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Sample records for unknown primary head

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting with trigeminal anesthesia: An uncommon presentation of head & neck cancer with unknown primary.

    Shah, Ameer T; Dagher, Walid I; O'Leary, Miriam A; Wein, Richard O

    The differential diagnosis of facial anesthesia is vast. This may be secondary to trauma, neoplasm, both intracranial and extracranial, infection, and neurologic disease. When evaluating a patient with isolated facial anesthesia, the head and neck surgeon often thinks of adenoid cystic carcinoma, which has a propensity for perineural invasion and spread. When one thinks of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with or without unknown primary, the typical presentation involves dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, hoarseness, or more commonly, a neck mass. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as facial anesthesia and perineural spread, with no primary site is quite rare. Case presentations and review of the literature. Trigeminal anesthesia is an uncommon presentation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with unknown primary. We present two interesting cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the trigeminal nerve, with no primary site identified. We will also review the literature of head and neck malignancies with perineural spread and the management techniques for the two different cases presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Post-operative therapy following transoral robotic surgery for unknown primary cancers of the head and neck.

    Patel, Sapna A; Parvathaneni, Aarthi; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Houlton, Jeffrey J; Karni, Ron J; Liao, Jay J; Futran, Neal D; Méndez, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Our primary objective is to describe the post- operative management in patients with an unknown primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS). We conducted a retrospective multi-institutional case series including all patients diagnosed with an unknown primary HNSCC who underwent TORS to identify the primary site from January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2016. We excluded those with recurrent disease, ≤6months of follow up from TORS, previous history of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck, or evidence of primary tumor site based on previous biopsies. Our main outcome measure was receipt of post-operative therapy. The tumor was identified in 26/35 (74.3%) subjects. Post-TORS, 2 subjects did not receive adjuvant therapy due to favorable pathology. Volume reduction of RT mucosal site coverage was achieved in 12/26 (46.1%) subjects who had lateralizing tumors, ie. those confined to the palatine tonsil or glossotonsillar sulcus. In addition, for 8/26 (30.1%), the contralateral neck RT was also avoided. In 9 subjects, no primary was identified (pT0); four of these received RT to the involved ipsilateral neck nodal basin only without pharyngeal mucosal irradiation. Surgical management of an unknown primary with TORS can lead to deintensification of adjuvant therapy including avoidance of chemotherapy and reduction in RT doses and volume. There was no increase in short term treatment failures. Treatment after TORS can vary significantly, thus we advocate adherence to NCCN guideline therapy post-TORS to avoid treatment-associated variability. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  4. Transoral robotic surgery for the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary

    Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Rubek, Niclas; Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Scandinavian study could potentially minimize the radiation field to the pharyngeal axis in patients with identified primary tumours. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate whether bilateral lingual tonsillectomy performed with TORS is feasible, and whether it could improve the detection rates...

  5. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  6. Prognostic factors for head and neck cancer of unknown primary including the impact of human papilloma virus infection.

    Axelsson, Lars; Nyman, Jan; Haugen-Cange, Hedda; Bove, Mogens; Johansson, Leif; De Lara, Shahin; Kovács, Anikó; Hammerlid, Eva

    2017-06-10

    Head and neck cancer of unknown primary (HNCUP) is rare and prospective studies are lacking. The impact of different prognostic factors such as age and N stage is not completely known, the optimal treatment is not yet established, and the reported survival rates vary. In the last decade, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been identified as a common cause of and important prognostic factor in oropharyngeal cancer, and there is now growing interest in the importance of HPV for HNCUP. The aim of the present study on curatively treated HNCUP was to investigate the prognostic importance of different factors, including HPV status, treatment, and overall survival. A search for HNCUP was performed in the Swedish Cancer Registry, Western health district, between the years 1992-2009. The medical records were reviewed, and only patients with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma treated with curative intent were included. The tumor specimens were retrospectively analyzed for HPV with p16 immunostaining. Sixty-eight patients were included. The mean age was 59 years. The majority were males, and had N2 tumors. Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were HPV positive using p16 staining. Patients who were older than 70 years, patients with N3-stage tumors, and patients with tumors that were p16 negative had a significantly worse prognosis. The overall 5-year survival rate for patients with p16-positive tumors was 88% vs 61% for p16-negative tumors. Treatment with neck dissection and postoperative radiation or (chemo) radiation had 81 and 88% 5-year survival rates, respectively. The overall and disease-free 5-year survival rates for all patients in the study were 82 and 74%. Curatively treated HNCUP had good survival. HPV infection was common. Independent prognostic factors for survival were age over 70 years, HPV status and N3 stage. We recommend that HPV analysis should be performed routinely for HNCUP. Treatment with neck dissection and postoperative radiation or

  7. Cancer of unknown primary

    Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    210 (38.7%) had a CUP diagnosis confirmed. Within the cohort, 347 patients (64.0%) had a registration in CR matching with the NPR registration. Exposure to diagnostic procedures included biopsy (n = 439, 81.0%) and image modalities (n = 532, 98.2%). Survival was poor with 67 (12.4%) individuals alive...... after 4 years.The validity of a CUP diagnosis in NPR was low when using data from CR as reference. More than half the suspected CUP patients had a previous cancer diagnosis with CUP being the most frequent. Patients were diagnosed in compliance with guidelines indicating high external validity, but less...... than 1 quarter had their primary identified and the 1-year survival was approximately 20%. Research is needed to develop efficacious methods for primary detection....

  8. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  9. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary: Outcomes of a pre-defined institutional treatment policy in a region with a high prevalence of skin cancer.

    Huo, Michael; Panizza, Benedict; Bernard, Anne; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2018-02-01

    To determine the rate of subsequent primary site failure in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary (UKP HNSCC) in a region with a high prevalence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, according to a pre-determined institutional policy. Secondary aims included regional and distant control, and overall survival. Patients presenting between April 2005 and June 2016 to the Princess Alexandra Hospital Head and Neck Multidisciplinary Meeting with UKP HNSCC from either presumed mucosal or cutaneous sites treated with curative intent were eligible. Patients with presumed mucosal origin were treated with radiation therapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy, while patients with presumed cutaneous SCC were treated with surgery and post-operative RT with or without chemotherapy. A total of 63 patients met the inclusion criteria. Median follow up duration was 3.9 years (IQR 2.07-5.14). There were no subsequent primary site failures. The rate of nodal failure among presumed mucosal patients was 11.5%, and 8.1% among presumed cutaneous patients. The rate of distant metastatic failure was 11.1% among all patients. The estimated 5 year overall survival was 71.2% (95% CI 59.2-85.7%). Treatment according to our pre-defined institutional policy for UKP HNSCC in a region with a high prevalence of cutaneous SCC appears to be safe and effective with low rates of mucosal primary emergence and nodal failure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human papillomavirus and p53 expression in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region in relation to clinical outcome

    Sivars, Lars; Näsman, Anders; Tertipis, Nikolaos; Vlastos, Andrea; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Nordemar, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head neck region are generally treated with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy at times combined with chemotherapy, a treatment associated with considerable side effects. Some of these tumors may originate as human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with better clinical outcome than head neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in general, and could potentially do well with less treatment. Here, we therefore investigated whether HPV status and p53-expression correlated to clinical outcome in patients with CUP in the head neck region. Fifty metastases were analyzed for presence of HPV DNA, and expression of p16 INK4A and p53 and the data were correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with HPV DNA-positive (HPV DNA+ ) metastases had significantly better 5-year overall survival (OS) compared to those with HPV DNA− metastases (80.0% vs. 36.7%, respectively; P = 0.004), with a similar tendency for disease-free survival (DFS). These survival rates showed excellent concordance with those of HPV DNA+ and HPV DNA− OSCC in Sweden during the same time period, strengthening the hypothesis that HPV DNA+ head and neck CUP may originate from HPV DNA+ OSCC. In addition, having absent/intermediary-low as compared to high expression of p53 correlated to a better prognosis with a 69% as compared to 14% 5-year OS, respectively (P < 0.001), and for DFS the tendency was analogous. In conclusion, both HPV status and p53 expression are valuable prognostic factors in patients with CUP in the head and neck region and should be further explored for clinical use

  11. Cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours. Results from a national survey by the Danish Society for Head and Neck Oncology

    Grau, Cai; Johansen, L V; Jakobsen, J

    2000-01-01

    The management of patients with cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours is a major challenge in oncology. This study presents data collected from all five oncology centres in Denmark.......The management of patients with cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours is a major challenge in oncology. This study presents data collected from all five oncology centres in Denmark....

  12. Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Presenting as Jugular Venous Thrombosis

    Prince Cheriyan Modayil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis is unusual and is associated with central venous catheterisation, intravenous drug abuse and head and neck sepsis. It is rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in a forty year old female which presented with jugular venous thrombosis. The discussion includes investigation and treatment options for this condition.

  13. Metastasis to neck from unknown primary tumor

    Jose, B.; Bosch, A.; Caldwell, W.L.; Frias, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 54 consecutive patients who were irradiated for metastatic disease in the neck from an unknown primary tumor were reviewed. The overall survival results are comparable to those of other reported series. Patients with high or posterior cervical lymph node involvement were irradiated with fields including the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Patients with high neck nodes had a better survival rate than those with low neck nodes. The size of the neck tumors and the local control after treatment also have prognostic significance. (Auth.)

  14. Carcinomatous Meningitis from Unknown Primary Carcinoma

    L. Favier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinomatous meningitis (CM occurs in 3 to 8% of cancer patients. Patients present with a focal symptom, and multifocal signs are often found following neurological examination. The gold standard for diagnosis remains the demonstration of carcinomatous cells in the cerebrospinal fluid on cytopathological examination. Despite the poor prognosis, palliative treatment could improve quality of life and, in some cases, overall survival. We report on a patient who presented with vertigo, tinnitus and left-sided hearing loss followed by progressive diffuse facial nerve paralysis. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of CM. However, no primary tumor was discovered, even after multiple invasive investigations. This is the first reported case in the English-language medical literature of CM resulting from a carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

  15. Treatment of Regional Metastatic Melanoma of Unknown Primary Origin

    Elke J. A. H. van Beek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the recurrence and survival rates of metastatic melanoma of unknown primary origin (MUP, in order to further refine current recommendations for the surgical treatment; (2 Methods: Medical data of all MUP patients registered between 2000 and 2011, were analyzed. Seventy-eight patients were categorized in either lymph node (axilla, groin, head-and neck or subcutaneous MUP. Axillary node MUPs were generally treated with dissections of levels I-III, inguinal node MUPs with combined superficial and deep groin dissections, and head-and-neck node MUPs with neck dissections to various extents, based on lymph drainage patterns. Subcutaneous lesions were excised with 1–2 cm margins. The primary outcome was treatment outcomes in terms of (locoregional recurrence and survival rates; (3 Results: Lymph node MUP recurred regionally in 11% of patients, with an overall recurrence rate of 45%. In contrast, subcutaneous MUP recurred locally in 65% of patients with an overall recurrence rate of 78%. This latter group had a significantly shorter disease-free interval than patients with lymph node MUP (p = 0.000. In the entire study population, 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 56% and 47% respectively, with no differences observed between the various subgroups; (4 Conclusion: The relatively low regional recurrence rate after regional lymph node dissection (11% supports its current status as standard surgical treatment for lymph node MUP. Subcutaneous MUP, on the contrary, appears to recur both locally (65% and overall (78% at a significantly higher rate, suggesting a different biological behavior. However, wide local excision remains the best available option for this specific group.

  16. Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), treatment can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis and treatment of CUP in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Diagnosis of the cancer of unknown primary origin

    Jurisova, S.; Poersoek, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP) is one of the ten most frequent cancers worldwide. It constitutes of 3-5% of all human malignancies. At time of diagnosis patients with CUP present with disseminated metastases without established primary origin. CUP manifests as heterogenous group of mainly epithelial cancers recognised by distinct clinico pathological entities. The diagnostic work-up includes extensive histopathology investigations and modern imaging technology. Nevertheless, the primary tumour remains undetected most of the time. (author)

  18. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Improves Target Coverage and Parotid Gland Sparing When Delivering Total Mucosal Irradiation in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck of Unknown Primary Site

    Bhide, Shreerang; Clark, Catherine; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with occult primary site represents a controversial clinical problem. Conventional total mucosal irradiation (TMI) maximizes local control, but at the expense of xerostomia. IMRT has been shown to spare salivary tissue in head and cancer patients. This study has been performed to investigate the potential of IMRT to perform nodal and TMI and also allow parotid gland sparing in this patient group. Conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and IMRT plans were produced for six patients to treat the ipsilateral (involved) post-operative neck (PTV1) and the un-operated contralateral neck and mucosal axis (PTV2). Plans were produced with and without the inclusion of nasopharynx in the PTV2. The potential to improve target coverage and spare the parotid glands was investigated for the IMRT plans. There was no significant difference in the mean doses to the PTV1 using CRT and IMRT (59.7 and 60.0 respectively, p = 0.5). The maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were lower for the IMRT technique as compared to CRT (P = 0.008 and P < 0.0001), respectively, and the minimum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher for IMRT as compared to CRT (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001), respectively, illustrating better dose homogeneity with IMRT. The mean dose to the parotid gland contralateral to PTV1 was significantly lower for IMRT (23.21 ± 0.7) as compared to CRT (50.5 ± 5.8) (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in parotid dose between plans with and without the inclusion of the nasopharynx. IMRT offers improved dose homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2 and allows for parotid sparing

  19. Metastatic meningioma presenting as cancer of unknown primary

    Vinay Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of anaplastic meningioma presenting in an extracranial osseous location, initially diagnosed as cancer of unknown primary. Although anaplastic meningioma comprise 3% of all meningiomas, this subtype is more likely to be associated with metastases. The increased degree of dedifferentiation in anaplastic meningioma makes diagnosis difficult, especially if characteristic imaging findings of meningioma are not identified. Adequate tissue for diagnostic purposes and appropriate imaging studies may help in establishing a definitive diagnosis.

  20. Cancer of unknown primary origin: a case report

    Elisa De Carlo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of unknown primary origin (CUP accounts for 2-10% of all malignancies. The apparent absence of the primary tumour, the development of early, uncommon systemic metastases and the resistance to therapy and poor prognosis are hallmarks of this heterogeneous clinical entity and are a challenge for physicians. The diagnostic workup of patients with CUP includes a large amount of histopathological examination, as well as the use of imaging techniques that often fail to identify the primary tumour. Therefore, the optimal workup and treatment for these patients remains to be determined. Molecular diagnostic tools, such as DNA microarray analysis, could help in the search for "lost" CUP origin and guide the further treatment approach. We report the case of a 66-year-old man, with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis of carcinoma and neurological syndrome with diplopia and balance disorders, in which many exams have been performed without finding the primary tumour.

  1. Metastatic cancer of unknown primary in 21 dogs.

    Rossi, F; Aresu, L; Vignoli, M; Buracco, P; Bettini, G; Ferro, S; Gattino, F; Ghiani, F; Costantino, R; Ressel, L; Bellei, E; Marconato, L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe clinical features, treatment and outcome of 21 dogs with metastatic cancer of unknown primary (MCUP), a biopsy-proven malignancy being diagnosed at a metastatic stage, in which the anatomical origin of the primary tumour cannot be detected. All dogs underwent total-body computed tomography. Signalment, type and duration of clinical signs, metastasis site, pathology results, treatment and outcome were recorded. Carcinoma was the most common diagnosis (57.1%), followed by sarcoma, melanoma and mast cell tumour. The median number of disease sites per dog was 2, with bones, lymph nodes, lungs and spleen being the most frequent metastatic locations. The median survival for all dogs was 30 days. Overall, a primary site was not identified in 20 (95.2%) dogs. MCUP encompasses a variety of different pathologic entities and harbours a poor prognosis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Extensive screening for primary tumor is redundant in melanoma of unknown primary

    Tos, Tina; Klyver, Helle; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T

    2011-01-01

    For decades, patients in our institution with metastastic melanoma of unknown primary have been subjected to extensive examinations in search of the primary tumor. This retrospective study questions the results, and thus the feasibility of these examinations. Of 103 patients diagnosed with unknow......, for patients referred with metastastic melanoma of unknown primary, we recommend that a detailed history is obtained, and a standard physical examination performed, in addition to a histopathological review and CT/PET for staging....

  3. Systemic treatment of cancer of unknown primary origin

    Reckova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP) comprises a heterogenous group of cancers with distinct biology and prognosis. There is, however, a specific group of patients with curable diseases, or incurable diseases with good prognosis. The main aim of treatment in the group of patients with CUP is timely initiation of therapy in the cases of curable disease. There is no known standard of care in the cases of CUP with poor prognosis, but most frequently, platinum-based regimens are used. In the cases of specific immunohistochemistry (IHC) or molecular gene expression profile, there are used the treatment regimens similar to those used in the patients with known primary tumor and similar IHC or molecular profile. Currently, most of data in patients with CUP are from phase II clinical trials. Thus proficiently designed phase III randomized clinical trials with translation research is priority, with aim to improve our knowledge and personalize treatment of such heterogenous group of patients as is a group of patients with CUP. (author)

  4. Investigation of cervical lymph node metastasis from primary unknown carcinoma

    Sagawa, Kosuke; Terada, Tomonori; Saeki, Nobuo; Uwa, Nobuhiro; Mohri, Takeshi; Sakagami, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated 41 patients with metastatic cervical tumors from unknown primary sites at the Hyogo College of Medicine between 1997 and 2007. The N stage classification of cervical lymph nodes was: N1 in 3 cases, N2a in 10 cases, N2b in 10 cases, N2c in 4 cases, and N3 in 14 cases. The histopathological diagnoses of cervical lymph node were: squamous cell carcinoma in 33 cases, adenocarcinoma in 5 cases, undifferentiated carcinoma in 2 cases, and papillary carcinoma in 1 cases. Primary tumor sites were: tonsil in 5 cases, esophaguses in 2 cases, hypopharynxies in 2 cases, and thyroid, oral floor, submandibular gland, lung, gastric and colon in 1 case each. The useful tests were gastric endoscope, positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and blind biopsy of tonsil. We treated 24 of the 41 patients. Therapies were: neck dissection with postoperative radiation therapy in 11 cases, neck dissection alone in 1 case, only radiation or chemoradiation therapy alone in 8 cases, and chemotherapy alone in 4 cases. The 5-year survival rate was 40.1% in all cases and 81.5% in cases who underwent neck dissection. (author)

  5. The Role of the Primary School Head.

    Davies, Lester

    1987-01-01

    This study uses Henry Mintzberg's structural observation method to examine British primary school head teachers' work patterns and determine the nature of their role. Head teachers' days were characterized by brevity, variety, and fragmentation similar to those discussed in findings of other empirical managerial studies. Leadership roles stressed…

  6. CUP Syndrome-Metastatic Malignancy with Unknown Primary Tumor.

    Zaun, Gregor; Schuler, Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Tannapfel, Andrea

    2018-03-09

    2-4% of newly diagnosed cases of malignant disease involve cancer of unknown primary (CUP). This mixed entity is one of the 6 most common types of malignant disease in Germany. Highly refined treatment strategies can now be offered to patients with CUP. This review is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search in PubMed with an emphasis on articles from the past decade. The current guidelines and recommendations of specialty societies were also considered in the evaluation. CUP most commonly manifests itself as metastases to the lymph nodes, lungs, liver, or bones. With the aid of imaging studies, including functional hybrid imaging and further medical examination, a primary tumor can be discovered in up to 40% of patients initially diagnosed with CUP. Immunohistochemistry guided by histomorphology often enables precise characterization of the lesion and can be supplemented, in selected cases, by molecular-genetic diagnostic evaluation. The most commonly detected types of primary tumor are cancers of the lung, pancreas, liver, and biliary system. For patients with local metastases, surgical resection or radiotherapy with curative intent is usually indicated, sometimes in the framework of a multimodal treatment concept. The median 2-year survival of patients with disseminated CUP is only 20%. For such patients, specific types of systemic therapy are recommended on the basis of the diagnostic characterization of the disease. Immune-modulatory antibodies can be effective, particularly in the treatment of CUP that has been characterized with biomarkers, but should still be considered experimental at present. A combination of conventional and innovative diagnostic methods enables the provision of highly refined therapeutic strategies to patients with CUP who are undergoing treatment in interdisciplinary cancer centers.

  7. Radiotherapeutic concepts in cancer of unknown primary site

    Krug, D.; Debus, J.; Sterzing, F.

    2014-01-01

    The term cancer of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a group of entities which differ to a great extent regarding etiology, prognosis and therapeutic management. The aim of the study was an elaboration of the role of radiotherapy in CUP syndrome. Systematic literature search and specification of the available treatment options. Radiotherapy is an integral part of interdisciplinary management approaches for patients with CUP in both curative and palliative situations. Radio-oncological techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy increase the therapeutic window. Modern diagnostic modalities from radiology and nuclear medicine are the cornerstone of radiotherapeutic interventions, especially in terms of target volume definition and pretherapeutic staging. In the interdisciplinary setting radiation oncology offers the possibility of curative and often organ preserving approaches in patients with axillary and cervical CUP. In addition, improvement and preservation of quality of life can be achieved in patients with metastatic disease. Radiation oncology is a crucial component of the interdisciplinary management of patients with CUP. Therapeutic decisions in patients with CUP should be made in an interdisciplinary setting. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site

    Colletier, Philip J.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Geara, Fady B.; Kian Ang, K.

    1996-01-01

    . The 5- and 10-year actuarial overall survival was 55% and 38%. For the S+XRT group, the 5- and 10- year actuarial survival was 59% and 40%, compared to 45% and 33%, respectively for the XRT group (p = .03). Failure in the neck occurred in 13 of 57 (23%) patients in the XRT group compared to 11 of 139 (8%) S+XRT patients (p = .004). Actuarial freedom from relapse (FFR) at 5 and 10 years was 65% and 59% for the entire population. In the S+XRT patients, FFR at 5 and 10 years was 72% and 67%, compared with 49% and 40%, respectively for the XRT group (p = .001). Nineteen patients developed a subsequent carcinoma in a head and neck mucosal site. Seven primary tumors occurred at intervals greater than five years after completion of radiation. Primary mucosal tumors developed in 15 of 173 patients (9%) who had mucosal sites treated and 4 of 23 patients (17%) treated to the neck only (p = .18). Seventeen patients had salvage treatment and 10 remained free of disease in the head and neck. CONCLUSIONS: Selected patients with carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary treated with radiotherapy had excellent regional control. Patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiation had improved survival, FFR, and regional control rates compared to patients treated with radiation +/- salvage neck dissections; however, this latter group had significantly greater unfavorable neck disease. Our policy of delivering radiation to the putative mucosal sites along the pharyngeal axis resulted in a very low incidence (9%) of subsequent manifestation of primary tumors in the head and neck, and based on the time to develop these cancers, it is suspected that many were second primaries unrelated to the treated disease

  9. Metastasis in the subcarinal lymph node with unknown primary tumor

    Eckardt, J.; Olsen, K. E.; Petersen, H.

    2011-01-01

    -differentiated squamous cell carcinoma but no primary tumor was visible on PET-computed tomography. Because of his previous lymphoma the patient was scheduled for mediastinoscopy where the diagnosis was confirmed. Subsequent gastroscopy was normal and a right-sided thoracotomy showed no evidence of cancer elsewhere, only...... an inoperable metastasis in a subcarinal lymph node which infiltrated the trachea, esophagus and aorta. Such isolated squamous cell carcinoma in a subcarinal lymph node without a primary tumor despite invasive work-up has not been reported before....

  10. The role of PET in initial work-up and evaluation after therapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary

    Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kang, Yoon Koo

    1998-12-01

    The carcinoma of unknown primary occupied 5 - 10 % of all malignancies. It is heterogenous in origin and has poor prognosis. The indentification of primary site and definition of involved area are more helpful in the management. The efficacy of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) was evaluated in several tumors such as breast, pancreas and head and neck cancers. In carcinoma of unknown primary, it was reported that the concentration of FDG was increased in tumor tissues, and that PET with F18-FDG may be much helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. The authors evaluated the usefulness of PET with F18-FDG in initial work-up and in evaluation after radical therapy for the patients with carcinoma of unknown primary. The visual analysis of FDG-PET would be helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. In detecting recurrent of residual lesions, FDG-PET seemed to be less helpful than conventional diagnostic work-up. But more studies with larger number of cases and longer follow-up were required. The results of this study can be bases for the direction of future studies for the usefulness of PET in carcinoma of unknown primary.

  11. The role of PET in initial work-up and evaluation after therapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary

    Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kang, Yoon Koo

    1998-12-01

    The carcinoma of unknown primary occupied 5 - 10 % of all malignancies. It is heterogenous in origin and has poor prognosis. The indentification of primary site and definition of involved area are more helpful in the management. The efficacy of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) was evaluated in several tumors such as breast, pancreas and head and neck cancers. In carcinoma of unknown primary, it was reported that the concentration of FDG was increased in tumor tissues, and that PET with F18-FDG may be much helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. The authors evaluated the usefulness of PET with F18-FDG in initial work-up and in evaluation after radical therapy for the patients with carcinoma of unknown primary. The visual analysis of FDG-PET would be helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. In detecting recurrent of residual lesions, FDG-PET seemed to be less helpful than conventional diagnostic work-up. But more studies with larger number of cases and longer follow-up were required. The results of this study can be bases for the direction of future studies for the usefulness of PET in carcinoma of unknown primary

  12. 18F-FDG whole body positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT)

    Lassen, U; Daugaard, G; Eigtved, A

    1999-01-01

    adenocarcinomas and 1 poorly differentiated carcinoma). The remaining patients had metastases located in bone (3), bone marrow (1), brain (1), pericardium (1), skin (1), pleura (1) and chest wall (1). All metastatic lesions were visible with PET. In 13 patients PET suggested the site for the primary tumour...... by the PET result. The rest received either radical radiotherapy to the head and neck region (7), palliative radiotherapy to the metastatic lesion (8), chemotherapy based on signet ring cell carcinoma in bone marrow (1) or no therapy (1). These results indicates that PET is useful in UPT preceding expensive......The management of patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT) often includes a large number of radiographical studies and invasive procedures, but the occult primary tumour is detected in less than 25%. In this prospective study we explored whether non-invasive whole body PET scans using FDG (18-F...

  13. Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) treatment depends on the best determination of the primary site, if possible. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic treatment. Get detailed information about diagnosis and treatment of CUP in this summary for clinicians.

  14. Neuroendocrine Merkel cell nodal carcinoma of unknown primary site: management and outcomes of a rare entity.

    Kotteas, E A; Pavlidis, N

    2015-04-01

    Merkel cell nodal carcinoma of unknown primary (MCCUP) is a rare neuroendocrine tumour with distinct clinical and biological behaviour. We conducted a review of retrospective data extracted from 90 patients focusing on the management and outcome of this disease. We also compared life expectancy of these patients with the outcome of patients with known Merkel primaries and with neuroendocrine cancers of unidentifiable primary. There is a limited body of data for this type of malignancy, however, patients with Merkel cell nodal carcinoma of unknown primary site, seem to have better survival when treated aggressively than patients with cutaneous Merkel tumours of the same stage and equal survival with patients with low-grade neuroendocrine tumour of unknown origin. The lack of prospective trials, and the inadequate data, hamper the management of these tumours. Establishment of treatment guidelines is urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic and prognostic yield of tumor markers in cancer of unknown primary site

    Pervez, T.; Ibraheim, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    A case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary is reported that had widely disseminated disease from the very outset. Every effort was made to find out the primary by integrating all results and specially tumor markers. It was assumed that lung was the most possible site for primary. Tumor markers did not show their diagnostic value even in combined panel, they only showed their prognostic value. (author)

  16. Squamous cell carcinomas metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown head and neck mucosal site treated with radiation therapy with palliative intent

    Erkal, Haldun S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.; Stringer, Scott P.

    2001-01-01

    Minimal information has been published about the results of palliative irradiation for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown head and neck primary site. Forty patients with this diagnosis were treated at the University of Florida with radiation therapy with palliative intent. The nodal response rate was 65% and the symptomatic response rate was 57% at 1 year. The absolute survival rate was 25% at 1 year, as was the cause-specific survival rate. Radiotherapy successfully palliates more than half of those treated. Approximately one fourth are alive 1 year after irradiation

  17. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a carcinoma with unknown primary: An autopsy study

    Gupta Kirti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease frequently complicates malignancy and its treatment. Although many solid and hematologic cancers may involve the renal parenchyma, clinical sequelae are usually not prominent. Published reports cite membranous nephropathy as the most common malignancy-associated glomerulopathy, occurring with many carcinomas and occasionally with leukemia and lymphoma followed by minimal change disease. Rarely membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN has been reported in patients with malignancy. The mechanism by which malignancy induces disease remains unproved, but may involve deposition of tumor antigen in the subepithelial space with in situ immune complex formation and subsequent complement activation. Treatment of the underlying malignancy may lead to resolution of nephrotic syndrome, lending indirect support to this theory. We report a rare autopsy case of a patient with metastatic carcinoma (with unknown primary associated with MPGN. The association between MPGN and metastatic carcinoma with unknown primary is uncommon and has not been previously reported in the literature.

  18. Neuroendocrine Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Arising in Long Standing History of Multiple Sclerosis

    Stergios Boussios

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease that targets myelinated axons in the central nervous system (CNS. Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is a well-recognised clinical disorder, accounting for 3–5% of all malignant epithelial tumors. CUP is clinically characterised as an aggressive disease with early dissemination. Studies of cancer risk in MS patients have shown inconsistent findings. An increased risk of malignancy in patients with MS has been suggested, but recently serious questions have been raised regarding this association. Use of disease-modifying therapies might contribute to an increased cancer risk in selected MS patients. The concurrence of MS and CUP is exceptionally rare. Here we describe the case of a neuroendocrine carcinoma of unknown primary diagnosed in a male patient with a nine-year history of MS. The discussion includes data from all available population-based register studies with estimates of certain malignancies in patients with MS.

  19. Pretreatment costs of care and time to initial treatment for patients with cancer of unknown primary.

    Walker, Mark S; Weinstein, Laura; Luo, Roger; Marino, Ingrid

    2018-06-01

    Time to treatment and pretreatment costs may be affected by unknown primary tumor site. This retrospective study used electronic medical record data from patients in ten US community oncology practices. Eligible patients were ≥18 years, diagnosed with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) or known metastatic solid tumor, and presented between 1 January 2012 and 30 June 2014. Patients with CUP (n = 294) had a longer interval than non-CUP patients (n = 92) from presentation to treatment initiation (1.18 vs 0.49 months, p < 0.0001), and had higher pretreatment costs (US$27,882 vs US$20,449, p = 0.0075). When analyzed as monthly cost, the difference between groups in log-cost per month was nonsignificant. Higher pretreatment costs in CUP patients appeared attributable to significantly longer time to initiation of therapy.

  20. [Standard of care of carcinomas on cancer of unknown primary site in 2016].

    Benderra, Marc-Antoine; Ilié, Marius; Hofman, Paul; Massard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Cancer of unknown primary (cup) represent 2-10%, and have disseminated cancers for which we cannot find the primary site despite the clinical, pathological and radiological exams at our disposal. Diagnosis is based on a thorough clinical and histopathologic examination as well as new imaging techniques. Several clinicopathologic entities requiring specific treatment can be identified. Genome sequencing and liquid biopsy (circulating tumor cells and tumor free DNA) could allow further advances in the diagnosis. Therapeutically, in addition to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, precision medicine provides new therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Angiogenesis in cancer of unknown primary: clinicopathological study of CD34, VEGF and TSP-1

    Karavasilis, Vasilis; Malamou-Mitsi, Vasiliki; Briasoulis, Evangelos; Tsanou, Elena; Kitsou, Evangelia; Kalofonos, Haralambos; Fountzilas, George; Fotsis, Theodore; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary remains a mallignancy of elusive biology and grim prognosis that lacks effective therapeutic options. We investigated angiogenesis in cancer of unknown primary to expand our knowledge on the biology of these tumors and identify potential therapeutic targets. Paraffin embedded archival material from 81 patients diagnosed with CUP was used. Tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (77%), undifferentiated carcinoma (18%) and squamous cell carcinoma (5%). The tissue expression of CD34, VEGF and TSP-1 was assessed immunohistochemically by use of specific monoclonal antibodies and was analyzed against clinicopathological data. VEGF expression was detected in all cases and was strong in 83%. Stromal expression of TSP-1 was seen in 80% of cases and was strong in 20%. The expression of both proteins was not associated with any clinical or pathological parameters. Tumor MVD was higher in tumors classified as unfavorable compared to more favorable and was positively associated with VEGF and negatively with TSP-1. Angiogenesis is very active and expression of VEGF is almost universal in cancers of unknown primary. These findings support the clinical investigation of VEGF targeted therapy in this clinical setting

  2. The Experiences of Female Head Teachers in Rural Primary ...

    The broad research aim was to investigate the lived experiences of women heading public rural primary schools in Kenya, and to explore possible strategies that may be applied to improve women's participation in educational leadership in rural primary schools in Kenya. This article is limited to the findings regarding the ...

  3. Primary tendinitis of the long head of the biceps.

    Post, M; Benca, P

    1989-09-01

    Seventeen patients with chronic painful shoulders who showed evidence of isolated bicipital tendinitis involving only the extracapsular, intertubercular portion of the long head of the biceps were chosen for surgical treatment when conservative treatment failed. The patients were thought to have primary bicipital tendinitis. The latter condition is secondary to other shoulder pathologies. Thirteen patients had tenodeses and four patients had transfer of the long head of the biceps to the origin of the conjoined tendon. Overall, excellent and good results were noted in 94% of both groups of patients when the long head of the biceps was tenodesed or transferred. Whether or not the long head of the biceps is a significant depressor of the humeral head requires further investigation.

  4. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin as second-line treatment in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site

    Møller, Anne Kirstine Hundahl; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Abildgaard, Julie Rafn

    2010-01-01

    tumours may be overrepresented. These patients could be candidates for GI tract-directed therapy. We here report the results obtained with oxaliplatin and capecitabine as second-line therapy in 25 recurrent/refractory CUP patients following first-line treatment with paclitaxel, cisplatin and gemcitabine.......Treatment of patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) remains a challenge, and no effective second-line treatment has been identified. In CUP patients who are non-responsive or relapse early after first-line platinum/taxane-based regimens, it is likely that gastrointestinal (GI) tract...

  5. The added value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography in patients with neck lymph node metastases from an unknown primary malignancy.

    Prowse, S J B; Shaw, R; Ganeshan, D; Prowse, P M; Hanlon, R; Lewis-Jones, H; Wieshmann, H

    2013-08-01

    The search for a primary malignancy in patients with a metastatic cervical lymph node is challenging yet ultimately of utmost clinical importance. This study evaluated the efficacy of positron emission tomography computed tomography in detecting the occult primary, within the context of a tertiary referral centre head and neck cancer multidisciplinary team tumour board meeting. Thirty-two patients (23 men and 9 women; mean and median age, 61 years) with a metastatic cervical lymph node of unknown primary origin, after clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging, underwent positron emission tomography computed tomography. The primary tumour detection rate was 50 per cent (16/32). Positron emission tomography computed tomography had a sensitivity of 94 per cent (16/17) and a specificity of 67 per cent (10/15). Combining these results with those of 10 earlier studies of similar patients gave an overall detection rate of 37 per cent. Positron emission tomography computed tomography has become an important imaging modality. To date, it has the highest primary tumour detection rate, for head and neck cancer patients presenting with cervical lymph node metastases from an unknown primary.

  6. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer

    Riihimäki Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. Methods 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Results Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66–0.72]. The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54–1.90], liver (1.58 [1.36–1.85], and stomach (1.16 [1.02–1.31]. For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06–1.46]. The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Conclusions Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the

  7. An Unusual Presentation of Isolated Leptomeningeal Disease in Carcinoma of Unknown Primary With Pancreatic Features

    Madhurima Anne MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal disease (LMD can occur in a small percentage of patients with active metastatic cancer. However, we report a case of LMD occurring during disease remission in a patient with carcinoma of unknown primary with panreaticobiliary features. A 45-year-old woman was found with mediastinal and abdominal lymphadenopathy with lymph node biopsy consistent with adenocarcinoma, expressing immunomarkers CK7, CK20, and Ca19-9 along with markedly elevated serum Ca19-9 level. The patient was started on a pancreatic cancer directed chemotherapy regimen of Folfirinox (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan and achieved complete response. She was then noted to have slowly rising Ca19-9 level that did not correlate with her lack of evidence of systemic disease progression. Eventually, she presented with neurologic symptoms and was found on imaging to have isolated LMD.

  8. Radiotherapeutic concepts in cancer of unknown primary site; Strahlentherapeutische Konzepte beim CUP-Syndrom

    Krug, D.; Debus, J.; Sterzing, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The term cancer of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a group of entities which differ to a great extent regarding etiology, prognosis and therapeutic management. The aim of the study was an elaboration of the role of radiotherapy in CUP syndrome. Systematic literature search and specification of the available treatment options. Radiotherapy is an integral part of interdisciplinary management approaches for patients with CUP in both curative and palliative situations. Radio-oncological techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy increase the therapeutic window. Modern diagnostic modalities from radiology and nuclear medicine are the cornerstone of radiotherapeutic interventions, especially in terms of target volume definition and pretherapeutic staging. In the interdisciplinary setting radiation oncology offers the possibility of curative and often organ preserving approaches in patients with axillary and cervical CUP. In addition, improvement and preservation of quality of life can be achieved in patients with metastatic disease. Radiation oncology is a crucial component of the interdisciplinary management of patients with CUP. Therapeutic decisions in patients with CUP should be made in an interdisciplinary setting. (orig.) [German] Das Cancer-of-unknown-primary(CUP)-Syndrom fasst eine Gruppe von Erkrankungen zusammen, die durch eine ausgepraegte Heterogenitaet hinsichtlich Aetiologie, Therapie und Prognose gepraegt sind. Darstellung der Rolle der Strahlentherapie beim CUP-Syndrom. Systematische Literaturrecherche und Erlaeuterung der Behandlungsoptionen. Die Strahlentherapie ist beim CUP-Syndrom sowohl in adjuvanten und definitiven Therapiekonzepten wie auch in palliativer Intention etabliert. Technisch innovative Verfahren wie die intensitaetsmodulierte Radiotherapie und die stereotaktische Bestrahlung im Koerperstammbereich ermoeglichen eine Vergroesserung der therapeutischen Breite. Eine leistungsfaehige und moderne

  9. Neck lymph node metastases from an unknown primary tumor. Retrospective study and review of literature

    Christiansen, H.; Hermann, R.M.; Nitsche, M.; Schmidberger, H.; Pradier, O.; Martin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: up to 10% of all neck lymph node metastases present without a known primary site. The optimal treatment strategy for these patients is still undefined. The purpose of this retrospective analysis is to assess the outcome in patients with neck metastases from an unknown primary tumor (CUP). Furthermore, prognostic factors and treatment modalities are discussed. Patients and methods: from 1984 to 2003, 28 patients with squamous cell neck metastases from a CUP were treated at the authors' institution. In 17 patients, neck dissection (twelve radical, five modified radical) was performed. In that case, adjuvant radiotherapy was carried out with a mean of 56.7 Gy. In eleven patients, only biopsies were done. These patients received definitive radiotherapy with a mean of 66.8 Gy. In summary, 25 patients received extended radiotherapy including both sides of the neck and potential mucosal primary sites. Additional chemotherapy was administered to five patients. Results: the duration of follow-up was 4.1-189.5 months (median 45.1 months). After this period of time, ten patients (36%) remained alive. 5-year overall survival was 40.1%, neck control rate 72.7%. No subsequent primary could be detected. Extracapsular extension and surgery had significant influence on prognosis. Grade 3 toxicity (mucositis or skin reactions) was seen in three patients; no hematologic toxicity > grade 2 was observed. 19 patients suffered from grade 2 xerostomia. Conclusion: with radical surgery followed by radiotherapy good survival rates in patients with neck metastases from a CUP can be obtained. Whether limited radiotherapy might be equal to extended irradiation and can reduce side effects, must be shown in ongoing clinical trials. (orig.)

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer

    Madani, Indira; Vakaet, Luc; Bonte, Katrien; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer (UPC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2006, 23 patients with UPC of squamous cell carcinoma were treated with IMRT. Extended putative mucosal and bilateral nodal sites were irradiated to a median dose of 66 Gy. In 19 patients, IMRT was performed after lymph node dissection, and in 4 patients primary radiotherapy was given. The conventional radiotherapy group (historical control group) comprised 18 patients treated to a median dose of 66 Gy between August 1994 and October 2003. Results: Twenty patients completed treatment. As compared with conventional radiotherapy, the incidence of Grade 3 acute dysphagia was significantly lower in the IMRT group (4.5% vs. 50%, p = 0.003). By 6 months, Grade 3 xerostomia was detected in 11.8% patients in the IMRT group vs. 53.4% in the historical control group (p = 0.03). No Grade 3 dysphagia or skin fibrosis was observed after IMRT but these were noted after conventional radiotherapy (26.7%, p = 0.01) and 26.7%, p = 0.03) respectively). With median follow-up of living patients of 17 months, there was no emergence of primary cancer. One patient had persistent nodal disease and another had nodal relapse at 5 months. Distant metastases were detected in 4 patients. The 2-year overall survival and distant disease-free probability after IMRT did not differ significantly from those for conventional radiotherapy (74.8% vs. 61.1% and 76.3% vs. 68.4%, respectively). Conclusions: Use of IMRT for UPC resulted in lower toxicity than conventional radiotherapy, and was similar in efficacy

  11. Nuclear imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with unknown primary: why, when and how?

    Santhanam, Prasanna; Chandramahanti, Sangeeta [Marshall University, Section of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Joan C Edwards School of Medicine, Huntington, WV (United States); Kroiss, Alexander [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Yu, Run [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology and Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ruszniewski, Philippe [Beaujon Hospital and Paris-Diderot University, Department of Gastroenterology-Pancreatology, Paris (France); Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, Marseille (France); Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Inserm UMR1068 Marseille Cancerology Research Center, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France)

    2015-03-13

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with unknown primary (CUP-NET) are associated with a poor prognosis (10-year survival 22 %), grade 1 and 2 NETs having a more favorable outcome than grade 3 (also called carcinoma). There is evidence that an effort should be made to localize the primary tumor even in the presence of metastasis because resection of the primary tumor(s) may improve disease-free and overall survival, and because the choice of chemotherapeutic agent depends on the location of the primary tumor. Localization of the tumors remains challenging and often relies on a combination of radiological, endoscopic and functional imaging. The functional imaging protocol for evaluation of these patients has historically relied on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS). However, the sensitivity and specificity of SRS may be unsatisfactory, especially for NETs of midgut origin. Newer PET radiotracers such as {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSTa) and {sup 18}F-DOPA have shown promise. In direct comparisons between {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/CT and {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-octreotide/{sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT(/CT), {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSTa performed better than other techniques, giving a compelling reason for switching from SPECT/CT to PET/CT imaging. {sup 18}F-DOPA performs better than SRS and CT in well-differentiated NETs of the small intestine. For detecting pancreatic NETs, the high background uptake of {sup 18}F-DOPA by the normal exocrine pancreas can be somewhat overcome by pretreatment with carbidopa. We have suggested a protocol in which SRS is replaced by one of the two agents (preferably with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSTa, alternatively {sup 18}F-DOPA) as first-line nuclear tracer for detection of CUP-NET in patients with well-differentiated NETs and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may be an additional diagnostic test for poorly differentiated tumors and for prognostication. In the near future, it is expected that patients with CUP-NET will benefit from newly

  12. Nuclear imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with unknown primary: why, when and how?

    Santhanam, Prasanna; Chandramahanti, Sangeeta; Kroiss, Alexander; Yu, Run; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Kumar, Rakesh; Taieb, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with unknown primary (CUP-NET) are associated with a poor prognosis (10-year survival 22 %), grade 1 and 2 NETs having a more favorable outcome than grade 3 (also called carcinoma). There is evidence that an effort should be made to localize the primary tumor even in the presence of metastasis because resection of the primary tumor(s) may improve disease-free and overall survival, and because the choice of chemotherapeutic agent depends on the location of the primary tumor. Localization of the tumors remains challenging and often relies on a combination of radiological, endoscopic and functional imaging. The functional imaging protocol for evaluation of these patients has historically relied on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS). However, the sensitivity and specificity of SRS may be unsatisfactory, especially for NETs of midgut origin. Newer PET radiotracers such as 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs ( 68 Ga-DOTA-SSTa) and 18 F-DOPA have shown promise. In direct comparisons between 68 Ga-DOTA-SSTa PET/CT and 99m Tc-HYNIC-octreotide/ 111 In-pentetreotide SPECT(/CT), 68 Ga-DOTA-SSTa performed better than other techniques, giving a compelling reason for switching from SPECT/CT to PET/CT imaging. 18 F-DOPA performs better than SRS and CT in well-differentiated NETs of the small intestine. For detecting pancreatic NETs, the high background uptake of 18 F-DOPA by the normal exocrine pancreas can be somewhat overcome by pretreatment with carbidopa. We have suggested a protocol in which SRS is replaced by one of the two agents (preferably with 68 Ga-DOTA-SSTa, alternatively 18 F-DOPA) as first-line nuclear tracer for detection of CUP-NET in patients with well-differentiated NETs and 18 F-FDG PET/CT may be an additional diagnostic test for poorly differentiated tumors and for prognostication. In the near future, it is expected that patients with CUP-NET will benefit from newly developed PET approaches (radiopharmaceuticals) and

  13. Significance of serum tumor markers monitoring in carcinomas of unknown primary site

    Pejčić Ivica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Unknown primary tumors represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies that are indicative of ominous prognosis. Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is defined as the lack of any detectable primary site after full evaluation, and accounts for approximately 3-5% of all newly diagnosed patients with malignancies. The aim of this report was to present the prognostic and predictive value of 8 serum tumor markers in this group of patients. Methods. The study involved 63 patients. On histological examination, all the patients were presented with metastatic tumors whose primary site (origin could not be detected with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. Following the routine light microscopy, all histological findings were classified into one of the following three groups: plano-cellular carcinoma - 8 patients; adenocarcinoma - 33 patients; unclassifiable (undifferentiated carcinoma - 22 patients. In all the cases we evaluated 8 serum tumor markers: alpha-fetoproteins (AFP, chronic gonadotrophin beta submit, human (beta-HCG, neuron specific enolase (NSE, marker of malignant ovarian tumors (CA 125, prostate-specific antigene (PSA, marker of malignant brest tumor (CA 15-3, marker of malignant pancreas tumor and gastrointestinal tumor (Ca 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA at the time of diagnosis. The patients on chemotherapy had the markers determined after the third and sixth chemocycle, i.e. at the time of illness progression observation, if present. The patients responding to chemotherapy with complete response (CR, partial response (PR or stable disease (SD had the markers determined after three-month periods until the time of relapse or progression. Chemotherapy was applied in 32 patients (20 females and 12 males, aged 29-70 years, who met the inclusion criteria. The following chemotherapy regimen was used: doxorubicin 50mg/m2 (day 1, cisplatin 60mg/m2 (day 1, and etoposide 120 mg/m2 (days 1-3. The period between two chemotherapy

  14. Biological characterization of two xenografts derived from human CUPs (carcinomas of unknown primary

    Bernheim Alain

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinomas of unknown primary site (CUP are epithelial malignancies revealed by metastatic lesions in the absence of any detectable primary tumor. Although they often adopt an aggressive clinical pattern, their basic biology remains poorly understood. Laboratory research on their biology have been hampered so far by the absence of cell lines representative of CUPs. Methods We attempted xenografts of CUP clinical specimens in immunodeficient mice and subsequent in vitro culture of transplanted malignant cells. Whenever possible, malignant xenografted or cultured cells were characterized by microsatellite genotyping, immunohistology, electron microscopy, multifish chromosome analysis and search of TP 53 gene mutations. Results Successful xenografts were achieved in 2 cases out of 4. One of them (Capi1 was lost after 3 passages whereas the other one (Capi3 has been adapted to in vitro culture and is currently available to the scientific community with reliable identification based on microsatellite genotyping. Both Capi1 and Capi3 have histological characteristics of adenocarcinomas and display intense expression of EMA, CEA and cytokeratin 7. Multifish chromosome analysis demonstrated a translocation involving chromosomes 4 and 21 in both specimens. Distinct rare missense mutations of the TP53 gene were detected in Capi1 (codon 312 and Capi3 (codon 181; the codon 181 mutation is consistent with a previously reported similar finding in a small series of CUP specimens. Finally, intense membrane expression of c-kit was recorded in Capi3. Conclusion Our data suggest that xenografted tumors can be obtained from a substantial fraction of CUP clinical specimens. The hypothesis of a preferential association of CUPs with TP 53 mutations of codon 181 deserves further investigations. The Capi3 cell line will be a useful tool for assessment of novel c-kit inhibitors.

  15. High dose intensity of cisplatin and etoposide in adenocarcinoma of unknown primary.

    Gill, I; Guaglianone, P; Grunberg, S M; Scholz, M; Muggia, F M

    1991-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (AUP) has generally a poor prognosis. Previous studies have suggested that Cisplatin and Etoposide have activity in AUP. The aim of this study was to determine if dose intensification of this combination would result in increased efficacy. Each 28 day cycle consisted of Cisplatin 100 mg/m2 given on Day 1 and 8 with Etoposide 80 mg/m2 given on day 1, 2, 8 and 9. Sixteen patients (Pts) with no prior chemotherapy were accrued to this study. Predominant sites of disease were lung, liver, and bone. BHCG and AFP were not elevated. One complete remission was seen in a patient with a mediastinal mass (duration of remission = 59 weeks). Two other patients had a partial response. Overall response rate was 19%. Moderate to severe renal toxicity was recorded in 8 patients, with neuro- and ototoxicities in 2 patients each. Severe granulocytopenia occurred in 8 patients, and one patient died of congestive heart failure on day 1 of cycle 2. This excessive toxicity, without enhanced efficacy does not encourage a more extensive empiric trial by this dose schedule in the treatment of AUP.

  16. Mass-forming cholangiocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma of unknown primary: can they be distinguished on liver MRI?

    Al Ansari, Najwa; Kim, Bong Soo; Srirattanapong, Saowanee; Semelka, Charles T A; Ramalho, Miguel; Altun, Ersan; Woosley, John T; Calvo, Benjamin; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    To determine MR features suggestive of mass-forming cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or liver metastases of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (AUP), and to compare the ability of two experienced radiologists to establish the correct diagnosis. 61 patients with CCA or AUP, with MRIs were placed into two groups: population 1, 28 patients with certain diagnosis of either CCA or AUP; and population 2, 33 patients with uncertain diagnosis. Using population 1 with known diagnosis, two investigators formulated imaging criteria for CCA or AUP, which represented phase 1 of the study. In phase 2, two independent radiologists categorized the patients in populations 1 and 2 as CCA or AUP using the formulated criteria. This categorization was compared with the patient medical records and pathologist review. Findings were tested for statistical significance. In phase 1, solitary lesion, multifocal lesions with dominant lesion, capsule retraction, and porta hepatis lymphadenopathy were features of CCA; multifocal lesions with similar size, and ring enhancement were features of AUP. The number of lesions, capsule retraction, and early tumor enhancement pattern were observed to be significant features (P AUP are identifiable on MRI images, which may aid the radiologist to establish the correct diagnosis.

  17. Role of Definitive Radiation Therapy in Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Abdomen and Pelvis

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) in the abdomen and pelvis is a heterogeneous group of cancers with no standard treatment. Considered by many to be incurable, these patients are often treated with chemotherapy alone. In this study, we determined the effectiveness of radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with CUP in the abdomen and pelvis. Patients and Methods: Medical records were reviewed for 37 patients with CUP treated with radiation therapy for disease located in the soft tissues and/or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer between 2002 and 2009. All patients underwent chemotherapy, either before or concurrent with radiation therapy. Patients were selected for radiation therapy on the basis of histologic type, disease extent, and prior therapy response. Twenty patients underwent definitive radiation therapy (defined as radiation therapy targeting all known disease sites with at least 45 Gy) and 17 patients underwent palliative radiation therapy. Only 6 patients had surgical resection of their disease. Patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the endpoints of local disease control, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and treatment-related toxicity incidence were analyzed. Results: The 2-year PFS and OS rates for the entire cohort were 32% and 57%, respectively. However, in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, the rates were 48% and 76%, and 7 patients lived more than 3 years after treatment with no evidence of disease progression. Nevertheless, radiation-associated toxicity was significant in this cohort, as 40% experienced Grade 2 or higher late toxicities. Conclusions: The use of definitive radiation therapy should be considered in selected patients with CUP in the soft tissues or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis.

  18. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck : I. A review of diagnostic approaches

    Strojan, Primoz; Ferlito, Alfio; Medina, Jesus E.; Woolgar, Julia A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Robbins, K. Thomas; Fagan, Johannes J.; Mendenhall, William M.; Paleri, Vinidh; Silver, Carl E.; Olsen, Kerry D.; Corry, June; Suarez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Devaney, Kenneth O.; Kowalski, Luiz P.; Hartl, Dana M.; Haigentz, Missak; Werner, Jochen A.; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; de Bree, Remco; Wolf, Gregory T.; Takes, Robert P.; Genden, Eric M.; Hinni, Michael L.; Mondin, Vanni; Shaha, Ashok R.; Barnes, Leon

    In an era of advanced diagnostics, metastasis to cervical lymph nodes from an occult primary tumor is a rare clinical entity and accounts for approximately 3% of head and neck malignancies. Histologically, two thirds of cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), with other tissue types less common

  19. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: I. A review of diagnostic approaches

    Strojan, P.; Ferlito, A.; Medina, J.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Robbins, K.T.; Fagan, J.J.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Silver, C.E.; Olsen, K.D.; Corry, J.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Langendijk, J.A.; Devaney, K.O.; Kowalski, L.P.; Hartl, D.M.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Werner, J.A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Bree, R. de; Wolf, G.T.; Takes, R.P.; Genden, E.M.; Hinni, M.L.; Mondin, V.; Shaha, A.R.; Barnes, L.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of advanced diagnostics, metastasis to cervical lymph nodes from an occult primary tumor is a rare clinical entity and accounts for approximately 3% of head and neck malignancies. Histologically, two thirds of cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), with other tissue types less common

  20. Clinical Pathology and Prognostic Analysis of Visceral Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Site (VMCUP

    Q Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse the clinicopathologic characteristics of visceral metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary site (VMCUP, discuss the relationship between its treatment and prognosis, and provide the basis for individualized clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis on clinical pathologic data was performed on 21 VMCUP cases from Fujian Union Hospital from January 2007 to January 2012. Follow-up visits on patients were made and analysis of their survival conditions and relevant influencing factors were collated. Results: The gender distribution of the 21 VMCUP cases was 1:1.1; the median age was 63 years and the pathology type was dominated by adenocarcinoma. The median survival time and survival rate in patients accepting treatment were evidently higher than those in patients not accepting treatment. The median survival time of those patients receiving more than one treatment procedure was higher than in those patients only receiving chemotherapy. Among those patients who received comprehensive therapy, the median survival time in those mainly receiving operative therapy was also higher than in those only receiving chemotherapy (p two cycles or > four cycles was evidently longer than those receiving chemotherapy ≤ two cycles or ≤ four cycles separately. For those choosing paclitaxel in combination with platinum as first-line chemotherapy, their median survival time was longer than those primarily taking fluorouracil (p 0.05 in the median survival times among groups receiving the same treatment but with different age, gender or pathological types. It was indicated by multiple-factor analysis that the chemotherapeutics, chemotherapy times and treatment methods were prognostic factors affecting the survival of VMCUP. Conclusion: The overall progression of VMCUP patients deteriorates quickly, with a poor prognosis and without a standard treatment pattern. Appropriate chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, however

  1. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CARCINOMA OF UNKNOWN PRIMARY WITH SECONDARY METASTASIS TO NECKANALYSIS OF PATIENT AND DISEASE RELATED FACTORS PREDICTING SUPERIOR PATIENT OUTCOMES IN CUPS NECK

    Preeti Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Carcinoma of unknown primary with secondary metastasis to neck (CUPS Neck is involvement of cervical nodes with squamous cell carcinoma without identifiable primary lesion in oral cavity, oropharynx and upper aerodigestive tract. Most commonly affects older male with history of tobacco and alcohol abuse. Commonly involved neck nodes are level II and III. Metastasis to these nodes usually comes from head and neck tumours. The aims of this study are to evaluate the factors (relating to patient and disease associated with improved outcomes following treatment in patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of neck with unknown primary site. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was done in ENT and Head Neck Centre, Base Hospital, Delhi Cantt. The investigation and treatment of such cases aim to detect a primary lesion, if possible in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT and in any case to institute the optimal management protocol. Many factors impact the outcomes of treatment in terms of survival and quality of life. RESULTS After followup of 0.5 to 2 years data were compared among various groups, various disease related factors like volume of disease, staging of neck node, extracapsular spread in final HPE report and various patient related factors like age and sex of patient, performance status of patient, and presence of comorbidities were compared with final outcome in terms of recurrence or disease free survival with less complications. CONCLUSION 1. Most prominent tumour related prognostic factors were low volume nodal disease in the neck and absence of extracapsular spread. Patients with TNM stage I (T0N1M0 were associated with lower recurrence and less complication postoperatively as compared to advanced stage disease (T0N2M0 and T0N3M0. 2. In our study, patient related variables associated with superior patient outcomes in terms of locoregional recurrence or disease free survival were good performance status, females, young age

  3. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck : II. A review of therapeutic options

    Strojan, Primoz; Ferlito, Alfio; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Corry, June; Woolgar, Julia A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E.; Paleri, Vinidh; Fagan, Johannes J.; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Haigentz, Missak; Suarez, Carlos; Robbins, K. Thomas; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Olsen, Kerry D.; Hinni, Michael L.; Werner, Jochen A.; Mondin, Vanni; Kowalski, Luiz P.; Devaney, Kenneth O.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Genden, Eric M.; Barnes, Leon

    Although uncommon, cancer of an unknown primary (CUP) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes poses a range of dilemmas relating to optimal treatment. The ideal resolution would be a properly designed prospective randomized trial, but it is unlikely that this will ever be conducted in this group of

  4. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: II. a review of therapeutic options

    Strojan, P.; Ferlito, A.; Langendijk, J.A.; Corry, J.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Silver, C.E.; Paleri, V.; Fagan, J.J.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Suarez, C.; Robbins, K.T.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Olsen, K.D.; Hinni, M.L.; Werner, J.A.; Mondin, V.; Kowalski, L.P.; Devaney, K.O.; Bree, R. de; Takes, R.P.; Wolf, G.T.; Shaha, A.R.; Genden, E.M.; Barnes, L.

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, cancer of an unknown primary (CUP) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes poses a range of dilemmas relating to optimal treatment. The ideal resolution would be a properly designed prospective randomized trial, but it is unlikely that this will ever be conducted in this group of

  5. Melanoma Patients with Unknown Primary Site or Nodal Recurrence after Initial Diagnosis Have a Favourable Survival Compared to Those with Synchronous Lymph Node Metastasis and Primary Tumour

    Weide, Benjamin; Faller, Christine; Els?sser, Margrit; B?ttner, Petra; Pflugfelder, Annette; Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Bauer, J?rgen; Meier, Friedegund; Garbe, Claus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A direct comparison of prognosis between patients with regional lymph node metastases (LNM) detected synchronously with the primary melanoma (primary LNM), patients who developed their first LNM subsequently (secondary LNM) and those with initial LNM in melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP) is missing thus far. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival of 498 patients was calculated from the time point of the first macroscopic LNM using Kaplan Meier and multivariate Cox hazard regression ...

  6. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases of Unknown Origin: Primary Tumor Detection with Whole-Body Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Nassenstein, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.; Stergar, H.; Gutzeit, A.; Freudenberg, L.; Kuehl, H.; Fischer, M.; Barkhausen, J.; Bockisch, A.; Antoch, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Identification of primary tumor in patients with cervical lymph node metastasis of unknown primary (MUO) has a great impact on therapy approach and potentially on patient prognosis. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computer tomography (CT) for primary tumor detection in cervical metastases of unknown origin compared to PET, CT, and PET+CT side-by-side evaluation. Material and Methods: 39 consecutive patients (eight women, 31 men; mean age 59.9±11.2 years) with MUO were enrolled in this study. PET/CT images were obtained 1 hour after injection of 350 MBq of fluorodeoxyglucose. Oral and intravenous contrast agents were administered in all patients to ensure diagnostic CT data. Fused PET/CT data were evaluated for primary tumor detection. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated and compared with CT alone, PET alone, and side-by-side PET+CT evaluation. Statistical analysis of differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures was based on the McNemar test. Results: Fused PET/CT depicted the primary tumor in 11 of 39 (28%) patients. In 28 (72%) patients, the primary tumor remained occult. CT revealed the primary in five (13%), PET alone in 10 (26%), and side-by-side evaluation of PET+CT in 10 (26%) of 39 patients. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the imaging modalities. Conclusion: PET, side-by-side PET+CT, and PET/CT revealed similar detection rates for primary tumors in cervical MUO patients. Therefore, cervical metastases of an unknown primary may be assessed with either of these imaging modalities. Detection rates with CT were substantially lower. Thus, inclusion of functional data for assessment of cervical MUO patients must be recommended

  7. Combined FDG-PET/CT for the detection of unknown primary tumors: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Kwee, Thomas C.; Kwee, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyze published data on the diagnostic performance of combined 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the detection of primary tumors in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). A systematic search for relevant studies was performed of the PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase databases. Methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Reported detection rates, sensitivities and specificities were meta-analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed if results of individual studies were heterogeneous. The 11 included studies, comprising a total sample size of 433 patients with CUP, had moderate methodological quality. Overall primary tumor detection rate, pooled sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT were 37%, 84% (95% CI 78-88%) and 84% (95% CI 78-89%), respectively. Sensitivity was heterogeneous across studies (P = 0.0001), whereas specificity was homogeneous across studies (P = 0.2114). Completeness of diagnostic workup before FDG-PET/CT, location of metastases of unknown primary, administration of CT contrast agents, type of FDG-PET/CT images evaluated and way of FDG-PET/CT review did not significantly influence diagnostic performance. In conclusion, FDG-PET/CT can be a useful method for unknown primary tumor detection. Future studies are required to prove the assumed advantage of FDG-PET/CT over FDG-PET alone and to further explore causes of heterogeneity. (orig.)

  8. Head and neck: treatment of primary and relapsed nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Wang, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is not a common malignancy of the head and neck in the United States and presents a great challenge to the radiation oncologists in this country. Its management is radiotherapeutic and technically demanding and calls for careful treatment techniques to include the primary and the lymphatic drainage areas to high doses while sparing the neighboring organs such as the spinal cord, eyes, temporal lobes and midrain. This refresher course will review the clinical course, pattern of spread with manifestations of various neurologic syndromes of the disease. The radiotherapeutic management of primary lesion will be discussed in detail including the treatment techniques, placement of the irradiation portals, dose levels, etc. Treatment results as reported in the literature as well as those achieved at the MGH will be presented. Special emphasis will be placed on the routine use of intracavitary implant to boost the primary site and its technical aspects. Relapsed NPC after previous radiation therapy presents a difficult problem in management, but can be re-irradiated with occasional success by observing careful technique and fractionated intracavitary brachytherapy and the local control rates will be briefly covered. Recurrent disease in the neck will be managed by neck dissection. Xerostomia is undesirable and common sequelae following radical radiation therapy for NPC. Efforts are being made to decrease its magnitude by using higher energies of photons, i.e. 10 MV to spare a portion of the parotid glands with some promising results. Because of the unique location of the primary lesion, currently a modified BID program (MBID) is used and its techniques and treatment concept are discussed

  9. Clinical applications of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary

    HU Man; YU Jin-ming; ZHAO Wei; ZHANG Pin-liang; JU Gui-fang; FU Zheng; ZHANG Guo-li; KONG Li; YANG Yan-qin; MA Yi-dong

    2011-01-01

    Background Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors with varying clinical features. The management of patients of CUP remains a clinical challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical applications of integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) information in patients with CUP,including detecting the occult primary tumor and effecting on disease therapy.Methods One hundred and forty-nine patients with histologically-proven metastases of CUP were included. For all patients,the conventional diagnostic work-up was unsuccessful in localizing the primary site. Whole-body PET/CT images were obtained approximately 60 minutes after intravenous injection of 350-425 MBq of 18F-FDG.Results In 24.8% of patients,FDG PET/CT detected primary tumors that were not apparent after conventional workup.In this group of patients,the overall sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy rates of FDG PET/CT in detecting unknown primary tumors were 86.0%,87.7%,and 87.2%,respectively. FDG PET/CT imaging also led to the detection of previously unrecognized metastases in 29.5% of patients. Forty-seven (31.5%,47 of 149) patients underwent a change in therapeutic management.Conclusions FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool in patients with CUP,because it assisted in detecting unknown primary tumors and previously unrecognized distant metastases,and optimized the mangement of these patients.

  10. Whole body 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in detecting the primary focus of metastatic cancer with an unknown primary

    Chen Yingrui; Li Weixiong; Gu Meixin; Zhan Zhiguang; Zeng Zijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in detecting the primary focus of metastatic cancer with an unknown primary. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with various histological types of metastases from an unknown primary after extensive conventional diagnostic work-up were studied. After intravenous 370 MBq FDG, whole body scan was made 50 minutes after injection. The results of FDG PET were compared with those of CT or MRI. Results: With FDG PET, the primary tumors were identified in 13 patients and confirmed by pathology. The corresponding detection rate was 44.8% (13/29) as compared with 27.6% (8/29) by CT or MRI. In addition, 26 metastases were discovered by FDG PET whole body imaging but only 13 were found by CT or MRI. During 2-13 months' follow-up, the mortality rates were 15.4%(2/13) and 42.9%(6/14) for patients with the primary tumor identified or unidentified. Conclusions: FDG PET is valuable in staging, selecting appropriate treatment protocol and predicting prognosis for patients suffering from metastatic cancers with an unknown primary

  11. Primary School Heads' Professional Socialization and Leadership Development in Cyprus

    Theodosiou, Valentina; Karagiorgi, Yiasemina

    2017-01-01

    This article explores Cypriot primary school heads' professional socialization (PS), in terms of their preparation for headship. A study in three phases involving a survey and interviews indicates that, to "learn what it is to be a head" prior to headship, Cypriot heads resort to personal initiatives for training and development in…

  12. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Villeneuve, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.villeneuve@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  13. 18F-FDG whole body positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT)

    Lassen, U; Daugaard, G; Eigtved, A

    1999-01-01

    -fluorodeoxyglucose) are of clinical value in detection of UPT. Whole-body FDG-PET scans were performed in 20 patients following standard staging procedures according to histology. PET results were verified either histologically or by the clinical course of the disease. 11 patients had neck metastases (5 squamous cell, 5......The management of patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT) often includes a large number of radiographical studies and invasive procedures, but the occult primary tumour is detected in less than 25%. In this prospective study we explored whether non-invasive whole body PET scans using FDG (18-F...... and this was verified in 9 (45%), either histologically or by the clinical course of disease. 8 of these had primary lung cancer and 1 had carcinoma at the basis of the tongue. In most patients PET had no treatment related implications. 3 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) received chemotherapy prompted...

  14. Prognostic factors for carcinoma of unknown primary localized to the neck only (CUP Syndrome) and the role of F-18-FDG PET for diagnosis and therapeutic management

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Bank, P.; Lopatta, E.C.; Wendt, T.G.; Koscielny, S.; Beleites, E.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Treatment of patients with carcinoma of unknown primary localized to the neck only is still controversial. To determine both patient related prognostic factors and the influence of treatment parameters the records of 99 patients were analyzed retrospectively, to evaluate the role of F-18-FDG PET for diagnostics and therapy management 33 patients were analyzed prospectively. Material and Methods: Retrospectively: Out of 99 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary, 51 received surgery as a sole treatment. 48 were treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. 8/99 patients received a F-18-FDG PET. Statistical analyses: Kaplan-Meier, log-rank-test, chi-square-test. Prospectively: All PET studies were carried out after conventional diagnostic procedures failed to detect the primary tumor. PET findings were correlated with histology and/or clinical course of the patients. Results: Retrospectively: Disease specific survival (DSS) was significant longer for patients with N1/N2 vs. N3 (p=0.03), for upper nodal involvement vs. lower and/or supraclavicular nodal involvement (p=0.031) and for absence of extracapsular spread (p=0.041). No influence of DSS was noted for grading (p=0.469), treatment volume (p=0.82) and applied dose (>50Gy vs. <50Gy). In 2/8 patients, PET detected the primary tumor, in 1/8 bone metastases. Prospectively: Detection of the primary tumor by PET was successful in 21%, mostly in patients with lower and/or supraclavicular nodal involvement. In these patients the primary tumor was located extracervically in 72%, e.g. lung or gastric cancer. Distant metastases were detected in 33%. Conclusion: The presence of ECS, the extend and localization of nodal involvement are prognostic factors in patients suffering from CUP localized to the neck only. Patients with upper nodal involvement should be treated with curative intention. The irradiation fields should cover the whole neck including the potential region of the primary tumor with doses

  15. Recurrent Merkel cell carcinoma of the testis with unknown primary site: a case report.

    Mweempwa, Angela; Tan, Alvin; Dray, Michael

    2016-11-05

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive neuroendocrine tumor that commonly arises in the skin. It is rare for it to occur in the testes. There are only seven cases of testicular Merkel cell carcinoma reported in the literature. A 66-year-old Maori man presented to our hospital with left testicular swelling. His alpha-fetoprotein and beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin levels were within normal limits. His lactate dehydrogenase concentration was elevated to 267 U/L. Ultrasound imaging confirmed a large testicular mass, and he underwent left orchiectomy. His histological examination revealed a neuroendocrine tumor with an immunostaining pattern suggesting Merkel cell carcinoma. He presented to our hospital again 3 months later with right testicular swelling that was confirmed on ultrasound sonography to be a tumor. He underwent a right orchiectomy, and his histological examination revealed metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma. A primary lesion was not identified, and computed tomographic imaging did not reveal spread to other organs. He received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin and etoposide chemotherapy and remained disease-free 18 months after completion of chemotherapy. Given the paucity of studies, standard adjuvant treatment for testicular Merkel cell carcinoma remains uncertain, although platinum-based chemotherapy seems to be an appropriate option.

  16. Pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma following head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Metastasis or second primary?

    Geurts, Tom W.; Nederlof, Petra M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; van't Veer, Laura J.; de Jong, Daphne; Hart, August A. M.; van Zandwijk, Nico; Klomp, Houke; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To distinguish a metastasis from a second primary tumor in patients with a history of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and subsequent pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. Experimental Design: For 44 patients with a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck followed by a

  17. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    Aim: To determine the incidence of primary head and neck cancers seen at Korle Bu Teaching hospital, Ghana. Methods: A retrospective study of histopathological records of diagnosed head and neck cancers from 1989-2008. Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were primary cancers. These were studied ...

  18. Panendoscopy as a screening procedure for simultaneous primary tumors in head and neck cancer

    Dhooge, IJ; DeVos, M; Albers, FWJ; VanCauwenberge, PB

    Head and neck cancer is often associated with second primary neoplasms. These cancers most commonly involve other regions of the head and neck, esophagus, and lung. The majority of cases are also squamous cell carcinomas. In view of this rather frequent occurrence of multiple primary cancers and how

  19. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Hoersch, Dieter [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 {+-} 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were calculated and compared with SUV{sub max} in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV{sub max} of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 {+-} 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 {+-} 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV{sub max} in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 {+-} 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 {+-} 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV{sub max} of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p < 0.05) as compared to the ones with known primary tumour sites; 19% of the patients had high-grade and 81% low-grade NET. Based on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is

  20. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P.; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Hommann, Merten; Hoersch, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 ± 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated and compared with SUV max in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV max of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 ± 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 ± 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV max in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 ± 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 ± 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV max of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is highly superior to 111 In-OctreoScan (39% detection rate for CUP according to the literature) and can play a major role in the management of patients with CUP-NET. (orig.)

  1. Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From an Unknown Primary Site: Retrospective Analysis of 113 Patients

    Beldi, Debora; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; D'Onofrio, Alberto; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Pia, Francesco; Chiesa, Fausto; Orecchia, Roberto; Krengli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The management of patients with cervical lymph-node metastases from unknown primary site (UPS) remains a matter of discussion. This study aimed to analyze the results and prognostic factors in a series of patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 113 patients who presented with cervical lymph nodes metastases from UPS treated from 1980 to 2004 were reviewed. Eighty-seven patients (77.0%) were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Ninety-one patients were treated with curative and 22 with palliative intent. Fifty-nine of 113 patients (52.2%) received surgery followed by radiotherapy and 54 of 113 (47.8%) received radiotherapy alone. Radiotherapy was delivered to the neck and pharyngeal mucosa in 67 patients and to the ipsilateral or bilateral neck in 45 patients. Twenty-one patients (18.5%) also received chemotherapy. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates were 40.7% for the entire group and 46.6% for the SCC subgroup. The occurrence of the occult primary was observed in 23 of 113 patients (20.3%), 19 (82.6%) within the head and neck region. At multivariate analysis, treatment with curative intent and extensive irradiation of bilateral neck and pharyngeal mucosa were favorable prognostic factors for the whole series, and treatment with curative intent, extensive irradiation of bilateral neck and pharyngeal mucosa, and absence of extracapsular spread were favorable prognostic factors for the SCC subgroup. Conclusions: Patients with cervical lymph node metastases from UPS have a similar prognosis to those affected by other head and neck malignancies. Curative treatment strategies including neck dissection and extensive irradiation by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy resulted in significantly better outcomes

  2. Gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy for carcinoma of unknown primary: results of a multicenter phase II trial.

    Shernan G Holtan

    Full Text Available Metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP has a very poor prognosis, and no standard first-line therapy currently exists. Here, we report the results of a phase II study utilizing a combination of gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy. Treatment was with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 weekly times four on a six week cycle (Cohort I. Due to excessive toxicity, the dose and schedule were modified as follows: gemcitabine 750 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 given weekly times three on a four week cycle (Cohort II. The primary endpoint was the confirmed response rate (CR + PR. Secondary endpoints consisted of adverse events based upon the presence or absence of the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1*28 (UGT1A1*28 polymorphism, time to progression, and overall survival. Thirty-one patients were enrolled with a median age of 63 (range: 38-94, and 26 patients were evaluable for efficacy. Significant toxicity was observed in Cohort 1, characterized by 50% (7/14 patients experiencing a grade 4+ adverse event, but not in cohort II. The confirmed response rate including patients from both cohorts was 12% (95% CI: 2-30%, which did not meet the criteria for continued enrollment. Overall median survival was 7.2 months (95% CI: 4.0 to 11.6 for the entire cohort but notably longer in cohort II than in cohort I (9.3 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 12.1 versus 4.0 months (95% CI: 2.2 to 15.6. Gemcitabine and irinotecan is not an active combination when used as first line therapy in patients with metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary. Efforts into developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches remain important for improving the outlook for this heterogeneous group of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066781.

  3. Do large heads enhance stability and restore native anatomy in primary total hip arthroplasty?

    Lombardi, Adolph V; Skeels, Michael D; Berend, Keith R; Adams, Joanne B; Franchi, Orlando J

    2011-06-01

    Dislocation remains a serious complication in hip arthroplasty. Resurfacing proponents tout anatomic femoral head restoration as an advantage over total hip arthroplasty. However, advances in bearings have expanded prosthetic head options from traditional sizes of 22, 26, 28, and 32 mm to diameters as large as 60 mm. Large heads reportedly enhance stability owing to increased range of motion before impingement and increased jump distance to subluxation. Available larger diameter material combinations include metal- or ceramic-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene and metal-on-metal, each with distinct advantages and disadvantages. We sought to determine (1) if using larger diameter heads has lowered our dislocation rate; and (2) how closely an anatomic metal-on-metal bearing with diameters to 60 mm replicates native femoral head size. We retrospectively reviewed 2020 primary arthroplasties performed with large heads (≥ 36 mm) in 1748 patients and noted dislocation incidence. In a prospective subset of 89 cases using anatomic heads, native femoral head diameter was measured intraoperatively with calipers by an independent observer and later compared with implanted size. One dislocation has occurred in 2020 hips for an incidence of 0.05%. The prosthetic head averaged 0.7 mm larger than the native head with 68 of 89 (76%) reconstructed to within ± 2 mm of native size. Larger diameter heads have contributed to lower dislocation rates and large-diameter metal-on-metal articulation can provide close anatomic restoration in primary THA.

  4. Melanoma patients with unknown primary site or nodal recurrence after initial diagnosis have a favourable survival compared to those with synchronous lymph node metastasis and primary tumour.

    Benjamin Weide

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct comparison of prognosis between patients with regional lymph node metastases (LNM detected synchronously with the primary melanoma (primary LNM, patients who developed their first LNM subsequently (secondary LNM and those with initial LNM in melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP is missing thus far. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival of 498 patients was calculated from the time point of the first macroscopic LNM using Kaplan Meier and multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients with secondary LNM (HR = 0.67; p = 0.009 and those with initial LNM in MUP (HR = 0.45; p = 0.008 had a better prognosis compared to patients with primary LNM (median survival time 52 and 65 vs. 24 months, respectively. A high number of involved nodes, the presence of in-transit/satellite metastases and male gender had an additional independent unfavourable effect. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of patients with LNM in MUP and with secondary LNM is similar and considerably more favourable compared to those with primary LNM. This difference needs to be considered during patient counselling and for stratification purposes in clinical trials. The assumption of an immune privilege of patients with MUP which is responsible for rejection of the primary melanoma, and results in a favourable prognosis is not supported by our data.

  5. Cancers of unknown primary origin (CUP) are characterized by chromosomal instability (CIN) compared to metastasis of know origin

    Vikeså, Jonas; Møller, Anne Kirstine H; Kaczkowski, Bogumil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancers of unknown primary (CUPs) constitute ~5% of all cancers. The tumors have an aggressive biological and clinical behavior. The aim of the present study has been to uncover whether CUPs exhibit distinct molecular features compared to metastases of known origin. METHODS: Employing......RNA signatures of chromosome instability (CIN), indicating that CUPs are chromosome unstable compared to metastases of known origin. CONCLUSIONS: CIN may account for the uncommon clinical presentation, chemoresistance and poor outcome in patients with CUP and warrant selective diagnostic strategies and treatment....... genome wide transcriptome analysis, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA), we defined the putative origins of a large series of CUP and how closely related a particular CUP was to corresponding metastases of known origin. LDA predictions were subsequently used...

  6. MET Activation and Physical Dynamics of the Metastatic Process: The Paradigm of Cancers of Unknown Primary Origin

    Giulia M. Stella

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular and cellular mechanisms which drive metastatic spread are the topic of constant debate and scientific research due to the potential implications for cancer patients' prognosis. In addition to genetics and environmental factors, mechanics of single cells and physical interaction with the surrounding environment play relevant role in defining invasive phenotype. Reconstructing the physical properties of metastatic clones may help to clarify still open issues in disease progression as well as to lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this perspective cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP identify the ideal model to study physical interactions and forces involved in the metastatic process. We have previously demonstrated that MET oncogene is mutated with unexpected high frequency in CUPs. We here analyze and discuss how the MET activation by somatic mutation may affect physical properties in giving rise to such a highly malignant syndrome, as that defined by CUP.

  7. Clinical problems of multiple primary cancers including head and neck cancers. From the viewpoint of radiotherapy

    Nishio, Masamichi; Myojin, Miyako; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masaru; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    A total of 2144 head and neck cancers were treated by radiotherapy at the National Sapporo Hospital between 1974 and 2001. Of these, 313 (14.6%) were found to have other primary cancers besides head and neck cancer, in which double cancers were 79% and triple or more cancers were 21%. Frequency according to primary site of the first head and neck cancer was oral cavity: 107/603 (17.7%), epipharynx cancer: 7/117 (6.0%), oropharyngeal cancer: 63/257 (24.5%), hypopharyngeal cancer: 65/200 (32.5%), laryngeal cancer: 114/558 (20.4%), and nose/paranasal sinus: 4.9% respectively. Esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer and gastric cancer were very frequent as other primary sites combined with the head and neck. The first onset region was the head and neck in 233 out of 313 cases with multiple primary cancers. The five-year survival rate from the onset of head and neck cancers is 52%, 10-year: 30%, and 5-year cause-specific survival rate 82%, and 10-year: 78%, respectively. The treatment possibilities in multiple primary cancers tend to be limited because the treatment areas are sometimes overlapped. New approaches to the treatment of multiple primary cancers should be considered in the future. (author)

  8. Primary childhood head and neck neoplasms: An 8-year ...

    Background: Although infectious diseases remain the leading cause of death among children in our environment, neoplastic diseases have emerged as important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. Method: A retrospective review of neoplastic lesions of the head and neck region histologically diagnosed at ...

  9. [Dropped head syndrome as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroid myopathy].

    Ota, Kiyobumi; Koseki, Sayo; Ikegami, Kenji; Onishi, Iichiroh; Tomimitsu, Hiyoryuki; Shintani, Shuzo

    2018-03-28

    75 years old woman presented with 6-month history of progressive dropped head syndrome. Neurological examination revealed moderate weakness of flexor and extensor of neck and mild weakness of proximal appendicular muscles with normal deep tendon reflexes. The needle electromyography showed short duration and low amplitude motor unit potential. No fibrillation potentials or positive sharp waves were seen. Biopsy of deltoid muscle was normal. Laboratory studies showed elevated levels of serum calcium (11.8 mg/dl, upper limit of normal 10.1) and intact parathyroid hormone (104 pg/ml, upper limit of normal 65), and decreased level of serum phosphorus (2.3 mg/dl, lower limit of normal 2.7). Ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography revealed a parathyroid tumor. The tumor was removed surgically. Pathological examination proved tumor to be parathyroid adenoma. Dropped head and weakness of muscles were dramatically improved within a week after the operation. Although hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of dropped head syndrome, neurologists must recognize hyperparathyroidism as a treatable cause of dropped head syndrome.

  10. What Do Primary School Heads Actually Do All Day?

    Clerkin, Ciaran

    1988-01-01

    Reports a study which examines the role of the head teacher as described in official reports, analyzing data from interviews and time diaries to determine their actual duties. Concludes that headteachers spend much of their time on daily school maintenance, stating that if duties were delegated, headteachers could more effectively focus on…

  11. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    McRoy

    12] epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (for nasopharyngeal cancer),[13] and others which include immune suppression, sunlight ... incidence of primary head and neck malignant tumours to contribute to the knowledge and understanding on this.

  12. A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary that Responded to the Multi-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Lenvatinib

    Reiko Kimura-Tsuchiya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lenvatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 through 4, as well as platelet-derived growth factor receptor α, RET, and KIT. At present, lenvatinib is used in the treatment of thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of a 67-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary who was effectively treated with lenvatinib. The patient was initially diagnosed as having undifferentiated thyroid cancer, and after total thyroidectomy and bilateral lymph node dissection, lenvatinib was administered for the treatment of residual lymph node metastasis. A computed tomography scan after 1 month of lenvatinib administration showed marked regression of the lymph nodes, but interstitial pneumonia was also detected. Because the drug lymphocyte stimulation test for lenvatinib was strongly positive, we concluded that the interstitial pneumonia was induced by lenvatinib. The interstitial pneumonia only improved by the withdrawal of lenvatinib. Finally, his thyroid tumor was diagnosed as a metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma; however, we were unable to identify the primary lesion. This is the first reported case of interstitial pneumonia induced by lenvatinib.

  13. Opportunities and Challenges for Public Primary School Head Teachers in the Implementation of Free Primary Education in Kisumu Municipality, Kenya: An Analytical Assessment

    Akech, Benta Achieng' Opul; Simatwa, Enose M. W.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated opportunities and challenges for public primary school head teachers in the implementation of Free Primary Education in Kisumu municipality. Being a descriptive research, the study population consisted of 114 head teachers, 17,100 class seven and eight pupils in the municipality. Out of this, a sample of 37 head teachers…

  14. Severe Unresponsive Hypoglycemia Associated with Neuroendocrine Tumor of Unknown Primary Site - 18 Years after Rectal Cancer Surgery. Case Report.

    Rusu, Octavia Cristina; Costea, Radu Virgil; Popa, Cristian Constantin; Iliesiu, Andreea; Dumitru, Adrian; Becheanu, Gabriel; Neagu, Stefan Ilie

    2015-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are derived from cells that have the unique ability to synthesize, store and secrete a variety of metabolically active substances, peptides and amines, characteristic of the tissue of origin, which can cause distinct clinical syndromes. We present the case of a 58-year-old patient diagnosed and surgically treated in January 1996 for stage III inferior rectal cancer, who was readmitted after 18 years presenting persistent diarrheic syndrome and asthenia. Investigations performed (abdominal CT) showed multiple liver metastases, initially suspected as being related to the rectal cancer. Biopsy of liver metastases and pathological and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the neuroendocrine origin (moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumor). Seven months after the identification of liver metastases and after initiation of oncological therapy with Interferon and Somatostatin, the patient presented severe hypoglycemia (serum glucose 13-70 mg/dl) proved to be due to insulin-like factors (serum insulin level 64.9 ìU/ml) secreted by metastases. Due to the aggressive evolution of neuroendocrine tumor, with multiple episodes of severe hypoglycemia, resistant to treatment, the patient died approximately one month after the occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes. Despite comprehensive tests (abdominal CT scan, colonoscopy, bone scintigraphy and PET/CT), the primary site of the neuroendocrine tumors remained unknown.

  15. Treatment of cervical lymph node metastasis from an unknown primary tumor, with a review of the literature

    Planken, H.J.M. van der; Tiwari, R.M.; Karim, A.B.M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The results of treatment at the Free University Hospital of 44 patients with cervical lymph node metastasis of an unknown primary tumor were reviewed in order to establish an optimal treatment policy and to look for prognostic parameters. These results were compared with results of other treatment policies known from the literature. Patients and Method: Thirty-three out of the 44 patients received a treatment with curative intent; 22 cases received a unilateral neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy, 7 were irradiated after an excisional biopsy and 4 received radical radiotherapy alone. Results: For the whole group 5- and 10-year overall survival was 50% and 44%, respectively, and for the group treated with curative intent 68% and 56%, respectively. Disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years after treatment for the whole group was 48% and 32%, respectively, and for the group treated with curative intent 63% and 37%, respectively. Conclusions: Multivariate analysis showed only treatment with intent and histology as significant independent prognostic factors for the whole group. For the patients treated with curative intent no significant influences of variables were found. (orig.) [de

  16. Detection of unknown primary tumours in patients with cerebral metastases using whole-body 18F-flouorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Klee, B; Law, I; Højgaard, L

    2002-01-01

    Identification of the unknown primary tumours in patients presenting with cerebral metastasis is a continued diagnostic challenge. Despite extensive and lengthy diagnostic work-up, the primary tumours will remain obscure in a significant proportion of the patients. The aim of this study was to ev...

  17. Head Lice Infestation (Pediculosis and Associated Factors among Primary School Girls in Sirik County, Southern Iran

    Alireza Sanei-Dehkordi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Head lice infestation (pediculosis is a serious health problem that can cause a high level of anxiety and psychological frustration, especially in developing countries.Socio-demographic factors are important determinants of the occurrence of head lice infestation. This study aimed to determine the head lice infestations and the factors affecting the rate of infestationin primary school girls.   Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 358 school girls from two urban and three rural primary school girls in Sirik County, Southern Iran, were randomly selected. For the diagnosis of head lice infestation, students were examined carefully by visual inspection of the scalp and hair for the presence of lice. Self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated factors of head lice infestation. SPSS version 21.0 was used to analyze the data. Results The prevalence of head lice infestation among primary school girls was 56.15%. There were significant associations between head lice infestation and age (p

  18. Preliminary Exploration of the Mental Health Education Competency Survey of Primary and Middle School Head Teachers

    Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Yanling; Guo, Cheng; Lan, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Despite a recent focus on the mental health of students, primary and middle school mental health education in China has been hampered by a lack of resources and inadequate professional training. This study assessed the mental health education competency of primary and middle school head teachers using the Mental Health Education Competency…

  19. Cost-effectiveness of using a gene expression profiling test to aid in identifying the primary tumour in patients with cancer of unknown primary.

    Hannouf, M B; Winquist, E; Mahmud, S M; Brackstone, M; Sarma, S; Rodrigues, G; Rogan, P; Hoch, J S; Zaric, G S

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of a 2000-gene-expression profiling (GEP) test to help identify the primary tumor site when clinicopathological diagnostic evaluation was inconclusive in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). We built a decision-analytic-model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of different clinical management strategies for CUP. The model was parameterized using follow-up data from the Manitoba Cancer Registry, cost data from Manitoba Health administrative databases and secondary sources. The 2000-GEP-based strategy compared to current clinical practice resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $44,151 per quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained. The total annual-budget impact was $36.2 million per year. A value-of-information analysis revealed that the expected value of perfect information about the test's clinical impact was $4.2 million per year. The 2000-GEP test should be considered for adoption in CUP. Field evaluations of the test are associated with a large societal benefit.

  20. Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary

    Rades, Dirk; Fehlauer, Fabian; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Karstens, Johann H.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer

    Chen, Allen M.; Cao, Minsong; Hsu, Sophia; Lamb, James; Mikaeilian, Argin; Yang, Yingli; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiation therapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and materials: Between October 2014 and August 2016, 13 consecutive patients with recurrent or new primary cancers of the head and neck that occurred in a previously irradiated field were prospectively enrolled in an institutional registry trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of ...

  2. The occult head and neck primary: to treat or not to treat?

    Sinnathamby, K.; Peters, L.J.; Laidlaw, C.; Hughes, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with cervical node metastases from an unknown primary malignancy, there is unresolved controversy regarding the utility of elective irradiation of putative pharyngeal primary sites as part of the management plan. We analysed the experience of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute to assess the risk of withholding mucosal irradiation in relation to the diagnostic algorithm used to exclude a primary lesion at the time of initial presentation. (author)

  3. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander; Grueneisen, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino M.; Grafe, Hong; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  4. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Sawicki, Lino M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Grafe, Hong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: verena.ruhlmann@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  5. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of primary tumours of unknown origin; experience of the Hospital Angeles del Pedregal

    Sanchez, N.; Serna, J.A.; Quiroz, O.; Valenzuela, J.; Romo, C.; Ramirez, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    It was in 1994 when published studies appear that evaluate the utility of the 18 F-FDG PET in the patients with primary tumors of unknown origin (TOD); starting from then diverse studies that support the clinical utility of the study arise with 18 F-FDG PET in the detection of the primary tumor. It is as well as it has been calculated that the study with 18 F-FDG PET is able to detect the primary tumor in around 40% of the patients with negative results in the conventional diagnostic procedures. Until the moment, most of the studies published in relation to the primary tumors of unknown origin only evaluate the paper of the study with 18 F-FDG PET, without including the image fusion technique PET/CT, which has demonstrated in diverse studies; in oncological scenarios different from the TOD, a superior diagnosis certainty. (Author)

  6. Head Teachers and Teachers as Pioneers in Facilitating Dyslexic Children in Primary Mainstream Schools

    Fahima Salman Jaka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the perceptions of school heads and teachers in facilitating young dyslexic children in primary mainstream schools of Pakistan. Through purposive sampling, the researcher selected eight participants: Four primary school heads and four primary teachers from elite schools of Karachi. The research instrument selected for this study was in-depth interviews to get a deeper insight of school heads and teachers perceptions regarding the facilitation of dyslexic children. The findings revealed that children with dyslexia face many emotional and academic problems and only a few elite schools provide policy to facilitate them in mainstream education. Findings showed that some schools hired remedial teaching services or special education services and the school heads and primary teachers put in immense effort in preparing intervention plans and evaluation plans to suit individual and young dyslexic children needs. It was also suggested that positivity of the learning environment depends upon the teachers. The findings further disclosed that unlike the more developed nations, apart from a few elite schools in Pakistan, there is no importance paid to professional training related to dyslexia.

  7. Increased Aldosterone Release During Head-Up Tilt in Early Primary Hypertension.

    Reinold, Annemarie; Schneider, Andreas; Kalizki, Tatjana; Raff, Ulrike; Schneider, Markus P; Schmieder, Roland E; Schmidt, Bernhard M W

    2017-05-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is well known cause of secondary hypertension. However, the importance of aldosterone for the much larger group of patients with primary hypertension is less clear. We hypothesized that in young subjects with primary hypertension, the rise of plasma aldosterone levels in response to head-up tilt testing as a stress stimulus is exaggerated. Hemodynamics (blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac index (CI), and total peripheral vascular resistance index (TPRI), all by TaskForce monitor) and hormones (plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone) were measured before and during 30 minutes of head-up tilt in 45 young hypertensive and 45 normotensive subjects. BP, HR, CI, and TPRI all increased in response to head-up tilt, with no difference between groups. There was no difference in baseline PRA, Ang II, and aldosterone between groups. During head-up tilt, PRA, and Ang II levels increased similarly. However, aldosterone levels increased to a greater extent in the hypertensive vs. normotensive subjects (P = 0.0021). Our data suggest that an increased release of aldosterone in response to orthostatic stress is a feature of early primary hypertension. The similar increase in PRA and Ang II suggests a potential role for secretagogues of aldosterone other than Ang II in this response. In addition to its established role in secondary hypertension, dysregulation of aldosterone release might contribute to the development of primary arterial hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Results of postoperative reirradiation for recurrent or second primary head and neck carcinoma

    Kasperts, N; Slotman, BJ; Leemans, CR; de Bree, R; Doornaert, P; Langendijk, JA

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND. In this prospective study, the effects of a second course of postoperative radiation therapy on locoregional control, survival, toxicity, and quality of life were investigated in patients who underwent resection of a second primary or locoregional recurrent head and neck tumor in a

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer

    Allen M. Chen, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Our preliminary findings show that reirradiation with MRI guided radiation therapy results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity for patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck. The superior soft tissue resolution of the MRI scans that were used for planning and delivery has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio.

  10. Role of 18F-FDG PET-CT in detection of primary tumors in patients with cervical/extra cervical metastases of unknown origin

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Naswa, Niraj; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Guru; Malhotra, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous group of histologically proven metastatic malignancies for which the primary tumor could not be detected despite thorough diagnostic evaluation. CUP accounts for 2.3-4.2% of cancer in both sexes and follows an aggressive behavior with a median survival less than 1 year. Identification of a primary tumor has an impact on therapy and life expectancy and it is often detected only in 10-35% of all cases by conventional imaging modalities. Hence there is clearly a need of whole body, non invasive imaging modality with a high diagnostic yield

  11. Extent of Head Teachers' Utilization of Innovative Sources of Funding Primary Schools in Enugu State of Nigeria

    Amogechukwu, Eze Thecla; Unoma, Chidobi Roseline

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent Head teachers utilize innovative sources of funding primary schools in Enugu State of Nigeria. Descriptive survey design was employed to examine the extent head teachers utilize innovative sources of funding primary schools in Enugu State. Data were collected through a 14-item questionnaire…

  12. Squamous cell carcinomas metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown head-and-neck mucosal site treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with neck dissection

    Erkal, Haldun S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.; Stringer, Scott P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The present study presents the experience at the University of Florida with treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown head-and-neck mucosal (H and NM) site with radiotherapy (RT) alone or in combination with neck dissection (ND). Methods and Materials: The study included 126 patients treated with curative intent from 1964 to 1997. All patients had follow-up for at least 2 years. No patients were lost to follow-up. Results: Twelve patients (10%) developed SCC in H and NM sites at 0.5 to 10.9 years (median, 1.8 years). The rate of developing carcinomas in H and NM sites at 5 years was 13%. Histologic differentiation significantly affected the rate of developing carcinomas in H and NM sites in multivariate analysis. Sixteen patients (13%) had persistent nodal disease and 12 patients (10%) developed recurrent nodal disease at 0.5 to 10.9 years (median, 1.1 years). The nodal control rate at 5 years was 78%. Nodal size, N stage, and planned ND significantly affected the rate of nodal control in multivariate analysis. Nineteen patients (15%) developed distant metastasis at 0.2-5.1 years (median, 0.9 years). The distant metastases rate at 5 years was 14%. Extracapsular extension and RT dose significantly affected the risk of distant metastases in multivariate analysis. The overall absolute survival rate at 5 years was 47%. Extracapsular extension, N stage, RT dose for H and NM sites, and planned ND significantly affected absolute survival in multivariate analysis. The rate of cause-specific survival at 5 years was 67%. Extracapsular extension, nodal size, N stage, overall treatment time, and planned ND significantly affected cause-specific survival in multivariate analysis. Eight patients (6%) had severe postoperative complications and 6 patients (5%) had severe late complications. Conclusion: The present study supports the effectiveness of RT in lowering the rate of developing carcinomas in the H

  13. Fever of unknown origin: prospective comparison of [18F]FDG imaging with a double-head coincidence camera and gallium-67 citrate SPET

    Meller, J.; Altenvoerde, G.; Jauho, A.; Behe, M.; Gratz, S.; Luig, H.; Becker, W.; Munzel, U.

    2000-01-01

    Gallium-67 citrate is currently considered as the tracer of first choice in the diagnostic workup of fever of unknown origin (FUO). Fluorine-18 2'-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has been shown to accumulate in malignant tumours but also in inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate FDG imaging with a double-head coincidence camera (DHCC) in patients with FUO in comparison with planar and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) 67 Ga citrate scanning. Twenty FUO patients underwent FDG imaging with a DHCC which included transaxial and longitudinal whole-body tomography. In 18 of these subjects, 67 Ga citrate whole-body and SPET imaging was performed. The 67 Ga citrate and FDG images were interpreted by two investigators, both blinded to the results of other diagnostic modalities. Forty percent (8/20) of the patients had infection, 25% (5/20) had auto-immune diseases, 10% (2/20) had neoplasms and 15% (3/20) had other diseases. Fever remained unexplained in 10% (2/20) of the patients. Of the 20 patients studied, FDG imaging was positive and essentially contributed to the final diagnosis in 11 (55%). The sensitivity of transaxial FDG tomography in detecting the focus of fever was 84% and the specificity, 86%. Positive and negative predictive values were 92% and 75%, respectively. If the analysis was restricted to the 18 patients who were investigated both with 67 Ga citrate and FDG, sensitivity was 81% and specificity, 86%. Positive and negative predictive values were 90% and 75%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of whole-body FDG tomography (again restricted to the aforementioned 18 patients) was lower (sensitivity, 36%; specificity, 86%; positive and negative predictive values, 80% and 46%, respectively). 67 Ga citrate SPET yielded a sensitivity of 67% in detecting the focus of fever and a specificity of 78%. Positive and negative predictive values were 75% and 70%, respectively. A low sensitivity (45%), but combined with a high

  14. Correlation of FDG-PET and MRI/CT with histopathology in primary diagnosis, lymph node staging and diagnosis of recurrency of head and neck cancer

    Poepperl, G.; Tiling, R.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K.; Lang, S.; Dagdelen, O.; Jaeger, L.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Correct staging of head and neck cancer is important for the patient's prognosis and further therapeutic strategies. Aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic value of FDG-PET regarding the pre-surgical diagnosis of primary tumor and cervical lymph node metastases, the diagnosis of tumour recurrence, and the localisation of unknown primary, further to compare the results to those of morphological imaging modalities (CT/MRI) and to correlate the results of both methods with histopathological findings. Patients/Methods: 115 patients (pts) (72 x primary diagnosis, 37 x recurrence, and 6 x unknown primary) underwent FDG-PET (ECAT EXACT HR+) and CT or MRI. Results were correlated with histopathological findings in terms of detection of primary and recurrent tumors as well as lymph node metastases. Results: Regarding the pre-surgical diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity for identifying primary tumors were 85% and 100% for PET and 88% and 75% for CT/MRI, respectively. Accuracy was 86% for PET and 87% for CT/MRI. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting primary lymph node envolvement were 71%/86% for PET and 68% with morphological imaging. In 23 pts histopathology revealed pT1 stages with tumor diameters [de

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer.

    Chen, Allen M; Cao, Minsong; Hsu, Sophia; Lamb, James; Mikaeilian, Argin; Yang, Yingli; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A; Steinberg, Michael L

    2017-01-01

    To report a single-institutional experience using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiation therapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Between October 2014 and August 2016, 13 consecutive patients with recurrent or new primary cancers of the head and neck that occurred in a previously irradiated field were prospectively enrolled in an institutional registry trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of MRI guided radiation therapy using a 0.35-T MRI scanner with a cobalt-60 radiation therapy source called the ViewRay system (ViewRay Inc., Cleveland, OH). Eligibility criteria included biopsy-proven evidence of recurrent or new primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, measurable disease, and previous radiation to >60 Gy. MRI guided reirradiation was delivered either using intensity modulated radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a median dose of 66 Gy or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using 7 to 8 Gy fractions on nonconsecutive days to a median dose of 40 Gy. Two patients (17%) received concurrent chemotherapy. The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 72%, respectively. A total of 227 daily MRI scans were obtained to guide reirradiation. The 2-year estimates of overall survival and progression-free survival were 53% and 59%, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis and/or conjunctivitis, and 1 case of aspiration pneumonia. Our preliminary findings show that reirradiation with MRI guided radiation therapy results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity for patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck. The superior soft tissue resolution of the MRI scans that were used for planning and delivery has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio.

  16. The role of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of patients with carcinoma of unknown primary.

    Deonarine, P; Han, S; Poon, F W; de Wet, C

    2013-08-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary is one of the ten most frequent cancers worldwide. Its median survival time is less than 10 months. Detecting primary tumour locations and/or occult metastatic lesions may inform definitive treatment and improve patients' prognosis. We aimed to determine: (1) the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography; (2) its detection rate of primary tumour locations and occult metastases and (3) factors associated with improved survival times. We retrospectively reviewed all cases in the West of Scotland for the period 1 December 2007 to 31 May 2011 that met all our selection criteria: (1) diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary; (2) a thorough but negative 'work-up' and (3) (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography report. Statistical methods included frequencies, Kaplan-Meier graphs and log-rank tests to compare survival times. (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected primary tumour sites in 19/51 (37.3%) and occult metastases in 28/51 (54.9%) of eligible patients. Its sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 79.2%, 70.4% and 74.5%, respectively; 20/51 (39.2%) patients died during the study period with a median survival of 8.4 months (range 21.4, SD ± 6.2). The number of metastatic locations was strongly associated with survival (p = 0.002), but detection of a primary tumour site (p = 0.174) or histopathology (p = 0.301) was not. (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected occult metastatic sites in the majority and a primary cancer location in a substantial minority of patients. Our results were comparable with international literature and may indicate that (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography have an early role to improve the accuracy of cancer staging and to optimise carcinoma of unknown

  17. Clinical response and safety of malathion shampoo for treatment of head lice in a primary school.

    Wananukul, Siriwan; Chatproedprai, Susheera; Tempark, Therdpong; Wananukul, Winai

    2011-04-01

    Help eradicate or at least alleviating head lice in a primary school with malathion shampoo and to study clinical response and safety of malathion shampoo. All students were examined by using a fine-toothed lice comb to help detect live lice. Direct visual examination and the collection of nits for microscopic examination were performed to differentiate viable nits from empty nits. Diagnosis of head lice was made by the presence of lice. All students that had lice and/or nits were treated with malathion shampoo. Malathion shampoo was also provided for all family members. Pediculocidal efficacy was by the presence or absence of live lice. Blood for red blood cell cholinesterase activity was drawn in 32 volunteers before treatment and after the second treatment. At the first visit, 629 students were examined and 48 students had live head lice. The infestation rate was 13% in girls and 1.3% in boys. The cure rate was 93% after the first treatment. The reported side effects were nausea, a burning sensation, and irritation that was found in five (4%), 10 (7%) and three (2%) students respectively. The mean of RBC cholinesterase activity before and after two applications showed significant changes (p = 0.03). It was -7.5 +/- 4.1% reduction from the initial, but all were in the normal range. There was no report of clinical manifestation of malathion toxicity. Malathion shampoo is safe and effective in the treatment of head lice. There is significant skin absorption so a scalp examination for head lice should be done before subsequent application to avoid unnecessary exposure.

  18. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  19. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Sakmann, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats the impact of

  20. Metachronous Second Primary Malignancies after Head and Neck Cancer in a Korean Cohort (1993-2010.

    Yuh-S Jung

    Full Text Available Second primary malignancy (SPM is the major long-term cause of patient mortality with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. As the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV-related HNSCC is increasing globally, we analyzed the patterns of SPM occurrence, the effect of the index tumor site along with attributes to HPV, and the effect of SPM on survival in South Korean patients with head and neck cancer (HNC. Data were retrieved from the Korea Central Cancer Registry, a nationwide population-based cancer registry, from 1993 to 2010. Standardized incidence ratios were analyzed and compared between index tumor sites, particularly oropharyngeal vs. non-oropharyngeal sites. After adjustment for competing risks, 3- and 5-year SPM rates were calculated using the cumulative incidence function. The effects of SPM occurrence on overall survival (OS were then analyzed. SPM rates were significantly lower for HPV-attributable oropharyngeal sites than for non-oropharyngeal sites, such as the larynx and hypopharynx (p<0.001. SPM rates were also lower for oral cavity first primary sites than for non-oropharyngeal first primary sites (p<0.001. SPMs typically occurred in the esophagus, lungs and the head and neck. Uterine cervical cancers occurred significantly more frequently after index oropharyngeal cancer in women. The 5-year and 10-year OS rates were 57.8 and 45.7% in all HNC patients, respectively. The OS after SPM occurrence was poor (5-year, 31.8%; 10-year, 20.8% compared to after index HNC occurrence (5-year, 68.4%; 10-year, 41.2%. SPM occurrence in the esophagus and lung/bronchus showed a worse OS than SPM localized to the head and neck. South Korean HNC patient, the first primary cancer site affected SPM risk and distribution. The 5- and 10-year OS rates deteriorated after SPM occurrence, particularly in the esophagus and lungs. Further optimization of follow-up strategies for effective surveillance of SPM, particularly in the esophagus

  1. Case Report: Intramammary lymph node metastasis of an unknown primary, probably occult breast, undifferentiated carcinoma [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Zacharoula Sidiropoulou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the clinical importance of intramammary lymph node metastasis of breast cancer, even though it is not rare. In the present paper, the authors present an unusual, rare case of an intramammary lymph node metastasis of an unknown primary, probably occult breast cancer, and its management. The patient was submitted to various staging exams and surgical procedures and a definitive diagnosis was not established. From a multidisciplinary context, it was assumed that the patient had a breast triple negative primary with axillary involvement. This decision lead to adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy. Challenging cases like the one described here, should always be managed within the multidisciplinary team context and recorded in the institution’s database.

  2. Staging of primary head and neck tumors and detection of recurrences

    Adams, S.; Baum, R.P.; Knecht, R.; Hoer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas represent the vast majority of all malignant tumors of the head and neck region. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor affecting survival of patients with head and neck cancer. The effectiveness of surgical treatment depends on the complete excision of all tumor tissue and an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging is therefore mandatory. In comparison to positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), morphological imaging modalities (CT, MRI) have been applied for the localization of primary head and neck tumors because of their better anatomical resolution. Metabolic tumor imaging using FDG PET is superior to morphological imaging by CT and MRI in the detection of small cervical lymph node metastases (Class 1a indication). Increased FDG uptake has also been observed in benign inflammatory lesions after radiation therapy, therefore detection of local recurrence with FDG PET can be problematic. To ensure a high diagnostic accuracy it is been suggested to perform FDG PET not earlier than 3 months after radiation therapy (Class 1a indication for the diagnosis of local recurrence). (orig.) [de

  3. Head-circumference distribution in a large primary care network differs from CDC and WHO curves.

    Daymont, Carrie; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Feudtner, Chris; Rubin, David

    2010-10-01

    To compare currently available head-circumference growth curves to curves constructed from clinical measurements from patients in a large US primary care network (PCN). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 75 412 patients in an urban-suburban PCN. Patients with a birth weight of curves. The PCN curves were most similar to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) curves and were substantially different from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) curves. The overall proportion of observations above the 95th percentile was 4.9% (PCN), 6.2% (NCHS), 8.6% (CDC), and 14.0% (WHO). The proportion below the 5th percentile was 4.4% (PCN), 5.1% (NCHS), 2.9% (CDC), and 2.3% (WHO). When using the CDC curves, the proportion above the 95th percentile increased from 0.2% for children younger than 2 weeks to 11.8% for children 12 months old. When using the WHO curves, the proportion above the 95th percentile was >5% at all ages, with a maximum of 18.0% for children older than 24 months. The CDC and WHO head-circumference curves describe different distributions than the clinical measurements in our PCN population, especially for children with larger heads. The resulting percentile misclassification may delay diagnosis in children with intracranial pathology in very young infants and spur unnecessary evaluation of healthy children older than 6 months.

  4. Histogram Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficients for Occult Tonsil Cancer in Patients with Cervical Nodal Metastasis from an Unknown Primary Site at Presentation.

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Hye Ok; Kim, Dae Yoon; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Cho, So Hyun; Koh, Myeong Ju; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Sang Yoon; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To explore the added value of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values over magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the detection of occult palatine tonsil squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients with cervical nodal metastasis from a cancer of an unknown primary site. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Differences in the bimodal histogram parameters of the ADC values were assessed among occult palatine tonsil SCC (n = 19), overt palatine tonsil SCC (n = 20), and normal palatine tonsils (n = 20). One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze differences among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The increased sensitivity of histogram analysis over MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of occult palatine tonsil SCC was evaluated as added value. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the mean, standard deviation, and 50th and 90th percentile ADC values among the three groups (P histogram analysis was 52.6% over MR imaging alone and 15.8% over combined conventional MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Adding ADC histogram analysis to conventional MR imaging can improve the detection sensitivity for occult palatine tonsil SCC in patients with a cervical nodal metastasis originating from a cancer of an unknown primary site. © RSNA, 2015.

  5. Diagnostic Performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cancer of Unknown Primary: Additional Benefit over CT-Based Conventional Work up

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the era of well-developed site-specific treatment strategies in cancer, identification of occult primary is of paramount importance in CUP patients. Furthermore, exact determination of the extent of the disease may help in optimizing treatment planning. The aim of the present study was to investigate additional value of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP as an appropriate imaging tool in early phase of initial standard work up.Materials and Methods: Sixty-two newly diagnosed CUP patients with inconclusive diagnostic CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis referring for F-18 FDG PET/CT were enrolled in this study. Standard of reference was defined as histopathology, other diagnostic procedures and a 3-month formal clinical follow up. The results of PET/CT were categorized as suggestion for primary site and additional metastasis and classified as true positive, false positive, false negative and true negative. The impact of additional metastasis revealed by F-18 FDG PET/CT on treatment planning and the time contribution of F-18 FDG PET/CT in diagnostic pathway was investigated.Results: Sixty-two patients with mean age of 62 (30 men, 32 women, PET/CT correctly identified primary origin in 32% with false positive rate of 14.8%. No primary lesion was detected after negative PET/CT according to standard of reference. Sensitivity, Specificity and accuracy were 100%, 78% and 85%, respectively. Additional metastatic site was found in 56% with 22% impact on treatment planning. Time contribution for PET/CT was 10% of total diagnostic pathway.Conclusion: Providing higher detection rate of primary origin with excellent diagnostic performance, shortening the diagnostic pathway and improving treatment planning, F-18 FDG PET/CT may play a major role in diagnostic work up of CUP patients and may be recommended as an alternative imaging tool in early phase of investigation.

  6. Role of whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with biopsy proven tumor metastases from unknown primary site

    Pelosi, E.; Pennone, M.; Deandreis, D.; Bisi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of whole body PET/CT scan with 1 8F -fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of the primary tumor in patients with metastatic cancer from unknown primary origin (CUP syndrome). Methods: Sixty-eight consecutive patients, with CUP syndrome (39 lymph nodes, 29 visceral biopsy proven tumor metastases), underwent a whole-body FDG-PET/CT study. All enrolled patients were unsuccessfully studied, within the previous month, with physical examination, laboratory tests and conventional diagnostic procedures. All the pathological findings identified at PET/CT scan and suspected for primaries, were further investigated. After PET study, the minimum follow-up period for the inclusion in the studied population was 3 months. Results: The primary tumor site was correctly identified by FDG-PET/CT in 24 patients (24/68, 35.3%): long (0-9). rino/oro-pharynx (n=6), pancreas (n=5), colon (n=2). uterus (n=2). In 5 cases, FDG-PET scan did not identify a primary pathological focus, which was subsequently detected by other diagnostic methods within 3 months. In 39 patients (39168, 57.4%), the primary tumor site was not localized. However, in 9 of them, FDG-PET/CT scan identified further unexpected metastases, modifying the stage of disease. Overall, the following oncological treatment was influenced by the PET scan, in a total of 33 patients (33/68, 48.5%). Conclusion: Our data strongly support the diagnostic contribution of whole body FDG-PET/CT scan in the evaluation of patients with CUP syndrome and suggest its use in an early phase of the diagnostic iter to optimize patient management

  7. Metastatic carcinoma in the cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site: results of bilateral neck plus mucosal irradiation vs. ipsilateral neck irradiation

    Reddy, Sarada P.; Marks, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcome for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of cervical lymph nodes metastatic from an unknown primary site who were irradiated to both sides of the neck and potential mucosal sites with opposed photon beams, and for those irradiated to the ipsilateral side of the neck alone with an electron beam. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site were irradiated by two different methods. Thirty-six were irradiated with a bilateral technique (BT), i.e., to both sides of the neck, including the naso-oro-hypopharyngeal mucosa, and 16 were irradiated with an electron beam (EB) to the ipsilateral side of the neck alone. Twenty patients of the BT group and 11 of the EB group had cervical lymph node dissections, and the remaining 21 patients had lymph node biopsies, prior to radiotherapy. Results: Tumor control in the ipsilateral side of the neck did not differ for either radiation technique, but was significantly higher after lymph node dissection than after biopsy (90 vs. 48%; p = 0.0004). Control of subclinical metastases in the contralateral cervical lymph nodes was higher for patients irradiated with BT than for patients irradiated with EB (86 vs. 56%; p 0.03). The occult primary was later discovered in 8% of the patients in the BT group and 44% of the EB group (p = 0.0005). The disease-free survival rate at 5 years for patients who had lymph node dissection prior to irradiation was 61%, and was 37% for those who had biopsy (p = 0.05). Only 20% of patients who subsequently developed an occult primary were salvaged and survived for 5 years after salvage treatment. Conclusion: Bilateral neck and mucosal irradiation is superior to ipsilateral neck irradiation in preventing contralateral cervical lymph node metastases and the subsequent appearance of an occult primary cancer. Both techniques combined with cervical lymph node dissection were equally effective

  8. Patterns of care and survival after a cancer of unknown primary (CUP) diagnosis: A population-based nested cohort study in Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients.

    Schaffer, Andrea L; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Dobbins, Timothy A; Er, Chuang C; Ward, Robyn L; Vajdic, Claire M

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about patterns of care after a cancer of unknown primary (CUP) diagnosis. We performed a retrospective cohort study to describe and compare the treatment, health service use and survival of patients with CUP and metastatic cancer of known primary among 143,956 Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients, 2004-2007. We randomly matched clients with CUP (C809; n=252) with clients with a first diagnosis of metastatic solid cancer of known primary (n=980). We ascertained health services from the month of diagnosis up to 2 months post-diagnosis for consultations, hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and up to 1 year for treatment. We compared cancer treatments using conditional logistic regression; consultation rates using negative binomial regression; and survival using stratified Cox regression. 30% of CUP patients and 70% of patients with known primary received cancer treatment and the median survival was 37 days and 310 days respectively. CUP patients received fewer cancer medicines (odds ratio (OR)=0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33-0.89) and less cancer-related surgery (OR=0.25, 95% CI 0.15-0.41); males with CUP received more radiation therapy (OR=2.88, 95% CI 1.69-4.91). CUP patients had more primary care consultations (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.25, 95% CI 1.11-1.41), emergency department visits (IRR=1.86, 95% CI 1.50-2.31) and hospitalizations (IRR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03-1.35), and a higher risk of death within 30 days (hazard ratio=3.30, 95% CI 1.69-6.44). Patients with CUP receive less treatment but use more health services, which may reflect underlying patient and disease characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Commonwealth of Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical study of 18F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging in disseminated carcinoma of unknown primary site

    Wang Guohui; Liang Peiyan; Cai Yanjun; Zhang Weiguang; Xie Chuanmiao; Wu Peihong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is not uncommon in usual clinical settings. They are, by definition, those cases with clinically suspected primary malignancy but not revealed by conventional investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of whole-body 18 F-fluoro- deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in detecting a primary neoplasm for these patients. Methods: A totle of 150 patients with retrievable records from 169 CUP patients were selected within a group of consecutive 2589 patients from Jan. 2006 to Jun. 2007. All cases underwent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan. The final diagnoses were confirmed by pathologic results, other imaging modalities or clinical follow-up. Results: Among 150 patients, primary tumor sites were successfully detected by whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan in 70 cases (46.7%), of which 52 were pathologically confirmed and 18 by clinical follow-up. And 38 cases (54.3%) were lung cancer, 8 (11.4%) were nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 13 (18.6%) in digestive sys- tem, and 11 (15.7%) in other systems. Three clinically suspected CUP cases with negative 18 F-FDG PET/ CT were subsequently confirmed of benign processes by clinical follow-up. Six patients were wrongly diagnosed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT, and 15 patients did not have a confirmed diagnosis by the end of research. The primary cause of malignancy after 18 F-FDG PET/CT remained obscure in 56 patients, only 3 of whom be- came known during the course of clinical follow-up (nasopharyngeal bladder and esophageal carcinoma). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging plays an important role in patients with metastatic CUP. (authors)

  10. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without belinostat as empiric first-line treatment for patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site

    Hainsworth, John D; Daugaard, Gedske; Lesimple, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    : The addition of belinostat to paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve the PFS of patients with CUP who were receiving first-line therapy, although the patients who received belinostat had a higher investigator-assessed response rate. Future trials in CUP should focus on specific subsets, defined either......BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of belinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, when added to paclitaxel/carboplatin in the empiric first-line treatment of patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP). METHODS: In this randomized phase 2 trial......, previously untreated patients with CUP were randomized to receive belinostat plus paclitaxel/carboplatin (group A) or paclitaxel/carboplatin alone (group B) repeated every 21 days. Patients were re-evaluated every 2 cycles, and those without disease progression continued treatment for 6 cycles. Patients...

  11. Quality of Life of Patients with Spinal Metastasis from Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: A Longitudinal Study of Surgical Management Combined with Postoperative Radiation Therapy.

    Ma, Yifei; He, Shaohui; Liu, Tielong; Yang, Xinghai; Zhao, Jian; Yu, Hongyu; Feng, Jiaojiao; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-10-04

    Patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin have limited life expectancy and poor quality of life. Surgery and radiation therapy remain the main treatment options, but, to our knowledge, there are limited data concerning quality-of-life improvement after surgery and radiation therapy and even fewer data on whether surgical intervention would affect quality of life. Patients were enrolled between January 2009 and January 2014 at the Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. The quality of life of 2 patient groups (one group that underwent surgery followed by postoperative radiation therapy and one group that underwent radiation therapy only) was assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire during a 6-month period. A subgroup analysis of quality of life was performed to compare different surgical strategies in the surgical group. A total of 287 patients, including 191 patients in the group that underwent surgery and 96 patients in the group that underwent radiation therapy only, were enrolled in the prospective study; 177 patients completed all 5 checkpoints and 110 patients had died by the final checkpoint. The surgery group had significantly higher adjusted quality-of-life scores than the radiation therapy group in each domain of the FACT-G questionnaire (all p quality of life in patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin in the 6-month assessment. In terms of surgical strategies, circumferential decompression seems better than laminectomy alone in quality-of-life improvement. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. Prospective Study of 68Ga-DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Unknown Primary Sites.

    Sadowski, Samira M; Neychev, Vladimir; Millo, Corina; Shih, Joanna; Nilubol, Naris; Herscovitch, Peter; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen J; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-02-20

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) are increasing in incidence, and accurate staging is important for selecting the appropriate treatment. (68)Ga-DOTATATE imaging is a promising approach for detecting GEPNETs and could help in selecting optimal therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the clinical utility of (68)Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in detecting unknown primary and metastatic GEPNETs. One hundred thirty-one patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients undergoing (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, (111)In-pentetreotide single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and multiphasic CT scan, and/or magnetic resonance imaging in a blinded fashion with comprehensive biochemical testing. The primary outcome measure was the detection of lesions by each imaging study. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging detected 95.1% of lesions (95% CI, 92.4% to 96.8%) with an average maximum standardized uptake value of 65.4 ± 47 (range, 6.9 to 244), anatomic imaging detected 45.3% of lesions (95% CI, 37.9% to 52.9%), and (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT detected 30.9% of lesions (95% CI, 25.0% to 37.5%), with a significant difference between imaging modalities (P < .001). In four of 14 patients (28.6%), (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT found a previously unknown primary tumor, and detected primary GEPNET, lymph node, and distant metastases correctly in 72 of 113 lesions (63.7%) when compared with histopathology, with 22.1% and 38.9% detected by using (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and anatomic imaging, respectively. On the basis of findings with (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 43 of 131 patients (32.8%) had a change in management recommendation. In patients with carcinoid symptoms but negative biochemical testing, (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected lesions in 65.2% of patients, 40% of which were detected neither by anatomic imaging nor by (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET

  13. Locoregional Recurrent or Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: Management Strategies and Challenges.

    Wong, Stuart J; Heron, Dwight E; Stenson, Kerstin; Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with locoregional recurrent or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been guided by well-reasoned principles and informed by carefully tested chemotherapy and radiation regimens. However, clinical decision making for this population is complicated by many factors. Although surgery is generally considered the treatment of choice for patients with HNSCC with recurrent disease or new second primary disease in a previously irradiated field, operability of cases is not always straightforward. Postoperative treatment is frequently warranted but carries significant risk. In addition, the rapid rise in the incidence of HPV-associated HNSCC raises the question of whether established treatment paradigms should be re-examined in this population of patients with a much better prognosis than the non-HPV population. Furthermore, new radiation techniques and new systemic agents show early promising results in recent clinical studies, suggesting potential for practice-changing effects in the future management of this disease. This article examines each of the treatment modalities used in the care of patients with HNSCC with recurrent or new second primary disease and provides a perspective to aid clinicians in the management of this disease.

  14. Carcinoma escamoso metastásico primario de origen desconocido. Presentación de un caso Primary Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Origin. A Case Report

    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El cáncer primario oculto representa según varias series del 0,5 al 7 % de todos los cánceres que se diagnostican y la edad media de presentación es 60 años. Se presenta un caso de metástasis ganglionar de carcinoma primario de células escamosas no identificado, de una paciente de 58 años de edad, de color de piel blanca, con antecedentes de salud, ama de casa, que fumaba desde joven e ingería alcohol frecuentemente. Ingresó con aumento de volumen de los ganglios del cuello. Se diagnosticó por biopsia metástasis de carcinoma escamoso. No pudo identificarse el primario en vida ni en la necropsia. El cáncer metastásico primario de origen desconocido sigue siendo un reto para la práctica clínica.Occult primary cancer represents, according to several series, from 0,5 % to 7 % of all diagnosed cancers, the average onset age being 60 years old. We report the case of nodal metastasis of unidentified primary squamous cell carcinoma in a 58 years old patient with white skin and a history of good health. The patient was a housekeeper who smoked from early age and frequently consumed alcohol. She was admitted with an enlargement of the neck glands. Metastases of squamous cell carcinoma were diagnosed through biopsy. Primary cancer was not identified neither while still alive or at necropsy. Primary metastatic cancers of unknown origin remain a challenge for clinical practice.

  15. Primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to mild head injury. Report of two cases

    Katsuno, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to direct mild head injury are reported. They presented with internal ophthalmoplegia, dilated nonreactive pupils, and very mild disturbance in consciousness. Except for the persistent oculomotor nerve palsy, both the patients recovered fully within one week. Neither demonstrated a history that was suggestive of a cause for their oculomotor nerve palsy. Initial CT scans demonstrated localized subarachnoid hemorrhage around the brain stem. One of the patients had sustained a fracture of the anterior clinoid process. As the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the oculomotor nerve palsy we suspected mild injury to the pupillomotor fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament and that of the pupillary fibers at the posterior petroclinoidal ligament. We speculate that these perforating fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament acted as a fulcrum due to downward displacement of the brainstem at the time of impact. (author)

  16. Radiosensitivity of primary tumour cultures as a determinant of curability of human head and neck cancers

    Peters, L.J.; Tofilon, P.J.; Goepfert, H.; Brock, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1987, 31 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck who were treated on protocol by surgery and post-operative radiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center had radiosensitivity measurements made on primary cultures of the surgical specimens using the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System. The parameter of cell survival at 2 Gy (S 2 ) was correlated with the clinical outcome independently of pathological risk factors. All five recurrences have been in patients with S 2 values >0.3 (p = 0.08). Evidence of significant intratumoral heterogeneity of cellular radiosensitivity in vitro was demonstrated in one of four cultures tested. Mathematical modelling suggests that in the absence of marked heterogeneity, the S 2 parameter is likely to be more robust than other radiobiologically based assays in predicting clinical treatment outcome. (author)

  17. Adenocarcinoma metastático cutâneo de origem desconhecida: Relato de um caso Metastatic cutaneous adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site: Case report

    Caio Sergio Rizkallah Nahas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Metástases podem ser a primeira manifestação de adenocarcinoma. Cerca de 60% destas podem ser cutâneas e correspondem a casos de neoplasia em estágio avançado. A procura pelo sítio primário é onerosa, sendo necessário o emprego de diversos exames de imagem, endoscópicos e imunoistoquímicos. Apesar disto, o sítio primário é descoberto somente em 15% a 20% dos pacientes, sendo os demais casos reconhecidos nas autopsias. OBJETIVO: Relatar um caso de adenocarcinoma, moderadamente diferenciado metastático cutâneo, de sítio primário desconhecido. A região acometida foi a pele da fossa ilíaca esquerda. RESULTADOS: A lesão foi ressecada cirurgicamente. O sítio primário não foi identificado por nenhum exame de imagem ou endoscópico. O estudo imunoistoquímico revelou o seguinte padrão de imunoperoxidase: CEA negativo, CK7 positivo, CK20 negativo e PSA negativo. Com base nestes achados, foram afastados tumores primários do intestino grosso e da próstata (PSA, CK20 e CEA negativos. Os principais sítios primários aventados foram pâncreas e vias biliares. CONCLUSÃO: A procura pelo sítio primário de adenocarcinoma metastático continua sendo tarefa difícil, onerosa e com pouco impacto no tratamento dos pacientes acometidos.BACKGROUND: Metastases may be the first manifestation of adenocarcinoma. Up to 60% are cutaneous and present in advanced stage neoplasms. Research for the primary site is costly and requires endoscopy, imaging and immunohistochemical exams. The primary site becomes obvious in only 15% to 20% of live patients and is detected mainly at autopsy. AIM: To report a case of metastatic cutaneous moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site, located in the lower left abdomen. RESULTS: The lesion was surgically resected. Primary site was not found by any imaging or endoscopy exams. The immunohistochemistry was negative for CEA, CK20, PSA and positive for CK7. Based on these exams

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the head and neck: A comparative study by primary site based on population data.

    Kuan, Edward C; Alonso, Jose E; Tajudeen, Bobby A; Arshi, Armin; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2017-08-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the head and neck is an extremely rare neuroendocrine malignancy. In this study, we describe the incidence and determinants of survival of patients with SmCC of the head and neck between the years of 1973 and 2012 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database as differed by primary site. Retrospective, population-based cohort study. A total of 237 cases of SmCC of the head and neck were identified, which was divided into sinonasal primaries (n = 82) and all other head and neck primaries (n = 155). Clinicopathologic and epidemiologic variables were analyzed as predictors of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) based on the Kaplan-Meier method. More than half of sinonasal primaries presented with Kadish stage C or D. On multivariate analysis, surgery was the only independent predictor of improved DSS (P = .008) for sinonasal primaries; in contrast, radiation therapy was a favorable prognosticator for OS (P = .007) and DSS (P = .043) in extrasinonasal sites. Comparison of survival between sinonasal primaries and all other sites demonstrated that sinonasal SmCC had uniformly better OS (P = .002) and DSS (P = .006). SmCC in the head and neck remains rare, and sinonasal primaries appear to have improved survival compared to other sites. Based on these results, optimal treatment for sinonasal SmCC appears to be surgical therapy, whereas radiation therapy is the preferred treatment for SmCC of other primary sites, particularly the larynx. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1785-1790, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. A phase II study of primary reirradiation in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Leemans, Charles R.; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this prospective study, the effect of a second course of primary radiotherapy on locoregional control, survival and toxicity was investigated, in patients who underwent a second course of high dose irradiation for second primary or locoregional recurrent squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (HNSCC) in a previously irradiated area. Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients with second primary (n=26) or locoregional recurrent (n=8) tumours were treated with a second course of high dose radiotherapy. Patients were selected for re-irradiation in case of inoperable and/or unresectable tumours. In most cases, the target volume for re-irradiation was confined to the gross tumour volume (GTV). No elective radiotherapy was applied in the former high-dose area. A total dose of 46 Gy was applied to elective areas with a boost up to 60 Gy with conventional fractionation. The median follow-up period was 32 months. Results: The locoregional control rate after 2 years was 27%. The 3-year overall survival was 22%. The most frequently reported acute side-effect was acute mucositis resulting in swallowing complaints. Pharyngeal and oesophageal late morbidity was also the most important late side-effect. In general, acute and late radiation-induced morbidity remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: In conclusion, primary re-irradiation appears to be feasible in terms of acute and late radiation-induced toxicity. To improve outcome in terms locoregional control and survival, future studies should be focussed on optimising radiation schedules and the addition of concomitant chemotherapy

  20. A Comparative Study of the Influence of Head Teachers Management Styles on Pupils Performance in KCPE in Public and Private Primary Schools in Nakuru Municipality, Kenya

    Shibo, Margaret Nekesa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of management styles of head teacher's on pupils' performance in private and public primary schools in Nakuru municipality at Kenya Certificate of Primary Education level. The population comprised of teachers and head teachers in public primary schools. The study adopted the ex post facto…

  1. Volume-based predictive biomarkers of sequential FDG-PET/CT for sunitinib in cancer of unknown primary: identification of the best benefited patients

    Ma, Yifei [Second Military Medical University, Department of Orthorpedic Oncology, Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai (China); Second Military Medical University, Department of Pathology, Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai (China); Xu, Wei; Xiao, Jianru [Second Military Medical University, Department of Orthorpedic Oncology, Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai (China); Bai, Ruojing [Geriatrics Institute, Department of Geriatrics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Laboratory of Neuro-Trauma and Neurodegenerative Disorder, Tianjin (China); Li, Yiming [Neurosurgery Institute, Department of Neuro-oncology, Beijing (China); Yu, Hongyu [Second Military Medical University, Department of Pathology, Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai (China); Yang, Chunshan [Panorama Medical Imaging Center, Department of PET/CT Radiology, Shanghai (China); Department of PET/CT Radiology Center, Shanghai (China); Shi, Huazheng; Zhang, Jian [Department of PET/CT Radiology Center, Shanghai (China); Li, Jidong [The First People' s Hospital of Shangqiu, Department of Stomatology, Shangqiu, Henan Province (China); Wang, Chenguang [Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2017-02-15

    To test the performance of sequential {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in predicting survival after sunitinib therapies in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). CUP patients were enrolled for sequential PET/CT scanning for sunitinib and a control group. Univariate and multivariate analysis were applied to test the efficacy of sunitinib therapy in CUP patients. Next, sequential analyses involving PET/CT parameters were performed to identify and validate sensitive PET/CT biomarkers for sunitinib therapy. Finally, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (TDROC) analyses were performed to compare the predictive accuracy. Multivariate analysis proved that sunitinib group had significantly improved survival (p < 0.01) as compared to control group. After cycle 2 of therapy, multivariate analysis identified volume-based PET/CT parameters as sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib (p < 0.01). TDROC curves demonstrated whole-body total lesion glycolysis reduction (Δ WTLG) and follow-up WTLG to have good accuracy for efficacy prediction. This evidence was validated after cycle 4 of therapy with the same method. Sunitinib therapy proved effective in treatment of CUP. PET/CT volume-based parameters may help predict outcome of sunitinib therapy, in which Δ WTLG and follow-up WTLG seem to be sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib efficacy. Patients with greater reduction and lower WTLG at follow-up seem to have better survival outcome. (orig.)

  2. Time trends in incidence and prognosis of primary liver cancer and liver metastases of unknown origin in a Danish region, 1985-2004

    Erichsen, Rune; Jepsen, Peter; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Changes, over the last 20 years, in the diagnostic procedures and treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) and liver metastases of unknown origin (LMUO) may have affected the clinical course of both cancers. Few longitudinal studies examined this issue. In a population-based setting, we...... studied changes in the incidence and prognosis of PLC and LMUO over time. METHODS: Between 1985 and 2004, we identified 2675 patients with PLC and LMUO in three Danish counties, with a population of 1.4 million. We computed the standardized incidence rate (SIR), ratio of PLC to LMUO diagnoses, median...... survival, and estimated mortality rate ratio adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity. RESULTS: The SIR of PLC increased from 3.2 in 1985 to 5.0 in 2003, and the SIR of LMUO increased from 3.7 to 6.4. No increase was noted in the PLC-to-LMUO ratio over time (P=0.1 for trend). From 1985 to 2004, the median...

  3. Volume-based predictive biomarkers of sequential FDG-PET/CT for sunitinib in cancer of unknown primary: identification of the best benefited patients

    Ma, Yifei; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Jianru; Bai, Ruojing; Li, Yiming; Yu, Hongyu; Yang, Chunshan; Shi, Huazheng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Jidong; Wang, Chenguang

    2017-01-01

    To test the performance of sequential "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in predicting survival after sunitinib therapies in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). CUP patients were enrolled for sequential PET/CT scanning for sunitinib and a control group. Univariate and multivariate analysis were applied to test the efficacy of sunitinib therapy in CUP patients. Next, sequential analyses involving PET/CT parameters were performed to identify and validate sensitive PET/CT biomarkers for sunitinib therapy. Finally, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (TDROC) analyses were performed to compare the predictive accuracy. Multivariate analysis proved that sunitinib group had significantly improved survival (p < 0.01) as compared to control group. After cycle 2 of therapy, multivariate analysis identified volume-based PET/CT parameters as sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib (p < 0.01). TDROC curves demonstrated whole-body total lesion glycolysis reduction (Δ WTLG) and follow-up WTLG to have good accuracy for efficacy prediction. This evidence was validated after cycle 4 of therapy with the same method. Sunitinib therapy proved effective in treatment of CUP. PET/CT volume-based parameters may help predict outcome of sunitinib therapy, in which Δ WTLG and follow-up WTLG seem to be sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib efficacy. Patients with greater reduction and lower WTLG at follow-up seem to have better survival outcome. (orig.)

  4. Feasibility of primary tumor culture models and preclinical prediction assays for head and neck cancer : A narrative review

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated

  5. A simple culture method inducing sexual reproduction by Fusarium graminearum, the primary causal agent of Fusarium head blight

    The homothallic ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum is the primary causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of wheat and barley worldwide. The fungus undergoes both asexual and sexual stages in its life cycle. The asexual stage produces conidiospores, whereas the sexual s...

  6. Knowledge and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Delivering Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Berkowitz, Callie; Allen, Deborah H; Tenhover, Jennifer; Zullig, Leah L; Ragsdale, John; Fischer, Jonathan E; Pollak, Kathryn I; Koontz, Bridget F

    2017-07-14

    Long-term care for head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors is complex and requires coordination among multiple providers. Clinical practice guidelines highlight the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in screening for secondary cancer/recurrence, assessment of late/long-term side effects, and referrals for appropriate specialty management of toxicity. However, these responsibilities may be difficult to meet within the scope of primary care practice. We conducted this study to explore preferences, comfort, and knowledge of PCPs in the care of HNC survivors. We piloted a 40-item web-based survey developed with oncologist and PCP input targeted for family medicine and internal medicine providers. Responses were collected within a single university health system over 2 months. PCPs (n = 28; RR = 11.3%) were interested in learning about health promotion after cancer treatment (89%) and generally agree that their current practice patterns address healthy lifestyle behaviors (82%). However, only 32% of PCPs felt confident they could manage late/long-term side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. Only 29% felt confident they could provide appropriate cancer screening. Looking at shared care responsibilities with oncology providers, PCPs perceived being responsible for 30% of care in the first year after treatment and 81% of care after 5 years. Seventy-one percent of PCPs agreed that oncologists provided them necessary information, yet 32% of PCPs found it difficult to coordinate with cancer providers. While these PCPs perceive increased care responsibility for long-term survivors, most are uncomfortable screening for recurrence and managing late/long-term side effects. Education and mutual coordination between PCPs and oncology providers may improve survivor care.

  7. Primary and Central Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Kennedy, Laurence; Malyapa, Robert S.; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced central and primary hypothyroidism regarding total dose, fractionation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 312 patients treated with RT for extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1964 and 2000. The cervical lymph nodes were irradiated in 197 patients. The radiation doses to the thyroid gland and hypothalamic-pituitary axis were estimated by reconstructing the treatment plans. Results: Clinical central hypothyroidism (CH) was observed in 17 patients (5.4%); the median clinical latency was 4.8 years. Clinical primary hypothyroidism (PH) was observed in 40 patients (20.3%); the median clinical latency was 3.1 years. Multivariate analysis of clinical CH revealed that fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and total dose to the pituitary were not significant. Multivariate analysis of clinical PH revealed that the total dose to the thyroid (p = 0.043) was significant, but adjuvant chemotherapy, age, and gender were not. Of the patients tested for hypopituitarism, 14 (20.3%) of 69 demonstrated subclinical CH and 17 (27.4%) of 62 demonstrated subclinical PH. The 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from clinical CH and PH were 97% and 87% and 68% and 67%, respectively. Of the patients tested, the 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from subclinical CH and PH were 91% and 78% and 71% and 71%, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical and subclinical manifestations of late radiation toxicity were observed in the thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although CH did not indicate a dependence on fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, or total dose to the pituitary, PH showed a dependence on the total dose to the thyroid gland

  8. Incidence of dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Selzer, Edgar; Liederer Susanne; Lemaire, Christiane; Radonjic, Dejan; Poetter, Richard; Bachtiary, Barbara [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kren, Gerhard; Knocke, Thomas [Hospital Hietzing, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kornek, Gabriela [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Internal Medicine I

    2011-06-15

    To retrospectively assess the incidence of radiation dermatitis in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) who received primary radiotherapy in combination with cetuximab in a curative intent. A total of 112 consecutively treated patients who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy at the Departments of Radiotherapy at the Medical University in Vienna and the Hospital Hietzing (Vienna) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered either as conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks) or using a concomitant boost protocol (72 Gy in 6 weeks). The incidence of dermatitis and mucositis within the radiation portals in 103 eligible patients was compared with a historical control group treated at the Medical University of Vienna as well as with published data. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 dermatitis was 57%, 29%, and 1% in the radiotherapy plus cetuximab treated collective. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 mucositis was 37%, 47%, and 4%, respectively. The incidence of grade 3 dermatitis during concurrent radiotherapy plus cetuximab was 29% in our patient collective. Only one case of grade 4 dermatitis was observed. These results do not statistically differ significantly from the incidence reported in the Bonner trial and indicate that cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  9. Incidence of dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Selzer, Edgar; Liederer Susanne; Lemaire, Christiane; Radonjic, Dejan; Poetter, Richard; Bachtiary, Barbara; Kren, Gerhard; Knocke, Thomas; Kornek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the incidence of radiation dermatitis in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) who received primary radiotherapy in combination with cetuximab in a curative intent. A total of 112 consecutively treated patients who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy at the Departments of Radiotherapy at the Medical University in Vienna and the Hospital Hietzing (Vienna) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered either as conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks) or using a concomitant boost protocol (72 Gy in 6 weeks). The incidence of dermatitis and mucositis within the radiation portals in 103 eligible patients was compared with a historical control group treated at the Medical University of Vienna as well as with published data. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 dermatitis was 57%, 29%, and 1% in the radiotherapy plus cetuximab treated collective. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 mucositis was 37%, 47%, and 4%, respectively. The incidence of grade 3 dermatitis during concurrent radiotherapy plus cetuximab was 29% in our patient collective. Only one case of grade 4 dermatitis was observed. These results do not statistically differ significantly from the incidence reported in the Bonner trial and indicate that cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  10. Radio(chemo)therapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site. A retrospective analysis

    Fakhrian, K.; Thamm, R.; Knapp, S.; Molls, M.; Pigorsch, S.; Geinitz, H.; Haller, B.

    2012-01-01

    The goal was to retrospectively review the outcome of patients with cervical lymph node metastases of squamuos cell carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) treated with radio(chemo)therapy. Patients and methods A total of 65 patients with CUP N1-3, M0, treated between 1988 and 2009 were evaluated: 61 patients underwent surgical resection followed by postoperative radio(chemo)therapy, 4 patients received definitive radiochemotherapy. Radiotherapy of bilateral neck nodes + the parapharyngeal region (COMP-RT) was performed in 48 patients (80%) and a unilateral radiotherapy of lymph nodes (UL-RT) in 17 patients (20%). Results After a median follow-up time of 64 months (range 3-219 months), the estimated 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 71 ± 6% and 48 ± 7%, respectively. The recurrent free survival (RFS) rate at 2- and 5-years was 58 ± 6% and 48% ± 7%, respectively. Extracapsular spread, resection status (R0 vs. R1/R2), neck lymph node level (I-III vs. IV-V), and Karnofsky index (60-70 vs. 80-100) were significant prognostic factors for OS and RFS in the univariate analysis. Lower nodal stage (N1/N2a vs. N2b/N2c/N3) was significantly associated with a better OS. Resection status and involvement of lymph node level IV significantly affected the OS and RFS in the multivariate analysis. COMP-RT or concurrent chemotherapy was not associated with a better OS or RFS. Conclusion An advantage of comprehensive radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy compared with unilateral radiotherapy of lymph nodes was not observed. (orig.)

  11. Radio(chemo)therapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site. A retrospective analysis

    Fakhrian, K.; Thamm, R.; Knapp, S.; Molls, M.; Pigorsch, S.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Haller, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-01-15

    The goal was to retrospectively review the outcome of patients with cervical lymph node metastases of squamuos cell carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) treated with radio(chemo)therapy. Patients and methods A total of 65 patients with CUP N1-3, M0, treated between 1988 and 2009 were evaluated: 61 patients underwent surgical resection followed by postoperative radio(chemo)therapy, 4 patients received definitive radiochemotherapy. Radiotherapy of bilateral neck nodes + the parapharyngeal region (COMP-RT) was performed in 48 patients (80%) and a unilateral radiotherapy of lymph nodes (UL-RT) in 17 patients (20%). Results After a median follow-up time of 64 months (range 3-219 months), the estimated 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 71 {+-} 6% and 48 {+-} 7%, respectively. The recurrent free survival (RFS) rate at 2- and 5-years was 58 {+-} 6% and 48% {+-} 7%, respectively. Extracapsular spread, resection status (R0 vs. R1/R2), neck lymph node level (I-III vs. IV-V), and Karnofsky index (60-70 vs. 80-100) were significant prognostic factors for OS and RFS in the univariate analysis. Lower nodal stage (N1/N2a vs. N2b/N2c/N3) was significantly associated with a better OS. Resection status and involvement of lymph node level IV significantly affected the OS and RFS in the multivariate analysis. COMP-RT or concurrent chemotherapy was not associated with a better OS or RFS. Conclusion An advantage of comprehensive radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy compared with unilateral radiotherapy of lymph nodes was not observed. (orig.)

  12. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    McRoy

    Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were ... Conclusion: We observed a rising incidence of head and neck .... head and neck cancer rose from 44 cases in ... Carcinosarcoma. 1. Clear cell tumour. 0. 1. Cutaneous lymphoma. 1.

  13. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Dohmen, Amy J. C.; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well

  14. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Amy J. C. Dohmen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  15. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Dohmen, Amy J. C., E-mail: a.dohmen@nki.nl [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Swartz, Justin E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Willems, Stefan M. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Spijker, René [Medical library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DE (Netherlands); Dutch Cochrane Centre, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Neefjes, Jacques [Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Zuur, Charlotte L. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)

    2015-08-28

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  16. Brain response to primary blast wave using validated finite element models of human head and advanced combat helmet

    Liying eZhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a signature injury in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH, a finite element (FE study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27-0.66 MPa from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP in the head ranged from 0.68-1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10-35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44% was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%. The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence "iso-damage" curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen curves

  17. Whole-brain radiotherapy with 20 Gy in 5 fractions for brain metastases in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP)

    Rades, D.; Bohlen, G.; Dunst, J.; Lohynska, R.; Veninga, T.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Schild, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most common treatment for brain metastases. Survival of patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) presenting with brain metastases is extremely poor. A radiation program with a short overall treatment time (short-course RT) would be preferable to longer programs if it provides similar outcomes. This study compares short-course RT with 20 Gy in 5 fractions (5 x 4 Gy) given over 5 days to longer programs in CUP patients. Patients and Methods: Data regarding 101 CUP patients who received either short course WBRT (n = 34) with 5 x 4 Gy or long-course WBRT (n = 67) with 10 x 3 Gy given over 2 weeks or 20 x 2 Gy given over 4 weeks for brain metastases were analyzed retrospectively. Six additional potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of brain metastases, extracranial metastases, RPA-(Recursive Partitioning Analysis-)class. Results: On univariate analysis, the radiation program was not associated with survival (p = 0.88) nor intracerebral control (p = 0.36). Improved survival was associated with KPS ≥ 70 (p < 0.001), absence of extracranial metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA-class 1 (p < 0.001). On multivariate analyses, KPS (risk ratio [RR]: 4.55; p < 0.001), extracranial metastases (RR: 1.70; p = 0.018), and RPA-class (RR: 2.86; p < 0.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, KPS (p < 0.001) and RPA-class (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with intracerebral control. On multivariate analyses, KPS (RR: 2.72; p < 0.001) and RPA-class (RR: 2.09; p < 0.001) remained significant. Conclusion: Short-course WBRT with 5 x 4 Gy provided similar intracerebral control and survival as longer programs for the treatment of brain metastases in CUP patients. 5 x 4 Gy appears preferable because it is more convenient for patients. (orig.)

  18. Primary circuit leak detection an application on PWR vessel head penetrations

    Loisy, F.; Germain, J.L.; Chauvel, L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1991, cracks were discovered and localized in the lower part of certain vessel head adapters in EDF PWR units. While awaiting the replacement of the vessel heads in question, EDF developed systems to enable continuous monitoring of vessel head penetration, by means of early detection of leaks. One of these systems in based on detection of water vapour in a confined space above the vessel head. The efficiency of the measurement chain is particularly dependent on dilution of the leakage in the confined space prior TO entry in the sampling circuit. The detection threshold for this method is on the order of 1.2 liters/hour for a dilution rate of 1500 rate of 1500 m 3 /h and a dew point of 22 deg C. This system has now been in operation on three 1300-MW PWR units for three years, and has proved to function satisfactorily. (authors)

  19. Reirradiation of Recurrent and Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer With Proton Therapy

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mark.mcdonald@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zolali-Meybodi, Omid; Lehnert, Stephen J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Estabrook, Neil C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Liu, Yuan [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moore, Michael G. [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of head and neck reirradiation with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: From 2004 to 2014, 61 patients received curative-intent proton reirradiation, primarily for disease involving skull base structures, at a median of 23 months from the most recent previous course of radiation. Most had squamous cell (52.5%) or adenoid cystic (16.4%) carcinoma. Salvage surgery before reirradiation was undertaken in 47.5%. Gross residual disease was present in 70.5%. For patients with microscopic residual disease, the median dose of reirradiation was 66 Gy (relative biological effectiveness), and for gross disease was 70.2 Gy (relative biological effectiveness). Concurrent chemotherapy was given in 27.9%. Results: The median follow-up time was 15.2 months and was 28.7 months for patients remaining alive. The 2-year overall survival estimate was 32.7%, and the median overall survival was 16.5 months. The 2-year cumulative incidence of local failure with death as a competing risk was 19.7%; regional nodal failure, 3.3%; and distant metastases, 38.3%. On multivariable analysis, Karnofsky performance status ≤70%, the presence of a gastrostomy tube before reirradiation, and an increasing number of previous courses of radiation therapy were associated with a greater hazard ratio for death. A cutaneous primary tumor, gross residual disease, increasing gross tumor volume, and a lower radiation dose were associated with a greater hazard ratio for local failure. Grade ≥3 toxicities were seen in 14.7% acutely and 24.6% in the late setting, including 3 treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: Reirradiation with proton therapy, with or without chemotherapy, provided reasonable locoregional disease control, toxicity profiles, and survival outcomes for an advanced-stage and heavily pretreated population. Additional data are needed to identify which patients are most likely to benefit from aggressive efforts to achieve local disease control and

  20. An EPID response calculation algorithm using spatial beam characteristics of primary, head scattered and MLC transmitted radiation

    Rosca, Florin; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an independent algorithm for the prediction of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) response. The algorithm uses a set of images [open beam, closed multileaf collimator (MLC), various fence and modified sweeping gap patterns] to separately characterize the primary and head-scatter contributions to EPID response. It also characterizes the relevant dosimetric properties of the MLC: Transmission, dosimetric gap, MLC scatter [P. Zygmansky et al., J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 8(4) (2007)], inter-leaf leakage, and tongue and groove [F. Lorenz et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 5985-5999 (2007)]. The primary radiation is modeled with a single Gaussian distribution defined at the target position, while the head-scatter radiation is modeled with a triple Gaussian distribution defined downstream of the target. The distances between the target and the head-scatter source, jaws, and MLC are model parameters. The scatter associated with the EPID is implicit in the model. Open beam images are predicted to within 1% of the maximum value across the image. Other MLC test patterns and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fluences are predicted to within 1.5% of the maximum value. The presented method was applied to the Varian aS500 EPID but is designed to work with any planar detector with sufficient spatial resolution

  1. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J. G.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Dean; Chu, Andy; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Wong, Tina; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Lee, Semin; Parfenov, Michael; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Haseley, Psalm; Zeng, Dong; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Bristow, Christopher; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Casasent, Tod; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Motter, Thomas; Weinstein, John; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Fan, You Hong; Liu, Jinze; Wang, Kai; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buda, Elizabeth; Hayes, D. Neil; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kimes, Patrick K.; Marron, J.S.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Singh, Darshan; Soloway, Mathew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Walter, Vonn; Waring, Scot; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wu, Junyuan; Zhao, Ni; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Tward, Aaron D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Carter, Scott L.; Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Freeman, Samuel S.; Meyerson, Matthew; Cho, Juok; Chin, Lynda; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael S.; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Hailei; Heiman, David I.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Voet, Doug; Lin, Pei; Frazer, Scott; Stojanov, Petar; Liu, Yingchun; Zou, Lihua; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sougnez, Carrie; Lichtenstein, Lee; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lander, Eric; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Kovar, Christie; Reid, Jeff; Morton, Donna; Han, Yi; Hale, Walker; Chao, Hsu; Chang, Kyle; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kakkar, Nipun; Wheeler, David; Xi, Liu; Ciriello, Giovanni; Ladanyi, Marc; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Shen, Ronglai; Sinha, Rileen; Weinhold, Nils; Taylor, Barry S.; Aksoy, B. Arman; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Reva, Boris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Chan, Timothy; Morris, Luc; Stuart, Joshua; Benz, Stephen; Ng, Sam; Benz, Christopher; Yau, Christina; Baylin, Stephen B.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Herman, James G.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Laird, Peter W.; Triche, Timothy; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Agrawal, Nishant; Bishop, Justin; Boutros, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeff P; Byers, Lauren Averett; Califano, Joseph; Carey, Thomas E.; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hui; Chiosea, Simion I.; Cohen, Ezra; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ferris, Robert L.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Guo, Yan; Haddad, Robert I.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Harris, Thomas; Hayes, D. Neil; Hui, Angela BY; Lee, J. Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Liu, Fei-Fei; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Myers, Jeff; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pickering, Curtis R.; Prystowsky, Michael; Romkes, Marjorie; Saleh, Anthony D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Seethala, Raja; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Si, Han; Tward, Aaron D.; Van Waes, Carter; Waggott, Daryl M.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Yarbrough, Wendell; Zhang, Jiexin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Burnett, Ken; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candance; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Frick, Jessica; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Harper, Hollie A.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Baboud, Julien; Jensen, Mark A.; Kahn, Ari B.; Pihl, Todd D.; Pot, David A.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Walton, Jessica S.; Wan, Yunhu; Burton, Robert; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Saller, Charles; Tarvin, Katherine; Chen, Chu; Bollag, Roni; Weinberger, Paul; Golusiński, Wojciech; Golusiński, Paweł; Ibbs, Matthiew; Korski, Konstanty; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Burnett, Ken; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Mallery, David; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Yena, Peggy; Beard, Christina; Mitchell, Colleen; Sandusky, George; Agrawal, Nishant; Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph; Khan, Zubair; Bruce, Jeff P; Hui, Angela BY; Irish, Jonathan; Liu, Fei-Fei; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Waldron, John; Boutros, Paul C.; Waggott, Daryl M.; Myers, Jeff; Lippman, Scott M.; Egea, Sophie; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Herbert, Lynn; Bradford, Carol R.; Carey, Thomas E.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Haddad, Andrea S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Komarck, Christine M.; Malakh, Mayya; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Nguyen, Ariane; Peterson, Lisa A.; Prince, Mark E.; Rozek, Laura S.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Taylor, Evan G.; Walline, Heather M.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Boice, Lori; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Hackman, Trevor G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hayward, Michele C.; Huang, Mei; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Salazar, Ashley H.; Shockley, William W.; Shores, Carol G.; Thorne, Leigh; Weissler, Mark C.; Wrenn, Sylvia; Zanation, Adam M.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; Ferris, Robert L.; Romkes, Marjorie; Seethala, Raja; Brown, Brandee T.; Guo, Yan; Pham, Michelle; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  2. prevalence of head lice infestation in primary school children in port ...

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... Excoriation and secondary pyoderma, following trauma due to scratching, may result in matting together of the hair, cervical and occipital lymphadenopathy. Severe cases may result in group A Streptococcal impetigo with the risk of developing rheumatic heart disease and glomerulonephritis (14). Head lice.

  3. Human papillomavirus is a favourable prognostic factor in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region and in hypopharyngeal cancer

    Sivars, Lars; Bersani, Cinzia; Grün, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), in addition to smoking and alcohol, is a cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), particularly of the tonsils and base of the tongue (TSCC and BOTSCC, respectively). Moreover, HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC are associated with a better outcome compared wit...

  4. Exploding Head Syndrome: A Case Report

    Ganguly, Gautam; Mridha, Banshari; Khan, Asif; Rison, Richard Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Exploding head syndrome (EHS) is a rare parasomnia in which affected individuals awaken from sleep with the sensation of a loud bang. The etiology is unknown, but other conditions including primary and secondary headache disorders and nocturnal seizures need to be excluded. Case Presentation: A 57-year-old Indian male presented with four separate episodes of awakening from sleep at night after hearing a flashing sound on the right side of his head over the last 2 years. These ev...

  5. Preliminary Assessment of Primary Flight Display Symbology for Electro- Optic Head-Down Displays

    1991-06-01

    information :elated to pitch and power; the vertica! line provides information related to bank and heading. As a result of this geometrica ...steering bar are centered over the aircraft symbol. -n -1-- If the bars are centered, the aircraft is either correcting properly or is flying the desired...a•Isd bas,:ý muve to provide a new pitch command. Roll theading correction ) commands are seen as unbalanced line width, the low command bar side

  6. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  7. Assessment of occult cervical lymph node metastasis in primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck by computed tomography

    Shakil, U.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of occult (node negative) cervical lymph node metastasis in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in Department of Radiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Duration of the study was 06 months i.e. from 19th February 2011 to 19th August 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 141 cases, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, reporting to the radiology department, were included in the study after seeking written informed consent. All patients underwent contrast enhanced CT scan of the neck from base of skull to root of neck using Asteion Whole Body X-ray CT Scanner (Model TSX-021A). Images were evaluated for the presence or absence of cervical lymph node metastasis according to the cervical lymph node metastatic criteria at each level of the neck. Results: Of the 141 patients with clinically no head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, 45.4% were found to have lymph node metastases. Frequency of occult metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity was 47.6%, oropharynx 23.5%, larynx 33.3% and hypopharynx 78.6%. Conclusion: In clinically node negative neck, the risk of lymph node metastases is significantly high in patients of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in our population. All patients presenting with node negative neck should undergo CT scans for early detection of occult metastasis. (author)

  8. Comparison of a gene expression profiling strategy to standard clinical work-up for determination of tumour origin in cancer of unknown primary (CUP)

    Ades, Felipe; de Azambuja, Evandro; Daugaard, Gedske

    2013-01-01

    CupPrint® is a genomic signature able to identify 47 different cancer types. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracy of this genomic signature to that of a full clinical work-up in diagnosing the primary tumour site. Patients with newly diagnosed, untreated metastatic tumours were eligible...

  9. Primary School Environment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers Overcrowded Classrooms Management Strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria

    Babatunde, Ehinola Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Primary school Enrolment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers overcrowded classrooms management strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria was investigated. The purpose of the study is to examine the current enrolment trend in public primary schools in northern senatorial District of Ondo State. Also, is to ascertain the…

  10. Primary and secondary prevention of acute complications of radiotherapy of head and neck cancers

    Lambrexhe, M.; Frederick, B.; Burie, D.; Cavuto, C.; Rob, L.; Rasquin, I.; Coiffier, N.; Untereiner, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: the standard treatment of head and neck cancers associates a 70 Gy irradiation and weekly concomitant chemotherapy by 5-fluoro-uracils and cisplatin or targeted therapy by Erbitux. A retrospective study realised at the Francois Baclesse center in 2004-2005 for 84 patients suffering of ear-nose-throat cancers whom treatment was a concomitant chemoradiotherapy, showed the noxious effects of the treatment on the patients nutritional situation: weight loss for 90% of patients; temporary interruption or definitive stop of radiotherapy for 28% of patients. based on this observation, a preventive approach of the nutritional risk was implemented. The objective was to reduce the malnutrition risk linked to radiotherapy associated to chemotherapy or to the targeted therapy. (N.C.)

  11. Known knowns, known unknowns and unknown unknowns in prokaryotic transposition.

    Siguier, Patricia; Gourbeyre, Edith; Chandler, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Although the phenomenon of transposition has been known for over 60 years, its overarching importance in modifying and streamlining genomes took some time to recognize. In spite of a robust understanding of transposition of some TE, there remain a number of important TE groups with potential high genome impact and unknown transposition mechanisms and yet others, only recently identified by bioinformatics, yet to be formally confirmed as mobile. Here, we point to some areas of limited understanding concerning well established important TE groups with DDE Tpases, to address central gaps in our knowledge of characterised Tn with other types of Tpases and finally, to highlight new potentially mobile DNA species. It is not exhaustive. Examples have been chosen to provide encouragement in the continued exploration of the considerable prokaryotic mobilome especially in light of the current threat to public health posed by the spread of multiple Ab R . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of head lice infestation and pediculicidal effect of permethrine shampoo in primary school girls in a low-income area in southeast of Iran.

    Soleimani-Ahmadi, Moussa; Jaberhashemi, Seyed Aghil; Zare, Mehdi; Sanei-Dehkordi, Alireza

    2017-07-24

    Head lice infestation is a common public health problem that is most prevalent in primary school children throughout the world, especially in developing countries including different parts of Iran. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with head lice infestation and pediculicidal effect of 1% permethrin shampoo in primary schools girls of Bashagard County, one of the low socioeconomic areas in southeast of Iran. In this interventional study six villages with similar demographical situations were selected and randomly assigned into intervention and control areas. In each area 150 girl students aged 7-12 years were selected randomly and screened for head lice infestation by visual scalp examination. In intervention area, treatment efficacy of 1% permethrin shampoo was evaluated via re-examination for infestation after one, two, and three weeks. Pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated factors of head lice infestation. The prevalence of head lice infestation was 67.3%. There was significant association between head lice infestation and school grade, family size, parents' literacy, bathing facilities, frequency of hair washing, and use of shared articles (p shampoo for head lice treatment was 29.2, 68.9, and 90.3% after the first, second, and third weeks, respectively. The head lice infestation is a health problem in primary school girls of Bashagard County. Improvement of socioeconomic status and providing appropriate educational programs about head lice risk factors and prevention can be effective for reduction of infestation in this area. This trial has been registered and approved by Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences ethical committee (Trial No.764). Trial registration date: March 17 2014.

  13. School-Based Training for Deputy Heads and Its Relationship to the Task of Primary School Management.

    Clerkin, Ciaran

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 40 newly appointed head teachers in Great Britain, supplemented by interviews with four head teachers, provided data establishing the extent to which head teachers were prepared for eight specific administrative roles by the experiences as deputy heads. Widely diverse, unsystematized approaches to administrator preparation were…

  14. Elective Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Failure in Head and Neck Cancer After Primary Radiation Therapy

    Kjems, Julie; Gothelf, Anita B; Håkansson, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    on recurrence in the retropharyngeal region and level IB. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2005 to 2012, 942 patients with oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, laryngeal or oral cavity carcinomas were curatively treated with primary radiation therapy. The median follow-up period was 34 months, and 77% of the patients...... underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy. The retropharyngeal region was only routinely included in cases of involvement of the posterior pharynx wall and level IB only in cases of involvement of the oral cavity. In patients with regional recurrence, the anatomic site of the recurrence was assessed...... likely to develop recurrence in distant sites. CONCLUSIONS: Retropharyngeal or level IB recurrence after primary HNC radiation therapy is rare. Thus, inclusion of these regions in the elective treatment volumes should be limited to patients with involvement of the posterior pharyngeal wall or oral cavity....

  15. Primary histiocytic sarcoma arising in the head and neck with predominant spindle cell component

    Zhao XF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first case report of Histiocytic Sarcoma (HS with predominant spindle cell component occurring in the head and neck region of a 41-year-old man. The tumor was composed of sheets of large round to oval cells with pleomorphic vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Multinucleated forms, numerous mitoses, and tumor necrosis were also noted. Sheets, fascicles, and whorls of spindle cells with spindled to ovoid vesicular nuclei, small to medium-sized distinct nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm were frequently observed. Immunohistochemical staining in the tumor cells was positive for CD163, CD68, lysozyme, CD45, and NSE. Focal expression of CD4 and S-100 was also noted. Electron microscopy demonstrated an abundance of lysosomes in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Chromosome study revealed a 57–80 hyperdiploid [7]/46, XY [13] karyotype, including 3 to 4 copies of various chromosomes. The immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings confirmed the diagnosis of HS.

  16. The diagnostic utility of Merkel cell polyomavirus immunohistochemistry in a fine needle aspirate of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma of unknown primary to the pancreas.

    Li, Long; Molberg, Kyle; Cheedella, Naga; Thibodeaux, Joel; Hinson, Stacy; Lucas, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin tumor with a high tendency for metastases. We report a case of MCC initially presenting as axillary and pancreatic metastases. A 33-year-old HIV-positive Hispanic male presented with a history of a rapidly growing axillary mass. A needle core biopsy demonstrated an epithelioid neoplasm composed of small to medium-sized cells with high nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, nuclear molding, and frequent mitotic figures. A subsequent PET scan revealed a 1.5 cm FDG avid mass in the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided FNA of the pancreatic mass showed neoplastic cells with similar morphology to those of the axillary mass. The tumor cells were positive with pancytokeratin AE1/AE3, CK20, CD56, synatophysin, chromogranin, and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). This case of MCC most likely originated from a resolved primary skin lesion drained by the involved axillary lymph node with subsequent metastases to the pancreas and distant lymph nodes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Prospective Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and CT as Diagnostic Tools to Identify the Primary Tumor Site in Patients with Extracervical Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Site

    Moller, Anne Kirstine H; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    that the same set of criteria were used for classification of patients, that is, either as CUP patients or patients with a suggested primary tumor site. The independently obtained suggestions of primary tumor sites using PET/CT and CT were correlated with the SR to reach a consensus regarding true-positive (TP......), true-negative, false-negative, and false-positive results.Results. SR identified a primary tumor site in 66 CUP patients (48.9%). PET/CT identified 38 TP primary tumor sites and CT identified 43 TP primary tumor sites. No statistically significant differences were observed between (18)F-FDG PET...

  18. Mathematical models of differential diagnostics and prognosis in chronic pancreatitis and cancer with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head

    I. A. Kryvoruchko

    2017-02-01

    Methods. Analyzed the results of surgical treatment of 132 patients, including 68 - for cancer of the pancreatic head (in 46 - with jaundice and 64 - chronic pancreatitis (CP with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head (16 - with jaundice. The distribution of patients into groups was carried out with a maximum value of classification functions calculated by special formulas. Next studied indicators of endothelial dysfunction for differential diagnosis.  Results. It was defined the threshold of VEGF = 346 pg/ml, which shared the group of chronic pancreatitis or cancer of the pancreatic head, which was determined based on the Pareto criterion. This model sensitivity was 72.1% and specificity of 75% for the overall accuracy of 72.7%. Even more precision indicator was on the threshold of VEGF = 248 pg/ml, which compared groups of patients with cancer and software of the control group (125.9 pg/ml and the sensitivity was 86.8%, specificity 82.4%, and overall accuracy of 82.3%. At about the same accuracy had this test and the comparison group of patients with chronic pancreatitis and control: sensitivity 84.4% and specificity of 76.5% overall accuracy of 81.5% in the threshold VEGF of 155 pg/ml (p<0,05. To develop a prognosis of a pathological process, along with the use of diagnostic data used a method of classification trees. The model showed that the index VEGF is the criterion that discriminates for pancreas- pancreatic cancer-pancreas, but relative differences in the presence of jaundice in patients defined using S-nitrozothiol. The accuracy of the proposed method of prediction was 89%, the price of cross-checking - 82,6% (p<0,05. Pancreatoduodenal resection for Whipple was performed in 23 patients, for Traverso-Longmire - in 8, subtotal right sided pancreatectomy for Fortner - in 3, hepaticojejunostomy by Roux - in 8, duodenopreserving resection for Beger - in 6, her Bernese option - in 7, operation Frey - in 51. In 26 (19.7% patients, minimally invasive

  19. Health service utilisation and investigations before diagnosis of cancer of unknown primary (CUP): A population-based nested case-control study in Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients.

    Vajdic, Claire M; Schaffer, Andrea L; Dobbins, Timothy A; Ward, Robyn L; Er, Chuang C; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2015-08-01

    Population-based data on the use of health services and diagnostic investigations for patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is scarce. It is uncertain whether the pathways to diagnosis are different for CUP compared to other cancers. We performed a population-based nested matched case-control study using linked routinely collected records for Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients, 2004-2007. We compared health care consultations, hospitalisations, emergency department visits, and diagnostic procedures in the three months prior and the month of diagnosis for 281 clients registered with a diagnosis of CUP (C809) and 1102 controls randomly selected from clients registered with a first diagnosis of metastatic cancer of known primary. Overall, the median age at cancer diagnosis was 83 years. CUP patients were slightly older and had significantly more comorbidities prior to diagnosis than those with known primary. Compared to known primary, a diagnosis of CUP was significantly more likely after an emergency department visit, less specialist input, fewer invasive diagnostic procedures such as resection or endoscopy, and more non-invasive procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging. There were no differences in primary care or allied health consultations and hospitalisations. This health care pathway suggests delayed recognition of cancer and scope for improvement in the medical management of high-risk individuals presenting to primary care. The pattern of diagnostic investigations reveals under-investigation in some CUP patients but this is likely to reflect recognition of limited treatment options and poor prognosis and is consistent with clinical guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Commonwealth of Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Occult primary tumors of the head and neck: accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging

    van Veen, S. A.; Balm, A. J.; Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Hoefnagel, C. A.; Hilgers, F. J.; Tan, I. B.; Pameijer, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography (thallium SPECT) and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) in the detection of occult primary tumors of the head and neck. Study of diagnostic tests. National Cancer Institute, Amsterdam,

  1. Exploring Daily Physical Activity and Nutrition Patterns in Early Learning Settings: Snapshots of Young Children in Head Start, Primary, and After-School Settings

    Stegelin, Dolores A.; Anderson, Denise; Kemper, Karen; Wagner, Jennifer; Evans, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to gain a greater understanding of daily routines of 4-7 year olds regarding physical activity and nutrition practices in typical early learning environments. The settings selected for this observational study included Head Start, primary, and after-school learning environments in a city in the southeast.…

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Carcinoma of Unknown Primary)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs, surgery, or radiation therapy are used to ...

  3. Impact of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia on Quality of Life After Primary Radiotherapy Among Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    Jellema, Anke Petra; Slotman, Ben J.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene M.D.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of xerostomia on overall quality of life (QoL) outcome and related dimensions among head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 288 patients with Stage I-IV disease without distant metastases were included. Late xerostomia according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG-xerostomia) and QoL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLC-C30) were assessed at baseline and every 6th month from 6 months to 24 months after radiotherapy. Results: A significant association was found between RTOG-xerostomia and overall QoL outcome (effect size [ES] 0.07, p 65 years). An analysis of the impact of RTOG-xerostomia on overall QoL outcome over time showed an increase from 0.09 at 6 months to 0.22 at 24 months. With elapsing time, a worsening was found for these individual scales with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. Conclusions: The results of this prospective study are the first to show a significant impact of radiation-induced xerostomia on QoL. Although the incidence of Grade ≥2 RTOG-xerostomia decreases with time, its impact on QoL increases. This finding emphasizes the importance of prevention of xerostomia

  4. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Overgaard, Jens; Johansen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors. Patients and methods: Patients with HNSCC receiving definitive radiotherapy with 66–68 Gy without surgery were followed up with serial post-treatment thyrotropin (TSH) assessment. HT was defined as TSH >4.0 mU/l. Data were analyzed with both a logistic and a mixture model (correcting for latency) to determine risk factors for HT and develop an NTCP model based on mean thyroid dose (MTD) and thyroid volume. Results: 203 patients were included. Median follow-up: 25.1 months. Five-year estimated risk of HT was 25.6%. In the mixture model, the only independent risk factors for HT were thyroid volume (cm 3 ) (OR = 0.75 [95% CI: 0.64–0.85], p 3 , respectively. Conclusions: Comparing the logistic and mixture models demonstrates the importance of latent-time correction in NTCP-modeling. Thyroid dose constraints in treatment planning should be individualized based on thyroid volume

  5. Designing towards the unknown

    Wilde, Danielle; Underwood, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    the research potential to far-ranging possibilities. In this article we unpack the motivations driving the PKI project. We present our mixed-methodology, which entangles textile crafts, design interactions and materiality to shape an embodied enquiry. Our research outcomes are procedural and methodological......New materials with new capabilities demand new ways of approaching design. Destabilising existing methods is crucial to develop new methods. Yet, radical destabilisation—where outcomes remain unknown long enough that new discoveries become possible—is not easy in technology design where complex......, to design towards unknown outcomes, using unknown materials. The impossibility of this task is proving as useful as it is disruptive. At its most potent, it is destabilising expectations, aesthetics and processes. Keeping the researchers, collaborators and participants in a state of unknowing, is opening...

  6. Radiation therapy of primary extranodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of head and neck. Results of a prospective multicenter study

    Hoederath, A.; Sack, H.; Stuschke, M.; Lampka, E.

    1996-01-01

    Between January 1986 and August 1993, 63 patients with primary extranodal Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of head and neck region, stages IE and IIE were treated with radiotherapy. The histological classification followed the Kiel classification, staging the Ann Arbor classification. Patient characteristics: 33 Male, 30 female; age 18 to 84 years; tumor localisation: Tonsils 26, nasopharynx 7, oropharynx 8, paranasal sinus 11, salivary glands 7, floor of mouth/gingiva 3, larynx 1. Mean follow-up is 74 months. Low-grade lymphoma in stages I and II CS were treated with definitive radiation therapy according to the concepts of epithelial tumors of the same localisation (target volume and technique).The adjuvant dose was 30 Gy and in the tumor volume 40 Gy, 2 Gy daily. 28 patients were registered, 18 in stage I and 10 in stage II. High-grade lymphoma were treated with definitive radiation therapy according to the concepts of epithelial tumors of the same localisation, too. The dose was 40 respectively 50 Gy, followed by 4 course of adjuvant chemotherapy with CHOP. Thirty-five patients were enrolled, of whom only 10 received chemotherapy. The overall 5-year survical rates were for low-grade 67% and for high grade lymphoma 88%. The corresponding relapse-free survival rates were 54/68%, respectively. Only 1 patient failed within the irradiated target volume. Recurrences occurred at sites distant to the irradiated volume in nodal and extranodal regions. Prognosis was influenced by histologic grade. Significant trends were not observed for other potential pretreatment parameters (age, stage, localisation, bulk). (orig./MG) [de

  7. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  8. Fever of unknown origin

    Misaki, Takashi; Matsui, Akira; Tanaka, Fumiko; Okuno, Yoshishige; Mitsumori, Michihide; Torizuka, Tatsurou; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Shimbo, Shin-ichirou

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a commonly performed imaging modality in deteting pyrogenic lesions in cases of long-standing inexplainable fever. To re-evaluate the significance of gallium imaging in such cases, a retrospective review was made of 56 scans performed in febrile patients in whom sufficient clinical and laboratory findings were obtained. Gallium scans were true positive in 30 patients, false positive in 3, true negative in 19, and false negative in 4. In the group of true positive, local inflammatory lesions were detected in 23 patients with a final diagnosis of lung tuberculosis, urinary tract infection, and inflammatory joint disease. Abnormal gallium accumulation, as shown in the other 7 patients, provided clues to the diagnosis of generalized disorders, such as hematological malignancies (n=3), systemic autoimmune diseases (n=3), and severe infectious mononucleosis (n=one). In the group of false positive, gallium imaging revealed intestinal excretion of gallium in 2 patients and physiological pulmonary hilar accumulation in one. In the true negative group of 19 patients, fever of unknown origin was resolved spontaneously in 12 patients, and with antibiotics and corticosteroids in 2 and 5 patients, respectively. Four patients having false negative scans were finally diagnosed as having urinary tract infection (n=2), bacterial meningitis (n=one), and polyarteritis (n=one). Gallium imaging would remain the technique of choice in searching for origin of unknown fever. It may also be useful for early diagnosis of systemic disease, as well as focal inflammation. (N.K.)

  9. [Badminton--unknown sport].

    Zekan-Petrinović, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    For a long time, badminton was considered to be only a slow and light game for children, a game that is played outdoors and is structurally undemanding.Today, it is not an unknown and unrecognised sport, especially after it was included into the Olympics Games in 1992. Badminton is one of the oldest sports in the world. It is suitable for all ages (for children and elderly equally), women and men and even handicapped persons. Beginners can start playing badminton matches early because the basics are learned quickly. As a recreational activity, badminton is very popular in Zagreb. In the last 10 years, a number of halls specialized for badminton or offering badminton as one of available sports activities have been opened in Zagreb. At present, there are over 70 professional playgrounds for training of top contestants but also for the citizens who can play recreational badminton.

  10. Intraabdominal abscessus of unknown etiology

    Čolović Radoje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraabdominal abscesses are in 98-99% cases the result of secondary and only in 1-2% of primary peritonitis. They are easy and successfully diagnosed. Abdominal abscesses of unknown cause are extremely rare. Case Outline. The authors present a 68-year-old man, without significant data in past history, who suddenly developed epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting and leukocytosis which was treated with antibiotics resulting in the alleviation of complaints and reduction of white blood cells count. After five days ultrasonography showed incapsulated collection of dense fluid in the epigastrium confirmed by CT scan two days later. Upper endoscopy excluded ulcer and/or perforation of the stomach and duodenum. Under local anesthesia, through the upper part of the left rectal muscle, puncture followed by incision was done, and about 50 ml of dense pus was removed. Finger exploration of the cavity showed no foreign body within the cavity. Using drainage, the recovery was quick and uneventful. By preoperative and postoperative abdominal investigations no cause of the abscess was found. Two and a half years after surgery the patient remained symptom-free with normal clinical, laboratory and ultrasonographic findings. Conclusion. The authors presented an intraabdominal abscess of unknown cause that was successfully treated with antibiotics, percutaneous puncture and drainage under local anaesthesia. In spite of all diagnostic methods the cause of the abscess could not be found. Thus, such a possibility, although being rare, should be taken into account.

  11. Combined human papillomavirus typing and TP53 mutation analysis in distinguishing second primary tumors from lung metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Daher, Tamas; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Brobeil, Alexander; Etschmann, Benjamin; Witte, Biruta; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Krombach, Gabriele; Blau, Wolfgang; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Bräuninger, Andreas; Gattenlöhner, Stefan

    2018-06-01

    In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the occurrence of concurrent lung malignancies poses a significant diagnostic challenge because metastatic HNSCC is difficult to discern from second primary lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, this differentiation is crucial because the recommended treatments for metastatic HNSCC and second primary lung SCC differ profoundly. We analyzed the origin of lung tumors in 32 patients with HNSCC using human papillomavirus (HPV) typing and targeted next generation sequencing of all coding exons of tumor protein 53 (TP53). Lung tumors were clearly identified as HNSCC metastases or second primary tumors in 29 patients, thus revealing that 16 patients had received incorrect diagnoses based on clinical and morphological data alone. The HPV typing and mutation analysis of all TP53 coding exons is a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with HNSCC and concurrent lung SCC, which can help to ensure that patients receive the most suitable treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Primary transoral robotic surgery with concurrent neck dissection for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma implemented at a Danish head and neck cancer center

    Rubek, Niclas; Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Charabi, Birgitte Wittenborg

    2017-01-01

    (RT) with or without concomitant chemotherapy. This is the first study in Scandinavia from a head and neck cancer centre that aims to demonstrate the feasibility of performing primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and concurrent neck dissection for patients with early stage OPSCC. Between September...... bilateral neck dissection. Due to an upstaging following surgery, 13 patients were referred to adjuvant therapy. Four of these patients received RT and two patients received concomitant chemo-radiation (CCR) therapy. Seven patients declined the recommended adjuvant therapy one of whom later developed an N......-site recurrence and received salvage surgery with postoperative RT. In summary, 43% of the patients were referred to adjuvant therapy following primary surgery which was mainly due to N-site stage migration and ECE. Primary TORS and concurrent neck dissection is a safe and feasible procedure that may...

  13. Can ultrasound elastography distinguish metastatic from reactive lymph nodes in patients with primary head and neck cancers?

    Mohamed Mohamed Hefeda

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: The accuracy of sonoelastography is higher than usual B mode and power Doppler ultrasound parameters in differentiation between benign and malignant nodes. The integration of lymph node sonoelastography in the follow up of patients with known head and neck cancer may reduce the number of biopsies.

  14. [Safe and effective administration of carboplatin-based chemotherapy in a patient undergoing hemodialysis with cancer of unknown primary by monitoring observed AUC of carboplatin-a case report].

    Kondo, Masahiro; Kuroda, Junko; Ikai, Yoshitomo; Hayashi, Rumiko; Uegaki, Shiori; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Kimura, Kazunori

    2012-11-01

    Here we report a case of successful treatment with combination chemotherapy of carboplatin(CBDCA)and paclitaxel for a patient undergoing hemodialysis(HD)with cancer of unknown primary, conducted by monitoring the observed AUC of ultrafilterable CBDCA. CBDCA was administered at a dose of 125 mg on day 1 in each course, an amount which had been calculated by the Calvert formula(GFR: 0, target AUC: 5). HD was started at a point in time one hour after the completion of each CBDCA administration, and performed for 5 hours in each course. Blood samples were collected during the first 3 courses of chemotherapy to measure the plasma concentration of free-platinum. The observed AUCs(o-AUC)of CBDCA in the first, second and third courses were 3. 03, 3. 44 and 3. 50mg·min/mL, respectively. The o-AUC in the first course was lower than that in the second course. The o-AUC in the second course was nearly equal to that in the third course, while each o-AUC was below the target AUC(t-AUC). Partial response was achieved after two courses of the CBDCA and paclitaxel combination chemotherapy, with adverse events of Grade 3 neutropenia and Grade 3 peripheral neuropathy observed in each course after the second course of chemotherapy. o-AUC of CBDCA administered to HD patients can not only be below t-AUC, as in this case, but also oppositely above t-AUC in cases with different doses of CBDCA or HD settings. Our results suggest that the monitoring of o-AUC of CBDCA is useful when practicing CBDCA-based chemotherapy safely and effectively in cancer patients undergoing HD.

  15. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    Rusthoven, Kyle; Chen Changhu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT

  16. Primary radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Comparative analysis of inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems

    Selzer, Edgar; Grah, Anja; Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar; Kornek, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation-based scoring systems have potential value in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients; however, detailed comparative analyses in well-characterized head and neck cancer patient collectives are missing. We analyzed overall survival (OS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who were treated with curative intent by primary radiotherapy (RT) alone, by RT in combination with cetuximab (RIT) or with cisplatin (RCHT), and by primary surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). The primary RT collective (N = 170) was analyzed separately from the surgery plus RT group (N = 148). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meyer method. Cox proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors and the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the modified GPS (mGPS), the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the prognostic index (PI). A prognostic relevance of the scoring systems for OS was observed in the primarily irradiated, but not in the PORT collective. OS was 35.5, 18.8, and 15.4 months, respectively, according to GPS 0, 1, and 2. OS according to mGPS 0-2 was identical. The PLR scoring system was not of prognostic relevance, while OS was 27.3 months in the NLR 0 group and 17.3 months in the NLR 1 group. OS was 35.5 months in PI 0, 16.1 months in PI 1, and 22.6 months in PI 2. GPS/mGPS scoring systems are able to discriminate between three risk groups in primarily, but not postoperatively irradiated locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. (orig.) [de

  17. A concern about the crack propagation rate of PWSCC which obtained from the investigation on primary coolant leakage portion of the reactor vessel head in Ohi 3

    Totsuka, Nobuo; Fukumura, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    There will be some concern about the content presented in the paper entitled 'Primary Coolant Leakage Path Research of Reactor Vessel Head Penetration' published in INSS JOURNAL of 2008, which may lead to misunderstanding about the PWSCC crack propagation rate, that is, the rate written in the paper seems to be faster than those reported by the previous studies. It is considered that such misunderstanding will be due to a sentence in the abstract of the paper. Therefore, we will revise a part of the abstract and explain about the outline of the paper again. (author)

  18. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm 3 , and patients with a tumor volume 3 had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm 3 at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume 3 had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = 3 larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm 3 larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer of the head and neck undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy and correlated with the treatment outcomes better than the T or N stage.

  19. Melanoma of unknown origin: a case series.

    Kelly, J

    2010-12-01

    The natural history of metastatic melanoma involving lymph nodes, in the absence of a known primary site (cutaneous, ocular or mucosal) has, to date, been poorly defined; and the optimal management of this rare subtype of disease is therefore unclear. Melanomas of unknown primary site (MUP) are estimated to comprise between 3.7 and 6% of all melanomas (Anbari et al. in Cancer 79:1861-1821, 1997).

  20. Recension: Mao - The Unknown Story

    Clausen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story".......Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story"....

  1. Exploding head syndrome: a case report.

    Ganguly, Gautam; Mridha, Banshari; Khan, Asif; Rison, Richard Alan

    2013-01-01

    Exploding head syndrome (EHS) is a rare parasomnia in which affected individuals awaken from sleep with the sensation of a loud bang. The etiology is unknown, but other conditions including primary and secondary headache disorders and nocturnal seizures need to be excluded. A 57-year-old Indian male presented with four separate episodes of awakening from sleep at night after hearing a flashing sound on the right side of his head over the last 2 years. These events were described 'as if there are explosions in my head'. A neurologic examination, imaging studies, and a polysomnogram ensued, and the results led to the diagnosis of EHS. EHS is a benign, uncommon, predominately nocturnal disorder that is self-limited. No treatment is generally required. Reassurance to the patient is often all that is needed.

  2. Twice-daily reirradiation for recurrent and second primary head-and-neck cancer with gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy

    Milano, Michael T.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stenson, Kerstin M.; Kao, Johnny; Witt, Mary-Ellyn; Mittal, Bharat B.; Argiris, Athanassios; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Haraf, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated the efficacy of concurrent gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil in conjunction with twice-daily (1.5-Gy) radiotherapy delivered on alternating weeks (TFGX 2 ) in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Here, we report the clinical outcome and late toxicity of TFGX 2 in a subset of patients previously irradiated to the head and neck. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine previously irradiated patients, presenting with recurrent or second primary head-and-neck cancer, underwent TFGX 2 . Twelve patients underwent attempted surgical resection before chemoradiotherapy, 10 of whom were left with no measurable disease. Patients with measurable disease received a median radiation dose of 72 Gy; those with no measurable disease received a median dose of 61 Gy. The cumulative dose ranged from 74.4 to 156.4 Gy (mean, 125.7 Gy; median, 131.0 Gy). Results: The median follow-up was 19.1 months (50.9 months for living patients). The 5-year overall survival rate was 34.5%, and the locoregional control rate was 54.5%. In patients with measurable disease at treatment, the 5-year overall survival and locoregional control rate was 26.3% and 45.1%, respectively, compared with 50.0% (p = 0.14) and 70% (p = 0.31), respectively, for those with no measurable disease. Measurable disease and radiation dose were highly statistically significant for overall survival and locoregional control on multivariate analysis. Of 14 patients assessable for late toxicity, 3 developed Grade 4-5, 8 Grade 2-3, and 3 Grade 0-1 toxicity. Conclusion: Aggressive reirradiation with chemotherapy in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer provides a chance for long-term cure at the expense of toxicity. Attempted surgical resection before chemoradiotherapy improved disease control and survival

  3. Tumor Hypoxia is Independent of Hemoglobin and Prognostic for Loco-regional Tumor Control after Primary Radiotherapy in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Overgaard, Jens

    2004-01-01

    There is evidence that tumor hypoxia adversely affects loco-regional tumor control and survival in head and neck cancer. The aim of the current study was to compare pretreatment tumor oxygenation measured by Eppendorf pO2 electrodes with known prognostic factors in advanced head and neck tumors after definitive radiotherapy, and to evaluate the prognostic significance of these parameters on loco-regional tumor control. Sixty-seven patients, median age 56 years (22-82), all with primary stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma were available for survival analysis. Tumor oxygenation was described as the fraction of pO2 values=2.5 mmHg (HP2.5) and the median tumor pO2. By regression analysis HP2.5 was independent of known prognostic factors including stage, pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) and the largest tumor diameter at the site of pO2 measurement. By Kaplan-Meier analysis loco-regional tumor control at 5 years was in favor of less hypoxic tumors using either HP2.5 or median tumor pO2 as descriptors and stratifying by the median values. Also, Hb was prognostic of loco-regional tumor control at 5 years using the median value as cut off. HP2.5 as continuous parameter was highly significant for loco-regional tumor control in a multivariate analysis. In conclusion both HP2.5 and total Hb were prognostic for loco-regional tumor control, but HP2.5 as continuous variable was independently the strongest prognostic indicator for loco-regional tumor control after definitive primary radiotherapy in advanced head and neck tumors

  4. Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of primary tumours of unknown origin; experience of the Hospital Angeles del Pedregal; Papel del 18F-FDG PET/CT en la evaluacion de tumores primarios de origen desconocido; experiencia del Hospital Angeles del Pedregal

    Sanchez, N; Serna, J A; Quiroz, O; Valenzuela, J; Romo, C; Ramirez, J L [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    It was in 1994 when published studies appear that evaluate the utility of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the patients with primary tumors of unknown origin (TOD); starting from then diverse studies that support the clinical utility of the study arise with {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the detection of the primary tumor. It is as well as it has been calculated that the study with {sup 18}F-FDG PET is able to detect the primary tumor in around 40% of the patients with negative results in the conventional diagnostic procedures. Until the moment, most of the studies published in relation to the primary tumors of unknown origin only evaluate the paper of the study with {sup 18}F-FDG PET, without including the image fusion technique PET/CT, which has demonstrated in diverse studies; in oncological scenarios different from the TOD, a superior diagnosis certainty. (Author)

  5. Experimental simulation of low rate primary coolant leaks. For the case of vessel head penetrations affected by through wall cracking

    You, D.; Feron, D.; Turluer, G.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental simulation of primary coolant leaks was carried out to determine how the composition of the leaking liquid would change. The experiment used the EVA experimental setup, specially designed for quantitatively investigating concentration phenomena driven by evaporation. The test showed that the final composition, obtained from a solution representative of the primary coolant at the beginning of the cycle, is highly concentrated and slightly acid. The experimental results are compared with those obtained using the MULTEQ software. (authors)

  6. Randomized study of control of the primary tumor and survival using preoperative radiation, radiation alone, or surgery alone in head and beck carcinomas

    Hintz, B.; Charyulu, K.; Chandler, J.R.; Sudarsanam, A.; Garciga, C.

    1979-01-01

    Fifty-five selected patients with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck regions were studied in a randomized, prospective manner. The three treatment categories were primary radiation (Gp R), primary surgery (Gp S), and preoperative radiation of 4000 rads in four weeks (Gp R/S). The local control rates for the 44 evaluable patients with a two-year minimum followup were 24%, 39%, and 43%, respectively. Further treatment attempts in patients failing initial therapy yielded local control rates of 35%, 39%, and 43% for Gp R, Gp S, and Gp R/S, respectively. None of the local control rates nor the corresponding survival curves were significantly different at P < 0.10. However, the group sizes were sufficiently small that true differences might not have been detected. Postoperative complications were higher in the primary radiation failures subsequently operated upon compared to the primary surgery group (P = 0.07). A table is included in which the types of postoperative complications are listed and enumerated according to treatment regime

  7. In vitro radiosensitivity of primary human fibroblasts. Lack of correlation with acute radiation toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer

    Rudat, Volker; Dietz, Andreas; Conradt, Christian; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a considerable hope among clinicians and radiobiologists to detect genetically radiosensitive patients prior to radiotherapy. A predictive assay would enable adjustment of the total irradiation dose to the individual at a constant risk of normal tissue complications. In this prospective study, the clonogenic survival assay for primary human fibroblasts to determine radiosensitivity in vitro was evaluated and then correlated with clinically observed acute radiation reactions. Materials and methods: One hundred twenty-five independent survival experiments with primary fibroblasts derived from 63 biopsies from 55 cancer and non-cancer patients were performed. Results: A wide variation of cell survival between biopsies was detected. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significantly larger interindividual than intraindividual variation of SF2 values. However, a considerable scatter of SF2 values in repeated experiments was observed in individual cases. Age, gender, disease status (cancer patient, non-cancer patient) and origin of fibroblasts (skin, periodontal tissue) were demonstrated not to be statistically significant confounding factors on the intrinsic radiosensitivity in vitro. In a prospective study, no correlation of the SF2 and acute reactions in 25 patients with head and neck cancer treated with a primary accelerated radiochemotherapy was detected. Conclusion: Our data show that the clonogenic assay is able to distinguish between intrinsic radiosensitivities of primary human fibroblasts if a statistical approach is used but does not predict acute radiation toxicity

  8. Impact of radiation-induced xerostomia on quality of life after primary radiotherapy among patients with head and neck cancer

    Jellema, Anke Petra; Slotman, Ben J.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of xerostomia on overall quality of life (QoL) outcome and related dimensions among bead and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 288 patients with Stage I-IV disease without distant metastases were included.

  9. Objective and subjective image quality of primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma on head and neck low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Kaup, Moritz; Kraft, Johannes; Noeske, Eva-Maria; Schulz, Boris; Burck, Iris; Kerl, J.M.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Scheerer, Friedrich [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-03-26

    To investigate low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography (CT) of head and neck primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) regarding objective and subjective image quality. We retrospectively evaluated 65 patients (47 male, 18 female; mean age: 62.1 years) who underwent head and neck dual-energy CT (DECT) due to biopsy-proven primary (n = 50) or recurrent (n = 15) SCC. Eighty peak kilovoltage and standard blended 120-kVp images were compared. Attenuation and noise of malignancy and various soft tissue structures were measured. Tumor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective image quality was rated by three reviewers using 5-point grading scales regarding overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Radiation dose was assessed as CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}). Interobserver agreement was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Mean tumor attenuation (153.8 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 97.1 HU), SNR (10.7 vs. 8.3), CNR (8.1 vs. 4.8), and subjective tumor delineation (score, 4.46 vs. 4.13) were significantly increased (all P < 0.001) with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard blended 120-kVp images. Noise of all measured structures was increased in 80-kVp acquisition (P < 0.001). Overall interobserver agreement was good (ICC, 0.86; 95 % confidence intervals: 0.82-0.89). CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 48.7 % with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard DECT (4.85 ± 0.51 vs. 9.94 ± 0.81 mGy cm, P < 0.001). Head and neck CT with low-tube-voltage 80-kVp acquisition provides increased tumor delineation, SNR, and CNR for CT imaging of primary and recurrent SCC compared to standard 120-kVp acquisition with an accompanying significant reduction of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  10. Cytokine modulation by stress hormones and antagonist specific hormonal inhibition in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) head kidney primary cell culture.

    Khansari, Ali Reza; Parra, David; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Tort, Lluís

    2017-09-01

    A tight interaction between endocrine and immune systems takes place mainly due to the key role of head kidney in both hormone and cytokine secretion, particularly under stress situations in which the physiological response promotes the synthesis and release of stress hormones which may lead into immunomodulation as side effect. Although such interaction has been previously investigated, this study evaluated for the first time the effect of stress-associated hormones together with their receptor antagonists on the expression of cytokine genes in head kidney primary cell culture (HKPCC) of the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the seawater gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). The results showed a striking difference when comparing the response obtained in trout and seabream. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) decreased the expression of immune-related genes in sea bream but not in rainbow trout and this cortisol effect was reverted by the antagonist mifepristone but not spironolactone. On the other hand, while adrenaline reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) in rainbow trout, the opposite effect was observed in sea bream showing an increased expression (IL-1β, IL-6). Interestingly, this effect was reverted by antagonist propranolol but not phentolamine. Overall, our results confirm the regional interaction between endocrine and cytokine messengers and a clear difference in the sensitivity to the hormonal stimuli between the two species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heads Up

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  12. The exploding head syndrome.

    Green, M W

    2001-06-01

    This article reviews the features of an uncommon malady termed "the exploding head syndrome." Sufferers describe terrorizing attacks of a painless explosion within their head. Attacks tend to occur at the onset of sleep. The etiology of attacks is unknown, although they are considered to be benign. Treatment with clomipramine has been suggested, although most sufferers require only reassurance that the spells are benign in nature.

  13. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes” are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1 rehabilitation; (2 integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3 psychology; and (4 normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  14. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J.; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes”) are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy. PMID:27973405

  15. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints.

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A

    2016-12-10

    Primary pain disorders (formerly "functional pain syndromes") are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition "chronic-on-acute pain." We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  16. Relap5/Mod2.5 analyses of SG primary collector head rupture in WWER-440 reactor

    Szczurek, J. [Inst. of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the results of the analyses of steam generator (SG) manifold cover rupture performed with RELAP5/MOD2.5 (version provided by RMA, Albuquerque, for PC PPS). The calculations presented are based on RELAP5 input deck for WWER-440/213 Bobunice NPP, developed within the framework of IAEA TC Project RER/9/004. The presented analyses are directed toward determining the maximum amount of reactor coolant discharged into the secondary coolant system and the maximum amount of contaminated coolant release to the atmosphere. In all cases considered in the analysis, maximum ECCS injection capacity is assumed. The paper includes only the cases without any operator actions within the time period covered by the analyses. In particular, the primary loop isolation valves are not used for isolating the broken steam generator. Two scenarios are analysed: with and without the SG safety valve stuck open. 3 refs.

  17. Relap5/Mod2.5 analyses of SG primary collector head rupture in WWER-440 reactor

    Szczurek, J.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the analyses of steam generator (SG) manifold cover rupture performed with RELAP5/MOD2.5 (version provided by RMA, Albuquerque, for PC PPS). The calculations presented are based on RELAP5 input deck for WWER-440/213 Bobunice NPP, developed within the framework of IAEA TC Project RER/9/004. The presented analyses are directed toward determining the maximum amount of reactor coolant discharged into the secondary coolant system and the maximum amount of contaminated coolant release to the atmosphere. In all cases considered in the analysis, maximum ECCS injection capacity is assumed. The paper includes only the cases without any operator actions within the time period covered by the analyses. In particular, the primary loop isolation valves are not used for isolating the broken steam generator. Two scenarios are analysed: with and without the SG safety valve stuck open

  18. Relap5/Mod2.5 analyses of SG primary collector head rupture in WWER-440 reactor

    Szczurek, J [Inst. of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the results of the analyses of steam generator (SG) manifold cover rupture performed with RELAP5/MOD2.5 (version provided by RMA, Albuquerque, for PC PPS). The calculations presented are based on RELAP5 input deck for WWER-440/213 Bobunice NPP, developed within the framework of IAEA TC Project RER/9/004. The presented analyses are directed toward determining the maximum amount of reactor coolant discharged into the secondary coolant system and the maximum amount of contaminated coolant release to the atmosphere. In all cases considered in the analysis, maximum ECCS injection capacity is assumed. The paper includes only the cases without any operator actions within the time period covered by the analyses. In particular, the primary loop isolation valves are not used for isolating the broken steam generator. Two scenarios are analysed: with and without the SG safety valve stuck open. 3 refs.

  19. Unknown foundation determination for scour.

    2012-04-01

    Unknown foundations affect about 9,000 bridges in Texas. For bridges over rivers, this creates a problem : regarding scour decisions as the calculated scour depth cannot be compared to the foundation depth, and a : very conservative costly approach m...

  20. Outcomes after primary chemoradiotherapy for N3 (>6 cm) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after an FDG-PET--guided neck management policy.

    Adams, Gerard; Porceddu, Sandro V; Pryor, David I; Panizza, Benedict; Foote, Matthew; Rowan, Ann; Burmeister, Bryan

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether a positron emission tomography (PET)-directed policy remains appropriate for managing neck nodes (N3; >6 cm) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). All patients with N3 (>6 cm) HNSCC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) at our institution between 2005 and 2012 were included in the analysis. Patients underwent PET assessment before and 12 weeks after CRT. Neck dissections were performed for PET-avid residual nodal abnormalities after complete response at the primary site. Rate of isolated nodal failure (INF) was the primary outcome. Median follow-up from diagnosis for 33 patients was 30 months (range, 6-76 months). INF occurred in 2 patients (6%) with neck dissections performed in 4 cases (12%). First failure was predominantly distant metastatic (10; 30%). The rate of INF remains low when following a PET-directed neck management policy after definitive CRT for N3 (>6 cm) HNSCC. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Increased evidence for the prognostic value of primary tumor asphericity in pretherapeutic FDG PET for risk stratification in patients with head and neck cancer

    Hofheinz, Frank; Lougovski, Alexandr [Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PET Center, Dresden (Germany); Zoephel, Klaus; Hentschel, Maria [University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Steffen, Ingo G.; Wedel, Florian; Buchert, Ralph; Brenner, Winfried [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Apostolova, Ivayla [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany); Baumann, Michael [University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Radiooncology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PET Center, Dresden (Germany); University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-11-22

    In a previous study, we demonstrated the first evidence that the asphericity (ASP) of pretherapeutic FDG uptake in the primary tumor provides independent prognostic information in patients with head and neck cancer. The aim of this work was to confirm these results in an independent patient group examined at a different site. FDG-PET/CT was performed in 37 patients. The primary tumor was delineated by an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding. For the resulting ROIs, the metabolically active part of the tumor (MTV), SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and ASP were computed. Univariate Cox regression with respect to progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was performed. For survival analysis, patients were divided in groups of high and low risk according to the parameter cut-offs defined in our previous work. In a second step, the cut-offs were adjusted to the present data. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression was performed for the pooled data consisting of the current and the previously described patient group (N = 68). In multivariate Cox regression, clinically relevant parameters were included. Univariate Cox regression using the previously published cut-off values revealed TLG (hazard ratio (HR) = 3) and ASP (HR = 3) as significant predictors for PFS. For OS MTV (HR = 2.7) and ASP (HR = 5.9) were significant predictors. Using the adjusted cutoffs MTV (HR = 2.9/3.3), TLG (HR = 3.1/3.3) and ASP (HR = 3.1/5.9) were prognostic for PFS/OS. In the pooled data, multivariate Cox regression revealed a significant prognostic value with respect to PFS/OS for MTV (HR = 2.3/2.1), SUV{sub max} (HR = 2.1/2.5), TLG (HR = 3.5/3.6), and ASP (HR = 3.4/4.4). Our results confirm the independent prognostic value of ASP of the pretherapeutic FDG uptake in the primary tumor in patients with head and neck cancer. Moreover, these results demonstrate that ASP can be determined unambiguously across different sites. (orig.)

  2. Evaluating the referral preferences and consultation requests of primary care physicians with otolaryngology - head and neck surgery.

    Scott, John R; Wong, Eric; Sowerby, Leigh J

    2015-12-29

    No literature exists which examines referral preferences to, or the consultation process with, Otolaryngology. In a recent Canadian Medical Association nation-wide survey of General Practitioners and Family Physicians, Otolaryngology was listed as the second-most problematic specialty for referrals. The purpose of this study was to learn about and improve upon the referral process between primary care physicians (PCPs) and Otolaryngology at an academic centre in Southwestern Ontario. PCPs who actively refer patients to Otolaryngology within the catchment area of Western University were asked to complete a short paper-based questionnaire. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 50 PCPs were surveyed. Subspecialty influenced 90.0% of the referrals made. Specialist wait times altered 58.0% of referrals. All PCPs preferred to communicate via fax. Half of those surveyed wanted clinical notes from every encounter. Seventy-four percent of respondents wanted inappropriate referrals forwarded to the proper specialist automatically. Twenty-two percent of those surveyed were satisfied with current wait times. A central referral system was favored by 74% of PCPs. Improvements could help streamline the referral and consultation practices with Otolaryngology in Southwestern Ontario. A central referral system and reduction in the frequency of consultative reports can be considered.

  3. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishikawa, Kei; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  4. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  5. Prospective Trial of High-Dose Reirradiation Using Daily Image Guidance With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Cheng, Suzan; Donald, Paul J.; Purdy, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image-guided radiotherapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one consecutive patients were prospectively treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy from February 2006 to March 2009 to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy). None of these patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Daily helical megavoltage CT scans were obtained before each fraction as part of an image-guided radiotherapy registration protocol for patient alignment. Results: The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 65%, respectively. A total of 651 daily megavoltage CT scans were obtained. The mean systematic shift to account for interfraction motion was 1.38 ± 1.25 mm, 1.79 ± 1.45 mm, and 1.98 ± 1.75 mm for the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Pretreatment shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19% of setups in the medial-lateral, 27% in the superior-inferior, and 33% in the anterior-posterior directions, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis, naso-lacrimal duct stenosis, and brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image guidance results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

  6. Staging of primary head and neck tumors and detection of recurrences; Staging und Rezidivdiagnostik von Tumoren im Kopf-Hals-Bereich

    Adams, S. [Klinikum der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Marienhospital, Herne (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Knecht, R. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Zentrum fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde; Hoer, G. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas represent the vast majority of all malignant tumors of the head and neck region. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor affecting survival of patients with head and neck cancer. The effectiveness of surgical treatment depends on the complete excision of all tumor tissue and an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging is therefore mandatory. In comparison to positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), morphological imaging modalities (CT, MRI) have been applied for the localization of primary head and neck tumors because of their better anatomical resolution. Metabolic tumor imaging using FDG PET is superior to morphological imaging by CT and MRI in the detection of small cervical lymph node metastases (Class 1a indication). Increased FDG utpake has also been observed in benign inflammatory lesions after radiation therapy, therefore detection of local recurrence with FDG PET can be problematic. To ensure a high diagnostic accuracy it is been suggested to perform FDG PET not earlier than 3 months after radiation therapy (Class 1a indication for the diagnosis of local recurrence). (orig.) [German] Plattenepithelkarzinome stellen mit 90% den ueberwiegenden Anteil von malignen Tumoren des Kopf-Hals-Bereiches dar. Ein wesentlicher prognostischer Faktor ist das Vorhandensein von Lymphknotenmetastasen. Die Entscheidung ueber das richtige therapeutische Vorgehen ist von der genauen Festlegung des primaeren Tumorstadiums abhaengig. Die Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) unter Verwendung von {sup 18}F-markierter 2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glukose (FDG) ist fuer das T-Staging gegenueber den morphologisch orientierten Verfahren (CT, MRT) im allgemeinen ohne klinischen Nutzen. Als funktionsorientiertes Verfahren ist die FDG-PET bei der Diagnostik von Lymphknotenmetastasen den anatomisch orientierten Untersuchungsverfahren ueberlegen (Klasse-1a-Indikation), da sie nicht alleine

  7. Primary radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Comparative analysis of inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems

    Selzer, Edgar; Grah, Anja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-13

    Inflammation-based scoring systems have potential value in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients; however, detailed comparative analyses in well-characterized head and neck cancer patient collectives are missing. We analyzed overall survival (OS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who were treated with curative intent by primary radiotherapy (RT) alone, by RT in combination with cetuximab (RIT) or with cisplatin (RCHT), and by primary surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). The primary RT collective (N = 170) was analyzed separately from the surgery plus RT group (N = 148). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meyer method. Cox proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors and the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the modified GPS (mGPS), the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the prognostic index (PI). A prognostic relevance of the scoring systems for OS was observed in the primarily irradiated, but not in the PORT collective. OS was 35.5, 18.8, and 15.4 months, respectively, according to GPS 0, 1, and 2. OS according to mGPS 0-2 was identical. The PLR scoring system was not of prognostic relevance, while OS was 27.3 months in the NLR 0 group and 17.3 months in the NLR 1 group. OS was 35.5 months in PI 0, 16.1 months in PI 1, and 22.6 months in PI 2. GPS/mGPS scoring systems are able to discriminate between three risk groups in primarily, but not postoperatively irradiated locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Entzuendungsbasierte Bewertungssysteme haben eine potenzielle Bedeutung fuer die Beurteilung der Prognose von Krebspatienten. Derzeit fehlen jedoch ausreichend detailliert durchgefuehrte Analysen in Kollektiven von Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Untersucht wurde das Gesamtueberleben (''overall survival'', OS) von Patienten mit lokal

  8. Exploding Head Syndrome:A Case Report

    Gautam Ganguly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exploding head syndrome (EHS is a rare parasomnia in which affected individuals awaken from sleep with the sensation of a loud bang. The etiology is unknown, but other conditions including primary and secondary headache disorders and nocturnal seizures need to be excluded. Case Presentation: A 57-year-old Indian male presented with four separate episodes of awakening from sleep at night after hearing a flashing sound on the right side of his head over the last 2 years. These events were described ‘as if there are explosions in my head’. A neurologic examination, imaging studies, and a polysomnogram ensued, and the results led to the diagnosis of EHS. Conclusion: EHS is a benign, uncommon, predominately nocturnal disorder that is self-limited. No treatment is generally required. Reassurance to the patient is often all that is needed.

  9. Salvage brachytherapy (BT) of 85 T1 T2 oral cavity second head and neck primaries (SHNP) in previously irradiated patients

    Peiffert, D; Hoffstetter, S; Pernot, M.; Aletti, P.; Luporsi, E.; Kozminski, P.; Lapeyre, M.; Dartois, D.; Bey, P.

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of a SNHP (20%) represents a major therapeutic dilemma for salvage treatment. BT achieves a local conservative treatment but neglects the node areas. The aim of the study is to evaluate the local control, the late complications, and the survival. Materials and Methods. From 1976 to 1994, 85 patients were treated by salvage BT for a T1 T2 SHNP (38 mobile tongues and 47 floors of mouth). All of them had been previously irradiated for a first head and neck primary by external beam irradiation (80 patients, mean dose = 55 Gy) and/or BT (31 patients, mean dose 39 Gy). A tumour resection had been performed in 33 patients. Results: They were 81 males and 4 females, their mean age was 59 (range 40-80). 78 had infiltrative squamous cell carcinomas, and 7 micro-invasive or intra-epithelial carcinomas. They were 20 T1N0, 17 T2 N0 and 1 T2 N1 mobile tongue, and 39 T1 N0, 8 T2 N0 floor of mouth tumours. The mean follow-up was 46 months (range 1-130). The BT used Ir 192 wires, at low dose rate (mean = 0.58 Gy/h, range 0.3-1.1), and delivered a mean dose of 62 Gy (range 26-70) in the 85% ref. isodose of the Paris System. For the tongue and the floor respectively, the 5 years overall survival was 41% and 26%, and the 5 years specific survival 74% and 94%. The causes of death were respectively the tumour for 32% and 5%, and another primary for 42% and 66%. The local relapse rate was respectively 18% and 8.5%, half of them occurring in the first year of follow-up, the nodal relapses were 8% and 4%. Only one patient developed a distant metastasis. 5 patients developed osteoradionecrosis (3 grade 3 with fracture and/or mandible resection) and 19 soft tissue necrosis (2 grade 3 treated by local excision, and 9 grade 2 treated by hyperbaric 02). 47 patients developed other primaries, especially in the oesophagus (18 patients) explaining the low overall survival. Conclusion: Salvage BT is a useful treatment for T1 T2 oral cavity SHNP occurring in previous irradiated

  10. High-grade acute organ toxicity as positive prognostic factor in primary radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Bosch, Jan; Hennies, Steffen; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Overbeck, Tobias [Dept. of Haematology and Oncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Matthias, Christoph; Roedel, Ralph M. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: to test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radio(chemo)therapy and treatment outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and methods: from 05/1994 to 01/2009, 216 HNSCC patients were treated with radio(chemo)therapy in primary approach. They received normofractionated (2 Gy/fraction) irradiation including associated nodal drainage sites to a cumulative dose of 70 Gy. 151 patients received additional concomitant chemotherapy (111 patients 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C, 40 patients cisplatin-based). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), and any toxicity grade CTC {>=} 3 of mucositis, dysphagia or skin reaction was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: a statistically significant coherency between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival as well as locoregional control was found: patients with CTC {>=} 3 acute organ toxicity had a 5-year overall survival rate of 4% compared to 8% in patients without (p < 0.01). Thereby, multivariate analyses revealed that the correlation was independent of other possible prognostic factors or factors that may influence treatment toxicity, especially concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy technique or treatment-planning procedure. Conclusion: these data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, as high-grade acute organ toxicity during radio(chemo)therapy showed to be an independent prognostic marker in the own patient population. However, the authors are aware of the fact that a multivariate analysis in a retrospective study generally has statistical limitations. Therefore, their hypothesis should be further analyzed on biomolecular and clinical levels and other tumor entities in prospective trials. (orig.)

  11. Allocating monitoring effort in the face of unknown unknowns

    Wintle, B.A.; Runge, M.C.; Bekessy, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing view that to make efficient use of resources, ecological monitoring should be hypothesis-driven and targeted to address specific management questions. 'Targeted' monitoring has been contrasted with other approaches in which a range of quantities are monitored in case they exhibit an alarming trend or provide ad hoc ecological insights. The second form of monitoring, described as surveillance, has been criticized because it does not usually aim to discern between competing hypotheses, and its benefits are harder to identify a priori. The alternative view is that the existence of surveillance data may enable rapid corroboration of emerging hypotheses or help to detect important 'unknown unknowns' that, if undetected, could lead to catastrophic outcomes or missed opportunities. We derive a model to evaluate and compare the efficiency of investments in surveillance and targeted monitoring. We find that a decision to invest in surveillance monitoring may be defensible if: (1) the surveillance design is more likely to discover or corroborate previously unknown phenomena than a targeted design and (2) the expected benefits (or avoided costs) arising from discovery are substantially higher than those arising from a well-planned targeted design. Our examination highlights the importance of being explicit about the objectives, costs and expected benefits of monitoring in a decision analytic framework. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  12. Recovering function and surviving treatments are primary motivators for health behavior change in patients with head and neck cancer: Qualitative focus group study.

    Henry, Melissa; Bdira, Ala; Cherba, Maria; Lambert, Sylvie; Carnevale, Franco A; MacDonald, Christina; Hier, Michael; Zeitouni, Anthony; Kost, Karen; Mlynarek, Alex; Black, Martin; Rosberger, Zeev; Frenkiel, Saul

    2016-08-01

    Against medical advice, head and neck cancer (HNC) patients have been shown to continue to smoke and misuse alcohol post-diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to better understand the barriers to and facilitators of health behavior change (HBC) in HNC patients. We conducted nine focus groups following a standard protocol. Eligible patients were diagnosed less than three years previously with a primary HNC and selected using maximum variability sampling (gender, age, cancer stage, smoking, and alcohol misuse). Thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo 10 software. Participants were mostly men (79%), 65 years of age (SD = 10.1), and married/common-law (52%, n = 15). Mean time from diagnosis was 19 months (SD = 12.3, range = 5.0-44.5), and most had advanced cancer (65.5%, n = 19). Participants provided a larger than anticipated definition of health behaviors, encompassing both traditional (smoking, drinking, diet, exercise, UV protection) and HNC-related (e.g., dental hygiene, skin care, speech exercises, using a PEG, gaining weight). The main emerging theme was patient engagement, that is, being proactive in rehabilitation, informed by the medical team, optimistic, flexible, and seeking support when needed. Patients were primarily motivated to stay proactive and engage in positive health behaviors in order to return to normal life and reclaim function, rather than to prevent a cancer recurrence. Barriers to patient engagement included emotional aspects (e.g., anxiety, depression, trauma, demoralization), symptoms (e.g., fatigue, pain), lack of information about HBC, and healthcare providers' authoritarian approach in counseling on HBC. We found some commonalities in barriers and facilitators according to behavior type (i.e., smoking/drinking/UV protection vs. diet/exercise). This study underlines the key challenges in addressing health behaviors in head and neck oncology, including treatment-related functional impairments, symptom burden, and the disease

  13. Function analysis of unknown genes

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used...... to describe different aspects of molecular biology of the cell, to study changes that occur in the cell due to overexpression or deletion of a gene and to identify various protein modifications. The biological questions and the results of the described studies show the diversity of the information that can...... genes and proteins. It reports the first global proteome database collecting 36 yeast single gene deletion mutants and selecting over 650 differences between analysed mutants and the wild type strain. The obtained results show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome...

  14. GSTM1 copy number and promoter haplotype as predictors for risk of recurrence and/or second primary tumor in patients with head and neck cancer

    Zhang X

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Xuemei Zhang,1 Maosheng Huang,2 Xifeng Wu,2 Susan Kadlubar,1 Jie Lin,2 Xinfeng Yu,1 Chunyang Fan,3 Baitang Ning,4 Fred F Kadlubar1†1University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, 2The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 3VA hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, 4National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, USA†Fred F Kadlubar passed away on December 4, 2010.Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine copy number variant (CNV and promoter genetic variants in glutathione S-transferase Mu class 1 (GSTM1 and the risk of recurrence (REC/second primary tumor (SPT in patients with previously diagnosed early stage head and neck cancer. Among 441 subjects, 133 experienced REC and/or an SPT, while 308 had single primary disease. TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the exact copy number of GSTM1 and direct sequencing was used to determine genetic variants in the GSTM1 promoter region. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs associated with copy number and genetic variants. REC/SPT-free survival times were compared by constructing Kaplan–Meier curves and differences between curves were tested by logrank test. Results showed a significantly decreased REC/SPT (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.35–0.95 and longer REC/SPT-free survival in subjects with at least two copies of GSTM1 compared with the GSTM1 homozygous deletion, but not in those with one copy of GSTM1. The −498G, −426G, and −339T alleles were significantly associated with REC/SPT, with HRs of 0.11 (0.02–0.85, 0.28 (0.11–0.74 and 2.02 (1.07–3.82, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that the −498G, −426G, and −339C alleles were also significantly associated with increased REC/SPT-free survival. Further haplotype analysis showed the haplotype P-498G--426G--339

  15. Financial Development and Economic Growth: Known Knowns, Known Unknowns, and Unknown Unknowns

    Ugo Panizza

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of the literature on the relationship between financial and economic development (the known knowns), points to directions for future research (the known unknowns), and then speculates on the third Rumsfeldian category. The known knowns section organizes the empirical literature on finance and growth into three strands: (i) the traditional literature which established the link between finance and growth; (ii) the new literature which qualified some of th...

  16. Outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent or new primary squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck treated with curative intent reirradiation at Mayo Clinic

    Curtis, Kelly K.; Ross, Helen J.; Garrett, Ashley L.; Jizba, Theresa A.; Patel, Ajay B.; Patel, Samir H.; Wong, William W.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ko, Stephen J.; Kosiorek, Heidi E.; Foote, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent (LRR) or new primary (NP) squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated at our institution with reirradiation (RRT). Patients received definitive RRT (DRRT) or post-operative RRT following salvage surgery (PRRT) from 2003 to 2011. Measured survival outcomes included loco-regional relapse free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 81 patients (PRRT, 42; DRRT, 39), median PRRT and DRRT doses were 60 Gy (12–70 Gy) and 69.6 Gy (48–76.8 Gy). The majority of patients received IMRT-based RRT (n = 77, 95 %). With median follow-up of 78.1 months (95 % CI, 56–96.8 months), 2-year OS was 53 % with PRRT and 48 % with DRRT (p = 0.12); 23 % of patients were alive at last follow-up. LRFS at 2 years was 60 %, and did not differ significantly between PRRT and DRRT groups. A trend toward inferior LRFS was noted among patients receiving chemotherapy with RRT versus RRT alone (p = 0.06). Late serious toxicities were uncommon, including osteoradionecrosis (2 patients) and carotid artery bleeding (1 patient, non-fatal). OS of PRRT- and DRRT-treated patients in this series appears superior to the published literature. We used IMRT for the majority of patients, in contrast to several series and trials previously reported, which may account in part for this difference. Future studies should seek to improve outcomes among patients with LRR/NP SCCHN via alternative therapeutic modalities such as proton radiotherapy and by incorporating novel systemic agents

  17. Effect of patient age on accuracy of primary MRI signs of long head of biceps tearing and instability in the shoulder. An MRI-arthroscopy correlation study

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Costello, Joanna; Vyas, Dharmesh [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bertolet, Marnie [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2018-02-15

    To determine the effect of patient age on the accuracy of primary MRI signs of long head of biceps (LHB) tendon tearing and instability in the shoulder using arthroscopy as a reference standard. Subjects with MRI studies and subsequent arthroscopy documenting LHB tendon pathology were identified and organized into three age groups (18-40, 41-60, 61-87). Normal and tendinopathic tendons were labeled grade 0, partial tears grade 1 and full tears grade 2. Two radiologists blinded to arthroscopic data graded MRI studies independently. Prevalence of disease, MRI accuracy for outcomes of interest, and inter-reader agreement were calculated. Eighty-nine subjects fulfilled inclusion criteria with 36 grade 0, 36 grade 1 and 17 grade 2 tendons found at arthroscopy. MRI sensitivity, regardless of age, ranged between 67-86% for grade 0, 72-94% for grade 1 and 82-94% for grade 2 tendons. Specificity ranged between 83-96% for grade 0, 75-85% for grade 1 and 99-100% for grade 2 tendons. MRI accuracy for detection of each LHB category was calculated for each age group. MRI was found to be least sensitive for grade 0 and 1 LHB tendons in the middle-aged group with sensitivity between 55-85% for grade 0 and 53-88% for grade 1 tendons. Agreement between MRI readers was moderate with an unweighted kappa statistic of 62%. MRI accuracy was moderate to excellent and agreement between MRI readers was moderate. MRI appears to be less accurate in characterizing lower grades of LHB tendon disease in middle-aged subjects. (orig.)

  18. Carboplatin-pemetrexed in treatment of patients with recurrent/metastatic cancers of the head and neck; superior outcomes in oropharyngeal primaries.

    Binu eMalhotra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – Platinum based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil with cetuximab has shown the best survival in pts with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of carboplatin, pemetrexed and to assess differential outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal primary and HPV related disease.Patients and Methods –The charts of consecutive patients with R/M SCCHN were reviewed. All patients receiving at least 1 cycle of the 2-drug regimen (pemetrexed 500 mg/m2, carboplatin area under the curve of 5 intravenously, were included for assessment of response, safety, toxicity and survival.Results - A total of 86 patients received this regimen between January 2008 and December 2012, of which, 63 were included in this analysis. Forty one percent (26 of the patients had cancers of the oropharynx, and of those, 50% had HPV positive disease, 32% (20 had cancers of the larynx and 24% (15 of the oral cavity. Median number of cycles administered was 4 (range 1-14 cycles with 50% of the patients receiving 4 or more cycles. Half the patients achieved stable disease as their best response, 8% (5 attained a partial response, 24% progressed on therapy and the remaining patients (12 could not have their response assessed.On the basis of Kaplan Meier analysis, median progression free survival (PFS was 5.1 months (95% CI 3.2, 6.2 and median overall survival (OS was 9.4 months (95% CI 4.3, 13.1. Among pts with oropharyngeal primary (n=26, median PFS was 6.4 months (95% CI 2.8, 7.9 and median OS was 16.6 months (95% CI 9.6, 19.5. Among HPV+ pts (n=13, median PFS was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.8, ne and median OS was 17.1 months (95% CI 11.2, 21.7. Conclusion: Combination carboplatin-pemetrexed is an effective and well tolerated treatment, associated with a median PFS of 5.1 months and a clinical benefit in at least 57% of the patients treated.

  19. [Focal myositis: An unknown disease].

    Gallay, L; Streichenberger, N; Benveniste, O; Allenbach, Y

    2017-10-01

    Focal myositis are inflammatory muscle diseases of unknown origin. At the opposite from the other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, they are restricted to a single muscle or to a muscle group. They are not associated with extramuscular manifestations, and they have a good prognosis without any treatment. They are characterized by a localized swelling affecting mostly lower limbs. The pseudo-tumor can be painful, but is not associated with a muscle weakness. Creatine kinase level is normal. Muscle MRI shows an inflammation restricted to a muscle or a muscle group. Muscle biopsy and pathological analysis remain necessary for the diagnosis, showing inflammatory infiltrates composed by macrophages and lymphocytes without any specific distribution within the muscle. Focal overexpression of HLA-1 by the muscle fibers is frequently observed. The muscle biopsy permits to rule out differential diagnosis such a malignancy (sarcoma). Spontaneous remission occurs within weeks or months after the first symptoms, relapse is unusual. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. [The exploding head syndrome].

    Bongers, K M; ter Bruggen, J P; Franke, C L

    1991-04-06

    The case is reported of a 47-year old female suffering from the exploding head syndrome. This syndrome consists of a sudden awakening due to a loud noise shortly after falling asleep, sometimes accompanied by a flash of light. The patient is anxious and experiences palpitations and excessive sweating. Most patients are more than fifty years of age. Further investigations do not reveal any abnormality. The pathogenesis is unknown, and no therapy other than reassurance is necessary.

  1. Previously unknown species of Aspergillus.

    Gautier, M; Normand, A-C; Ranque, S

    2016-08-01

    The use of multi-locus DNA sequence analysis has led to the description of previously unknown 'cryptic' Aspergillus species, whereas classical morphology-based identification of Aspergillus remains limited to the section or species-complex level. The current literature highlights two main features concerning these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species. First, the prevalence of such species in clinical samples is relatively high compared with emergent filamentous fungal taxa such as Mucorales, Scedosporium or Fusarium. Second, it is clearly important to identify these species in the clinical laboratory because of the high frequency of antifungal drug-resistant isolates of such Aspergillus species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been shown to enable the identification of filamentous fungi with an accuracy similar to that of DNA sequence-based methods. As MALDI-TOF MS is well suited to the routine clinical laboratory workflow, it facilitates the identification of these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species at the routine mycology bench. The rapid establishment of enhanced filamentous fungi identification facilities will lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical importance of these emerging Aspergillus species. Based on routine MALDI-TOF MS-based identification results, we provide original insights into the key interpretation issues of a positive Aspergillus culture from a clinical sample. Which ubiquitous species that are frequently isolated from air samples are rarely involved in human invasive disease? Can both the species and the type of biological sample indicate Aspergillus carriage, colonization or infection in a patient? Highly accurate routine filamentous fungi identification is central to enhance the understanding of these previously unknown Aspergillus species, with a vital impact on further improved patient care. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and

  2. Porcine head response to blast.

    Shridharani, Jay K; Wood, Garrett W; Panzer, Matthew B; Capehart, Bruce P; Nyein, Michelle K; Radovitzky, Raul A; Bass, Cameron R 'dale'

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G's and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R(2) = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  3. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Helen; Chen, Duo-duo; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; Razak, Albiruni; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Kim, John; Dawson, Laura A.; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, B.C. John; Goldstein, David; Gullane, Patrick; Yu, Eugene; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(−)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(−). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (≤1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(−) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(−) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(−) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(−) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(−) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(−) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(−) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(−) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(−) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12

  4. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    Huang, Shao Hui; O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei; Zhao, Helen [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Duo-duo [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Razak, Albiruni [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery/Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dawson, Laura A.; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, B.C. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Goldstein, David; Gullane, Patrick [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery/Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan [Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Waldron, John, E-mail: John.Waldron@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(−)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(−). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (≤1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(−) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(−) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(−) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(−) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(−) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(−) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(−) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(−) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(−) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1957-10-21 to 1963-08-15 (NCEI Accession 0157734)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157734 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea,...

  6. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  7. Boxing-related head injuries.

    Jayarao, Mayur; Chin, Lawrence S; Cantu, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Fatalities in boxing are most often due to traumatic brain injury that occurs in the ring. In the past 30 years, significant improvements in ringside and medical equipment, safety, and regulations have resulted in a dramatic reduction in the fatality rate. Nonetheless, the rate of boxing-related head injuries, particularly concussions, remains unknown, due in large part to its variability in clinical presentation. Furthermore, the significance of repeat concussions sustained when boxing is just now being understood. In this article, we identify the clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, and management of boxing-related head injuries, and discuss preventive strategies to reduce head injuries sustained by boxers.

  8. Values of some topographic parameters of optic nerve head obtained by Heidelberg retina tomograph II in volunteers and different stage primary open-angle glaucoma patients

    B. Anguelov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: То assess the values of the top five topographic parameters of optic nerve head (ONH obtained by Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT II in volunteers and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients with different stage of perimetric changes.Methods: 73 eyes (38 volunteers at the age of 56 years ±13, 11 men and 27 women and 170 eyes (90 patients at the age of 66 years ±12, 33 men and 57 women were examined. We performed the comprehensive ophthalmic examination, standard automated perimetry and measurement of the top five topographic parameters of ONH — rim area, rim volume, cup shape measure, height variation contour и mean RNFL thickness. For the purpose of this study we used HRT II.Results: We determine the values of the investigated topographic parameters of the ONH for healthy volunteers (rim area = 1.68±0.22 mm2, rim volume = 0.44±0.07 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.2±0.06, height variation contour = 0.38±0.08 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.24±0.03 mm and for the patients in different perimetric glaucoma stages (early stage: rim area = 1.52±0.47 mm2, rim volume = 0.38±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.14±0.1, height variation contour = 0.36±0.09 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.22±0.11 mm; moderate stage: rim area = 1.21±0.46 mm2, rim volume = 0.27±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.09±0.1, height variation contour = 0.36±0.17 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.16±0.12 mm; severe stage: rim area = 0.97±0.01 mm2, rim volume = 0.18±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.06±0.1, height variation contour = 0.28±0.11 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.17±0.11 mm. Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson (H-P-A ’s staging system includes three separate levels (early, moderate and severe of glaucoma according to visual field defects. Each stage is additionally characterized by the values of the top five topographic parameters of the ONH.Conclusion: Early diagnosis, staging and follow-up of POAG are based on both function and

  9. Head Lice

    ... nits. You should also use hot water to wash any bed linens, towels, and clothing recently worn by the person who had head lice. Vacuum anything that can’t be washed, such as the couch, carpets, your child’s car seat, and any stuffed animals. Because head lice ...

  10. Head Injuries

    ... a severe blow to the head can still knock the brain into the side of the skull ... following certain precautions and taking a break from sports and other activities that make symptoms worse. Playing ...

  11. Total hip arthroplasty survival in femoral head avascular necrosis versus primary hip osteoarthritis: Case-control study with a mean 10-year follow-up after anatomical cementless metal-on-metal 28-mm replacement.

    Ancelin, D; Reina, N; Cavaignac, E; Delclaux, S; Chiron, P

    2016-12-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is the most widely used procedure to treat avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. Few studies have compared the outcomes of THA in femoral head AVN and primary hip osteoarthritis. Therefore we performed a case-control study to compare THA for femoral head AVN vs. primary hip osteoarthritis in terms of: (1) prosthesis survival, (2) complication rates, (3) functional outcomes and radiographic outcomes, (4) and to determine whether specific risk factors for THA failure exist in femoral head AVN. THA survival is similar in femoral head AVN and primary hip osteoarthritis. We compared two prospective cohorts of patients who underwent THA before 65 years of age, one composed of cases with femoral head AVN and the other of controls with primary hip osteoarthritis. In both cohorts, a cementless metal-on-metal prosthesis with a 28-mm cup and an anatomical stem was used. Exclusion criteria were THA with other types of prosthesis, posttraumatic AVN, and secondary osteoarthritis. With α set at 5%, to obtain 80% power, 246 patients were required in all. Prosthesis survival was assessed based on time to major revision (defined as replacement of at least one implant fixed to bone) and time to aseptic loosening. The other evaluation criteria were complications, Postel-Merle d'Aubigné (PMA) score, and the Engh and Agora Radiographic Assessment (ARA) scores for implant osseointegration. The study included 282 patients, 149 with AVN and 133 with osteoarthritis. Mean age was 47.8±10.2 years (range, 18.5-65) and mean follow-up was 11.4±2.8 years (range, 4.5-18.3 years). The 10-year survival rates were similar in the two groups: for major revision, AVN group, 92.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 90.2-94.8) and osteoarthritis group, 95.3% (95% CI, 92.9-97.7); for aseptic loosening, AVN group, 98.6% (95% CI, 97.6-98.6) and osteoarthritis, 99.2% (95% CI, 98.4-100). The AVN group had higher numbers of revision for any reason (19 vs. 6, P=0.018) and

  12. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  13. Randomized phase III trial (GORTEC 98-03) comparing re-irradiation plus chemotherapy versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent or a second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, treated with a palliative intent

    Tortochaux, Jacques; Tao Yungan; Tournay, Elodie; Lapeyre, Michel; Lesaunier, Francois; Bardet, Etienne; Janot, Francois; Lusinchi, Antoine; Benhamou, Ellen; Bontemps, Patrick; Maingon, Philippe; Calais, Gilles; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Verrelle, Pierre; Bourhis, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized phase III trial investigated the potential benefit of concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea versus methotrexate for patients treated with palliative intent for recurrent or second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in previously irradiated area. Patients and methods: Patients with recurrent HNSCC or a second primary not amenable to curative-intent treatment were randomized to the R-RT arm (concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea) or to the Ch-T arm (methotrexate). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Due to a very slow accrual, the trial was closed after inclusion of 57 patients. Results: Fifty-seven patients were included. All patients died in the two arms with a maximal follow-up of 5 years. Although four complete responses were achieved in R-RT arm, (none in Ch-T arm) re-irradiation did not improve OS compared with methotrexate (23% versus 22% at 1 year, NS). Sixteen patients experienced clinical grade ≥3 late toxicities (>6 months), 11 in R-RT arm and five in Ch-T arm. Conclusions: Premature discontinuation of the trial did not allow us to draw firm conclusions. However, there was no suggestion that concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea improved OS compared to methotrexate alone in patients treated with palliative intent for a recurrent or second primary HNSCC.

  14. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Her...

  15. Head Start.

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  16. Quantum circuits cannot control unknown operations

    Araújo, Mateus; Feix, Adrien; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential building blocks of classical computer programs is the ‘if’ clause, which executes a subroutine depending on the value of a control variable. Similarly, several quantum algorithms rely on applying a unitary operation conditioned on the state of a control system. Here we show that this control cannot be performed by a quantum circuit if the unitary is completely unknown. The task remains impossible even if we allow the control to be done modulo a global phase. However, this no-go theorem does not prevent implementing quantum control of unknown unitaries in practice, as any physical implementation of an unknown unitary provides additional information that makes the control possible. We then argue that one should extend the quantum circuit formalism to capture this possibility in a straightforward way. This is done by allowing unknown unitaries to be applied to subspaces and not only to subsystems. (paper)

  17. Multifocal, chronic osteomyelitis of unknown etiology

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Feltham, C.; James, M.; Nespoli, L.; Tamaela, L.; Pavia Univ.; Municipal Hospital, Nelson; Medical School, Jakarta

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of multifocal osteomyelitis of unknown origin in childhood are reported. The variable clinical and radiographic appearances of the disease are illustrated and the diagnostic difficulties in the early stages of the disease are stressed. (orig.) [de

  18. Known Unknowns in Judgment and Choice

    Walters, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how people make inferences about missing information. Whereas most prior literature focuses on how people process known information, I show that the extent to which people make inferences about missing information impacts judgments and choices. Specifically, I investigate how (1) awareness of known unknowns affects overconfidence in judgment in Chapter 1, (2) beliefs about the knowability of unknowns impacts investment strategies in Chapter 2, and (3) inferences...

  19. Mobile assistant for unknown caller identification

    Hribernik, Andraž

    2012-01-01

    The main motivation of this diploma thesis is a development of Android application, which helps user of application to find out who is the owner of unknown phone number. Data source for finding unknown phone number are free available web sources. Through the development of prototype, data from different web sources were integrated. Result of this integration is shown in Android application. Data integration includes access to semi-structured data on web portal of Phone Directory of Slovenia, ...

  20. [Reconstructive investigations and identification measures in unknown soldiers of the Second World War].

    Jopp-van Well, Eilin; Gehl, Axel; Säring, Dennis; Amling, Michael; Hahn, Michael; Sperhake, Jan; Augustin, Christa; Krebs, Oliver; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The article reports on the exhumation and identification of unknown soldiers from the Second World War. With the help of medicolegal investigation and reconstruction methods an American pilot presumably murdered by a shot to the head (lynch law) and an interned Italian soldier could be identified after about 70 years and brought back home.

  1. A Novel Closed-head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    Scott A Heldt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, which we have used to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8 weeks after blast, 50-60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, however, and only scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50-60 psi mice 3-8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to diffuse axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI.

  2. In vitro lipofection with novel series of symmetric 1,3-dialkoylamidopropane-based cationic surfactants containing single primary and tertiary amine polar head groups.

    Sheikh, Mohammad; Feig, Jennifer; Gee, Becky; Li, Song; Savva, Michalakis

    2003-06-01

    A novel series of symmetric double-chained primary and tertiary 1,3-dialkoylamido monovalent cationic lipids were synthesized and evaluated for their transfection activities. In the absence of the helper lipid DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine), only the primary and tertiary dioleoyl derivatives 1,3lmp5 and 1,3lmt5, respectively elicited transfection activity. This is a striking difference between symmetrical 1,2-diacyl glycerol-based monovalent cationic lipids that always found both dioleoyl and dimyristoyl analogues being efficient transfection reagents. In the presence of helper lipid, all cationic derivatives induced marker gene expression, except the dilauroyl analogues 1,3lmp1 and 1,3lmt1 that elicited no transfection activity. Combining electrophoretic mobility data of the lipoplexes at different charge ratios with transfection activity suggested two requirements for high transfection activity with monovalent double-chained cationic lipids, that is, binding/association of the lipid to the plasmid DNA and membrane fusion properties of the lipid layers surrounding the DNA.

  3. Primary brain lymphoma. Effectiveness and secondary effects of the onco specific treatment in patients with head and neck tumors in advanced stages

    Leon Gonzalez, Roberto; Areces Delgado, Fernando; Chi Ramirez, Daysi; Chon Rivas, Ivonne; Vilau Prieto, Luis; Trujillo Matienzo, Clemente

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated that the effectiveness of chemotherapy for the treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) has not been proved; however, the intravenous or intrathecal treatment with methotrexate dse has been used and satisfactory results have been obtained. The case of a patient with diagnosis of PCNSL and an intraparenchymatous infiltration on the left temporoparietal region at the onset of the disease, and later on the homo lateral pontocerebellar angle, is reported. Systemic and intrathecal onco specific polychemotherapy and holocranial radiotherapy were applied. All the reported lesions disappeared, and a satisfactory evolution was observed, although this patient had severe late alterations of his higher psychical functions with progressive cognoscitive and behavioral disorders. Lesions such as cortical atrophy, leukoatrophy, dilated ventricular system, and hyper intensive areas in the white matter of the brain without tumoral recurrence were evidenced in the imaging study. The positive impact of chemotherapy on the treatment of primary brain lymphoma was verified, as well as the neurotoxicity in the central nervous system caused by the onco specific treatment (radiotherapy and chemotherapy). It was considered that radiotherapy and combined therapy should be only used in relapses. It was recommended to conduct a comparative clinical study with periodical neuropsychological assessments to determine the possible neurotoxic effect caused by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. From the clinical and imaging point of view, the patient presented a neurotoxic atrophic leucoencephalopathy

  4. Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Primary Radiotherapy: A Comparison of the Addition of Cetuximab or Chemotherapy and the Impact of Protocol Treatment

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Sawrie, Stephen M.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Desmond, Renee A.; Carroll, William R.; Peters, Glenn E.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Bonner, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of platinum-based chemotherapy (ChRT) or cetuximab (ExRT) to concurrent radiotherapy (RT) has resulted in improved survival in Phase III studies for locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). However the optimal treatment regimen has not been defined. A retrospective study was performed to compare outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with ExRT or ChRT. Methods: Cetuximab with concurrent RT was used to treat 29 patients with LAHNC, all of whom had tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or larynx. All patients were T2 to T4 and overall American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III to IVB, with a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of 60 or greater. ChRT was used to treat 103 patients with similar characteristics. Patients were evaluated for locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Median follow-up for patients alive at last contact was 83 months for those treated with ExRT and 53 months for those treated with ChRT. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent prognostic factors. Results: The LRC, DMFS, and DSS were not significantly different, with 3-year rates of 70.7%, 92.4%, and 78.6% for ExRT and 74.7%, 86.6%, and 76.5% for ChRT, respectively. The OS was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.02), with 3-year rates of 75.9% for ExRT and 61.3% for ChRT. OS was not significant when patients who were on protocol treatments of ExRT or ChRT were compared. Also, OS was not significant when multivariate analysis was used to control for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: In our single-institution retrospective review of patients treated with ExRT or ChRT, no significant differences were found in LRC, DMFS, DSS, or OS

  5. The impact of virus in N3 node dissection for head and neck cancer.

    Armas, Gian Luca; Su, Chih-Ying; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Fang, Fu-Min; Chen, Ching-Mei; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2008-11-01

    This study is to determine the impact of virus in surgical outcomes among patients of head and neck cancer with N3 lymph node metastasis. A retrospective analysis was conducted for 32 patients with operable N3 neck metastasis undergoing surgical treatment between January 1987 and October 2006. The nuclei of the tumor cells were investigated for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAs and were taken into account as the variable for survival analysis. The primary sites were oropharynx in 11 patients, tongue in 3, buccal mucosa in 1, hypopharynx in 8 and unknown primary in 9. The five-year cumulative overall survival rate was 40.7% and 5-year cumulative regional control rate was 55.8%. The 5-year cumulative overall survival rate of patients with unknown primary site (72.9%) and HPV or EBV positive in the tumor (77.8%) were significantly higher than those patients with known primary site (31.3%) and HPV or EBV negative in the tumor (27.4%), respectively (P = 0.0335 and P = 0.0348, log rank test). In conclusion, surgery with adjuvant therapy offers reasonable outcomes for operable N3 node in head and neck cancer in our cohort. In addition, patients with HPV or EBV positive in the tumor have a better survival.

  6. Flued head replacement alternatives

    Smetters, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses flued head replacement options. Section 2 discusses complete flued head replacement with a design that eliminates the inaccessible welds. Section 3 discusses alternate flued head support designs that can drastically reduce flued head installation costs. Section 4 describes partial flued head replacement designs. Finally, Section 5 discusses flued head analysis methods. (orig./GL)

  7. Protocol for counterfactually transporting an unknown qubit

    Hatim eSalih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum teleportation circumvents the uncertainty principle using dual channels: a quantum one consisting of previously-shared entanglement, and a classical one, together allowing the disembodied transport of an unknown quantum state over distance. It has recently been shown that a classical bit can be counterfactually communicated between two parties in empty space, Alice and Bob. Here, by using our dual version of the chained quantum Zeno effect to achieve a counterfactual CNOT gate, we propose a protocol for transporting an unknown qubit counterfactually, that is without any physical particles travelling between Alice and Bob—no classical channel and no previously-shared entanglement.

  8. Goniometer head

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  9. The Optic Nerve Head in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Eyes With High Myopia: Characteristics and Association With Visual Field Defects.

    Chen, Li-Wei; Lan, Yu-Wen; Hsieh, Jui-Wen

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the morphologic characteristics of optic neuropathy and its association with visual field (VF) defects in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) eyes with high myopia. In this cross-sectional study, we reviewed data from 375 Taiwanese patients (375 eyes) of POAG, ages 20 to 60 years. Optic disc photographs were used for planimetric measurements of morphologic variables. The myopic refraction was divided into high myopia (<-6.0 D) and nonhigh myopia (moderate myopia to hyperopia). The optic disc area was classified as moderate (1.59 to 2.85 mm), large, and small. Differences in characteristics between groups, correlations with the disc area, and factors associated with VF defects were determined. Of the 142 highly myopic eyes, 33 (23%) had a large disc, 26 (18%) had a small disc, and 55 (39%) had a tilted disc. Large discs had a higher cup-to-disc (C/D) area ratio and a higher tilt ratio; small discs had a smaller rim area and a lower tilt ratio (all P<0.05). Characteristics associated with high myopia included a smaller rim area, a higher C/D area ratio, and a lower tilt ratio (all P<0.001). In logistic regression, the refraction, the C/D area ratio, the rim area, and the tilt ratio (all P<0.05) were associated with VF defects. In Taiwanese individuals with POAG, our study found that tilted, large, or small discs were prevalent in highly myopic eyes. Of these characteristics, only the disc tilt and high myopia by itself were associated with the severity of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

  10. 18F-FDG PET和PET/CT显像对原发不明转移癌诊断价值的系统性综述和Meta分析%Role of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in detection of unknown primary tumor: a systematic review and Meta-analysis of the literature

    杨忠毅; 徐俊彦; 胡四龙

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究F-FDG PET和PET/CT显像寻找原发灶的价值.方法:收集2010年3月31日前公开发表的关于F-FDG PET或PET/CT显像用于寻找原发灶价值的中英文文献,并进行数据提取和方法学质量评估.采用Meta分析的方法计算综合灵敏度(Se)、特异性(Sp)、阳性似然比(LR+)、阴性似然比(LR-)和诊断优势比(DOR),并绘制综合受试者工作特征(SROC)曲线.结果:共有24篇文献纳入(PET显像14篇,PET/CT显像10篇).F-FDG PET和PET/CT显像对原发灶的正确检出率为40.86%(344/842),两者分别为37.60%(144/383)和43.57%(200/459).检出的原发灶主要位于肺、扁桃体和胃肠道.PET显像的综合Se、Sp、LR+、LR-、DOR及相应的95%可信区间(CI)分别为88%(82%~92%)、80%(74%~85%)、3.55(2.14~5.88)、0.24(0.16-0.36)和24.94(11.36~54.78);PET/CT显像则分别为90%(86%~94%)、84%(79%~89%)、5.19(3.48~7.74)、0.07(0.02~0.25)和80.02(20.42~313.48).SROC曲线下面积分别为0.9074和0.8758,Q*值为0.8393和0.8063.易产生假阳性的部位主要为肺、扁桃体和口咽部,而假阴性则好发于乳腺、扁桃体、舌根和骨骼等.结论:F-FDG PET和PET/CT显像对原发不明转移癌原发灶的检出具有较高的价值.%Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in the detection of primary tumors. Methods: Publications were collected from the English and Chinese literatures on PET or PET/CT imaging in detecting primary tumors of patients presenting with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) unidentified by conventional workup(before March 31, 2010). Systematic methods were used to identify, select, and evaluate the methodological quality of the studies. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio(LR+), negative likelihood ratio(LR-), diagnostic odds ratio(DOR) and summary receiver operating characteristic(SROC) curves were obtained through Meta analysis. Results: 24 studies were analyzed(l4 studies of PET and

  11. Multifocal chronic osteomyelitis of unknown etiology

    Kozlowski, K.; Masel, J.; Harbison, S.; Yu, J.; Royal Brisbane Children Hospital; Regional Hospital Bowral

    1983-01-01

    Five cases of chronic, inflammatory, multifocal bone lesions of unknown etiology are reported. Although bone biopsy confirmed osteomyelitis in each case in none of them were organisms found inspite of an extensive work up. Different clinical course of the disease reflects different aetiology in respective cases. These cases present changing aspects of osteomyelitis emerging since introduction of antibiotics. (orig.)

  12. Algorithms for Rapidly Dispersing Robot Swarms in Unknown Environments

    Hsiang, Tien-Ruey; Arkin, Esther M.; Bender, Michael; Fekete, Sandor P.; Mitchell, Joseph S. B.

    2002-01-01

    We develop and analyze algorithms for dispersing a swarm of primitive robots in an unknown environment, R. The primary objective is to minimize the makespan, that is, the time to fill the entire region. An environment is composed of pixels that form a connected subset of the integer grid. There is at most one robot per pixel and robots move horizontally or vertically at unit speed. Robots enter R by means of k>=1 door pixels Robots are primitive finite automata, only having local communicatio...

  13. Genome Study Yields Clues to Head and Neck Cancers

    Researchers have surveyed the genetic changes in nearly 300 head and neck cancers, revealing some previously unknown alterations that may play a role in the disease, including in patients whose cancer is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  14. Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton; He, Ruijie; Roy, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are already commodities on ground vehicles, air vehicles seeking the same performance face unique challenges. In this paper, we describe the difficulties in achieving fully autonomous helicopter flight, highlighting the differences between ground and helicopter robots that make it ...

  15. Multidimensional procurement auctions with unknown weights

    Greve, Thomas

    This paper studies the consequences of holding a procurement auction when the principal chooses not to show its preferences. My paper extends the procurement auction model of Che (1993) to a situation where both the principal and the agents have private information. Thus, unknown parameters of bo...... gives rise to an analysis of a principal that can not fully commit to the outcome induced by the scoring rule. Therefore, my result apply to contract theory and it’s problems with imperfect commitment....

  16. Size of the Optic Nerve Head and Its Relationship with the Thickness of the Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Nobuko Enomoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the relationships among the optic nerve head (ONH area, macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC thickness, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL thickness, and visual field defects in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG. Methods. This retrospective study included 90 eyes of 90 patients with POAG. The ONH area, rim area, mGCC thickness, and cpRNFL thickness were measured using optical coherence tomography. Mean deviation (MD was measured using standard automated perimetry. The relationships among clinical factors including age, refraction, the ONH area, the rim area, the mGCC thickness, the cpRNFL thickness, and MD were evaluated using correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results. The significant correlation of the ONH area with refraction (r=0.362, P<0.001, the mGCC thickness (r=0.225, P=0.033, and the cpRNFL thickness (r=0.253, P=0.016 was found. Multiple regression analysis showed that the ONH area, rim area, and MD were selected as significant contributing factors to explain the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness. No factor was selected to explain MD. Conclusions. The ONH area, in other words, the disc size itself may affect the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness in POAG patients.

  17. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  18. Is HEADS in our heads?

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  19. TOURISM PROMOTION FOR UNKNOWN AREAS IN ROMANIA

    Fotache Lacramioara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an effort to unknown areas identity affirmation, through collaborative development of advertising mix, with an emphasis on virtual platforms as admissible solution for increasing visibility. Based upon comparative effective analysis of categories of communication particularities, it is suggested a positioning strategic solution, via virtual advertising platform as unique, integrated, complex and very attractive tourism product promotion, fitted for the internal and international tourism circuit. The active promotion of the specified territorial identity will launch a brand with an impact among tourists by using marketing techniques and innovating technical means and prioritizing tourism as a principal vector of local and regional development.

  20. Gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration.

    Tierney, Ryan T; Sitler, Michael R; Swanik, C Buz; Swanik, Kathleen A; Higgins, Michael; Torg, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Recent epidemiological research has revealed that gender differences exist in concussion incidence but no study has investigated why females may be at greater risk of concussion. Our purpose was to determine whether gender differences existed in head-neck segment kinematic and neuromuscular control variables responses to an external force application with and without neck muscle preactivation. Forty (20 females and 20 males) physically active volunteers participated in the study. The independent variables were gender, force application (known vs unknown), and force direction (forced flexion vs forced extension). The dependent variables were kinematic and EMG variables, head-neck segment stiffness, and head-neck segment flexor and extensor isometric strength. Statistical analyses consisted of multiple multivariate and univariate analyses of variance, follow-up univariate analyses of variance, and t-tests (P Gender differences existed in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head angular acceleration. Females exhibited significantly greater head-neck segment peak angular acceleration (50%) and displacement (39%) than males despite initiating muscle activity significantly earlier (SCM only) and using a greater percentage of their maximum head-neck segment muscle activity (79% peak activity and 117% muscle activity area). The head-neck segment angular acceleration differences may be because females exhibited significantly less isometric strength (49%), neck girth (30%), and head mass (43%), resulting in lower levels of head-neck segment stiffness (29%). For our subject demographic, the results revealed gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration in response to an external force application. Females exhibited significantly greater head-neck segment peak angular acceleration and displacement than males despite initiating muscle activity earlier (SCM only) and using a greater percentage of their maximum head-neck segment

  1. Head and neck cancers. Generalities and potential positron emission tomography with 18Flurodesoxyglucose indications

    Carpentier, Ph.; Gauthier, H.; Lefebvre, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Head and neck cancers occur in patients after a long history of tobacco consumption and alcohol abuse. They are diagnosed most often at advanced stages, carry both a local and nodal aggressiveness with a notable risk of distant metastases. They are frequently associated to synchronous or metachronous cancers of the same origin (head and neck, esophagus, lung). They often require combined and heavy therapies. The post-therapeutic follow up may be difficult. If morphologic imaging is mandatory for an appropriate decision making, there is an emerging role for PET at various times of the patients' care (initial work up, treatment planning and follow-up) despite possible physiologic uptake in this area. PET may be of interest for diagnosis, metastatic lymph node from an unknown primary, assessment of response to treatment and follow up as well as radiotherapy targeting. (author)

  2. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  3. Place attachment and disasters: Knowns and unknowns.

    Jamali, Mehdi; Nejat, Ali

    When considering the factors important for disaster recovery, one must consider the attachment individuals have toward their living area. This article reviews and synthesizes the current literature on the determinants of place attachment in the context of postdisaster recovery. Although the majority of the reviewed articles focused on disaster recovery, there were some which had a broader scope and were included due to their importance. This research categorizes the determinants of place attachment into four categories: demographic, socioeconomic, spatial, and psychosocial. Age, ethnicity, and religion were grouped under the category of demographics. Job status, education, and property ownership were categorized under the socioeconomic category. Attachment to home, neighborhood, and city, together with attachment to rural and urban areas, were grouped under the spatial category. Finally, mental health status and community attachment were classified under the psychosocial heading. Based on the outcome of the aforementioned synthesis, this article develops a conceptual framework to guide future research.

  4. Adresse inconnue / Address unknown / Suchwiin Bulmyeong

    Serge Gruzinski

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Tous les films asiatiques parlent de métissage, même ceux qui se présentent comme de vastes fresques historiques perdues dans le temps. Les emprunts aux traditions hollywoodiennes et européennes n'ont cessé d'enrichir une cinématographie aussi ancienne que celle du monde occidental. Dans Adresse inconnue (Address unknown le cinéaste coréen Kim Ki-duk explore l'expérience du métissage et le corps du métis à la frontière entre Corée du Nord et Corée du sud. Fils d'un GI américain et noir et d...

  5. Adresse inconnue / Address unknown / Suchwiin Bulmyeong

    Serge Gruzinski

    2005-01-01

    Tous les films asiatiques parlent de métissage, même ceux qui se présentent comme de vastes fresques historiques perdues dans le temps. Les emprunts aux traditions hollywoodiennes et européennes n'ont cessé d'enrichir une cinématographie aussi ancienne que celle du monde occidental. Dans Adresse inconnue (Address unknown) le cinéaste coréen Kim Ki-duk explore l'expérience du métissage et le corps du métis à la frontière entre Corée du Nord et Corée du sud. Fils d'un GI américain et noir et d'...

  6. The Unknown Component Problem Theory and Applications

    Villa, Tiziano; Brayton, Robert K; Mishchenko, Alan; Petrenko, Alexandre; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The Problem of the Unknown Component: Theory and Applications addresses the issue of designing a component that, combined with a known part of a system, conforms to an overall specification. The authors tackle this problem by solving abstract equations over a language. The most general solutions are studied when both synchronous and parallel composition operators are used. The abstract equations are specialized to languages associated with important classes of automata used for modeling systems. The book is a blend of theory and practice, which includes a description of a software package with applications to sequential synthesis of finite state machines. Specific topologies interconnecting the components, exact and heuristic techniques, and optimization scenarios are studied. Finally the scope is enlarged to domains like testing, supervisory control, game theory and synthesis for special omega languages. The authors present original results of the authors along with an overview of existing ones.

  7. Education Through Exploration: Evaluating the Unknown

    Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mastery of the peculiar and powerful practices of science is increasingly important for the average citizen. With the rise of the Internet, most of human knowledge is at our fingertips. As content becomes a commodity, success and survival aren't about who knows the most, but who is better able to explore the unknown, actively applying and extending knowledge through critical thinking and hypothesis-driven problem-solving. This applies to the economic livelihoods of individuals and to society at large as we grapple with climate change and other science-infused challenges. Unfortunately, science is too often taught as an encyclopedic collection of settled facts to be mastered rather than as a process of exploration that embraces curiosity, inquiry, testing, and communication to reduce uncertainty about the unknown. This problem is exacerbated by the continued prevalence of teacher-centric pedagogy, which promotes learning-from-authority and passive learning. The initial wave of massively open online courses (MOOCs) generally mimic this teaching style in virtual form. It is hypothesized that emerging digital teaching technologies can help address this challenge at Internet scale in "next generation" MOOCs and flipped classroom experiences. Interactive simulations, immersive virtual field trips, gamified elements, rapid adaptive feedback, intelligent tutoring systems, and personalized pathways, should motivate and enhance learning. Through lab-like projects and tutorials, students should be able to construct knowledge from interactive experiences, modeling the authentic practice of science while mastering complex concepts. Freed from lecturing, teaching staff should be available for direct and intense student-teacher interactions. These claims are difficult to evaluate with traditional assessment instruments, but digital technologies provide powerful new ways to evaluate student learning and learn from student behaviors. We will describe ongoing experiences with such

  8. Head Trauma: First Aid

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  9. Mobile robot navigation in unknown static environments using ANFIS controller

    Anish Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Navigation and obstacle avoidance are the most important task for any mobile robots. This article presents the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS controller for mobile robot navigation and obstacle avoidance in the unknown static environments. The different sensors such as ultrasonic range finder sensor and sharp infrared range sensor are used to detect the forward obstacles in the environments. The inputs of the ANFIS controller are obstacle distances obtained from the sensors, and the controller output is a robot steering angle. The primary objective of the present work is to use ANFIS controller to guide the mobile robot in the given environments. Computer simulations are conducted through MATLAB software and implemented in real time by using C/C++ language running Arduino microcontroller based mobile robot. Moreover, the successful experimental results on the actual mobile robot demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed controller.

  10. Head and neck cancer

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  11. High Valence, Normal Valence and Unknown Valence

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul

    the serendipitous synthesis of the nitrido-bridged [Rh(en)3]2- [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]. The complex anion have previously been studied in the form of the mixed Rb4Na2-salt. In this earlier study, the nitrido-bridge was found to be asymmetrical with the axial ligands in an eclipsed formation. The complex was described...... the [Rh(en)3]2-salt is best described as Mn3.5/Mn3.5. This means that the [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]6􀀀 ion displays crystal packing induced oxidation state isomerism, a rare phenomenon. Chapter 4 details the synthesis and characterisation of group 9 dithiolene complexes with focus on the hitherto unknown...... homoleptic iridium dithiolene complexes. When the complexes [M(mnt)3]3􀀀, M = Rh and Co are chemically oxidized, they decompose to yield dinuclear complexes with the metal still in oxidation state III. This is not the case for the corresponding Ir complex which can be oxidized and the oxidation...

  12. Lung Lesions During Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Krupa, Renata; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Hadzik-Blaszczyk, Malgorzata; Wardyn, Kazimierz A; Zycinska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges. The causes of FUO can be various diseases located in different organs. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and nature of pulmonary lesions during FUO. One hundred and sixty one patients with FUO participated in this prospective study. We performed a detailed comprehensive history, physical examination, and a wide spectrum of tests. The most common causes of FUO were infections (39%), autoimmune conditions (28%), and neoplasms (17%). Lung lesions were found in 30% of patients. In this group 35% were infections, 30% autoimmune diseases, and 4% cancer. Among patients with respiratory infections, there were cases of tuberculosis, atypical pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchiectases. Autoimmune pulmonary lesions were observed during vasculitis and systemic lupus. The causes of FUO in the group of patients with lung lesions were also pulmonary embolism, sarcoidosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Chest CT played an important role in the diagnosis of the causes of FUO with pulmonary manifestations. Pulmonary lesions are a common cause of FUO. Most FUO with pulmonary lesions are recognized during infections and autoimmune diseases. An important part of diagnosing FUO is a detailed evaluation of the respiratory system.

  13. Unknown Risks: Parental Hesitation about Vaccination.

    Blaisdell, Laura L; Gutheil, Caitlin; Hootsmans, Norbert A M; Han, Paul K J

    2016-05-01

    This qualitative study of a select sample of vaccine-hesitant parents (VHPs) explores perceived and constructed personal judgments about the risks and uncertainties associated with vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) and how these subjective risk judgments influence parents' decisions about childhood vaccination. The study employed semistructured focus group interviews with 42 VHPs to elicit parents' perceptions and thought processes regarding the risks associated with vaccination and nonvaccination, the sources of these perceptions, and their approach to decision making about vaccination for their children. VHPs engage in various reasoning processes and tend to perceive risks of vaccination as greater than the risks of VPDs. At the same time, VHPs engage in other reasoning processes that lead them to perceive ambiguity in information about the harms of vaccination-citing concerns about the missing, conflicting, changing, or otherwise unreliable nature of information. VHPs' refusal of vaccination may reflect their aversion to both the risk and ambiguity they perceive to be associated with vaccination. Mitigating this vaccine hesitancy likely requires reconstructing the risks and ambiguities associated with vaccination-a challenging task that requires providing parents with meaningful evidence-based information on the known risks of vaccination versus VPDs and explicitly acknowledging the risks that remain truly unknown. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The energy equation with three unknowns

    Schifano, Fabio; Moriconi, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the alarming situation of energy in Italy as this country depends at 82 per cent on its imports (oil, natural gas and electricity), a dependence which could even increase. The authors first propose overviews of the situation regarding oil, natural gas and electric power (origins of imports, role of Italian companies, status of infrastructures), and also briefly of renewable energies. They recall the history of the use of nuclear energy: Italy has been one of the first country to use nuclear energy to produce electric power, but a referendum organised after Chernobyl resulted in phasing out nuclear. Then, the authors discuss perspectives associated with three main strategic unknowns: an increase of energy dependence with respect to hydrocarbons and to foreign nuclear power, a supply insecurity due to a dependence concentrated on a small number of countries (notably as far as natural gas is concerned), and an increasing interdependence between economic growth and sustainable development (the reduction of greenhouse emissions is a prevailing parameter for future energetic choices)

  15. Uric Acid: The Unknown Uremic Toxin.

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    This review brings together concepts of uric acid metabolism affecting renal parenchyma and its function and the current therapies to reduce hyperuricemia (HyU) and avoid renal disease progression. High uric acid plays an important role in several chronic diseases including kidney diseases such as lithiasis, gout nephropathy, and preeclampsia. In the last 30 years, it has been shown that reducing HyU with low protein and low purine diets in addition to allopurinol creates physiopathological conditions that produce a slight increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In recent years, in a new era of research in clinical, genetics, pharmacological, and epidemiologic fields, they have been moving forward to support the idea that reduction in HyU could benefit the chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (stage III-IV), thereby avoiding the drop of GFR for undefined mechanisms. There are several clinical trials in progress that show the HyU reducing to very low values and an increased GFR. In a young population, when treating HyU there is a reduction in high blood pressure. There are some reports showing that HyU could play a role in the diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, there have been some speculations that HyU treatment could stop the progression of CRF modifying the natural history of the diseases. So there will be new clinical trials with old and new medication and metabolic procedure to maintain a very low blood levels in the unknown uremic toxin know as uric acid which seems to be the toxin to the damage kidney. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Nodal parameters of FDG PET/CT performed during radiotherapy for locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can predict treatment outcomes: SUVmean and response rate are useful imaging biomarkers

    Lin, Peter [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool BC, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic utility of nodal metabolic parameters derived from FDG PET/CT performed before radiotherapy (prePET) and during the third week of radiotherapy (iPET) in patients with mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (MPHNSCC). This analysis included 75 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced node-positive MPHNSCC treated with radical radiotherapy and concurrent systemic therapy who underwent prePET and iPET: N1 11 patients, N2a 38, N2b 12, N2c 9, N3 5. The median follow-up was 28 months (9 - 70 months). The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of the index lymph node (node with the highest TLG) and the combined total lymph nodes, and their percentage reductions on iPET were determined, and the results were correlated with 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional, regional and distant metastatic failure-free survival (FFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Optimal cut-off values were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Cox regression univariate and multivariate analyses with clinical covariates were performed. Based on assessment of residual nodal metabolic burden during treatment, the iPET index node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 2.95 g/ml) and the total node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 3.25) were the best independent predictors of outcome in the multivariate analysis: index node SUVmean for DFS and OS p = 0.033 and 0.003, respectively, and the total node SUVmean for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS p = 0.028, 0.025 and 0.014, respectively. Based on the assessment of response rates during treatment, a reduction of more than 50 % in the total node TLG was the best biomarker for locoregional and regional FFS, DFS and OS in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.001, 0.016, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively), and reduction in the total node MTV for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS (p = 0.026, 0.003 and 0

  17. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y.; Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  18. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Child Protection Programs, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  19. Head injury - first aid

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other ... aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  4. Smooth extrapolation of unknown anatomy via statistical shape models

    Grupp, R. B.; Chiang, H.; Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Gordon, C. R.; Armand, M.; Taylor, R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Several methods to perform extrapolation of unknown anatomy were evaluated. The primary application is to enhance surgical procedures that may use partial medical images or medical images of incomplete anatomy. Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplant is one such procedure. From CT data of 36 skulls and 21 mandibles separate Statistical Shape Models of the anatomical surfaces were created. Using the Statistical Shape Models, incomplete surfaces were projected to obtain complete surface estimates. The surface estimates exhibit non-zero error in regions where the true surface is known; it is desirable to keep the true surface and seamlessly merge the estimated unknown surface. Existing extrapolation techniques produce non-smooth transitions from the true surface to the estimated surface, resulting in additional error and a less aesthetically pleasing result. The three extrapolation techniques evaluated were: copying and pasting of the surface estimate (non-smooth baseline), a feathering between the patient surface and surface estimate, and an estimate generated via a Thin Plate Spline trained from displacements between the surface estimate and corresponding vertices of the known patient surface. Feathering and Thin Plate Spline approaches both yielded smooth transitions. However, feathering corrupted known vertex values. Leave-one-out analyses were conducted, with 5% to 50% of known anatomy removed from the left-out patient and estimated via the proposed approaches. The Thin Plate Spline approach yielded smaller errors than the other two approaches, with an average vertex error improvement of 1.46 mm and 1.38 mm for the skull and mandible respectively, over the baseline approach.

  5. The role of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of cancer of unknown origin

    Demir, H; Berk, F; Raderer, M

    2004-01-01

    Cancer of unknown origin (CUO) is defined by the absence of any primary tumour in biopsy-proved metastatic cancer. CUO accounts for a 5-10% of all malignancies. These tumors have a specific biology with clinical characteristics of rapid progression and atypical metastases. Diagnostic evaluation i...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  7. Odontogenic facial swelling of unknown origin.

    Ranjitkar, S; Cheung, W; Yong, R; Deverell, J; Packianathan, M; Hall, C

    2015-12-01

    Current radiography techniques have limitations in detecting subtle odontogenic anomalies or defects that can lead to dentoalveolar and facial infections. This report examines the application of micro-CT imaging on two extracted teeth to enable detailed visualization of subtle odontogenic defects that had given rise to facial swelling. Two extracted non-carious mandibular left primary canine teeth (73) associated with odontogenic infections were selected from two patients, and an intact contralateral tooth (83) from one of the patients was used as a control. All three teeth were subjected to three-dimensional micro-CT imaging at a resolution of 20 μm. Tooth 73 from the first case displayed dentine pores (channels) that established communication between the pulp chamber and the exposed dentine surface. In comparison, tooth 73 from the second case had a major vertical crack extending from the external enamel surface into the pulp chamber. The control tooth did not display any anomalies or major cracks. The scope of micro-CT imaging can be extended from current in vitro applications to establish post-extraction diagnosis of subtle odontogenic defects, in a manner similar to deriving histopathological diagnoses in extracted teeth. Ongoing technological advancements hold the promise for more widespread translatory applications. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  9. Head and Neck Cancer

    Tomita, Toshiki; Imanishi, Yorihisa

    2008-01-01

    The limitation of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC) as the primary treatment is described based on recent findings. Limits in the application/indication involve factors of age, performance status (PS) and renal function. The first is that, as deaths in >71 years old patients are derived from other causes (41%) than HNC, CCRT is only useful for younger population; the second, patients with PS 0-1 or Karnofsky performance score >60-70 can be indicated; and third, contraindicated are those with creatinine clearance (CCr) <60 mL/min as the key drug cisplatin in CCRT has a high renal toxicity. It should be recognized that completion rates of chemotherapy and RT are as low as 66-85% and 84-92%, respectively, in CCRT. CCRT has such limiting adverse events as mucitis, dry mouth, dysohagia, weight loss, neutropenia, sepsis, etc., which are most important in CCRT application. CCRT is recommended for the primary cancers of larynx and hypopharynx because they are significantly better conserved than middle pharyngeal, oral and upper jaw cancers. Evidence of CCRT is poor for cancers in paranasal sinuses. Planned neck dissection (PND) is for the cervical metastatic lymph nodes and conducted 6-12 weeks after CCRT regardless to its outcome. In fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) negative cases, PND can be omitted. Necessity of PND is possibly inversely proportional to CCRT intensity performed. For control of remote metastasis, CCRT has obvious limits and inductive chemotherapy before it is currently considered. Salvage surgery post CCRT does not always yield a relief because of complication. Patients with advanced laryngeal cancer can be selected either to surgery or CCRT depending on results of the inductive chemotherapy. To predict the sensitivity to CCRT, some biomarkers like HPV, EGFR and VEGF have been suggested to be useful by retrospective studies. Understanding the limitation is as important as knowing the usefulness in

  10. A sensitivity analysis approach to control of manipulators with unknown load

    Tzes, A.; Yurkovich, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a straightforward control strategy applied to an N-link manipulator holding an unknown load and driving its end effector along a prespecified trajectory. The control is constituted into two primary components. The non-adaptive component is derived from the inverse problem technique while the adaptive component is computed via the application of sensitivity analysis applied to the complete, centralized dynamic model of the manipulator. The result is a robust adaptive controller which tunes its parameters at specified time instants and can withstand all expected variations of the payload. The control synthesis is illustrated by simulations in a 2-link planar manipulator holding an unknown load

  11. The incidence of pathologic changes of the long head of the biceps tendon.

    Murthi, A M; Vosburgh, C L; Neviaser, T J

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of primary and secondary bicipital tendinitis remains unknown. In our prospective study, 200 consecutive shoulders underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression for impingement syndrome. A biceps tenodesis was performed in 80 shoulders (40%) featuring macroscopic degeneration of the long head of the biceps; rotator cuff tears were apparent in 91% of these shoulders, the mean patient age being 55 years. In each of 120 shoulders (60%), an extraarticular tenosynovectomy was performed, and histopathologic studies revealed chronic inflammation in 63% and fibrotic degeneration in 13% of the specimens; rotator cuff tears were evident in 70% (23% full thickness) of these cases, the mean patient age being 47 years. In addition, when glenohumeral arthritis was present, it was uniformly associated with pathologic biceps tenosynovium. In summary, the high incidence of chronic inflammation of the long head of the biceps in shoulders with benign-appearing intraarticular portions viewed arthroscopically is significant, and long head of the biceps disease should also be considered in patients with painful rotator cuff disease and arthritic shoulder conditions.

  12. Head CT scan

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  13. Bottom head assembly

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  14. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel.

    Nicolaou, G

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions.

  15. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel

    Nicolaou, G.

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions

  16. Video Analysis of Primary Shoulder Dislocations in Rugby Tackles.

    Maki, Nobukazu; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Urayama, Shingo; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Characteristics of rugby tackles that lead to primary anterior shoulder dislocation remain unclear. To clarify the characteristics of tackling that lead to shoulder dislocation and to assess the correlation between the mechanism of injury and morphological damage of the glenoid. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eleven elite rugby players who sustained primary anterior shoulder dislocation due to one-on-one tackling between 2001 and 2014 were included. Using an assessment system, the tackler's movement, posture, and shoulder and head position were evaluated in each phase of tackling. Based on 3-dimensional computed tomography, the glenoid of the affected shoulder was classified into 3 types: intact, erosion, and bone defect. Orientation of the glenoid defect and presence of Hill-Sachs lesion were also evaluated. Eleven tackles that led to primary shoulder dislocation were divided into hand, arm, and shoulder tackle types based on the site at which the tackler contacted the ball carrier initially. In hand and arm tackles, the tackler's shoulder joint was forcibly moved to horizontal abduction by the impact of his upper limb, which appeared to result from an inappropriate approach to the ball carrier. In shoulder tackles, the tackler's head was lowered and was in front of the ball carrier at impact. There was no significant correlation between tackle types and the characteristics of bony lesions of the shoulder. Although the precise mechanism of primary anterior shoulder dislocation could not be estimated from this single-view analysis, failure of individual tackling leading to injury is not uniform and can be caused by 2 main factors: failure of approach followed by an extended arm position or inappropriate posture of the tackler at impact, such as a lowered head in front of the opponent. These findings indicate that injury mechanisms should be assessed for each type of tackle, as it is unknown whether external force to the glenoid is different in each mechanism

  17. Poverty analysis of children in child headed households in Addis

    Eyerusalem

    From the regression result we found out that sex, size of household and age are determinants .... There is only one Muslim child who is also the head of single ... of the children are enrolled in primary school, while 32.4% are enrolled in first cycle ...... in CHHs, where female-headed households are at a disadvantage. Gender.

  18. teachers' perception of their head teachers' role effectiveness

    Global Journal

    This paper is a survey study focused on teacher's perception of their head ... constructed and distributed to 100 teachers selected from primary schools in the ... Ability to motivate the student to learn ... policies, a counsellor and decision maker.

  19. Treatment of Childhood Head and Neck Cancer - Patient Version

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  20. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Patient Version

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  3. Psychological profile: the problem of modeling the unknown criminal personality

    Г. М. Гетьман

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the problem of modeling an unknown person in the preparation of criminal psychological profile. Some approaches to the concept of "psychological profile" and "psychological portrait", in particular the proposed delineation of these terms. We consider the system steps in the development of the psychological profile of an unknown perpetrator.

  4. Reactor head shielding apparatus

    Schukei, G.E.; Roebelen, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor head shielding apparatus for mounting on spaced reactor head lifting members radially inwardly of the head bolts. It comprises a frame of sections for mounting on the lifting members and extending around the top central area of the head, mounting means for so mounting the frame sections, including downwardly projecting members on the frame sections and complementary upwardly open recessed members for fastening to the lifting members for receiving the downwardly projecting members when the frame sections are lowered thereto with lead shielding supported thereby on means for hanging lead shielding on the frame to minimize radiation exposure or personnel working with the head bolts or in the vicinity thereof

  5. A randomized double-blind phase III study of nimorazole as a hypoxic radiosensitizer of primary radiotherapy in supraglottic larynx and pharynx carcinoma. Results of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study (DAHANCA) Protocol 5-85

    Overgaard, J; Hansen, Hanne Sand; Overgaard, Marie

    1998-01-01

    A multicenter randomized and balanced double-blind trial with the objective of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of nimorazole given as a hypoxic radiosensitizer in conjunction with primary radiotherapy of invasive carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx and pharynx....

  6. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism

  7. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  8. Robust Fault Detection for Switched Fuzzy Systems With Unknown Input.

    Han, Jian; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Yingchun; Sun, Xun

    2017-10-03

    This paper investigates the fault detection problem for a class of switched nonlinear systems in the T-S fuzzy framework. The unknown input is considered in the systems. A novel fault detection unknown input observer design method is proposed. Based on the proposed observer, the unknown input can be removed from the fault detection residual. The weighted H∞ performance level is considered to ensure the robustness. In addition, the weighted H₋ performance level is introduced, which can increase the sensibility of the proposed detection method. To verify the proposed scheme, a numerical simulation example and an electromechanical system simulation example are provided at the end of this paper.

  9. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  10. Protective head of sensors

    Liska, K.; Anton, P.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery concerns the protective heads of diagnostic assemblies of nuclear power plants for conductors of the sensors from the fuel and control parts of the said assemblies. A detailed description is presented of the design of the protective head which, as compared with the previous design, allows quick and simple assembly with reduced risk of damaging the sensors. The protective head may be used for diagnostic assemblies both in power and in research reactors and it will be used for WWER reactor assemblies. (A.K.). 3 figs

  11. Primary and secondary prevention of acute complications of radiotherapy of head and neck cancers; Prevention primaire et secondaire des complications aigues de la radiotherapie des cancers de la tete et du cou

    Lambrexhe, M.; Frederick, B.; Burie, D.; Cavuto, C.; Rob, L.; Rasquin, I.; Coiffier, N.; Untereiner, M. [Centre national de Radiotherapie, Centre Francois-Baclesse (CFB), Esch-sur-Alzette (Luxembourg)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: the standard treatment of head and neck cancers associates a 70 Gy irradiation and weekly concomitant chemotherapy by 5-fluoro-uracils and cisplatin or targeted therapy by Erbitux. A retrospective study realised at the Francois Baclesse center in 2004-2005 for 84 patients suffering of ear-nose-throat cancers whom treatment was a concomitant chemoradiotherapy, showed the noxious effects of the treatment on the patients nutritional situation: weight loss for 90% of patients; temporary interruption or definitive stop of radiotherapy for 28% of patients. based on this observation, a preventive approach of the nutritional risk was implemented. The objective was to reduce the malnutrition risk linked to radiotherapy associated to chemotherapy or to the targeted therapy. (N.C.)

  12. Interruptions in Chest Compressions by Surf Lifeguards: A Comparison of Face-mask Ventilation in Over-the-head CPR vs Standard CPR

    Nørkjær, Louise; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Bomholt, Katrine Bjørnshave

    . The International Life Saving Federation recommends CPR using face-mask ventilation. It is currently unknown if OH-CPR using face-mask ventilation improves CPR quality. We hypothesized that OH-CPR is superior to standard CPR with face-mask ventilation among surf lifeguards. Methods: Surf lifeguards were trained......Introduction: Ventilation is a priority in drowning resuscitation. Over-the-head CPR (OH-CPR), i.e. with the rescuer located at the top of the victim’s head instead of alongside the victim’s torso, has been demonstrated to be superior when doing bag-valve-mask ventilation compared to standard CPR...... in OH-CPR and standard CPR with face-mask ventilation and randomized to a crossover comparison on a manikin. CPR quality data were obtained from the manikin and video recordings. Interruptions in chest compressions were used as a primary measure of CPR quality. A sample size of 14 participants...

  13. Carcinoma of unknown primary: 35 years of a single institution's experience

    Rana I Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data confirm the heterogeneity of CUP cases and variable treatment courses. This highlights the importance of establishing a national registry for this subgroup of cancer patients. Moreover, there is a need to develop multidisciplinary specialist teams and protocols to manage this group of patients, and participation in clinical trials should be strongly encouraged.

  14. 42 CFR 81.23 - Guidelines for cancers for which primary site is unknown.

    2010-10-01

    ...), 189 (M). Brain and spinal cord (198.3) 162, 172 (M), 174 (F). Other parts of nervous system (198.4) 162, 172 (M), 174 (F), 185 (M), 202. Bone and bone marrow (198.5) 162, 174 (F), 185 (M). Ovary (198.6...

  15. Survey of Permethrin and Malathion Resistance in Human Head Lice Populations from Denmark

    Kristensen, Michael; Knorr, Mette; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2006-01-01

    was selected, 2 ng of permethrin and 100 ng of malathion per head louse, respectively. Head lice were collected from heads of infested children in Denmark at 33 primary schools, one kindergarten, and seven boarding schools. The lice were collected by combing of dry hair, with a fine-toothed antilouse comb...

  16. Competition or Collaboration? Head Start Enrollment during the Rapid Expansion of State Pre-Kindergarten

    Bassok, Daphna

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade states have surpassed the federal Head Start program as the primary public funder of preschool slots. This paper investigates trends in Head Start enrollment in the context of increased state investment in early childhood. Using national, longitudinal data I find no evidence Head Start programs in states with expanding state…

  17. Iterative Selection of Unknown Weights in Direct Weight Optimization Identification

    Xiao Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To the direct weight optimization identification of the nonlinear system, we add some linear terms about input sequences in the former linear affine function so as to approximate the nonlinear property. To choose the two classes of unknown weights in the more linear terms, this paper derives the detailed process on how to choose these unknown weights from theoretical analysis and engineering practice, respectively, and makes sure of their key roles between the unknown weights. From the theoretical analysis, the added unknown weights’ auxiliary role can be known in the whole process of approximating the nonlinear system. From the practical analysis, we learn how to transform one complex optimization problem to its corresponding common quadratic program problem. Then, the common quadratic program problem can be solved by the basic interior point method. Finally, the efficiency and possibility of the proposed strategies can be confirmed by the simulation results.

  18. RBF neural network based H∞ synchronization for unknown chaotic ...

    , 172 ... the effect of disturbance to an H∞ norm constraint. It is shown that ... unknown chaotic systems; linear matrix inequality (LMI); learning law. 1. Introduction .... (9) is RBFNN H∞ synchronized if the synchronization error e(t) satisfies. ∫ ∞.

  19. Classification of Unknown Thermocouple Types Using Similarity Factor Measurement

    Seshu K. DAMARLA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to classification using PCA method, a new methodology is proposed for type identification of unknown thermocouple. The new methodology is based on calculating the degree of similarity between two multivariate datasets using two types of similarity factors. One similarity factor is based on principle component analysis and the angles between the principle component subspaces while the other is based on the Mahalanobis distance between the datasets. Datasets containing thermo-emfs against given temperature ranges are formed for each type of thermocouple (e.g. J, K, S, T, R, E, B and N type by experimentation are considered as reference datasets. Datasets corresponding to unknown type are captured. Similarity factor between the datasets one of which being the unknown type and the other being each known type are compared. When maximum similarity factor occurs, then the class of unknown type is allocated to that of known type.

  20. Head movements encode emotions during speech and song.

    Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    When speaking or singing, vocalists often move their heads in an expressive fashion, yet the influence of emotion on vocalists' head motion is unknown. Using a comparative speech/song task, we examined whether vocalists' intended emotions influence head movements and whether those movements influence the perceived emotion. In Experiment 1, vocalists were recorded with motion capture while speaking and singing each statement with different emotional intentions (very happy, happy, neutral, sad, very sad). Functional data analyses showed that head movements differed in translational and rotational displacement across emotional intentions, yet were similar across speech and song, transcending differences in F0 (varied freely in speech, fixed in song) and lexical variability. Head motion specific to emotional state occurred before and after vocalizations, as well as during sound production, confirming that some aspects of movement were not simply a by-product of sound production. In Experiment 2, observers accurately identified vocalists' intended emotion on the basis of silent, face-occluded videos of head movements during speech and song. These results provide the first evidence that head movements encode a vocalist's emotional intent and that observers decode emotional information from these movements. We discuss implications for models of head motion during vocalizations and applied outcomes in social robotics and automated emotion recognition. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  2. Exploding head syndrome.

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of abrupt, loud noises when going to sleep or waking up. They are usually painless, but associated with fear and distress. In spite of the fact that its characteristic symptomatology was first described approximately 150 y ago, exploding head syndrome has received relatively little empirical and clinical attention. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and PubMed was undertaken. After first discussing the history, prevalence, and associated features, the available polysomnography data and five main etiological theories for exploding head syndrome are summarized. None of these theories has yet reached dominance in the field. Next, the various methods used to assess and treat exploding head syndrome are discussed, as well as the limited outcome data. Finally, recommendations for future measure construction, treatment options, and differential diagnosis are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary because of potential risk to the baby. This risk is, however, minimal with head CT ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  4. Early Head Start Evaluation

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for ... Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  10. Head Start Impact Study

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  12. TCGA head Neck

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. ... typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused ...

  14. Assessment of What/For What? Teachers' and Head Teachers' Views on Using Well-Being and Involvement as a Screening Measure for Conducting Baseline Assessment on School Entry in English Primary Schools

    Guimaraes, Sofia; Howe, Sally; Clausen, Sigrid Brogaard; Cottle, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Baseline assessment has recently been trialled as part of an accountability measure in English primary schools. The research presented in this colloquium examines the views of teachers related to using well-being and involvement indicators as a starting point for baseline assessment. The findings suggest that the focus on well-being was welcomed…

  15. Chinese Unknown Word Recognition for PCFG-LA Parsing

    Qiuping Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the recognition of unknown words in Chinese parsing. Two methods are proposed to handle this problem. One is the modification of a character-based model. We model the emission probability of an unknown word using the first and last characters in the word. It aims to reduce the POS tag ambiguities of unknown words to improve the parsing performance. In addition, a novel method, using graph-based semisupervised learning (SSL, is proposed to improve the syntax parsing of unknown words. Its goal is to discover additional lexical knowledge from a large amount of unlabeled data to help the syntax parsing. The method is mainly to propagate lexical emission probabilities to unknown words by building the similarity graphs over the words of labeled and unlabeled data. The derived distributions are incorporated into the parsing process. The proposed methods are effective in dealing with the unknown words to improve the parsing. Empirical results for Penn Chinese Treebank and TCT Treebank revealed its effectiveness.

  16. GPK heading machine

    Krmasek, J.; Novosad, K.

    1981-01-01

    This article evaluates performance tests of the Soviet made GPK heading machine carried out in 4 coal mines in Czechoslovakia (Ostrava-Karvina region and Kladno mines). GPK works in coal seams and rocks with compression strength of 40 to 50 MPa. Dimensions of the tunnel are height 1.8 to 3.8 m and width 2.6 to 4.7 m, tunnel gradient plus to minus 10 degrees. GPK weighs 16 t, its conical shaped cutting head equipped with RKS-1 cutting tools is driven by an electric motor with 55 kW capacity. Undercarriage of the GPK, gathering-arm loader, hydraulic system, electric system and dust supression system (water spraying or pneumatic section) are characterized. Specifications of GPK heading machines are compared with PK-3r and F8 heading machines. Reliability, number of failures, dust level, noise, productivity depending on compression strength of rocks, heading rate in coal and in rocks, energy consumption, performance in inclined tunnels, and cutting tool wear are evaluated. Tests show that GPK can be used to drive tunnels in coal with rock constituting up to 50% of the tunnel crosscut, as long as rock compression strength does not exceed 50 MPa. In rocks characterized by higher compression strength cutting tool wear sharply increases. GPK is characterized by higher productivity than that of the PK-3r heading machine. Among the weak points of the GPK are: unsatisfactory reliability and excessive wear of its elements. (4 refs.) (In Czech)

  17. Perspectives about family meals from single-headed and dual-headed households: a qualitative analysis.

    Berge, Jerica M; Hoppmann, Caroline; Hanson, Carrie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-12-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal research has shown that family meals are protective for adolescent healthful eating behaviors. However, little is known about what parents think of these findings and whether parents from single- vs dual-headed households have differing perspectives about the findings. In addition, parents' perspectives regarding barriers to applying the findings on family meals in their own homes and suggestions for more widespread adoption of the findings are unknown. The current study aimed to identify single- and dual-headed household parents' perspectives regarding the research findings on family meals, barriers to applying the findings in their own homes, and suggestions for helping families have more family meals. The current qualitative study included 59 parents who participated in substudy of two linked multilevel studies-EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) and Families and Eating and Activity in Teens (F-EAT). Parents (91.5% female) were racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results from the current study suggest that parents from both single- and dual-headed households have similar perspectives regarding why family meals are protective for healthful eating habits for adolescents (eg, provides structure/routine, opportunities for communication, connection), but provide similar and different reasons for barriers to family meals (eg, single-headed=cost vs dual-headed=lack of creativity) and ideas and suggestions for how to increase the frequency of family meals (eg, single-headed=give fewer options vs dual-headed=include children in the meal preparation). Findings can help inform public health intervention researchers and providers who work with adolescents and their families to understand how to approach discussions regarding reasons for having family meals, barriers to carrying out family meals, and ways to increase family meals depending on family structure. Copyright

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  2. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Malignancy of Unknown Origin

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary origin site in the management of malignancy of unknown origin (MUO) is the most important issue. According to the histopathologic subtype of primary lesion, specialized treatment can be given and survival gain is expected. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been estimated as useful in detection of primary lesion with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) study before conventional studies is also recommended because it has high diagnostic performance compared to conventional studies. Although there has few data, F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) is expected to be useful in diagnosis of recurrence, restaging, evaluation of treatment effect, considering that PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in other malignancies

  3. MoCha: Molecular Characterization of Unknown Pathways.

    Lobo, Daniel; Hammelman, Jennifer; Levin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Automated methods for the reverse-engineering of complex regulatory networks are paving the way for the inference of mechanistic comprehensive models directly from experimental data. These novel methods can infer not only the relations and parameters of the known molecules defined in their input datasets, but also unknown components and pathways identified as necessary by the automated algorithms. Identifying the molecular nature of these unknown components is a crucial step for making testable predictions and experimentally validating the models, yet no specific and efficient tools exist to aid in this process. To this end, we present here MoCha (Molecular Characterization), a tool optimized for the search of unknown proteins and their pathways from a given set of known interacting proteins. MoCha uses the comprehensive dataset of protein-protein interactions provided by the STRING database, which currently includes more than a billion interactions from over 2,000 organisms. MoCha is highly optimized, performing typical searches within seconds. We demonstrate the use of MoCha with the characterization of unknown components from reverse-engineered models from the literature. MoCha is useful for working on network models by hand or as a downstream step of a model inference engine workflow and represents a valuable and efficient tool for the characterization of unknown pathways using known data from thousands of organisms. MoCha and its source code are freely available online under the GPLv3 license.

  4. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  5. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16INK4A expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan; Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Burfeind, Peter; Reichardt, Holger M.; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16 INK4A expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16 INK4A expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16 INK4A expression only, and patients without p16 INK4A expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16 INK4A expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16 INK4A expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16 INK4A expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [de

  6. Grasping Unknown Objects in an Early Cognitive Vision System

    Popovic, Mila

    2011-01-01

    Grasping of unknown objects presents an important and challenging part of robot manipulation. The growing area of service robotics depends upon the ability of robots to autonomously grasp and manipulate a wide range of objects in everyday environments. Simple, non task-specific grasps of unknown ...... and comparing vision-based grasping methods, and the creation of algorithms for bootstrapping a process of acquiring world understanding for artificial cognitive agents....... presents a system for robotic grasping of unknown objects us- ing stereo vision. Grasps are defined based on contour and surface information provided by the Early Cognitive Vision System, that organizes visual informa- tion into a biologically motivated hierarchical representation. The contributions...... of the thesis are: the extension of the Early Cognitive Vision representation with a new type of feature hierarchy in the texture domain, the definition and evaluation of contour based grasping methods, the definition and evaluation of surface based grasping methods, the definition of a benchmark for testing...

  7. Primary hydatid cysts of the pancreas

    Kurt

    Hydatid cysts of the pancreas are rare. The reported incidence varies from 0.1% to 2% of patients with hydatid disease.4-7. Management may be diffi- cult as a hydatid cyst in the head of the pancreas may closely simulate a cystic tumour. In this study we report 4 cases of primary hydatid cysts involving the head of the ...

  8. Celiac Disease Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin

    Megan J. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune enteropathy that occurs, in affected individuals, with exposure to gluten in the diet and improves with removal of dietary gluten. Although CD is readily considered in patients with classical presentations of the disease, atypical manifestations may be the only presenting symptoms. We present a case of CD in a 16-year-old female presenting as fever of unknown origin, which has not been reported previously. The postulated mechanism for fever in CD and the importance of clinicians having a low threshold for considering CD in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and other enigmatic clinical presentations is discussed.

  9. Adaptive Incentive Controls for Stackelberg Games with Unknown Cost Functionals.

    1984-01-01

    APR EZT:: F I AN 73S e OsL:-: UNCLASSI?:-- Q4~.’~- .A.., 6, *~*i i~~*~~*.- U ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH UNKNOWN COST...AD-A161 885 ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH i/1 UNKNOWN COST FUNCTIONALSCU) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DECISION AND CONTROL LAB T...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7.. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION CoriaeLcenef~pda~ Joint Services Electronics Program Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois N/A

  10. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    Chen Mei-Feng; Ma Song-She

    2008-01-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system.The scheme only requires a single laser beam.It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons,e.g.a thermal motion.Furthermore,it works in the regime,where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency.Thus,the teleportation speed is greatly increased,which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect.This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  11. Head first Ajax

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  12. Head First Statistics

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  13. Gender Preference in Primary School Enrolment among ...

    Gender Preference in Primary School Enrolment among Households in Northern ... Narrowing and eliminating enrolment gaps between male and female ... that income level of the household head, number of male and female children of ...

  14. Detection of primary tumor by 18F-FDG-TEP in patients with cup syndrome

    Alberini, J.L.; Belhocine, T.; Daenen, F.; Hustinx, R.; Rigo, P.

    2000-01-01

    To study the performance of whole body 18 F-FDG-PET in the detection of the primary tumor in patients with unknown primary carcinoma in comparison with conventional imaging. Patients and methods: Forty-one patients, without previous history of known cancer, (18 women and 23 men; average age 64,1 years) with bone, brain, lymph node, liver, cutaneous, pleural and epidural metastases were included in a retrospective study. Results of PET (UGM Penn PET 240 H) were compared with those of techniques used in the current conventional procedure. There were 26 true positives, 2 false negatives (1 renal carcinoma and 1 myeloma) and one false positive results. Origins were lung [16], gut [6], breast [3] and head and neck [1] but stayed undetermined in 8 patients. Results of PET were superior to conventional diagnostic procedure in 12 patients and led to modify the therapy management in 11 patients. All known metastatic lesions were detected by PET. FDG-PET can be useful to determine the origin of metastasis. It allows detection of the primary tumor (26/33 patients) and allows evaluation of the spread of the disease. These results have to be confirmed and particularly in patients with highly treatable unknown primary carcinoma. (author)

  15. A randomized double-blind phase III study of nimorazole as a hypoxic radiosensitizer of primary radiotherapy in supraglottic larynx and pharynx carcinoma. Results of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study (DAHANCA) Protocol 5-85

    Overgaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Overgaard, M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A multicenter randomized and balanced double-blind trial with the objective of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of nimorazole given as a hypoxic radiosensitizer in conjunction with primary radiotherapy of invasive carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx and pharynx. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT...... for the end-points of final loco-regional control (including surgical salvage) and cancer-related deaths (52 versus 41%, P = 0.002). This trend was also found in the overall survival but to a lesser, non-significant extent (26 versus 16%, 10-year actuarial values, P = 0.32). Cox multivariate regression...... of dying from cancer. The compliance to radiotherapy was good and 98% of the patients received the planned dose. Late radiation-related morbidity was observed in 10% of the patients, irrespective of nimorazole treatment. Drug-related side-effects were minor and tolerable with transient nausea and vomiting...

  16. Designing towards the Unknown: Engaging with Material and Aesthetic Uncertainty

    Danielle Wilde

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New materials with new capabilities demand new ways of approaching design. Destabilising existing methods is crucial to develop new methods. Yet, radical destabilisation—where outcomes remain unknown long enough that new discoveries become possible—is not easy in technology design where complex interdisciplinary teams with time and resource constraints need to deliver concrete outcomes on schedule. The Poetic Kinaesthetic Interface project (PKI engages with this problematic directly. In PKI we use unfolding processes—informed by participatory, speculative and critical design—in emergent actions, to design towards unknown outcomes, using unknown materials. The impossibility of this task is proving as useful as it is disruptive. At its most potent, it is destabilising expectations, aesthetics and processes. Keeping the researchers, collaborators and participants in a state of unknowing, is opening the research potential to far-ranging possibilities. In this article we unpack the motivations driving the PKI project. We present our mixed-methodology, which entangles textile crafts, design interactions and materiality to shape an embodied enquiry. Our research outcomes are procedural and methodological. PKI brings together diverse human, non-human, known and unknown actors to discover where the emergent assemblages might lead. Our approach is re-invigorating—as it demands re-envisioning of—the design process.

  17. Liability for Unknown Risks: A Law and Economics Perspective

    M.G. Faure (Michael); L.T. Visscher (Louis); F. Weber (Franziska)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn the law and economics literature liability is generally regarded as an instrument which provides potential tortfeasors with incentives for optimal care taking. The question, however, arises whether liability can still provide those incentives when risks are unknown. That is the

  18. Fault tolerant control of wind turbines using unknown input observers

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for accommodating faults in the rotor and generator speed sensors in a wind turbine. These measured values are important both for the wind turbine controller as well as the supervisory control of the wind turbine. The scheme is based on unknown input observers, which...

  19. Value of Bone marrow Examination in Pyrexia of unknown origin

    A Jha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrexia of unknown origin is a common diagnostic dilemma. Series of diagnostic modalities are required to arrive at diagnosis. Bone marrow examination is one of the common tests implicated in the diagnosis in combination with other diagnostic modalities. Present study has attempted to explore the causes of pyrexia of unknown origin based on bone marrow morphological study. Materials and Methods: In a one year prospective study conducted at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal; bone marrow aspiration and biopsy was performed and evaluated morphologically, in 57 patients fulfilling the criteria of classic pyrexia of unknown origin. Results: In 42% cases; specific diagnosis could be made and hematological neoplasm was the most common finding followed by megaloblastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia and one case each of hemophagocytosis, malaria and tuberculosis. Acute leukemia was the most frequently encountered hematological malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, chronic myeloid leukemia, essential thrombocythemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conclusion: Morphological examination of bone marrow has important role in diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin. However, yield of diagnosis can be increased if it is combined with other diagnostic modalities including radiological, microbiological and serological tests. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8991 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 447-451

  20. Fast grasping of unknown objects using principal component analysis

    Lei, Qujiang; Chen, Guangming; Wisse, Martijn

    2017-09-01

    Fast grasping of unknown objects has crucial impact on the efficiency of robot manipulation especially subjected to unfamiliar environments. In order to accelerate grasping speed of unknown objects, principal component analysis is utilized to direct the grasping process. In particular, a single-view partial point cloud is constructed and grasp candidates are allocated along the principal axis. Force balance optimization is employed to analyze possible graspable areas. The obtained graspable area with the minimal resultant force is the best zone for the final grasping execution. It is shown that an unknown object can be more quickly grasped provided that the component analysis principle axis is determined using single-view partial point cloud. To cope with the grasp uncertainty, robot motion is assisted to obtain a new viewpoint. Virtual exploration and experimental tests are carried out to verify this fast gasping algorithm. Both simulation and experimental tests demonstrated excellent performances based on the results of grasping a series of unknown objects. To minimize the grasping uncertainty, the merits of the robot hardware with two 3D cameras can be utilized to suffice the partial point cloud. As a result of utilizing the robot hardware, the grasping reliance is highly enhanced. Therefore, this research demonstrates practical significance for increasing grasping speed and thus increasing robot efficiency under unpredictable environments.

  1. A Size Exclusion Chromatography Laboratory with Unknowns for Introductory Students

    McIntee, Edward J.; Graham, Kate J.; Colosky, Edward C.; Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2015-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography is an important technique in the separation of biological and polymeric samples by molecular weight. While a number of laboratory experiments have been published that use this technique for the purification of large molecules, this is the first report of an experiment that focuses on purifying an unknown small…

  2. Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models

    2016-08-02

    The key is to develop online learning strategies at each individual node. Specifically, through local information exchange with its neighbors, each...infinitely repeated game with incomplete information and developed a dynamic pricing strategy referred to as Competitive and Cooperative Demand Learning...Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models This research aims to develop fundamental theories and practical algorithms for

  3. Multiple analysis of an unknown optical multilayer coating

    Dobrowolski, J.A.; Ho, F.C.; Waldorf, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are given of the analysis at five different laboratories of an unknown optical multilayer coating. In all, eleven different analytical and laboratory techniques were applied to the problem. The multilayer nominally consisted of three dielectric and two metallic layers. It was demonstrated convincingly that with present day techniques it is possible to determine the basic structure of such a coating

  4. Inventory control in case of unknown demand and control parameters

    Janssen, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with unknown demand and control parameters in inventory control. Inventory control involves decisions on what to order when and in what quantity. These decisions are based on information about the demand. Models are constructed using complete demand information; these models ensure

  5. Editoria: EBOLA: Fear of the unknown | Comoro | Tanzania Journal ...

    Tanzania Journal of Health Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editoria: EBOLA: Fear of the unknown. C. Comoro, J.

  6. Lod score curves for phase-unknown matings.

    Hulbert-Shearon, T; Boehnke, M; Lange, K

    1996-01-01

    For a phase-unknown nuclear family, we show that the likelihood and lod score are unimodal, and we describe conditions under which the maximum occurs at recombination fraction theta = 0, theta = 1/2, and 0 < theta < 1/2. These simply stated necessary and sufficient conditions seem to have escaped the notice of previous statistical geneticists.

  7. Teleportation of Unknown Superpositions of Collective Atomic Coherent States

    ZHENG ShiBiao

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme to teleport an unknown superposition of two atomic coherent states with different phases. Our scheme is based on resonant and dispersive atom-field interaction. Our scheme provides a possibility of teleporting macroscopic superposition states of many atoms first time.``

  8. Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic State via Adiabatic Passage

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state via adiabatic passage. Taking advantage of adiabatic passage, the atom has no probability of being excited and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed.We also show that the fidelity can reach 1 under certain condition.

  9. Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown ...

    Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown significance in adults in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Abstract. Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes a high burden of disease in high-resource healthcare systems, with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial implications. CDI is a ...

  10. Severe scratcher-reaction: an unknown health hazard?

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tattoos are well known to cause skin problems and the number of reported adverse reactions after tattooing has increased. Illegally imported tattoo ink is unrestrained and can contain unknown ingredients and contamination thereby posing a serious health hazard. We present a case illustrating the risk of pronounced phototoxic allergic reaction and other severe complications after using home kit tattoo ink.

  11. Vision-based autonomous grasping of unknown piled objects

    Johnson, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Computer vision techniques have been used to develop a vision-based grasping capability for autonomously picking and placing unknown piled objects. This work is currently being applied to the problem of hazardous waste sorting in support of the Department of Energy's Mixed Waste Operations Program

  12. Cancer of unknown primitive metastatic. About two clinical cases

    Cawen, L; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the two clinical cases about the unknown primitive metastatic cancer. The main techniques used for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of different s carcinomas are: Electronic microscope, molecular biology and genetics, especially histopathological study, topographic survey, ultrasound, radiography, chemotherapy, radiotherapy

  13. Head banging persisting during adolescence: A case with polysomnographic findings

    Ravi Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Head banging is a sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder of unknown etiology. It is common during infancy; however, available literature suggests that prevalence decreases dramatically after childhood. We report the case of a 16-year-old male who presented with head banging. The symptoms were interfering with his functioning and he had been injured because of the same in the past. We are presenting the video-polysomnographic data of the case. Possible differential diagnoses, etiology, and treatment modalities are discussed. The boy was prescribed clonazepam and followed up for 3 months. Parents did not report any episode afterward.

  14. Bayesian source term determination with unknown covariance of measurements

    Belal, Alkomiet; Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2017-04-01

    Determination of a source term of release of a hazardous material into the atmosphere is a very important task for emergency response. We are concerned with the problem of estimation of the source term in the conventional linear inverse problem, y = Mx, where the relationship between the vector of observations y is described using the source-receptor-sensitivity (SRS) matrix M and the unknown source term x. Since the system is typically ill-conditioned, the problem is recast as an optimization problem minR,B(y - Mx)TR-1(y - Mx) + xTB-1x. The first term minimizes the error of the measurements with covariance matrix R, and the second term is a regularization of the source term. There are different types of regularization arising for different choices of matrices R and B, for example, Tikhonov regularization assumes covariance matrix B as the identity matrix multiplied by scalar parameter. In this contribution, we adopt a Bayesian approach to make inference on the unknown source term x as well as unknown R and B. We assume prior on x to be a Gaussian with zero mean and unknown diagonal covariance matrix B. The covariance matrix of the likelihood R is also unknown. We consider two potential choices of the structure of the matrix R. First is the diagonal matrix and the second is a locally correlated structure using information on topology of the measuring network. Since the inference of the model is intractable, iterative variational Bayes algorithm is used for simultaneous estimation of all model parameters. The practical usefulness of our contribution is demonstrated on an application of the resulting algorithm to real data from the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). This research is supported by EEA/Norwegian Financial Mechanism under project MSMT-28477/2014 Source-Term Determination of Radionuclide Releases by Inverse Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling (STRADI).

  15. Silva as the Head

    Svabo, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The head of the performance design programme is substituted by a sister's academy delegate. this performance situation formed part of a week of semesterstart where the students and professors visited Sister's Academy, Malmø. I participated in the Sister's Academy as visiting researcher and here i...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  19. The Twente humanoid head

    Reilink, Rob; Visser, L.C.; Bennik, J.; Carloni, Raffaella; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This video shows the results of the project on the mechatronic development of the Twente humanoid head. The mechanical structure consists of a neck with four degrees of freedom (DOFs) and two eyes (a stereo pair system) which tilt on a common axis and rotate sideways freely providing a three more

  20. F.D.G. PET role in the localisation of primary neoplasias

    Audigier, C.; Billotey, C.; Deshayes, E.; Banayan, S.; Janier, M.

    2009-01-01

    Carcinomas of unknown primary site (C.U.P.) and para neoplastic syndromes have the common characteristic that an extensive conventional biological and imaging analysis fails in some instance to detect the primary tumour. F.D.G.-PET becomes recognized to provide interesting information in the case of 'head and neck' C.U.P. as well as in the case of neurological para neoplastic syndromes biologically well defined. When, either C.U.P. or para neoplastic syndromes, are less defined, F.D.G.-PET will not provide as much information as in the previous situation, although it can help in the etiologic diagnosis (oncologic or not) in some cases. (authors)

  1. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16{sup INK4A} expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim [University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Burfeind, Peter [University Medical Center, Institute for Human Genetics, Goettingen (Germany); Reichardt, Holger M. [University Medical Center, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, Martin [Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16{sup INK4A} expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16{sup INK4A} expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression only, and patients without p16{sup INK4A} expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16{sup INK4A} expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16{sup INK4A} expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [German] Ein besseres Therapieansprechen von humanen Papillomavirus (HPV)-positiven Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist durch Studien belegt. Weniger Beachtung hat bisher die Relevanz unerwuenschter

  2. Head injury in children

    Sugiura, Makoto; Mori, Nobuhiko; Yokosuka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Imanaga, Hirohisa

    1981-01-01

    Findings of computerized tomography (CT) in 183 cases of head injury in children were investigated with special reference to CT findings of mild head injury. As was expected, CT findings of mild head injury fell within the normal range, in almost all cases. However, abnormal findings were noticed in 4 out of 34 cases (12%) in acute stage and 7 out of 76 cases (9%) in chronic stage. They were 3 cases of localized low density area in acute stage and 6 cases of mild cerebral atrophy in chronic stage, etc. There were some cases of mild head injury in which CT findings were normal while EEG examination revealed abnormality. Also in some cases, x-ray study demonstrated linear skull fracture which CT failed to show. These conventional techniques could be still remained as useful adjunct aid in diagnosis of head injury. CT findings of cases of cerebral contusion in their acute stage were divided as follows; normal, low density, small ventricle and ventricular and/or cisternal hemorrhage, frequency of incidence being 38, 17, 22, 11% respectively. These findings were invariably converted to cerebral atrophy from 10 days to 2 months after the impacts. In the cases with intracranial hematoma revealed by CT, only 32% of them showed clinical signs of Araki's type IV in their acute stage and 63% of them showed no neurological defects, that is Araki's type I and II. A case of extreme diffuse cerebral atrophy which followed acute subdural hematoma caused by tear of bridging veins without cortical contusion was presented. (author)

  3. "Stuttering" after minor head trauma.

    Strasberg, Stephen; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Parry, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as impairment in brain function as a result of mechanical force. It is classified based on clinical findings using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Mild TBI is defined as GCS 14-15; moderate, 9-13; and severe, 3-8. Patients with the same TBI classification may have very different underlying pathology. In moderate to severe TBI, the primary pathology may include contusions, hemorrhage, diffuse axonal injury, direct cellular damage, "tearing and shearing of the tissues, loss of the blood-brain barrier, disruption of the neurochemical homeostasis and loss of the electrochemical function". Although the primary pathology associated with mild TBI may be milder versions of the same pathology associated with moderate and severe TBI, it is generally a metabolic injury. However, it is reported that 15% of patients with mild TBI and a GCS score of 14 or 15 will have an intracranial lesion; less than 1% of these require neurosurgical intervention. Although patients with mild TBI may have intracranial lesions, it is rare that the presenting and only physical examination finding is an isolated neurologic finding. Here we present a case of isolated head trauma with a single physical examination finding--expressive aphasia.

  4. Sexual dimorphism of head morphology in three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Aguirre, W E; Akinpelu, O

    2010-09-01

    This study examined sexual dimorphism of head morphology in the ecologically diverse three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Male G. aculeatus had longer heads than female G. aculeatus in all 10 anadromous, stream and lake populations examined, and head length growth rates were significantly higher in males in half of the populations sampled, indicating that differences in head size increased with body size in many populations. Despite consistently larger heads in males, there was significant variation in size-adjusted head length among populations, suggesting that the relationship between head length and body length was flexible. Inter-population differences in head length were correlated between sexes, thus population-level factors influenced head length in both sexes despite the sexual dimorphism present. Head shape variation between lake and anadromous populations was greater than that between sexes. The common divergence in head shape between sexes across populations was about twice as important as the sexual dimorphism unique to each population. Finally, much of the sexual dimorphism in head length was due to divergence in the anterior region of the head, where the primary trophic structures were found. It is unclear whether the sexual dimorphism was due to natural selection for niche divergence between sexes or sexual selection. This study improves knowledge of the magnitude, growth rate divergence, inter-population variation and location of sexual dimorphism in G. aculeatus head morphology. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  9. Head Lice: Prevention and Control

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Prevention & Control Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of head lice: Avoid head-to- ...

  10. Critical weight loss in head and neck cancer - prevalence and risk factors at diagnosis : an explorative study

    Jager-Wittenaar, H.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Vissink, A.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; van Oort, R.P.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    Goals of work Critical weight loss (>= 5% in 1 month or >= 10% in 6 months) is a common phenomenon in head and neck cancer patients. It is unknown which complaints are most strongly related to critical weight loss in head and neck cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. The aim of this explorative

  11. Towards high-speed autonomous navigation of unknown environments

    Richter, Charles; Roy, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize recent research enabling high-speed navigation in unknown environments for dynamic robots that perceive the world through onboard sensors. Many existing solutions to this problem guarantee safety by making the conservative assumption that any unknown portion of the map may contain an obstacle, and therefore constrain planned motions to lie entirely within known free space. In this work, we observe that safety constraints may significantly limit performance and that faster navigation is possible if the planner reasons about collision with unobserved obstacles probabilistically. Our overall approach is to use machine learning to approximate the expected costs of collision using the current state of the map and the planned trajectory. Our contribution is to demonstrate fast but safe planning using a learned function to predict future collision probabilities.

  12. Renal disease masquerading as pyrexia of unknown origin

    D Korivi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrexia of unknown origin is a challenging clinical problem. Infections, malignancies, and connective tissue diseases form the major etiologies for this condition. We report a case of a 57-year-old diabetic male who presented with fever of unknown origin for several months. The course of investigations led to a kidney biopsy which clinched the cause of his fever as well as the underlying diagnosis. The light microscopy findings of expansile storiform fibrosis with a dense inflammatory infiltrate suggested the diagnosis which was confirmed by positive staining of Immunoglobulin G4, the dense lympho-plasmacytic infiltrate and elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. A course of steroids followed by mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance immunosuppression rendered the patient afebrile with improvement of renal function.

  13. Learning Unknown Structure in CRFs via Adaptive Gradient Projection Method

    Wei Xue

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of fitting probabilistic graphical models to the given data when the structure is not known. More specifically, we focus on learning unknown structure in conditional random fields, especially learning both the structure and parameters of a conditional random field model simultaneously. To do this, we first formulate the learning problem as a convex minimization problem by adding an l_2-regularization to the node parameters and a group l_1-regularization to the edge parameters, and then a gradient-based projection method is proposed to solve it which combines an adaptive stepsize selection strategy with a nonmonotone line search. Extensive simulation experiments are presented to show the performance of our approach in solving unknown structure learning problems.

  14. Quadrotor Control in the Presence of Unknown Mass Properties

    Duivenvoorden, Rikky Ricardo Petrus Rufino

    Quadrotor UAVs are popular due to their mechanical simplicity, as well as their capability to hover and vertically take-off and land. As applications diversify, quadrotors are increasingly required to operate under unknown mass properties, for example as a multirole sensor platform or for package delivery operations. The work presented here consists of the derivation of a generalized quadrotor dynamic model without the typical simplifying assumptions on the first and second moments of mass. The maximum payload capacity of a quadrotor in hover, and the observability of the unknown mass properties are discussed. A brief introduction of L1 adaptive control is provided, and three different L 1 adaptive controllers were designed for the Parrot AR.Drone quadrotor. Their tracking and disturbance rejection performance was compared to the baseline nonlinear controller in experiments. Finally, the results of the combination of L1 adaptive control with iterative learning control are presented, showing high performance trajectory tracking under uncertainty.

  15. Biomarkers for Ectopic Pregnancy and Pregnancy of Unknown Location

    Senapati, Suneeta; Barnhart, Kurt T.

    2013-01-01

    Early pregnancy failure is the most common complication of pregnancy, and 1–2% of all pregnancies will be ectopic. As one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality, diagnosing ectopic pregnancy and determining the fate of a pregnancy of unknown location are of great clinical concern. Several serum and plasma biomarkers for ectopic pregnancy have been investigated independently and in combination. The following is a review of the state of biomarker discovery and development for...

  16. Transfer of an unknown quantum state, quantum networks, and memory

    Biswas, Asoka; Agarwal, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present a protocol for transfer of an unknown quantum state. The protocol is based on a two-mode cavity interacting dispersively in a sequential manner with three-level atoms in the Λ configuration. We propose a scheme for quantum networking using an atomic channel. We investigate the effect of cavity decoherence in the entire process. Further, we demonstrate the possibility of an efficient quantum memory for arbitrary superposition of two modes of a cavity containing one photon

  17. Additional value of integrated PET/CT over PET alone in the initial staging and follow up of head and neck malignancy

    Ishikita, Tomohiro; Oriuchi, Noboru; Higuchi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Clinical application of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in head and neck cancer includes identification of metastases, unknown primary head and neck malignancy, or second primary carcinoma, and also recurrent tumor after treatment. In this study, the additional value of PET/CT fusion images over PET images alone was evaluated in patients with initial staging and follow up of head and neck malignancy. Forty patients with suspected primary head and neck malignancy and 129 patients with suspected relapse after treatment of head and neck malignancy were included. FDG-PET/CT study was performed after the intravenous administration of FDG (5 MBq/kg). Target of evaluation was set at primary tumor, cervical lymph node, and whole body. PET images and PET with CT fusion images were compared. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results of PET and PET/CT were compared with postoperative histopathological examination, and case by case comparison of PET and PET/CT results for each region was performed. The additional value of CT images over PET only images was assessed. Statistical differences in sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. In the comparative evaluation of 507 targets by PET alone and PET/CT, 401 targets showed agreement of the results. Of the 106 discordant targets, 103 showed a positive result on PET alone and negative result on PET/CT. These results showed a significant difference (p<0.01). Sensitivity of PET/CT was slightly higher than that of PET without statistical significance, while specificity of PET/CT was significantly higher than that of PET alone (Initial Staging: 90.5% vs. 62.2%, p<0.01; Follow up: 97.2% vs. 74.4%, p<0.01). In Fisher's direct probability test, a significant difference was noted in the sensitivity (Initial staging: 91.3% vs. 87.0%, p<0.01; Follow up: 93.9% vs. 91.4%, p<0.01). Combined PET/CT showed improved diagnostic

  18. Femoral head vitality after intracapsular hip fracture

    Stroemqvist, B.

    1983-01-01

    Femoral head vitality before, during and at various intervals from the operation was determined by tetracycline labeling and/or 99 sp (m)Tc-MDP scintimetry. In a three-year follow-up, healing prognosis could be determined by scintimetry 3 weeks from operation; deficient femoral head vitality predicting healing complications and retained vitality predicting uncomplicated healing. A comparison between pre- and postoperative scintimetry indicated that further impairment of the femoral head vitality could be caused by the operative procedure, and as tetracycline labeling prior to and after fracture reduction in 370 fractures proved equivalent, it was concluded that the procedure of osteosynthesis probably was responsible for capsular vessel injury, using a four-flanged nail. The four-flanged nail was compared with a low-traumatic method of osteosynthesis, two hook-pins, in a prospective randomized 14 month study, and the postoperative femoral head vitality was significantly better in the hook-pin group. This was also clearly demonstrated in a one-year follow-up for the fractures included in the study. Parallel to these investigations, the reliability of the methods of vitality determination was found satisfactory in methodologic studies. For clinical purpose, primary atraumatic osteosynthesis, postoperative prognostic scintimetry and early secondary arthroplasty when indicated, was concluded to be the appropriate approach to femoral neck fracture treatment. (Author)

  19. Characterizing unknown systematics in large scale structure surveys

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ho, Shirley; Myers, Adam D.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Muna, Demitri; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Photometric large scale structure (LSS) surveys probe the largest volumes in the Universe, but are inevitably limited by systematic uncertainties. Imperfect photometric calibration leads to biases in our measurements of the density fields of LSS tracers such as galaxies and quasars, and as a result in cosmological parameter estimation. Earlier studies have proposed using cross-correlations between different redshift slices or cross-correlations between different surveys to reduce the effects of such systematics. In this paper we develop a method to characterize unknown systematics. We demonstrate that while we do not have sufficient information to correct for unknown systematics in the data, we can obtain an estimate of their magnitude. We define a parameter to estimate contamination from unknown systematics using cross-correlations between different redshift slices and propose discarding bins in the angular power spectrum that lie outside a certain contamination tolerance level. We show that this method improves estimates of the bias using simulated data and further apply it to photometric luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a case study

  20. Quantum key distribution with an unknown and untrusted source

    Zhao, Yi; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2009-03-01

    The security of a standard bi-directional ``plug & play'' quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been an open question for a long time. This is mainly because its source is equivalently controlled by an eavesdropper, which means the source is unknown and untrusted. Qualitative discussion on this subject has been made previously. In this paper, we present the first quantitative security analysis on a general class of QKD protocols whose sources are unknown and untrusted. The securities of standard BB84 protocol, weak+vacuum decoy state protocol, and one-decoy decoy state protocol, with unknown and untrusted sources are rigorously proved. We derive rigorous lower bounds to the secure key generation rates of the above three protocols. Our numerical simulation results show that QKD with an untrusted source gives a key generation rate that is close to that with a trusted source. Our work is published in [1]. [4pt] [1] Y. Zhao, B. Qi, and H.-K. Lo, Phys. Rev. A, 77:052327 (2008).

  1. Characterizing unknown systematics in large scale structure surveys

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ho, Shirley [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ross, Ashley J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Bahcall, Neta [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Brinkmann, Jonathan [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Muna, Demitri [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pâris, Isabelle [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Petitjean, Patrick [Université Paris 6 et CNRS, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis blvd. Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Weaver, Benjamin A., E-mail: nishanta@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Photometric large scale structure (LSS) surveys probe the largest volumes in the Universe, but are inevitably limited by systematic uncertainties. Imperfect photometric calibration leads to biases in our measurements of the density fields of LSS tracers such as galaxies and quasars, and as a result in cosmological parameter estimation. Earlier studies have proposed using cross-correlations between different redshift slices or cross-correlations between different surveys to reduce the effects of such systematics. In this paper we develop a method to characterize unknown systematics. We demonstrate that while we do not have sufficient information to correct for unknown systematics in the data, we can obtain an estimate of their magnitude. We define a parameter to estimate contamination from unknown systematics using cross-correlations between different redshift slices and propose discarding bins in the angular power spectrum that lie outside a certain contamination tolerance level. We show that this method improves estimates of the bias using simulated data and further apply it to photometric luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a case study.

  2. Navigation through unknown and dynamic open spaces using topological notions

    Miguel-Tomé, Sergio

    2018-04-01

    Until now, most algorithms used for navigation have had the purpose of directing system towards one point in space. However, humans communicate tasks by specifying spatial relations among elements or places. In addition, the environments in which humans develop their activities are extremely dynamic. The only option that allows for successful navigation in dynamic and unknown environments is making real-time decisions. Therefore, robots capable of collaborating closely with human beings must be able to make decisions based on the local information registered by the sensors and interpret and express spatial relations. Furthermore, when one person is asked to perform a task in an environment, this task is communicated given a category of goals so the person does not need to be supervised. Thus, two problems appear when one wants to create multifunctional robots: how to navigate in dynamic and unknown environments using spatial relations and how to accomplish this without supervision. In this article, a new architecture to address the two cited problems is presented, called the topological qualitative navigation architecture. In previous works, a qualitative heuristic called the heuristic of topological qualitative semantics (HTQS) has been developed to establish and identify spatial relations. However, that heuristic only allows for establishing one spatial relation with a specific object. In contrast, navigation requires a temporal sequence of goals with different objects. The new architecture attains continuous generation of goals and resolves them using HTQS. Thus, the new architecture achieves autonomous navigation in dynamic or unknown open environments.

  3. MRI in head trauma

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  4. Where is Russia heading?

    Natalija Pliskevič

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the proceedings from the collection Where is Russia Heading? (= Куда идёт Россия?, published between 1994 and 1998 in connection with the international symposium held under this name each year in Moscow. The symposia and their proceeding, involving leading Russian and foreign experts, were significant in that they encompassed a wide range of themes – social, economic, political, legislative, cultural and other transformations that have been occurring in Russia during the past decades. The author, however, limits her review to contributions dealing with ethno-political and socio-cultural transformations in Russia. She concludes that the question – “Where is Russia heading?” – still remains open to answers.

  5. MRI in head trauma

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  6. "Head versus heart"

    Paul Rozin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this study that American adults and undergraduates are substantially less likely to acknowledge magical effects when the judgments involve money (amount willing to pay to avoid an ``unpleasant'' magical contact than they are when using preference or rating measures. We conclude that in ``head-heart'' conflicts of this type, money tips the balance towards the former, or, in other words, that money makes the mind less magical.

  7. Head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomy does not depend on the direct vestibulospinal tracts.

    Fukushima, K; Fukushima, J; Kato, M

    1988-01-01

    Head tilt is one of the most characteristic and enduring symptoms produced by hemilabyrinthectomy and is compensated by the central nervous system with time. In order to study the central mechanisms of compensation of the head tilt, it is first necessary to understand how it is produced. However, its mechanism remains unknown. Experiments were performed in cats to examine whether the direct vestibulocollic pathways are responsible for the head tilt, as suggested by some authors. Hemilabyrinthectomies produced a characteristic head tilt in cats in which the medial and/or one lateral vestibulospinal tracts (VSTs) had been interrupted. The lesions of the medial VST did not influence the preexisting head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomies. These results suggest that the head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomies does not depend on the activity of the VSTs.

  8. Where are we heading

    Noto, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry's participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  9. "Head versus heart"

    Paul Rozin; Heidi Grant; Stephanie Weinberg; Scott Parker

    2007-01-01

    Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach) are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this ...

  10. Exploding head syndrome is common in college students.

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2015-08-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of loud noises during sleep-wake or wake-sleep transitions. Although episodes by themselves are relatively harmless, it is a frightening phenomenon that may result in clinical consequences. At present there are little systematic data on exploding head syndrome, and prevalence rates are unknown. It has been hypothesized to be rare and to occur primarily in older (i.e. 50+ years) individuals, females, and those suffering from isolated sleep paralysis. In order to test these hypotheses, 211 undergraduate students were assessed for both exploding head syndrome and isolated sleep paralysis using semi-structured diagnostic interviews: 18.00% of the sample experienced lifetime exploding head syndrome, this reduced to 16.60% for recurrent cases. Though not more common in females, it was found in 36.89% of those diagnosed with isolated sleep paralysis. Exploding head syndrome episodes were accompanied by clinically significant levels of fear, and a minority (2.80%) experienced it to such a degree that it was associated with clinically significant distress and/or impairment. Contrary to some earlier theorizing, exploding head syndrome was found to be a relatively common experience in younger individuals. Given the potential clinical impacts, it is recommended that it be assessed more regularly in research and clinical settings. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Amenorrhea - primary

    ... of periods - primary Images Primary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  12. Prevalence and Impact of Unknown Diabetes in the ICU.

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Xu, Kejun; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with diabetes and their care providers are unaware of the presence of the disease. Dysglycemia encompassing hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glucose variability is common in the ICU in patients with and without diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of unknown diabetes on glycemic control in the ICU. Prospective observational study. Nine ICUs in an academic, tertiary hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. Hemoglobin A1c levels were ordered at all ICU admissions from March 1, 2011 to September 30, 2013. Electronic medical records were examined for a history of antihyperglycemic medications or International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition diagnosis of diabetes. Patients were categorized as having unknown diabetes (hemoglobin A1c > 6.5%, without history of diabetes), no diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5%, with documented history of diabetes). None. A total of 15,737 patients had an hemoglobin A1c and medical record evaluable for the history of diabetes, and 5,635 patients had diabetes diagnosed by either medical history or an elevated hemoglobin A1c in the ICU. Of these, 1,460 patients had unknown diabetes, accounting for 26.0% of all patients with diabetes. This represented 41.0% of patients with an hemoglobin A1c > 6.5% and 9.3% of all ICU patients. Compared with patients without diabetes, patients with unknown diabetes had a higher likelihood of requiring an insulin infusion (44.3% vs 29.3%; p 180 mg/dL; p < 0.0001) and hypoglycemia (8.9% vs 2.5%; blood glucose < 70 mg/dL; p < 0.0001), higher glycemic variability (55.6 vs 28.8, average of patient SD of glucose; p < 0.0001), and increased mortality (13.8% vs 11.4%; p = 0.01). Patients with unknown diabetes represent a significant percentage of ICU admissions. Measurement of hemoglobin A1c at admission can prospectively identify a population that are not known to have diabetes but have significant challenges in glycemic control in the ICU.

  13. Primary care guidelines

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. DESIGN: A cross...... Guideline. RESULTS: Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p ...: Hypertension Guideline recommendations that require joint agreements between professionals are less often adopted than simple, precise recommendations. More emphasis on effective multidisciplinary collaboration is needed....

  14. Evaluation of the role of 18FDG-PET/CT in radiotherapy target definition in patients with head and neck cancer

    Newbold, Katie L; Partridge, Mike; Cook, Gary; Sharma, Bhupinder; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Background and purpose. As techniques for radiotherapy delivery have developed, increasingly accurate localisation of disease is demanded. Functional imaging, particularly PET and its fusion with anatomical modalities, such as PET/CT, promises to improve detection and characterisation of disease. This study evaluated the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on radiotherapy target volume definition in head and neck cancer (HNC). Materials and methods. The PET/CT scans of patients with HNC were used in a radiotherapy planning (RTP) study. The gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined conventionally and compared to those defined using the PET/CT. Data were reported as the median value with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Eighteen patients were consented, 9 had known primary tumour site, 9 presented as unknown primary. In nine cases where the primary site was known, the combined primary and nodal GTV (GTVp+n) increased by a median of 6.1cm3 (2.6, 12.2) or 78% (18, 313), p=0.008 with CTV increasing by a median of 10.1cm3 (1.3, 30.6) or 4% (0, 13) p=0.012. In 9 cases of unknown primary the GTVp+n increased by a median 6.3cm3 (0.2, 15.7) or 61% (4, 210), p=0.012, with CTV increasing by a median 155.4cm3 (2.7, 281.7) or 95% (1, 137), p=0.008. Conclusion. 18FDG-PET revealed disease lying outside the conventional target volume, either extending a known area or highlighting a previously unknown area of disease, including the primary tumour in 5 cases. We recommend PET/CT in the RTP of all cases of unknown primary. In patients with a known primary, although the change in volume was statistically significant the clinical impact is less clear. 18FDG-PET can also show areas within the conventional target volume that are hypermetabolic which may be possible biological target volumes for dose escalation studies in the future

  15. CT and MR imaging of closed head trauma

    Park, Byung Moon; Kim, Wan Jin; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chung, Moo Chan; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Kim, Ki Jeong

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and extent of traumatic lesions were evaluated with MR imaging in 40 patients with closed head injuries. The primary intraaxial lesions were classified into four main types, according to their topographical distribution within the brain ; cortical contusion (54%), diffuse axonal injury (35%), subcortical gray matter injury (4%), primary brain stem injury (7%). MR was found to be superior to CT and to be very useful in the detection of traumatic head lesions and T2WI were most useful for lesion detection. But T1WI proved to be also useful for detection of hemorrhage and anatomical localization

  16. Estimation of the false discovery proportion with unknown dependence.

    Fan, Jianqing; Han, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale multiple testing with correlated test statistics arises frequently in many scientific research. Incorporating correlation information in approximating false discovery proportion has attracted increasing attention in recent years. When the covariance matrix of test statistics is known, Fan, Han & Gu (2012) provided an accurate approximation of False Discovery Proportion (FDP) under arbitrary dependence structure and some sparsity assumption. However, the covariance matrix is often unknown in many applications and such dependence information has to be estimated before approximating FDP. The estimation accuracy can greatly affect FDP approximation. In the current paper, we aim to theoretically study the impact of unknown dependence on the testing procedure and establish a general framework such that FDP can be well approximated. The impacts of unknown dependence on approximating FDP are in the following two major aspects: through estimating eigenvalues/eigenvectors and through estimating marginal variances. To address the challenges in these two aspects, we firstly develop general requirements on estimates of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for a good approximation of FDP. We then give conditions on the structures of covariance matrices that satisfy such requirements. Such dependence structures include banded/sparse covariance matrices and (conditional) sparse precision matrices. Within this framework, we also consider a special example to illustrate our method where data are sampled from an approximate factor model, which encompasses most practical situations. We provide a good approximation of FDP via exploiting this specific dependence structure. The results are further generalized to the situation where the multivariate normality assumption is relaxed. Our results are demonstrated by simulation studies and some real data applications.

  17. Neurological autoantibodies in drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause.

    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden; Kamisli, Suat; Yucel, Fatma Ebru; Ozcan, Cemal

    2018-03-09

    Autoimmune epilepsy is a rarely diagnosed condition. Recognition of the underlying autoimmune condition is important, as these patients can be resistant to antiepileptic drugs. To determine the autoimmune and oncological antibodies in adult drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause and identify the clinical, radiological, and EEG findings associated with these antibodies according to data in the literature. Eighty-two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause were prospectively identified. Clinical features were recorded. The levels of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex (anti-VGKCc), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), anti-phospholipid IgG and IgM, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, and onconeural antibodies were determined. Serum antibody positivity suggesting the potential role of autoimmunity in the aetiology was present in 17 patients with resistant epilepsy (22.0%). Multiple antibodies were found in two patients (2.6%). One of these patients (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and ANA, whereas another (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and anti-TPO. A single antibody was present in 15 patients (19.5%). Of the 77 patients finally included in the study, 4 had anti-TPO (5.2%), 1 had anti-GAD (1.3%), 4 had anti-VGKCc (5.2%) 8 had ANA (10.3%), and 2 had onconeural antibodies (2.6%) (1 patient had anti-Yo and 1 had anti-MA2/TA). The other antibodies investigated were not detected. EEG abnormality (focal), focal seizure incidence, and frequent seizures were more common in antibody-positive patients. Autoimmune factors may be aetiologically relevant in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause, especially if focal seizures are present together with focal EEG abnormality and frequent seizures.

  18. Optimal unambiguous comparison of two unknown squeezed vacua

    Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Sedlak, Michal; Rapsan, Peter; Busek, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the unambiguous state comparison (USC) of two unknown squeezed vacuum states of the electromagnetic field. Our setup is based on linear optical elements and photon-number detectors, and it achieves optimal USC in an ideal case of unit quantum efficiency. In realistic conditions, i.e., for nonunit quantum efficiency of photodetectors, we evaluate the probability of getting an ambiguous result as well as the reliability of the scheme, thus showing its robustness in comparison to previous proposals.

  19. Fast entanglement detection for unknown states of two spatial qutrits

    Lima, G.; Gomez, E. S.; Saavedra, C.; Vargas, A.; Vianna, R. O.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the practicality of the method proposed by Maciel et al. [Phys. Rev. A. 80, 032325 (2009).] for detecting the entanglement of two spatial qutrits (three-dimensional quantum systems), which are encoded in the discrete transverse momentum of single photons transmitted through a multislit aperture. The method is based on the acquisition of partial information of the quantum state through projective measurements, and a data processing analysis done with semidefinite programs. This analysis relies on generating gradually an optimal entanglement witness operator, and numerical investigations have shown that it allows for the entanglement detection of unknown states with a cost much lower than full state tomography.

  20. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied....... This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the actual force(s) applied to the structure. The white noise input(s) and the structures responses are then used...

  1. Primary acalvaria: a case report

    Rios, Livia Teresa Moreira; Martins, Marilia da Gloria; Simoes, Vanda Maria Ferreira; Nunes, Marynea do Vale; Marques, Patricia Franco; Godoy, Silvia Helena Cavalcante de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Acalvaria is a rare congenital malformation of unknown pathogenesis characterized by the absence of the flat bones of the cranial vault, dura mater and associated muscles, while the central nervous system is usually preserved. The most accepted physiopathogenic theory suggests the presence of a post neurulation defect with normal placement the embryonic ectoderm. The present report describes neonatal imaging findings of primary acalvaria. (author)

  2. Primary acalvaria: a case report

    Rios, Livia Teresa Moreira, E-mail: ltlrios@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Hospital Universitario. Unidade de Diagnostico por Imagem; Martins, Marilia da Gloria [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Hospital Universitario. Servico de Ginecologia e Obstetricia; Simoes, Vanda Maria Ferreira; Nunes, Marynea do Vale; Marques, Patricia Franco; Godoy, Silvia Helena Cavalcante de Souza [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Hospital Universitario. Servico de Neonatologia

    2010-07-15

    Acalvaria is a rare congenital malformation of unknown pathogenesis characterized by the absence of the flat bones of the cranial vault, dura mater and associated muscles, while the central nervous system is usually preserved. The most accepted physiopathogenic theory suggests the presence of a post neurulation defect with normal placement the embryonic ectoderm. The present report describes neonatal imaging findings of primary acalvaria. (author)

  3. Overexpression of EMMPRIN Isoform 2 Is Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Metastasis

    Huang, Zhiquan; Tan, Ning; Guo, Weijie; Wang, Lili; Li, Haigang; Zhang, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaojia; Xu, Qin; Li, Jinsong; Guo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a plasma membrane protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, has been reported to promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis in several human malignancies. However, the roles of the different EMMPRIN isoforms and their associated mechanisms in head and neck cancer progression remain unknown. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we found that EMMPRIN isoform 2 (EMMPRIN-2) was the only isoform that was overexpressed in both head and n...

  4. Kinematics of the AM-50 heading machine cutting head

    Sikora, W; Bak, K; Klich, R [Politechnika Slaska, Gliwice (Poland). Instytut Mechanizacji Gornictwa

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes motion of the cutter head of the AM-50 heading machine. Two types of head motion are comparatively evaluated: planar motion and spatial motion. The spatial motion consists of the head rotational motion and horizontal or vertical feed motion, while planar motion consists of rotational motion and vertical feed motion. Equations that describe head motion under conditions of cutter vertical or horizontal feed motion are derived. The angle between the cutting speed direction and working speed direction is defined. On the basis of these formulae variations of cutting speed depending on the cutting tool position on a cutter head are calculated. Calculations made for 2 extreme cutting tools show that the cutting speed ranges from 1,205 m/s to 3,512 m/s. 4 refs.

  5. Head First Web Design

    Watrall, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Want to know how to make your pages look beautiful, communicate your message effectively, guide visitors through your website with ease, and get everything approved by the accessibility and usability police at the same time? Head First Web Design is your ticket to mastering all of these complex topics, and understanding what's really going on in the world of web design. Whether you're building a personal blog or a corporate website, there's a lot more to web design than div's and CSS selectors, but what do you really need to know? With this book, you'll learn the secrets of designing effecti

  6. Head first C#

    Stellman, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Head First C# is a complete learning experience for object-oriented programming, C#, and the Visual Studio IDE. Built for your brain, this book covers C# 3.0 and Visual Studio 2008, and teaches everything from language fundamentals to advanced topics including garbage collection, extension methods, and double-buffered animation. You'll also master C#'s hottest and newest syntax, LINQ, for querying SQL databases, .NET collections, and XML documents. By the time you're through, you'll be a proficient C# programmer, designing and coding large-scale applications. Every few chapters you will come

  7. Head first C#

    Stellman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    You want to learn C# programming, but you're not sure you want to suffer through another tedious technical book. You're in luck: Head First C# introduces this language in a fun, visual way. You'll quickly learn everything from creating your first program to learning sophisticated coding skills with C# 4.0, Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4, while avoiding common errors that frustrate many students. The second edition offers several hands-on labs along the way to help you build and test programs using skills you've learned up to that point. In the final lab, you'll put everything together. From o

  8. Head First Python

    Barry, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ever wished you could learn Python from a book? Head First Python is a complete learning experience for Python that helps you learn the language through a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals, helping you understand how to be a great Python programmer. You'll quickly learn the language's fundamentals, then move onto persistence, exception handling, web development, SQLite, data wrangling, and Google App Engine. You'll also learn how to write mobile apps for Android, all thanks to the power that Python gives you. We think your time is too valuable to waste struggling with

  9. Head First Mobile Web

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  10. Group prioritisation with unknown expert weights in incomplete linguistic context

    Cheng, Dong; Cheng, Faxin; Zhou, Zhili; Wang, Juan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study a group prioritisation problem in situations when the expert weights are completely unknown and their judgement preferences are linguistic and incomplete. Starting from the theory of relative entropy (RE) and multiplicative consistency, an optimisation model is provided for deriving an individual priority vector without estimating the missing value(s) of an incomplete linguistic preference relation. In order to address the unknown expert weights in the group aggregating process, we define two new kinds of expert weight indicators based on RE: proximity entropy weight and similarity entropy weight. Furthermore, a dynamic-adjusting algorithm (DAA) is proposed to obtain an objective expert weight vector and capture the dynamic properties involved in it. Unlike the extant literature of group prioritisation, the proposed RE approach does not require pre-allocation of expert weights and can solve incomplete preference relations. An interesting finding is that once all the experts express their preference relations, the final expert weight vector derived from the DAA is fixed irrespective of the initial settings of expert weights. Finally, an application example is conducted to validate the effectiveness and robustness of the RE approach.

  11. Unknown facets of Well-Known Scientists Series - Part II

    V S Dixit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 1st in the series of articles on “Unknown Facets of well-known Scientists” was about Sir Frederick Grant Banting, co-discoverer of Insulin, who also researched in Aviation and Diving Medicines, results of which brought extraordinary benefits for Flight crew during the World War II. The article was published in the previous issue of the Journal Unknown facets could be celebrated attributes, talents or otherwise, but it is necessary that we get to know fully about the “great mind". THIS ARTICLE IS ABOUT DR WERNER THEODOR OTTO FORSSMANN, A CARDIOLOGIST, WHO BECAME A UROLOGIST! Does the name Dr Forssmann ring a bell? He shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with “Andre Cournand and Dickinson Richards". The trio was awarded for their “discoveries concerning heart catheterization and pathological changes in the circulatory system". Dr Forssmann was nominated for performing an experiment in which he introduced a catheter into a vein of his arm, further passing it onward into his heart It was risky. This was in the year 1929. Subject of this article is the self-experimentation he carried out and what happened later.

  12. Parameter identification of chaos system based on unknown parameter observer

    Wang Shaoming; Luo Haigeng; Yue Chaoyuan; Liao Xiaoxin

    2008-01-01

    Parameter identification of chaos system based on unknown parameter observer is discussed generally. Based on the work of Guan et al. [X.P. Guan, H.P. Peng, L.X. Li, et al., Acta Phys. Sinica 50 (2001) 26], the design of unknown parameter observer is improved. The application of the improved approach is extended greatly. The works in some literatures [X.P. Guan, H.P. Peng, L.X. Li, et al., Acta Phys. Sinica 50 (2001) 26; J.H. Lue, S.C. Zhang, Phys. Lett. A 286 (2001) 148; X.Q. Wu, J.A. Lu, Chaos Solitons Fractals 18 (2003) 721; J. Liu, S.H. Chen, J. Xie, Chaos Solitons Fractals 19 (2004) 533] are only the special cases of our Corollaries 1 and 2. Some observers for Lue system and a new chaos system are designed to test our improved method, and simulations results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the improved approach

  13. Unknown quantum states: The quantum de Finetti representation

    Caves, Carlton M.; Fuchs, Christopher A.; Schack, Ruediger

    2002-01-01

    We present an elementary proof of the quantum de Finetti representation theorem, a quantum analog of de Finetti's classical theorem on exchangeable probability assignments. This contrasts with the original proof of Hudson and Moody [Z. Wahrschein. verw. Geb. 33, 343 (1976)], which relies on advanced mathematics and does not share the same potential for generalization. The classical de Finetti theorem provides an operational definition of the concept of an unknown probability in Bayesian probability theory, where probabilities are taken to be degrees of belief instead of objective states of nature. The quantum de Finetti theorem, in a closely analogous fashion, deals with exchangeable density-operator assignments and provides an operational definition of the concept of an ''unknown quantum state'' in quantum-state tomography. This result is especially important for information-based interpretations of quantum mechanics, where quantum states, like probabilities, are taken to be states of knowledge rather than states of nature. We further demonstrate that the theorem fails for real Hilbert spaces and discuss the significance of this point

  14. Atmospheric turbulence profiling with unknown power spectral density

    Helin, Tapio; Kindermann, Stefan; Lehtonen, Jonatan; Ramlau, Ronny

    2018-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology in modern ground-based optical telescopes to compensate for the wavefront distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. One method that allows to retrieve information about the atmosphere from telescope data is so-called SLODAR, where the atmospheric turbulence profile is estimated based on correlation data of Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurements. This approach relies on a layered Kolmogorov turbulence model. In this article, we propose a novel extension of the SLODAR concept by including a general non-Kolmogorov turbulence layer close to the ground with an unknown power spectral density. We prove that the joint estimation problem of the turbulence profile above ground simultaneously with the unknown power spectral density at the ground is ill-posed and propose three numerical reconstruction methods. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that our methods lead to substantial improvements in the turbulence profile reconstruction compared to the standard SLODAR-type approach. Also, our methods can accurately locate local perturbations in non-Kolmogorov power spectral densities.

  15. Three-dimensional cinematography with control object of unknown shape.

    Dapena, J; Harman, E A; Miller, J A

    1982-01-01

    A technique for reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) motion which involves a simple filming procedure but allows the deduction of coordinates in large object volumes was developed. Internal camera parameters are calculated from measurements of the film images of two calibrated crosses while external camera parameters are calculated from the film images of points in a control object of unknown shape but at least one known length. The control object, which includes the volume in which the activity is to take place, is formed by a series of poles placed at unknown locations, each carrying two targets. From the internal and external camera parameters, and from locations of the images of point in the films of the two cameras, 3D coordinates of the point can be calculated. Root mean square errors of the three coordinates of points in a large object volume (5m x 5m x 1.5m) were 15 mm, 13 mm, 13 mm and 6 mm, and relative errors in lengths averaged 0.5%, 0.7% and 0.5%, respectively.

  16. Reactive Path Planning Approach for Docking Robots in Unknown Environment

    Peng Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robots need to be recharged and exchange information with the host through docking in the long-distance tasks. Therefore, feasible path is required in the docking process to guide the robot and adjust its pose. However, when there are unknown obstacles in the work area, it becomes difficult to determine the feasible path for docking. This paper presents a reactive path planning approach named Dubins-APF (DAPF to solve the path planning problem for docking in unknown environment with obstacles. In this proposed approach the Dubins curves are combined with the designed obstacle avoidance potential field to plan the feasible path. Firstly, an initial path is planned and followed according to the configurations of the robot and the docking station. Then when the followed path is evaluated to be infeasible, the intermediate configuration is calculated as well as the replanned path based on the obstacle avoidance potential field. The robot will be navigated to the docking station with proper pose eventually via the DAPF approach. The proposed DAPF approach is efficient and does not require the prior knowledge about the environment. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed approach.

  17. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  18. Neurological Autoantibody Prevalence in Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology.

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Alqallaf, Abdulradha; Hays, Ryan; Freeman, Matthew; Chen, Kevin; Ding, Kan; Agostini, Mark; Vernino, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an underrecognized condition, and its true incidence is unknown. Identifying patients with an underlying autoimmune origin is critical because these patients' condition may remain refractory to conventional antiseizure medications but may respond to immunotherapy. To determine the prevalence of neurological autoantibodies (Abs) among adult patients with epilepsy of unknown etiology. Consecutive patients presenting to neurology services with new-onset epilepsy or established epilepsy of unknown etiology were identified. Serum samples were tested for autoimmune encephalitis Abs as well as thyroperoxidase (TPO) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) Abs. An antibody prevalence in epilepsy (APE) score based on clinical characteristics was assigned prospectively. Data were collected from June 1, 2015, to June 1, 2016. Presence of neurological Abs. A score based on clinical characteristics was assigned to estimate the probability of seropositivity prior to antibody test results. Good seizure outcome was estimated on the basis of significant reduction of seizure frequency at the first follow-up or seizure freedom. Of the 127 patients (68 males and 59 females) enrolled in the study, 15 were subsequently excluded after identification of an alternative diagnosis. Serum Abs suggesting a potential autoimmune etiology were detected in 39 (34.8%) cases. More than 1 Ab was detected in 7 patients (6.3%): 3 (2.7%) had TPO-Ab and voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKCc) Ab, 2 (1.8%) had GAD65-Ab and VGKCc-Ab, 1 had TPO-Ab and GAD65-Ab, and 1 had anti-Hu Ab and GAD65-Ab. Thirty-two patients (28.6%) had a single Ab marker. Among 112 patients included in the study, 15 (13.4%) had TPO-Ab, 14 (12.5%) had GAD65-Ab, 12 (10.7%) had VGKCc (4 of whom were positive for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 [LGI1] Ab), and 4 (3.6%) had N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) Ab. Even after excluding TPO-Ab and low-titer GAD65-Ab, Abs strongly suggesting an

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... and send an official report to your primary care physician or physician who referred you for the ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... images and send an official report to your primary care physician or physician who referred you for ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  1. CTOD-based acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.; Barnes, D.M.; Awadalla, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    The primary coolant piping system of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors contains twelve heat exchangers to remove the waste heat from the nuclear materials production. A large break at the inlet or outlet heads of the heat exchangers would occur if the restraint members of the heads become inactive. The heat exchanger head is attached to the tubesheet by 84 staybolts. The structural integrity of the heads is demonstrated by showing the redundant capacity of the staybolts to restrain the head at design conditions and under seismic loadings. The beat exchanger head is analyzed with a three- dimensional finite element model. The restraint provided by the staybolts is evaluated for several postulated cases of inactive or missing staybolts, that is, bolts that have a flaw exceeding the ultrasonic testing (UT) threshold depth of 25% of the bolt diameter. A limit of 6 inactive staybolts is reached with a fracture criterion based on the maximum allowable local displacement at the active staybolts which corresponds to the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) of 0.032 inches. An acceptance criteria methodology has been developed to disposition flaws reported in the staybolt inspections while ensuring adequate restraint capacity of the staybolts to maintain integrity of the heat exchanger heads against collapse. The methodology includes an approach for the baseline and periodic inspections of the staybolts. A total of up to 6 staybolts, reported as containing flaws with depths at or exceeding 25% would be acceptable in the heat exchanger

  2. Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination

    Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described

  3. Crack growth rates in vessel head penetration materials

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    1994-01-01

    The cracks detected in reactor vessel head penetrations in certain European plants have been attributed to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The penetrations in question are made from Inconel 600. The susceptibility of this alloy to PWSCC has been widely studied in relation to use of this material for steam generator tubes. When the first reactor vessel head penetration cracks were detected, most of the available data on crack propagation rates were from test specimens made from steam generator tubes and tested under conditions that questioned the validity of these data for assessment of the evolution of cracks in penetrations. For this reason, the scope of the Spanish Research Project on the Inspection and Repair of PWR reactor vessel head penetrations included the acquisition of data on crack propagation rates in Inconel 600, representative of the materials used for vessel head penetrations. (authors). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  4. diagnostic imaging of acute head trauma

    Prayer, D.; Rametsteiner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the primary modality of choice for imaging patients with acute head trauma. Lesions of the soft tissues and of the bones can be assessed more precisely than with other imaging modalities. With magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) additional information may be gained especially in subacute and chronic posttraumatic conditions. Urgent indication to perform a CT examination depends on the patient's history and on the mechanism of trauma. Imaging interpretation has been performed in the context of typical pathologic effects of trauma and with respect to potential therapy. (author)

  5. Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Undersea Vehicle in Unknown Unstructured Environment

    Zheping Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To avoid obstacle in the unknown environment for unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV, an obstacle avoiding system based on improved vector field histogram (VFH is designed. Forward looking sonar is used to detect the environment, and the divisional sonar modal is applied to deal with the measure uncertainty. To adapt to the VFH, rolling occupancy grids are used for the map building, and high accuracy details of local environment are obtained. The threshold is adaptively adjusted by the statistic of obstacles to solve the problem that VFH is sensitive to threshold. To improve the environment adaptability, the hybrid-behaviors strategy is proposed, which selects the optimal avoidance command according to the motion status and environment character. The simulation shows that UUV could avoid the obstacles fast and escape from the U shape obstacles.

  6. Fever of unknown origin (FUO): CMV infectious mononucleosis or lymphoma?

    Cunha, Burke A; Chawla, Karishma

    2018-04-20

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) refers to fevers of > 101 °F that persist for > 3 weeks and remain undiagnosed after a focused inpatient or outpatient workup. FUO may be due to infectious, malignant/neoplastic, rheumatic/inflammatory, or miscellaneous disorders. The FUO category determines the focus of the diagnostic workup. In the case presented of an FUO in a young woman, there were clinical findings of both CMV infectious mononucleosis or a lymphoma, e.g., highly elevated ESR, elevated ferritin levels, and elevated ACE level, β-2 microglobulins. The indium scan showed intense splenic uptake. Lymph node biopsy, PET scan, and flow cytometry were negative for lymphoma. CMV infectious mononucleosis was the diagnosis, and she made a slow recovery.

  7. Impact of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin

    Barkhausen, J.; Stoeblen, F.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic relevance of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin. Material and Methods: Sixty-three consecutive intensive care patients with suspicion of an abscess and negative or inconclusive previous radiological examinations were included. CT was performed using the helical technique. A total of 45 abdominal and 38 chest examinations were evaluated. Results: 5/38 examinations of the chest revealed the source of sepsis (pleural empyema 2, lung abscess 1, mediastinitis 1, retrosternal abscess 1). 7/45 abdominal CT examinations showed the source of sepsis (intraabdominal abscess 2, hepatic abscess 3, intestinal perforation 1, gangrenous colitis 1). Conclusion: CT is useful for the evaluation of patients with fever or sepsis without a known source. Due to the detection of a spetic focus by CT, 19% of the patients in our study could be immediately referred to causal therapy as percutaneous drainage or surgery. (orig.)

  8. Impact of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin

    Barkhausen, J.; Stoeblen, F.; Mueller, R.D. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Dominguez-Fernandez, E. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery; Henseke, P. [Nycomed-Amersham Arzneimittel GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic relevance of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin. Material and Methods: Sixty-three consecutive intensive care patients with suspicion of an abscess and negative or inconclusive previous radiological examinations were included. CT was performed using the helical technique. A total of 45 abdominal and 38 chest examinations were evaluated. Results: 5/38 examinations of the chest revealed the source of sepsis (pleural empyema 2, lung abscess 1, mediastinitis 1, retrosternal abscess 1). 7/45 abdominal CT examinations showed the source of sepsis (intraabdominal abscess 2, hepatic abscess 3, intestinal perforation 1, gangrenous colitis 1). Conclusion: CT is useful for the evaluation of patients with fever or sepsis without a known source. Due to the detection of a spetic focus by CT, 19% of the patients in our study could be immediately referred to causal therapy as percutaneous drainage or surgery. (orig.)

  9. Autonomous Underwater Navigation and Optical Mapping in Unknown Natural Environments

    Juan David Hernández

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach for navigating in unknown environments while, simultaneously, gathering information for inspecting underwater structures using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV. To accomplish this, we first use our pipeline for mapping and planning collision-free paths online, which endows an AUV with the capability to autonomously acquire optical data in close proximity. With that information, we then propose a reconstruction pipeline to create a photo-realistic textured 3D model of the inspected area. These 3D models are also of particular interest to other fields of study in marine sciences, since they can serve as base maps for environmental monitoring, thus allowing change detection of biological communities and their environment over time. Finally, we evaluate our approach using the Sparus II, a torpedo-shaped AUV, conducting inspection missions in a challenging, real-world and natural scenario.

  10. Distributed Synchronization Control of Multiagent Systems With Unknown Nonlinearities.

    Su, Shize; Lin, Zongli; Garcia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the distributed adaptive control problem for synchronization of multiagent systems where the dynamics of the agents are nonlinear, nonidentical, unknown, and subject to external disturbances. Two communication topologies, represented, respectively, by a fixed strongly-connected directed graph and by a switching connected undirected graph, are considered. Under both of these communication topologies, we use distributed neural networks to approximate the uncertain dynamics. Decentralized adaptive control protocols are then constructed to solve the cooperative tracker problem, the problem of synchronization of all follower agents to a leader agent. In particular, we show that, under the proposed decentralized control protocols, the synchronization errors are ultimately bounded, and their ultimate bounds can be reduced arbitrarily by choosing the control parameter appropriately. Simulation study verifies the effectiveness of our proposed protocols.

  11. Keratosis of unknown significance and leukoplakia: a preliminary study.

    Woo, Sook-Bin; Grammer, Rebecca L; Lerman, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    The objectives were to (1) determine the frequency of specific diagnoses in a series of white lesions, and (2) describe the nature of keratotic lesions that are neither reactive nor dysplastic. White lesions were analyzed and diagnosed as reactive keratoses, dysplastic/malignant, or keratoses of unknown significance (KUS). Of the 1251 specimens that were evaluated, 703 met criteria for inclusion, and approximately 75% were reactive, 10% dysplastic/malignant, and 14% KUS. Excluding reactive keratoses, 43% were dysplastic/malignant and 57% were KUS. Reactive keratoses were the most common white lesions followed by lichen planus. Dysplastic/malignant lesions constituted almost 50% of all true leukoplakias. KUS constituted the remaining cases and do not show typical reactive histopathology as well as clear dysplasia. They may represent evolving or devolving reactive keratoses but may also represent the very earliest dysplasia phenotype. Clinical findings may be helpful in differentiating the two. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Villitis of unknown aetiology: correlation of recurrence with clinical outcome.

    Feeley, L

    2010-01-01

    Villitis of unknown aetiology (VUA) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Consequently, an ability to predict recurrence could be clinically relevant. We examined placentas where villitis was diagnosed in a previous pregnancy to establish the risk of recurrence and outcome. A total of 304 cases of VUA were diagnosed in our laboratory over a 4-year period. Subsequently, 19 of this cohort had a second placenta examined histologically. Recurrence and clinical outcome were recorded. Villitis recurred in 7 of 19 cases (37%). There was a high level of adverse pregnancy outcome in this cohort overall, characterised by small for gestational age infants and stillbirth, particularly in cases with high-grade villitis. We identified recurrent villitis more frequently than previously reported. Our findings confirm an association between high-grade villitis and poor outcome. Adequately powered prospective studies are required to determine if enhanced surveillance of subsequent pregnancies is indicated following a diagnosis of villitis.

  13. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors.

  14. A Brief Introduction on Mystery, the Unknown, Surprise

    Sean Scanlan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this age of globalization, this age of so many ways to know—and so many ways to know things so quickly—it is both satisfying and deeply unnerving to come upon things and events that are really hard to understand, things and events so shocking or strange or mysterious, that they seem Unknown. Perhaps even unknowable. The first note of NANO Issue 2 focuses on an unsolved murder and reveals a mystery that is confounding, creepy, and yet oddly compelling. In “Karr’s Kill Cult: Virtual Cults and Pseudo-Killing in the Digital Age,” Jeremy Biles and Brian Collins explore the edges of where cyber-crime threatens to turn real—and vice versa. In the second note, Jennifer Ballengee compares Oedipus at Colonus with Don DeLillo’s Falling Man.

  15. Searching for unknown transfusion-transmitted hepatitis viruses

    Edgren, G.; Hjalgrim, H.; Rostgaard, K.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Both hepatitis B and C viruses were transmitted through blood transfusion before implementation of donor screening. The existence of additional, yet unknown transfusion transmittable agents causing liver disease could have important public health implications. Methods: Analyses were...... 1992 to account for the effect of screening for hepatitis C virus. Results: A total of 1 482 922 transfused patients were included in the analyses. Analyses showed evidence of transfusion transmission of liver diseases before, but not after the implementation of hepatitis C virus screening in 1992...... for transfusion transmission of agents causing liver disease after the implementation of screening for hepatitis B and C, and suggest that if such transmission does occur, it is rare....

  16. Analysing Trust Transitivity and The Effects of Unknown Dependence

    Touhid Bhuiyan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trust can be used to improve online automated recommendation within a given domain. Trust transitivity is used to make it successful. But trust transitivity has different interpretations. Trust and trust transitivity; both are the human mental phenomenon and for this reason, there is no such thing as objective transitivity. Trust transitivity and trust fusion both are important elements in computational trust. This paper analyses the parameter dependence problem in trust transitivity and proposes some definitions considering the effects of base rate. In addition, it also proposes belief functions based on subjective logic to analyse trust transitivity of three specified cases with sensitive and insensitive based rate. Then it presents a quantitative analysis of the effects of unknown dependence problem in an interconnected network environment; such Internet.

  17. Heuristic method for searching global maximum of multimodal unknown function

    Kamei, K; Araki, Y; Inoue, K

    1983-06-01

    The method is composed of three kinds of searches. They are called g (grasping)-mode search, f (finding)-mode search and c (confirming)-mode search. In the g-mode search and the c-mode search, a heuristic method is used which was extracted from search behaviors of human subjects. In f-mode search, the simplex method is used which is well known as a search method for unimodal unknown function. Each mode search and its transitions are shown in the form of flowchart. The numerical results for one-dimensional through six-dimensional multimodal functions prove the proposed search method to be an effective one. 11 references.

  18. Evaluation of a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model

    Kim Harry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major cause of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is interruption of a blood supply to the proximal femur. In order to evaluate blood circulation and pathogenetic alterations, a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model was examined to address whether ligature of the femoral neck (vasculature deprivation induces a reduction of blood circulation in the femoral head, and whether transphyseal vessels exist for communications between the epiphysis and the metaphysis. We also tested the hypothesis that the vessels surrounding the femoral neck and the ligamentum teres represent the primary source of blood flow to the femoral head. Methods Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in Yorkshire pigs by transecting the ligamentum teres and placing two ligatures around the femoral neck. After heparinized saline infusion and microfil perfusion via the abdominal aorta, blood circulation in the femoral head was evaluated by optical and CT imaging. Results An angiogram of the microfil casted sample allowed identification of the major blood vessels to the proximal femur including the iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral, deep femoral and circumflex arteries. Optical imaging in the femoral neck showed that a microfil stained vessel network was visible in control sections but less noticeable in necrotic sections. CT images showed a lack of microfil staining in the epiphysis. Furthermore, no transphyseal vessels were observed to link the epiphysis to the metaphysis. Conclusion Optical and CT imaging analyses revealed that in this present pig model the ligatures around the femoral neck were the primary cause of induction of avascular osteonecrosis. Since the vessels surrounding the femoral neck are comprised of the branches of the medial and the lateral femoral circumflex vessels, together with the extracapsular arterial ring and the lateral epiphyseal arteries, augmentation of blood circulation in those arteries will improve

  19. Primary head and neck cancers in north eastern Nigeria | Otoh ...

    Carcinomas (68.4%) were the most common cancers reported, mostly affecting the oral cavity (20.3%). Carcinomas were associated with farmers, kola nut chewers and tobacco users in this region, while kaposi sarcoma was the only cancer associated with HIV-positive patients. The overall mean duration of symptoms for ...

  20. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  1. Calculation of Unknown Preoperative K Readings in Postrefractive Surgery Patients

    Nicola Rosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the unknown preoperative K readings (Kpre to be used in history-based methods, for intraocular lens (IOL power calculation in patients who have undergone myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK. Methods. A regression formula generated from the left eyes of 174 patients who had undergone PRK for myopia or for myopic astigmatism was compared with other methods in 168 right eyes. The Pearson index and paired t-test were utilized for statistical analysis. Results. The differences between Kpre and those obtained with the other methods were as follows: 0.61 ± 0.94 D (range: −3.94 to 2.05 D, p<0.01 subtracting the effective treatment, 0.01 ± 0.86 D (range: −2.61 to 2.34 D, p=0.82 with Rosa’s formula, −0.02 ± 1.31 D (range: −3.43 to 3.68 D, p=0.82 with the current study formula, and −0.43 ± 1.40 D (range: −3.98 to 3.12 D, p<0.01 utilizing a mean K (Km of 43.5 D. Conclusions. These formulas may permit the utilization of history-based methods, that is, the double-K method in calculating the IOL power following PRK when Kpre are unknown.

  2. A 'range test' for determining scatterers with unknown physical properties

    Potthast, Roland; Sylvester, John; Kusiak, Steven

    2003-06-01

    We describe a new scheme for determining the convex scattering support of an unknown scatterer when the physical properties of the scatterers are not known. The convex scattering support is a subset of the scatterer and provides information about its location and estimates for its shape. For convex polygonal scatterers the scattering support coincides with the scatterer and we obtain full shape reconstructions. The method will be formulated for the reconstruction of the scatterers from the far field pattern for one or a few incident waves. The method is non-iterative in nature and belongs to the type of recently derived generalized sampling schemes such as the 'no response test' of Luke-Potthast. The range test operates by testing whether it is possible to analytically continue a far field to the exterior of any test domain Omegatest. By intersecting the convex hulls of various test domains we can produce a minimal convex set, the convex scattering support of which must be contained in the convex hull of the support of any scatterer which produces that far field. The convex scattering support is calculated by testing the range of special integral operators for a sampling set of test domains. The numerical results can be used as an approximation for the support of the unknown scatterer. We prove convergence and regularity of the scheme and show numerical examples for sound-soft, sound-hard and medium scatterers. We can apply the range test to non-convex scatterers as well. We can conclude that an Omegatest which passes the range test has a non-empty intersection with the infinity-support (the complement of the unbounded component of the complement of the support) of the true scatterer, but cannot find a minimal set which must be contained therein.

  3. Identification of unknown sample using NAA, EDXRF, XRD techniques

    Dalvi, Aditi A.; Swain, K.K.; Chavan, Trupti; Remya Devi, P.S.; Wagh, D.N.; Verma, R.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) receives samples from law enforcement agencies such as Directorate of Revenue Intelligence, Customs for analysis. Five unknown grey powdered samples were received for identification and were suspected to be Iridium (Ir). Identification of unknown sample is always a challenging task and suitable analytical techniques have to be judiciously utilized for arriving at the conclusion. Qualitative analysis was carried out using Jordan Valley, EX-3600 M Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer at ACD, BARC. A SLP series LEO Si (Li) detector (active area: 30 mm 2 ; thickness: 3.5 mm; resolution: 140 eV at 5.9 keV of Mn K X-ray) was used during the measurement and only characteristic X-rays of Ir (Lα: 9.17 keV and Lβ: 10.70 keV) was seen in the X-ray spectrum. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement results indicated that the Ir was in the form of metal. To confirm the XRD data, neutron activation analysis (NAA) was carried out by irradiating samples and elemental standards (as comparator) in graphite reflector position of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor Critical Facility (AHWR CF) reactor, BARC, Mumbai. After suitable decay period, gamma activity measurements were carried out using 45% HPGe detector coupled to 8 k multi channel analyzer. Characteristic gamma line at 328.4 keV of the activation product 194 Ir was used for quantification of iridium and relative method of NAA was used for concentration calculations. NAA results confirmed that all the samples were Iridium metal. (author)

  4. Meniscofibular Ligament: Morphology and Functional Significance of a Relatively Unknown Anatomical Structure

    K. Natsis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A relatively unknown ligamentous structure of the posterolateral corner of the knee joint, the so-called meniscofibular ligament (MFL, was investigated as regards its macroscopic morphology, its histological features, and its reaction to knee movements. Material and Methods. MFL was exposed on 21 fresh-frozen unpaired knee joints. Its microscopic morphology was examined utilizing for comparison the fibular collateral and the popliteofibular ligament. Results. MFL was encountered in 100% of the specimens as a thin striplike fibrous band extending between the lower border of the lateral meniscus and the head of the fibula. MFL was tense during knee extension and external rotation of the tibia, whereas its histological features were similar to those of fibular collateral and popliteofibular ligament. Discussion. Its precise histological nature is studied as well as its tension alterations during knee movements. The potential functional significance of the MFL with respect to its role in avoidance of lateral meniscus and lateral coronary ligament tears is discussed. Conclusions. MFL presumably provides an additional protection to the lateral meniscus during the last stages of knee extension, as well as to the lateral coronary ligament reducing the possibility of a potential rupture.

  5. Simultaneous identification of unknown groundwater pollution sources and estimation of aquifer parameters

    Datta, Bithin; Chakrabarty, Dibakar; Dhar, Anirban

    2009-09-01

    Pollution source identification is a common problem encountered frequently. In absence of prior information about flow and transport parameters, the performance of source identification models depends on the accuracy in estimation of these parameters. A methodology is developed for simultaneous pollution source identification and parameter estimation in groundwater systems. The groundwater flow and transport simulator is linked to the nonlinear optimization model as an external module. The simulator defines the flow and transport processes, and serves as a binding equality constraint. The Jacobian matrix which determines the search direction in the nonlinear optimization model links the groundwater flow-transport simulator and the optimization method. Performance of the proposed methodology using spatiotemporal hydraulic head values and pollutant concentration measurements is evaluated by solving illustrative problems. Two different decision model formulations are developed. The computational efficiency of these models is compared using two nonlinear optimization algorithms. The proposed methodology addresses some of the computational limitations of using the embedded optimization technique which embeds the discretized flow and transport equations as equality constraints for optimization. Solution results obtained are also found to be better than those obtained using the embedded optimization technique. The performance evaluations reported here demonstrate the potential applicability of the developed methodology for a fairly large aquifer study area with multiple unknown pollution sources.

  6. The head-regeneration transcriptome of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    2011-01-01

    Background Planarian flatworms can regenerate their head, including a functional brain, within less than a week. Despite the enormous potential of these animals for medical research and regenerative medicine, the mechanisms of regeneration and the molecules involved remain largely unknown. Results To identify genes that are differentially expressed during early stages of planarian head regeneration, we generated a de novo transcriptome assembly from more than 300 million paired-end reads from planarian fragments regenerating the head at 16 different time points. The assembly yielded 26,018 putative transcripts, including very long transcripts spanning multiple genomic supercontigs, and thousands of isoforms. Using short-read data from two platforms, we analyzed dynamic gene regulation during the first three days of head regeneration. We identified at least five different temporal synexpression classes, including genes specifically induced within a few hours after injury. Furthermore, we characterized the role of a conserved Runx transcription factor, smed-runt-like1. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown and immunofluorescence analysis of the regenerating visual system indicated that smed-runt-like1 encodes a transcriptional regulator of eye morphology and photoreceptor patterning. Conclusions Transcriptome sequencing of short reads allowed for the simultaneous de novo assembly and differential expression analysis of transcripts, demonstrating highly dynamic regulation during head regeneration in planarians. PMID:21846378

  7. Splenectomy as a treatment for adults with relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis of unknown cause.

    Jing-Shi, Wang; Yi-Ni, Wang; Lin, Wu; Zhao, Wang

    2015-05-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical value of splenectomy as a treatment for relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) of unknown cause in adults. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data from medical records of 19 adults with relapsed HLH of unknown cause treated with splenectomy in our institution from June 2007 to March 2014. To rule out possible underlying diseases, including infection, autoimmune disease, neoplasms, and primary HLH, the patients had undergone examinations including F18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, HLH-associated gene defects, and lymph node biopsies. Twelve patients (63.2%) achieved partial responses (PR), whereas seven patients (36.8%) had no response (NR) prior to splenectomy. Infection and hemorrhage were the main complications of splenectomy. Eighteen cases were evaluable after follow-up. Seven cases with histopathologic diagnoses of lymphoma had received chemotherapy, four of whom had achieved complete responses (CR), one PR, and two NR. Maintenance treatment was ceased 2 or 3 months after splenectomy in the other 11 cases, five of whom had CR, four PR, and two NR. Eleven of 18 cases (61.1%) survived with a median follow-up of 25 months (range 3-79 months) for survivors. Twelve- and 36-month progression-free survival rates were 48 and 24%, respectively; 12- and 36-month overall survival rates were 57 and 25%, respectively. Median survival time was 22 months. Our results indicate splenectomy may be an effective means of diagnosis and treatment of relapsed HLH of unknown cause. Further study is required to establish the mechanism and value of splenectomy in this disease.

  8. Representation of heading direction in far and near head space

    Poljac, E.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2003-01-01

    Manipulation of objects around the head requires an accurate and stable internal representation of their locations in space, also during movements such as that of the eye or head. For far space, the representation of visual stimuli for goal-directed arm movements relies on retinal updating, if eye

  9. Harnessing the microbiome to reduce Fusarium head blight

    Fusarium graminearum (Fg), the primary fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB), reduces crop yield and contaminates grain with trichothecene mycotoxins that are deleterious to plant, human and animal health. In this presentation, we will discuss two different research projects tha...

  10. Head trauma and CT

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  12. Effects of Sex and Event Type on Head Impact in Collegiate Soccer

    Reynolds, Bryson B.; Patrie, James; Henry, Erich J.; Goodkin, Howard P.; Broshek, Donna K.; Wintermark, Max; Druzgal, T. Jason

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of head impact in sports are of growing interest for clinicians, scientists, and athletes. Soccer is the most popular sport worldwide, but the burden of head impact in collegiate soccer is still unknown. Purpose: To quantify head impact associated with practicing and playing collegiate soccer using wearable accelerometers. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Mastoid patch accelerometers were used to quantify head impact in soccer, examining differences in head impact as a function of sex and event type (practice vs game). Seven female and 14 male collegiate soccer players wore mastoid patch accelerometers that measured head impacts during team events. Data were summarized for each athletic exposure, and statistical analyses evaluated the mean number of impacts, mean peak linear acceleration, mean peak rotational acceleration, and cumulative linear and rotational acceleration, each grouped by sex and event type. Results: There were no differences in the frequency or severity of head impacts between men’s and women’s soccer practices. For men’s soccer, games resulted in 285% more head impacts than practices, but there were no event-type differences in mean impact severity. Men’s soccer games resulted in more head impacts than practices across nearly all measured impact severities, which also resulted in men’s soccer games producing a greater cumulative impact burden. Conclusion: Similar to other sports, men’s soccer games have a greater impact burden when compared with practices, and this effect is driven by the quantity rather than severity of head impacts. In contrast, there were no differences in the quantity or severity of head impacts in men’s and women’s soccer practices. These data could prompt discussions of practical concern to collegiate soccer, such as understanding sex differences in head impact and whether games disproportionately contribute to an athlete’s head impact burden. PMID:28491885

  13. Characterization of unknown genetic modifications using high throughput sequencing and computational subtraction

    Butenko Melinka A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When generating a genetically modified organism (GMO, the primary goal is to give a target organism one or several novel traits by using biotechnology techniques. A GMO will differ from its parental strain in that its pool of transcripts will be altered. Currently, there are no methods that are reliably able to determine if an organism has been genetically altered if the nature of the modification is unknown. Results We show that the concept of computational subtraction can be used to identify transgenic cDNA sequences from genetically modified plants. Our datasets include 454-type sequences from a transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana and published EST datasets from commercially relevant species (rice and papaya. Conclusion We believe that computational subtraction represents a powerful new strategy for determining if an organism has been genetically modified as well as to define the nature of the modification. Fewer assumptions have to be made compared to methods currently in use and this is an advantage particularly when working with unknown GMOs.

  14. Lower head failure analysis

    Rempe, J.L.; Thinnes, G.L.; Allison, C.M.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a lower vessel head research program to investigate plausible modes of reactor vessel failure in order to determine (a) which modes have the greatest likelihood of occurrence during a severe accident and (b) the range of core debris and accident conditions that lead to these failures. This paper presents the methodology and preliminary results of an investigation of reactor designs and thermodynamic conditions using analytic closed-form approximations to assess the important governing parameters in non-dimensional form. Preliminary results illustrate the importance of vessel and tube geometrical parameters, material properties, and external boundary conditions on predicting vessel failure. Thermal analyses indicate that steady-state temperature distributions will occur in the vessel within several hours, although the exact time is dependent upon vessel thickness. In-vessel tube failure is governed by the tube-to-debris mass ratio within the lower head, where most penetrations are predicted to fail if surrounded by molten debris. Melt penetration distance is dependent upon the effective flow diameter of the tube. Molten debris is predicted to penetrate through tubes with a larger effective flow diameter, such as a boiling water reactor (BWR) drain nozzle. Ex-vessel tube failure for depressurized reactor vessels is predicted to be more likely for a BWR drain nozzle penetration because of its larger effective diameter. At high pressures (between ∼0.1 MPa and ∼12 MPa) ex-vessel tube rupture becomes a dominant failure mechanism, although tube ejection dominates control rod guide tube failure at lower temperatures. However, tube ejection and tube rupture predictions are sensitive to the vessel and tube radial gap size and material coefficients of thermal expansion

  15. Systemic amyloidosis due to unknown multiple myeloma in small bowel pseudo-obstruction: case report

    Giuseppe Caparrotti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a pathologic diagnosis characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble protein fibrils in various organs and tissues. There are two main forms of amyloidosis, primary amyloidosis, and secondary amyloidosis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in both amyloidosis forms. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman taken to the operating room for small bowel obstruction, found to have pseudo-obstruction and enteritis. Exploratory laparotomy revealed gastric mass and histological examen showed extensive amyloid deposition consistent with amyloidosis. Hematological evaluation revealed unknown multiple myeloma. This case report and literature data suggest to perform a hematological examination in patients with amyloidosis diagnosis to exclude a multiple myeloma or other plasma cell disorders

  16. A case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin

    Indira Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a potentially fatal hyper inflammatory condition, which occurs as either primary (genetic or secondary (acquired due to impaired or absent function of natural killer cells and cytotoxic cells. Common secondary causes include viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases, and hematological malignancies. Extensive phagocytosis of blood cells by histiocytes in bone marrow, spleen, liver and lymphnodes result in peripheral blood cytopenias, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy. We evaluated a case of pyrexia of unknown origin and found out that he fulfilled the criteria for diagnosing HLH. He was started on immunochemotherapy with etoposide, cyclosporine and steroids, but he succumbed to illness within 2 weeks of treatment. High index of suspicion is needed to diagnose HLH and prompt treatment on diagnosis can be lifesaving.

  17. The unknown-unknowns: Revealing the hidden insights in massive biomedical data using combined artificial intelligence and knowledge networks

    Chris Yoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic data is estimated to be doubling every seven months with over 2 trillion bases from whole genome sequence studies deposited in Genbank in just the last 15 years alone. Recent advances in compute and storage have enabled the use of artificial intelligence techniques in areas such as feature recognition in digital pathology and chemical synthesis for drug development. To apply A.I. productively to multidimensional data such as cellular processes and their dysregulation, the data must be transformed into a structured format, using prior knowledge to create contextual relationships and hierarchies upon which computational analysis can be performed. Here we present the organization of complex data into hypergraphs that facilitate the application of A.I. We provide an example use case of a hypergraph containing hundreds of biological data values and the results of several classes of A.I. algorithms applied in a popular compute cloud. While multiple, biologically insightful correlations between disease states, behavior, and molecular features were identified, the insights of scientific import were revealed only when exploration of the data included visualization of subgraphs of represented knowledge. The results suggest that while machine learning can identify known correlations and suggest testable ones, the greater probability of discovering unexpected relationships between seemingly independent variables (unknown-unknowns requires a context-aware system – hypergraphs that impart biological meaning in nodes and edges. We discuss the implications of a combined hypergraph-A.I. analysis approach to multidimensional data and the pre-processing requirements for such a system.

  18. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    Ling Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2 with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the

  19. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Health Professional Version

    Find information about prognosis, staging, and treatment for adult head and neck cancer sites: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  20. The head-mounted microscope.

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.