, and purification takes a great deal of time and labor. In this study, we assessed the use of an antibody-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ABELLA) for analyzing non-purified recombinant hEPO (rhEPO). The major problem of this method was the high background due to terminal sialylation of components of the assay (antibody and bovine serum albumin) other than rhEPO. To solve this problem, we used a monoclonal antibody (Mab 287) to capture the rhEPO, and oxidized the bovine serum albumin used for blocking with meta-periodate. The sialic acid content of non-purified rhEPO measured by ABELLA was similar to that obtained by the resorcinol method on purified rhEPO. ABELLA has advantages such as adaptability and need for minimal amounts of rhEPO (40 ng/ml). Our observations suggest that ABELLA should reduce the time and labor needed to improve culture conditions so as to increase protein sialylation, and also facilitate the study of sialylation mechanisms.

  14. Evaluation of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit for the detection of Babesia bovis antibodies in cattle in Argentina

    Echaide, S.; Echaide, I.E.; Mangold, A.J.; Lugaresi, C.I.; Guglielmone, A.A.; Gaido, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to Babesia bovis was evaluated by using sera of 874 cattle carrying B. bovis antibodies, 700 sera of uninfected cattle, and 357 sera from calves from 16 herds subjected to different B. bovis inoculation rates. The seropositive/ seronegative cut-off point set as double the mean percent positivity of negative cattle sera (= 16%). The sensitivity of the ELISA (four trials) ranged from 97.1% to 100% and the specificity (three trials) varied from 92.0% to 97.0%. The agreement between ELISA and immunofluorescent antibody test was ≥ 90.0% in 18 of 23 evaluations and it ranged from 86.0% to 88.0% in the remainder. The correlation coefficient between percentage of sera positive to ELISA and IFA test in 16 herds was 0.9958 (P<0.001). The ELISA has the advantages of a high sensitivity, objectivity and capacity to test large number of samples in short period of time and could replace the IFA test specially for epidemiological studies. (author)

  15. Ethylbenzene induces microsomal oxygen free radical generation: antibody-directed characterization of the responsible cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Serron, S C; Dwivedi, N; Backes, W L

    2000-05-01

    Small aromatic hydrocarbons cause changes in oxidative metabolism by modulating the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes, with the changes in these enzymes being responsible for qualitative changes in aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to the small alkylbenzene ethylbenzene (EB) leads to an increase in hepatic free radical production. Male F344 rats were treated with ip injections of EB (10 mmol/kg) and compared to corn oil controls. Hepatic free radical production was examined by measuring the conversion of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) to its fluorescent product 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). A significant elevation of fluorescent DCF production was observed after treatment with EB, despite the lack of effect on overall cytochrome P450 levels. This process was shown to be inhibitable by metyrapone, an inhibitor of P450. DCF production was also inhibited by catalase, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is one of the reactive oxygen intermediates involved in EB-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Interestingly, superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not inhibit DCF production in corn oil-treated rats but was an effective inhibitor in the EB-treated groups. In an effort to determine if the increase in ROS production was related to changes in specific P450 enzymes, DCF production was measured in the presence of anti-CYP2B, anti-CYP2C11, anti-CYP2E1, and anti-CYP3A2 inhibitory antibodies. Anti-CYP2B antibodies inhibited DCF production in EB-treated, but not corn oil groups, which is consistent with the low constitutive levels of this enzyme and its induction by EB. The data also demonstrate that CYP2B contributes to ROS production. Anti-CYP2C11 did not influence DCF production in either group. ROS formation in corn oil-treated rats as well as in ethylbenzene-treated rats was also inhibited with antibodies to anti-CYP2E1 and anti-CYP3A2. These results suggest that CYP2C11 does not appear to

  16. Relation between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay for detection of antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b

    Kristensen, K.; Weis Bentzon, M.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide (PRP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is important because vaccines inducing such antibodies are now available. We developed and evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of these antibodies based on direct coating of the plates with tyraminated PRP. The assay fulfilled the requirements for parallel line assays; it was sensitive, specific, and reproducible with a coefficient of variation between days of 19%. Results from the ELISA were compared with results from radioimmunoassay and a correlation coefficient of 0.93 was found. Results obtained by the two methods were proportional and the relation was indepenedent of the antibody level. The relation between them was also unaffected by the contribution of different antibody isotypes, indicating that these were measured to the same extent by both methods. ELISA employing direct coating of the plates with tyraminated PRP represents a useful alternative for detection of antibodies when studying immunogenicity of Hib vaccines. (au)

  17. Enzyme immunoassay for measurement of murine plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, employing a specific antibody produced by the DNA vaccine method.

    Yamada, Takayuki; Takagi, Akira; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Yamamoto, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Matsushita, Tadashi; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2003-01-01

    We developed a sensitive immunoassay to determine the concentration of mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The assay was a non-competitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the production of a specific polyclonal antibody against mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) used both as a trapping and detecting antibody. This antibody was raised in a rabbit by direct introduction of the expression vector plasmid DNA encoding mouse PAI-1, instead of conventional immunization with the purified protein. The standard curve was constructed with a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mouse PAI-1 fusion protein (GST-mPAI-1) and dose-response of the assay was linear for GST-mPAI-1 between 6.25 and 100 pM. In order to assess the consistency of the assay, we measured PAI-1 antigen in normal mouse pooled plasma several times. We found that the intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were 4.8% and 9.2%, respectively, indicating that the ELISA would be sufficiently repeatable and reproducible. In this assay, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice showed substantially higher levels (22-fold) of plasma PAI-1 antigen than did control mice (12.5+/-2.4 vs. 0.58+/-0.16 nM), similar to results reported elsewhere. Taken together, the DNA vaccine method is extremely useful for preparing specific antibodies against mouse PAI-1, which can be utilized to establish the ELISA and analyze the profile of PAI-1 distributions in mice under various conditions. This approach might also be useful for immunological investigation of other coagulation factors and related proteins.

  18. Antibody Banding Patterns of the Enzyme-Linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot and Brain Imaging Findings in Patients With Neurocysticercosis.

    Arroyo, Gianfranco; Rodriguez, Silvia; Lescano, Andres G; Alroy, Karen A; Bustos, Javier A; Santivañez, Saul; Gonzales, Isidro; Saavedra, Herbert; Pretell, E Javier; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Tsang, Victor C W; Garcia, Hector H

    2018-01-06

    The enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay is the reference serological test for neurocysticercosis (NCC). A positive result on EITB does not always correlate with the presence of active infections in the central nervous system (CNS), and patients with a single viable brain cyst may be EITB negative. Nonetheless, EITB antibody banding patterns appears to be related with the expression of 3 protein families of Taenia solium, and in turn with the characteristics of NCC in the CNS (type, stage, and burden of viable cysts). We evaluated EITB antibody banding patterns and brain imaging findings of 548 NCC cases. Similar banding patterns were grouped into homogeneous classes using latent class analysis. The association between classes and brain imaging findings was assessed. Four classes were identified. Class 1 (patients negative or only positive to the GP50 band, related to the protein family of the same name) was associated with nonviable or single viable parenchymal cysticerci; class 2 (patients positive to bands GP42-39 and GP24, related to the T24-42 protein family, with or without anti-GP50 antibodies) was associated with intraparenchymal viable and nonviable infections; classes 3 and 4 (positive to GP50, GP42-39, and GP24 but also responding to low molecular weight bands GP21, GP18, GP14, and GP13, related to the 8 kDa protein family) were associated with extraparenchymal and intraparenchymal multiple viable cysticerci. EITB antibody banding patterns correlate with brain imaging findings and complement imaging information for the diagnosis of NCC and for staging NCC patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders

  20. Evaluation of an egg yolk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody test and its use to assess the prevalence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in laying hens in Italy

    Marco Tamba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in commercial layers was established by the presence of antibodies in eggs. Saline-extracted yolks were used with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. For the prevalence study, yolks from 30 eggs were obtained from each of 66 flocks coming from 36 layer farms. The prevalence of egg antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum was 33.3% in single-age farms and 77.8% in multi-age farms. In 27 flocks, antibody titers were compared with results obtained from blood samples taken in the same flock and in the same period and analyzed with the same kit. This study has confirmed that egg yolk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody test is a suitable and practical approach for assessing the flock prevalence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in layer hens.

  1. Enzyme immunoassay for rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids and its application to differentiation of street and laboratory strains of rabies virus.

    Smith, J S; Sumner, J W; Roumillat, L F

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive enzyme immunoassay is described for detecting rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids. Glass fiber filter disks were used to immobilize gamma-irradiated mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with street or laboratory strains of rabies virus. Bound rabies-specific antibody was detected by reaction with horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G. The assay was performed in a 96-well filtration device developed by Cleveland et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. ...

  2. Immobilization of enzymes and antibodies to radiation grafted polymers for therapeutic and diagnostic applications

    Hoffman, A.S.; Gombotz, W.R.; Uenoyama, S.; Dong, L.C.; Schmer, G.

    1986-01-01

    Pre-irradiation and mutual radiation grafting were employed to produce poly(methacrylic acid) (MAAc) hydrogels on polypropylene/polyethylene (PP/PE) copolymer films, and porous PP fibers of a plasma filter. A diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) assay was developed to measure the surface peroxide concentration of the pre-irradiated PP/PE films prior to grafting. Mutually grafted porous PP fibers were used for subsequent immobilization of L-asparaginase while the mutually grafted PP/PE films were used to immobilize a schistosoma monoclonal antibody.

  3. DNA-linked Inhibitor Antibody Assay (DIANA) for sensitive and selective enzyme detection and inhibitor screening

    Navrátil, Václav; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Knedlík, Tomáš; Vik, V.; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2017), č. článku e10. ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : quantitative PCR * enzyme detection * inhibitor screening Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemical research methods Impact factor: 10.162, year: 2016 https:// academic .oup.com/nar/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/nar/gkw853

  4. The significance for epidemiological studies anti-measles antibody detection examined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT).

    Siennicka, Joanna; Częścik, Agnieszka; Trzcińska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of anti-measles antibodies for protection and significance for epidemiological studies determination of antibodies by different serological methods. The comparison of anti-measles virus antibodies levels measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT) was described. It was found that the 200 mIU/ml of anti-measles activity measured by PRNT (level protection against symp- tomatic disease) is equivalent of 636 mIU/ml measured by EIA (Enzygnost®Anti-Measles Virus/IgG, Simens).

  5. Positive-Unlabeled Learning for Pupylation Sites Prediction

    Ming Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupylation plays a key role in regulating various protein functions as a crucial posttranslational modification of prokaryotes. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of pupylation, it is important to identify pupylation substrates and sites accurately. Several computational methods have been developed to identify pupylation sites because the traditional experimental methods are time-consuming and labor-sensitive. With the existing computational methods, the experimentally annotated pupylation sites are used as the positive training set and the remaining nonannotated lysine residues as the negative training set to build classifiers to predict new pupylation sites from the unknown proteins. However, the remaining nonannotated lysine residues may contain pupylation sites which have not been experimentally validated yet. Unlike previous methods, in this study, the experimentally annotated pupylation sites were used as the positive training set whereas the remaining nonannotated lysine residues were used as the unlabeled training set. A novel method named PUL-PUP was proposed to predict pupylation sites by using positive-unlabeled learning technique. Our experimental results indicated that PUL-PUP outperforms the other methods significantly for the prediction of pupylation sites. As an application, PUL-PUP was also used to predict the most likely pupylation sites in nonannotated lysine sites.

  6. Validation of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of trypanosomal antibodies in Ghanaian cattle

    Doku, C.K.; Seidu, I.B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ab-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to pathogenic trypanosomes in cattle is described. Two hundred known negative sera obtained from the tsetse-free zone of Dori (Burkina Faso) were analyzed using microtitre plates pre-coated with crude antigen lysates of Trypanosoma congolense and T. vivax. A pre-test optimization was carried out and a percent positivity (PP) of 50% was chosen (specificity: >82%) for assaying field sera. A total of 440 serum samples collected from cattle in areas of known and unknown disease prevalence were assayed. For all animals the packed red cell volume (PCV) was determined and the buffy coat technique (BCT) and blood smears were examined to detect trypanosomes at the species level. A comparison of the BCT and Ab-ELISA results showed there was a much higher prevalence of antibodies to both species than the parasite prevalence as shown by the BCT (10 fold). The rate of agreement between BCT-positive and Ab-ELISA-positive samples for both species was low (<10%). No conclusion could be drawn from this finding because of the low number of known BCT positive cases that were identified. There was a better, albeit highly variable, agreement between BCT-negative and Ab-ELISA-negative samples (30-70%). Proposals for further improvement of the Ab-ELISA and prospects for the use of the assay in the monitoring of trypanosomosis control in Ghana are discussed. (author)

  7. Summary of field trials using the direct and competitive enzyme immunoassays for detection of antibody to brucella abortus

    Nielsen, K.; Gall, D.

    1998-01-01

    Two indirect and two competitive enzyme immunoassays for detection of antibody to Brucella abortus, validated elsewhere, were field tested in five different Latin American laboratories. Testing was performed according to standardised protocols using sera obtained in each area. Sera from B. abortus infected herds, from vaccinated (but serologically negative in a screening test) and non-vaccinated cattle were tested in each assay and compared to the results obtained with conventional diagnostic tests used for diagnosis of brucellosis in each country. Relative sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for each country as well as a weighted summary combining the data from all the participating laboratories. The result demonstrate that all ELISAs performed as well as, or better than, the conventional aerological tests. Given the inherent errors in the use of the latter in the diagnosis of brucellosis, it is recommended that the ELISAs described here be considered as replacements for the conventional tests. The CELISA using the lipopolysaccharide antigen with the competing monoclonal antibody M84, should be considered as the most useful because of cross-species and vaccination considerations. (author)

  8. Usefulness of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for screening of anti HIV antibodies in urinary specimens: A comparative analysis.

    Sahni, A K; Nagendra, A; Roy, Partha; Patrikar, S

    2014-07-01

    Standard HIV testing is done using serum or plasma. FDA approved ELISA to screen urine for IgG antibodies to HIV-1 in 1996. It is a simple, noninvasive test and is appropriate for developing countries where health care personnel may not be professionally trained or where clean needles for drawing blood may not always be available. 436 individuals with high-risk behavior and strong clinical suspicion of HIV infection were screened for IgG antibodies to HIV-1 in urine by ELISA. Urine HIV testing was performed by enzyme immunoassay, at the ongoing Voluntary Confidential Counseling and Testing Center (VCCTC) at a large tertiary care microbiology lab. The individuals enrolled for the study had high-risk exposure to the virus and majorities were from a state with a high incidence of HIV infection. In all individuals, both serum and urine were tested for IgG antibodies to HIV-1. Overall, 135 individuals (30.96%) were HIV-positive, of whom 96 (71%) had never previously tested positive; 87% of those who tested positive received their results, and most were referred for medical care. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of HIV-1 urine ELISA test kit were determined. Sensitivity was found to be 89.6%; 95% CI [82.9-94.0], specificity 97.3%; 95% CI [94.6-98.8], positive predictive value 93.8%; 95% CI [87.8-97.1] and negative predictive value 95.4%; 95% CI [92.3-97.4]. Efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity of the urine-based screening for HIV-1 test kits were excellent as compared to the reference test.

  9. A Comparison of Anti-Nuclear Antibody Quantification Using Automated Enzyme Immunoassays and Immunofluorescence Assays

    Baronaite, Renata; Engelhart, Merete; Mørk Hansen, Troels

    2014-01-01

    using IFA and automated EIA techniques. The IFA results generated by two independent laboratories were compared with the EIA results from antibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), from ANA screening, and from tests of the seven included subantigens. The final IFA and EIA results for 386 unique......, with Cohen's kappa value of 0.30 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.14-0.46), which decreased to 0.23 (95% CI = 0.06-0.40) when the results for dsDNA were omitted. The EIA method was less reliable for assessing nuclear and speckled reactivity patterns, whereas the IFA method presented difficulties detecting...... dsDNA and Ro activity. The automated EIA method was performed in a similar way to the conventional IFA method using HEp-2 cells; thus, automated EIA may be used as a screening test....

  10. Activity modulation of microbial enzymes by llama (Lama glama) heavy-chain polyclonal antibodies during in vivo immune responses.

    Ferrari, A; Weill, F S; Paz, M L; Cela, E M; González Maglio, D H; Leoni, J

    2012-03-01

    Since they were first described in 1993, it was found that recombinant variable fragments (rVHHs) of heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) from Camelidae have unusual biophysical properties, as well as a special ability to interact with epitopes that are cryptic for conventional Abs. It has been assumed that in vivo raised polyclonal HCAbs (pHCAbs) should behave in a similar manner than rVHHs; however, this assumption has not been tested sufficiently. Furthermore, our own preliminary work on a single serum sample from a llama immunized with a β-lactamase, has suggested that pHCAbs have no special ability to down-modulate catalytic activity. In this work, we further explored the interaction of pHCAbs from four llamas raised against two microbial enzymes and analyzed it within a short and a long immunization plan. The relative contribution of pHCAbs to serum titer was found to be low compared with that of the most abundant conventional subisotype (IgG(1)), during the whole immunization schedule. Furthermore, pHCAbs not only failed to inhibit the enzymes, but also activated one of them. Altogether, these results suggest that raising high titer inhibitory HCAbs is not a straightforward strategy - neither as a biotechnological strategy nor in the biological context of an immune response against infection - as raising inhibitory rVHHs.

  11. Comparison of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and one rapid immunoblot assay for detection of herpes simplex virus type 2-specific antibodies in serum

    Groen, J; Van Dijk, G; Niesters, H G; Van Der Meijden, W I; Osterhaus, A D

    The sensitivities and specificities of three immunoassays for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in serum, including the one-strip rapid immunoblot assay (RIBA; Chiron Corporation) and two indirect enzyme immunosorbent assays (EIA; Gull

  12. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on monoclonal antibodies for the serology and antigen detection in canine parvovirus infections.

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); N. Juntti; B. Klingeborn; J. Groen (Jan); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed for the detection of canine parvovirus (CPV) or CPV antigen in dog faeces and two other ELISA systems were developed for the detection of CPV-specific antibodies in dog sera. The ELISA's were based on the use of

  13. Comparison of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for detection of IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi

    Wahyuni, Sitti; van Ree, Ronald; Mangali, Andarias; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Sartono, Erliyani

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for specific IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi was compared with the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for use in immunoepidemiological studies of lymphatic filariasis. Sera used were from individuals (aged 5-82 years) living in an area endemic for lymphatic

  14. Development and validation of an indirect Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay for the detection of antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in blood samples from ruminants

    Heijden, van der H.M.J.F.; Bouwstra, R.J.; Mars, M.H.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Wellenberg, G.J.; Maanen, van C.

    2013-01-01

    To detect Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infections in ruminants and to perform SBV epidemiological studies a cost-effective serological test is required. For these purposes an indirect whole virus Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for detection of SBV specific antibodies in ruminant blood

  15. Evaluation of a commercial competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of avian influenza virus subtype H5 antibodies in zoo birds

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Andersen, Jannie Holmegaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2017-01-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is the current gold standard for detecting antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been explored for use in poultry and certain wild bird species because of high efficiency and lower cost. This study com...

  16. Development and application of triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for begomovirus detection using monoclonal antibodies against Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus.

    Seepiban, Channarong; Charoenvilaisiri, Saengsoon; Warin, Nuchnard; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Phironrit, Namthip; Phuangrat, Bencharong; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Attathom, Supat; Gajanandana, Oraprapai

    2017-05-30

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus, TYLCTHV, is a begomovirus that causes severe losses of tomato crops in Thailand as well as several countries in Southeast and East Asia. The development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and serological methods for detecting TYLCTHV is essential for epidemiological studies and screening for virus-resistant cultivars. The recombinant coat protein (CP) of TYLCTHV was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to generate MAbs against TYLCTHV through hybridoma technology. The MAbs were characterized and optimized to develop triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (TAS-ELISAs) for begomovirus detection. The efficiency of TAS-ELISAs for begomovirus detection was evaluated with tomato, pepper, eggplant, okra and cucurbit plants collected from several provinces in Thailand. Molecular identification of begomoviruses in these samples was also performed through PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the CP gene. Two MAbs (M1 and D2) were generated and used to develop TAS-ELISAs for begomovirus detection. The results of begomovirus detection in 147 field samples indicated that MAb M1 reacted with 2 begomovirus species, TYLCTHV and Tobacco leaf curl Yunnan virus (TbLCYnV), whereas MAb D2 reacted with 4 begomovirus species, TYLCTHV, TbLCYnV, Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and Squash leaf curl China virus (SLCCNV). Phylogenetic analyses of CP amino acid sequences from these begomoviruses revealed that the CP sequences of begomoviruses recognized by the narrow-spectrum MAb M1 were highly conserved, sharing 93% identity with each other but only 72-81% identity with MAb M1-negative begomoviruses. The CP sequences of begomoviruses recognized by the broad-spectrum MAb D2 demonstrated a wider range of amino acid sequence identity, sharing 78-96% identity with each other and 72-91% identity with those that were not detected by MAb D2. TAS-ELISAs using the narrow-specificity MAb M1 proved highly efficient for the detection of

  17. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary

    Zhou, Lifang [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Yajing [Hangzhou EPIE Bio-detection Technology Limited, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Shuqing, E-mail: chenshuqing@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-01-15

    tool to detect DBP in urinary samples. - Highlights: • DBP complete antigens (DBP–BSA and DBP–OVA) were designed and synthesized novelty. • The development of DBP monoclonal antibody with no cross-reactivity, low LOD (0.06 ng mL{sup −1}) and IC{sub 50} (7.34 ng mL{sup −1}) • Optimization and evaluation of indirect complete competitive enzyme immunoassay • Application of the method in detecting DBP of internal exposure among Chinese human urinary • Subjects were randomly recruited and system classified by ages, genders and educations.

  18. Sensitive optical biosensors for unlabeled targets: A review

    Fan Xudong; White, Ian M.; Shopova, Siyka I.; Zhu Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Sun Yuze

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the recent progress in optical biosensors that use the label-free detection protocol, in which biomolecules are unlabeled or unmodified, and are detected in their natural forms. In particular, it will focus on the optical biosensors that utilize the refractive index change as the sensing transduction signal. Various optical label-free biosensing platforms will be introduced, including, but not limited to, surface plasmon resonance, interferometers, waveguides, fiber gratings, ring resonators, and photonic crystals. Emphasis will be given to the description of optical structures and their respective sensing mechanisms. Examples of detecting various types of biomolecules will be presented. Wherever possible, the sensing performance of each optical structure will be evaluated and compared in terms of sensitivity and detection limit

  19. Learning gene regulatory networks from only positive and unlabeled data

    Elkan Charles

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, supervised learning methods have been exploited to reconstruct gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. The reconstruction of a network is modeled as a binary classification problem for each pair of genes. A statistical classifier is trained to recognize the relationships between the activation profiles of gene pairs. This approach has been proven to outperform previous unsupervised methods. However, the supervised approach raises open questions. In particular, although known regulatory connections can safely be assumed to be positive training examples, obtaining negative examples is not straightforward, because definite knowledge is typically not available that a given pair of genes do not interact. Results A recent advance in research on data mining is a method capable of learning a classifier from only positive and unlabeled examples, that does not need labeled negative examples. Applied to the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks, we show that this method significantly outperforms the current state of the art of machine learning methods. We assess the new method using both simulated and experimental data, and obtain major performance improvement. Conclusions Compared to unsupervised methods for gene network inference, supervised methods are potentially more accurate, but for training they need a complete set of known regulatory connections. A supervised method that can be trained using only positive and unlabeled data, as presented in this paper, is especially beneficial for the task of inferring gene regulatory networks, because only an incomplete set of known regulatory connections is available in public databases such as RegulonDB, TRRD, KEGG, Transfac, and IPA.

  20. Clinical significance of quantitative analysis of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) with chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay

    Zhu Cuiying; Wang Qing; Huang Gang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The only method of laboratory diagnosis for autoimmune thyroid diseases used to be serum TGA and TMA detections. Morerecently, quantitative analysis of TPOAb has been introduced. To assess the relative sensitivity of these tests , positive rates detected with the respective tests were compared. Methods: Serum TGA, TMA (with RIA) and TPOAb (with chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay) were simultaneously detected in 998 cases of thyroid diseases (hyperthyroidism 307, Hashimoto's disease 193, simple goiter 498). For complementary sake, fine needle aspiration cytology was obtained in a number of cases including all the patients with Hashimoto's disease. Results: Positive detection rate of TPOAb in three groups of patients (hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto's, simple goiter) was 81.76%, 96.89 % and 42.97% respectively. With TMA, the positive rate was only 54.72%, 65.80%, 22.09% respectively. About one third more cases would be detected with the newer method. Conclusion: For the laboratory detection of auto immune thyroid diseases, quantitative analysis of TPOAb is much wore sensitive than the conventional TMA detection. (authors)

  1. UNLABELED SELECTED SAMPLES IN FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR CLASSIFICATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES WITH LIMITED TRAINING SAMPLES

    A. Kianisarkaleh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction plays a key role in hyperspectral images classification. Using unlabeled samples, often unlimitedly available, unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction methods show better performance when limited number of training samples exists. This paper illustrates the importance of selecting appropriate unlabeled samples that used in feature extraction methods. Also proposes a new method for unlabeled samples selection using spectral and spatial information. The proposed method has four parts including: PCA, prior classification, posterior classification and sample selection. As hyperspectral image passes these parts, selected unlabeled samples can be used in arbitrary feature extraction methods. The effectiveness of the proposed unlabeled selected samples in unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction is demonstrated using two real hyperspectral datasets. Results show that through selecting appropriate unlabeled samples, the proposed method can improve the performance of feature extraction methods and increase classification accuracy.

  2. Development of monoclonal antibodies to pre-haptoglobin 2 and their use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    Flanagan, J J; Arjomandi, A; Delanoy, M L; Du Paty, E; Galea, P; Laune, D; Rieunier, F; Walker, R P; Binder, S R

    2014-04-01

    Haptoglobins (HPs) are alpha 2-globulin proteins that bind free hemoglobin in plasma to prevent oxidative damage. HPs are produced as preproteins that are proteolytically cleaved in the ER into alpha and beta chains prior to forming mature, functional tetramers. Two alleles exist in humans (HP1 and HP2), therefore three genotypes are present in the population, i.e., HP1-1, HP2-1, and HP2-2. A biochemical role for nascent haptoglobin 2 (pre-haptoglobin 2 or pre-HP2) as the only known modulator of intestinal permeability has been established. In addition, elevated levels of serum pre-HP2 have been detected in multiple conditions including celiac disease and type I diabetes, which are believed to result in part through dysregulation of the intestinal barrier. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody that is specific for pre-HP2 with a binding affinity in the nanomolar range. Additional antibodies with specificities for preHP but not mature haptoglobin were also characterized. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established and validated. The ELISA showed high specificity for pre-HP2 even in the presence of excess pre-HP1 or mature haptoglobins, and has excellent linearity and inter- and intra-assay reproducibility with a working range from 3.1ng/mL to 200ng/mL. Testing of sera from 76 healthy patients revealed a non-Gaussian distribution of pre-HP2 levels with a mean concentration of 221.2ng/mL (95% CI: 106.5-335.9ng/mL) and a median value of 23.9ng/mL. Compared to current approaches, this ELISA offers a validated, monoclonal-based method with high sensitivity and specificity for measuring pre-HP2 in human serum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Bovine coronavirus-specific and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus-specific antibodies in serum versus milk samples detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Ohlson, Anna; Blanco-Penedo, Isabel; Fall, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Bovine coronavirus (BCV; Betacoronavirus 1) and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) are significant causes of enteric and respiratory disease in beef and dairy cattle throughout the world. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are widely used to detect serum antibodies for herd monitoring and prevalence studies. In dairy herds, milk is more readily collected than serum. Hence, in order to investigate the test agreement between serum and milk, both serum and milk samples from 105 cows in 27 dairy herds were analyzed in parallel for presence of immunoglobulin G antibodies to BCV and BRSV. The Bland-Altman analyses of data demonstrated good agreement between serum and milk antibody titers for both viruses. The results indicate milk samples are sufficient for surveillance of antibodies to BCV and BRSV.

  4. Unlabeled probes for the detection and typing of herpes simplex virus.

    Dames, Shale; Pattison, David C; Bromley, L Kathryn; Wittwer, Carl T; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2007-10-01

    Unlabeled probe detection with a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dye is one method to detect and confirm target amplification after PCR. Unlabeled probes and amplicon melting have been used to detect small deletions and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in assays where template is in abundance. Unlabeled probes have not been applied to low-level target detection, however. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was chosen as a model to compare the unlabeled probe method to an in-house reference assay using dual-labeled, minor groove binding probes. A saturating dsDNA dye (LCGreen Plus) was used for real-time PCR. HSV-1, HSV-2, and an internal control were differentiated by PCR amplicon and unlabeled probe melting analysis after PCR. The unlabeled probe technique displayed 98% concordance with the reference assay for the detection of HSV from a variety of archived clinical samples (n = 182). HSV typing using unlabeled probes was 99% concordant (n = 104) to sequenced clinical samples and allowed for the detection of sequence polymorphisms in the amplicon and under the probe. Unlabeled probes and amplicon melting can be used to detect and genotype as few as 10 copies of target per reaction, restricted only by stochastic limitations. The use of unlabeled probes provides an attractive alternative to conventional fluorescence-labeled, probe-based assays for genotyping and detection of HSV and might be useful for other low-copy targets where typing is informative.

  5. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis in european wild boar

    Gortázar Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine tuberculosis (bTB remains a significant problem in some parts of Spain largely because of contacts between cattle and wildlife reservoirs in extensive grazing systems. European Wild boar (Sus scrofa is one of the species involved in the transmission of the disease to other species. Fast and simple detection methods would be critical for assessing infection prevalence, study the mechanisms of pathogen transmission and monitoring the effects of TB control measures. Results An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis in wild boar serum was developed and validated on 185 sera from TB positive and negative wild boar. Based on antigen inoculation of captive animals as well as tuberculosis compatible lesions, culture results and molecular analysis of hunted individuals, animals were allocated into two groups: tuberculosis positive group and tuberculosis negative group. After optimization of the positive to negative ratio using different combinations of serum dilutions and conjugate concentrations, the test yielded a sensitivity of 72.60% and a specificity of 96.43% for the best cut-off. Conclusion Although some negative group animals showed an ELISA positive reaction (

  6. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a gold-nanoparticle based immuno chromatographic test for amatoxins using recombinant antibody

    He, Kuo; Zhao, Ruiping; Wang, Lixia; Feng, Tingting; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Xiuyuan

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe two kinds of rapid assays for the determination of amatoxins in mushrooms. The first is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horseradish peroxidase. The second is a rapid immuno chromatographic assay that uses colloidal gold as a red label (CG-ICA). Both are based on the use of a well-characterized recombinant single chain variable fragment antibody (named scFv-A4). The half-maximum inhibition concentrations (IC50) of α-amanitin, β-amanitin and γ-amanitin are 78, 85 and 90 ng⋅mL"-"1, and the limits of detection (LODs; for IC15) are 1.9, 2.1 and 2.8 ng⋅mL"-"1. The method was applied to the determination of amanitins in mushrooms, and the LODs for α-amanitin, β-amanitin and γ-amanitin in mushroom samples were found to be 4.9, 6.4 and 8.3 ng⋅mL"-"1. The visual minimum detection limits of the optimized CGIA are 4 and 6 ng⋅mL"-"1 for mushroom samples. The test can be performed within 10 min. The results of the analysis of spiked samples showed that the CG-IA can rapidly and semi-quantitatively quantify amatoxins in mushroom samples on site and at low costs. (author)

  7. Detection of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)

    Dumrongpisutikul, S.; Tuchinda, S.

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) were determined in 100 patients using radioreceptor assay (RRA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity of RRA and ELISA were found to be 70.6% and 88.2% respectively (n=51). The specificity of both assays were 100% (n=16). With RRA as the standard test the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were 75.8% and 86.8%. In the untreated hyperthyroid the RRA result which expressed as % specific 125 I-TSH inhibition was 33.6% (n=51), decline to 26.9% in the treated hyperthyroid (n=33) and 14.1% in the euthyroid (n=16). The mean 0.D 492nm of TRAb-ELISA were 0.861 in untreated hyperthyroid, 0.437 in treated hyperthyroid and 0.135 in euthyroid Phi coefficient analysis show that the RRA was 60.4% correlated to hyperthyroidism where as TRAb-ELISA was 80.1%

  8. The development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Trypanosoma vivax antibodies and its use in epidemiological surveys

    Claudio R Madruga

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available There are data indicating that the distribution of Trypanosoma vivax in the Brazilian territory is expanding with potential to reach other areas, where the vectors are present. The detection of anti-trypanosomal antibodies in serum provides important information of the trypanosomal status in cattle herds. For this reason, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Tv-ELISA-Ab with crude antigen from one Brazilian isolate of T. vivax was developed and evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity were respectively 97.6 and 96.9%. In the evaluation of cross-reactions, three calves inoculated with T. evansi trypimastigotes blood forms showed optical densities (OD under the cut-off during the whole experimental period, except one at 45 days post-inoculation. With relation to Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, and Anaplasma marginale, which are endemic hemoparasites in the studied area, the cross-reactions were shown to be 5.7, 5.3, and 1.1%, respectively. The first serological survey of Pantanal and state of Pará showed that T. vivax is widespread, although regions within both areas had significantly different prevalences. Therefore, this Tv-ELISA-Ab may be a more appropriate test for epidemiological studies in developing countries because the diagnostic laboratories in most countries may be able to perform an ELISA, which is not true for polymerase chain reaction.

  9. USE OF AN INDIRECT ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY (ELISA TO DETECT ANTIBODIES IN AYU (Plecogiossus altivelis VACCINATED BY IMMERSION ADMINISTRATION

    . Sukenda

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAn indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect serum antibody in ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis, immunized against Pseudomonasplecoglossicida by immersion vaccination.  First, the procedure of the ELISA was optimized and the sensitivity was checked.  Secondly, the formalin-killed cells (FKC of P. plecoglossicida was administered to ayu by immersion vaccination.  Two weeks after vaccination, fish were divided into two groups, one group was given booster.  The level of specific antibody production of both boostered and vaccinated only fish were statistically higher than unvaccinated control fish at the time of each blood collection.  However, the differences between the boostered and vaccinated only fish were not statistically significant.Keywords :  immunization, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, ayu, ELISA ABSTRAKIndirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA digunakan untuk mendeteksi antibodi pada ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis, yang diimunisasi dengan cara perendaman untuk melawan infeksi Pseudomonas plecoglossicida.  Pertama, prosedur ELISA dioptimasikan dan sensitivitas dari metode ini juga diperiksa.  Kemudian, bakteri Plecoglossus altivelis yang sudah dimatikan dengan formalin diberikan ke ikan ayu dengan vaksinasi perendaman.  Dua minggu setelah vaksinasi, ikan dibagi menjadi dua kelompok, satu kelompok diberi vaksinasi kedua.  Produksi antibodi spesifik dari ikan-ikan yang divaksinasi satu kali dengan vaksinasi dua kaii secara statistik lebih tinggi dibandingkan dengan control.  Akan tetapi, tidak ada perbedaan produksi antibodi antara ikan yarig divaksanisi satu kali dengan divaksinasi dua kali.Kata kunci :  imunisasi, Pseudomonasplecoglossicida, ayu, ELISA

  10. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay, complement fixation, anticomplement immunofluorescence and passive haemaglutination techniques for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody

    Booth, J C; Hannington, G; Bakir, T M.F.; Stern, H; Kangro, H; Griffiths, P D; Heath, R B [Saint George' s Hospital Medical School, London (UK); Saint Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (UK))

    1982-12-01

    The radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were found to be comparable in sensitivity and specificity for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody, and 10 to 100 times more sensitive than complement-fixation (CF), anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) and passive haemagglutination (PHA). In screening tests for antibody, the frequency of false-positive and -negative results was 0.6% for RIA and ELISA, 1.5% for CF, 1.6% for ACIF and 3.6% for PHA. PHA was the least satisfactory test, largely because of technical problems.

  11. Application of commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA for the detection of antibodies for foot-and-mouth disease virus in wild boar and red deer

    Terzić Svjetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For detecting antibodies towards foot and mouth (FMD virus in sera collected from red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus and wild boars (Sus scrofa, three commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used. Two ELISA kits (PrioCHECK FMDV NS and CHEKIT FMD-3ABC were used for the detection of antibodies towards non-structural proteins of FMD virus and one assay was based on the detection of antibodies for serotype O (PrioCHECK FMDV type O. All of the sera tested in our study were negative for antibodies against FMD virus. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of commercially available ELISA kits given for marketing authorization in Croatia in testing the prevalence of FMD antibodies in wild boar and red deer populations. Since the producers of ELISA kits used in our study did not declare wild animals as a target species, we hypothesised that the same kits could be used for serological diagnosis of FMD in red deer and wild boars. Our study confirmed that the kits used are acceptable for detecting antibodies in both species tested, however, the investigation highlighted the problem of validating the kits due to the absence of available positive sera originating from red deer, as well as other susceptible species, especially artiodactyls.

  12. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) and development of a PAD2-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Damgaard, Dres; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Skjødt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) has been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis. To investigate the association of various diseases with extracellular PAD2, we raised monoclonal antibodies (m......Abs) against rabbit PAD2 and evaluated their cross-reactivity with human PAD2 by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blotting and immunohistological staining of inflamed synovial tissue. Moreover, we established a sandwich ELISA detecting human PAD2, based on two different monoclonal...... diseases....

  13. Bystander responses in three-dimensional cultures containing radiolabelled and unlabelled human cells

    Pinto, M.; Azzam, E. I.; Howell, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Research on the radiation-induced bystander effect has been carried out mainly in 2-D tissue culture systems. This study uses a 3-D model, wherein apparently normal human diploid fibroblasts (AG1522) are grown in a carbon scaffold, to investigate the induction of a G 1 checkpoint in bystander cells present alongside radiolabelled cells. Cultures were simultaneously pulse-labelled with 3 H-deoxycytidine ( 3 HdC) to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify the radiolabelled cells. After thorough washing of cultures, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) was administered to detect proliferating bystander cells. The cultures were harvested at various times thereafter, and cells were reacted with two monoclonal antibodies specific to IdU/BrdU or BrdU, respectively, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cell-cycle progression was followed in radiolabelled cells (BrdU + ) that were chronically irradiated by low energy beta particles emitted by DNA-incorporated 3 H, and in unlabelled bystander cells (BrdU - ) by a flow cytometry based cumulative labelling index assay. As expected, radiolabelled cells were delayed, in a dose-dependent manner, in G 2 and subsequently G 1 . No delay occurred in progression of bystander cells through G 1 , when the labelled cells were irradiated at dose rates up to 0.32 Gy h -1 . (authors)

  14. A simplification of the enzyme-linked immunospot technique. Increased sensitivity for cells secreting IgG antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide

    Barington, T; Sparholt, S; Juul, L

    1992-01-01

    A simplified enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) technique is described for the detection of cells secreting antibodies to tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT) or Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (PRP). By combining the cell suspension with the enzyme-linked secondary...... antibodies in one incubation, the second incubation and washing procedure could be omitted from the original technique. The simplified assay had the same sensitivity for anti-TT and anti-DT spot-forming cells as the ordinary ELISPOT assay. The IgG anti-PRP spots were, however, improved both in quality...... and in quantity (median: 40% more spots), while the detection of IgM and IgA anti-PRP spot-forming cells was the same in the two techniques. This simplified technique can probably also be used to save time in other antigen systems and should be considered when designing ELISPOT assays for the detection...

  15. Enhanced immunoassay for porcine circovirus type 2 antibody using enzyme-loaded and quantum dots-embedded shell–core silica nanospheres based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Wu, Long; Li, Xuepu; Shao, Kang; Ye, Shiyi; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Chenjun; Han, Heyou

    2015-01-01

    Boosting the detection sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is significant to the early clinical diagnosis of various diseases. Here, we developed a versatile immunosensor using silica nanospheres as carriers for sensitive detection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antibody. With HRP enzyme covalently immobilized on the silica nanospheres and CdSe nanocrystals embedded inside, these signal probes were successfully utilized in the sensitive detection of PCV2 antibody by ELISA, fluorometry and square-wave voltammetry (SWV). To further demonstrate the performance of the immunosensor, Human IgG (HIgG) was used as a model analyte. Since more HRP and CdSe QDs were loaded, 5-, 200- and 400-fold enhancements in amplified ELISA, fluorometry and voltammetry responses for HIgG could be achieved compared to conventional ELISA. The respective detection limits of theses methods for HIgG were 3.9, 0.1 and 0.05 ng mL −1 with a RSD below 5% for amplified ELISA, fluorescence and SWV measurements. Additionally, a 100-fold improvement was obtained in the detection sensitivity for PCV2 antibody immunoassay. The versatile immunosensor exhibits good sensitivity, stability and reproducibility, suggesting its potential applications in clinical diagnostics. - Highlights: • A versatile ELISA-based immunoassay for PCV2 antibody was developed. • Enzyme and CdSe QDs modified SiO 2 particles were used to improve sensitivity. • The simultaneous three ELISA-based techniques enhanced the detection reliability. • The biosensors strategy could provide a new avenue to ELISA-based sensors

  16. Enhanced immunoassay for porcine circovirus type 2 antibody using enzyme-loaded and quantum dots-embedded shell–core silica nanospheres based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Wu, Long; Li, Xuepu; Shao, Kang; Ye, Shiyi; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Chenjun; Han, Heyou, E-mail: hyhan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2015-08-05

    Boosting the detection sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is significant to the early clinical diagnosis of various diseases. Here, we developed a versatile immunosensor using silica nanospheres as carriers for sensitive detection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antibody. With HRP enzyme covalently immobilized on the silica nanospheres and CdSe nanocrystals embedded inside, these signal probes were successfully utilized in the sensitive detection of PCV2 antibody by ELISA, fluorometry and square-wave voltammetry (SWV). To further demonstrate the performance of the immunosensor, Human IgG (HIgG) was used as a model analyte. Since more HRP and CdSe QDs were loaded, 5-, 200- and 400-fold enhancements in amplified ELISA, fluorometry and voltammetry responses for HIgG could be achieved compared to conventional ELISA. The respective detection limits of theses methods for HIgG were 3.9, 0.1 and 0.05 ng mL{sup −1} with a RSD below 5% for amplified ELISA, fluorescence and SWV measurements. Additionally, a 100-fold improvement was obtained in the detection sensitivity for PCV2 antibody immunoassay. The versatile immunosensor exhibits good sensitivity, stability and reproducibility, suggesting its potential applications in clinical diagnostics. - Highlights: • A versatile ELISA-based immunoassay for PCV2 antibody was developed. • Enzyme and CdSe QDs modified SiO{sub 2} particles were used to improve sensitivity. • The simultaneous three ELISA-based techniques enhanced the detection reliability. • The biosensors strategy could provide a new avenue to ELISA-based sensors.

  17. A new solid phase enzyme immuno assay using a monoclonal antibody for CEA determinations in patients with various carcinomas

    Staab, H.J.; Glock, S.; Hornung, A.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical validity of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) determination with a new solid phase enzyme immuno assay using a monoclonal antibody (EIA-m) in comparison with a common CEA radioimmunoassay with polyclonal antisera (RIA) was investigated for primary diagnosis in 123 patients with various malignancies and in the postoperative followup of 83 patients with gastrointestinal cancers over a period of about one year. The normal range of the new CEA test in which CEA was directly measured without any further extraction, was calculated from the CEA distribution of 147 healthy blood donors and found to be 0-1.5 μg CEA/l. Besides a very fine reproducibility the CEA-m exhibited a pronounced specificity for CEA from patients with colorectal cancers compared with the RIA. Using a cut-off level of >=1.5 μg CEA/l serum with the EIA-m, the test gave a specificity of 76% with a sensitivity of 72% for preoperative serum specimen of 82 patients with colorectal cancers and a control group of 53 patients with nonmalignant gastrointestinal diseases. In this groups of patients the EIA-m was superior to the RIA test which had a sensitivity of 75% at a specificity of 62% using a threshold of >=2.0 μg CEA/l serum. In the followup studies 3 basic tendencies of the CEA time courses well distinguished from each other could be established for both CEA-Tests. Tumor progression, characterized by steadily increasing CEA levels were evident in 20/23 cases with recurrent disease while decreasing or essentially unchanged CEA levels correlated with NED status in the patients. Furthermore 3/23 cases with metastasis in the followup had initial CEA increases indicated by EIA-m, 3-5 months before this increase of the CEA values was evident with the RIA. Transient CEA elevations, not associated with malignant growth, were found less frequently with the new EIA-m compared to the RIA. (orig.) [de

  18. Synthesis of an oxytetracyline-tolidin-BSA immunogen and antibodies production of anti-oxytetracyline developed for oxytetracyline residue detection with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays technique

    Widiastuti R

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An oxytetracycline-tolidin-bovine serum albumin (OTC-tolidin-BSA-conjugate was synthezed as immunogen for producing specific antibodies in immunized rabbits that would be used as reagent for development of OTC residue detection with enzym-linked immunoassays technique. The immunogen was prepared through diazotization tolidin and subsequently reacted with OTC. The red purple immunogen of OTC-tolidin-BSA absorbed at wave lengths of 277 nm and 488 nm under UV screening absorbances and confirmation with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC showed the absence of peak at retention time of 3.46 minutes. Characaterized result with SDS-PAGE showed the molecular weight of the OTC-tolidin-BSA at 69.79 kDA. Subsequently, the immunogen was immunized into New Zealand rabbits in order to produce the polyclonal antibodies. The antibodies were purified using a protein A sepharose column. The OD optimum responses of 0.92 to 1.20 were obtained from the second fractionation at dilution of 1/1000 by titrating the antibodies and OTC-tolidin-BSA coating antigen at concentration of 10 µg/mL on several bleeding times.

  19. Detection of Human Epididymis Protein 4 (HE4) in Human Serum Samples Using a Specific Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).

    Zhou, Lijun; Lv, Zhiqiang; Shao, Jing; Xu, Ying; Luo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wenji; Luo, Shuhong; Fang, Jianmin; Wang, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Huang, Ruopan

    2016-09-01

    The human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) may have high specificity in the detection of malignant diseases, making the development of an immunoassay for HE4 essential. In our study, a fusion gene was constructed encoded with the HE4 protein. This protein was then produced in the bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) and used to immunize mice in order to eventually generate hybridomas specific to HE4. The hybridoma supernatants were then screened, and four positive anti-HE4 cell lines were selected. These cell lines produce monoclonal antibodies against HE4 epitopes, as demonstrated in the Western blot as well as by direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using the developed antibodies, we successfully identified several good antibody pairs from the hybridomas, which allowed for the development of a sandwich ELISA to measure HE4 levels. By using the HE4 ELISA, we measured HE4 levels of 60 clinical human serum samples. Compared with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved kit (Roche), our results showed a strong positive correlation to those of the FDA-approved kit. In summary, highly sensitive antibody pairs were screened against HE4, and a sandwich ELISA was developed as an accurate analytical tool for the detection of HE4 in human serum, which could be especially valuable for diagnosing ovarian carcinomas. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Efficient use of unlabeled data for protein sequence classification: a comparative study.

    Kuksa, Pavel; Huang, Pai-Hsi; Pavlovic, Vladimir

    2009-04-29

    Recent studies in computational primary protein sequence analysis have leveraged the power of unlabeled data. For example, predictive models based on string kernels trained on sequences known to belong to particular folds or superfamilies, the so-called labeled data set, can attain significantly improved accuracy if this data is supplemented with protein sequences that lack any class tags-the unlabeled data. In this study, we present a principled and biologically motivated computational framework that more effectively exploits the unlabeled data by only using the sequence regions that are more likely to be biologically relevant for better prediction accuracy. As overly-represented sequences in large uncurated databases may bias the estimation of computational models that rely on unlabeled data, we also propose a method to remove this bias and improve performance of the resulting classifiers. Combined with state-of-the-art string kernels, our proposed computational framework achieves very accurate semi-supervised protein remote fold and homology detection on three large unlabeled databases. It outperforms current state-of-the-art methods and exhibits significant reduction in running time. The unlabeled sequences used under the semi-supervised setting resemble the unpolished gemstones; when used as-is, they may carry unnecessary features and hence compromise the classification accuracy but once cut and polished, they improve the accuracy of the classifiers considerably.

  1. Application of the indirect enzyme-labeled antibody microtest to the detection and surveillance of animal diseases. [Brucellosis, cholera, and trichinosis in cattle and swine

    Saunders, G.C. Clinard, E.H.; Bartlett, M.L.; Sanders, W.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid, indirect enzyme-labeled antibody (ELA) microplate test has been developed as a diagnostic and surveillance tool to aid in the control of animal disease. Data are presented, which illustrate the application of the test to viral (hog cholera), parasitic (trichinosis), and bacterial (brucellosis) diseases of animals. A greater than 95 percent correlation was observed between the hog cholera ELA test and the hog cholera serum neutralization test performed on over 2000 mixed hog cholera positive and negative field samples obtained during the 1976 New Jersey epizootic. Of 56 swine naturally infected with Trichinella spiralis at a level considered dangerous to man, all were ELA positive, while only one of 360 T. spiralis negative packing house sera was ELA positive. Preliminary experiments with bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) indicate that the ELA test is more sensitive than other test methods currently in use. ELA procedures should soon become tests of choice for the detection of antibodies to animal disease agents.

  2. Catalytic Antibodies

    biological processes and is intended to catalyze a reaction for which no real enzyme is ... the reaction. In order to enhance the rates of chemical reactions, enzymes, ..... of such antibodies has already been exploited in the production of a biosensor. ..... tant to the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries for the synthesis ...

  3. Detection of Antibodies to U.S. Isolates of Avian Pneumovirus by a Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Gulati, Baldev R.; Munir, Shirin; Patnayak, Devi P.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Kapur, Vivek

    2001-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of subgroup C (United States-specific) avian pneumovirus (APV/US) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and antibodies to the recombinant N protein were shown to specifically recognize the ≈47-kDa N protein of APV/US by Western immunoblot analysis. The recombinant APV/US N protein was used in a sandwich-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the resulting assay was found to be more sensitive and specific than the routine indirect ELISA for the detecti...

  4. Clinical Comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA Syphilis-G Enzyme Immunoassay with the Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption Immunoglobulin G Assay for Syphilis Testing

    Halling, V. W.; Jones, M. F.; Bestrom, J. E.; Wold, A. D.; Rosenblatt, J. E.; Smith, T. F.; Cockerill, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTI...

  5. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  6. A novel whole-bacterial enzyme linked-immunosorbant assay to quantify Chlamydia trachomatis specific antibodies reveals distinct differences between systemic and genital compartments.

    Hannah L Albritton

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (CT is the leading sexually transmitted bacterial infection. The continued global burden of CT infection strongly predicates the need for a vaccine to supplement current chlamydial control programs. The correlates of protection against CT are currently unknown, but they must be carefully defined to guide vaccine design. The localized nature of chlamydial infection in columnar epithelial cells of the genital tract necessitates investigation of immunity at the site of infection. The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive whole bacterial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to quantify and compare CT-specific IgG and IgA in sera and genital secretions from CT-infected women. To achieve this, elementary bodies (EBs from two of the most common genital serovars (D and E were attached to poly-L-lysine-coated microtiter plates with glutaraldehyde. EB attachment and integrity were verified by the presence of outer membrane antigens and the absence of bacterial cytoplasmic antigens. EB-specific IgG and IgA standards were developed by pooling sera with high titers of CT-specific antibodies from infected women. Serum, endocervical and vaginal secretions, and endocervical cytobrush specimens from CT-infected women were used to quantify CT-specific IgG and IgA which were then normalized to total IgG and IgA, respectively. Analyses of paired serum and genital samples revealed significantly higher proportions of EB-specific antibodies in genital secretions compared to sera. Cervical and vaginal secretions and cytobrush specimens had similar proportions of EB-specific antibodies, suggesting any one of these genital sampling techniques could be used to quantify CT-specific antibodies when appropriate normalization methodologies are implemented. Overall, these results illustrate the need to investigate genital tract CT antibody responses, and our assay provides a useful quantitative tool to assess natural immunity in defined

  7. Development of an Indirect Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Glycocholic Acid Based on Chicken Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibodies.

    Cui, Xiping; Vasylieva, Natalia; Wu, Panpan; Barnych, Bogdan; Yang, Jun; Shen, Ding; He, Qiyi; Gee, Shirley J; Zhao, Suqing; Hammock, Bruce D

    2017-10-17

    Glycocholic acid (GCA) is an important metabolite of bile acids, whose urine levels are expected to be a specific diagnostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A high-throughput immunoassay for determination of GCA would be of significant advantage and useful for primary diagnosis, surveillance, and early detection of HCC. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies have several desirable characteristics and are an attractive alternative to traditional antibodies for the immunoassay. Because chicken antibodies possess single heavy and light variable functional domains, they are an ideal framework for simplified generation of recombinant antibodies for GCA detection. However, chicken scFvs have rarely been used to detect GCA. In this study, a scFv library was generated from chickens immunized with a GCA hapten coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), and anti-GCA scFvs were isolated by a phage-displayed method. Compared to the homologous coating antigen, use of a heterologous coating antigen resulted in about an 85-fold improvement in sensitivity of the immunoassay. This assay, under optimized conditions, had a linear range of 0.02-0.18 μg/mL, with an IC 50 of 0.06 μg/mL. The assay showed negligible cross-reactivity with various related bile acids, except for taurocholic acid. The detection of GCA from spiked human urine samples ranged from 86.7% to 123.3%. These results, combined with the advantages of scFv antibodies, indicated that a chicken scFv-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is a suitable method for high-throughput screening of GCA in human urine.

  8. Antibody production of wild-type and enzyme V279F variants of PAF-AH as a risk factor for Cardiovascular disease

    Ramadhani, Anggia N.; Puspitarini, Sapti; Sari, Anissa N.; Widodo

    2017-11-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has emerged as a leading cause of death in Indonesia nowadays. WHO data in 2012 revealed that 37% of the Indonesian population died from this disease. CAD occurs because of endothelial dysfunction in the arteries. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), also known as platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), is a phospholipase A2 enzyme, encoded by the PLA2G7 gene. This protein is predicted to be involved in inflammatory phospholipid metabolism so it can be used as a biomarker of CAD in the early phase. Thus, the purpose of this research is to discover the difference in antibody production between wild-type and mutant V279F. The PAF-AH enzyme was isolated from mice lymphocyte cells in order to develop this enzyme as a biomarker of cardiovascular disease. PAF-AH migrates at 55kDa according to SDS-PAGE analysis. Flow cytometry analysis showed that mutant PAF-AH (V279F) is more antigenic than wild-type PAF-AH. The missense mutation of V279F PAF-AH means this enzyme cannot catabolize the acetyl group at the sn-2 position of PAF.

  9. Production and characterization of a camelid single domain antibody-urease enzyme conjugate for the treatment of cancer.

    Tian, Baomin; Wong, Wah Yau; Hegmann, Elda; Gaspar, Kim; Kumar, Praveen; Chao, Heman

    2015-06-17

    A novel immunoconjugate (L-DOS47) was developed and characterized as a therapeutic agent for tumors expressing CEACAM6. The single domain antibody AFAIKL2, which targets CEACAM6, was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pT7-7 system. High purity urease (HPU) was extracted and purified from Jack bean meal. AFAIKL2 was activated using N-succinimidyl [4-iodoacetyl] aminobenzoate (SIAB) as the cross-linker and then conjugated to urease. The activation and conjugation reactions were controlled by altering pH. Under these conditions, the material ratio achieved conjugation ratios of 8-11 antibodies per urease molecule, the residual free urease content was practically negligible (95%) L-DOS47 conjugate was produced using only ultradiafiltration to remove unreacted antibody and hydrolyzed cross-linker. L-DOS47 was characterized by a panel of analytical techniques including SEC, IEC, Western blot, ELISA, and LC-MS(E) peptide mapping. As the antibody-urease conjugate ratio increased, a higher binding signal was observed. The specificity and cytotoxicity of L-DOS47 was confirmed by screening in four cell lines (BxPC-3, A549, MCF7, and CEACAM6-transfected H23). BxPC-3, a CEACAM6-expressing cell line was found to be most susceptible to L-DOS47. L-DOS47 is being investigated as a potential therapeutic agent in human phase I clinical studies for nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  10. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Mycoplasma hominis antibodies in infertile women serum samples

    Baczynska, Agata; Friis Svenstrup, Helle; Fedder, Jens

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides Chlamydiae trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis may also cause infertility due to damage of the Fallopian tubes. Therefore serum samples from infertile women were analyzed for antibodies to M. hominis. METHODS: Sera from 304 infertile women were investigat...

  11. Detection of Giardia duodenalis antigen in human fecal eluates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies

    Sofía Duque-Beltrán

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study developed and standardized an enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect Giardia antigen in feces using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Giardia cysts were purified from human fecal samples by sucrose and percoll gradients. Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus were infected to obtain trophozoites. Rabbits were inoculated with either cyst or trophozoite antigens of 14 Colombian Giardia isolates to develop antibodies against the respective stages. The IgG anti-Giardia were purified by sequential caprylic acid and ammonium sulfate precipitation. A portion of these polyclonal antibodies was linked to alkaline phosphatase (conjugate. One hundred and ninety six samples of human feces, from different patients, were tested by parasitologic diagnosis: 69 were positive for Giardia cysts, 56 had no Giardia parasites, and 71 revealed parasites other than Giardia. The optimal concentration of polyclonal antibodies for antigen capture was 40 µg/ml and the optimal conjugate dilution was 1:100. The absorbance cut-off value was 0.24. The parameters of the ELISA test for Giardia antigen detection were: sensitivity, 100% (95% CI: 93.4-100%; specificity, 95% (95% CI: 88.6-97.6%; positive predictive value, 91% (95% CI: 81.4-95.9%; and negative predictive value, 100% (95% CI: 96.1-100%. This ELISA will improve the diagnosis of Giardia infections in Colombia and will be useful in following patients after treatment.

  12. Water-soluble nanoconjugates of quantum dot-chitosan-antibody for in vitro detection of cancer cells based on “enzyme-free” fluoroimmunoassay

    Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Mansur, Alexandra A.P. [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Soriano-Araújo, Amanda [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary School, UFMG (Brazil); Lobato, Zélia I.P. [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary School, UFMG (Brazil); Carvalho, Sandhra M. de [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, ICB, UFMG (Brazil); Leite, Maria de Fatima [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, ICB, UFMG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Cancer remains one of the world's most devastating diseases with millions of fatalities and new cases every year. In this work, we attempted to develop a facile “enzyme-free” fluoroimmunoassay based on the novel nanoconjugates composed of CdS quantum dots (QDs) as the fluorescent inorganic core and an antibody-modified polysaccharide as the organic shell, modeling their possible application for the in vitro diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancer. Chitosan was conjugated with an anti-CD20 polyclonal antibody (pAbCD20) by the formation of covalent amide bonds. In the sequence, these chitosan-antibody conjugates were utilized as direct ligands for the surface biofunctionalization of CdS QDs (CdS/chitosan-pAbCD20) using a single-step colloidal process in aqueous medium at room temperature. The most relevant physico-chemical properties of these nanoconjugates were assessed by morphological and spectroscopic techniques. The results indicated that CdS nanocrystals were produced with an average diameter of 2.5 nm and with cubic zinc blende crystalline nanostructure. The CdS-immunoconjugates (CdS/chitosan-pAbCD20) presented colloidal hydrodynamic diameter (H{sub D}) of 15.0 ± 1.2 nm. In addition, the results evidenced that the “enzyme-free” QD-linked immunosorbent assay (QLISA) was effective for the in vitro detection against the antigen CD20 (aCD20) based on fluorescent behavior of the CdS nanoconjugates. Moreover, the CdS-immunoconjugates were successfully used for fluorescence bioimaging of NHL cancer cells. Finally, the cell viability results using different cell cultures based on LDH, MTT and Resazurin bio-assays have demonstrated no cytotoxicity of the new CdS-chitosan bioconjugates relative to the standard controls. Thus, CdS conjugates may offer a promising platform for the future development of in vitro and in vivo applications for the detection and diagnosis of NHL cancer cells. - Highlights: • CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared using

  13. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based sandwich-type enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of abrin in food samples.

    Zhou, Yu; Tian, Xiang-Li; Li, Yan-Song; Pan, Feng-Guang; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Wang, Xin-Rui; Ren, Hong-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Chen, Qi-Jun; Liu, Jing-Qiu

    2012-12-15

    Abrin is a plant toxin, which can be easily isolated from the seeds of Abrus precatorius. It may be used as a biological warfare agent. In order to detect abrin in food samples, a two-layer sandwich format enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the monoclonal antibody (mAb) (as capture antibody) and rabbit polyclonal serum (as detecting antibody) was developed and applied for the determination of abrin in some food matrices. The linear range of the mAb was 1-100 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 μg L(-1) for abrin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The recoveries of abrin from sausage, beer and milk samples ranged 97.5-98.6%, 95.8-98.4% and 94.8-9.6%, respectively, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 3.7% or less. The newly developed sandwich ELISA using the mAb appears to be a reliable and useful method for detection of abrin in sausage, beer and milk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a Nucleoprotein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using a Synthetic Peptide Antigen for Detection of Avian Metapneumovirus Antibodies in Turkey Sera

    Alvarez, Rene; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Scott, Melissa; Seal, Bruce S.

    2004-01-01

    Avian metapneumoviruses (aMPV) cause an upper respiratory tract disease with low mortality but high morbidity, primarily in commercial turkeys, that can be exacerbated by secondary infections. There are three types of aMPV, of which type C is found only in the United States. The aMPV nucleoprotein (N) amino acid sequences of serotypes A, B, and C were aligned for comparative analysis. On the basis of the predicted antigenicity of consensus sequences, five aMPV-specific N peptides were synthesized for development of a peptide antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (aMPV N peptide-based ELISA) to detect aMPV-specific antibodies among turkeys. Sera from naturally and experimentally infected turkeys were used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies reactive to the chemically synthesized aMPV N peptides. Subsequently, aMPV N peptide 1, which had the sequence 10-DLSYKHAILKESQYTIKRDV-29, with variations at only three amino acids among aMPV serotypes, was evaluated as a universal aMPV ELISA antigen. Data obtained with the peptide-based ELISA correlated positively with total aMPV viral antigen-based ELISAs, and the peptide ELISA provided higher optical density readings. The results indicated that aMPV N peptide 1 can be used as a universal ELISA antigen to detect antibodies for all aMPV serotypes. PMID:15013970

  15. Diagnostic specificity of the African swine fever virus antibody detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in feral and domestic pigs in the United States.

    Bergeron, H C; Glas, P S; Schumann, K R

    2017-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious haemorrhagic disease of pigs that has the potential to cause mortality nearing 100% in naïve animals. While an outbreak of ASF in the United States' pig population (domestic and feral) has never been reported, an introduction of the disease has the potential to cause devastation to the pork industry and food security. During the recovery phase of an outbreak, an antibody detection diagnostic assay would be required to prove freedom of disease within the previously infected zone and eventually nationwide. Animals surviving an ASF infection would be considered carriers and could be identified through the persistence of ASF viral antibodies. These antibodies would demonstrate exposure to the disease and not vaccination, as there is no ASF vaccine available. A well-established commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detects antibodies against ASF virus (ASFV), but the diagnostic specificity of the assay had not been determined using serum samples from the pig population of the United States. This study describes an evaluation of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE)-recommended Ingezim PPA COMPAC ELISA using a comprehensive cohort (n = 1791) of samples collected in the United States. The diagnostic specificity of the assay was determined to be 99.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): [98.9, 99.7]). The result of this study fills a gap in understanding the performance of the Ingezim PPA COMPAC ELISA in the ASF naïve pig population of the United States. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of avian influenza virus subtypes H5 and H7 antibodies

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Ajjouri, Gitte; Handberg, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    subtypes H5 and H7. The ELISAs were evaluated with polyclonal chicken anti-AIV antibodies against AIV subtypes: H1N2, H5N2, H5N7, H7N1, H7N7, H9N9, H10N4 and H16N3. RESULTS: Both the H5 and H7 ELISA proved to have a high sensitivity and specificity and the ELISAs detected H5 and H7 antibodies earlier......BACKGROUND: Avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes H5 and H7 attracts particular attention because of the risk of their potential pathogenicity in poultry. The haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is widely used as subtype specific test for serological diagnostics despite the laborious nature...

  17. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of IgM antibodies to Babesia bigemina in cattle

    Ruiz Patrícia M Gonçalves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A crude antigenic preparation of Babesia bigemina was used to develop an ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies. Optimal dilutions of the antigen, using positive and negative reference sera, were determined by checkerboard titrations. Negative sera from cattle imported from tick-free areas, serum samples collected from infected B. bigemina cattle were used to validate the test. The specificity was 94% and sensitivity of the Elisa 87.5%. Sera from 385 cattle deriving from areas free from tick-borne diseases, which were submitted to a preimmunization process, were screened by this technique. The Elisa detected seroconversion on the 14th day post-inoculation in animals either infested with Boophilus microplus ticks (infected with B. bigemina, or inoculated with B. bigemina infected blood. Antibody titers decreased after day 33; however, all animals remained positive until the end of the experiment (124 days. The ELISA described may prove to be an appropriate serological test for the detection of IgM antibodies against B. bigemina.

  18. Statistical-mechanics analysis of Gaussian labeled-unlabeled classification problems

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The labeled-unlabeled classification problem in semi-supervised learning is studied via statistical-mechanics approach. We analytically investigate performance of a learner with an equal-weight mixture of two symmetrically-located Gaussians, performing posterior mean estimation of the parameter vector on the basis of a dataset consisting of labeled and unlabeled data generated from the same probability model as that assumed by the learner. Under the assumption of replica symmetry, we have analytically obtained a set of saddle-point equations, which allows us to numerically evaluate performance of the learner. On the basis of the analytical result we have observed interesting phenomena, in particular the coexistence of good and bad solutions, which may happen when the number of unlabeled data is relatively large compared with that of labeled data

  19. Bidirectional Active Learning: A Two-Way Exploration Into Unlabeled and Labeled Data Set.

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Shupeng; Yun, Xiaochun

    2015-12-01

    In practical machine learning applications, human instruction is indispensable for model construction. To utilize the precious labeling effort effectively, active learning queries the user with selective sampling in an interactive way. Traditional active learning techniques merely focus on the unlabeled data set under a unidirectional exploration framework and suffer from model deterioration in the presence of noise. To address this problem, this paper proposes a novel bidirectional active learning algorithm that explores into both unlabeled and labeled data sets simultaneously in a two-way process. For the acquisition of new knowledge, forward learning queries the most informative instances from unlabeled data set. For the introspection of learned knowledge, backward learning detects the most suspiciously unreliable instances within the labeled data set. Under the two-way exploration framework, the generalization ability of the learning model can be greatly improved, which is demonstrated by the encouraging experimental results.

  20. A dual amplified electrochemical immunosensor for ofloxacin: Polypyrrole film-Au nanocluster as the matrix and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized gold nanorod as the label

    Zang, Shuai; Liu, Yingju; Lin, Mouhong; Kang, Jianli; Sun, Yuanming; Lei, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the OFL electrochemical immunosensor using Au nanoclusters/PPy/GCE as the substrate and multi-HRP-GNR-Ab2 bioconjugates as the label. Highlights: ► Gold nanorod was used to load HRP and Ab 2 to form multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 . ► A sensitive immunosensor for ofloxacin was constructed using the homemade antibody. ► A dual signal amplified strategy was based on the PPy-Au and multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 . -- Abstract: In this work, an electrochemical immunosensor, basing on a dual signal amplified strategy by employing a biocompatible polypyrrole film-Au nanocluster matrix as a sensor platform and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized gold nanorod as an electrochemical detection label, is established for sensitive detection of ofloxacin (OFL). Firstly, polypyrrole film and Au nanoclusters were progressively fabricated onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode via electropolymerization and electrochemical deposition, respectively. Such PPy-Au nanocomposite modified electrode was used to immobilize OFL-OVA, blocked with the blocking reagent, and then associated with the corresponding antibody. Secondly, gold nanorod (GNR) was synthesized to load horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and horseradish peroxidase-secondary antibody (HRP-Ab 2 ), and the resulting nanostructure (multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 ) was applied as the detection label. The fabrication process of the ordered multilayer structure and immunosensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical measurements, respectively. Finally, based on a competitive immunoassay, i.e., the association ability with the corresponding antibody between the captured antigen and free OFL in the solution, the fabricated immunosensor exhibited a sensitive response to OFL in the range from 0.08 to 410 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL. The current immunosensor exhibited good sensitivity, selectivity and long-term stability. This amplification strategy shows excellent

  1. Comparative sensitivity of 125I-protein A and enzyme-conjugated antibodies for detection of immunoblotted proteins

    Bernstein, J.M.; Stokes, C.E.; Fernie, B.

    1987-01-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the detection of small amounts of immunologically interesting proteins in unpurified preparations. Iodinated protein A (PA) has been widely used as a second antibody for detection of proteins; however, it does not bind equally well to immunoglobulins from different species nor does it bind to all subclasses of immunoglobulin G (IgG). We compared the sensitivity of [ 125 I]PA with those of both horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibodies (HRP) and glucose oxidase-anti-glucose oxidase (GAG) soluble complexes for visualizing bovine serum albumin, human IgG, or human C3 which was either dot blotted or electroblotted to nitrocellulose. [ 125 I]PA was uniformly 10- to 100-fold less sensitive than either HRP or GAG. GAG was more sensitive than HRP except for C3 (electroblotting) and bovine serum albumin and IgG (dot blotting), in which they were equivalent. In general, dot blotting was 10- to 1000-fold more sensitive than electroblotting. Although relative sensitivities varied depending on the proteins analyzed and the antisera used, GAG appeared to be superior to [ 125 I]PA and HRP for detection of immunoblotted proteins

  2. Comparison of enzyme immunoassays for antibodies to Haemophilus ducreyi in a community outbreak of chancroid in the United States.

    Chen, C Y; Mertz, K J; Spinola, S M; Morse, S A

    1997-06-01

    The performance of two EIAs (adsorption EIA and lipooligosaccharide [LOS] EIA) that detect antibodies to Haemophilus ducreyi was evaluated with serum specimens obtained from 163 patients (96 with genital ulcer disease [GUD]). Paired serum specimens (initial and follow-up) were obtained from 52 of the GUD patients. By use of initial serum specimens from 82 GUD patients whose etiologic agents for their ulcers had been identified, the adsorption EIA had a sensitivity and specificity for chancroid of 53% and 71%, while the LOS EIA had a sensitivity and specificity of 48% and 89%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of the adsorption EIA increased to 78% and 84%, respectively, when the results of follow-up serum specimens were used to calculate optimal performance. The proportion of patients testing positive for H. ducreyi who had anti-H. ducreyi IgG antibodies, as determined by adsorption EIA, increased with the duration of infection, thus limiting the role of EIAs in the diagnosis of chancroid.

  3. Radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunoassay of antibodies directed against lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) proteins larger than the core protein (P24)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Lee, Y.S.; Nilsen, T.; Baker, L.; Sproul, P.; Rubinstein, P.; Taylor, P.; Stevens, C.E.; Gold, J.W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular exclusion chromatography of crude LAV antigen preparations allows separation of most of P24 from larger proteins of LAV (PL). PL and 125 I- or beta-lactamase-labeled anti-LAV were used as reagents for radioimmunoassay (RIA) - or enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) - inhibition tests to detect antibodies directed predominantly against PL (anti-PL). Among 257 individuals belonging to groups at high risk of developing AIDS, 117 (45.5%) were positive for anti-PL and 108 (42%) for anti-P24, respectively. The 2 individuals among 600 random blood donors found to be anti-P24-positive in the preceding study also had anti-PL in their serum. Sera from 500 additional blood donors were screened for anti-PL and 1 of these was positive. The implication of these findings for screening of blood donors is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunoassay of antibodies directed against lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) proteins larger than the core protein (P24)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Lee, Y S; Nilsen, T; Baker, L; Sproul, P; Rubinstein, P; Taylor, P; Stevens, C E; Gold, J W.M.

    1985-10-01

    Molecular exclusion chromatography of crude LAV antigen preparations allows separation of most of P24 from larger proteins of LAV (PL). PL and /sup 125/I- or beta-lactamase-labeled anti-LAV were used as reagents for radioimmunoassay (RIA) - or enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) - inhibition tests to detect antibodies directed predominantly against PL (anti-PL). Among 257 individuals belonging to groups at high risk of developing AIDS, 117 (45.5%) were positive for anti-PL and 108 (42%) for anti-P24, respectively. The 2 individuals among 600 random blood donors found to be anti-P24-positive in the preceding study also had anti-PL in their serum. Sera from 500 additional blood donors were screened for anti-PL and 1 of these was positive. The implication of these findings for screening of blood donors is discussed. 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table.

  5. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  6. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    Ingenhoven, Kathleen; Kramer, Daniel; Jensen, Poul Erik Hyldgaard

    2017-01-01

    to be 26 ng/mL using commercially available polyclonal rabbit antihuman IFN-β in human sera as the positive control. CONCLUSION: An ultrasensitive ELISA for IFN-β-binding ADA testing has been validated. This will form the basis to assess anti-biopharmaceutical immunization toward IFN-β with regards to its......OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) against interferon beta (IFN-β) in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK) aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization...... to minimize the risk. METHOD: A two-tiered bridging enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format was selected and validated according to current recommendations. Screening assay: ADA in serum samples form complexes with immobilized IFN-β and biotinylated IFN-β, which are then detected using HRP labeled...

  7. Unlabelled and radioactive labelled derivatives of butylamino propiophenone and their preparation

    Findlay, J.W.A.; Butz, R.F.; Welch, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to new unlabelled and radioactive labelled derivatives of butylamino propiophenone and their preparation. This invention is primarily directed to a radioimmunoassay for clinical or experimental testing for the presence of and quantitation of bupropion, a pharmacologically active antidepressant compound, in biological fluids

  8. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogona...

  9. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody as a new tool to detect Sudan dyes and Para red

    Ju Chunmei; Tang Yong; Fan Huiying; Chen Jinding

    2008-01-01

    To set up an immunoassay-based method to detect Sudan dyes and Para red, we generated a monoclonal antibody (Mab) using a specially designed carboxyl derivative of Sudan I (CSD I) as the immunogen. CSD I was synthesized by azocoupling reaction using 2-naphthol and diazotised 4-aminobenzoic acid. The antibody was obtained from a hybridoma, which was derived from the fusion of the mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells and the splenocytes from the mice immunized with the CSD I-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate. In addition, we showed that the Mab was highly specific for Sudan I, III and Para red. The limit of detection was approximately 0.01 ng mL -1 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and 0.5 ng g -1 in chilli tomato sauce. The recoveries of Sudan I, III and Para red for the chilli tomato sauce were from 84% to 99% and coefficients of variation were from 14.9% to 33.3%. Thus, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method is a rapid and high throughput screening tool to detect Sudan dyes and Para red in food products

  10. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody as a new tool to detect Sudan dyes and Para red

    Ju Chunmei [College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang Yong [Center of Antibody Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Fan Huiying [College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Chen Jinding [College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)], E-mail: jdchen@scau.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    To set up an immunoassay-based method to detect Sudan dyes and Para red, we generated a monoclonal antibody (Mab) using a specially designed carboxyl derivative of Sudan I (CSD I) as the immunogen. CSD I was synthesized by azocoupling reaction using 2-naphthol and diazotised 4-aminobenzoic acid. The antibody was obtained from a hybridoma, which was derived from the fusion of the mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells and the splenocytes from the mice immunized with the CSD I-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate. In addition, we showed that the Mab was highly specific for Sudan I, III and Para red. The limit of detection was approximately 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and 0.5 ng g{sup -1} in chilli tomato sauce. The recoveries of Sudan I, III and Para red for the chilli tomato sauce were from 84% to 99% and coefficients of variation were from 14.9% to 33.3%. Thus, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method is a rapid and high throughput screening tool to detect Sudan dyes and Para red in food products.

  11. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Detection and Quantification Using a Murine Monoclonal Antibody-Based Direct Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Liu, Changqi; Chhabra, Guneet S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2015-10-21

    A commercially available direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (BioFront Technologies, Tallahassee, FL, USA) using murine anti-pistachio monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as capture and detection antibodies was evaluated. The assay was sensitive (limit of detection = 0.09 ± 0.02 ppm full fat pistachio, linear detection range = 0.5-36 ppm, 50% maximum signal concentration = 7.9 ± 0.7 ppm), reproducible (intra- and inter-assay variability pistachio seeds subjected to autoclaving (121 °C, 15 psi, 15, 30 min), blanching (100 °C, 5, 10 min), frying (191 °C, 1 min), microwaving (500, 1000 W, 3 min), and dry roasting (140 °C, 30 min; 168 °C, 12 min). No cross-reactivity was observed in 156 food matrices, each tested at 100,000 ppm, suggesting the ELISA to be pistachio specific. The pistachio recovery ranges for spiked (10 ppm) and incurred (10-50000 ppm) food matrices were 93.1-125.6% and 35.7-112.2%, respectively. The assay did not register any false-positive or -negative results among the tested commercial and laboratory prepared samples.

  12. Validation of the World Health Organization Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Quantitation of Immunoglobulin G Serotype-Specific Anti-Pneumococcal Antibodies in Human Serum.

    Lee, Hyunju; Lim, Soo Young; Kim, Kyung Hyo

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) guideline is currently accepted as the gold standard for the evaluation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies specific to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. We conducted validation of the WHO ELISA for 7 pneumococcal serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) by evaluating its specificity, precision (reproducibility and intermediate precision), accuracy, spiking recovery test, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), and stability at the Ewha Center for Vaccine Evaluation and Study, Seoul, Korea. We found that the specificity, reproducibility, and intermediate precision were within acceptance ranges (reproducibility, coefficient of variability [CV] ≤ 15%; intermediate precision, CV ≤ 20%) for all serotypes. Comparisons between the provisional assignments of calibration sera and the results from this laboratory showed a high correlation > 94% for all 7 serotypes, supporting the accuracy of the ELISA. The spiking recovery test also fell within an acceptable range. The quantification limit, calculated using the LLOQ, for each of the serotypes was 0.05-0.093 μg/mL. The freeze-thaw stability and the short-term temperature stability were also within an acceptable range. In conclusion, we showed good performance using the standardized WHO ELISA for the evaluation of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal IgG antibodies; the WHO ELISA can evaluate the immune response against pneumococcal vaccines with consistency and accuracy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  13. Comparison of Laboratory-Developed and Commercial Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Almond (Prunus dulcis) Detection and Quantification.

    Liu, Changqi; Chhabra, Guneet S; Zhao, Jing; Zaffran, Valerie D; Gupta, Sahil; Roux, Kenneth H; Gradziel, Thomas M; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2017-10-01

    A commercially available monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (BioFront Technologies, Tallahassee, Fla., U.S.A.) was compared with an in-house developed mAb 4C10-based ELISA for almond detection. The assays were comparable in sensitivity (limit of detection almond, limit of quantification almond), specificity (no cross-reactivity with 156 tested foods at a concentration of 100000 ppm whole sample), and reproducibility (intra- and interassay variability almond seeds subjected to autoclaving, blanching, frying, microwaving, and dry roasting. The almond recovery ranges for spiked food matrices were 84.3% to 124.6% for 4C10 ELISA and 81.2% to 127.4% for MonoTrace ELISA. The almond recovery ranges for commercial and laboratory prepared foods with declared/known almond amount were 30.9% to 161.2% for 4C10 ELISA and 38.1% to 207.6% for MonoTrace ELISA. Neither assay registered any false-positive or negative results among the tested commercial and laboratory prepared samples. Ability to detect and quantify trace amounts of almonds is important for improving safety of almond sensitive consumers. Two monoclonal antibody-based ELISAs were compared for almond detection. The information is useful to food industry, regulatory agencies, scientific community, and almond consumers. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody in type 1 diabetes mellitus: Comparison between radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Murata, Takashi; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Tomokazu; Mizutani, Yukako; Okada, Hayami; Tsukamoto, Masami; Odori, Shinji; Nakagawachi, Reiko; Kawaguchi, Yaeko; Yoshioka, Fumi; Yamada, Kazunori; Shimatsu, Akira; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Sakane, Naoki

    2017-07-01

    The distributer of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody assay kit using radioimmunoassay (RIA) recently announced its discontinuation, and proposed an alternative kit using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic values of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody by RIA and ELISA among type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and control participants. A total of 79 type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and 79 age-matched controls were enrolled and assessed using RIA and ELISA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values were calculated for cut-off values (RIA = 1.5 U/mL and ELISA = 5.0 U/mL, respectively). Kappa coefficients were used to test for agreements between the RIA and ELISA methods regarding the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values for diagnosing type 1 diabetes mellitus were 57.0, 97.5, 95.7, and 69.4% by RIA, and 60.8, 100.0, 100.0 and 71.8% by ELISA, respectively. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus using the RIA and ELISA methods showed substantial agreement with the kappa values of 0.74 for all participants, and of 0.64 for the acute type; however, there was moderate agreement with the kappa value of 0.56 for the slowly progressive type. The present study suggests that both anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody by RIA and ELISA was useful for diagnosing type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, in the slowly progressive type, the degree of agreement of these two kits was poorer compared with those in all participants or in the acute type. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of a covalent mix-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for screening of Salmonella antibodies in pig serum

    Chow, E.Y.W.; Wu, J.T.Y.; Jauho, E.S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a commercial Salmonella covalent mix-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serological detection of Salmonella infection in swine was evaluated by comparing it with the conventional fecal culture method and inter-laboratory proficiency testing, using a panel of sera tested.......9% tested negative. The interlaboratory comparison study found a kappa value of 0.9 between our laboratory (using an automated system) and the manufacturer laboratory (using the manual method). Comparison of ELISA results from all 5 participating laboratories showed very good to excellent agreement, between...

  16. Pregnancy does not affect HIV incidence test results obtained using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay or an antibody avidity assay.

    Oliver Laeyendecker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate incidence estimates are needed for surveillance of the HIV epidemic. HIV surveillance occurs at maternal-child health clinics, but it is not known if pregnancy affects HIV incidence testing.We used the BED capture immunoassay (BED and an antibody avidity assay to test longitudinal samples from 51 HIV-infected Ugandan women infected with subtype A, C, D and intersubtype recombinant HIV who were enrolled in the HIVNET 012 trial (37 baseline samples collected near the time of delivery and 135 follow-up samples collected 3, 4 or 5 years later. Nineteen of 51 women were also pregnant at the time of one or more of the follow-up visits. The BED assay was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The avidity assay was performed using a Genetic Systems HIV-1/HIV-2 + O EIA using 0.1M diethylamine as the chaotropic agent.During the HIVNET 012 follow-up study, there was no difference in normalized optical density values (OD-n obtained with the BED assay or in the avidity test results (% when women were pregnant (n = 20 results compared to those obtained when women were not pregnant (n = 115; for BED: p = 0.9, generalized estimating equations model; for avidity: p = 0.7, Wilcoxon rank sum. In addition, BED and avidity results were almost exactly the same in longitudinal samples from the 18 women who were pregnant at only one study visit during the follow-up study (p = 0.6, paired t-test.These results from 51 Ugandan women suggest that any changes in the antibody response to HIV infection that occur during pregnancy are not sufficient to alter results obtained with the BED and avidity assays. Confirmation with larger studies and with other HIV subtypes is needed.

  17. Standardization of the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against Newcastle disease virus in chickens

    Della Porta, A.J.; Young, J.; Hansson, E.; Spencer, T.

    1994-01-01

    Newcastle disease is the major viral disease of poultry causing significant economic losses in most countries except Australia and New Zealand. Serological monitoring of poultry has traditionally been carried out using the haemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) test. More recently, ELISA has been used for the same purpose. This paper described the use of an indirect ELISA for assay of antibodies in chickens against Newcastle disease viruses and compares some of the parameters for this test. The sucrose density gradient purified, inactivated, antigen enabled performance of the test without the addition of any blocking agents other than the usual Tween 20. A range of plates was compared and the most suitable plate was found to be a polystyrene haemagglutination plate giving an excellent positive to negative ratio of 33.2, compared with some expensive ELISA plates which gave very low +ve/-ve ratios. Various incubation conditions for the steps in the ELISA were compared and incubation with shaking at room temperature (24 to 28 deg. C) gave adequate reactivity whilst simplifying incubation conditions and speeding up the test. The negative cut-off value was determined by testing 1632 HI negative specific pathogen free sera from birds of a wide age range. The reactivity of sera in the ELISA was standardized using a standard curve on every plate and converting the readings to ELISA units (EUs) in the range of 16 to 512 EUs. The EU values of these sera were not normally distributed and so the 95% cut-off was determined by ranking the values in descending order and retaining only the top 5% of the values as false positives. This resulted in a cut-off value of 33.6 EUs, with few of HI positive sera having values lower than this cut-off. The use of a standard curve on each plate is recommended in order to standardize the assay and to determine the ELISA units for the test sera. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  18. Two competitive enzyme immunoassays for the detection of IgG class antibodies to hepatitis a antigen

    Claudia Lamarca Vitral

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Two competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA techniques were developed: in the first (COMP-1, test sera were added together with HAV antigen on anti-HAV IgG-coated wells followed by an anti-HA VHRP conjugate; in the second (COMP-2, test sera and anti-HA VHRP conjugate competed for HAV epitopes previously adsorbed to anti-HA V IgG-coated wells. Both procedures used tetramethylbenzidine (TMB as a substrate. Both competitive tests were shown to be reproducible and suitable for routine diagnosis and research purposes.Foram desenvolvidos dois ensaios imunoenzimáticos (EIA competitivos: no primeiro (COMP-1 colocou-se numa placa sensibilizada com anti-HAVIgG as amostras teste juntamente como antígeno HA Vea seguir o conjugado anti-HA VHRP; no segundo (COMP-2, as amostras teste e o conjugado anti-HAV HRP competem pelos epitopos do antígeno HAV previamente absorvido na placa sensibilizada do anti-HAV IgG. O substrato utilizado foi tetrametilbenzidina (TMB. Ambas as técnicas mostraram ser produtíveis e aplicáveis para fins de diagnóstico e pesquisa.

  19. A novel sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with covalently bound monoclonal antibody and gold probe for sensitive and rapid detection of bovine β-lactoglobulin.

    He, Shengfa; Li, Xin; Wu, Yong; Wu, Shandong; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Yuan, Juanli; Gao, Jinyan; Chen, Hongbing

    2018-06-01

    Bovine milk is a recognized allergenic food source with β-lactoglobulin (BLG) as its major allergen. Reliable detection of BLG epitopes can, therefore, be a useful marker for the presence of milk in processed food products, and for potential allergenicity. At the present, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the detection of BLG are time-consuming and generally not specific to BLG IgE epitopes. In this study, the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-activated anti-BLG IgE epitope monoclonal antibody (mAb 1G9) was covalently bound onto the KOH-treated microtiter plate surface. Using this mAb-bound plate in sandwich combination with biotinylated anti-BLG polyclonal antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles, a linear dynamic range between 31.25 and 64 × 10 3  ng mL -1 with a limit of detection for BLG of 0.49 ng mL -1 was obtained, which is 32 times wider and 16 times more sensitive than conventional sandwich ELISA (sELISA). Total recovery of BLG in spiked food samples was found, without matrix effects. Also in partially hydrolyzed infant formulas, the allergenic BLG residues were detected quantitatively. Compared with conventional and commercial BLG detection sELISAs, our sELISA is reliable, highly BLG epitope-specific, user-friendly, and time-saving and allows accurate detection of potentially allergenic residues in different types of processed foods. This improved sELISA protocol can be easily extended to detect other well-identified and characterized food allergens. Graphical abstract IgE epitope mAb-bound plate in sandwich combination with gold probe for sensitive and rapid detection of bovine β-lactoglobulin and its potentially allergenic residues.

  20. AN EVALUATION STUDY OF ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY (ELISA USING RECOMBINANT PROTEIN GRA1 FOR DETECTION OF IGG ANTIBODIES AGAINTS TOXOPLASMA GONDII INFECTIONS

    Nina Difla Muflikhah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite that live inside the cells of the reticulo endothelial and parenchymal cells of human and animals (mammals and birds. Some cases of toxoplasmosis usually have no symptoms, but in any cases caused severe symptoms, such as hydrocephalus, microcephalus, intracranial calcification, retinal damage, brain abscess, mental retardation, lymphadenopathy, and others. Its severe symptoms usually showed a long time after first exposure, except symptoms showed by congenital transmission caused by infected mother. Early diagnosis is important to prevent the illness but methods for toxoplasmosis screening are still too expensive for developing country. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA allow the testing of a large number samples within short time frame and based on antibody or antigen detection. This study aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of recombinat protein GRA1 as antigen using ELISA methods. We tested the sensitivity and spesificity of GRA1 protein as antigen in ELISA methods to diagnose toxoplasmosis and compared with ELISA Kit Commercial. Reliable laboratory testing is important to detect Toxoplasma gondii infection, and focused to improving the low cost and easy-to-use diagnostic instrument. Seventy sera collected and tested using both indirect ELISA, commercial ELISA kit and GRA1 protein coated as antigen. Fourty eight and fifty one samples showed positive IgG antibody result of ELISA-GRA1 and ELISA kit. Negative sample tested by ELISA-GRA1 was 22 samples and 19 sample tested by ELISA Kit. The sensitivity and specificity of GRA1-based on ELISA were 100% and 86.36%, positive prediction value (ppv was 94.11%. These data indicate that the recombinant protein GRA1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human toxoplasmosis and become a promising marker for the screening of toxoplasmosis.

  1. Poisoning following exposure to chemicals stored in mislabelled or unlabelled containers: a recipe for potential disaster.

    Millard, Yvette C; Slaughter, Robin J; Shieffelbien, Lucy M; Schep, Leo J

    2014-09-26

    To investigate poisoning exposures to chemicals that were unlabelled, mislabelled or not in their original containers in New Zealand over the last 10 years, based on calls to the New Zealand National Poisons Centre (NZNPC). Call data from the NZNPC between 2003 and 2012 were analysed retrospectively. Parameters reviewed included patient age, route and site of exposure, product classification and recommended intervention. Of the 324,411 calls received between 2003 and 2012, 100,465 calls were associated with acute human exposure to chemicals. There were 757 inquiries related to human exposure to mislabelled or unlabelled chemicals consisting of 0.75% of chemical exposures. Adults were involved in 51% of incidents, children, containers is a problem for all age groups. Although it represents a small proportion of total calls to the NZNPC it remains a potential risk for serious poisoning. It is important that chemicals are stored securely, in their original containers, and never stored in drinking vessels.

  2. Quantification of isotope-labelled and unlabelled folates in plasma, ileostomy and food samples.

    Büttner, Barbara E; Öhrvik, Veronica E; Witthöft, Cornelia M; Rychlik, Michael

    2011-01-01

    New stable isotope dilution assays were developed for the simultaneous quantitation of [(13)C(5)]-labelled and unlabelled 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acid, folic acid along with unlabelled tetrahydrofolic acid and 10-formylfolic acid in clinical samples deriving from human bioavailability studies, i.e. plasma, ileostomy samples, and food. The methods were based on clean-up by strong anion exchange followed by LC-MS/MS detection. Deuterated analogues of the folates were applied as the internal standards in the stable isotope dilution assays. Assay sensitivity was sufficient to detect all relevant folates in the respective samples as their limits of detection were below 0.62 nmol/L in plasma and below 0.73 μg/100 g in food or ileostomy samples. Quantification of the [(13)C(5)]-label in clinical samples offers the possibility to differentiate between folate from endogenous body pools and the administered dose when executing bioavailability trials.

  3. Enhancing deep convolutional neural network scheme for breast cancer diagnosis with unlabeled data.

    Sun, Wenqing; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Zhang, Jianying; Qian, Wei

    2017-04-01

    In this study we developed a graph based semi-supervised learning (SSL) scheme using deep convolutional neural network (CNN) for breast cancer diagnosis. CNN usually needs a large amount of labeled data for training and fine tuning the parameters, and our proposed scheme only requires a small portion of labeled data in training set. Four modules were included in the diagnosis system: data weighing, feature selection, dividing co-training data labeling, and CNN. 3158 region of interests (ROIs) with each containing a mass extracted from 1874 pairs of mammogram images were used for this study. Among them 100 ROIs were treated as labeled data while the rest were treated as unlabeled. The area under the curve (AUC) observed in our study was 0.8818, and the accuracy of CNN is 0.8243 using the mixed labeled and unlabeled data. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Application of the Ceditest FMDV type O and FMDV-NS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies against Foot-and-mouth disease virus in selected livestock and wildlife species in Uganda

    Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Balinda, Sheila Nina

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and control of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) requires rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests. Two antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, Ceditest FMDV-NS for the detection of antibodies against the nonstructural proteins of all FMDV serotypes and Ceditest FMDV type O......, and selected samples were tested not only in serotype-specific ELISAs for antibodies against primarily FMDV serotype O, but also against other serotypes. The FMDV-NS assay detected far more positive samples (93%) than the FMDV type O assay (30%) in buffalo (P ... the South African Territories (SAT) serotypes, while the seroprevalence was generally comparable in cattle with antibodies against serotype O elicited by infection and/or vaccination. However, some districts had higher seroprevalence using the FMDV type O assay indicating vaccination without infection...

  5. Challenges, pitfalls and surprises: development and validation of a monoclonal antibody for enzyme immunoassay of the steroid 1α-hydroxycorticosterone in elasmobranch species.

    Wheaton, Catharine J; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Rimoldi, John M; Gadepalli, Rama S V S; Hart, R; O'Hara, Bobbi R; Evans, Andrew N

    2018-01-31

    Sharks and rays are popular species used in wildlife ecotourism and aquariums to educate the public on the behavior, ecology and conservation challenges of elasmobranchs. To understand long-term physiological health and welfare under varying social and husbandry conditions, we developed and validated an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure stress/ionoregulatory hormones in managed and semi-free range southern rays (Hypanus americanus). Banked serum and interrenal samples from 27 female rays managed at Disney's The Seas with Nemo and Friends® and Castaway Cay were used to evaluate measurement of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone (1αOHB) relative to corticosterone (B). Although commercial EIAs are available for B, those tested exhibit only low relative cross-reactivity to 1αOHB (3-5%). To improve measurement of 1αOHB, we developed a monoclonal antibody using a synthesized 1αOHB-derivative for evaluation using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and EIA. Relative displacements of cross-reactant compounds showed that the antibody had good sensitivity for the target antigen 1αOHB, and low sensitivity to related steroids (desoxycorticosterone and B), but greater sensitivity to 11-dehydrocorticosterone. Tests of competitive vs. noncompetitive EIA formats, reagent titration, and incubation times of the antibody and conjugate were used to optimize sensitivity, repeatability and precision of measured 1αOHB in standards and samples (4 ng/ml, 90% binding). Tests of sample pre-treatment (pH adjustment) and extraction with varying solvent polarity were used to optimize measurement of 1αOHB in <1 ml (serum) or 1 g (interrenal) samples. HPLC analysis revealed the 1αOHB EIA to be superior for measurement of 1αOHB compared to use of a B EIA with or without HPLC fractioning. Results may prove useful for extrapolation to guide best practices for 1αOHB measurement in other elasmobranch species. Improved measurement of stress/ionoregulatory hormones in sharks and rays

  6. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  7. Cross-reactivity of antibodies with phenolic compounds in pistachios during quantification of ochratoxin A by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits.

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Meldrum, Alexander D; Rivera, Nicholas; Ryu, Dojin

    2014-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a nephrotoxic mycotoxin, naturally occurs in wide range of agricultural commodities. Typical screening of OTA involves various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) is a rich source of phenolic compounds that may result in a false positive due to structural similarities to OTA. The present study investigated the cross-reactivity profiles of phenolic compounds using two commercial ELISA test kits. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to confirm the concentration of OTA in the pistachio samples and compared with the results obtained from ELISA. When the degree of interaction and 50 % inhibitory concentration of phenolic compounds were determined, the cross-reactivity showed a pattern similar to that observed with the commercial ELSIA kits, although quantitatively different. In addition, the degree of interaction increased with the increasing concentration of phenolic compounds. The ELISA value had stronger correlations with the content of total phenolic compound, gallic acid, and catechin (R(2) = 0.757, 0.732, and 0.729, respectively) compared with epicatechin (R(2) = 0.590). These results suggest that phenolic compounds in pistachio skins may cross-react with the OTA antibody and lead to a false positive or to an overestimation of OTA concentration in ELISA-based tests.

  8. Autoreactive lymphocytes in thyroid disorders. 2. Comparison of anti-thyroglobulin antibody production by plaque-forming cell, radio-immunological and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Petersen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K; Hoeier-Madsen, M; Larsen, F; Husby, S

    1986-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from 9 randomly selected patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were stimulated in vitro with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), a polyclonal B lymphocyte activator. The secretion of immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) was assayed by means of haemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays, radioimmune assay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Total Ig and TgAb production was maximal using MNC cultured at 1.0 x 10/sup 6//ml as estimated by PFC, RIA and ELISA. The Ig and TgAb production as measured by RIA and ELISA was 1.5 - 3 times higher after 12 days' culture compared to 6 days' culture. Ig and TgAb production measured by PFC-assays at day 6 correlated positively to the results obtained by RIA and ELISA at day 12. PWM-induced TgAb secretion correlated positively to TgAb titres in serum. As judged by PFC, TgAb production was found in 8/9 patients; about 5% (range 0 - 7.9%) of the total PWM-stimulated IgG-secreting cells were involved in TgAb secretion. TgAb production as measured by ELISA and RIA was found in 6/9 patients. By reference to an affinity-purified human TgAb preparation, the TgAb secretion was about 0.7% (range 0 - 21.3%) of the total PWM-induced IgG secretion.

  9. An Evaluation Study of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Using Recombinant Protein Pap31 for Detection of Antibody against Bartonella bacilliformis Infection among the Peruvian Population

    Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Atkins, Erin H.; Romero, Sofia; Grieco, John; Chao, Chien Chung; Ching, Wei Mei

    2014-01-01

    Reliable laboratory testing is of great importance to detect Bartonella bacilliformis infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant protein Pap31 (rPap31) for the detection of antibodies against B. bacilliformis as compared with immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Of the 302 sera collected between 1997 and 2000 among an at-risk Peruvian population, 103 and 34 samples tested positive for IFA-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IFA-IgM, respectively. By using Youden's index, the cutoff values of ELISA-IgG at 0.915 gave a sensitivity of 84.5% and specificity of 94%. The cutoff values of ELISA-IgM at 0.634 gave a sensitivity of 88.2% and specificity of 85.1%. Using latent class analysis, estimates of sensitivity and specificity of almost all the assays were slightly higher than those of a conventional method of calculation. The test is proved beneficial for discriminating between infected and non-infected individuals with the advantage of low-cost and high-throughput capability. PMID:24515944

  10. Evaluation and Comparison of Enzyme Immunoassay (Eia and Acid Fast Staining with Confirmation by Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay for Detection of Cryptosporidium Species in Infants and Young Children.

    D Dorostcar Moghaddam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cryptosporidiosis is prevalent world wide, causing a variety of problems ranging from acute, self-limiting diarrhea to fatal cases in immunocompromised persons, particulary those with acquired immunodeficiency (AIDS. Diagnosis of Cryptosporidium is made by identification of oocysts in stool specimens. The detection is most commonly made by the acid-fast staining method followed by microscopic examination which has low specificity and sensitivity. Material and Methods: In the present study, we evaluated diagnostic utility of a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA, which detects Cryptosporidium-Specific antigen (CSA in 204 unprocessed stool specimens obtained from patients less than 3 years of age. Results: When compared with the routine screening procedure applied in this field study (screening by acid-fast staining and microscopy after concentration of positive results by IFA, both sensitivity and specificity were 98%. Of the 139 specimens negative by microscopy, 13 (9.3% were positive by EIA, 11 of which were confirmed by inhibition with antibody to Cryptosporidia-specific antigen. Conclusion: The EIA is an important tool for identifying Cryptosporidium in fecal specimens in field studies since it is sensitive, specific, simple to use and unaffected by the presence of a preservative.

  11. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    Kathleen Ingenhoven

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs against interferon beta (IFN-β in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization to minimize the risk.MethodA two-tiered bridging enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format was selected and validated according to current recommendations. Screening assay: ADA in serum samples form complexes with immobilized IFN-β and biotinylated IFN-β, which are then detected using HRP labeled Streptavidin and TMB substrate. Confirmation assay: Screen “putative positive” samples are tested in the presence of excess drug (preincubation of sera with 0.3 µg/mL of soluble IFN-β and percentage of inhibition is calculated.ResultsThe assay is precise, and the sensitivity of the assay was confirmed to be 26 ng/mL using commercially available polyclonal rabbit antihuman IFN-β in human sera as the positive control.ConclusionAn ultrasensitive ELISA for IFN-β-binding ADA testing has been validated. This will form the basis to assess anti-biopharmaceutical immunization toward IFN-β with regards to its clinical relevance and may allow for the development of predictive tools, key aims within the ABIRISK consortium.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot (IB) for the detection of antibodies against Neospora caninum in milk from dairy cows.

    Chatziprodromidou, I P; Apostolou, T

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot (IB) for detecting antibodies of Neospora caninum in dairy cows, in the absence of a gold standard. The study complies with STRADAS-paratuberculosis guidelines for reporting the accuracy of the test. We tried to apply Bayesian models that do not require conditional independence of the tests under evaluation, but as convergence problems appeared, we used Bayesian methodology, that does not assume conditional dependence of the tests. Informative prior probability distributions were constructed, based on scientific inputs regarding sensitivity and specificity of the IB test and the prevalence of disease in the studied populations. IB sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 98.8% and 91.3%, respectively, while the respective estimates for ELISA were 60% and 96.7%. A sensitivity analysis, where modified prior probability distributions concerning IB diagnostic accuracy applied, showed a limited effect in posterior assessments. We concluded that ELISA can be used to screen the bulk milk and secondly, IB can be used whenever needed.

  13. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon ovarian fluid

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Chase, Dorothy M.; McKibben, Constance L.

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 × 109cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 × 104cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of 111In-labeled anti-p97 monoclonal antibody in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma

    Rosenblum, M.G.; Murray, J.L.; Haynie, T.P.; Glenn, H.J.; Jahns, M.F.; Benjamin, R.S.; Frincke, J.M.; Carlo, D.J.; Hersh, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with metastatic malignant melanoma received anti-p97 murine monoclonal antibody (96.5) infused over 2 h at doses between 1 and 20 mg coupled to either 2.5 or 5.0 mCi of 111 In by the bifunctional chelating agent diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid. Clearance of 111 In from plasma closely fit an open, one-compartment mathematical model (r2 greater than 0.90). The overall half-life of 111 In plasma was approximately 31 h and did not appear to be dependent on the total dose of antibody administered. The apparent volume of distribution of the 111 In label approximated the total blood volume (7.8 +/- 0.7 liters) at the 1-mg dose and decreased to 3.0 +/- 0.14 liters at the 20-mg dose, suggesting saturation of antigenic or other extravascular binding sites at higher antibody doses. The clearance of the murine monoclonal antibody itself from plasma was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pharmacokinetics for the murine antibody in plasma also fit an open, one-compartment mathematical model. All pharmacokinetic parameters for unlabeled antibody closely paralleled those found for 111 In-labeled antibody pharmacokinetics. This suggests that the 111 In radiolabel remains complexed to the monoclonal antibody after in vivo administration. The cumulative urinary excretion of the 111 In label over 48 h was between 12 and 23% of the total administered dose and is assumed to represent 111 In-labeled chelate complex unattached to antibody. Analysis of the 111 In label in spleen, liver, heart, and kidney showed that the concentration of label in liver tissue was reduced with increasing antibody doses and coincided with changes in the apparent volume of distribution

  15. THE HYDROGENOSOMAL ENZYME HYDROGENASE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX SP L2 IS RECOGNIZED BY ANTIBODIES, DIRECTED AGAINST THE C-TERMINAL MICROBODY PROTEIN TARGETING SIGNAL SKL

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; KRAAK, MN; VEENHUIS, M; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    The question was addressed whether antibodies directed against the general microbody C-terminal protein targeting signal SKL recognized hydrogenosomal proteins from Neocallimastix sp. L2. Immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting experiments using these antibodies indicated the

  16. Standardization of micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies using extracts from Mexican strains as antigens.

    Sánchez, B; Monteón, V; Reyes, P A; Espinoza, B

    2001-01-01

    This report describes two assays for the detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies using Mexican strains of the parasite and the concordance with two assays previously evaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez in Mexico City. Micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot were used for the detection of T. cruzi antibodies with a total extract of epimastigote from Ninoa and Queretaro, which are Mexican strains of T. cruzi. To standardize these methods, a total of 246 serum samples was used. In addition, sera from six confirmed Mexican chronic individuals in the asymptomatic phase were also used for comparison with the Argentinean antigen. ELISA was 100% specific in that no false positive results were found with sera of both healthy individuals and non-Chagasic cardiopaths. Sera from individuals infected with Leishmania sp. showed approximately 16% of cross-reaction with ELISA. The test showed a positive predictive value of 90% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Western blot was also a highly sensitive test for detecting chronic Chagasic symptomatic patients from Mexico because no false negative results were obtained. Furthermore, it was possible to use Western blot to detect seven immunodominant antigens of approximately 30, 32, 40, 42, 65, 70, and 83 kDa. Concordance with two previous standardized tests at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología showed a Kappa index of 0.96, indicating high concordance between the results obtained at these two laboratories. Finally, ELISA using Ninoa antigen extract was more sensitive than ELISA with an Argentinean extract, which failed to detect individuals in the chronic asymptomatic phase (undetermined phase) of infection. This study indicates that ELISA and Western blot using Ninoa and/or Queretaro extracts of T. cruzi as antigens are useful tools in the detection of individuals who have been exposed to T. cruzi both in the undetermined/asymptomatic and symptomatic phases

  17. Clinical comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA syphilis-G enzyme immunoassay with the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption immunoglobulin G assay for syphilis testing.

    Halling, V W; Jones, M F; Bestrom, J E; Wold, A D; Rosenblatt, J E; Smith, T F; Cockerill, F R

    1999-10-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTIA-positive samples (antibody indices of >/=0.650 and 0.900, the sample was considered positive. Thirteen of 89 (15%) samples had discrepant results. Compared to the FTA-ABS assay, the CAPTIA EIA had a sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 70.7, 97.9, 96.7, and 79.7%, respectively. In another analysis, discrepancies between results were resolved by repeated FTA-ABS testing (technologists were blinded to previous RPR results) and patient chart reviews. Seven CAPTIA-negative samples which were previously interpreted (unblinded) as minimally reactive by the FTA method were subsequently interpreted (blinded) as nonreactive. One other discrepant sample (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [at an intensity of 3+], unblinded) was FTA negative with repeated testing (blinded). For the five remaining discrepant samples, chart reviews indicated that one patient (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [minimally reactive], blinded) had possible syphilis. These five samples were also evaluated and found to be negative by another treponema-specific test, the Treponema pallidum microhemagglutination assay. Therefore, after repeated testing and chart reviews, 2 of the 89 (2%) samples had discrepant results; the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 96.7, 98.3, 96.7, and 98.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the CAPTIA IgG EIA is a reliable method for syphilis testing and that personnel performing tests

  18. On the asymptotic improvement of supervised learning by utilizing additional unlabeled samples - Normal mixture density case

    Shahshahani, Behzad M.; Landgrebe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of additional unlabeled samples in improving the supervised learning process is studied in this paper. Three learning processes. supervised, unsupervised, and combined supervised-unsupervised, are compared by studying the asymptotic behavior of the estimates obtained under each process. Upper and lower bounds on the asymptotic covariance matrices are derived. It is shown that under a normal mixture density assumption for the probability density function of the feature space, the combined supervised-unsupervised learning is always superior to the supervised learning in achieving better estimates. Experimental results are provided to verify the theoretical concepts.

  19. A sensitive progesterone enzyme immunoassay for cow, goat and llama plasma using a monoclonal antibody and Danazol (17-α-2,4-pregnadien-20-yno (2,3-D) isoxazol-17-ol) as a displacing agent

    Aba, M.A.; Carlsson, M.A.; Karlsson, A.; Forsberg, M.

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive progesterone enzyme immunoassay was developed for cow, goat and llama plasma using a monoclonal antibody and Danazol (17-α-2,4-pregnadien-20-yno (2,3-d) isoxazol-17-ol) as a displacing agent. The microtitration plates were first coated with progesterone 3 (o-carboxy-methyl) oxine: BSA conjugate. The immune reaction was performed by incubating overnight a mixture of 50 μL of plasma and 100 μL of first antibody. After washing, 100 μL of the second antibody (horse radish peroxidase conjugated anti-mouse IgG) were added. The plates were incubated for 1 hour and washed. Immediately the substrate solution was added and finally the reaction stopped and optical density measured. This assay allows accurate determination of progesterone in plasma from several species with good specificity, precision and accuracy, and is suitable for the rapid assessment of luteal function and reproductive status in both clinical and research situations. (author)

  20. Development of a monoclonal antibody to urinary degradation products from the C-terminal telopeptide alpha 1 chain of type I collagen. Application in an enzyme Immunoassay and comparison to CrossLaps(TM) ELISA

    C, Fledelius; I, Kolding; P, Quist

    1997-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody MAbA7 was raised against a synthetic peptide having a sequence (EKAHDGGR) specific for a part of the C-telopeptide alpha 1 chain of type I collagen. MAbA7 was labelled with horseradish peroxide and used in a competitive one-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA...... concentrations decreased 88% (pantibody and the new assay may be useful for further investigations of the physiological...

  1. Diagnostic efficacy of monoclonal antibody based sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detection of Fasciola gigantica excretory/secretory antigens in both serum and stool

    Zoheiry Mona K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This research was carried out to develop a reliable monoclonal antibody (MoAb-based sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the diagnosis of active Fasciola gigantica infection in both serum and stool for comparative purposes. Methods From a panel of MoAbs raised against F. gigantica excretory/secretory antigens (ES Ags, a pair (12B/11D/3F and 10A/9D/10G was chosen due to its high reactivity and strict specificity to F. gigantica antigen by indirect ELISA. Results The two MoAbs were of the IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses, respectively. Using SDS-PAGE and EITB, the selected MoAbs recognized 83, 64, 45 and 26 kDa bands of ES Ags. The lower detection limit of ELISA assay was 3 ng/ml. In stool, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficacy of ELISA was 96%, 98.2 and 97.1%; while in serum they were 94%, 94.6% and 94.3%, respectively. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between ova count in stool of F. gigantica infected patients and the OD readings of ELISA in both stool and serum samples (r = 0.730, p Conclusions These data showed that the use of MoAb-based sandwich ELISA for the detection of F. gigantica coproantigens in stool specimens was superior to serum samples; it provides a highly efficient, non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of active F. gigantica infection.

  2. Inhibitory effect of unlabeled iodothyronines on the deiodination of labeled thyroid hormones by cultured hepatocarcinoma cells

    Sorimachi, Kenji

    1980-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of unlabeled iodothyronines on the metabolism of thyroxine (T 4 ), 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (reverse T 3 , rT 3 ) were investigated in continuously cultured monkey hepatocarcinoma cells which showed a rapid metabolism of the thyroid hormones. Nonphenolic ring deiodination of [3',5'- 125 I]-T 4 and [3'- 125 I]-T 3 was strongly inhibited by excess T 3 , 3,5-diiodothyronine (3,5-T 2 ) and T 4 , whereas rT 3 was the least effective inhibitor. Phenolic ring deiodination of [3',5'- 125 I]-rT 3 was strongly affected by excess unlabeled rT 3 . However, the inhibitory effect of T 4 , T 3 and 3,5-T 3 was much weaker than that of rT 3 . It was concluded that rT 3 is apparently the most effective inhibitor of phenolic ring deiodination but the least effective inhibitor of nonphenolic ring deiodination. (author)

  3. Unlabelled advertorials in Slovenian life-style press: a study of the promotion of health products.

    Kovacic, Melita Poler; Erjavec, Karmen; Stular, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses unlabelled advertorials about health products in four life-style magazines and three daily newspapers' life-style supplements in Slovenia. Based on 250 hours of observing the production practice, 20 in-depth interviews with the main participants and a textual analysis of 247 advertorials, supported by three detailed case studies, the process of unlabelled advertorial production was unveiled, reasons for their production explained and their discursive elements of promotion uncovered. Despite their typical news-like appearance, advertorials focus on a product's positive characteristics only and represent an oversimplified viewpoint on health, primarily oriented towards the interest of the pharmaceutical industry. In advertorials, readers are instructed in healthy living and caring about their health through buying the promoted product. No particular differences were found between the magazines and quality dailies' supplements, indicating that the advertorial practice has become a common part of the Slovenian press media scene. The outburst of advertorials in Slovenia is outstanding due to the lack of historical democracy, problems with the supervision of legal transgressions, the small media and advertising market, economic downturns and the financial weakness of the media.

  4. Inhibitory effect of unlabeled iodothyronines on the deiodination of labeled thyroid hormones by cultured hepatocarcinoma cells

    Sorimachi, K [Dokkyo Univ. Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-04-01

    Inhibitory effects of unlabeled iodothyronines on the metabolism of thyroxine (T/sub 4/), 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) and 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (reverse T/sub 3/, rT/sub 3/) were investigated in continuously cultured monkey hepatocarcinoma cells which showed a rapid metabolism of the thyroid hormones. Nonphenolic ring deiodination of (3',5'-/sup 125/I)-T/sub 4/ and (3'-/sup 125/I)-T/sub 3/ was strongly inhibited by excess T/sub 3/, 3,5-diiodothyronine (3,5-T/sub 2/) and T/sub 4/, whereas rT/sub 3/ was the least effective inhibitor. Phenolic ring deiodination of (3',5'-/sup 125/I)-rT/sub 3/ was strongly affected by excess unlabeled rT/sub 3/. However, the inhibitory effect of T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/ and 3,5-T/sub 3/ was much weaker than that of rT/sub 3/. It was concluded that rT/sub 3/ is apparently the most effective inhibitor of phenolic ring deiodination but the least effective inhibitor of nonphenolic ring deiodination.

  5. A comparison of titers of anti-Brucella antibodies of naturally infected and healthy vaccinated cattle by standard tube agglutination test, microtiter plate agglutination test, indirect hemagglutination assay, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Anju Mohan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We determined the antibody response in cattle naturally infected with brucellosis and normal healthy adult cattle vaccinated during calf hood with strain 19. Materials and Methods: The antibody titers were measured by standard tube agglutination test (STAT, microtiter plate agglutination test (MAT, indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA as per standard protocols. Results: The mean STAT titers were 1.963±0.345 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was extremely significant (p<0.0001. The mean MAT titers were 2.244±0.727 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was very significant (p<0.005. The mean IHA titers in infected cattle were 2.284±0.574, and those in healthy vaccinated cattle were 1.200±0.155. The difference was extremely significant (p=0.0002. However, the difference in mean iELISA titers of infected cattle (1.3678±0.014 and healthy vaccinated cattle (1.367±0.014 was non-significant. The infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. However, it cannot be ascertained whether these antibodies are due to vaccine or response to infection. Since the infected animals had been vaccinated earlier, the current infection may suggest that vaccination was unable to induce protective levels of antibody. The heightened antibody response after infection may also indicate a secondary immune response to the antigens common to the vaccine strain and wild Brucella organisms. Conclusion: The brucellosis infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals.

  6. Wortmannin efficiently suppresses the recovery from radiation-induced damage in pimonidazole-unlabeled quiescent tumor cell population

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Labeling of proliferating (P) cells in mice bearing EL4 tumors was achieved by continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Tumors were irradiated with γ-rays at 1 h after pimonidazole administration followed by caffeine or wortmannin treatment. Twenty-four hours later, assessment of the responses of quiescent (Q) and total (=P+Q) cell populations were based on the frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of the pimonidazole-unlabeled tumor cell fractions was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. The pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radio-sensitivity compared with the whole cell fraction more remarkably in Q cells than total cells. However, a significantly greater decrease in radio-sensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabeled than the whole cell fraction, evaluated using an assay performed 24 hours after irradiation, was more clearly observed in Q cells than total cells. In both the pimonidazole-unlabeled and the whole cell fractions, wortmannin efficiently suppressed the reduction in sensitivity due to delayed assay. Wortmannin combined with γ-ray irradiation is useful for suppressing the recovery from radiation-induced damage especially in the pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction within the total and Q tumor cell populations. (author)

  7. How Well Does BODIPY-Cholesteryl Ester Mimic Unlabeled Cholesteryl Esters in High Density Lipoprotein Particles?

    Karilainen, Topi; Vuorela, Timo; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    We compare the behavior of unlabeled and BODIPY-labeled cholesteryl ester (CE) in high density lipoprotein by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We find through replica exchange umbrella sampling and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations that BODIPY labeling has no significant effect...... on the partitioning of CE between HDL and the water phase. However, BODIPY-CE was observed to diffuse more slowly and locate itself closer to the HDL-water interface than CE due to the BODIPY probe that is constrained to the surface region, and because the CE body in BODIPY-CE prefers to align itself away from...... the HDL surface. The implications as to the suitability of BODIPY to explore lipoprotein properties are discussed....

  8. Autonomic intrusion detection: Adaptively detecting anomalies over unlabeled audit data streams in computer networks

    Wang, Wei; Guyet, Thomas; Quiniou, René ; Cordier, Marie-Odile; Masseglia, Florent; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel framework of autonomic intrusion detection that fulfills online and adaptive intrusion detection over unlabeled HTTP traffic streams in computer networks. The framework holds potential for self-managing: self-labeling, self-updating and self-adapting. Our framework employs the Affinity Propagation (AP) algorithm to learn a subject’s behaviors through dynamical clustering of the streaming data. It automatically labels the data and adapts to normal behavior changes while identifies anomalies. Two large real HTTP traffic streams collected in our institute as well as a set of benchmark KDD’99 data are used to validate the framework and the method. The test results show that the autonomic model achieves better results in terms of effectiveness and efficiency compared to adaptive Sequential Karhunen–Loeve method and static AP as well as three other static anomaly detection methods, namely, k-NN, PCA and SVM.

  9. Autonomic intrusion detection: Adaptively detecting anomalies over unlabeled audit data streams in computer networks

    Wang, Wei

    2014-06-22

    In this work, we propose a novel framework of autonomic intrusion detection that fulfills online and adaptive intrusion detection over unlabeled HTTP traffic streams in computer networks. The framework holds potential for self-managing: self-labeling, self-updating and self-adapting. Our framework employs the Affinity Propagation (AP) algorithm to learn a subject’s behaviors through dynamical clustering of the streaming data. It automatically labels the data and adapts to normal behavior changes while identifies anomalies. Two large real HTTP traffic streams collected in our institute as well as a set of benchmark KDD’99 data are used to validate the framework and the method. The test results show that the autonomic model achieves better results in terms of effectiveness and efficiency compared to adaptive Sequential Karhunen–Loeve method and static AP as well as three other static anomaly detection methods, namely, k-NN, PCA and SVM.

  10. Exploiting the potential of unlabeled endoscopic video data with self-supervised learning.

    Ross, Tobias; Zimmerer, David; Vemuri, Anant; Isensee, Fabian; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Both, Fabian; Kessler, Philip; Wagner, Martin; Müller, Beat; Kenngott, Hannes; Speidel, Stefanie; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Maier-Hein, Klaus; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2018-04-27

    Surgical data science is a new research field that aims to observe all aspects of the patient treatment process in order to provide the right assistance at the right time. Due to the breakthrough successes of deep learning-based solutions for automatic image annotation, the availability of reference annotations for algorithm training is becoming a major bottleneck in the field. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the concept of self-supervised learning to address this issue. Our approach is guided by the hypothesis that unlabeled video data can be used to learn a representation of the target domain that boosts the performance of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms when used for pre-training. Core of the method is an auxiliary task based on raw endoscopic video data of the target domain that is used to initialize the convolutional neural network (CNN) for the target task. In this paper, we propose the re-colorization of medical images with a conditional generative adversarial network (cGAN)-based architecture as auxiliary task. A variant of the method involves a second pre-training step based on labeled data for the target task from a related domain. We validate both variants using medical instrument segmentation as target task. The proposed approach can be used to radically reduce the manual annotation effort involved in training CNNs. Compared to the baseline approach of generating annotated data from scratch, our method decreases exploratively the number of labeled images by up to 75% without sacrificing performance. Our method also outperforms alternative methods for CNN pre-training, such as pre-training on publicly available non-medical (COCO) or medical data (MICCAI EndoVis2017 challenge) using the target task (in this instance: segmentation). As it makes efficient use of available (non-)public and (un-)labeled data, the approach has the potential to become a valuable tool for CNN (pre-)training.

  11. Characteristics of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of IgG antibodies specific to Сhlamydia trachomatis heat shock protein (HSP-60

    O. Yu. Galkin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study sensitivity and specificity of the developed ELISA set for the identification of IgG antibodies against Chlamydia trachomatis HSP-60 (using biotinylated tyramine-based signal amplification system. The study was conducted using a panel of characterized sera, as well as two reference ELISA sets of similar purpose. According to the results of ELISA informative value parameters, the ELISA we have developed showed the highest specificity and sensitivity parameters (no false negative or false positive results were registered. In 4 out of 15 intralaboratory panel serum samples initially identified as negative, anti-HSP-60 IgG-antibodies test result in reference ELISA sets upon dilution changed from negative to positive. The nature of titration curves of false negative sera and commercial monoclonal antibodies А57-В9 against C. trachomatis HSP-60 after incubation for 24 h was indicative of the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies in these samples. Upon sera dilution, idiotypic-anti-idiotypic complexes dissociated, which caused the change of test result. High informative value of the developed ELISA set for identification of IgG antibodies against C. trachomatis HSP-60 has been proven. Anti-idiotypic antibodies possessing C. trachomatis anti-HSP-60 activity and being one of the causes of false negative results of the relevant ELISA-based tests have been identified in blood sera of individuals infected with chlamydial genitourinary infection agents.

  12. Development and application of radioimmunoassays and enzyme immunoassays in microbiological and immunological diagnosis. 2. Comparative studies for the detection of toxoplasma antibodies with ELISA, RIA and other serological methods

    Mueller, W A; Struy, H; Holzwarth, F [Medizinische Akademie, Magdeburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1982-06-01

    Comparative studies of indirect immunofluorescence test (IT), complement binding reaction (CBR), enzyme- and radioimmunoassay (ELISA, RIA) for the detection of toxoplasma antibodies in sera of 513 patients are reported. The precision dependent on time, showed coefficients of variation from 3% to 12% (IFT 3%, CBR 10%, ELISA 12%, RIA 7%). The correlation of IFT and ELISA as well as RIA was relatively unfavourable (coefficient of correlation IFT/ELISA r = 0.52, IFT/RIA r = 0.54, RIA/ELISA r = 0.60). The ELISA is the most sensitive method for the detection of antibodies. The specificity of the Toxo-ELISA has to be improved by application of suitable fractions of antigens.

  13. Improvement of Roller Bearing Diagnosis with Unlabeled Data Using Cut Edge Weight Confidence Based Tritraining

    Wei-Li Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Roller bearings are one of the most commonly used components in rotational machines. The fault diagnosis of roller bearings thus plays an important role in ensuring the safe functioning of the mechanical systems. However, in most cases of bearing fault diagnosis, there are limited number of labeled data to achieve a proper fault diagnosis. Therefore, exploiting unlabeled data plus few labeled data, this paper proposed a roller bearing fault diagnosis method based on tritraining to improve roller bearing diagnosis performance. To overcome the noise brought by wrong labeling into the classifiers training process, the cut edge weight confidence is introduced into the diagnosis framework. Besides a small trick called suspect principle is adopted to avoid overfitting problem. The proposed method is validated in two independent roller bearing fault experiment vibrational signals that both include three types of faults: inner-ring fault, outer-ring fault, and rolling element fault. The results demonstrate the desirable diagnostic performance improvement by the proposed method in the extreme situation where there is only limited number of labeled data.

  14. A 35-year comparison of children labelled as gifted, unlabelled as gifted and average-ability

    Joan Freeman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984686X14273Why are some children seen as gifted while others of identical ability are not?  To find out why and what the consequences might be, in 1974 I began in England with 70 children labelled as gifted.  Each one was matched for age, sex and socio-economic level with two comparison children in the same school class. The first comparison child had an identical gift, and the second taken at random.  Investigation was by a battery of tests and deep questioning of pupils, teachers and parents in their schools and homes which went on for 35 years. A major significant difference was that those labelled gifted had significantly more emotional problems than either the unlabelled but identically gifted or the random controls.  The vital aspects of success for the entire sample, whether gifted or not, have been hard work, emotional support and a positive personal outlook.  But in general, the higher the individual’s intelligence the better their chances in life. 

  15. [Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibodies to Salmonella Typhi lipopolysaccharide O and capsular polysaccharide Vi antigens in persons from outbreak of typhoid fever].

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Kałużewski, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever is dependent upon either isolation of S. Typhi from a clinical sample or the detection of raised titers of serum antibodies in the Widal test or the passive hemagglutination assay (PHA). In this study we evaluated the usefulness of ELISA for detection of antibodies to S. Typhi lipopolysaccharide O and capsular polysaccharide Vi antigens in the sera of persons from outbreak of typhoid fever. Fifteen serum samples from patients with laboratory confirmed typhoid fever and 140 sera from persons suspected for contact with typhoid fever patients from outbreak in 1974/75 in Poland were tested by ELISA. Additionally, as the control group, we tested 115 sera from blood donors for the presence of S. Typhi anti-LPS and anti-Vi antibodies. Anti-LPS and anti-Vi antibodies were detected in 80% and 53.3% of sera obtained from patients with laboratory confirmed typhoid fever, respectively. The high percentages of positive results in ELISA were also noted in the group of persons suspected for contact with typhoid fever patients (51.4% and 45%) but not in the group of blood donors (7.8% and 6.1%, respectively). The ELISA could be a useful tool for the serological diagnosis of typhoid fever in patients who have clinical symptoms but are culture negative, especially during massive outbreaks of typhoid fever.

  16. Diagnostic performance of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect bovine leukemia virus antibodies in bulk-tank milk samples

    Nekouei, Omid; Durocher, Jean; Keefe, Greg

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a commercial ELISA for detecting bovine leukemia virus antibodies in bulk-tank milk samples from eastern Canada. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were estimated at 97.2% and 100%, respectively. The test was recommended as a cost-efficient tool for large-scale screening programs. PMID:27429469

  17. How-to-do-it: Immunological Assays for the Classroom 1. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A Laboratory Tool for Demonstration of Antibody-Antigen Interaction.

    Russo, A. J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of required materials, and procedures are provided for an immunological assay which has been modified for use as a classroom/laboratory demonstration of antigen-antibody reaction. The assay is designed for a two and one-half hour laboratory period but may be modified for one hour laboratories. (JN)

  18. Production and assay of forskolin antibodies

    Ho, L.T.; Ho, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Forskolin (Fo), a cardiovascular active diterpene of plant origin, has been widely used as a research tool in regulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase (AC). A linear relationship of Fo binding to plasma membrane with activation of AC has been reported. The present abstract describes the production and assay of Fo antibodies (AB). 7-0-Hemisuccinyl-7-deacetyl Fo, coupled to either human serum albumin or goat IgG, was injected into goats to elicit AB to Fo haptan. AB to Fo in antiserum or an isolated IgG fraction was tested by two assay methods, a radioimmunoassay using 3 H-Fo as a tracer and a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horse radish peroxidase-rabbit anti goat IgG as indicator. The titers for Fo antiserum were 4000-10,000. In the defined assay condition, approximately 20-25% of the added 3 H-Fo was found to bind to AB. The bound radioactivity was displaced by Fo-HSA or Fo-goat IgG or free unlabelled Fo ranging from 0.5-50 pmol/tube, or 5-500 nM. The IC 50 was approximately 8-10 pmol/tube or 80-100 nM. The binding of HRP-rabbit anti goat IgG in the ELISA was inhibited by proper Fo conjugate. The development of methods for production and assay for Fo AB may be useful in the study of mechanism of activation of AC by Fo and Fo-like compound

  19. Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using chicken egg yolk IgY antibodies

    Yanil R Parma

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, a subset of Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC is associated with a spectrum of diseases that includes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and a life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Regardless of serotype, Shiga toxins (Stx1 and/or Stx2 are uniformly expressed by all EHEC, and so exploitable targets for laboratory diagnosis of these pathogens. In this study, a sandwich ELISA for determination of Shiga toxin (Stx was developed using anti-Stx2 B subunit antibodies and its performance was compared with that of the Vero cell assay and a commercial immunoassay kit. Chicken IgY was used as capture antibody and a HRP-conjugated rabbit IgG as the detection antibody. The anti-Stx2B IgY was harvested from eggs laid by hens immunized with a recombinant protein fragment. Several parameters were tested in order to optimize the sandwich ELISA assay, including concentration of antibodies, type and concentration of blocking agent, and incubation temperatures. Supernatants from 42 STEC strains of different serotypes and stx variants, including stx2EDL933, stx2vha, stx2vhb, stx2g, stx1EDL933 and stx1d were tested. All Stx variants were detected by the sandwich ELISA, with a detection limit of 400 ng /ml Stx2. Twenty three strains negative for stx genes, including different bacteria species, showed no activity in Vero cell assay and produced negative results in ELISA, except for 2 strains. Our results show that anti-Stx2B IgY sandwich ELISA could be used in routine diagnosis as a rapid, specific and economic method for detection of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

  20. Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using chicken egg yolk IgY antibodies

    Parma, Y. R.; Chacana, P. A.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Rogé, A.; Granobles Velandia, C. V.; Krüger, A.; Parma, A. E.; Fernández-Miyakawa, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a subset of Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC) is associated with a spectrum of diseases that includes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and a life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Regardless of serotype, Shiga toxins (Stx1 and/or Stx2) are uniformly expressed by all EHEC, and so exploitable targets for laboratory diagnosis of these pathogens. In this study, a sandwich ELISA for determination of Shiga toxin (Stx) was developed using anti-Stx2B subunit antibodies and its performance was compared with that of the Vero cell assay and a commercial immunoassay kit. Chicken IgY was used as capture antibody and a HRP-conjugated rabbit IgG as the detection antibody. The anti-Stx2B IgY was harvested from eggs laid by hens immunized with a recombinant protein fragment. Several parameters were tested in order to optimize the sandwich ELISA assay, including concentration of antibodies, type and concentration of blocking agent, and incubation temperatures. Supernatants from 42 STEC strains of different serotypes and stx variants, including stx2EDL933, stx2vha, stx2vhb, stx2g, stx1EDL933, and stx1d were tested. All Stx variants were detected by the sandwich ELISA, with a detection limit of 115 ng/ml Stx2. Twenty three strains negative for stx genes, including different bacteria species, showed no activity in Vero cell assay and produced negative results in ELISA, except for two strains. Our results show that anti-Stx2B IgY sandwich ELISA could be used in routine diagnosis as a rapid, specific and economic method for detection of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. PMID:22919675

  1. UV-Visible Spectroscopy-Based Quantification of Unlabeled DNA Bound to Gold Nanoparticles.

    Baldock, Brandi L; Hutchison, James E

    2016-12-20

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles have been increasingly applied as sensitive and selective analytical probes and biosensors. The DNA ligands bound to a nanoparticle dictate its reactivity, making it essential to know the type and number of DNA strands bound to the nanoparticle surface. Existing methods used to determine the number of DNA strands per gold nanoparticle (AuNP) require that the sequences be fluorophore-labeled, which may affect the DNA surface coverage and reactivity of the nanoparticle and/or require specialized equipment and other fluorophore-containing reagents. We report a UV-visible-based method to conveniently and inexpensively determine the number of DNA strands attached to AuNPs of different core sizes. When this method is used in tandem with a fluorescence dye assay, it is possible to determine the ratio of two unlabeled sequences of different lengths bound to AuNPs. Two sizes of citrate-stabilized AuNPs (5 and 12 nm) were functionalized with mixtures of short (5 base) and long (32 base) disulfide-terminated DNA sequences, and the ratios of sequences bound to the AuNPs were determined using the new method. The long DNA sequence was present as a lower proportion of the ligand shell than in the ligand exchange mixture, suggesting it had a lower propensity to bind the AuNPs than the short DNA sequence. The ratio of DNA sequences bound to the AuNPs was not the same for the large and small AuNPs, which suggests that the radius of curvature had a significant influence on the assembly of DNA strands onto the AuNPs.

  2. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using a Virus Type-Specific Peptide Based on a Subdomain of Envelope Protein Erns for Serologic Diagnosis of Pestivirus Infections in Swine

    Langedijk, J. P. M.; Middel, W. G. J.; Meloen, R. H.; Kramps, J. A.; de Smit, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Peptides deduced from the C-terminal end (residues 191 to 227) of pestivirus envelope protein Erns were used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to measure specifically antibodies against different types of pestiviruses. The choice of the peptide was based on the modular structure of the Erns protein, and the peptide was selected for its probable independent folding and good exposure, which would make it a good candidate for an antigenic peptide to be used in a diagnostic test. A solid-phase peptide ELISA which was cross-reactive for several types of pestivirus antibodies and which can be used for the general detection of pestivirus antibodies was developed. To identify type-specific pestivirus antibodies, a liquid-phase peptide ELISA, with a labeled, specific classical swine fever virus (CSFV) peptide and an unlabeled bovine viral diarrhea virus peptide to block cross-reactivity, was developed. Specificity and sensitivity of the liquid-phase peptide ELISA for CSFV were 98 and 100%, respectively. Because the peptide is a fragment of the Erns protein, it can be used to differentiate between infected and vaccinated animals when a vaccine based on the E2 protein, which is another pestivirus envelope protein, is used. PMID:11230402

  3. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay To Differentiate the Antibody Responses of Animals Infected with Brucella Species from Those of Animals Infected with Yersinia enterocolitica O9

    Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Bayarsaikhan, Balgan; Watarai, Masahisa; Makino, Sou-ichi; Shirahata, Toshikazu

    2003-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using antigens extracted from Brucella abortus with n-lauroylsarcosine differentiated natural Brucella-infected animals from Brucella-vaccinated or Yersinia enterocolitica O9-infected animals. A field trial in Mongolia showed cattle, sheep, goat, reindeer, camel, and human sera without infection could be distinguished from Brucella-infected animals by conventional serological tests.

  4. Determination, at equilibrium, of association constants of labelled or unlabelled ligands by a non-graphical method

    Goertz, G.; Longchampt, J.; Crepy, O.; Judas, O.; Jayle, M.-F.

    1976-01-01

    Determination, at equilibrium of association constants of labelled or unlabelled ligands by a non-graphical method are described. This work deals with the determination of association constants at equilibrium by a non-graphical method in binding systems containing one specific receptor. Equations have been derived from that originally described by Lea (Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 322, 68-74), the terms of which are obtained from the data of simple displacement curves of a bound radioactive ligand by unlabelled competitors identical or different in nature. By knowing the function relating the variations of the bound ligand (B) to the affinity constant (Ksub(i)) and the quantity (Msub(i)) of competitor for a given system, it is possible to calculate any of these parameters when the two others are measured. Thus, it becomes easy to compare the relative affinities of different receptors for the same ligand or that of one receptor for various labelled or unlabelled ligands. Furthermore, theoretical displacement curves can be drawn and compared to experimental data, only when knowing the affinity constant of a specific binding system in given conditions. These modes of calculation have been tested in a study of interactions between various steroids and a fraction of human serum proteins precipitated by ammonium sulfate (30-45%) and containing the sex hormone-binding globulin. Association constants thus obtained agree well with those reported in the literature and determined by graphical procedures

  5. Radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunoassay of antibodies to the core protein (P24) of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV III). [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Sproul, P

    1985-05-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic viruses designated HTLV III or LAV are considered to represent the causative agents of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Therefore a simple direct RIA or ELISA method for antibodies to distinct epitopes of HTLV III/LAV structural components would be of great value. The authors describe RIA and ELISA assays which obviate the need for purified virus or virus proteins, do not utilize infected cells and thus do not diminish the source for continuous production of viral antigens and are specific for a major core protein of HTLV III/LAV.

  6. Implementation of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Quantification of Allergenic Egg Residues in Red Wines Using Commercially Available Antibodies

    Koestel, Carole; Simonin, Céline; Belcher, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Since the early 2000s, labeling of potentially allergenic food components to protect people who suffer from food allergies is compulsory in numerous industrialized countries. In Europe, milk and egg components used during the winemaking process must be indicated on the label since July 1, 2012. Several ELISA procedures have been developed to detect allergenic residues in wines. However, the complexity of the wine matrix can inhibit the immunoenzymatic reaction. The aim of this study was to implement an ELISA assay for the detection of ovalbumin in red wines using commercially available antibodies. The specificity of the acquired antibodies and the absence of cross reactivity were assessed by immunoblotting and ELISA. An ELISA assay with a LOD of 14.2 μg/L and a LOQ of 56.4 μg/L of ovalbumin in aqueous solution was obtained. Differences in ELISA signals were observed when analyzing various fining agents, although reproducible conformation of the antigen could be reached for the comparison of ovalbumin and Ovicolle. The differences between samples in terms of pH could be leveled but the inhibition of the ELISA signal, positively correlated to the tannin content of the wines, could not be suppressed. Thus, standard curves of ovalbumin in several wines were obtained by relative quantification. The control steps and the difficulties encountered presented in this study should be considered by anybody working toward the development of ELISA assays for the detection of allergenic residues in complex food matrices. PMID:27356183

  7. Clinical phenotype associations with various types of anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with recent onset of rheumatic symptoms. Results from a multicentre observational study

    Compagno, Michele; Rekvig, Ole P; Bengtsson, Anders A

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Despite anti-dsDNA antibodies constitute a wide range of specificities, they are considered as the hallmark for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). OBJECTIVE: To identify clinical phenotypes associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, independently of any clinical diagnoses. METHODS...

  8. Preparation of anti-Sudan red monoclonal antibody and development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Sudan red in chilli jam and chilli oil.

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Yuanyang; Yi, Jian; Meng, Meng; Wan, Yuping; Feng, Caiwei; Wang, Shanliang; Lu, Xiao; Xi, Rimo

    2010-10-01

    Sudan dyes are banned to be used in food additives because of the carcinogenicity of their metabolites. A rapid and sensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect the residues of Sudan dyes. Novel immunogen and coating antigen were synthesized via glutaraldehyde linking. The hapten-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was applied as immunogen and the hapten-ovalbumin (OVA) was served as coating antigen. The monoclonal antibody obtained showed high sensitivity to Sudan I with an IC(50) value of 1.7 μg L(-1) in buffer and was suitable to detect the residues of Sudan red in food products. The specificity of the assay was studied by measuring cross-reactivity of the antibody with the structurally related compounds of Sudan II (red (120%). Chilli jam and chilli oil samples spiked with Sudan dyes were analyzed by the method. The detection limit (LOD) of the ELISA method applied in chilli jam and chilli oil was 9.0 μg L(-1) and 19.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The recovery rates of Sudan-I in chilli oil and chilli jam were in the range of 80%-110% with coefficients of variation <25%. The intra-assay variation and inter-assay variation in buffer were both <9%.

  9. Relationship between presence of cows with milk positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dust in cattle barns.

    Eisenberg, Susanne W F; Chuchaisangrat, Ruj; Nielen, Mirjam; Koets, Ad P

    2013-09-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive dairy farms studied the relationship between the number of cows with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody-positive milk and the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in settled-dust samples, including their temporal relationship. Milk and dust samples were collected in parallel monthly for 2 years. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in milk were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and used as a proxy for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. Settled-dust samples were collected by using electrostatic dust collectors (EDCs) at six locations in housing for dairy cattle and young stock. The presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was identified by liquid culture and PCR. The results showed a positive relationship (odds ratio [OR], 1.2) between the number of cows with ELISA-positive milk and the odds of having positive EDCs in the same airspace as the adult dairy cattle. Moreover, the total number of lactating cows also showed an OR slightly above 1. This relationship remained the same for settled-dust samples collected up to 2 months before or after the time of milk sampling. The results suggest that removal of adult cows with milk positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody by ELISA might result in a decrease in the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dust and therefore in the environment. However, this decrease is likely delayed by several weeks at least. In addition, the data support the notion that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis exposure of young stock is reduced by separate housing.

  10. Serological discrimination by indirect enzyme immunoassay between the antibody response to Brucella sp and Yersinia enterocolitica O : 9 in cattle and pigs

    Nielsen, K.; Smith, P.; Yu, W.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, inexpensive and rugged serological test that distinguishes cattle and swine infected with Brucella sp. or Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 is described. The test protocol, which is an indirect enzyme immunoassay uses a high concentration of divalent cation chelating agents to minimize binding...... with Brucella sp. Sera from 58 cattle and 38 swine exposed to Y. enterocolitica O:9 were negative while only 20 sera from 121 'false positive' reactors of unspecified origin gave low level positive reactions, eliminating 84% of the false positive reactions. Crown...

  11. Implementation of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Quantification of Allergenic Egg Residues in Red Wines Using Commercially Available Antibodies.

    Koestel, Carole; Simonin, Céline; Belcher, Sandrine; Rösti, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Since the early 2000s, labeling of potentially allergenic food components to protect people who suffer from food allergies is compulsory in numerous industrialized countries. In Europe, milk and egg components used during the winemaking process must be indicated on the label since July 1, 2012. Several ELISA procedures have been developed to detect allergenic residues in wines. However, the complexity of the wine matrix can inhibit the immunoenzymatic reaction. The aim of this study was to implement an ELISA assay for the detection of ovalbumin in red wines using commercially available antibodies. The specificity of the acquired antibodies and the absence of cross reactivity were assessed by immunoblotting and ELISA. An ELISA assay with a LOD of 14.2 μg/L and a LOQ of 56.4 μg/L of ovalbumin in aqueous solution was obtained. Differences in ELISA signals were observed when analyzing various fining agents, although reproducible conformation of the antigen could be reached for the comparison of ovalbumin and Ovicolle. The differences between samples in terms of pH could be leveled but the inhibition of the ELISA signal, positively correlated to the tannin content of the wines, could not be suppressed. Thus, standard curves of ovalbumin in several wines were obtained by relative quantification. The control steps and the difficulties encountered presented in this study should be considered by anybody working toward the development of ELISA assays for the detection of allergenic residues in complex food matrices. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of Food Technologists.

  12. Antimitochondrial antibody

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  13. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  14. Binding assays for the quantitative detection of P. brevis polyether neurotoxins in biological samples and antibodies as therapeutic aids for polyether marine intoxication. Annual report, 1 December 1987-30 November 1988

    Baden, D.G.

    1988-12-15

    The polyether lipid-soluble toxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) can be detected using two separate types of specific binding reaction. Using tritiated PbTx-3 as a specific probe for binding to voltage-dependent sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes or to specific polyclonal antibodies, binding equilibria and displacement by unlabeled brevetoxins were compared. Labeled toxin can be displaced in a competitive manner by any of the other 5 naturally-occurring toxins; the quantitative displacement ability of each appears to reflect individual potency in fish bioassay. A comparison of ED50 in Radioimmunoassay and ED50 in synaptosome binding assay indicates that the former assay is useful for detection of toxins which possess the structural backbone of PbTx-3, the immunizing hapten. Thus, the two assays have quantitative applicability; the sodium channel with respect to potency and the antibodies with respect to structure. Microtiter plate assays utilizing each specific brevetoxin binding component and enzyme-linked toxin hapten have been successful and indicate a general applicability of colorimetric prototypes. There, is however, considerable manipulation required to decrease non-specific binding of the hydrophobic toxin-enzyme complex to the plates. Preliminary studies aimed at producing monoclonal antibodies have been explored using brevetoxins linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

  15. Various levels and forms of dietary α-lipoic acid in broiler chickens: Impact on blood biochemistry, stress response, liver enzymes, and antibody titers.

    Kim, D W; Mushtaq, M M H; Parvin, R; Kang, H K; Kim, J H; Na, J C; Hwangbo, J; Kim, J D; Yang, C B; Park, B J; Choi, H C

    2015-02-01

    The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of various levels and forms of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on blood biochemistry, immune and stress response, and antibody titers in broiler chickens. The four levels (7.5, 15, 75, and 150 ppm) and 2 sources (powder, P-ALA and encapsulated, E-ALA) of ALA along with negative (C-) and positive control (C+; contains antibiotics) diets consisted of 10 dietary treatments, and these treatments were allocated to 1,200 1-d-old chicks and were replicated 12 times with 10 birds per replicate. Among the blood biochemistry parameters, creatinine levels were almost 3 times lower in E-ALA-supplemented diets compared to the C- diet (0.09 vs. 0.25 mg/dL; PBirds did not respond to infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccination at any observed stage (P>0.05). The concentration of cortisol was reduced in chickens fed ALA-supplemented diets as compared to the C- diet (Pbiochemistry profiles and immune responses and reduced stress in broiler chickens. The encapsulated form of ALA was more effective than the powder form. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Novel sensitive monoclonal antibody based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of raw and processed bovine beta-casein.

    Castillo, Daniela S; Cassola, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Cow milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the most common childhood food allergy, which can sometimes persist or can newly develop in adulthood with severe symptoms. CMPA's treatment is complete dietary avoidance of milk proteins. To achieve this task, patients have to be aware of milk proteins found as "hidden allergens" in food commodities. In regard to milk proteins, it has been reported that allergenicity of caseins remains unaffected upon heat treatment. For these reasons, we aimed to obtain monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against native and denatured β-casein, one of the most abundant and antigenic caseins, in order to develop an indirect competitive ELISA (icELISA) to detect and quantify traces of this milk allergen in raw and processed foodstuffs. We developed two specific hybridoma clones, 1H3 and 6A12, which recognized β-casein in its denatured and native conformations by indirect ELISA (iELISA). Cross-reaction analysis by Western blot and iELISA indicated that these mAbs specifically recognized β-casein from bovine and goat milk extracts, while they did not cross-react with proteins present in other food matrixes. These highly specific mAbs enabled the development of sensitive, reliable and reproducible icELISAs to detect and quantify this milk protein allergen in food commodities. The extraction of β-casein from foodstuff was efficiently carried out at 60°C for 15 minutes, using an extraction buffer containing 1% SDS. The present study establishes a valid 1H3 based-icELISA, which allows the detection and quantification -0.29 ppm and 0.80 ppm, respectively- of small amounts of β-casein in raw and processed foods. Furthermore, we were able to detect milk contamination in incurred food samples with the same sensitivity as a commercial sandwich ELISA thus showing that this icELISA constitutes a reliable analytical method for control strategies in food industry and allergy prevention.

  17. Field estimation of the flock-level diagnostic specificity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Avian metapneumovirus antibodies in turkeys.

    Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia; Trampel, Darrell; Hanson, Tim; Harrison, Kristen; Goyal, Sagar; Cortinas, Roberto; Lauer, Dale

    2009-03-01

    Routine serologic testing for Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) infection of turkey flocks at slaughter is currently being used to monitor changes in the occurrence of AMPV infection in endemic areas and can also be used to detect the emergence of infection in currently unaffected areas. Because of the costs associated with false-positive results, particularly in areas that are free of AMPV infection, there is a need to obtain improved estimates of flock-level specificity (SP). The objective of this study was to estimate flock-level SP of a program to monitor AMPV infection in turkey flocks at processing using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A study was carried out in which 37 AMPV-free flocks from 7 Midwest operations were followed serologically. Six percent, 3%, and 0.2% of total samples tested AMPV positive at 8 weeks, 12 weeks, and at processing, respectively. Overall, flock-level SP increased as the cutoff increased and as age increased. Flock-level SP at processing was 97%, if a cutoff of 1 was used (the flock was classified as positive if at least 1 sample tested positive), and 100%, if any other cutoff was used. Administration of antibiotics (P = 0.02) and vaccination for Bordetella avium (P = 0.08) were positively associated with the probability of (false) positive test results. These findings suggest possible cross-reactions with other infections and highlight the need to consider variable diagnostic performance depending on farm conditions.

  18. Crowd-Sourced Mobility Mapping for Location Tracking Using Unlabeled Wi-Fi Simultaneous Localization and Mapping

    Mu Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing requirements of the seamless and round-the-clock Location-based services (LBSs, a growing interest in Wi-Fi network aided location tracking is witnessed in the past decade. One of the significant problems of the conventional Wi-Fi location tracking approaches based on received signal strength (RSS fingerprinting is the time-consuming and labor intensive work involved in location fingerprint calibration. To solve this problem, a novel unlabeled Wi-Fi simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM approach is developed to avoid the location fingerprinting and additional inertial or vision sensors. In this approach, an unlabeled mobility map of the coverage area is first constructed by using the crowd-sourcing from a batch of sporadically recorded Wi-Fi RSS sequences based on the spectral cluster assembling. Then, the sequence alignment algorithm is applied to conduct location tracking and mobility map updating. Finally, the effectiveness of this approach is verified by the extensive experiments carried out in a campus-wide area.

  19. Identification of TNIP1 Polymorphisms by High Resolution Melting Analysis with Unlabelled Probe: Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Jie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. TNFα-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3 interacting with protein 1 (TNIP1 acts as a negative regulator of NF-κB and plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of immune system. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS showed that the polymorphism of TNIP1 was associated with the disease risk of SLE in Caucasian. In this study, we investigated whether the association of TNIP1 with SLE was replicated in Chinese population. Methods. The association of TNIP1 SNP rs7708392 (G/C was determined by high resolution melting (HRM analysis with unlabeled probe in 285 SLE patients and 336 healthy controls. Results. A new SNP rs79937737 located on 5 bp upstream of rs7708392 was discovered during the HRM analysis. No association of rs7708392 or rs79937737 with the disease risk of SLE was found. Furthermore, rs7708392 and rs79937737 were in weak linkage disequilibrium (LD. Hypotypes analysis of the two SNPs also showed no association with SLE in Chinese population. Conclusions. High resolution melting analysis with unlabeled probes proves to be a powerful and efficient genotyping method for identifying and screening SNPs. No association of rs7708392 or rs79937737 with the disease risk of SLE was observed in Chinese population.

  20. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  1. Comparison of immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoglobulin G avidity techniques for screening of anti: Toxoplasma antibodies among single serum sample pregnant women in Tabriz, Iran

    Mehrangiz Rajaii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital toxoplasmosis is that pregnant women acquire the infection during gestation; diagnosis of the acute infection during pregnancy is a complex subject of maternal toxoplasmosis. Thus, the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG and/or IgM Toxoplasma antibodies in a single serum sample drawn during gestation cannot be used to define whether the infection was recently acquired or chronic. Materials and Methods: At this cross-sectional descriptive study, sera of 391 pregnant women examined and compared. They were in an age range of 21-35 years, referred by gynecologists and infectious disease specialists, during March 2012-April 2013. They have referred, 215 (54.98%, 102 (26%, 74 (18.92% in the first, second and third trimesters of gestation, respectively. For each of them, a questionnaire was completed and serum samples were prepared in an equal condition, examined according to the procedures of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and IgG Avidity techniques. Results: We have found 111 (28.38% seronegative and 280 (71.61% seropositive cases by IIF and 124 (31.70% seronegative, 267 (68.28% seropositive cases by ELISA. The IgG avidity test confirmed 45 (69.23% and 7 (10.76% doubtful cases of IgM test in IIF and ELISA techniques. Conclusions: This study highlights how to manage pregnant women with toxoplasmosis, especially in a single serum sample condition.

  2. Development of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to differentiate antibodies against wild-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome from the vaccine strain TJM-F92 based on a recombinant Nsp2 protein.

    Wang, X X; Wang, F X; Li, Z G; Wen, Y J; Wang, X; Song, N; Wu, H

    2018-01-01

    An accurate ELISA method to differentiate pigs infected with wild-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRSV) strains from vaccinated ones would help to monitor PRRSV vaccination compliance. The recombinant protein GST-d120aa derived from the continuous deletion of 120 amino acids in the non-structural protein 2 region of the modified-live vaccine strain TJM-F92 was used to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (d120-ELISA) for differentiating serum antibodies against TJM-F92 from other PRRSV strains. At the optimized cut-off value which was calculated at an S/P of 0.25, it yielded a sensitivity of 90.7% and a specificity of 95.1%. Cross-reactivity tests suggested that the d120-ELISA was PRRSV-specific. Coefficient of variations of the repeatability tests ranged between 1.41-17.02%. The results suggest that the d120-ELISA is suitable for differentiating animals infected with wild-type strains from those immunized with MLV TJM-F92. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Large Discrepancy in the Results of Sensitive Measurements of Thyroglobulin Antibodies in the Follow-Up on Thyroid Cancer

    Nygaard, Birte; Bentzen, Jens; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: During follow-up on patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer, thyroglobulin (Tg) antibodies can interfere with the Tg assay, making the use of Tg less reliable as a tumor marker. PURPOSE: To compare Tg and Tg autoantibodies (Tg-Ab) methods used in Denmark, regarding the number...

  4. Antibody biotechnology

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Another milestone in the history of antibodies was the work of Porter and Edelman ... transgenic animals (Lonberg et al., 1994; Green et al.,. 1994) or .... create and to screen human recombinant antibodies libraries, that is ...

  5. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  6. Pancreatic Enzymes

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  7. A simple method for enzymatic synthesis of unlabeled and radiolabeled Hydroxycinnamate-CoA

    Rautergarten, Carsten; Baidoo, Edward; Keasling, Jay; Vibe Scheller, Henrik

    2011-07-20

    Hydroxycinnamate coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters are substrates for biosynthesis of lignin and hydroxycinna- mate esters of polysaccharides and other polymers. Hence, a supply of these substrates is essential for investigation of cell wall biosynthesis. In this study, three recombinant enzymes, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase, 4-coumarate- CoA ligase 1, and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase 5, were cloned from wheat, tobacco, and Arabidopsis, respectively, and were used to synthesize {sup 14}C-feruloyl-CoA, caffeoyl-CoA, p-coumaroyl-CoA, feruloyl-CoA, and sinapoyl-CoA. The corresponding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesters were high-performance liquid chromatography purified, the only extraction/purification step necessary, with total yields between 88-95%. Radiolabeled {sup 14}C-feruloyl-CoA was generated from caffeic acid and S-adenosyl-{sup 14}C-methionine under the combined action of caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase 1. About 70% of {sup 14}C-methyl groups from S-adenosyl methionine were incorporated into the final product. The methods presented are simple, fast, and efficient for the preparation of the hydroxycinnamate thioesters.

  8. Thyroid Antibodies

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  9. Resonance assignment for a particularly challenging protein based on systematic unlabeling of amino acids to complement incomplete NMR data sets

    Bellstedt, Peter; Seiboth, Thomas; Häfner, Sabine; Kutscha, Henriette; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Görlach, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    NMR-based structure determination of a protein requires the assignment of resonances as indispensable first step. Even though heteronuclear through-bond correlation methods are available for that purpose, challenging situations arise in cases where the protein in question only yields samples of limited concentration and/or stability. Here we present a strategy based upon specific individual unlabeling of all 20 standard amino acids to complement standard NMR experiments and to achieve unambiguous backbone assignments for the fast precipitating 23 kDa catalytic domain of human aprataxin of which only incomplete standard NMR data sets could be obtained. Together with the validation of this approach utilizing the protein GB1 as a model, a comprehensive insight into metabolic interconversion ('scrambling”) of NH and CO groups in a standard Escherichia coli expression host is provided

  10. Study of conjugation and radiolabeling of monoclonal antibody rituximab for use in radionuclide therapy

    Massicano, Adriana Vidal Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Lymphomas are tumors originated from the transformation of a lymphocyte in the lymphatic system. The most common lymphoma is the Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Advances in immunology and molecular biology have been improving NHL's detection and treatment strategies development, such as Radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody used as immunotherapeutic to treat refractory or relapsed NHL. The goal of the present work was to conjugate this antibody to DOTA-NHS-ester bifunctional chelator and to radiolabel it with 177 Lu radioisotope in order to develop a radio immunotherapeutic agent for NHL's treatment. Different rituximab to DOTA molar ratios (1:5, 1:10, 1:20, 1:50, 1:250, 1:500 and 1:1000) were evaluated in order to determine the best condition for obtaining the highest radiochemical purity of radio immunotherapeutic. The stability of the unlabeled immuno conjugated was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for up to 240 days in different storage conditions. The stability of the labeled preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C. The binding to serum proteins was also determined. In vivo studies were performed in healthy Swiss mice, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled conjugate. Finally, preliminary studies of radio immuno conjugated competitive binding to CD20 positive Raji cells were carried out in order to analyze if the process of conjugation and radiolabeling compromises the immunoreactivity of the antibody. The conjugation applying lower antibody to chelator molar ratios (1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) showed high stability when stored for up to 240 days in different conditions. The HPLC analysis showed that the monoclonal antibody conjugated in molar ratio 1:50 was labeled with higher radiochemical purity (> 95%) when purified in PD-10 column. This conjugate showed reasonable stability at 2-8 degree C. The analysis of the

  11. Improved tumor localization with (strept)avidin and labeled biotin as a substitute for antibody

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Fritz, B.; Virzi, F.; Mardirossian, G.; Rusckowski, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated tumor localization with labeled biotin administered subsequent to unlabeled and unconjugated streptavidin. Nude mice bearing anti-CEA tumors (LS174T) received 10 μg of 111 In-labeled anti-CEA antibody (C110) or 111 In-labeled streptavidin with sacrifice 5 h later. In an examination of pretargeting, other animals received 50 μg of unlabeled streptavidin followed 3 h later with 1 μg of 111 In-labeled biotin (EB 1 ) and sacrifice 2 h later. The biodistribution of labeled streptavidin was similar to that of labeled specific antibody except for lower blood and higher kidney levels. Tumor levels were also lower with labeled streptavidin but, because of still lower levels in liver and blood, the tumor/normal tissue ratios were improved. When unlabeled streptavidin was administered and followed by labeled biotin (pretargeting), tumor levels were further reduced modestly; however, normal tissue levels were greatly reduced such that the tumor/blood and tumor/liver ratios were 10.6 and 2.2 vs 1.5 and 0.5 for the specific antibody. Improvements were seen in all tissues sampled with the exception of kidney and muscle. A further control of labeled biotin alone (without the preinjection of streptavidin) showed minimal accumulations in all tissues with the exception of kidneys. In conclusion, the accumulation of (strept)avidin by passive diffusion in tumor may be comparable, at early times, to the accumulation of specific antibody. (author)

  12. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  13. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xinju; Liu, Weiwei; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex) in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type) covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  14. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Zhiyuan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. CONCLUSIONS: With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  15. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength

    Mu Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN, received signal strength (RSS-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM. Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization.

  16. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength.

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization.

  17. A simplified radioimmunoassay for triiodothyronine (T3) using pre-incubated labelled antigen and antibody

    Pillai, M.R.A.; Nagvekar, U.H.; Desai, C.N.; Mani, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a simplified radioimmunoassay for triiodothyronine (T 3 ) using pre-incubated labelled T 3 and antibody is described. The assay is carried out by adding 50 μl of standard or sample to 0.4 ml of pre-incubated reagent dispensed in assay tubes. The reaction was allowed to proceed for about four hours and the antigen-antibody complex precipitated by the addition of 1 cm 3 of 22% polyethylene glycol solution. Due to the high dissociation constant of T 3 -antibody complex at 37 deg C, the labelled antigen-antibody complex dissociates and thereby the unlabelled antigen binds with the antibody. The sensitivity of this assay is comparable to an assay done by the equilibrium method using the same antibody. Sixty serum samples were analyzed using this method and were compared with the equilibrium assay. (author)

  18. Role of signal-to-cut-off ratios of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody by enzyme immunoassays along with ID-NAT for screening of whole blood donors in India

    Satyam Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of elevated signal-to-cut off ratios (S/CO as an alternate to further supplemental testing (i.e., RIBA has been included in the guidelines provided by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention for HCV diagnostic purposes since 2003. With availability of screening by NAT and non availability of RIBA, further confirmation of HCV infection has been possible at the molecular level (RNA. Aims: To study the role of S/CO ratios of anti hepatitis C virus antibody detection by enzyme immunoassays (EIA along with ID-NAT for screening of whole blood donors. Methods: In this study we reviewed the donor screening status for anti HCV from January 2013 to May 2014. All the donations were screened for anti HCV with fourth generation ELISA (BioRad Monolisa Ag-Ab Ultra as well as with ID NAT (Procleix Ultrio. The S/CO ratio of all the anti-HCV reactive samples were analysed for their presence of HCV RNA. Results: On screening 21,115 donors for HCV, 83 donors (0.39% were found reactive on pilot tube and repeat plasma bag testing (S/Co ratio ≥1 by ELISA. 41 donors were HCV RNA reactive with ID-NAT. 4 samples out of 41 were NAT yields and 37 were concordant reactive with ELISA. The S/Co ratio of anti-HCV reactive samples ranged from 0.9-11.1 [mean = 5.1; SD ΁ 2.9] whereas S/Co ratio of anti HCV and NAT reactive samples (concordant positives ranged from 4.1-11.1 [mean 7.3]. In our analysis we found that S/CO ratio of 4 showed positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity of 100%. Summary/Conclusions: Our study showed that S/CO of 4 for anti HCV on ELISA would have maximum positive predictive value of having donor with HCV RNA. S/CO ratio of 4 is very close to 3.8 which was the CDC guideline. The presence of anti-HCV does not distinguish between current or past infections but a confirmed anti-HCV-positive result indicates the need for counseling and medical evaluation for HCV infection.

  19. Development and application of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for specific detection of mangiferin content in various cultivars of Mangifera indica leaves using anti-mangiferin polyclonal antibody.

    Yusakul, Gorawit; Kitirattrakarn, Wongsathorn; Tanwanichkul, Narunat; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2012-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for determining mangiferin content in plant samples using a polyclonal antibody (PAb) against mangiferin. The developed ELISA showed a full measurement range from 0.12 to 31.25 μg/mL mangiferin with a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 6% for both intra- and interassay precision levels. The accuracy was determined by a percent recovery experiment at three concentration levels and it showed 97.8%-103.7% recovery in Mangifera indica leaf samples. The developed ELISA exhibited a high correlation value (R² = 0.992) with the standard high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method in various mangiferin-containing plant samples. Our results suggest that the validated ELISA methodology using a PAb against mangiferin can be applied to determine mangiferin content with high specificity, rapidity and simplicity in various mangiferin-containing plant samples. The mangiferin content in the mature leaves of fifty M. indica cultivars were determined using the developed ELISA. The mangiferin contents ranged from 1.94 ± 0.13% to 13.79 ± 0.84% dry wt. The Thawai cultivar leaves contained the highest level of mangiferin (13.79 ± 0.84% dry wt), but it is a rare cultivar. The Namdokmai, which is more commonly cultivated in Thailand, contain 12.41 ± 0.60% dry wt mangiferin; therefore, this cultivar leaf was recommended as the source of raw material for the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic product industries. Currently, natural heath products are accepted worldwide for healthcare. Mangiferin-containing plants and products exhibit health benefits against oxidative stress-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, dyslipidemia and diabetes. We have developed an ELISA with high specificity, rapidity and simplicity for the quality control of mangiferin-derived product production. Moreover, we found that the Namdokmai leaf, a Thai M. indica cultivar, was recommended as the source of raw

  20. Improved tumor localization with (strept)avidin and labeled biotin as a substitute for antibody

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Fritz, B.; Virzi, F.; Mardirossian, G.; Rusckowski, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated tumor localization with labeled biotin administered subsequent to unlabeled and unconjugated streptavidin. Nude mice bearing anti-CEA tumors (LS174T) received 10 μg of 111 In-labeled anti-CEA antibody (C110) or 111 In-labeled streptavidin with sacrifice 5 h later. In an examination of pretargeting, other animals received 50 μg of unlabeled streptavidin followed 3 h later with 1 μg of 111 In-labeled biotin (EB 1 ) and sacrifice 2 h later. The biodistribution of labeled streptavidin was similar to that of labeled specific antibody except for lower blood and higher kidney levels. Tumor levels were also lower with labeled streptavidin but, because of still lower levels in liver and blood, the tumor/normal tissue ratios were improved. When unlabeled streptavidin was administered and followed by labeled biotin (pretargeting), tumor levels were further reduced modestly; however, normal tissue levels were greatly reduced such that the tumor/blood and tumor/liver ratios were 10.6 and 2.2 vs 1.5 and 0.5 for the specific antibody. Improvements were seen in all tissues sampled with the exception of kidney and muscle. A further control of labeled biotin alone showed minimal accumulation in all tissues with the exception of kidneys. In conclusion, the accumulation of (strept)avidin by passive diffusion in tumor may be comparable, at early times, to the accumulation of specific antibody. By combining the administration of unlabeled (strept)avidin with labeled biotin, tumor targeting may potentially be improved. (author)

  1. An immunochemical method for the quantitation of insulin antibodies

    Reeves, W.G.; Kelly, U.

    1980-01-01

    A 125 I-labelled insulin binding assay is described in which IgG antibody is precipitated by the addition of an optimal concentration of second antibody. Other features include the removal of unlabelled insulin from test sera prior to assay and the use of 22 Na as a volume marker. This approach overcomes problems associated with previous assays for insulin antibodies. Clear differences are seen in the IgG insulin binding capacity (IBC) of sera from patients with insulin resistance and injection site lipo-atrophy when compared with insulin-treated diabetics who lack such complications. The precision and flexibility of this technique make it particularly suitable for studies of the immune response to different species and forms of insulin. (Auth.)

  2. Enzyme Informatics

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  3. Mouse-specific antibody responses to a monoclonal antibody during repeated immunoscintigraphy investigations: Comparison of antibody titres and imaging studies in a rat model

    Pimm, M.V.; Gribben, S.J.; Markham, A.J.; Perkins, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    As a model for human mouse-specific antibody responses in patients undergoing immunoscintigraphy, we have investigated in rats the production of mouse-specific antibodies (MA) to the mouse monoclonal antibody 791T/36. At intervals of between 5 and 16 weeks the rats were given repeated cycles of intravenous (IV) injections of antibody with or without a simultaneous intradermal (ID) injection. The IV dose was 60 μg/kg, a dose similar to that used in many clinical immunoscintigraphy studies. The ID injection was 2 μg, which mimicks the skin test dose often given in clinical imaging protocols. The study was carried out with both 131 I-labelled antibody and with antibody labelled with 111 In by DTPA chelation. MA was measured with a passive haemagglutination assay using sheep red blood cells coated with the monoclonal antibody. Of rats given ID injections of unlabelled antibody at the same time as the IV imaging doses, 9/20 produced MA during 4 cycles of injections. In contrast, only 2/16 rats given only the IV dose produced MA. Both 131 I- and 111 In-labelled antibody appeared equally immunogenic with 5/18 and 6/18 overall responders, respectively. The production of MA was associated with a significant perturbation in the biodistribution of the IV dose of labelled antibody as seen by gamma-camera imaging of the rats given 111 In-labelled antibody. There was clearance of immune complexes to the liver, this organ accumulating up to 90% of the whole body count rate of radiolabel. MA titres of between 1/100 and 1/78000 caused equal perturbation of biodistribution, although below 1/100 the effect was more variable. (orig.)

  4. Estimation of endogenous glucose production during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamps. Comparison of unlabeled and labeled exogenous glucose infusates

    Finegood, D.T.; Bergman, R.N.; Vranic, M.

    1987-01-01

    Tracer methodology has been applied extensively to the estimation of endogenous glucose production (Ra) during euglycemic glucose clamps. The accuracy of this approach has been questioned due to the observation of significantly negative estimates for Ra when insulin levels are high. We performed hyperinsulinemic (300 microU/ml)-euglycemic glucose clamps for 180 min in normal dogs and compared the standard approach, an unlabeled exogenous glucose infusate (cold GINF protocol, n = 12), to a new approach in which a tracer (D-[3- 3 H]glucose) was added to the exogenous glucose used for clamping (hot GINF protocol, n = 10). Plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations, and glucose infusion rates were similar for the two protocols. Plasma glucose specific activity was 20 +/- 1% of basal (at 120-180 min) in the cold GINF studies, and 44 +/- 3 to 187 +/- 5% of basal in the hot GINF studies. With the one-compartment, fixed pool volume model of Steele, Ra for the cold GINF studies was -2.4 +/- 0.7 mg X min-1 X kg-1 at 25 min and remained significantly negative until 110 min (P less than .05). For the hot GINF studies, Ra was never significantly less than zero (P greater than .05) and was greater than in the cold GINF studies at 20-90 min (P less than .05). There was substantially less between-(78%) and within- (40%) experiment variation for the hot GINF studies compared with the cold GINF studies. An alternate approach (regression method) to the application of the one-compartment model, which allows for a variable and estimable effective distribution volume, yielded Ra estimates that were suppressed 60-100% from basal

  5. Monoclonal antibody

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Matzku, S.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systematic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplated into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 μCi (group 1), 700 μCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimunotherapy. (orig.) [de

  7. Lipolysis og different oils using crude enzyme isolate from the intestinal tract of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Göttsche, J.R.; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2005-01-01

    Crude enzyme isolate was prepared from the intestine of rainbow trout. Positional specificity of the crude enzyme isolate was determined from both 1(3)- and 2-MAG products after i n vitro lipolysis of radioactive-labeled triolein. The ratio of 2- MAG/1(3)-MAG was 2:1, suggesting that the overall...... lipase specificity of the enzyme isolate from rainbow trout tended to be 1,3-specific; however, activity against the sn -2 position also was shown. In vitro lipolysis of four different unlabeled oils was performed with the crude enzyme isolate. The oils were: structured lipid [SL; containing the medium...

  8. Breast cancer imaging with mouse monoclonal antibodies

    Major, P.; Wang Taqui; Unger, M.; Rosenthall, L.

    1989-10-01

    The localization of /sup 111/In-labelled MA5 monoclonal antibody, reactive with a breast tumor associated antigen, was studied in 17 patients. MA5 was selected because (1) it reacts with >95% of primary and metastatic lesions, (2) the recognized antigen is present on the cell surface in vivo and (3) MA5 gives excellent localization in human breast tumor xenografts. Each patient received 2 mg antibody labeled with 5 mCi /sup 111/In and in some cases, 3 mg or 18 mg unlabeled carrier antibody. No serious allergic reactions were noted. There was a large uptake in the liver, less significant uptake in the spleen and bone and minimal accumulation in the bowel. Bone lesions, primary tumors, soft tissue recurrences and lung metastases larger than 3 cm diameter were imaged, while only 1 lesion smaller than 3 cm was detected. Non specific accumulation of tracer was noted at the site of a port-a-cath, in a hematoma, in fibrocystic lesions, and at sites of previous radiation treatment. Extensive fibrosis and poor vascularization characteristic of breast tumors may explain in part the limited sensitivity of the imaging. (orig.).

  9. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been ...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  10. Wiring of heme enzymes by methylene-blue labeled dendrimers

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Shahdost-fard, Faezeh; Ferapontova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme- and moli......Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme......- and molibdopterin-containing sulfite oxidase (SOx), wired to gold by the methylene blue (MB)-labeled polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. The enzymes’ electrochemical transformation and bioelectrocatalytic function could be followed at both unlabeled and MB-labeled dendrimer-modified electrodes with the formal redox......, optimization of bioelectrocatalysis of complex intermembrane and, possibly, membrane enzymes....

  11. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  12. Comparison of in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with gold standard in vivo mouse neutralization test for the detection of low level antibodies.

    Sonmez, Cemile; Coplu, Nilay; Gozalan, Aysegul; Akin, Lutfu; Esen, Berrin

    2017-06-01

    Detection of anti-tetanus antibody levels is necessary for both determination of the immune status of individuals and also for planning preventive measures. ELISA is the preferred test among in vitro tests however it can be affected by the cross reacting antibodies. A previously developed in-house ELISA test was found not reliable for the antibody levels ≤1.0IU/ml. A new method was developed to detect low antibody levels correctly. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of the newly developed in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test with the in vivo mouse neutralization test, for the antibody levels ≤1.0IU/ml. A total of 54 serum samples with the antibody levels of three different levels, =0.01IU/ml, 0.01-0.1IU/ml, 0.1-1IU/ml, which were detected by in vivo mouse neutralization test were studied by the newly developed in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test. Test was validated by using five different concentrations (0.01IU/ml, 0.06IU/ml, 0.2IU/ml, 0.5IU/ml, 1.0IU/ml). A statistically significant correlation (r 2 =0.9967 p=0,001) between in vivo mouse neutralization test and in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test, was observed. For the tested concentrations intra-assay, inter-assay, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and coefficients of variations were determined as ≤15%. In-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test can be an alternative method to in vivo mouse neutralization method for the detection of levels ≤1.0IU/ml. By using in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test, individuals with non protective levels, will be reliably detected. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. An ELISA test for the detection of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila.

    Wreghitt, T G; Nagington, J; Gray, J

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test has been developed to detect antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. There is good correlation between indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and ELISA titres but ELISA is more sensitive.

  14. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based, congener-specific and solvent-tolerable direct enzyme-linked immunosorbgent assay for the detection of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether in environmental samples

    A sensitive direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in environmental samples was developed. A hapten mimicking the whole structure of BDE-47 was synthesized by introducing a butyric acid spacer to 5-hydroxy-BDE-47 and coupled ...

  15. Inhibition of ligand exchange kinetics via active-site trapping with an antibody fragment.

    Oyen, David; Steyaert, Jan; Barlow, John N

    2014-04-01

    We describe the first example of an inhibitory antibody fragment (nanobody ca1697) that binds simultaneously to an enzyme (the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli) and its bound substrate (folate). Binding of the antibody to the substrate causes a 20-fold reduction in the rate of folate exchange kinetics. This work opens up the prospect of designing new types of antibody-based inhibitors of enzymes and receptors through suitable design of immunogens.

  16. A Paper-Based Sandwich Format Hybridization Assay for Unlabeled Nucleic Acid Detection Using Upconversion Nanoparticles as Energy Donors in Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Zhou, Feng; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-09-24

    Bioassays based on cellulose paper substrates are gaining increasing popularity for the development of field portable and low-cost diagnostic applications. Herein, we report a paper-based nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET). UCNPs with intense green emission served as donors with Cy3 dye as the acceptor. The avidin functionalized UCNPs were immobilized on cellulose paper and subsequently bioconjugated to biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. Introduction of unlabeled oligonucleotide targets resulted in a formation of probe-target duplexes. A subsequent hybridization of Cy3 labeled reporter with the remaining single stranded portion of target brought the Cy3 dye in close proximity to the UCNPs to trigger a LRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye. The hybridization assays provided a limit of detection (LOD) of 146.0 fmol and exhibited selectivity for one base pair mismatch discrimination. The assay was functional even in undiluted serum samples. This work embodies important progress in developing DNA hybridization assays on paper. Detection of unlabeled targets is achieved using UCNPs as LRET donors, with minimization of background signal from paper substrates owing to the implementation of low energy near-infrared (NIR) excitation.

  17. Study of lignin biotransformation by Aspergillus fumigatus and white-rot fungi using 14C-labeled and unlabeled kraft lignins

    Kadam, K.K.; Drew, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The biodegradation of lignin by fungi was studied in shake flasks using 14 C-labeled kraft lignin and in a deep-tank fermentor using unlabeled kraft lignin. Among the fungi screened, A. fumigatus - isolated in our laboratories - was most potent in lignin biotransformation. Dialysis-type fermentation, designed to study possible accumulation of low MW lignin-derived products, showed no such accumulation. Recalcitrant carbohydrates like microcrystalline cellulose supported higher lignolytic activity than easily metabolized carbohydrates like cellobiose. An assay developed to distinguish between CO 2 evolved from lignin and carbohydrate substrates demonstrated no stoichiometric correlation between the metabolism of the two cosubstrates. The submerged fermentations with unlabeled liqnin are difficult to monitor since chemical assays do not give accurate and true results. Lignolytic efficiencies that allowed monitoring of such fermentations were defined. Degraded lignins were clearly superior to C. versicolor in all aspects of lignin degradation; A fumigatus brought about substantial demethoxylation and dehydroxylation, whereas C. versicolor degraded lignins closely resembled undegraded kraft lignin. There was a good agreement among the different indices of lignin degradation, namely, 14 CO evolution, OCH 3 loss, OH loss, and monomer and dimer yield after permanganate oxidation

  18. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  19. Evaluation of a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against Salmonella, employing a stable coating of lipopolysaccharide-derived antigens covalently attached to polystyrene microwells

    Wiuff, C.; Jauho, E. S.; Stryhn, H.

    2000-01-01

    to microtiter polystyrene plates by ultraviolet irradiation. Both polysaccharide antigens could be coupled simultaneously to the same microtiter plate. The coated surface was used in indirect ELISA for the determination of serum antibodies from pigs infected with bacteria of the two Salmonella groups and from......Polysaccharides derived from Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) representing the O-antigen factors 1, 4, 5, and 12 and the O-antigen factors 6 and 7 from Salmonella choleraesuis LPS were derivatized with the photoreactive compound anthraquinone and subsequently covalently coupled...

  20. Perfusion of tumor-bearing kidneys as a model for scintigraphic screening of monoclonal antibodies

    van Dijk, J.; Oosterwijk, E.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Jonas, U.; Fleuren, G.J.; Pauwels, E.K.; Warnaar, S.O.

    1988-01-01

    Tumor-bearing human kidneys were used in an ex vivo perfusion model to screen monoclonal antibodies, recognizing renal cell carcinoma-associated antigens for diagnostic potential in vivo. Perfusion of tumor-bearing kidneys with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled G250 and RC38 antibody resulted in visualization of the tumor, whereas perfusion with two other monoclonal antibodies, RC2 and RC4, did not lead to tumor visualization. Uptake of radiolabel in normal kidney tissue was low for G250 and RC38 antibody. Tumor-to-kidney tissue ratios after perfusion with G250 and RC38 antibody were 2.7 and 2.2, respectively. After rinsing for 3 hr with unlabeled perfusion fluid the tumor-to-kidney tissue ratios increased to 8.6 for G250 antibody and to 2.7 for RC38 antibody. We conclude that perfusion of tumor-bearing human kidneys with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies is a relatively simple way to evaluate renal cell carcinoma associated monoclonal antibodies as diagnostic agents in vivo

  1. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  2. Development of a Chlamydia suis-specific antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the use of a B-cell epitope of the polymorphic membrane protein C.

    De Puysseleyr, K; Kieckens, E; De Puysseleyr, L; Van den Wyngaert, H; Ahmed, B; Van Lent, S; Creasy, H H; Myers, G S A; Vanrompay, D

    2018-04-01

    Chlamydia suis infections lead to economic loss in the pork industry. Chlamydia suis infections could be successfully treated with tetracyclines until the appearance of a tetracycline resistant phenotype, which was acquired via horizontal gene transfer of the tet(C) gene. Given the importance of C. suis as a swine pathogen and as a recently emerged tetracycline resistant pathogen with zoonotic potential, our aim was to develop a sensitive C. suis-specific antibody ELISA based on the polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps). Chlamydia Pmps are important virulence factors and candidate antigens for serodiagnosis. We identified nine Pmps (PmpA to I) in C. suis strain MD56 using a recently developed Hidden-Markov model. PmpC was the most promising candidate for the development of a C. suis-specific antibody ELISA as the protein was absent in C. abortus, C. pecorum and C. psittaci which also infect pigs and as the protein contained C. suis-specific amino acid regions, absent in C. trachomatis PmpC. We identified an immunodominant B-cell epitope in C. suis PmpC using experimental porcine sera. The sensitivity and specificity of the PmpC ELISA was compared to the complement fixation test (CFT) and to a recombinant MOMP ELISA using experimental sera. The PmpC ELISA detected all positive control sera and was in contrast to CFT and the rMOMP ELISA 100% C. suis specific as positive control sera against other Chlamydia species did not react in the PmpC ELISA. The test was successfully validated using slaughterhouse sera and sera from clinically affected pigs. The PmpC ELISA could assist in diminishing the spread of C. suis infections in the pork industry. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Seasonal variations in antibody response to a Plasmodium ...

    An Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), employing a recombinant peptide capture antigen (R32tet32) was used to detect antibodies against the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum in 169 ...

  4. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    Yuan-Cheng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen; goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody; finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were applied to the concomitant assay to analyze the feasibility. The first approach applied FITC and Cy3 when both targets were present at the same time, resulting in 50 ng/mL of the antibody detection limit and 10 ng/mL of antigen detection limit in the quantitative measurements of target concentration, taking the consideration of FRET efficiency of 68% between donor and acceptor. The sequential approach tended to lower the signal/noise (S/N ratio and the detection of the model antigen (lower than 1 ng/mL had better sensitivity than the model antibody (lower than 50 ng/mL. This combined antigen/antibody method might be useful for combined detection of antigens and antibodies. It will be helpful to screen for both antigen and antibody particularly in the situations of the multiserotype and high-frequency mutant virus infections.

  6. Bispecific Antibody Pretargeting for Improving Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    Sharkey, Robert M.

    2005-02-04

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate pretargeting systems that use a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) to improve the detection and treatment of cancer. A bsMAb has specificity to a tumor antigen, which is used to bind the tumor, while the other specificity is to a peptide that can be radiolabeled. Pretargeting is the process by which the unlabeled bsMAb is given first, and after a sufficient time (1-2 days) is given for it to localize in the tumor and clear from the blood, a small molecular weight radiolabeled peptide is given. According to a dynamic imaging study using a 99mTc-labeled peptide, the radiolabeled peptide localizes in the tumor in less than 1 hour, with > 80% of it clearing from the blood and body within this same time. Tumor/nontumor targeting ratios that are nearly 50 times better than that with a directly radiolabeled Fab fragment have been observed (Sharkey et al., ''Signal amplification in molecular imaging by a multivalent bispecific nanobody'' submitted). The bsMAbs used in this project have been composed of 3 antibodies that will target antigens found in colorectal and pancreatic cancers (CEA, CSAp, and MUC1). For the ''peptide binding moiety'' of the bsMAb, we initially examined an antibody directed to DOTA, but subsequently focused on another antibody directed against a novel compound, HSG (histamine-succinyl-glycine).

  7. Seroprevalence of Marek's Disease Virus antibody in some poultry ...

    This study reports a survey of Marek's disease virus (MDV) antibody done in 21 selected poultry flocks in Lagos, Ogun and Oyo states of southwestern Nigeria. A total of 315 serum samples were examined using the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. Marek's disease virus antibody was present in ...

  8. Sensitivity of some Immunoglobulin G class and subclass antibodies ...

    Indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure serum antibody responses in onchocerciasis patients. Apparently, IgG antibody class was more sensitive than IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 responses to Onchocerca volvulus adult worms sodium duodecyl sulphate (SDS) extracted crude ...

  9. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  10. Rifampicin-dependent antibodies bind a similar or identical epitope to glycoprotein IX-specific quinine-dependent antibodies

    Burgess, Janette K.; Lopez, Jose A.; Gaudry, Leonie E.; Chong, Beng H.

    2000-01-01

    The drug-dependent antibody of a patient with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia was characterized using the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAIPA assay), flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation. The antibody was found to bind glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX but not GPIIb-IIIa because

  11. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against native and disassembled human catalase

    Wiemer, E. A.; Ofman, R.; Middelkoop, E.; de Boer, M.; Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalase isolated from human erythrocytes was used to immunise mice, in order to generate hybridomas producing specific monoclonal antibodies to the enzyme. Hybridomas secreting anti-(catalase) antibodies were identified by a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using either

  12. Synthetic methyl hexagalacturonate hapten inhibitors of antihomogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Willats, William George Tycho; Knox, J. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A range of synthetic methyl hexagalacturonates were used as potential hapten inhibitors in competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with anti-homogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7. The selective inhibition of these antibodies by different haptens...... provides insight into the structures of the partially methyl-esterified pectin epitopes of these widely used monoclonal antibodies....

  13. Measurements in international units of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen(anti-HBs) after immunization with a yeast-derived, subtype adr hepatitis B vaccine are considerably different between chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) and chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA).

    Ogata, Norio

    2006-04-01

    The worldwide consensus of the minimum protective anti-HBs level against HBV infection is 10 mIU/mL on assays standardized by the World Health Organization (WHO) reference preparations. To investigate whether this value could be applied to recipients of yeast-derived recombinant HB vaccine containing the major surface protein of subtype adr (Bimmugen, Astellas Pharmaceutical, Tokyo), we compared anti-HBs measurements between chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) (Architect Ausab, Abbott Japan, Tokyo) and chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) (Lumipulse Forte, Fujirebio, Tokyo) in given serum samples obtained from the vaccinees. The vaccine and the two assay methods are currently in a wide use in Japan. The study included 300 medical students who completed a standard vaccination course (0, 1 and 6 months). Serum samples obtained 1 month or 13 months after completing the vaccination were simultaneously tested for anti-HBs by CLIA and CLEIA. In 147 samples with quantifiable values on both CLIA and CLEIA (10 to 1000 mIU/mL) the geometric mean titer on CLEIA (225.0 mIU/mL) was significantly higher than that on CLIA (94.5 mIU/mL) (p < 0.0001). Of 26 subjects with CLIA measurements below 10 mIU/mL, 15 samples (57.7%) showed CLEIA measurements more than 10 mIU/mL. Thus, in the subtype adr-vaccinees CLEIA demonstrated considerably high serum anti-HBs measurements compared to CLIA and discordance in determining critical anti-HBs level of 10 mIU/mL was observed in more than half the samples. This suggests that the minimum HBV-protective anti HBs titer of 10 mIU/mL is difficult to be introduced to Japan where subtype adr-HB vaccines or -HBV infection are prevalent, unless characteristics of assay methods are carefully evaluated.

  14. Radioimmunoassay of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE antibodies with a uniform indicator system in allergies of childhood

    Struy, H.; Schuster, R.; Sollich, V.; Thal, W.; Morenz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Solid-phase radioimmunoassays for the determination of allergen-specific and total IgE have been developed. In an indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the measurement of allergen-specific antibodies PVC blisters coated with allergens and in a sandwich solid-phase radioimmunoassay blisters coated with antihuman IgE antibodies are incubated sequentially with patient serum, unlabelled antihuman IgE from rabbits purified by affinity chromatography, and finally with antirabbitglobulin from sheep. Antirabbitglobuline was purified by immunoadsorption. The 125 I-labelled antibody with a specific activity of 30 kBq/μg antibody protein could be used universally for the determination of antibodies of each immunoglobulin class. In 160 patients mostly with seasonal asthma these assays supported RAST and PRIST kits and were helpful in the diagnosis of atopic diseases. (author)

  15. A double antibody radioimmunoassay specific for placental alkaline phosphatase

    Dass, S.; Bagshawe, K.D.

    1984-01-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) is normally found in enzymically measurable amounts in second and third trimester pregnancy serum. Its occurrence in sera and tumours from patients with malignant disease has led to the development of methods to specifically identify and quantitate the enzyme. Recently immunological techniques have been used, employing antibodies raised to purified PLAP; these include solid phase radioimmunoassays and enzyme-immunoassay. The development of a sensitive, specific, automated double-antibody radioimmunoassay for the measurement of PLAP in serum is reported. (Auth.)

  16. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  17. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  18. Isotopic measurements (C,N,O) of detonation soot produced from labeled and unlabeled Composition B-3 indicate source of solid carbon residues

    Podlesak, David; Manner, Virginia; Amato, Ronald; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gusavsen, Richard; Huber, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    Detonation of HE is an exothermic process whereby metastable complex molecules are converted to simple stable molecules such as H2 O, N2, CO, CO2, and solid carbon. The solid carbon contains various allotropes such as detonation nanodiamonds, graphite, and amorphous carbon. It is well known that certain HE formulations such as Composition B (60% RDX, 40% TNT) produce greater amounts of solid carbon than other more oxygen-balanced formulations. To develop a greater understanding of how formulation and environment influence solid carbon formation, we synthesized TNT and RDX with 13 C and 15 N at levels slightly above natural abundance levels. Synthesized RDX and TNT were mixed at a ratio of 60:40 to form Composition B and solid carbon residues were collected from detonations of isotopically-labeled as well as un-labelled Composition B. The raw HE and detonation residues were analyzed isotopically for C, N, O isotopic compositions. We will discuss differences between treatments groups as a function of formulation and environment. LA-UR - 17-21266.

  19. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  20. Parasite enzymes as a tool to investigate immune responses

    Italo M. Cesari

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous evidences reported by us and by other authors revealed the presence of IgG in sera of Schistosoma mansoni-infected patients to immunodominant antigens which are enzymes. Besides their immunological interest as possible inductors of protection, several of these enzume antigens might be also intersting markers of infection in antibody-detecting immunocapture assays which use the intrinsic catalytic property of these antigens. It was thus thought important to define some enzymatic and immunological characteristics of these molecules to better exploit their use as antigens. Four different enzymes from adult worms were partially characterized in their biochemical properties and susceptibility to react with antibodies of infected patients, namely alkaline phosphatase (AKP, Mg*+, pH 9.5, type I phosphodiesterase (PDE, pH 9.5, cysteine proteinase (CP, dithiothreitol, pH 5.5 and N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase (NAG, pH 5.5. The AKP and PDE are distinct tegumental membrane-bound enzymes whereas CP and NAG are soluble acid enzymes. Antibodies in infected human sera differed in their capacity to react with and to inhibit these enzyme antigens. Possibly, the specificity of the antibodies related to the extent of homology between the parasite and the host enzyme might be in part responsible for the above differences. The results are also discussed in view of the possible functional importance of these enzymes.

  1. Persistence of Antibodies to West Nile Virus in Naturally Infected Rock Pigeons (Columba livia)

    Gibbs, Samantha E. J.; Hoffman, Douglas M.; Stark, Lillian M.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Beaty, Barry J.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Wild caught rock pigeons (Columba livia) with antibodies to West Nile virus were monitored for 15 months to determine antibody persistence and compare results of three serologic techniques. Antibodies persisted for the entire study as detected by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and plaque reduction neutralization test. Maternal antibodies in squabs derived from seropositive birds persisted for an average of 27 days. PMID:15879030

  2. Production and purification of polyclonal antibody against F(ab')2 fragment of human immunoglobulin G

    Nasiri, Hadi; Valedkarimi, Zahra; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Kazemi, Tohid; Esparvarinha, Mojghan; Majidi, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are essential tools of biomedical and biochemical researches. Polyclonal antibodies are produced against different epitopes of antigens. Purified F(ab')2 can be used for animal’s immunization to produce polyclonal antibodies. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified by ion exchange chromatography method. In all stages verification method of the purified antibodies was sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Purified IgG was digested by pepsin enzyme a...

  3. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  4. Lyme disease antibody

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  5. Antinuclear antibody panel

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  6. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  7. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  8. Platelet antibodies blood test

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  9. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measles antibody: a comparison with haemagglutination inhibition, immunofluorescence and plaque neutralization tests Reação imunoenzimática (ELISA para detecção de anticorpos para o vírus do sarampo: comparação com reações de inibição da hema-glutinação, imunofluorescência indireta e neutralização de placas

    Vanda Akico Ueda Fick de Souza

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measles antibodies was compared with Plaque Neutralization (PRN, Haemagglutination inhibition (HI and Fluorescent antibody (IFA tests in 181 sera from vaccinated children and umbilical cord. Of 179 positive samples by the sensitive PRN, only two, with titers of 8, were negative by ELISA (copositivity of 98.9%. IFA and HI presented, respectively, copo-sitivities of 93.3% and 82.7%. The ELISA presented a high sensitivity as well as a good reproducibility and represents an alternative for the time consuming PRN for detection of low measles antibodies.A reação imunoenzimática (ELISA para determinação de anticorpos para o vírus do sarampo foi comparada com a reação de neutralização de placas (RNP, inibição da hemaglutinação (RIH e imunofluorescência indireta (RIF. Das 179 amostras positivas pela RNP, somente 2, com títulos iguais a 8, se apresentaram negativas por ELISA (copositividade de 98.9%. A RIF e RIH apresentaram, respectivamente, copositividade de 93.3 e 82.7%. ELISA apresentou sensibilidade equivalente à complexa RNP, boa reprodutibilidade e representa uma alternativa para a detecção de baixos títulos de anticorpos contra o sarampo.

  10. Heavy chain only antibodies

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  11. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    Novak, J.; Kselikova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125 I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  12. Anti-phospholipid antibodies in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Jakobsen, P H; Morris-Jones, S D; Hviid, L

    1993-01-01

    Plasma levels of antibodies against phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cardiolipin (CL) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in patients from malaria endemic area of Sudan and The Gambia. Some Sudanese adults produced IgM antibodies against all three types...... of phospholipids (PL) during an acute Plasmodium falciparum infection. The anti-PL antibody titre returned to preinfection levels in most of the donors 30 days after the disease episode. IgG titres against PI, PC and CL were low. In Gambian children with malaria, IgM antibody titres against PI and PC were...... significantly higher in those with severe malaria than in those with mild malaria. These results show that a proportion of malaria patients produce anti-PL antibodies during infection and that titres of these antibodies are associated with the severity of disease....

  13. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  14. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  15. Isolation of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments That Preferentially Detect Intact (146S Particles of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus for Use in Vaccine Quality Control

    Michiel M. Harmsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intact (146S foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDVs can dissociate into specific (12S viral capsid degradation products. FMD vaccines normally consist of inactivated virions. Vaccine quality is dependent on 146S virus particles rather than 12S particles. We earlier isolated two llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs that specifically recognize 146S particles of FMDV strain O1 Manisa and shown their potential use in quality control of FMD vaccines during manufacturing. These 146S-specific VHHs were specific for particular O serotype strains and did not bind strains from other FMDV serotypes. Here, we describe the isolation of 146S-specific VHHs against FMDV SAT2 and Asia 1 strains by phage display selection from llama immune libraries. VHHs that bind both 12S and 146S particles were readily isolated but VHHs that bind specifically to 146S particles could only be isolated by phage display selection using prior depletion for 12S particles. We obtained one 146S-specific VHH—M332F—that binds to strain Asia 1 Shamir and several VHHs that preferentially bind 146S particles of SAT2 strain SAU/2/00, from which we selected VHH M379F for further characterization. Both M332F and M379F did not bind FMDV strains from other serotypes. In a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA employing unlabeled and biotinylated versions of the same VHH M332F showed high specificity for 146S particles but M379F showed lower 146S-specificity with some cross-reaction with 12S particles. These ELISAs could detect 146S particle concentrations as low as 2.3–4.6 µg/l. They can be used for FMD vaccine quality control and research and development, for example, to identify virion stabilizing excipients.

  16. Variations of the pharmakocinetic in rabbits of the monoclonal antibody ior t1 produced by the radioiodonation with the chloramina T and iodogen methods

    Montenegro, A.

    1997-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody ior t1, an IgG 2a was labeled with 125I , using the chloramine T and iodogen methods. Immunoreactivity against human lymphocites in vitro was affected in a significant way, mostly with chloramine T methods. In F1 male rabbits, the plasma radioactivity declined in apparently bioexponential manner in the administration of unlabeled ior t1, measured by an specific ELISA to murine IgG, and with the use of chloramine T. A monoexponential declined with the iodogen reagent was observed. We consider the possible of an unspecific binding in blood in the experiment with iodogen reagent. The t-tes student analysis show significant differences between the unlabeled protein and both methods of radioiodination, that differences must be have their origin in the high specific activity when labeled with chloramine T and in the probably of non-specific binding when we employs the iodogen reagents

  17. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  18. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  19. Nanoparticles for the delivery of therapeutic antibodies: Dogma or promising strategy?

    Sousa, Flávia; Castro, Pedro; Fonte, Pedro; Kennedy, Patrick J; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    Over the past two decades, therapeutic antibodies have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of a wide array of diseases. However, the application of antibody-based therapy implies multiple administrations and a high cost of antibody production, resulting in costly therapy. Another disadvantage inherent to antibody-based therapy is the limited stability of antibodies and the low level of tissue penetration. The use of nanoparticles as delivery systems for antibodies allows for a reduction in antibody dosing and may represent a suitable alternative to increase antibody stability Areas covered: We discuss different nanocarriers intended for the delivery of antibodies as well as the corresponding encapsulation methods. Recent developments in antibody nanoencapsulation, particularly the possible toxicity issues that may arise from entrapment of antibodies into nanocarriers, are also assessed. In addition, this review will discuss the alterations in antibody structure and bioactivity that occur with nanoencapsulation. Expert opinion: Nanocarriers can protect antibodies from degradation, ensuring superior bioavailability. Encapsulation of therapeutic antibodies may offer some advantages, including potential targeting, reduced immunogenicity and controlled release. Furthermore, antibody nanoencapsulation may aid in the incorporation of the antibodies into the cells, if intracellular components (e.g. intracellular enzymes, oncogenic proteins, transcription factors) are to be targeted.

  20. A sandwich immunoassay for human prolyl 4-hydroxylase using monoclonal antibody

    Yoshida, Shinichi

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody was used in a sandwich enzyme immunoassay and in a radioimmunoassay for human serum immunoreactive prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The enzyme immunoassay utilized a monoclonal antibody as a solid phase and horseradish peroxidase-labeled rabbit antibody to human prolyl 4-hydroxylase as a conjugate. Sensitivity was 0.1 ng of enzyme per tube. With a conjugate purified by an enzyme-bound affinity column, sensitivity was increased to 0.01 ng per tube, and linearity was obtained between 0.01 to 30 ng per tube. The radioimmunoassay used a 125 I-labeled rabbit antibody (IgG) as the conjugate. Sensitivity of this technique was 0.4 ng of enzyme per tube. (Auth.)

  1. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  2. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-α, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with 99m Tc or 111 In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision-making and

  3. Kinetics of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Neutralizing and Virus-Specific Antibodies after Primary Infection with EBV

    Bu, Wei; Hayes, Gregory M.; Liu, Hui; Gemmell, Lorraine; Schmeling, David O.; Radecki, Pierce; Aguilar, Fiona; Burbelo, Peter D.; Woo, Jennifer; Balfour, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    Prospective studies of antibodies to multiple Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins and EBV neutralizing antibodies in the same individuals before, during, and after primary EBV infection have not been reported. We studied antibody responses to EBV in college students who acquired primary EBV infection during prospective surveillance and correlated the kinetics of antibody response with the severity of disease. Neutralizing antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibodies to gp350, the major target of neutralizing antibody, reached peak levels at medians of 179 and 333 days after the onset of symptoms of infectious mononucleosis, respectively. No clear correlation was found between the severity of the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis and the peak levels of antibody to individual viral proteins or to neutralizing antibody. In summary, we found that titers of neutralizing antibody and antibodies to multiple EBV proteins increase over many months after primary infection with EBV. PMID:26888186

  4. Double Antibody EIA of Cortisol Using Peroxidase As Label

    Karim, F.M.; Hamad, A.W.R.; Hashim, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique for plasma cortisol was established by using cortisol-3 (carboxymethyl) oxime covalently linked to the horseradish peroxidase as the label. An antibody raised in the rabbits against cortisol-3-(carboxy-methyl) oxime-bovline serum albumin was used as the first anti-body. Sheep anti-rabbit gamma-globulin serum with 8 percent poly-ethyleneglycol were used to separate antibody-bound and free cortisol. The enzyme activity of the bound fraction was measured with ortho-phenylene diamine as substrate. The procedure performed at room temperature was evaluated by sensitivity (50 pg/ tube). The correlation coefficient between our enzyme immunoassay technique and radioimmunoassay technique for determination of plasma cortisol was 97 percent

  5. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    2016-02-01

    Enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Quality Testing MS2 coat protein (MS2CP) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...primarily relied on the performance of an antibody in an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with little regard for quantifying the full spectrum...Protection, and Multi-Year Stabilization, in High Concentration Protein Solutions, Using Ionic Liquids. Chem. Commun. (Camb) 2007, 26, 2714–2716. 3. Bio

  6. Replacement of Antibodies in Pseudo-ELISAs: Molecularly Imprinted Nanoparticles for Vancomycin Detection.

    Canfarotta, Francesco; Smolinska-Kempisty, Katarzyna; Piletsky, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a widely employed analytical test used to quantify a given molecule. It relies on the use of specific antibodies, linked to an enzyme, to target the desired molecule. The reaction between the enzyme and its substrate gives rise to the analytical signal that can be quantified. Thanks to their robustness and low cost, molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) are a viable alternative to antibodies. Herein, we describe the synthesis of nanoMIPs imprinted for vancomycin and their subsequent application in an ELISA-like format for direct replacement of antibodies.

  7. A rat monoclonal antibody that recognizes pro- and active MMP-7 indicates polarized expression in vivo

    Fingleton, Barbara; Powell, William C; Crawford, Howard C

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes named for their ability to degrade proteins of the extracellular matrix. Here we describe the characterization of a rat monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing one member of this enzyme family, MMP-7. This antibody has been tested...... for its use in multiple assay types and was shown to be useful for direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of frozen or paraffin-embedded tissues. The antibody has been evaluated for its usefulness with tissues from several...

  8. Imaging of myocardial infarction in dogs and humans using monoclonal antibodies specific for human myosin heavy chains

    Leger, J.; Chevalier, J.; Larue, C.; Gautier, P.; Planchenault, J.; Aumaitre, E.; Messner, P.; Puech, P.; Saccavini, J.C.; Pau, B.

    1991-01-01

    The use of three different monoclonal antibodies specific for human ventricular myosin heavy chains in the visualization of the location and extent of necrosis in dogs with experimental acute myocardial infarction and in humans is described. Using a classic immunohistochemical method or ex vivo analysis of heart slices in dogs with acute myocardial infarction subjected to intravenous injection of unlabeled antimyosin antibodies or antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111, it was observed that all antibody fragments specifically reached the targeted necrotic zone less than 2 h after antibody injection and remained bound for up to 24 h. In a limited but significant number of cases (5 of the 12 humans and 11 of 43 dogs), it was possible to image the necrotic zone in vivo as early as 2 to 4 h after antibody injection. In other cases, individual blood clearance variations retarded or even prevented in vivo necrosis detection. Higher antimyosin fixation values were obtained in the necrotic zones in dogs with a rapid blood clearance relative to that of the other dogs. It is concluded that antimyosin antibodies always reached necrotic areas within 2 h. If blood clearance was rapid, in vivo imaging of the necrotic area was possible 2 to 6 h after necrosis, even in humans. In some cases, however, uncontrolled individual variations in the timing required for sufficient blood clearance hampered this rapid in vivo detection of myocardial necrosis

  9. Radioimmunological imaging of metastatic prostatic cancer with 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibody PAY 276

    Babaian, R.J.; Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 25 patients with histologically proved adenocarcinoma of the prostate, whose disease was staged clinically as D2 by appropriate radiographic and nuclear medicine studies, received increasing doses of PAY 276, an antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody for radioimmunological imaging. The patients were divided into 5 groups of 5. Groups 1 through 5 received an infusion of 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg. monoclonal antibody, respectively, 1 mg. of which was labeled to 5 mCi. of 111 indium, while stable monoclonal antibody was added to achieve the desired antibody concentration. No patient had an allergic reaction, and no significant change in serial hemoglobin levels, platelet count, chemistry profile or results of urinalyses was noted. The monoclonal antibody scan visualized at least 1 lesion in 19 of 25 patients (76 per cent): 4 in groups 1 and 2, and all 15 in groups 3 to 5. With results of conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy considered definitive for metastases, monoclonal antibody scans detected 7 of 32 metastases (21.8 per cent) in group 3 (20 mg.), 31 of 58 (53.4 per cent) in group 4 (40 mg.) and 101 of 134 (75.4 per cent) in group 5 (80 mg). In group 5 the incidence of false positive and false negative scans was 2.3 per cent (3 of 132) and 24.6 per cent (33 of 134), respectively. The detection of metastatic lesions increased as the concentration of unlabeled monoclonal antibody increased. Radioimmunological imaging of prostatic cancer with antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody seems to be feasible

  10. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 in hematological malignancies and beyond

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Janmaat, Maarten L.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    CD38 is a multifunctional cell surface protein that has receptor as well as enzyme functions. The protein is generally expressed at low levels on various hematological and solid tissues, while plasma cells express particularly high levels of CD38. The protein is also expressed in a subset of hema...... strong anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. The antibody engages diverse mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, programmed cell death, modulation of enzymatic activity...... combination therapies with existing as well as emerging therapies, which are currently evaluated in the clinic. Finally, CD38 antibodies may have a role in the treatment of diseases beyond hematological malignancies, including solid tumors and antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A....../S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd....

  11. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  12. In vitro experimental (211)At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Frömke, Cornelia; Meyer, Geerd J; Knapp, Wolfram H

    2010-05-01

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter (211)At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the (211)At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free (211)At. The mean labelling ratio of (211)At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 +/- 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of (211)At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. (211)At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after (211)At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that (211)At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase (211)At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects.

  13. In vitro experimental {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H. [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Froemke, Cornelia [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Biometry, Hanover (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter {sup 211}At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free {sup 211}At. The mean labelling ratio of {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 {+-} 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that {sup 211}At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  14. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  15. Expression of recombinant Antibodies

    André eFrenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with human-like post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  16. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  17. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  18. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  19. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent and alternative assays for detection of HIV antibodies using panels of Brasilian sera Avaliação de testes sorológicos para a detecção de anticorpos anti-HIV em painéis de soros de brasileiros

    Jairo Ivo-Dos-Santos

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available Sera from 472 Brazilian subjects, confirmed to be either positive or negative for HIV antibodies and comprising the total clinical spectrum of HIV infection, were utilized in the evaluation of six commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA, as well as of four alternative assays, namely indirect immunofluorescence (IIF, passive hemagglutination (PHA, dot blot and Karpas AIDS cell test. The sensitivities ranged from 100% (Abbott and Roche ELISA to 84.2% (PHA and the specificities ranged from 99.3% (IIF to 80.2% (PHA. The sensitivity and specificity of the PHA and the sensitivity of the Karpas cell test were significantly lower than those of the other tests. Although the IFF and dot blot had good sensitivities and specificities, the six ELISA were more attractive than those tests when other parameters such as ease of reading and duration of assay were considered.Os soros de 472 brasileiros, confirmados como sendo positivos ou negativos em relação à presença de anticorpos anti-HIV e compreendendo todo o espectro clínico da infecção, foram utilizados na avaliação de seis ensaios imunoenzimáticos comerciais (ELISA, bem como de quatro testes alternativos tais como imunofluorescência indireta (IFI, hemaglutinação passiva (HP, dot blot e Karpas AIDS cell test. As sensibilidades variaram de 100% (ELISA Abbott e Roche a 84,2% (HP e as especificidades variaram de 99,3% (IFI a 80,2% (HP. A sensibilidade e especificidade da HP e a sensibilidade do Karpas AIDS cell test foram significativamente menores que os outros ensaios. Embora a IFI e o dot blot tivessem apresentado uma boa sensibilidade e especificidade, os ensaios imunoenzimáticos (ELISA foram mais adequados para serem utilizados em triagem quando outros parâmetros tais como facilidade de leitura e interpretação dos resultados e duração dos ensaios foram considerados.

  20. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Antibodies to the human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I in Dutch haemophiliacs

    Goudsmit, J.; Miedema, F.; Breederveld, C.; Terpstra, F.; Roos, M.; Schellekens, P.; Melief, C.

    1986-01-01

    95 Dutch haemophiliacs were tested for antibodies to membrane antigens on cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I-MA) by indirect immunofluorescence and to purified HTLV-I by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to HTLV-I-MA were present in 8 of 95 (8%) haemophiliacs,

  2. Radiolabelled antibodies in imaging

    Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent technological advances make it possible to produce pure (monoclonal) antibodies in unlimited quantities without the need for continuous immunization of animals and to label these antibodies with a variety of radionuclides which can be traced by single-photon computed tomography. An outline review of the state of the art is presented, with particular reference to the imaging of myocardial infarcts and to tumour imaging studies using labelled monoclonal antibodies (sup(99m)Tc and 125 I). Lengthy bibliography. (U.K.)

  3. Development of Antibody-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles for Biomarker Immobilization

    Christian Chapa Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have great potential in biomedical applications because of their magnetic response offers the possibility to direct them to specific areas and target biological entities. Magnetic separation of biomolecules is one of the most important applications of MNPs because their versatility in detecting cancer biomarkers. However, the effectiveness of this method depends on many factors, including the type of functionalization onto MNPs. Therefore, in this study, magnetite nanoparticles have been developed in order to separate the 5′-nucleotidase enzyme (5eNT. The 5eNT is used as a bio-indicator for diagnosing diseases such as hepatic ischaemia, liver tumor, and hepatotoxic drugs damage. Magnetic nanoparticles were covered in a core/shell type with silica, aminosilane, and a double shell of silica-aminosilane. A ScFv (fragment antibody and anti-CD73 antibody were attached to the coated nanoparticles in order to separate the enzyme. The magnetic separation of this enzyme with fragment antibody was found to be 28% higher than anti-CD73 antibody and the enzyme adsorption was improved with the double shell due to the increased length of the polymeric chain. Magnetite nanoparticles with a double shell (silica-aminosilane were also found to be more sensitive than magnetite with a single shell in the detection of biomarkers.

  4. The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting ...

    The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting gene mutations as well as genome repair. Type B lymphocytes are a specific type of white blood cell within our immune system. They produce and export antibodies which seek out, attach to, and neutralize microbes and toxins. A unique way that B ...

  5. Comparison of agal gel precipitation test (AGPT) and enzyme linked ...

    The use of agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in assaying for the presence of infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus antibody in village chickens in Oyo State, Nigeria, was compared. Out of 400 sera subjected to ELISA, 360 (90%) samples where positive for IBD virus ...

  6. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  7. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  9. Future of antibody purification.

    Low, Duncan; O'Leary, Rhona; Pujar, Narahari S

    2007-03-15

    Antibody purification seems to be safely ensconced in a platform, now well-established by way of multiple commercialized antibody processes. However, natural evolution compels us to peer into the future. This is driven not only by a large, projected increase in the number of antibody therapies, but also by dramatic improvements in upstream productivity, and process economics. Although disruptive technologies have yet escaped downstream processes, evolution of the so-called platform is already evident in antibody processes in late-stage development. Here we perform a wide survey of technologies that are competing to be part of that platform, and provide our [inherently dangerous] assessment of those that have the most promise.

  10. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  11. Antibody tumor penetration

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  12. Quantitation of antibodies to nucleoribonucleoprotein by ELISA : relation between antibody levels and disease activity in patients with connective tissue disease

    Houtman, PM; Kallenberg, CGM; Limburg, PC; Huitema, MG; van Rijswijk, MH; The, TH

    1985-01-01

    We describe a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantitation of antibodies to nucleoribonucleoprotein (nRNP/Sm). nRNP/Sm was purified from rabbit thymus acetone powder by immunoaffinity chromatography and characterized by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and immunoblotting

  13. [EIA-IgG antibody measles prevention level estimated from measles neutralizing, particle agglutination and hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titer].

    Takayama, Naohide; Saika, Shizuko; Ichinohe, Sadato

    2009-09-01

    Measles hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titer, widely used in clinical practice to simply and easily determine the measles immunity level has, in recent years, been increasingly replaced by measles IgG-antibody titer determined by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA). HI antibody titer appears to reflect this protective level, because HI measures the antibody against H protein required for the measles virus to adhere to host cells. EIA-IgG antibody titer does not correlate with the protective level, similar to particle agglutination (PA) titer, because EIA measures different antibodies, including those unrelated to measles protection. After determining HI, PA, neutralizing test (NT) results, and EIA-IgG antibody titer for individual specimens, we compared EIA-IgG antibody titer obtained using an EIA-Kit (Denka Seiken) to HI, PA, and NT titer with the following results: (1) Subjects with EIA-IgG titer of > or = 12.0 may be protected against measles: (2) Subjects with EIA-IgG titer of 4.0 to 8.0 appear to be protected insufficiently requiring a booster dose against measles: (3) Subjects with EIA-IgG titer of 8.0 to 12.0 may benefit from booster vaccination.

  14. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  15. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  16. Scanning force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of microcontact printed antibodies and antibody fragments.

    LaGraff, John R; Chu-LaGraff, Quynh

    2006-05-09

    Unlabeled primary immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and its F(ab')2 and Fc fragments were attached to oxygen-plasma-cleaned glass substrates using either microcontact printing (MCP) or physical adsorption during bath application from dilute solutions. Fluorescently labeled secondary IgGs were then bound to surface-immobilized IgG, and the relative surface coverage was determined by measuring the fluorescence intensity. Results indicated that the surface coverage of IgG increased with increasing protein solution concentration for both MCP and bath-applied IgG and that a greater concentration of IgG was transferred to a glass substrate using MCP than during physisorption during bath applications. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) showed that patterned MCP IgG monolayers were 5 nm in height, indicating that IgG molecules lie flat on the substrate. After incubation with a secondary IgG, the overall line thickness increased to around 15 nm, indicating that the secondary IgG was in a more vertical orientation with respect to the substrate. The surface roughness of these MCP patterned IgG bilayers as measured by SFM was observed to increase with increasing surface coverage. Physisorption of IgG to both unmodified patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps and plasma-cleaned glass substrates was modeled by Langmuir adsorption kinetics yielding IgG binding constants of K(MCP) = 1.7(2) x 10(7) M(-1) and K(bath) = 7.8(7) x 10(5) M(-1), respectively. MCP experiments involving primary F(ab')2 and Fc fragments incubated in fluorescently labeled fragment-specific secondary IgGs were carried out to test for the function and orientation of IgG. Finally, possible origins of MCP stamping defects such as pits, pull outs, droplets, and reverse protein transfer are discussed.

  17. Engineered Antibodies for Monitoring of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Alexander E. Karu Ph.D; Victoria A. Roberts Ph.D.; Qing X. Li, Ph.D.

    2002-01-17

    This project was undertaken to fill needs in ODE's human and ecosystem health effects research, site remediation, rapid emergency response, and regulatory compliance monitoring programs. Doe has greatly stimulated development and validation of antibody-based, rapid, field-portable detection systems for small hazardous compounds. These range from simple dipsticks, microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and hand-held colorimeters, to ultrasensitive microfluidic reactors, fiber-optic sensors and microarrays that can identify multiple analytes from patterns of cross-reactivity. Unfortunately, the technology to produce antibodies with the most desirable properties did not keep pace. Lack of antibodies remains a limiting factor in production and practical use of such devices. The goals of our project were to determine the chemical and structural bases for the antibody-analyte binding interactions using advanced computational chemistry, and to use this information to create useful new binding properties through in vitro genetic engineering and combinatorial library methods.

  18. The in vivo fate of a 211At labelled monoclonal antibody with known specificity in a murine system

    Vaughan, A.T.M.; Bateman, W.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody reactive against the human transferrin receptor has been labelled with the alpha and X ray emitting isotope Astatine 211. The labelling procedure does not affect the ability of the product to bind to the transferrin receptor on the human leukemic cell line HL60. Using a direct binding assay, 211 At labelled antibody can be specifically inhibited from binding to its target cells by excess unlabelled antibody. Furthermore, the binding inhibition demonstrated in this system correlates to enhanced clonogenic survival of these cells, indicating that very few atoms of 211 At/cell are required for cell death. Data obtained from labelled antibody injected into mice show that the labelled product in serum retains the ability to bind to HL60 cells in vitro, although tissue distributions of the injected activity implies that some of the radiolabel is lost from the protein. Despite this loss of label, preliminary experiments on the localization of labelled antibody to HL60 cells growing s/c in nude mice show that tumor tissue has a higher specific activity than all other tissues, other than blood, after 12 hours. This suggests that further work on the nature of label degradation in vivo is warranted in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic studies

  19. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  20. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  1. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiphospholipid antibodies in Brazilian hepatitis C virus carriers

    A.M. Atta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C, a worldwide viral infection, is an important health problem in Brazil. The virus causes chronic infection, provoking B lymphocyte dysfunction, as represented by cryoglobulinemia, non-organ-specific autoantibody production, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The aim of this research was to screen for the presence of antiphospholipid autoantibodies in 109 Brazilian hepatitis C virus carriers without clinical history of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forty healthy individuals were used as the control group. IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies against cardiolipin and β2-glycoprotein I were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using a cut-off point of either 20 UPL or 20 SBU. While 24 (22.0% hepatitis C carriers had moderate titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies (median, 22.5 MPL; 95%CI: 21.5-25.4 MPL, only three carriers (<3% had IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (median, 23 GPL; 95%CI: 20.5-25.5 GPL. Furthermore, IgA anticardiolipin antibodies were not detected in these individuals. Male gender and IgM anticardiolipin seropositivity were associated in the hepatitis C group (P = 0.0004. IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies were detected in 29 of 109 (27.0% hepatitis C carriers (median, 41 SAU; 95%CI: 52.7-103.9 SAU. Twenty patients (18.0% had IgM anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (median, 27.6 SMU; 95%CI: 23.3-70.3 SMU, while two patients had IgG antibodies against this protein (titers, 33 and 78 SGU. Antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in only one healthy individual, who was seropositive for IgM anticardiolipin. We concluded that Brazilian individuals chronically infected with hepatitis C virus present a significant production of antiphospholipid antibodies, mainly IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, which are not associated with clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies as reversible equilibrium carriers of radiopharmaceuticals

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.; Meares, C.F.; McCall, M.J.; David, G.F.; Frincke, J.M.; Stone, M.R.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Leung, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have prepared monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) with the specific ability to bind metal chelates such as 111 In benzyl EDTA. One, 10, 50 and 100 μg MoAb CHA255 Ksub(b) 4 x 10E9 was complexed with 111 In BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, and benzyl EDTA and injected i.v. in Balb/c mice with KHJJ tumor. The biological half-life by whole body counting was profoundly altered for all three compounds; from minutes to hours with 10 μg; to days with 100 μg. Tumor uptake increased 50 fold at 24 h with increasing MoAb but satisfactory tumor concentrations (3% per g) and tumor/blood ratios (1.8:1) were obtained with an amount equivalent to 7 mg for a human. Blood level and whole body activity were decreased 30-50% within 3 h or i.v. injection of a 'flushing' dose of unlabeled indium benzyl EDTA, increasing tumor/blood ratios to 50:1. (author)

  4. Monoclonal antibody to DNA containing thymine glycol

    Leadon, S A; Hanawalt, P C [Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of DNA to ionizing or near ultraviolet radiation modifies thymine to form ring-saturated products. One of the major products formed is 5,6-dihydroxy-5.6-dihydrothymine (thymine glycol). Thymine glycol can also be selectively formed by oxidizing DNA with OsO/sub 4/. We have isolated hybrids that produce monoclonal antibodies against thymine glycol by fusing mouse myeloma cells (P3X63-Ag8-6.5.3) with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with OsO/sub 4/-oxidized poly(dT) complexed with methylated bovine serum albumin. This report describes the characterization of the antibody from one hybridoma using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with both single- and double-stranded DNA treated with OsO/sub 4/, and with OsO/sub 4/-treated poly(dA-dT) and poly(dT); it did not crossreact with unmodified or apurinic DNA. It also reacted with DNA treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or with ..gamma..-rays at doses as low as 250 rad. We were able to detect 2 fmoles of thymine glycol in OsO/sub 4/-treated DNA and could quantitate 1 thymine glycol per 220000 thymines. Using the antibody and the ELISA, the formation and removal of thymine glycol was examined in cultures of African green monkey cells irradiated with 25 krad of ..gamma..-rays. The antibody reactive sites produced by irradiation (8.5 per 10/sup 6/ thymines) were efficiently removed from the cellular DNA.

  5. Radiolabelled antibody imaging

    Perkins, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    A steadily growing number of tumor-associated antigens are used to raise antibodies used for the detection of human tumors by external imaging, a technique termed immunoscintigraphy. The majority of these clinical antibody studies are performed using Iodine-131, which is cheap, readily available and easily attached to protein. It has the disadvantage of having a high energy gamma emission (365 keV) which is poorly detected by modern cameras, so that increasing use is now being made of more appropriate labels with lower energies for imaging, such as Iodine-123, Indium-111 and Technetium-99m. A number of research centres in the United Kingdom are currently involved in the production of tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies, only a small number of which are finally selected for diagnostic use. These developments represent a major area of advancement in Nuclear Medicine and when used for imaging are capable of providing diagnostic information complimentary to other diagnostic techniques

  6. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  7. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  8. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  9. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  10. Antibody affinity maturation

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...... laboratory conditions. A particular emphasis was put on using molecular techniques in conjunction with microenvironmental measurements (O2, pH, irradiance), a combination that is rarely found but provides a much more detailed understanding of “cause and effect” in complex natural systems...

  11. Technetium-99m direct radiolabeling of monoclonal antibody ior egf/r3

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Crespo, Francisco Zayas; Gandolff, Gilda Nunez; Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Perez, Niuvis Perez; Hernandez, Juan C. Izquierdo

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are being widely used for imaging studies, coupled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc. The antibody ior egf/r3 is a MAb against human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGF-r), and we have developed a method for optimum labeling of this MAb with {sup 99m}Tc. The reduction was performed with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) at a molar ratio of 2000:1 (2-ME:MAb) and methylene diphosphonate as transchelant. The integrity of reduced MAb was checked by mean of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and gel filtration chromatography on Superose 12 (purity >99%). Radio colloids remained lower than 2%, and the labeling efficiency was 98.5%. The number of sulfhydryl groups generated was quantified using Ellman's reagent and was found to be 6.65 {+-} 0.69 per antibody molecule. In vitro stability studies in several challenging conditions (DTPA, human serum albumin and human serum) were performed, and no significant loss in binding percentage was seen. Radio receptor assay was used to test immunoreactivity of the reduced MAb. Both labeled and unlabeled MAbs were able to compete for binding to the hEGF-r with radioiodinated EGF. Biodistribution studies in BALB/c mice are reported.

  12. Technetium-99m direct radiolabeling of monoclonal antibody ior egf/r3

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Crespo, Francisco Zayas; Gandolff, Gilda Nunez; Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Perez, Niuvis Perez; Hernandez, Juan C. Izquierdo

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are being widely used for imaging studies, coupled mainly with 99m Tc. The antibody ior egf/r3 is a MAb against human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGF-r), and we have developed a method for optimum labeling of this MAb with 99m Tc. The reduction was performed with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) at a molar ratio of 2000:1 (2-ME:MAb) and methylene diphosphonate as transchelant. The integrity of reduced MAb was checked by mean of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and gel filtration chromatography on Superose 12 (purity >99%). Radio colloids remained lower than 2%, and the labeling efficiency was 98.5%. The number of sulfhydryl groups generated was quantified using Ellman's reagent and was found to be 6.65 ± 0.69 per antibody molecule. In vitro stability studies in several challenging conditions (DTPA, human serum albumin and human serum) were performed, and no significant loss in binding percentage was seen. Radio receptor assay was used to test immunoreactivity of the reduced MAb. Both labeled and unlabeled MAbs were able to compete for binding to the hEGF-r with radioiodinated EGF. Biodistribution studies in BALB/c mice are reported

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against plant viruses

    Sandler, E.; Dietzgen, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since antigenic properties of plant viruses were discovered antisera have been raised and used for plant virus diagnosis and for the analysis of virus structure as well. From the early qualitative diagnosis method of precipitating the virus in clarified sap of an infected plant and the first quantitative application of the precipitin test vast progress has been made with regard to the development of highly sensitive and highly quantitative methods for virus detection. Of equal importance was the improvement of methods for separating virus from host cell components since the specificity of antisera raised against a virus could be increased by using an antigen for immunization highly concentrated and largely freed from contaminating host substances. The introduction of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) into plant virology allows detection of virus in nanogram quantities. Still, the conventionally raised antisera, no matter how pure an antigen was used for immunization, are polyclonal. They contain products of thousands of different antibody-secreting plasma cell clones which can be directed against all antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the virus, but also against antigens of the host plant that may not have been entirely separated from the immunizing virus during the purification procedure. Even after cross adsorption of polyclonal antisera some residual heterogeneity can be expected to remain. Within these boundaries the information gained with polyclonal antisera on virus structure and on virus diagnosis has to be interpreted

  14. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  15. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  16. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  17. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Miller, J J; Brand, J C

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  18. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  19. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Enzymes are biocatalytic protein molecules that enhance the rates of ... to physical forces (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic 1, electrostatic and Van der ... conformation. In 1995 ... surface against 14.7% in Klenow poll (some of the hydrophobic.

  20. Production of rabbit antibodies against purified Glucose oxidase

    Muhammad Anjum Zia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucose oxidase is an active oxygen species generating enzyme produced from Aspergillus niger grown in submerged fermentation. Disintegration of the mycelium resulted in high glucose oxidase activity that was subjected to ammonium sulfate precipitation at 60-85% saturation rates that resulted to 6.14 U mg -1 specific activity. Purification of enzyme by anion exchange column (DEAE-Cellulose resulted into 22.53 U mg-1 specific activity and 10.27 fold purification. This was applied to sephadex G-200 column for gel filtration chromatography. It was observed that enzyme achieved 59.37 U mg-1of specific activity with 27.08 fold purity and 64.36% recovery. Purified glucose oxidase was injected into rabbits through intravenous route, to raise the glucose oxidase antibodies. After 30 days incubation period, the rabbits were slaughtered and serum was separated from blood. The antibodies were isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and confirmed by agar gel precipitation test. This could be a convenient and low cost alternate assay for the estimation of glucose oxidase in biological fluids. Moreover, such antibodies against the said enzyme could be used in various therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  1. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    ... as ratios. For example, the result 1:320 means that one part blood sample was mixed with 320 parts of a diluting ... name "antinuclear". My doctor told me my ANA test is ... normal concentration of these antibodies. This is one of the tools in diagnosing lupus as well ...

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  3. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    2017-10-01

    these unusual antibodies can effectively be displayed on the cell surface. 5 Additionally, we successfully prepared cDNA from lymphocytes derived...from cow peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes, amplified this cDNA by PCR with VH gene specific primers, and this “library” has been cloned into

  4. Antibody Blood Tests

    ... out for sure? If antibody tests and/or symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by ... who is still experiencing symptoms, to establish the diagnosis or to rule out celiac disease as a part of establishing another diagnosis. Find ...

  5. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    ... MACRA MACRAlerts MACRA FAQs MACRA Glossary MACRA Resources Position Statements Insurance Advocacy Current Issues Tools & Resources Practice Resources ... a medical or health condition. Resources Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) in Spanish (Español) Download Print-Friendly PDF ... Join Donate © 2018 American College ...

  6. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  7. Limited diagnostic capacities of two commercial assays for the detection of Leptospira immunoglobulin M antibodies in Laos

    Blacksell, Stuart D.; Smythe, Lee; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Dohnt, Michael; Hartskeerl, Rudy; SymondS, Meegan; Slack, Andrew; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Davong, Viengmone; Lattana, Olay; Phongmany, Simmaly; Keolouangkot, Valy; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Newton, Paul N.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of immunochromatographic (Leptotek) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Panbio) tests for the detection of Leptospira immunoglobulin M antibodies was assessed in febrile adults admitted in Vientiane, Laos. Both tests demonstrated poor diagnostic accuracy using

  8. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  9. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  10. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  11. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http

  12. Enzymatic Inactivation of Endogenous IgG by IdeS Enhances Therapeutic Antibody Efficacy.

    Järnum, Sofia; Runström, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Winstedt, Lena; Crispin, Max; Kjellman, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Endogenous plasma IgG sets an immunologic threshold that dictates the activity of tumor-directed therapeutic antibodies. Saturation of cellular antibody receptors by endogenous antibody limits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Here, we show how enzymatic cleavage of IgG using the bacterial enzyme IdeS can be utilized to empty both high and low affinity Fcγ-receptors and clear the entire endogenous antibody pool. Using in vitro models, tumor animal models as well as ex vivo analysis of sera collected during a previous clinical trial with IdeS, we show how clearing of competing plasma antibody levels with IdeS unblocks cellular antibody receptors. We show that therapeutic antibodies against breast cancer (trastuzumab), colon cancer (cetuximab), and lymphomas (rituximab and alemtuzumab) can be potentiated when endogenous IgG is removed. Overall, IdeS is shown to be a potent tool to reboot the human antibody repertoire and to generate a window to preferentially load therapeutic antibodies onto effector cells and thereby create an armada of dedicated tumor-seeking immune cells. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(9); 1887-97. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Anti-DNA antibodies: Sequencing, cloning, and expression

    Barry, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanism of systemic lupus erythematosus, and the interactions involved in proteins binding to DNA four anti-DNA antibodies have been investigated. Two of the antibodies, Hed 10 and Jel 242, have previously been prepared from female NZB/NZW mice which develop an autoimmune disease resembling human SLE. The remaining two antibodies, Jel 72 and Jel 318, have previously been produced via immunization of C57BL/6 mice. The isotypes of the four antibodies investigated in this thesis were determined by an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. All four antibodies contained [kappa] light chains and [gamma]2a heavy chains except Jel 318 which contains a [gamma]2b heavy chain. The complete variable regions of the heavy and light chains of these four antibodies were sequenced from their respective mRNAs. The gene segments and variable gene families expressed in each antibody were identified. Analysis of the genes used in the autoimmune anti-DNA antibodies and those produced by immunization indicated no obvious differences to account for their different origins. Examination of the amino acid residues present in the complementary-determining regions of these four antibodies indicates a preference for aromatic amino acids. Jel 72 and Jel 242 contain three arginine residues in the third complementary-determining region. A single-chain Fv and the variable region of the heavy chain of Hed 10 were expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression resulted in the production of a 26,000 M[sub r] protein and a 15,000 M[sub r] protein. An immunoblot indicated that the 26,000 M[sub r] protein was the Fv for Hed 10, while the 15,000 M[sub r] protein was shown to bind poly (dT). The contribution of the heavy chain to DNA binding was assessed.

  14. Evaluation of Gamma Interferon and Antibody Tuberculosis Tests in Alpacas

    Holder, Tom; Clifford, Derek; Dexter, Ian; Brewer, Jacky; Smith, Noel; Waring, Laura; Crawshaw, Tim; Gillgan, Steve; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Lawrence, John; Clarke, John; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Vordermeier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance of cell-based and antibody blood tests for the antemortem diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in South American camelids (SAC). The sensitivity and specificity of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay, two lateral flow rapid antibody tests (Stat-Pak and Dual Path Platform [DPP]), and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody tests (Idexx and Enferplex) were determined using diseased alpacas from Mycobacterium bovis culture-confirmed breakdown herds and TB-free alpacas from geographical areas with no history of bovine TB, respectively. Our results show that while the sensitivities of the IFN-γ and antibody tests were similar (range of 57.7% to 66.7%), the specificity of the IFN-γ test (89.1%) was lower than those of any of the antibody tests (range of 96.4% to 97.4%). This lower specificity of the IFN-γ test was at least in part due to undisclosed Mycobacterium microti infection in the TB-free cohort, which stimulates a positive purified protein derivative (PPD) response. The sensitivity of infection detection could be increased by combining two antibody tests, but even the use of all four antibody tests failed to detect all diseased alpacas. These antibody-negative alpacas were IFN-γ positive. We found that the maximum sensitivity could be achieved only by the combination of the IFN-γ test with two antibody tests in a “test package,” although this resulted in decreased specificity. The data from this evaluation of tests with defined sensitivity and specificity provide potential options for antemortem screening of SAC for TB in herd breakdown situations and could also find application in movement testing and tracing investigations. PMID:22914362

  15. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials

    Edgue, G.; Twyman, R.M.; Beiss, V.; Fischer, R.; Sack, M.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of a...

  16. Distribution of angiotensin converting enzyme in sheep hypothalamus and medulla oblongata visualized by in vitro autoradiography

    Chai, S.Y.; McKinley, M.J.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic mapping of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in sheep brain using the specific ACE inhibitor, 125 I-351A, revealed very high densities of binding in large blood vessels and choroid plexus. In the a very high density of labelling occurred in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median eminence and a high density in the subfornical organ and moderate density in supraoptic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate and paraventricular nuclei. All fiber tracts were unlabelled. In the medulla oblongata, a very high density of binding was detected in the area postrema and a high density in the nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus; a moderate density was found in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal tract and the inferior olivary nucleus

  17. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  18. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  20. Research Applications of Proteolytic Enzymes in Molecular Biology

    József Tőzsér

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes (also termed peptidases, proteases and proteinases are capable of hydrolyzing peptide bonds in proteins. They can be found in all living organisms, from viruses to animals and humans. Proteolytic enzymes have great medical and pharmaceutical importance due to their key role in biological processes and in the life-cycle of many pathogens. Proteases are extensively applied enzymes in several sectors of industry and biotechnology, furthermore, numerous research applications require their use, including production of Klenow fragments, peptide synthesis, digestion of unwanted proteins during nucleic acid purification, cell culturing and tissue dissociation, preparation of recombinant antibody fragments for research, diagnostics and therapy, exploration of the structure-function relationships by structural studies, removal of affinity tags from fusion proteins in recombinant protein techniques, peptide sequencing and proteolytic digestion of proteins in proteomics. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular biological aspects of proteolytic enzymes and summarize their applications in the life sciences.

  1. Characterization of antibodies specific for UV-damaged DNA by ELISA

    Eggset, G; Volden, G; Krokan, H

    1987-04-01

    The specificity of affinity purified antibodies raised against UV-irradiated DNA was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA irradiated with UV doses higher than needed for saturation with pyrimidine dimers bound increasing amounts of antibody. Photosensitized DNA, containing high amounts of pyrimidine dimers, showed very poor binding of antibody. When UV-irradiated DNA was given a second dose of 340-nm UV light, the binding of antibodies was inhibited. Taken together, this indicates a major specificity for (6-4)-photoproducts, which are photochemically reversed by UV light in the 340-nm region. The antibodies also showed little but detectable binding to pyrimidine glycols produced in DNA by oxidation with OsO/sub 4/. Previously, we have used these antibodies for the detection of UV-induced DNA damage and its repair in human skin in vivo. These findings indicate that (6-4)-photoproducts, considered highly mutagenic, are repaired in human skin.

  2. Characterization of antibodies specific for UV-damaged DNA by ELISA

    Eggset, G.; Volden, G.; Krokan, H.; Norsk Hydro Research Centre, Porsgrunn

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of affinity purified antibodies raised against UV-irradiated DNA was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA irradiated with UV doses higher than needed for saturation with pyrimidine dimers bound increasing amounts of antibody. Photosensitized DNA, containing high amounts of pyrimidine dimers, showed very poor binding of antibody. When UV-irradiated DNA was given a second dose of 340-nm UV light, the binding of antibodies was inhibited. Taken together, this indicates a major specificity for (6-4)-photoproducts, which are photochemically reversed by UV light in the 340-nm region. The antibodies also showed little but detectable binding to pyrimidine glycols produced in DNA by oxidation with OsO 4 . Previously, we have used these antibodies for the detection of UV-induced DNA damage and its repair in human skin in vivo. These findings indicate that (6-4)-photoproducts, considered highly mutagenic, are repaired in human skin. (author)

  3. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  4. Gag- and env-specific serum antibodies in cats after natural and experimental infection with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); H. Broos; G.A. Drost; K. Weijer (Kees); R. van Herwijnen (Rob); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn order to monitor the antibody response to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in cats, following experimental and natural infection, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed using recombinant env and gag proteins and p24-specific monoclonal antibodies. It was shown

  5. Isolation and functional effects of monoclonal antibodies binding to thymidylate synthase.

    Jastreboff, M M; Todd, M B; Malech, H L; Bertino, J R

    1985-01-29

    Monoclonal antibodies against electrophoretically pure thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells have been produced. Antibodies (M-TS-4 and M-TS-9) from hybridoma clones were shown by enzyme-linked immunoassay to recognize thymidylate synthase from a variety of human cell lines, but they did not bind to thymidylate synthase from mouse cell lines. The strongest binding of antibodies was observed to enzyme from HeLa cells. These two monoclonal antibodies bind simultaneously to different antigenic sites on thymidylate synthase purified from HeLa cells, as reflected by a high additivity index and results of cross-linked radioimmunoassay. Both monoclonal antibodies inhibit the activity of thymidylate synthase from human cell lines. The strongest inhibition was observed with thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells. Monoclonal antibody M-TS-9 (IgM subclass) decreased the rate of binding of [3H]FdUMP to thymidylate synthase in the presence of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate while M-TS-4 (IgG1) did not change the rate of ternary complex formation. These data indicate that the antibodies recognize different epitopes on the enzyme molecule.

  6. Random-walk enzymes

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    Sundseth, S.S.; Kennel, S.J.; Waters, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins

  8. Three Types of Striational Antibodies in Myasthenia Gravis

    Shigeaki Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is caused by antibodies that react mainly with the acetylcholine receptor on the postsynaptic site of the neuromuscular junction. A wide range of clinical presentations and associated features allow MG to be classified into subtypes based on autoantibody status. Striational antibodies, which react with epitopes on the muscle proteins titin, ryanodine receptor (RyR, and Kv1.4, are frequently found in MG patients with late-onset and thymoma. Antititin and anti-RyR antibodies are determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblot. More recently, a method for the detection of anti-Kv1.4 autoantibodies has become available, involving 12–15% of all MG patients. The presence of striational antibodies is associated with more severe disease in all MG subgroups. Anti-Kv1.4 antibody is a useful marker for the potential development of lethal autoimmune myocarditis and response to calcineurin inhibitors. Detection of striational antibodies provides more specific and useful clinical information in MG patients.

  9. Detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by a four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay.

    Turunen, H J

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii is described. Microtiter plates were sensitized with rabbit anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) used as the primary antibodies; guinea pig anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) were used as the secondary trapping antibodies. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-guinea pig immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The specificity of th...

  10. Clinical use of antibodies

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  11. Delta antibody radioimmunoassay

    Kselikova, M; Urbankova, J

    1985-11-15

    The principle and procedure are described of the radioimmunoassay of delta antibody (delta-Ab) using the ABBOTT ANTI-DELTA kit by Abbott Co. A description is given of the kit, the working procedure and the method of evaluation. The results are reported of the incidence of delta-Ab in sera of patients with viral hepatitis B, in haemophiliacs, carriers of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and blood donors. The presence was detected of delta-Ab in one HBsAg carrier. The necessity is emphasized of delta-Ab determinations in the blood of donors in view of the antibody transfer with blood and blood preparations.

  12. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  13. Study of cross-reactivity in serum samples from dogs positive for Leishmania sp., Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test Estudo da reatividade cruzada em amostras de soro de cães positivos para Leishmania sp., Babesia canis e Ehrlichia canis, pelo ensaio imunoenzimático indireto e pela reação de imunofluorescência indireta

    Trícia Maria F. de Sousa Oliveira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To verify the presence of cross-reaction among leishmaniosis, ehrlichiosis and babesiosis in serological diagnostics used in human visceral leishmaniasis control programs, serum samples from leishmaniasis endemic and non-endemic areas were collected and tested by Indirect Fluorescent Antibody (IFAT and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. All serum samples from endemic areas were positive for Leishmania sp., by ELISA and IFAT, 51% positive for Babesia canis and 43% for Ehrlichia canis by IFAT. None of the serum samples from non-endemic areas were positive for Leishmania sp., by IFAT, but 67% were positive for B. canis and 78% for E. canis using the same test. When tested by ELISA for Leishmania sp., four samples from non-endemic area were positive. These dogs were then located and no clinical signs, parasites or antibody was detected in new tests for a six month period. Only one of these 4 samples was positive for B. canis by IFAT and ELISA and three for E. canis by IFAT. The results of the work suggest a co-infection in the endemic area and no serological cross-reaction among these parasites by IFAT and ELISA.Para verificar a existência de reação cruzada entre leishmaniose visceral, erliquiose e babesiose, nos testes sorológicos utilizados em programas de controle da leishmaniose visceral humana, amostras de soro canino provenientes de áreas endêmicas e não endêmicas para essa enfermidade, foram testadas pela Reação de Imunofluorescência (RIFI e Ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA. Todos os soros provenientes de área endêmica foram positivos para Leishmania sp pelo ELISA e RIFI, 51% para Babesia canis e 43% para Ehrlichia canis pela RIFI. Pela RIFI, nenhum dos soros provenientes de área não endêmica foi positivo para Leishmania sp, sendo 67% positivos para B. canis e 78% para E. canis pelo mesmo teste. Quando testados pelo ELISA para Leishmania sp., quatro soros da área não endêmica foram positivos. Os cães foram localizados

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  15. Quantitative relationship between antibody affinity and antibody avidity

    Griswold, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between antibody avidity, measured by the dissociation of the antigen-antibody bond in antigen excess, and antibody affinity was studied. Complexes of radiolabelled antigen and antibody of known affinity were prepared in vitro and allowed to stand for seven days to reach equilibrium. Then nonlabelled antigen in one hundred fold excess was added to dissociate the complexes. After an appropriate incubation the fraction of antigen bound to antibody was measured by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method. The dissociation index was the fraction bound in the experimental sample divided by the fraction bound in the control. The correlation coefficient between the dissociation index and the antibody binding constant was 0.92 for early dissociation and 0.98 for late dissociation. The regression equation relating the binding constant to the dissociation index was K = 6.4(DI) + 6.25, where DI is the late dissociation index and K is the logarithm to the base 10 of the binding constant. There is a high correlation between avidity and affinity of antibody. Antibody affinity can be estimated from avidity data. The stability of antigen-antibody complexes can be predicted from antibody affinity

  16. The surface science of enzymes

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  17. A monoclonal antibody to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera

    Mweene, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to defeat antibodies to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera. Single sera from 211 cattle and 22 sheep from 7 different farms were tested using ELISA and Serum Neutralisation Test (SNT). 17 Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against P80, gp48 and gp53 were tested for ability to coat ELISA plates and capture the bovine viral diarrhea antigen. 5 mabs(WB 103, WB, 105, WB 112 against P80 kDa protein, WB 210 and WB 214 directed against gp48 and gp 53 kDa protein. Specific antibody to BVDV was detected by rabbit anti-bovine and anti-ovine IgG antisera. The quantitative correlation between two tests was good

  18. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    Brad G. Magor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID. We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  20. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  1. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  2. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  3. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  5. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  6. Embedded enzymes catalyse capture

    Kentish, Sandra

    2018-05-01

    Membrane technologies for carbon capture can offer economic and environmental advantages over conventional amine-based absorption, but can suffer from limited gas flux and selectivity to CO2. Now, a membrane based on enzymes embedded in hydrophilic pores is shown to exhibit combined flux and selectivity that challenges the state of the art.

  7. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  8. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  9. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  10. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  11. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  13. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  14. E.coli and investigation of antibody titer in rats

    masoud abdollahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant ribosome inactivating proteins act as N-glycosidase enzyme and produce by several family of Caryophyllaceae such as Saponaria Officinalis. Different Isoforms of RIPs expressed by Saponaria Officinalis. SO6 isoform depurinate Adenine 4324 in the conserved GAGA loop of 28SrRNA and disrupts protein synthesis. The aim of this study was expression of SO6 isoform in E.coli and investigation of antibody titer in rats. Methods: In this experimental study, SO6 synthetic gene was excised from recombinant pUC57- SO6 plasmid with BamHI and SalI restriction enzymes and subcloned into pET28a (+ expression vector. The expression of recombinant protein was induced by IPTG. Recombinant SO6 was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Western blotting was performed to confirm the recombinant protein. Rats were immunized intraperitoneal with purified protein and IgG serum titer was assayed by ELISA. Results: PCR reaction and enzyme digestion confirmed subcloning of SO6 gene into pET28a (+ expression vector. A 29.5kDa protein band on SDS-PAGE showed a high level of recombinant protein expression. Polyclonal antibodies recognized SO6. ELISA confirmed significant antibody titer after injection of protein in test group compared with the control group. Conclusion: The recombinant purified SO6 antigen can be used for anti-cancer and vaccine candidate research.

  15. Radioimmunoassay with heterologous antibody (hetero-antibody RIA)

    Iwasawa, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Itoh, Zen; Wakabayashi, Katsumi

    1991-01-01

    To develop a homologous radioimmunoassay (RIA) for a hormone of a small or rare animal often meets difficulty in collecting a large amount of purified antigen required for antibody production. On the other hand, to employ a heterologous RIA to estimate the hormone often gives poor sensitivity. To overcome this difficulty, a 'hetero-antibody' RIA was studied. In a hetero-antibody RIA system, a purified preparation of a hormone is used for radioiodination and standardization and a heterologous antibody to the hormone is used for the first antibody. Canine motilin and rat LH were selected as examples, and anti-porcine motilin and anti-hCG, anti-hCGβ or anti-ovine LHβ was used as the heterologous antibody. The sensitivities of the hetero-antibody RIAs were much higher than those of heterologous RIAs in any case, showing that these hetero-antibody RIA systems were suitable for practical use. To clarify the principle of hetero-antibody RIA, antiserum to porcine motilin was fractionated on an affinity column where canine motilin was immobilized. The fraction bound had greater constants of affinity with both porcine and canine motilins than the rest of the antibody fractions. This fraction also reacted with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to porcine and canine motilins in a competitive binding test with labeled canine motilin. These results suggest that an antibody population having high affinity and cross-reactivity is present in polyclonal antiserum and indicate that the population can be used in hetero-antibody RIA at an appropriate concentration. (author)

  16. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Immunohematologic study and transfusion approach to patients with public antibodies].

    Solves, P; de la Rubia, J; Arriaga, F; Cervera, J; Arnao, M; Carpio, N; Marty, M L

    1997-02-01

    To analyze the different immunohematologic studies required to identify anti-red cell antibodies directed against high incidence antigens and comment the best tranfusion management. Five patients with suspected anti-red cell alloantibodies directed against high frequency antigens are reported. After a positive antibody screening test (AST), an agglutination test with a commercial panel of 24 red cells was performed. Red cells were treated with proteolytic enzymes and AET to try to identify the circulating antibody. However, it was necessary to send the samples to reference laboratories for definitive identification. In order to evaluate the haemolytic potential of the antibody serum samples were treated with DTT and immunoglobulin subtype was studied with the capillary agglutination test. Finally, we analyze the half life of Cr51 labelled red cells. To obtain compatible blood for transfusion, autologous transfusion and cross-match with blood from direct relatives were performed. AST was positive in every case. A decrease in the agglutination test was observed after ficin treatment in two patients, and an increase in the remaining. The treatment of red cells with ZZAP and AET resulted in a decrease of agglutination in three cases and an increase in the remaining two. Specificity of the antibodies was as follows: anti-Cellano (two cases), anti-Ku (one case) and anti-Yta (two cases). Anti-Kell antibodies were IgG1 and anti-Cartwright antibodies were IgG4. One patient was transfused with autologous blood alone, another patient received compatible blood from direct relatives. A third patient was transfused both with autologous and allogeneic compatible blood. The fourth patient did not need red cell transfusion and, finally the last patient had to be transfused with incompatible blood but no postransfusion haemolysis was observed. In patients with anti-red cell antibodies against high-frequency antigens, red blood cells treatment with proteolytic enzymes (ZZAP, ficin

  18. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...

  19. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Goldenberg, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas

  20. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine

  1. Safety and Efficacy of 188-Rhenium-Labeled Antibody to Melanin in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    M. Klein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for effective “broad spectrum” therapies for metastatic melanoma which would be suitable for all patients. The objectives of Phase Ia/Ib studies were to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, dosimetry, and antitumor activity of 188Re-6D2, a 188-Rhenium-labeled antibody to melanin. Stage IIIC/IV metastatic melanoma (MM patients who failed standard therapies were enrolled in both studies. In Phase Ia, 10 mCi 188Re-6D2 were given while unlabeled antibody preload was escalated. In Phase Ib, the dose of 188Re-6D2 was escalated to 54 mCi. SPECT/CT revealed 188Re-6D2 uptake in melanoma metastases. The mean effective half-life of 188Re-6D2 was 12.4 h. Transient HAMA was observed in 9 patients. Six patients met the RECIST criteria for stable disease at 6 weeks. Two patients had durable disease stabilization for 14 weeks and one for 22 weeks. Median overall survival was 13 months with no dose-limiting toxicities. The data demonstrate that 188Re-6D2 was well tolerated, localized in melanoma metastases, and had antitumor activity, thus warranting its further investigation in patients with metastatic melanoma.

  2. Collaborative enhancement of antibody binding to distinct PECAM-1 epitopes modulates endothelial targeting.

    Ann-Marie Chacko

    Full Text Available Antibodies to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 facilitate targeted drug delivery to endothelial cells by "vascular immunotargeting." To define the targeting quantitatively, we investigated the endothelial binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to extracellular epitopes of PECAM-1. Surprisingly, we have found in human and mouse cell culture models that the endothelial binding of PECAM-directed mAbs and scFv therapeutic fusion protein is increased by co-administration of a paired mAb directed to an adjacent, yet distinct PECAM-1 epitope. This results in significant enhancement of functional activity of a PECAM-1-targeted scFv-thrombomodulin fusion protein generating therapeutic activated Protein C. The "collaborative enhancement" of mAb binding is affirmed in vivo, as manifested by enhanced pulmonary accumulation of intravenously administered radiolabeled PECAM-1 mAb when co-injected with an unlabeled paired mAb in mice. This is the first demonstration of a positive modulatory effect of endothelial binding and vascular immunotargeting provided by the simultaneous binding a paired mAb to adjacent distinct epitopes. The "collaborative enhancement" phenomenon provides a novel paradigm for optimizing the endothelial-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  4. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  5. Incomplete Antibodies May Reduce ABO Cross-Match Incompatibility: A Pilot Study

    Mehmet Özen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Any erythrocyte transfusion among humans having type A or B blood groups is impossible due to antibodies causing fatal transfusion complications. A cross-match test is performed to prevent immune transfusion complications before transfusion. Our hypothesis is that the fragment antibody (Fab part of the antibody (incomplete antibody may be used to prevent an immune stimulus related to the complete antibody. Therefore, we designed a pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of these incomplete antibodies using cross-match tests. Materials and Methods: Pepsin enzyme and staphylococcal protein A columns were used to cut anti-A and anti-B monoclonal antibodies and purify their Fab (2 fragments, respectively. An Rh-positive erythrocyte suspension with purified anti-A Fab (2 solution and B Rh-positive erythrocyte suspension with purified anti-B Fab (2 solution were combined correspondingly. Cross-match tests were performed by tube and gel centrifugation methods. The agglutination levels due to the anti-A and anti-B Fab (2 antibodies and their effects on the agglutination normally observed with complete antibodies were then measured. Results: No agglutination for the purified incomplete anti-A Fab (2 with A Rh+ erythrocyte and anti-B Fab (2 with B Rh+ erythrocyte combinations was observed in the tube cross-match tests. These agglutination levels were 1+ in two wells in the gel centrifugation cross-match tests. Fab (2-treated erythrocytes were also resistant to the agglutination that normally occurs with complete antibodies. Conclusion: We determined that the Fab (2 fragments of antibodies may not only be used to obtain a mild or negative reaction when compared to complete antibodies, but they might also be used for decreasing ABO incompatibility. Incomplete antibodies might be a therapeutic option in autoimmune hemolytic anemia and they may also be used in solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, we have planned an

  6. Antibody-nanoparticle conjugates to enhance the sensitivity of ELISA-based detection methods.

    Margaret M Billingsley

    Full Text Available Accurate antigen detection is imperative for clinicians to diagnose disease, assess treatment success, and predict patient prognosis. The most common technique used for the detection of disease-associated biomarkers is the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In an ELISA, primary antibodies are incubated with biological samples containing the biomarker of interest. Then, detectible secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP bind the primary antibodies. Upon addition of a color-changing substrate, the samples provide a colorimetric signal that directly correlates to the targeted biomarker concentration. While ELISAs are effective for analyzing samples with high biomarker content, they lack the sensitivity required to analyze samples with low antigen levels. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of ELISAs could be enhanced by replacing freely delivered primary antibodies with antibody-nanoparticle conjugates that provide excess binding sites for detectible secondary antibodies, ultimately leading to increased signal. Here, we investigated the use of nanoshells (NS decorated with antibodies specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as a model system (EGFR-NS. We incubated one healthy and two breast cancer cell lines, each expressing different levels of EGFR, with EGFR-NS, untargeted NS, or unconjugated EGFR antibodies, as well as detectable secondary antibodies. We found that EGFR-NS consistently increased signal intensity relative to unconjugated EGFR antibodies, with a substantial 13-fold enhancement from cells expressing high levels of EGFR. Additionally, 40x more unconjugated antibodies were required to detect EGFR compared to those conjugated to NS. Our results demonstrate that antibody-nanoparticle conjugates lower the detection limit of traditional ELISAs and support further investigation of this strategy with other antibodies and nanoparticles. Owing to their enhanced sensitivity, we anticipate that

  7. Epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies directed to aminopeptidase A and their relevance for albuminuria in mice.

    Gerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E; Assmann, Karel J M; van Son, Jacco P H F; Dijkman, Henry B P M; te Loeke, Nathalie A J M; van der Zee, Ruurd; Wetzels, Jack F M; Groenen, Patricia J T A

    2003-01-01

    We have shown previously that injection of specific combinations of anti-aminopeptidase A monoclonal antibodies induces an acute massive albuminuria in mice. This albuminuria is neither dependent on systemic mediators of inflammation nor angiotensin II. In this study, we examined the contribution of two individual antibodies, the enzyme-inhibiting antibody ASD-37 and the non-enzyme-inhibiting antibody ASD-41, in the induction of albuminuria as well as the interactions between these two monoclonals. In addition, we have mapped the epitopes of both antibodies using in vitro coupled transcription/translation of specifically designed cDNA fragments followed by immunoprecipitation, and using peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in case of a continuous epitope. A single intravenous injection of 4 mg of either ASD-37 or ASD-41 did not induce albuminuria. This dose of ASD-37 did not completely inhibit enzyme activity. The combination of 4 mg ASD-37/41 (1:1 weight ratio) induced albuminuria and almost completely inhibited enzyme activity. Similar results were obtained with a combination of ASD-37/41 in a 1:39 or 39:1 weight ratio. Administration of 2 mg ASD-41 24 h before injection of 2 mg ASD-37 significantly enhanced albuminuria. The epitope of ASD-37 is located at the C-terminal end of aminopeptidase A, whereas the ASD-41 epitope is mapped near the enzyme active site. Our data suggest that ASD-41 modulates the binding of ASD-37 to its epitope and/or vice versa. As a consequence, ASD-37 and ASD-41 act synergistically, not only in inhibiting enzyme activity but also in inducing albuminuria. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients of vitiligo

    Zhokhar, A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients suffering from vitiligo with healthy control group. Type of Study: Case control study. Settings: Dermatology Department, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 20th March 2010 to 20th July 2011. Material and Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of vitiligo, age = 18 yrs and both genders with no history of thyroid disease, past or current use of drugs for thyroid disorder or thyroid surgery were included as cases (Group A). Fifty healthy individuals with no evidence of vitiligo or thyroid disorder on history and physical examination and with no family history of vitiligo, matched for age and gender with cases, were included as control (Group B). Serum anti thyroid peroxidase (anti TPO) antibodies were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both cases and control. Results: Eight (16%) patients in Group A were anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive and forty two (84%) patients were negative while one (2%) patient was anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive in Group B and forty nine (98%) patients were negative (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Anti TPO antibody is significantly more common in patients of vitiligo as compared to general population. (author)

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to polioviruses; comparison of intratypic strain differentiation of poliovirus type 1 using monoclonal antibodies versus cross-absorbed antisera.

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; T.G. Hazendonk; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack); G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractA panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies raised to 3 different poliovirus type 1 strains was tested in a micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and in a micro-neutralization test against 87 poliovirus type 1 strains. The results, evaluated in a newly developed system for intratypic strain

  10. Comparison of radioimmunoassay and ELISA methods for detection of antibodies to chromatin components

    Fowler, E; Cheng, N [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill (USA). Dept. of Bacteriology and Immunology

    1983-09-16

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay has been compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for efficacy in measuring anti-chromatin antibodies. The low backgrounds achieved with the radioimmunoassay method produced a high signal-to-noise ratio and enabled detection of the human test antiserum at a dilution of 1:102,400. By contrast, the ELISA could detect the same antiserum only at a dilution of 1;3200 and above. The radioimmunoassay was consistently more sensitive than the ELSIA for detection of anti-chromatin antibodies in a number of human and mouse sera and ascites fluid containing a monoclonal antibody. Factors affecting sensitivity in both assays are discussed.

  11. Seropositivity of Dengue Antibodies during Pregnancy

    Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Malaysia a dengue endemic country with dengue infections in pregnancy on the rise. The present study was aimed at determining dengue seroprevalence (IgG or IgM during pregnancy and its neonatal transmission in dengue seropositive women. Methods. Maternal with paired cord blood samples were tested for dengue antibodies (IgG and IgM using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Maternal age, parity, occupation, ethnic group, and gestational age were recorded. Data on neonatal Apgar score and admissions to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU were analyzed. Results. Out of 358 women recruited, about 128 (35.8% patients were seropositive. Twelve patients (3.4% had recent infections (IgM positive and another 116 women (32.4% were with past infections (IgG positive. All babies born to seropositive mothers had positive IgG paired cord blood; however, no IgM seropositivity was observed. All neonates had good Apgar scores and did not require NICU admission. Conclusion. In this study, 35.8% pregnant women were found to be dengue seropositive. However, transplacental transfer of IgG antibodies had no detrimental effect on the neonatal outcomes.

  12. Immunochemical and biological properties of a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive to prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus.

    Aebig, J A; Jordan, R L; Lawson, R H; Hsu, H T

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody reacting with prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus was tested in immunochemical studies, neutralization of infectivity assays, and by immuno-electron microscopy. The antibody was able to detect the 27,000 Mr coat protein of prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus in western blots and also detected all polypeptide fragments generated after incubation of whole virus with proteolytic enzymes. In neutralization of infectivity studies, the antibody blocked virus infectivity, although it did not precipitate the antigen in agar gel Ouchterlony double diffusion tests. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed that the antibody coats virions but does not cause clumping. The antibody may be a useful tool for investigating coat protein-dependent initiation of ilarvirus infection.

  13. Hepatitis B and A virus antibodies in alcoholic steatosis and cirrhosis

    Gluud, C; Aldershvile, J; Henriksen, J

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 74 alcoholics with cirrhosis and 63 alcoholics with steatosis were tested for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen, to hepatitis B core antigen, and to hepatitis A virus by radioimmunoassay or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant difference between the two groups...... of alcoholics could be found concerning the prevalence of these antibodies. The total group of patients had antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen, or both, significantly (p less than 0.001) more often (26%) than sex- and age-matched controls (4%). No significant difference...... was found between patients and controls concerning the prevalence of antibody to hepatitis A virus (46% v 40%). In patients with cirrhosis, no correlation between wedged hepatic vein pressure or wedged-to-free hepatic vein pressure and any of the viral antibodies could be established. The present results...

  14. Diagnostic utility of egg yolk for the detection of avian metapneumovirus antibodies in laying hens.

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Yoo, Yae-Na; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2010-12-01

    Surveillance and diagnosis of avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) infection typically involve measurement of serum antibodies. In the current study, eggs instead of serum samples were used for the detection of AMPV antibodies in egg-laying chicken hens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). AMPV-free commercial layer hens were experimentally challenged with AMPV strain SC1509 through intravenous or oculonasal administration. Antibody levels were determined by ELISA. AMPV antibodies were detected in egg yolks from challenged hens by 7 days postinoculation (dpi), with the peak titer at 16 dpi. Antibody levels in eggs laid at 28 dpi correlated well (r = 0.93) with sera taken 28 dpi from the same hens. In a field trial of the yolk ELISA, six broiler breeder farms were surveyed, and all tested positive for AMPV antibodies in hen eggs, although positivity varied from farm to farm. Abnormal discolored eggs collected from outbreak farms had significantly higher titers of AMPV yolk antibodies than normal eggs from the same farm, unlike clinically healthy farms, where normal and abnormal eggs had similar antibody titers. These results indicate that diagnosis of AMPV infection by yolk ELISA to detect anti-AMPV antibodies may be a suitable alternative to serologic testing.

  15. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  16. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... human population grows and economic development. However, the current .... conditions and the production cost of the related enzyme system. Therefore ... Given the importance of this enzyme to these so many industries,.

  17. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human glioma using [sup 131]I-labeled monoclonal antibody to epidermal growth factor receptor

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Shozo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Herlyn, D

    1993-09-01

    [sup 131]I-labeled F (ab')[sub 2] fragments of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) 425 specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on human gliomas were used in experimental human malignant glioma immunotherapy. Two injections of 150 [mu]Ci [sup 131]I-labeled 425 F(ab')[sub 2] achieved growth inhibition of U-87MG human malignant glioma xenografts in nude mice. This radiolabeled specific MAb F(ab')[sub 2] was significantly superior to radiolabeled fragments of an anti-hepatitis virus control MAb A5C3 in influencing tumor growth. However, similar treatment of established human malignant glioma xenografts did not inhibit progressive tumor growth significantly. No clear tumor inhibition was produced by unlabeled MAb 425F(ab')[sub 2]. These studies suggest that [sup 131]I-labeled MAbs have a significant antitumor effect where unmodified antibody is ineffective. Multiple doses of antibody may achieve an increase in labeled MAb concentration in tumors. (author).

  18. Novel flow cytometric analysis of the progress and route of internalization of a monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody.

    Ford, C H; Tsaltas, G C; Osborne, P A; Addetia, K

    1996-03-01

    A flow cytometric method of studying the internalization of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been compared with Western blotting, using three human colonic cancer cell lines which express varying amounts of the target antigen. Cell samples incubated for increasing time intervals with fluoresceinated or unlabelled Mab were analyzed using flow cytometry or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. SDS/PAGE analysis of cytosolic and membrane components of solubilized cells from the cell lines provided evidence of non-degraded internalized anti-CEA Mab throughout seven half hour intervals, starting at 5 min. Internalized anti-CEA was detected in the case of high CEA expressing cell lines (LS174T, SKCO1). Very similar results were obtained with an anti-fluorescein flow cytometric assay. Given that these two methods consistently provided comparable results, use of flow cytometry for the detection of internalized antibody is suggested as a rapid alternative to most currently used methods for assessing antibody internalization. The question of the endocytic route followed by CEA-anti-CEA complexes was addressed by using hypertonic medium to block clathrin mediated endocytosis.

  19. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    ... antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC ... the only things that can cause a transfusion reaction. The recipient's immune ... or to drugs that the donor may have taken. Rarely, antibodies in the plasma ...

  20. Competitive enzyme immunoassay for human chorionic somatomammotropin using the avidin-biotin system

    Rappuoli, R.; Leoncini, P.; Tarli, P.; Neri, P.

    1981-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (HCS) is determined by an enzyme immunoassay where HCS competes with biotin-labeled HCS for insolubilized anti-HCS antibodies. Enzyme-labeled avidin is then used to reveal the amount of bound HCS. The system proves to be sensitive (1 ng/ml of HCS can be detected) and results agree with radioimmunoassay determinations (correlation coefficient = 0.979). Kinetics of the avidin-biotin reaction and coating of polystyrene wells are also investigated

  1. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery....... To better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  2. Comparison of a commercial ELISA and an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay to detect antibodies directed against porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus

    Nodelijk, G.; Wensvoort, G.; Kroese, B.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Colijn, E.; Verheijden, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    A commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV) was compared to an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). Serum samples used were collected from pigs experimentally infected with

  3. Discovery of Deep Structure from Unlabeled Data

    2014-11-01

    GPU processors . To evaluate the unsupervised learning component of the algorithms (which has become of less importance in the era of “big data...representations to those in biological visual, auditory, and somatosensory cortex ; and ran numerous control experiments investigating the impact of

  4. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  5. New perspectives on recombinant human antibodies

    J. de Kruif (John); A.-R. van der Vuurst de Vries (Anne); L. Cilenti (L.); E. Boel (E.); W. van Ewijk (Willem); T. Logtenberg (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe limited potential of murine monoclonal antibodies for human immunotherapy has driven recent progress in recombinant antibody technology. Here, de Kruif and colleagues report on advances in the development and use of phage-antibody-display libraries.

  6. Measurement of antibodies to tubulin by radioimmunoassay

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M.A. [CRC Medical Oncology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, U.K.

    1979-07-24

    A solid-phase double antibody radioimmunoassay capable of measuring antibody to tubulin, the principal component of microtubules, is described. This assay is simple, combining sensitivity with specificity and also allowing determination of antibody subclasses.

  7. DIRECT AND INDIRECT FLUORESCENT-ANTIBODY TECHNIQUES FOR THE PSITTACOSIS-LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM-TRACHOMA GROUP OF AGENTS1

    Ross, Martin R.; Borman, Earle K.

    1963-01-01

    Ross, Martin R. (Connecticut State Department of Health, Hartford) and Earle K. Borman. Direct and indirect fluorescent-antibody techniques for the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma group of agents. J. Bacteriol. 85:851–858. 1963.—Direct and indirect fluorescent-antibody (FA) techniques were developed for the detection of group antigen in infected tissue cultures and the titration of group antibody in human antiserum. The growth of the agent of meningopneumonitis (MP) in mouse embryo lung cell monolayers was followed by infectivity and complement-fixing (CF) antigen titrations, and cytological examination of FA stained cultures. Although infectivity and CF antigen reached a peak at 2 days and remained constant for an additional 3 days, only cells tested 2 to 3 days after infection were suitable for FA staining with labeled anti-MP serum because of excessive artifacts in the older cultures. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled rooster and guinea pig anti-MP serums and human antipsittacosis serums were titrated in direct FA and hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests. The rooster conjugate showed brighter staining and higher antibody titers than the guinea pig or human conjugates and was more effective in detecting minimal amounts of virus antigen. FA staining reactions with 1 and 2 units of labeled rooster serum were inhibited by unlabeled rooster serum but clear-cut inhibition with human antipsittacosis serum could not be demonstrated. The indirect FA technique was successfully used for the titration of group antibody in human serum. A comparison of the indirect FA, HI, and CF tests showed the indirect FA technique to be intermediate in sensitivity between the HI and CF tests. None of the three tests showed significant cross reactions with human serums reactive for influenza A and B; parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3; respiratory syncytial virus; Q fever; or the primary atypical pneumonia agent. PMID:14044954

  8. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... for several batches of hydrolysis, and thereby reduces the overall cost associated with the hydrolysis. Research on this subject has been ongoing for many years and several promising technologies and methods have been developed and demonstrated. But only in a very few cases have these technologies been...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...

  9. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  10. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  11. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems for the serology and antigen detection in parvovirus, coronavirus and rotavirus infections in dogs in The Netherlands.

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Groen (Jan); H.F. Egberink (Herman); G.H.A. Borst (Gerrit); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractComplex trapping blocking (CTB) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV) and rotavirus in sera of dogs were established. Double antibody sandwich ELISAs for the detection of CPV-,

  12. Development of an EGFRvIII specific recombinant antibody

    Li Gordon

    2010-10-01

    determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Conclusion This recombinant antibody thus holds great potential to be used as a research reagent and diagnostic tool in research laboratories and clinics because of its high quality, easy viability and unique versatility. This antibody is also a strong candidate to be investigated for further in vivo therapeutic studies.

  13. Elevated serum antiphospholipid antibodies in adults with celiac disease.

    Laine, Outi; Pitkänen, Katariina; Lindfors, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Niemelä, Onni; Collin, Pekka; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri

    2018-05-01

    An increased incidence of thrombosis is suggested in celiac disease. We explored serum levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in untreated and treated adult celiac disease patients. A cohort of 179 biopsy-proven celiac disease patients (89 untreated, 90 on long-term gluten-free diet) and 91 non-celiac controls underwent clinical examination, assessment of celiac serology and enzyme immunoassay testing for anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, prothrombin IgG, and phosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG and IgM. The level of antiphospholipid antibodies was higher in celiac disease patients compared with controls: anticardiolipin IgG 4.9 (0.7-33.8) vs 2.2 (0.4-9.6) U/ml, antiprothrombin IgG 2.9 (0.3-87.8) vs 2.1 (0.5-187.0) U/ml, antiphosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG 6.9 (0.0-54.1) vs 2.3 (0.5-15.1) U/ml; p celiac disease at presentation (gastrointestinal symptoms, malabsorption or anemia, and extraintestinal symptoms or screen-detected disease) had no effect on the level of serum antiphospholipid antibodies. The serum level of antiphospholipid antibodies is increased in adults with celiac disease. The higher level of antibodies in treated patients suggests that the increase is not gluten-dependent. The prothrombotic role of antiphospholipid antibodies in celiac disease warrants further studies. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody to thymidine glycol monophosphate

    Chen, B.X.; Hubbard, K.; Ide, H.; Wallace, S.S.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody specific for thymine glycol (TG) in irradiated or OsO4-treated DNA was obtained by immunizing with thymidine glycol monophosphate (TMP-glycol) conjugated to bovine serum albumin by a carbodiimide procedure. Screening by dot-immunobinding and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) procedures gave eight clones that bound OsO4- treated DNA. One of them, 2.6F.6B.6C, an IgG2a kappa, was characterized further. Hapten inhibition studies with OsO4-treated DNA showed that the antibody was specific for TMP-glycol. Among the various inhibitors tested, inhibition was in the order TMP-glycol greater than 5,6-dihydrothymidine phosphate greater than TMP greater than thymidine glycol greater than TG. Inhibition by 5,6-dihydrothymidine, thymidine, thymine, AMP, and CMP was negligible. In OsO4-treated DNA, as few as 0.5 TG per 10,000 bp were detectable by direct ELISA. Inhibition assays could detect as few as 1.5 TG per 10,000 bp. The antibody was equally reactive with native or denatured DNA containing TG. Among the X-irradiated homopolymers dC, dA, dG, and dT, only dT reacted with the antibody. Using an ELISA, the antibody could detect damage in irradiated DNA at the level of 20 Gy. Thus the antibody is of potential use in assays for DNA damage caused by X rays or other agents that damage DNA by free radical interactions

  15. Fluctuation of zonulin levels in blood vs stability of antibodies.

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Elroy; Kharrazian, Datis

    2017-08-21

    To evaluate the measurement of zonulin level and antibodies of zonulin and other tight junction proteins in the blood of controls and celiac disease patients. This study was conducted to assess the variability or stability of zonulin levels vs IgA and IgG antibodies against zonulin in blood samples from 18 controls at 0, 6, 24 and 30 h after blood draw. We also measured zonulin level as well as zonulin, occludin, vinculin, aquaporin 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies in the sera of 30 patients with celiac disease and 30 controls using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology. The serum zonulin level in 6 out of 18 subjects was low or zonulin levels of > 2.8 ng/mL and showed significant fluctuation from sample to sample. Comparatively, zonulin antibody measured in all samples was highly stable and reproducible from sample to sample. Celiac disease patients showed zonulin levels with a mean of 8.5 ng/mL compared to 3.7 ng/mL in controls ( P zonulin level at 2SD above the mean was demonstrated in 37% of celiac disease patients, while antibodies against zonulin, occludin and other tight junction proteins was detected in up to 86% of patients with celiac disease. Due to its fluctuation, a single measurement of zonulin level is not recommended for assessment of intestinal barrier integrity. Measurement of IgG and IgA antibodies against zonulin, occludin, and other tight junction proteins is proposed for the evaluation of the loss of intestinal barrier integrity.

  16. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  17. Improved functional immobilization of llama single-domain antibody fragments to polystyrene surfaces using small peptides

    Harmsen, M.M.; Fijten, H.P.D.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of different fusion domains on the functional immobilization of three llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) after passive adsorption to polystyrene in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Three VHHs produced without any fusion domain were efficiently adsorbed to

  18. Thrombotic risk assessment in antiphospholipid syndrome the role of new antibody specificities and thrombin generation assay

    Sciascia, Savino; Baldovino, Simone; Schreiber, Karen

    2016-01-01

    anticoagulant, a functional coagulation assay, and anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies, generally detected by solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The real challenge for treating physicians is understanding what is the actual weight of aPL in provoking clinical manifestations in each...

  19. Rapid Active Assay for the Detection of Antibodies to West Nile Virus in Chickens

    Groves, Stephanie S; Turell, Michael J; Bailey, Charles L; Morozov, Victor N

    2008-01-01

    ... by detection of bound IgM molecules with functionalized magnetic beads as active labels. This assay takes only 15 minutes and has the same sensitivity as a commercially available human WNV IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...

  20. Prevalence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in horses from Mexico

    The risk of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) to horses in Mexico has not been established. Serum samples from 495 horses in Durango State, Mexico were examined for the presence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based o...

  1. Indirect solid-phase immunosorbent assay for detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Ivanov, A P; Rezapkin, G V; Dzagurova, T K; Tkachenko, E A [Institute of Poliomyelitis anU Viral Encephalities of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow

    1984-05-01

    Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) using either enti-human or anti-mouse IgG labelled with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I, respectively, were developed for the detection of Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amapari, Tamiami, Lassa and LCM arenaviruses. Both methods allow high sensitivity detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies.

  2. Evaluation of six immunoassays for detection of dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin M and G antibodies

    J. Groen (Jan); P. Koraka (Penelope); J. Velzing (Jans); C. Copra (Cederick); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe performance of six commercially available immunoassay systems for the detection of dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies in serum was evaluated. These included two IgM and IgG enzyme immunoassays (EIA) from MRL Laboratories and PanBio, a rapid

  3. Development of a Rapid Qualitative Assay for Determining Elevated Antibody Levels to Periodontopathic Organisms

    1990-01-01

    stemic antibody titers to ".actinomycetemcornitans, B.gingivalis, Cochracea, and Eubacterium saburreum either de(., cased or remained similar to...1984b) Serological identification of oral Bacteroides spp . by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. J. Clin. Microbiol. 19: 639-644. Ebersole, J.L

  4. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  5. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  6. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  7. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  8. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  9. Association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Michel Alexandre Yazbek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus exposure appears to be an environmental trigger for rheumatoid arthritis that interacts with other risk factors. Relationships among anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status have been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from different populations. OBJECTIVE: To perform an association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In a case-control study, 140 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 143 healthy volunteers who were matched for age, sex, and ethnicity were recruited. Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and shared epitope alleles were identified by genotyping. Smoking information was collected from all subjects. A comparative analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status was performed in the patient group. Logistic regression analysis models were used to analyze the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies were not associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, shared epitope alleles, or smoking status. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity was significantly higher in smoking patients with shared epitope alleles (OR = 3.82. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis using stepwise selection, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were found to be independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 247.9. CONCLUSION: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies did not increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and were not associated with the rheumatoid arthritis risk factors studied. Smoking

  10. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  11. Anti-Chol-1 antigen, GQ1bα, antibodies are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Toshio Ariga

    Full Text Available The interaction of amyloid β-proteins (Aβ with membrane gangliosides has been reported to be an early event in Aβ fibril formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Neuronal degeneration in AD has been postulated to be associated with the presence of anti-ganglioside antibodies in patient sera. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC immunostaining, sera from 27 individuals (10 with AD, 6 with vascular dementia (VD, and 11 non-demented age-matched pathological controls were examined in order to detect anti-glycosphingolipid (GSL antibodies, including anti-cholinergic-specific antigen (Chol-1α; GQ1bα antibodies. All sera had natural antibodies against ganglio-N-tetraosyl gangliosides (brain-type gangliosides. However, sera of demented patients with AD and VD had significantly higher titers of anti-GSL antibodies than those in age-matched pathological controls. Although most serum antibodies, including anti- GM1, -GT1b, -GQ1b, -GQ1bα, were of the IgM type, the presence of the IgG type antibodies was also significantly elevated in the sera of demented patients with AD. Anti-GT1b antibodies of the IgG type were elevated in AD (90%, 9 of 10 cases and VD (100%, respectively. Most surprisingly, anti-GQ1bα antibodies (IgM were found in 90% (9/10 and 100% (6/6 in the sera of patients with AD and VD, respectively. Since GQ1bα is present in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, the presence of anti-GQ1bα antibodies may play an important role in disrupting cholinergic synaptic transmission and may participate in the pathogenesis of dementia. We conclude that elevated anti-GSL antibody titers may be useful as an aid for clinical diagnosis of those dementias.

  12. Egg yolk antibodies for detection and neutralization of Clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin.

    Trott, D L; Yang, M; Gonzalez, J; Larson, A E; Tepp, W H; Johnson, E A; Cook, M E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to determine the usefulness of an egg antibody platform for producing materials for the detection and neutralization of botulinum type A neurotoxin. Yield estimates for detection and neutralizing antibodies produced using methods described were calculated. Antibody specific to botulinum toxoid A (aToxoid) and toxin A (aBoNT/A) was produced by immunizing hens with botulinum toxoid A (toxoid) followed by increasing amounts of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) in Freund incomplete adjuvant. Egg yolks were extracted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for antibody detection and neutralization experiments. A model aToxoid/toxoid immunoassay using only egg yolk antibody was developed and had a detection limit of 1 pg/ml of toxoid. In an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of BoNT/A-specific antibody, the aBoNT/A contained more BoNT/A-specific antibody than did the aToxoid, and aBoNT/A was as effective as commercial rabbit antibody. The aToxoid provided no protection against BoNT/A in a standard mouse neutralization assay; however, 1 mg of PEG-extracted aBoNT/A neutralized 4,000 lethal doses of BoNT/A injected intraperitoneally. Based on these results, we calculated that in 1 month one hen could produce more than 100 liters of antibody detection reagents or enough antibody to neutralize approximately 11.6 million mouse lethal doses of botulinum toxin. Utilization of an egg antibody platform is potentially rapid (28 to 70 days) and scalable to kilogram quantities using current egg production facilities with as few as 1,000 hens.

  13. Antibodies to watch in 2018

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  14. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  15. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  16. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed.

  18. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  19. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  20. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  2. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  3. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  4. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-48 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Itai, Shunsuke; Chang, Yao-Wen; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-04-02

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is expressed on normal renal podocytes, pulmonary type I alveolar cells, and lymphatic endothelial cells. Increased expression of PDPN in cancers is associated with poor prognosis and hematogenous metastasis through interactions with C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets. We previously reported a novel PMab-48 antibody, which is an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizing PDPN expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. However, the binding epitope of PMab-48 is yet to be clarified. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry were used to investigate epitopes of PMab-48. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-48 comprises Asp29, Asp30, Ile31, Ile32, and Pro33 of dPDPN.

  5. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  6. Isotypes of Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Association with Rheumatoid Factors and Citrulline-Dependent Antibodies

    Marie Wulff Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the humoral immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to compare it with the two major autoantibody types in RA, plasma samples from 77 RA patients, 28 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and 28 healthy controls (HCs were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Increased percentages of positives and concentrations of IgG/IgA/IgM antibodies against the latent EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 were observed in RA patients compared to SLE patients and HCs. Increased concentrations and percentages of positives of IgG/IgA/IgM against the early lytic EBV antigen diffuse (EAD were also found in RA patients compared to HCs but were highest in SLE patients. Furthermore, associations between the elevated EBNA-1 IgA and EBNA-1 IgM levels and the presence of IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors (RFs and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs, IgG and between elevated IgA concentrations against EAD and the presence of RFs and ACPAs in RA patients were found. Thus, RA patients had elevated antibodies of all isotypes characteristic of latent EBV infection (whereas SLE patients had elevated antibodies characteristic of lytic EBV infection. Notably, for IgM and IgA (but not IgG, these were associated with the presence of characteristic RA autoantibodies.

  7. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  9. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... particles. However, enzymes may loose a significant part of their activity over a time period of several weeks. Possible causes of inactivation of enzymes in a granule may be related to the release of hydrogen peroxide from the bleaching chemicals in a moisture-containing atmosphere, humidity, autolysis...

  10. Enzymes in Human Milk.

    Dallas, David C; German, J Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Milk proteins are a complex and diverse source of biological activities. Beyond their function, intact milk proteins also act as carriers of encrypted functional sequences that, when released as peptides, exert biological functions, including antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity, which could contribute to the infant's competitive success. Research has now revealed that the release of these functional peptides begins within the mammary gland itself. A complex array of proteases produced in mother's milk has been shown to be active in the milk, releasing these peptides. Moreover, our recent research demonstrates that these milk proteases continue to digest milk proteins within the infant's stomach, possibly even to a larger extent than the infant's own proteases. As the neonate has relatively low digestive capacity, the activity of milk proteases in the infant may provide important assistance to digesting milk proteins. The coordinated release of these encrypted sequences is accomplished by selective proteolytic action provided by an array of native milk proteases and infant-produced enzymes. The task for scientists is now to discover the selective advantages of this protein-protease-based peptide release system. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparison of efficacies of bovine immune colostral antibody and each immunoglobulin class against verotoxin 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in mice.

    Seita, Tetsurou; Kuribayashi, Takashi; Honjo, Toshio; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    The efficacy of bovine immune colostral (colostral) antibodies against verotoxin (VT) 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 in mice was determined. Three major immunoglobulin (Ig) classes were isolated from the colostral antibody against VT2 by affinity chromatography and were used for estimation. Mice inoculated with VT2 were administered each Ig class from the colostral antibody, colostral antibody (colostral whey containing antibody) or serum antibody against VT2 at 1 hour after VT2 inoculation. All control mice (20/20) died after administration of sterilized saline instead of the colostral antibody. The survival rate was 93.3% (14/15) after administration of S-IgA or IgM antibody, or colostral antibody. Survival rates for IgG antibody and serum antibody administration were 80% (12/15) and 60% (9/15), respectively. Serum concentrations of VT2, which was absorbed from the small intestine in mice after administration of VT2 and colostral antibody, were measured by fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). Serum concentrations of VT2 after administration of colostral antibody were lower than those after administration of sterilized saline. Mice inoculated with VT2-producing E. coli 157:H7 were administered anti-flagellum or anti-somatic colostral antibodies. Survival rates for E. coli O157:H7-infected mice administered the anti-flagellum and anti-somatic colostral antibodies were 52.4% (11/21) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively. Furthermore, survival rates increased to 89.5% (17/19) with combined administration of anti-flagellum and anti-VT2 colostral antibodies. These results suggest that colostral antibodies against VT2, flagellum and somatic cells are effective against E. coli O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Antinuclear Antibody-Positive Ticlopidine-Induced Hepatitis

    Sander Jo Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Ticlopidine hydrochloride has been shown to reduce the risk of first or recurrent stroke in patients who have experienced a transient ischemic attack, reversible ischemic neurological deficit, recurrent stroke or first stroke. Severe liver dysfunction is a contraindication for its use. Increase in liver enzymes has been reported with use of this drug, but jaundice is rare. A case of severe ticlopidine-induced hepatitis that was associated with a marked increase in antinuclear antibody (ANA levels is reported. Physicians prescribing ticlopidine hydrochloride should be aware that a potentially severe acute hepatitis associated with ANA positivity can occur. The drug should be discontinued if signs of liver dysfunction occur.

  15. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). METHODS: B cell immunodominant regions on the COMP molecule were measured with a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using mammalian expressed full-length mouse COMP as well as a panel of recombinant mouse COMP fragments. 18 mAbs specific to COMP were generated......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  16. Cross-reactivity and phospholipase A2 neutralization of anti-irradiated Bothrops jararaca venom antibodies

    Spencer, P.J.; Nascimento, N. do; Paula, R.A. de; Cardi, B.A.; Rogero, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The detoxified Bothrops jararaca venom, immunized rabbits with the toxoid obtained and investigated cross-reactivity of the antibodies obtained against autologous and heterelogous venoms was presented. It was also investigated the ability of the IgGs, purified by affinity chromatography, from those sera to neutralize phospholipase. A 2 , an ubiquous enzyme in animal venoms. Results indicate that venom irradiation leads to an attenuation of toxicity of 84%. Cross-reactivity was investigated by ELISA and Western blot and all venoms were reactive to the antibodies. On what refers to phospholipase A 2 activity neutralization, the antibodies neutralized autologous venoms efficiently and, curiously, other venoms from the same genus were not neutralized, while Lachesis muta venom, a remote related specier, was neutralized by this serum. These data suggest that irradiation preserve important epitopes for induction of neutralizing antibodies and that these epitopes are not shared by all venoms assayed. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for the determination of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus

    Leibowitz, J L [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla (USA); Fung, L S; Levy, G A [Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1983-05-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay is described for the detection of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus. Viruses were purified by velocity and isopycnic gradient centrifugation and 96-well plastic plates were coated with viral antigens. To allow the detection of most serotypes of low titered antisera, a pool of antigens from several viral serotypes were employed. The second antibody, an affinity-purified goat antimouse immunoglobulin, detects IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This assay is more sensitive than either the plaque reduction assay or the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and proved to be useful for screening mouse colonies for the presence of mouse hepatitis virus, following seroconversion in experimental animals and in the production of monoclonal antibodies to both structural and nonstructural proteins.

  18. A sensitive radioimmunoassay for the determination of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus

    Leibowitz, J.L.; Fung, L.S.; Levy, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay is described for the detection of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus. Viruses were purified by velocity and isopycnic gradient centrifugation and 96-well plastic plates were coated with viral antigens. To allow the detection of most serotypes of low titered antisera, a pool of antigens from several viral serotypes were employed. The second antibody, an affinity-purified goat antimouse immunoglobulin, detects IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This assay is more sensitive than either the plaque reduction assay or the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and proved to be useful for screening mouse colonies for the presence of mouse hepatitis virus, following seroconversion in experimental animals and in the production of monoclonal antibodies to both structural and nonstructural proteins. (Auth.)

  19. Naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in Botswana.

    Good, Kyle M; Houser, Annmarie; Arntzen, Lorraine; Turnbull, Peter C B

    2008-07-01

    An outbreak of anthrax in the Jwana Game Reserve in Jwaneng, Botswana, was first observed when three cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) died of the disease in November 2004. In the aftermath of this event, banked serum samples collected from 23 wild-caught cheetahs were examined, by the inhibition enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), for antibodies to the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis. Of the 23 cheetahs, 16 regularly accessed the reserve. Antibodies to PA were detected in one cheetah collected in May 2004, indicating the disease was occurring well before it was first noticed. This appears to be the first demonstration of naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in cheetahs. The finding of one antibody-positive animal amongst at least 16 potentially exposed individuals is consistent with existing reports that it is uncommon for cheetahs to develop natural immunity to anthrax.

  20. A comparison of labelled antibody methods for the detection of virus antigens in cell monolayers

    Oram, J.D.; Crooks, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    A number of labelled antibody methods have been applied to the detection of Semliki Forest virus antigens after replication of the virus in monolayers of host cells in multi-well polystyrene plates. The importance of several reaction variables has been investigated and the sensitivity of the methods compared for different periods of virus replication. Direct assays with radio-labelled antibody (RLA) and indirect assays peroxidase-antiperoxidase complexes (PAP) were equally sensitive. Direct and indirect assays using enzyme-linked antibodies (ELA) were slightly less sensitive than the direct RLA and PAP methods but were more sensitive than the indirect RLA or fluorescent antibody (FLA) methods. Direct assays using ELA were more rapid and easier to perform than the other assay methods. (Auth.)