WorldWideScience

Sample records for unknown photometric quality

  1. From Intensity Profile to Surface Normal: Photometric Stereo for Unknown Light Sources and Isotropic Reflectances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feng; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    We propose an uncalibrated photometric stereo method that works with general and unknown isotropic reflectances. Our method uses a pixel intensity profile, which is a sequence of radiance intensities recorded at a pixel under unknown varying directional illumination. We show that for general isotropic materials and uniformly distributed light directions, the geodesic distance between intensity profiles is linearly related to the angular difference of their corresponding surface normals, and that the intensity distribution of the intensity profile reveals reflectance properties. Based on these observations, we develop two methods for surface normal estimation; one for a general setting that uses only the recorded intensity profiles, the other for the case where a BRDF database is available while the exact BRDF of the target scene is still unknown. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations are conducted using both synthetic and real-world scenes, which show the state-of-the-art accuracy of smaller than 10 degree without using reference data and 5 degree with reference data for all 100 materials in MERL database.

  2. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  3. Photometric Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiao-Duan; Li, Jian-Yang; Clark, Beth Ellen; Golish, Dathon

    2018-01-01

    The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, launched in September, 2016, will study the asteroid Bennu and return a sample from its surface to Earth in 2023. Bennu is a near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid which will provide insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system. OSIRIS-REx will first approach Bennu in August 2018 and will study the asteroid for approximately two years before sampling. OSIRIS-REx will develop its photometric model (including Lommel-Seelinger, ROLO, McEwen, Minnaert and Akimov) of Bennu with OCAM and OVIRS during the Detailed Survey mission phase. The model developed during this phase will be used to photometrically correct the OCAM and OVIRS data.Here we present the analysis of the error for the photometric corrections. Based on our testing data sets, we find:1. The model uncertainties is only correct when we use the covariance matrix to calculate, because the parameters are highly correlated.2. No evidence of domination of any parameter in each model.3. And both model error and the data error contribute to the final correction error comparably.4. We tested the uncertainty module on fake and real data sets, and find that model performance depends on the data coverage and data quality. These tests gave us a better understanding of how different model behave in different case.5. L-S model is more reliable than others. Maybe because the simulated data are based on L-S model. However, the test on real data (SPDIF) does show slight advantage of L-S, too. ROLO is not reliable to use when calculating bond albedo. The uncertainty of McEwen model is big in most cases. Akimov performs unphysical on SOPIE 1 data.6. Better use L-S as our default choice, this conclusion is based mainly on our test on SOPIE data and IPDIF.

  4. Photometric Assessment of Night Sky Quality over Chaco Culture National Historical Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Wei; Duriscoe, Dan M.; White, Jeremy M.; Meadows, Bob; Anderson, Sharolyn J.

    2018-06-01

    The US National Park Service (NPS) characterizes night sky conditions over Chaco Culture National Historical Park using measurements in the park and satellite data. The park is located near the geographic center of the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and the adjacent Four Corners state. In the park, we capture a series of night sky images in V-band using our mobile camera system on nine nights from 2001 to 2016 at four sites. We perform absolute photometric calibration and determine the image placement to obtain multiple 45-million-pixel mosaic images of the entire night sky. We also model the regional night sky conditions in and around the park based on 2016 VIIRS satellite data. The average zenith brightness is 21.5 mag/arcsec2, and the whole sky is only ~16% brighter than the natural conditions. The faintest stars visible to naked eyes have magnitude of approximately 7.0, reaching the sensitivity limit of human eyes. The main impacts to Chaco’s night sky quality are the light domes from Albuquerque, Rio Rancho, Farmington, Bloomfield, Gallup, Santa Fe, Grants, and Crown Point. A few of these light domes exceed the natural brightness of the Milky Way. Additionally, glare sources from oil and gas development sites are visible along the north and east horizons. Overall, the night sky quality at Chaco Culture National Historical Park is very good. The park preserves to a large extent the natural illumination cycles, providing a refuge for crepuscular and nocturnal species. During clear and dark nights, visitors have an opportunity to see the Milky Way from nearly horizon to horizon, complete constellations, and faint astronomical objects and natural sources of light such as the Andromeda Galaxy, zodiacal light, and airglow.

  5. CFHTLenS: improving the quality of photometric redshifts with precision photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Erben, T.; Kuijken, K.; van Waerbeke, L.; Heymans, C.; Coupon, J.; Benjamin, J.; Bonnett, C.; Fu, L.; Hoekstra, H.; Kitching, T. D.; Mellier, Y.; Miller, L.; Velander, M.; Hudson, M. J.; Rowe, B. T. P.; Schrabback, T.; Semboloni, E.; Benítez, N.

    2012-04-01

    Here we present the results of various approaches to measure accurate colours and photometric redshifts (photo-z) from wide-field imaging data. We use data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey which have been re-processed by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) team in order to carry out a number of weak gravitational lensing studies. An emphasis is put on the correction of systematic effects in the photo-z arising from the different point spread functions (PSFs) in the five optical bands. Different ways of correcting these effects are discussed and the resulting photo-z accuracies are quantified by comparing the photo-z to large spectroscopic redshift (spec-z) data sets. Careful homogenization of the PSF between bands leads to increased overall accuracy of photo-z. The gain is particularly pronounced at fainter magnitudes where galaxies are smaller and flux measurements are affected more by PSF effects. We discuss ways of defining more secure subsamples of galaxies as well as a shape- and colour-based star-galaxy separation method, and we present redshift distributions for different magnitude limits. We also study possible re-calibrations of the photometric zero-points (ZPs) with the help of galaxies with known spec-z. We find that if PSF effects are properly taken into account, a re-calibration of the ZPs becomes much less important suggesting that previous such re-calibrations described in the literature could in fact be mostly corrections for PSF effects rather than corrections for real inaccuracies in the ZPs. The implications of this finding for future surveys like the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), Dark Energy Survey (DES), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope or Euclid are mixed. On the one hand, ZP re-calibrations with spec-z values might not be as accurate as previously thought. On the other hand, careful PSF homogenization might provide a way out and yield accurate, homogeneous photometry without the need for full

  6. Manipulation of Unknown Objects to Improve the Grasp Quality Using Tactile Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Andrés; Suárez, Raúl

    2018-05-03

    This work presents a novel and simple approach in the area of manipulation of unknown objects considering both geometric and mechanical constraints of the robotic hand. Starting with an initial blind grasp, our method improves the grasp quality through manipulation considering the three common goals of the manipulation process: improving the hand configuration, the grasp quality and the object positioning, and, at the same time, prevents the object from falling. Tactile feedback is used to obtain local information of the contacts between the fingertips and the object, and no additional exteroceptive feedback sources are considered in the approach. The main novelty of this work lies in the fact that the grasp optimization is performed on-line as a reactive procedure using the tactile and kinematic information obtained during the manipulation. Experimental results are shown to illustrate the efficiency of the approach.

  7. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the ∼30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find ∼40,000 galaxies with R AB 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1σ scatter in Δz/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that ∼20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  8. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Satellite Photometric Error Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    Satellite Photometric Error Determination Tamara E. Payne, Philip J. Castro, Stephen A. Gregory Applied Optimization 714 East Monument Ave, Suite...advocate the adoption of new techniques based on in-frame photometric calibrations enabled by newly available all-sky star catalogs that contain highly...filter systems will likely be supplanted by the Sloan based filter systems. The Johnson photometric system is a set of filters in the optical

  10. Drinking water quality and chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu): synergic effects of fluoride, cadmium and hardness of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasana, Hewa M S; Aluthpatabendi, Dharshani; Kularatne, W M T D; Wijekoon, Pushpa; Weerasooriya, Rohan; Bandara, Jayasundera

    2016-02-01

    High prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in some regions of the world is suspected mainly due to a toxin-mediated renal failure. We examined the incidence of CKDu and potable chemical water quality in a CKDu-affected region. This region has been identified as a high-risk zone for CKDu (location: latitude: 8.3500°-9.0000°, longitude: 80.3833°-81.3000°, North Central Province, NCP, Sri Lanka) by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, within this macro-region, small pockets of CKDu non-prevalence zones do exist; notably, the residents in those pockets consume spring water. Therefore, the drinking water quality of four areas, namely high-CKDu-prevalence areas (zone I), low-CKDu-prevalence area (zone II), the CKDu-free isolated pockets (zone III) and control areas (controls) were examined for F, Al, Cd, and As, and hardness and the statistical analysis were carried out to probe possible correlations among these parameters. The fluoride and hardness concentrations of water in zone III and control areas are much lower compared to zones I and II, and the water hardness is ~61 mg/L CaCO3. In zones I and II, the harness of drinking water is ~121-180 mg/L CaCO3; however, Al, Cd and As concentrations are almost comparable and below WHO recommendations. In most of the locations in zones I and II, the F concentration in drinking water is higher than the WHO recommendations. The peculiar distribution patterns of CKDu point to a synergic effect of trace elements in water for etiology of the disease.

  11. THE ALHAMBRA PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, T. Aparicio; Alfaro, E. J.; Cabrera-Cano, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the optical range of the ALHAMBRA photometric system, a 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band CCD system with wavelength coverage from 3500 A to 9700 A. The photometric description of the system is done by presenting the full response curve as a product of the filters, CCD, and atmospheric transmission curves, and using some first- and second-order moments of this response function. We also introduce the set of standard stars that defines the system, formed by 31 classic spectrophotometric standard stars which have been used in the calibration of other known photometric systems, and 288 stars, flux calibrated homogeneously, from the Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). Based on the NGSL, we determine the transformation equations between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry and the ALHAMBRA photometric system, in order to establish some relations between both systems. Finally, we develop and discuss a strategy to calculate the photometric zero points of the different pointings in the ALHAMBRA project.

  12. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  13. Astrometric vs. photometric microlensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominik, M; Brainerd, TG; Kochanek, CS

    2001-01-01

    I discuss the differences between the properties of astrometric and photometric microlensing and between the arising prospects for survey and follow-up experiments based on these two different signatures. In particular, the prospects for binary stars and extra-solar planets are considered.

  14. Photometric microdetermination of malathion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, B.J.

    1962-01-01

    Carboxylic esters and lactones react with alkaline hydroxylamine to yield hydroxamates; these in acidic solution form colored iron(III) complexes. A photometric determination of such esters and lactones is thus permitted and has been extensively applied ( I-6). Hestrin ( 3) utilized this method for the microdetermination of acetylcholine and his procedure is much used for the in vitro study of cholinesterase activity and inhibition (4-6).

  15. Multiview photometric stereo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Esteban, Carlos; Vogiatzis, George; Cipolla, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of obtaining complete, detailed reconstructions of textureless shiny objects. We present an algorithm which uses silhouettes of the object, as well as images obtained under changing illumination conditions. In contrast with previous photometric stereo techniques, ours is not limited to a single viewpoint but produces accurate reconstructions in full 3D. A number of images of the object are obtained from multiple viewpoints, under varying lighting conditions. Starting from the silhouettes, the algorithm recovers camera motion and constructs the object's visual hull. This is then used to recover the illumination and initialise a multi-view photometric stereo scheme to obtain a closed surface reconstruction. There are two main contributions in this paper: Firstly we describe a robust technique to estimate light directions and intensities and secondly, we introduce a novel formulation of photometric stereo which combines multiple viewpoints and hence allows closed surface reconstructions. The algorithm has been implemented as a practical model acquisition system. Here, a quantitative evaluation of the algorithm on synthetic data is presented together with complete reconstructions of challenging real objects. Finally, we show experimentally how even in the case of highly textured objects, this technique can greatly improve on correspondence-based multi-view stereo results.

  16. Quality of Life of Patients with Spinal Metastasis from Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: A Longitudinal Study of Surgical Management Combined with Postoperative Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; He, Shaohui; Liu, Tielong; Yang, Xinghai; Zhao, Jian; Yu, Hongyu; Feng, Jiaojiao; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-10-04

    Patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin have limited life expectancy and poor quality of life. Surgery and radiation therapy remain the main treatment options, but, to our knowledge, there are limited data concerning quality-of-life improvement after surgery and radiation therapy and even fewer data on whether surgical intervention would affect quality of life. Patients were enrolled between January 2009 and January 2014 at the Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. The quality of life of 2 patient groups (one group that underwent surgery followed by postoperative radiation therapy and one group that underwent radiation therapy only) was assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire during a 6-month period. A subgroup analysis of quality of life was performed to compare different surgical strategies in the surgical group. A total of 287 patients, including 191 patients in the group that underwent surgery and 96 patients in the group that underwent radiation therapy only, were enrolled in the prospective study; 177 patients completed all 5 checkpoints and 110 patients had died by the final checkpoint. The surgery group had significantly higher adjusted quality-of-life scores than the radiation therapy group in each domain of the FACT-G questionnaire (all p quality of life in patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin in the 6-month assessment. In terms of surgical strategies, circumferential decompression seems better than laminectomy alone in quality-of-life improvement. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  18. Photometric stereo endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S; Vakoc, Benjamin J; Durr, Nicholas J

    2013-07-01

    While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging.

  19. Astronomical Research Institute Photometric Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Tyler R.; Sampson, Ryan; Holmes, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Astronomical Research Institute (ARI) conducts astrometric and photometric studies of asteroids with a concentration on near-Earth objects (NEOs). A 0.76-m autoscope was used for photometric studies of seven asteroids of which two were main-belt targets and five were NEOs, including one potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA). These objects are: 3122 Florence, 3960 Chaliubieju, 5143 Heracles, (6455) 1992 HE, (36284) 2000 DM8, (62128) 2000 SO1, and 2010 LF86.

  20. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in bottom sediment by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Virendra Kumar; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 pesticide degradates from bottom-sediment samples is described. The compound O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-proplyphosphorothioate is reported as an estimated concentration because of variable performance. In this method, the sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess waster mixed with anhydrous sodium sulfate and Soxhlet extracted overnight with dichloromethane (93 percent) and methanol (7 percent). The extract is concentrated and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoroethylene membrane syringe filter. An aliquot of the sample extract is quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene-divinylbenzene gel-permeation chromatographic columns connected in series. The compounds are eluted with dichloromethane and a fraction is collected for analysis, with some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, separated and discarded. The aliquot is concentrated and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. The extract is analyzed by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator method detection limits in sodium sulfate matrix samples ranged from 0.81 to 2 micrograms per kilogram. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds into three different solid matrices (sodium sulfate, bed sediment from Clear Creek, and bed sediment from Evergreen Lake) at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in Clear Creek samples ranged from 43 to 110 percent, and those in Evergreen Lake samples ranged from 62 to 118 percent for all pesticides. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in reagent sodium sulfate samples ranged from 41 to 101 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had an average recovery of 35 percent, and, thus, sample concentration is reported as estimated ('E' remark code).

  1. Photometric requirements for portable changeable message signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    This project reviewed the performance of pchangeable message signs (PCMSs) and developed photometric standards to establish performance requirements. In addition, researchers developed photometric test methods and recommended them for use in evaluati...

  2. ESO & NOT photometric monitoring of the Cloverleaf quasar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostensen, R; Remy, M; Lindblad, PO; Refsdal, S; Stabell, R; Surdej, J; Barthel, PD; Emanuelsen, PI; Festin, L; Gosset, E; Hainaut, O; Hakala, P; Hjelm, M; Hjorth, J; Hutsemekers, D; Jablonski, M; Kaas, AA; Kristen, H; Larsson, S; Magain, P; Pettersson, B; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A; Smette, A; Teuber, J; Thomsen, B; Van Drom, E

    1997-01-01

    The Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, has been photometrically monitored at ESO (La Silla, Chile) and with the NOT (La Palma, Spain) during the period 1987-1994. All good quality CCD frames have been successfully analysed using two independent methods (i.e. an automatic image decomposition technique and

  3. CHARACTERIZING AND PROPAGATING MODELING UNCERTAINTIES IN PHOTOMETRICALLY DERIVED REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamse, Augusta; Knox, Lloyd; Schmidt, Samuel; Thorman, Paul; Anthony Tyson, J.; Zhan Hu

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from multi-band imaging surveys. The accuracy of the photometric redshifts measured in these surveys depends not only on the quality of the flux data, but also on a number of modeling assumptions that enter into both the training set and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting methods of photometric redshift estimation. In this work we focus on the latter, considering two types of modeling uncertainties: uncertainties in the SED template set and uncertainties in the magnitude and type priors used in a Bayesian photometric redshift estimation method. We find that SED template selection effects dominate over magnitude prior errors. We introduce a method for parameterizing the resulting ignorance of the redshift distributions, and for propagating these uncertainties to uncertainties in cosmological parameters.

  4. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 ∼> z ∼> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z phot )/(1 + z spec ) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 μm flux ∼> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR ∼> 10 12 L ☉ ), and 3% of the total SFRD at z ∼ 2

  5. Known knowns, known unknowns and unknown unknowns in prokaryotic transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siguier, Patricia; Gourbeyre, Edith; Chandler, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Although the phenomenon of transposition has been known for over 60 years, its overarching importance in modifying and streamlining genomes took some time to recognize. In spite of a robust understanding of transposition of some TE, there remain a number of important TE groups with potential high genome impact and unknown transposition mechanisms and yet others, only recently identified by bioinformatics, yet to be formally confirmed as mobile. Here, we point to some areas of limited understanding concerning well established important TE groups with DDE Tpases, to address central gaps in our knowledge of characterised Tn with other types of Tpases and finally, to highlight new potentially mobile DNA species. It is not exhaustive. Examples have been chosen to provide encouragement in the continued exploration of the considerable prokaryotic mobilome especially in light of the current threat to public health posed by the spread of multiple Ab R . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photometric Modeling of Simulated Surace-Resolved Bennu Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golish, D.; DellaGiustina, D. N.; Clark, B.; Li, J. Y.; Zou, X. D.; Bennett, C. A.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) is a NASA mission to study and return a sample of asteroid (101955) Bennu. Imaging data from the mission will be used to develop empirical surface-resolved photometric models of Bennu at a series of wavelengths. These models will be used to photometrically correct panchromatic and color base maps of Bennu, compensating for variations due to shadows and photometric angle differences, thereby minimizing seams in mosaicked images. Well-corrected mosaics are critical to the generation of a global hazard map and a global 1064-nm reflectance map which predicts LIDAR response. These data products directly feed into the selection of a site from which to safely acquire a sample. We also require photometric correction for the creation of color ratio maps of Bennu. Color ratios maps provide insight into the composition and geological history of the surface and allow for comparison to other Solar System small bodies. In advance of OSIRIS-REx's arrival at Bennu, we use simulated images to judge the efficacy of both the photometric modeling software and the mission observation plan. Our simulation software is based on USGS's Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) and uses a synthetic shape model, a camera model, and an empirical photometric model to generate simulated images. This approach gives us the flexibility to create simulated images of Bennu based on analog surfaces from other small Solar System bodies and to test our modeling software under those conditions. Our photometric modeling software fits image data to several conventional empirical photometric models and produces the best fit model parameters. The process is largely automated, which is crucial to the efficient production of data products during proximity operations. The software also produces several metrics on the quality of the observations themselves, such as surface coverage and the

  7. Photometric variability in earthshine observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Sally V; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Turner, Edwin L

    2009-04-01

    The identification of an extrasolar planet as Earth-like will depend on the detection of atmospheric signatures or surface non-uniformities. In this paper we present spatially unresolved flux light curves of Earth for the purpose of studying a prototype extrasolar terrestrial planet. Our monitoring of the photometric variability of earthshine revealed changes of up to 23% per hour in the brightness of Earth's scattered light at around 600 nm, due to the removal of specular reflection from the view of the Moon. This variability is accompanied by reddening of the spectrum and results from a change in surface properties across the continental boundary between the Indian Ocean and Africa's east coast. Our results based on earthshine monitoring indicate that specular reflection should provide a useful tool in determining the presence of liquid water on extrasolar planets via photometric observations.

  8. Photometric Orbit of TX UMa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Dong Oh

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Two-color photometric light curves (Oh and Chan 1984 of the eclipsing binary TX UMa have been analyzed by the method of differential corrections of the model of Wilson and Devinney(1971. The system found to be simi-detached with cooler and less massive component filling its Roche lobe. The absolute dimensions have been derived from the results of the photometric solutions with spectroscopic elements of Hiltner(1945. It is assumed that the B8V primary component is on the zero age main sequence stage of the core hydrogen burning and the secondary os at the core contraction stage after the shell hydrogen burning stage according to the Iben's (1967 evolutional tracks for 3.0m_solar and 1.0m_solar.

  9. Photometric device using optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, Gilbert; Perez, J.-J.

    1981-02-01

    Remote measurements in radioactive environment are now possible with optical fibers. Measurement instruments developed by CEA are constitued of: - an optical probe (5 mm to 1 meter optical path length), - a photometric measurement device, - optical fiber links. 'TELEPHOT' is a photometric device for industrial installations. It is uses interferentiel filters for 2 to 5 simultaneous wave lengths. 'CRUDMETER' measures the muddiness of water. It can be equipped with a high sensitivity cell of 50 cm optical path length tested up to 250 bars. Coupling a double beam spectrophotometer to a remote optical probe, up to 1 meter optical path length, is carried out by means of an optical device using optical fibers links, eventually several hundred meter long. For these equipments special step index large core fibers, 1 to 1.5 mm in diameter, have been developed as well connectors. For industrial control and research these instruments offer new prospect thanks to optical fibers use [fr

  10. CALIBRATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of proposed galaxy surveys will increase the number of galaxies with photometric redshift identifications by two orders of magnitude, drastically expanding both the redshift range and detection threshold from the current state of the art. Obtaining spectra for a fair subsample of these new data could be cumbersome and expensive. However, adequate calibration of the true redshift distribution of galaxies is vital to tapping the potential of these surveys to illuminate the processes of galaxy evolution and to constrain the underlying cosmology and growth of structure. We examine here an alternative to direct spectroscopic follow-up: calibration of the redshift distribution of photometric galaxies via cross-correlation with an overlapping spectroscopic survey whose members trace the same density field. We review the theory, develop a pipeline to implement the method, apply it to mock data from N-body simulations, and examine the properties of this redshift distribution estimator. We demonstrate that the method is generally effective, but the estimator is weakened by two main factors. One is that the correlation function of the spectroscopic sample must be measured in many bins along the line of sight, which renders the measurement noisy and interferes with high-quality reconstruction of the photometric redshift distribution. Also, the method is not able to disentangle the photometric redshift distribution from redshift dependence in the bias of the photometric sample. We establish the impact of these factors using our mock catalogs. We conclude that it may still be necessary to spectroscopically follow up a fair subsample of the photometric survey data. Nonetheless, it is significant that the method has been successfully implemented on mock data, and with further refinement it may appreciably decrease the number of spectra that will be needed to calibrate future surveys.

  11. Photometric Redshifts with the LSST: Evaluating Survey Observing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melissa L.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ivezić, Željko; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Jones, R. Lynne; Jurić, Mario; Daniel, Scott F.; Yoachim, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present and characterize a nearest-neighbors color-matching photometric redshift estimator that features a direct relationship between the precision and accuracy of the input magnitudes and the output photometric redshifts. This aspect makes our estimator an ideal tool for evaluating the impact of changes to LSST survey parameters that affect the measurement errors of the photometry, which is the main motivation of our work (i.e., it is not intended to provide the “best” photometric redshifts for LSST data). We show how the photometric redshifts will improve with time over the 10 year LSST survey and confirm that the nominal distribution of visits per filter provides the most accurate photo-z results. The LSST survey strategy naturally produces observations over a range of airmass, which offers the opportunity of using an SED- and z-dependent atmospheric affect on the observed photometry as a color-independent redshift indicator. We show that measuring this airmass effect and including it as a prior has the potential to improve the photometric redshifts and can ameliorate extreme outliers, but that it will only be adequately measured for the brightest galaxies, which limits its overall impact on LSST photometric redshifts. We furthermore demonstrate how this airmass effect can induce a bias in the photo-z results, and caution against survey strategies that prioritize high-airmass observations for the purpose of improving this prior. Ultimately, we intend for this work to serve as a guide for the expectations and preparations of the LSST science community with regard to the minimum quality of photo-z as the survey progresses.

  12. ACS Photometric Zero Point Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2003-07-01

    The uncertainties in the photometric zero points create a fundamental limit to the accuracy of photometry. The current state of the ACS calibration is surprisingly poor, with zero point uncertainties of 0.03 magnitudes in the Johnson filters. The reason for this is that ACS observations of excellent ground-based standard fields, such as the omega Cen field used for WFPC2 calibrations, have not been obtained. Instead, the ACS photometric calibrations are based primarily on semi-emprical synthetic zero points and observations of fields too crowded for accurate ground-based photometry. I propose to remedy this problem by obtaining ACS broadband images of the omega Cen standard field with both the WFC and HRC. This will permit the direct determination of the ACS transformations, and is expected to double the accuracy to which the ACS zero points are known. A second benefit is that it will facilitate the comparison of the WFPC2 and ACS photometric systems, which will be important as WFPC2 is phased out and ACS becomes HST's primary imager.

  13. Calibrating photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Budavari, Tamas; Schlegel, David J.; Bridges, Terry; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the construction of a photometric redshift catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), emphasizing the principal steps necessary for constructing such a catalogue: (i) photometrically selecting the sample, (ii) measuring photometric redshifts and their error distributions, and (iii) estimating the true redshift distribution. We compare two photometric redshift algorithms for these data and find that they give comparable results. Calibrating against the SDSS and SDSS–2dF (Two Degree Field) spectroscopic surveys, we find that the photometric redshift accuracy is σ~ 0.03 for redshifts less than 0.55 and worsens at higher redshift (~ 0.06 for z < 0.7). These errors are caused by photometric scatter, as well as systematic errors in the templates, filter curves and photometric zero-points. We also parametrize the photometric redshift error distribution with a sum of Gaussians and use this model to deconvolve the errors from the measured photometric redshift distribution to estimate the true redshift distribution. We pay special attention to the stability of this deconvolution, regularizing the method with a prior on the smoothness of the true redshift distribution. The methods that we develop are applicable to general photometric redshift surveys.

  14. Data-driven, Interpretable Photometric Redshifts Trained on Heterogeneous and Unrepresentative Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leistedt, Boris; Hogg, David W., E-mail: boris.leistedt@nyu.edu, E-mail: david.hogg@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We present a new method for inferring photometric redshifts in deep galaxy and quasar surveys, based on a data-driven model of latent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a physical model of photometric fluxes as a function of redshift. This conceptually novel approach combines the advantages of both machine learning methods and template fitting methods by building template SEDs directly from the spectroscopic training data. This is made computationally tractable with Gaussian processes operating in flux–redshift space, encoding the physics of redshifts and the projection of galaxy SEDs onto photometric bandpasses. This method alleviates the need to acquire representative training data or to construct detailed galaxy SED models; it requires only that the photometric bandpasses and calibrations be known or have parameterized unknowns. The training data can consist of a combination of spectroscopic and deep many-band photometric data with reliable redshifts, which do not need to entirely spatially overlap with the target survey of interest or even involve the same photometric bands. We showcase the method on the i -magnitude-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in the COSMOS field. The model is trained on the deepest bands (from SUBARU and HST ) and photometric redshifts are derived using the shallower SDSS optical bands only. We demonstrate that we obtain accurate redshift point estimates and probability distributions despite the training and target sets having very different redshift distributions, noise properties, and even photometric bands. Our model can also be used to predict missing photometric fluxes or to simulate populations of galaxies with realistic fluxes and redshifts, for example.

  15. Data-driven, Interpretable Photometric Redshifts Trained on Heterogeneous and Unrepresentative Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Hogg, David W.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method for inferring photometric redshifts in deep galaxy and quasar surveys, based on a data-driven model of latent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a physical model of photometric fluxes as a function of redshift. This conceptually novel approach combines the advantages of both machine learning methods and template fitting methods by building template SEDs directly from the spectroscopic training data. This is made computationally tractable with Gaussian processes operating in flux–redshift space, encoding the physics of redshifts and the projection of galaxy SEDs onto photometric bandpasses. This method alleviates the need to acquire representative training data or to construct detailed galaxy SED models; it requires only that the photometric bandpasses and calibrations be known or have parameterized unknowns. The training data can consist of a combination of spectroscopic and deep many-band photometric data with reliable redshifts, which do not need to entirely spatially overlap with the target survey of interest or even involve the same photometric bands. We showcase the method on the i -magnitude-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in the COSMOS field. The model is trained on the deepest bands (from SUBARU and HST ) and photometric redshifts are derived using the shallower SDSS optical bands only. We demonstrate that we obtain accurate redshift point estimates and probability distributions despite the training and target sets having very different redshift distributions, noise properties, and even photometric bands. Our model can also be used to predict missing photometric fluxes or to simulate populations of galaxies with realistic fluxes and redshifts, for example.

  16. Revised photometric elements of XZ And

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Predolin, F.

    1980-01-01

    With the aid of Wood's (1972) computer program we have reanalyzed the photoelectric lightcurves of XZ And, made by Blitzstein (1954) and by Reinhardt (1967), from which appreciably different sets of photometric elements have previously been deduced. The photometric elements that we have derived separately from different lightcurves turned out to be in good agreement. Thus XZ And, whose seondary - somewhat larger than its hotter companion - appears to be roughly a G5-type star, has well-determined photometric elements. (author)

  17. A photometric study of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We have supplemented Voyager imaging data from Enceladus (limited to phase angles of 13 deg-43 deg) with recent Earth-based CCD observations to obtain an improved determination of the Bond albedo, to construct an albedo map of the satellite, and to constrain parameters in Hapke's (1986) photometric equation. A major result is evidence of regional variations in the physical properties of Enceladus' surface. The average global photometric properties are described by single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) average = 0.998 +/- 0.001, macroscopic roughness parameter theta average = 6 +/- 1 deg, and Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry parameter g = -0.399 +/- 0.005. The value of theta average is smaller than the 14 deg found by fitting whole-disk data, which include all terrains on Enceladus. The opposition surge amplitude B(sub 0) = 0.21 +/- 0.07 and regolith compaction parameter h = 0.014 +/- 0.02 are loosely constrained by the scarcity of and uncertainty in near-opposition observations. From the solar phase curve we determine the geometric albedo of Enceladus p(sub v) = 0.99 +/- 0.06 and phase integral q = 0.92 +/- 0.05, which corresponds to a spherical albedo A = p(sub v)q = 0.91 +/- 0.1. Since the spectrum of Enceladus is fairly flat, we can approximate the Bond albedo A(sub B) with the spherical albedo. Our photometric analysis is summarized in terms of an albedo map which generally reproduces the satellite's observed lightcurve and indicates that normal reflectances range from 0.9 on the leading hemisphere to 1.4 on the trailing one. The albedo map also revels an albedo variation of 15% from longitudes 170 deg to 200 deg, corresponding to the boundary between the leading and trailing hemispheres.

  18. Morpho-z: improving photometric redshifts with galaxy morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, John Y. H.; Moraes, Bruno; Joachimi, Benjamin; Hartley, William; Lahav, Ofer; Charbonnier, Aldée; Makler, Martín; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Comparat, Johan; Erben, Thomas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Shan, Huanyuan; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2018-04-01

    We conduct a comprehensive study of the effects of incorporating galaxy morphology information in photometric redshift estimation. Using machine learning methods, we assess the changes in the scatter and outlier fraction of photometric redshifts when galaxy size, ellipticity, Sérsic index, and surface brightness are included in training on galaxy samples from the SDSS and the CFHT Stripe-82 Survey (CS82). We show that by adding galaxy morphological parameters to full ugriz photometry, only mild improvements are obtained, while the gains are substantial in cases where fewer passbands are available. For instance, the combination of grz photometry and morphological parameters almost fully recovers the metrics of 5-band photometric redshifts. We demonstrate that with morphology it is possible to determine useful redshift distribution N(z) of galaxy samples without any colour information. We also find that the inclusion of quasar redshifts and associated object sizes in training improves the quality of photometric redshift catalogues, compensating for the lack of a good star-galaxy separator. We further show that morphological information can mitigate biases and scatter due to bad photometry. As an application, we derive both point estimates and posterior distributions of redshifts for the official CS82 catalogue, training on morphology and SDSS Stripe-82 ugriz bands when available. Our redshifts yield a 68th percentile error of 0.058(1 + z), and a outlier fraction of 5.2 per cent. We further include a deep extension trained on morphology and single i-band CS82 photometry.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, John

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  1. Designing towards the unknown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Danielle; Underwood, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    the research potential to far-ranging possibilities. In this article we unpack the motivations driving the PKI project. We present our mixed-methodology, which entangles textile crafts, design interactions and materiality to shape an embodied enquiry. Our research outcomes are procedural and methodological......New materials with new capabilities demand new ways of approaching design. Destabilising existing methods is crucial to develop new methods. Yet, radical destabilisation—where outcomes remain unknown long enough that new discoveries become possible—is not easy in technology design where complex......, to design towards unknown outcomes, using unknown materials. The impossibility of this task is proving as useful as it is disruptive. At its most potent, it is destabilising expectations, aesthetics and processes. Keeping the researchers, collaborators and participants in a state of unknowing, is opening...

  2. Characterizing unknown systematics in large scale structure surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ho, Shirley; Myers, Adam D.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Muna, Demitri; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Photometric large scale structure (LSS) surveys probe the largest volumes in the Universe, but are inevitably limited by systematic uncertainties. Imperfect photometric calibration leads to biases in our measurements of the density fields of LSS tracers such as galaxies and quasars, and as a result in cosmological parameter estimation. Earlier studies have proposed using cross-correlations between different redshift slices or cross-correlations between different surveys to reduce the effects of such systematics. In this paper we develop a method to characterize unknown systematics. We demonstrate that while we do not have sufficient information to correct for unknown systematics in the data, we can obtain an estimate of their magnitude. We define a parameter to estimate contamination from unknown systematics using cross-correlations between different redshift slices and propose discarding bins in the angular power spectrum that lie outside a certain contamination tolerance level. We show that this method improves estimates of the bias using simulated data and further apply it to photometric luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a case study

  3. Characterizing unknown systematics in large scale structure surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ho, Shirley [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ross, Ashley J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Bahcall, Neta [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Brinkmann, Jonathan [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Muna, Demitri [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pâris, Isabelle [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Petitjean, Patrick [Université Paris 6 et CNRS, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis blvd. Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Weaver, Benjamin A., E-mail: nishanta@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Photometric large scale structure (LSS) surveys probe the largest volumes in the Universe, but are inevitably limited by systematic uncertainties. Imperfect photometric calibration leads to biases in our measurements of the density fields of LSS tracers such as galaxies and quasars, and as a result in cosmological parameter estimation. Earlier studies have proposed using cross-correlations between different redshift slices or cross-correlations between different surveys to reduce the effects of such systematics. In this paper we develop a method to characterize unknown systematics. We demonstrate that while we do not have sufficient information to correct for unknown systematics in the data, we can obtain an estimate of their magnitude. We define a parameter to estimate contamination from unknown systematics using cross-correlations between different redshift slices and propose discarding bins in the angular power spectrum that lie outside a certain contamination tolerance level. We show that this method improves estimates of the bias using simulated data and further apply it to photometric luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a case study.

  4. Photometric functions for photoclinometry and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Least-squared fits to the brightness profiles across a disk or "limb darkening" described by Hapke's photometric function are found for the simpler Minnaert and lunar-Lambert functions. The simpler functions are needed to reduce the number of unknown parameters in photoclinometry, especially to distinguish the brightness variations of the surface materials from that due to the resolved topography. The limb darkening varies with the Hapke parameters for macroscopic roughness (??), the single-scattering albedo (w), and the asymmetry factor of the particle phase function (g). Both of the simpler functions generally provide good matches to the limb darkening described by Hapke's function, but the lunar-Lambert function is superior when viewing angles are high and when (??) is less than 30??. Although a nonunique solution for the Minnaert function at high phase angles has been described for smooth surfaces, the discrepancy decreases with increasing (??) and virtually disappears when (??) reaches 30?? to 40??. The variation in limb darkening with w and g, pronounced for smooth surfaces, is reduced or eliminated when the Hapke parameters are in the range typical of most planetary surfaces; this result simplifies the problem of photoclinometry across terrains with variable surface materials. The Minnaert or lunar-Lambert fits to published Hapke models will give photoclinometric solutions that are very similar (>1?? slope discrepancy) to the Hapke-function solutions for nearly all of the bodies and terrains thus far modeled by Hapke's function. ?? 1991.

  5. A> L1-TV algorithm for robust perspective photometric stereo with spatially-varying lightings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    We tackle the problem of perspective 3D-reconstruction of Lambertian surfaces through photometric stereo, in the presence of outliers to Lambert's law, depth discontinuities, and unknown spatially-varying lightings. To this purpose, we introduce a robust $L^1$-TV variational formulation of the re...

  6. Low-Cost Photometric Calibration for Interactive Relighting

    OpenAIRE

    Loscos , Céline; Drettakis , George

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Computer augmented reality is a rapidly emerging field allowing users to mix virtual and real worlds. Our interest is to allow relighting and remodelling of real scenes, using a reflectance estimation method. Most previous work focused on the quality of the results without considering the expense in computation and the price of acquisition equipment. In this paper, we present a low–cost photometric calibration method which improves the reflectance estimate of real scen...

  7. Fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Matsui, Akira; Tanaka, Fumiko; Okuno, Yoshishige; Mitsumori, Michihide; Torizuka, Tatsurou; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Shimbo, Shin-ichirou

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a commonly performed imaging modality in deteting pyrogenic lesions in cases of long-standing inexplainable fever. To re-evaluate the significance of gallium imaging in such cases, a retrospective review was made of 56 scans performed in febrile patients in whom sufficient clinical and laboratory findings were obtained. Gallium scans were true positive in 30 patients, false positive in 3, true negative in 19, and false negative in 4. In the group of true positive, local inflammatory lesions were detected in 23 patients with a final diagnosis of lung tuberculosis, urinary tract infection, and inflammatory joint disease. Abnormal gallium accumulation, as shown in the other 7 patients, provided clues to the diagnosis of generalized disorders, such as hematological malignancies (n=3), systemic autoimmune diseases (n=3), and severe infectious mononucleosis (n=one). In the group of false positive, gallium imaging revealed intestinal excretion of gallium in 2 patients and physiological pulmonary hilar accumulation in one. In the true negative group of 19 patients, fever of unknown origin was resolved spontaneously in 12 patients, and with antibiotics and corticosteroids in 2 and 5 patients, respectively. Four patients having false negative scans were finally diagnosed as having urinary tract infection (n=2), bacterial meningitis (n=one), and polyarteritis (n=one). Gallium imaging would remain the technique of choice in searching for origin of unknown fever. It may also be useful for early diagnosis of systemic disease, as well as focal inflammation. (N.K.)

  8. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  9. RSO Characterization with Photometric Data Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    RSO Characterization with Photometric Data Using Machine Learning Michael Howard Charles River Analytics, Inc. Bernie Klem SASSO, Inc. Joe...and its behavior. This paper explores object characterization methods using photometric data. An important property of RSO photometric signatures is... photometric signature include geometry, orientation, material characteristics and stability. For this reason, it should be possible to recover these

  10. [Badminton--unknown sport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekan-Petrinović, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    For a long time, badminton was considered to be only a slow and light game for children, a game that is played outdoors and is structurally undemanding.Today, it is not an unknown and unrecognised sport, especially after it was included into the Olympics Games in 1992. Badminton is one of the oldest sports in the world. It is suitable for all ages (for children and elderly equally), women and men and even handicapped persons. Beginners can start playing badminton matches early because the basics are learned quickly. As a recreational activity, badminton is very popular in Zagreb. In the last 10 years, a number of halls specialized for badminton or offering badminton as one of available sports activities have been opened in Zagreb. At present, there are over 70 professional playgrounds for training of top contestants but also for the citizens who can play recreational badminton.

  11. ASTEROID PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Asteroid Photometric Catalog (3rd update), Lagerkvist, et.al., 1993 [LAGERKVISTETAL1993], is a compilation of all asteroid lightcurve photometry published up to...

  12. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-01-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  13. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  14. Photometrical Observations "SBIRS GEO-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Sukhov, K. P.; Kudak, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    Photometrical observations GSS "SBIRS GEO 2" in B,V,R filters were carried near the equinoxes 2014-2015. Used velocity electrophotometer based on the FEU-79 in the pulse-counting mode. Received more than 25 light curves. From the known dimensions are defined; effective reflecting area - Sγλ, the spectral reflectance index - γλ, periods of light variation. Color-indices showed that in the reflected light flux from the GSS prevails "red" component. In the light curves are periodically dips and specular flash. This shows that GSS orbit is not in a static position specified triaxial orientation as in dynamic motion. Assumed following dynamics of the satellite "SBIRS GEO 2" in orbit. Helical scanning the Earth's surface visible infrared sensors satellite occurs with a period P1 = 15.66 sec. and swinging of the GSS about the direction of the motion vector of the satellite in an orbit with P2 = 62.64 sec., from the northern to the southern pole. Thus, during the period of swinging GSS going on 2 scan the visible part of the northern and southern hemispheres. In some dates observations dynamics work satellite in orbit changed.

  15. Most oxidative stress response in water samples comes from unknown chemicals: the need for effect-based water quality trigger values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; van Daele, Charlotte; Dutt, Mriga; Tang, Janet Y M; Altenburger, Rolf

    2013-07-02

    The induction of adaptive stress response pathways is an early and sensitive indicator of the presence of chemical and non-chemical stressors in cells. An important stress response is the Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway where electrophilic chemicals or chemicals that cause the formation of reactive oxygen species initiate the production of antioxidants and metabolic detoxification enzymes. The AREc32 cell line is sensitive to chemicals inducing oxidative stress and has been previously applied for water quality monitoring of organic micropollutants and disinfection byproducts. Here we propose an algorithm for the derivation of effect-based water quality trigger values for this end point that is based on the combined effects of mixtures of regulated chemicals. Mixture experiments agreed with predictions by the mixture toxicity concept of concentration addition. The responses in the AREc32 and the concentrations of 269 individual chemicals were quantified in nine environmental samples, ranging from treated effluent, recycled water, stormwater to drinking water. The effects of the detected chemicals could explain less than 0.1% of the observed induction of the oxidative stress response in the sample, affirming the need to use effect-based trigger values that account for all chemicals present.

  16. Measurement of the photometric characteristics of LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, L.A.; Zubkov, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed and implemented a method for measuring LEDs, which is based on self-calibration of the LED goniophotometer facility by using a trap-detector. Designed and manufactured automated goniophotometer, which provides a measurement of high power LEDs at a specified junction temperature. Designed and experimentally researched the photometer with a photometric sphere based diffuser, which meets all requirements of CIE for photometric measurements of LEDs

  17. ArborZ: PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS USING BOOSTED DECISION TREES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single 'best estimate' and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  18. The many flavours of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Mara; Ilbert, Olivier; Hoyle, Ben

    2018-06-01

    Since more than 70 years ago, the colours of galaxies derived from flux measurements at different wavelengths have been used to estimate their cosmological distances. Such distance measurements, called photometric redshifts, are necessary for many scientific projects, ranging from investigations of the formation and evolution of galaxies and active galactic nuclei to precision cosmology. The primary benefit of photometric redshifts is that distance estimates can be obtained relatively cheaply for all sources detected in photometric images. The drawback is that these cheap estimates have low precision compared with resource-expensive spectroscopic ones. The methodology for estimating redshifts has been through several revolutions in recent decades, triggered by increasingly stringent requirements on the photometric redshift accuracy. Here, we review the various techniques for obtaining photometric redshifts, from template-fitting to machine learning and hybrid schemes. We also describe state-of-the-art results on current extragalactic samples and explain how survey strategy choices affect redshift accuracy. We close with a description of the photometric redshift efforts planned for upcoming wide-field surveys, which will collect data on billions of galaxies, aiming to investigate, among other matters, the stellar mass assembly and the nature of dark energy.

  19. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy

  20. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas Y; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-24

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects.

  1. Managing the Unknown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Early approaches to managing risk in supply chains were based on enterprise risk management tools – tools that had been developed for a system called the “company.” These tools often contained risk categories relating to operational and financial circumstances within the company. Moreover......, these tools were easily scalable, as they allowed the inclusion of additional risk categories. It comes as no surprise, therefore, that the notion of risks further upstream and downstream in the supply chain has led risk managers to include new categories such as “supplier insolvency,” “supplier quality......” or “defects of supplied parts (per million).” The inclusion of such categories that represent risk sources outside of their own companies has certainly been a great achievement. But, as I will argue, this is not enough to shift from a company view towards a supply chain view that has been shown to enable...

  2. Recension: Mao - The Unknown Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story".......Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story"....

  3. Photometric Studies of Orbital Debris at GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Hortsman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Orbital debris represents a significant and increasing risk to operational spacecraft. Here we report on photometric observations made in standard BVRI filters at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in an effort to determine the physical characteristics of optically faint debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan s 0.6-m Curtis-Schmidt telescope (known as MODEST, for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. For a sample of 50 objects, calibrated sequences in RB- V-I-R filters have been obtained with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could imply that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For irregularly shaped objects tumbling at unknown orientations and rates, such sequential filter measurements using one telescope are subject to large errors for interpretation. If all observations in all filters in a particular sequence are of the same surface at the same solar and viewing angles, then the colors are meaningful. Where this is not the case, interpretation of the observed colors is impossible. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m observes in B, and the Schmidt in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are both the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Now the observed B-R color is a true measure of the scattered illuminated area of the debris piece for that observation.

  4. Photometric observations of local rocket-atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, R. G. H.; Murtagh, D. P.; Witt, G.; Stegman, J.

    1983-06-01

    Photometric measurements from rocket flights which recorded a strong foreign luminance in the altitude region between 90 and 130 km are reported. From one Nike-Orion rocket the luminance appeared on both up-leg and down-leg; from a series of Petrel rockets the luminance was apparent only on the down-leg. The data suggest that the luminance may be distributed mainly in the wake region along the rocket trajectory. The luminance is believed to be due to a local interaction between the rocket and the atmosphere although the precise nature of the interaction is unknown. It was measured at wavelengths ranging from 275 nm to 1.61 microns and may be caused by a combination of reactions.

  5. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Folatelli, G. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Anderson, J. P., E-mail: sgonzale@das.uchile.cl [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  6. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  7. V 463 Cyg: revised photometric elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Ferluga, S.

    1982-01-01

    Using Wood's (1972) model we have re-analyzed Vetesnik's (1968) two-colour photoelectric light curves of eclipsing binary V 463 Cyg. Our photometric solutions which confirm the presence of a large amount of third light do not greatly differ from previous results. The eclipsing pair appears to be composed of an A 0 primary attended by a somewhat smaller (around G 5) companion. In view of the large ratio of the radii this component cannot be in the main sequence. It seems to be more advanced in the evolution than the primary, like common secondaries of Algols, and it appears to fill its Roche lobe for our photometric mass ratio. (author)

  8. Photometric Exoplanet Characterization and Multimedia Astronomy Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Kimberly M. S.

    The transit method of detecting exoplanets has dominated the search for distant worlds since the success of the Kepler space telescope and will continue to lead the field after the launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite in 2018. But detections are just the beginning. Transit light curves can only reveal a limited amount of information about a planet, and that information is almost entirely dependent on the properties of the host star or stars. This dissertation discusses follow-up techniques to more precisely characterize transiting planets using photometric observations. A high-resolution follow-up imaging program using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) searched for previously unknown stars nearby the hosts of small and cool Kepler exoplanets and observed a higher-than-expected occurrence rate of stellar multiplicity. The rate of previously unknown stellar multiples has strong implications for the size and habitability of the orbiting planets. Three systems with newly discovered stellar multiplicity, Kepler-296 (2 stars, 5 planets), KOI-2626 (3 stars, 1 planet), and KOI-3049 (2 stars, 1 planet), were characterized in more detail. In the cases of Kepler-296 and KOI-2626, some of the planets lost their previous habitable zone status because of host star ambiguity. Next, the ultra-short period, ultra-hot Jupiter WASP-103b was used as a casestudy to test for the presence of a stratospheric temperature inversion through dayside emission spectroscopy using HST. WASP-103b's near-infrared emission spectrum is consistent with an isothermal or thermally-inverted atmosphere and shows no significant broadband water absorption feature. Detection of an anomalously strong "super- Rayleigh" slope in its optical transmission spectrum prompted follow-up transmission spectroscopy of WASP-103b's atmosphere using the MINiature Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA), which tentatively verified the unexplained "super-Rayleigh" spectral slope. The final follow-up technique for

  9. Photo-z with CuBANz: An improved photometric redshift estimator using Clustering aided Back propagation Neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Samui Pal, Shanoli

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved photometric redshift estimator code, CuBANz, that is publicly available at https://goo.gl/fpk90V. It uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, which makes it more efficient than existing neural network codes. In CuBANz, the training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u - g , g - r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. Separate neural networks are trained for each cluster using all possible colors, magnitudes and uncertainties in the measurements. For a galaxy with unknown redshift, we identify the closest possible clusters having similar photometric properties and use those clusters to get the photometric redshifts using the particular networks that were trained using those cluster members. For galaxies that do not match with any training cluster, the photometric redshifts are obtained from a separate network that uses entire training set. This clustering method enables us to determine the redshifts more accurately. SDSS Stripe 82 catalog has been used here for the demonstration of the code. For the clustered sources with redshift range zspec training/testing phase is as low as 0.03 compared to the existing ANNz code that provides residual error on the same test data set of 0.05. Further, we provide a much better estimate of the uncertainty of the derived photometric redshift.

  10. On the realistic validation of photometric redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, R.; Lin, C. A.; Ishida, E. E.O.

    2017-01-01

    test of photo-z methods. Using photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectroscopy from a collection of sources, we constructed data sets that mimic the biases between the underlying probability distribution of the real spectroscopic and photometric sample. We demonstrate the potential...

  11. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  12. Interstellar Extinction in the Gaia Photometric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridžius A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Three medium-band photometric systems proposed for the Gaia space mission are intercompared in determining color excesses for stars of spectral classes from O to M at V = 18 mag. A possibility of obtaining a three-dimensional map of the interstellar extinction is discussed.

  13. Photometric study of uranyl-terramycin complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankara Reddy, P B [Government Coll., Cuddapah, Andhra Pradesh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Reddy, A V.R.; Brahmaji Rao, S [SVU Autonomous Post-Graduate Centre, Anantapur (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1980-04-01

    The spectrophotometric investigation of uranylterramycin complex in solution has been studied photometrically at pH 1.3. The composition of the complex is established by Job's and Slope ratio methods as 1:1. The stability constant calculated from the data obtained in Job's method is 1.9 x 10/sup 3/. Beer's law is obeyed.

  14. Simultaneous spectral and photometric observations of the beat Cepheid U TrA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niva, G.D.; Schmidt, E.G.

    1981-01-01

    It was suggested that U TrA was a Cepheid with a modulated light curve. Further photometric and radial-velocity observations have confirmed this behaviour. Unfortunately, the radial velocities are too few in number and too scattered to allow a detailed analysis. This paper presents further photometric and spectroscopic observations of U TrA. The original intent was to obtain enough simultaneous observations to perform a Wesselink analysis similar to the one made for another beat Cepheid, TU Cas. Unfortunately, this has not been possible. However, the data obtained are of high quality and are clearly useful in studies of the modal content and period stability of the star. (author)

  15. Photometric Variability of the Be Star Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Pepper, Joshua; McSwain, M. Virginia [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Drive East, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Bjorkman, J. E.; Bjorkman, K. S. [Ritter Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Lund, Michael B.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Stevens, Daniel J. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); James, David J. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603 La Serena (Chile); Kuhn, Rudolf B. [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Siverd, Robert J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Beatty, Thomas G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. The photometric data comes from the KELT transit survey, with a typical cadence of 30 minutes, a baseline of up to 10 years, photometric precision of about 1%, and coverage of about 60% of the sky. We analyze KELT light curves of 610 known Be stars in both the northern and southern hemispheres in an effort to study their variability. Consistent with other studies of Be star variability, we find most of the stars to be photometrically variable. We derive lower limits on the fraction of stars in our sample that exhibit features consistent with non-radial pulsations (25%), outbursts (36%), and long-term trends in the circumstellar disk (37%), and show how these are correlated with spectral sub-types. Other types of variability, such as those owing to binarity, are also explored. Simultaneous spectroscopy for some of these systems from the Be Star Spectra database allow us to better understand the physical causes for the observed variability, especially in cases of outbursts and changes in the disk.

  16. Photometric Variability of the Be Star Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Pepper, Joshua; McSwain, M. Virginia; Bjorkman, J. E.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Lund, Michael B.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Stevens, Daniel J.; James, David J.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Siverd, Robert J.; Beatty, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. The photometric data comes from the KELT transit survey, with a typical cadence of 30 minutes, a baseline of up to 10 years, photometric precision of about 1%, and coverage of about 60% of the sky. We analyze KELT light curves of 610 known Be stars in both the northern and southern hemispheres in an effort to study their variability. Consistent with other studies of Be star variability, we find most of the stars to be photometrically variable. We derive lower limits on the fraction of stars in our sample that exhibit features consistent with non-radial pulsations (25%), outbursts (36%), and long-term trends in the circumstellar disk (37%), and show how these are correlated with spectral sub-types. Other types of variability, such as those owing to binarity, are also explored. Simultaneous spectroscopy for some of these systems from the Be Star Spectra database allow us to better understand the physical causes for the observed variability, especially in cases of outbursts and changes in the disk.

  17. PHOTOMETRIC STEREO SHAPE-AND-ALBEDO-FROM-SHADING FOR PIXEL-LEVEL RESOLUTION LUNAR SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS techniques recover pixel-wise surface details based on the relationship between terrain slopes, illumination and imaging geometry, and the energy response (i.e., image intensity captured by the sensing system. Multiple images with different illumination geometries (i.e., photometric stereo can provide better SAfS surface reconstruction due to the increase in observations. Photometric stereo SAfS is suitable for detailed surface reconstruction of the Moon and other extra-terrestrial bodies due to the availability of photometric stereo and the less complex surface reflecting properties (i.e., albedo of the target bodies as compared to the Earth. Considering only one photometric stereo pair (i.e., two images, pixel-variant albedo is still a major obstacle to satisfactory reconstruction and it needs to be regulated by the SAfS algorithm. The illumination directional difference between the two images also becomes an important factor affecting the reconstruction quality. This paper presents a photometric stereo SAfS algorithm for pixel-level resolution lunar surface reconstruction. The algorithm includes a hierarchical optimization architecture for handling pixel-variant albedo and improving performance. With the use of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera - Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC photometric stereo images, the reconstructed topography (i.e., the DEM is compared with the DEM produced independently by photogrammetric methods. This paper also addresses the effect of illumination directional difference in between one photometric stereo pair on the reconstruction quality of the proposed algorithm by both mathematical and experimental analysis. In this case, LROC NAC images under multiple illumination directions are utilized by the proposed algorithm for experimental comparison. The mathematical derivation suggests an illumination azimuthal difference of 90 degrees between two images is recommended to achieve

  18. Application of photometric models to asteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowell, E.; Dominque, D.; Hapke, B.

    1989-01-01

    The way an asteroid or other atmosphereless solar system body varies in brightness in response to changing illumination and viewing geometry depends in a very complicated way on the physical and optical properties of its surface and on its overall shape. The authors summarize the formulation and application of recent photometric models by Hapke and by Lumme and Bowell. In both models, the brightness of a rough and porous surface is parametrized in terms of the optical properties of individual particles, by shadowing between particles, and by the way in which light scattered among collections of particles. Both models succeed in their goal of fitting the observed photometric behavior of a wide variety of bodies, but neither has led to a very complete understanding of the properties of asteroid regoliths, primarily because in most cases the parameters in the present models cannot be adequately constrained by observations of integral brightness alone over a restricted range of phase angles

  19. Stellar physics with the ALHAMBRA photometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, T Aparicio; Alfaro, E J; Moles, M; Benítez, N; Perea, J; Olmo, A del; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D; Cervio, M; Delgado, R M González; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Prada, F; Cabrera-Caño, J; Fernández-Soto, A; Aguerri, J A L; Cepa, J; Broadhurst, T; Castander, F J; Infante, L; Martínez, V J

    2011-01-01

    The ALHAMBRA photometric system was specifically designed to perform a tomography of the Universe in some selected areas. Although mainly designed for extragalactic purposes, its 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band photometric system in the optical wavelength range, shows a great capacity for stellar classification. In this contribution we propose a methodology for stellar classification and physical parameter estimation (T eff , log g, [Fe/H], and color excess E(B – V)) based on 18 independent reddening-free Q-values from the ALHAMBRA photometry. Based on the theoretical Spectral library BaSeL 2.2, and applied to 288 stars from the Next Generation spectral Library (NGSL), we discuss the reliability of the method and its dependence on the extinction law used.

  20. Photometric Characterization of the Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, G. M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Armstrong, R.; Burke, D. L.; Diehl, H. T.; Gruendl, R. A.; Johnson, M. D.; Li, T. S.; Rykoff, E. S.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.

    2018-05-01

    We characterize the variation in photometric response of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) across its 520 Mpix science array during 4 years of operation. These variations are measured using high signal-to-noise aperture photometry of >107 stellar images in thousands of exposures of a few selected fields, with the telescope dithered to move the sources around the array. A calibration procedure based on these results brings the rms variation in aperture magnitudes of bright stars on cloudless nights down to 2–3 mmag, with color corrections; and the use of an aperture-correction proxy. The DECam response pattern across the 2° field drifts over months by up to ±9 mmag, in a nearly wavelength-independent low-order pattern. We find no fundamental barriers to pushing global photometric calibrations toward mmag accuracy.

  1. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts with Deep Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Isanto, A.

    2017-06-01

    The need for accurate photometric redshifts estimation is a topic that has fundamental importance in Astronomy, due to the necessity of efficiently obtaining redshift information without the need of spectroscopic analysis. We propose a method for determining accurate multi-modal photo-z probability density functions (PDFs) using Mixture Density Networks (MDN) and Deep Convolutional Networks (DCN). A comparison with a Random Forest (RF) is performed.

  2. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Chen, Y.-T. [Insitute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Cuillandre, J.-C. [Canada-France-Hawaïi Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Duc, P. A. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lançon, A., E-mail: anand.raichoor@obspm.fr [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  3. THE PAN-STARRS 1 PHOTOMETRIC REFERENCE LADDER, RELEASE 12.01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Sweeney, W. E.; Schlafly, E.; Finkbeiner, D.; Juric, M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Price, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    As of 2012 January 21, the Pan-STARRS 1 3π Survey has observed the 3/4 of the sky visible from Hawaii with a minimum of 2 and mean of 7.6 observations in five filters, g P1 , r P1 , i P1 , z P1 , y P1 . Now at the end of the second year of the mission, we are in a position to make an initial public release of a portion of this unprecedented data set. This article describes the PS1 Photometric Ladder, Release 12.01. This is the first of a series of data releases to be generated as the survey coverage increases and the data analysis improves. The Photometric Ladder has rungs every hour in right ascension and at four intervals in declination. We will release updates with increased area coverage (more rungs) from the latest data set until the PS1 survey and the final re-reduction are completed. The currently released catalog presents photometry of ∼1000 objects per square degree in the rungs of the ladder. Saturation occurs at g P1 , r P1 , i P1 ∼ 13.5; z P1 ∼ 13.0; and y P1 ∼ 12.0. Photometry is provided for stars down to g P1 , r P1 , i P1 ∼ 19.1 in the AB system. This data release depends on the rigid 'Ubercal' photometric calibration using only the photometric nights, with systematic uncertainties of (8.0, 7.0, 9.0, 10.7, 12.4) mmag in (g P1 , r P1 , i P1 , z P1 , y P1 ). Areas covered only with lower quality nights are also included, and have been tied to the Ubercal solution via relative photometry; photometric accuracy of the non-photometric regions is lower and should be used with caution.

  4. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Chen, Y.-T.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Guhathakurta, P.; Lançon, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg 2 centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i AB = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z phot ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ outl.rej. , and an individual error on z phot that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z phot ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ outl.rej ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z phot.err. ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations

  5. Unknown foundation determination for scour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Unknown foundations affect about 9,000 bridges in Texas. For bridges over rivers, this creates a problem : regarding scour decisions as the calculated scour depth cannot be compared to the foundation depth, and a : very conservative costly approach m...

  6. Photometric Defocus Observations of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias C. Hinse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6 m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique, allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of sub-millimagnitude order over several hours for a V ~10 host star, typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compared our results with transit observations from a telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision was obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons, resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by exposing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reduce the effect of scintillation noise which otherwise has a significant effect for small-aperture telescopes operated in in-focus mode. Finally we present the results of modelling four light-curves in which a root-mean-square scatter of 0.70 to 2.3 milli-magnitudes was achieved.

  7. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  8. Degradation analysis in the estimation of photometric redshifts from non-representative training sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, J. D.; Moraes, B.; Merson, A. I.; Jouvel, S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Abdalla, M. C. B.

    2018-04-01

    We perform an analysis of photometric redshifts estimated by using a non-representative training sets in magnitude space. We use the ANNz2 and GPz algorithms to estimate the photometric redshift both in simulations as well as in real data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR12). We show that for the representative case, the results obtained by using both algorithms have the same quality, either using magnitudes or colours as input. In order to reduce the errors when estimating the redshifts with a non-representative training set, we perform the training in colour space. We estimate the quality of our results by using a mock catalogue which is split samples cuts in the r-band between 19.4 manage to define a photometric estimator which fits well the spectroscopic distribution of galaxies in the mock testing set, but with a larger scatter. To complete this work, we perform an analysis of the impact on the detection of clusters via density of galaxies in a field by using the photometric redshifts obtained with a non-representative training set.

  9. DES Science Portal: Computing Photometric Redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Julia [LIneA, Rio de Janeiro

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge facing photometric surveys for cosmological purposes, such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is the need to produce reliable photometric redshifts (photo-z). The choice of adequate algorithms and configurations and the maintenance of an up-to-date spectroscopic database to build training sets, for example, are challenging tasks when dealing with large amounts of data that are regularly updated and constantly growing. In this paper, we present the first of a series of tools developed by DES, provided as part of the DES Science Portal, an integrated web-based data portal developed to facilitate the scientific analysis of the data, while ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis. We present the DES Science Portal photometric redshift tools, starting from the creation of a spectroscopic sample to training the neural network photo-z codes, to the final estimation of photo-zs for a large photometric catalog. We illustrate this operation by calculating well calibrated photo-zs for a galaxy sample extracted from the DES first year (Y1A1) data. The series of processes mentioned above is run entirely within the Portal environment, which automatically produces validation metrics, and maintains the provenance between the different steps. This system allows us to fine tune the many steps involved in the process of calculating photo-zs, making sure that we do not lose the information on the configurations and inputs of the previous processes. By matching the DES Y1A1 photometry to a spectroscopic sample, we define different training sets that we use to feed the photo-z algorithms already installed at the Portal. Finally, we validate the results under several conditions, including the case of a sample limited to i<22.5 with the color properties close to the full DES Y1A1 photometric data. This way we compare the performance of multiple methods and training configurations. The infrastructure presented here is an effcient way to test several methods of

  10. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  11. Statistical learning modeling method for space debris photometric measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjing; Sun, Jinqiu; Zhang, Yanning; Li, Haisen

    2016-03-01

    Photometric measurement is an important way to identify the space debris, but the present methods of photometric measurement have many constraints on star image and need complex image processing. Aiming at the problems, a statistical learning modeling method for space debris photometric measurement is proposed based on the global consistency of the star image, and the statistical information of star images is used to eliminate the measurement noises. First, the known stars on the star image are divided into training stars and testing stars. Then, the training stars are selected as the least squares fitting parameters to construct the photometric measurement model, and the testing stars are used to calculate the measurement accuracy of the photometric measurement model. Experimental results show that, the accuracy of the proposed photometric measurement model is about 0.1 magnitudes.

  12. Allocating monitoring effort in the face of unknown unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, B.A.; Runge, M.C.; Bekessy, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing view that to make efficient use of resources, ecological monitoring should be hypothesis-driven and targeted to address specific management questions. 'Targeted' monitoring has been contrasted with other approaches in which a range of quantities are monitored in case they exhibit an alarming trend or provide ad hoc ecological insights. The second form of monitoring, described as surveillance, has been criticized because it does not usually aim to discern between competing hypotheses, and its benefits are harder to identify a priori. The alternative view is that the existence of surveillance data may enable rapid corroboration of emerging hypotheses or help to detect important 'unknown unknowns' that, if undetected, could lead to catastrophic outcomes or missed opportunities. We derive a model to evaluate and compare the efficiency of investments in surveillance and targeted monitoring. We find that a decision to invest in surveillance monitoring may be defensible if: (1) the surveillance design is more likely to discover or corroborate previously unknown phenomena than a targeted design and (2) the expected benefits (or avoided costs) arising from discovery are substantially higher than those arising from a well-planned targeted design. Our examination highlights the importance of being explicit about the objectives, costs and expected benefits of monitoring in a decision analytic framework. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  13. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT METHODS: A CANDELS INVESTIGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Dickinson, Mark E.; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Wiklind, Tommy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates

  14. Function analysis of unknown genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used...... to describe different aspects of molecular biology of the cell, to study changes that occur in the cell due to overexpression or deletion of a gene and to identify various protein modifications. The biological questions and the results of the described studies show the diversity of the information that can...... genes and proteins. It reports the first global proteome database collecting 36 yeast single gene deletion mutants and selecting over 650 differences between analysed mutants and the wild type strain. The obtained results show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome...

  15. DISSECTING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS USING XMM- AND CHANDRA-COSMOS SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Rau, A.; Brusa, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Aussel, H.; Le Floc'h, E.; Fiore, F.; Mainieri, V.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by active galactic nucleus (AGN) dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy σ Δz/(1+z spec ) ∼0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 deg 2 of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by Δz > 0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry (H AB = 24 mag). We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together, with the number and the depth of the available bands, influences the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGNs, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Evolutionary Map of the Universe in the radio band.

  16. LED-based Photometric Stereo: Modeling, Calibration and Numerical Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durix, Bastien; Wu, Tao

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a thorough study of photometric stereo under nearby point light source illumination, from modeling to numerical solution, through calibration. In the classical formulation of photometric stereo, the luminous fluxes are assumed to be directional, which is very difficult to achieve in pr...

  17. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric ca...

  18. Photometric Variability in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    The Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS) is aimed at finding photometric and/or astrometric variable objects between 16th and 24th mag on time-scales between tens of minutes and years with photometric precisions ranging from 3 millimag to 0.2 mag. An area of ~23 deg2, located at mid and

  19. Photometric estimation of defect size in radiation direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuev, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Factors, affecting accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are analyzed. Experimentally obtained dependences of contrast of defect image on its size in radiation transmission direction are presented. Practical recommendations on improving accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are developed

  20. Financial Development and Economic Growth: Known Knowns, Known Unknowns, and Unknown Unknowns

    OpenAIRE

    Ugo Panizza

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of the literature on the relationship between financial and economic development (the known knowns), points to directions for future research (the known unknowns), and then speculates on the third Rumsfeldian category. The known knowns section organizes the empirical literature on finance and growth into three strands: (i) the traditional literature which established the link between finance and growth; (ii) the new literature which qualified some of th...

  1. Photometric properties of type II supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbon, R [Osservatorio Astrofisico, Asiago (Italy); Trieste Univ. (Italy). Instituto di Matematica); Ciatti, F; Rosino, L [Osservatorio Astrofisico, Asiago (Italy); Pavia Univ. (Italy))

    1979-02-01

    An analysis of the available photometric observations for type II supernovae is presented. The possibility of drawing average curves by the fitting method, as previously done for type I supernovae, is indicated. Two basic shapes have been put into evidence, the first one (2/3 of the objects) is characterized by the presence of a plateau at intermediate phase, the second one by an almost linear decline. Average curves have been also built for the intrinsic color indices. Peculiar cases are discussed, including the unusual objects of types III-IV. The mean absolute magnitude at maximum for type II supernovae has been determined about Msub(B) = -16.45 (sigma=0.78), as a calibration for their use as distance indicators. The distribution in different morphological types and luminosity classes of the parent galaxies is briefly discussed.

  2. Photometrical research geostationary satellite "SBIRS GEO-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P; Sukhov, K. P; Kudak, V. I.

    The multicolor photometrical observations GSS "Sbirs Geo-2" were carried in B,V,R filters out during the autumn equinox 2014 and spring 2015 y. Periodic appearance of many light curves and dips of mirror reflections suggests that the GSS was not in orbit in a static position, predetermined three-axis orientation and in dynamic motion. On the basis of computer modeling suggests the following dynamics GSS "Sbirs Geo-2" in orbit. Helically scanning the visible Earth's surface infrared satellite sensors come with period P1 = 15.66 sec. and the rocking of the GSS about the direction of the motion vector of the satellite in orbit with P2 = 62.64 sec., most likely with the purpose to survey the greatest possible portion of the earth's surface.

  3. Robust photometric stereo using structural light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Qi; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Hui-Liang; Du, Xin

    2014-05-01

    We propose a robust photometric stereo method by using structural arrangement of light sources. In the arrangement, light sources are positioned on a planar grid and form a set of collinear combinations. The shadow pixels are detected by adaptive thresholding. The specular highlight and diffuse pixels are distinguished according to their intensity deviations of the collinear combinations, thanks to the special arrangement of light sources. The highlight detection problem is cast as a pattern classification problem and is solved using support vector machine classifiers. Considering the possible misclassification of highlight pixels, the ℓ1 regularization is further employed in normal map estimation. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world scenes verify that the proposed method can robustly recover the surface normal maps in the case of heavy specular reflection and outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques.

  4. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA CLASSIFICATION WITH MACHINE LEARNING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochner, Michelle; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.; McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k -nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  5. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA CLASSIFICATION WITH MACHINE LEARNING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochner, Michelle; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McEwen, Jason D., E-mail: dr.michelle.lochner@gmail.com [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k -nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  6. Intraabdominal abscessus of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraabdominal abscesses are in 98-99% cases the result of secondary and only in 1-2% of primary peritonitis. They are easy and successfully diagnosed. Abdominal abscesses of unknown cause are extremely rare. Case Outline. The authors present a 68-year-old man, without significant data in past history, who suddenly developed epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting and leukocytosis which was treated with antibiotics resulting in the alleviation of complaints and reduction of white blood cells count. After five days ultrasonography showed incapsulated collection of dense fluid in the epigastrium confirmed by CT scan two days later. Upper endoscopy excluded ulcer and/or perforation of the stomach and duodenum. Under local anesthesia, through the upper part of the left rectal muscle, puncture followed by incision was done, and about 50 ml of dense pus was removed. Finger exploration of the cavity showed no foreign body within the cavity. Using drainage, the recovery was quick and uneventful. By preoperative and postoperative abdominal investigations no cause of the abscess was found. Two and a half years after surgery the patient remained symptom-free with normal clinical, laboratory and ultrasonographic findings. Conclusion. The authors presented an intraabdominal abscess of unknown cause that was successfully treated with antibiotics, percutaneous puncture and drainage under local anaesthesia. In spite of all diagnostic methods the cause of the abscess could not be found. Thus, such a possibility, although being rare, should be taken into account.

  7. Effects of illumination differences on photometric stereo shape-and-albedo-from-shading for precision lunar surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung Liu, Wai; Wu, Bo; Wöhler, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Photoclinometric surface reconstruction techniques such as Shape-from-Shading (SfS) and Shape-and-Albedo-from-Shading (SAfS) retrieve topographic information of a surface on the basis of the reflectance information embedded in the image intensity of each pixel. SfS or SAfS techniques have been utilized to generate pixel-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of the Moon and other planetary bodies. Photometric stereo SAfS analyzes images under multiple illumination conditions to improve the robustness of reconstruction. In this case, the directional difference in illumination between the images is likely to affect the quality of the reconstruction result. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the effects of illumination differences on photometric stereo SAfS. Firstly, an algorithm for photometric stereo SAfS is developed, and then, an error model is derived to analyze the relationships between the azimuthal and zenith angles of illumination of the images and the reconstruction qualities. The developed algorithm and error model were verified with high-resolution images collected by the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). Experimental analyses reveal that (1) the resulting error in photometric stereo SAfS depends on both the azimuthal and the zenith angles of illumination as well as the general intensity of the images and (2) the predictions from the proposed error model are consistent with the actual slope errors obtained by photometric stereo SAfS using the LROC NAC images. The proposed error model enriches the theory of photometric stereo SAfS and is of significance for optimized lunar surface reconstruction based on SAfS techniques.

  8. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  9. [Focal myositis: An unknown disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, L; Streichenberger, N; Benveniste, O; Allenbach, Y

    2017-10-01

    Focal myositis are inflammatory muscle diseases of unknown origin. At the opposite from the other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, they are restricted to a single muscle or to a muscle group. They are not associated with extramuscular manifestations, and they have a good prognosis without any treatment. They are characterized by a localized swelling affecting mostly lower limbs. The pseudo-tumor can be painful, but is not associated with a muscle weakness. Creatine kinase level is normal. Muscle MRI shows an inflammation restricted to a muscle or a muscle group. Muscle biopsy and pathological analysis remain necessary for the diagnosis, showing inflammatory infiltrates composed by macrophages and lymphocytes without any specific distribution within the muscle. Focal overexpression of HLA-1 by the muscle fibers is frequently observed. The muscle biopsy permits to rule out differential diagnosis such a malignancy (sarcoma). Spontaneous remission occurs within weeks or months after the first symptoms, relapse is unusual. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Previously unknown species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, M; Normand, A-C; Ranque, S

    2016-08-01

    The use of multi-locus DNA sequence analysis has led to the description of previously unknown 'cryptic' Aspergillus species, whereas classical morphology-based identification of Aspergillus remains limited to the section or species-complex level. The current literature highlights two main features concerning these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species. First, the prevalence of such species in clinical samples is relatively high compared with emergent filamentous fungal taxa such as Mucorales, Scedosporium or Fusarium. Second, it is clearly important to identify these species in the clinical laboratory because of the high frequency of antifungal drug-resistant isolates of such Aspergillus species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been shown to enable the identification of filamentous fungi with an accuracy similar to that of DNA sequence-based methods. As MALDI-TOF MS is well suited to the routine clinical laboratory workflow, it facilitates the identification of these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species at the routine mycology bench. The rapid establishment of enhanced filamentous fungi identification facilities will lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical importance of these emerging Aspergillus species. Based on routine MALDI-TOF MS-based identification results, we provide original insights into the key interpretation issues of a positive Aspergillus culture from a clinical sample. Which ubiquitous species that are frequently isolated from air samples are rarely involved in human invasive disease? Can both the species and the type of biological sample indicate Aspergillus carriage, colonization or infection in a patient? Highly accurate routine filamentous fungi identification is central to enhance the understanding of these previously unknown Aspergillus species, with a vital impact on further improved patient care. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and

  11. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  12. Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type. Eclipsing ... binary with the less massive secondary component filling the inner Roche lobe. ..... Cox 2000) assuming that the primary component is a normal main sequence star.

  13. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Inst. Geo. Astron., Havana /Sao Paulo U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; Johnston, David; /Fermilab; Kubo, Jeffrey; /Fermilab; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Seo, Hee-Jong; /UC, Berkeley; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  14. Photometric immersion refractometry of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, P; Beaman, T C; Corner, T R; Greenamyre, J T; Tisa, L S

    1982-01-01

    Photometric immersion refractometry was used to determine the average apparent refractive index (n) of five types of dormant Bacillus spores representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The n of a spore type increased as the molecular size of various immersion solutes decreased. For comparison of the spore types, the n of the entire spore and of the isolated integument was determined by use of bovine serum albumin, which is excluded from permeating into them. The n of the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was determined by use of glucose, which was shown to permeate into the spore only as deeply as the pericortex membrane. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated with the n of the entire spore and of the sporoplast, but not of the isolated perisporoplast integument. Correlation of the n with the solids content of the entire spore provided a method of experimentally obtaining the refractive index increment (dn/dc), which was constant for the various spore types and enables the calculation of solids and water content from an n. Altogether, the results showed that the total water content is distributed unequally within the dormant spore, with less water in the sporoplast than in the perisporoplast integument, and that the sporoplast becomes more refractile and therefore more dehydrated as the heat resistance becomes greater among the various spore types. PMID:6802796

  15. Photometric stability of the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    The rate at which cratering events currently occur on the Moon is considered in light of their influence on the use of the Moon as a radiometric standard. The radiometric effect of small impact events is determined empirically from the study of Clementine images. Events that would change the integral brightness of the moon by 1% are expected once per 1.4 Gyr. Events that cause a 1% shift in one pixel for low Earth-orbiting instruments with a 1-km nadir field of view are expected approximately once each 43 Myr. Events discernible at 1% radiometric resolution with a 5 arc-sec telescope resolution correspond to crater diameters of approximately 210 m and are expected once every 200 years. These rates are uncertain by a factor of two. For a fixed illumination and observation geometry, the Moon can be considered photometrically stable to 1 ?? 10-8per annum for irradiance, and 1 ?? 10-7per annum for radiance at a resolution common for spacecraft imaging instruments, exceeding reasonable instrument goals by six orders of magnitude. ?? 1997 Academic Press.

  16. Photometric Detection of Extra-Solar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported the TEMPEST Texas McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits) program at McDonald Observatory, which searches for transits of extrasolar planets across the disks of their parent stars. The basic approach is to use a wide-field ground-based telescope (in our case the McDonald Observatory 0.76m telescope and it s Prime Focus Corrector) to search for transits of short period (1-15 day orbits) of close-in hot-Jupiter planets in orbit around a large sample of field stars. The next task is to search these data streams for possible transit events. We collected our first set of test data for this program using the 0.76 m PFC in the summer of 1998. From those data, we developed the optimal observing procedures, including tailoring the stellar density, exposure times, and filters to best-suit the instrument and project. In the summer of 1999, we obtained the first partial season of data on a dedicated field in the constellation Cygnus. These data were used to develop and refine the reduction and analysis procedures to produce high-precision photometry and search for transits in the resulting light curves. The TeMPEST project subsequently obtained three full seasons of data on six different fields using the McDonald Observatory 0.76m PFC.

  17. Photometric determination of traces of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The first three editions of this widely used classic were published under the title Colorimetric Determination of Traces of Metals, with E.B. Sandell as author. Part I (General Aspects) of the fourth edition was co-authored by E.B. Sandell and H. Onishi and published in 1978. After Sandell's death in 1984, Onishi assumed the monumental task of revising Part II. This book (Part IIA) consists of 21 chapters in which the photometric determinations of the individual metals, aluminium to lithium (including the lanthanoids), are described. Each chapter is divided into three sections: Separations, Methods of Determination, and Applications. The sections on Separations are of general interest and include methods based on precipitation, ion-exchange, chromatography, and liquid-liquid extraction. Molecular absorption and fluorescence techniques are described in the sections on determinations, and the emphasis is on the use of well-established reagents. Several reagents that have been recently introduced for the determination of trace levels of metals are also critically reviewed at the end of each section on methods of determination. Important applications of these methods to the determination of trace metals in complex organic and inorganic materials are described in detail at the end of each chapter

  18. Carcinomatous Meningitis from Unknown Primary Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Favier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinomatous meningitis (CM occurs in 3 to 8% of cancer patients. Patients present with a focal symptom, and multifocal signs are often found following neurological examination. The gold standard for diagnosis remains the demonstration of carcinomatous cells in the cerebrospinal fluid on cytopathological examination. Despite the poor prognosis, palliative treatment could improve quality of life and, in some cases, overall survival. We report on a patient who presented with vertigo, tinnitus and left-sided hearing loss followed by progressive diffuse facial nerve paralysis. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of CM. However, no primary tumor was discovered, even after multiple invasive investigations. This is the first reported case in the English-language medical literature of CM resulting from a carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

  19. Long-term photometric behaviour of outbursting AM CVn systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, David; Groot, Paul J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ; Ofek, Eran O.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The AM CVn systems are a class of He-rich, post-period minimum, semidetached, ultracompact binaries. Their long-term light curves have been poorly understood due to the few systems known and the long (hundreds of days) recurrence times between outbursts. We present combined photometric light curves from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research, Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, and Palomar Transient Factory synoptic surveys to study the photometric variability of these systems over an almo...

  20. Measuring redshift-space distortions using photometric surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Ashley; Percival, Will; Crocce, M.; Cabre, A.; Gaztanaga, E.

    2011-01-01

    We outline how redshift-space distortions (RSD) can be measured from the angular correlation function w({\\theta}), of galaxies selected from photometric surveys. The natural degeneracy between RSD and galaxy bias can be minimized by comparing results from bins with top-hat galaxy selection in redshift, and bins based on the radial position of galaxy pair centres. This comparison can also be used to test the accuracy of the photometric redshifts. The presence of RSD will be clearly detectable ...

  1. Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts in the Era of Petascale Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process has become increasingly important. These surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analyzing all of these photometric redshift PDFs will be non-trivial, and this challenge becomes even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this thesis, we have developed an end-to-end framework that will compute accurate and robust photometric redshift PDFs for massive data sets by using two new, state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that are based on a random forest and a random atlas, respectively. By using data from several photometric surveys, we demonstrate the applicability of these new techniques, and we demonstrate that our new approach is among the best techniques currently available. We also show how different techniques can be combined by using novel Bayesian techniques to improve the photometric redshift precision to unprecedented levels while also presenting new approaches to better identify outliers. In addition, our framework provides supplementary information regarding the data being analyzed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, and a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used during the estimation process. Furthermore, we present a new approach to represent and store photometric redshift PDFs by using a sparse representation with outstanding compression and reconstruction capabilities. We also demonstrate how this framework can also be directly incorporated into cosmological analyses. The new techniques presented in this thesis are crucial

  2. Intensity measurement of automotive headlamps using a photometric vision system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Balvant; Cruz, Jose; Perry, David L.; Himebaugh, Frederic G.

    1996-01-01

    Requirements for automotive head lamp luminous intensity tests are introduced. The rationale for developing a non-goniometric photometric test system is discussed. The design of the Ford photometric vision system (FPVS) is presented, including hardware, software, calibration, and system use. Directional intensity plots and regulatory test results obtained from the system are compared to corresponding results obtained from a Ford goniometric test system. Sources of error for the vision system and goniometer are discussed. Directions for new work are identified.

  3. Using polynomials to simplify fixed pattern noise and photometric correction of logarithmic CMOS image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Mahmoodi, Alireza; Joseph, Dileepan

    2015-10-16

    An important class of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors are those where pixel responses are monotonic nonlinear functions of light stimuli. This class includes various logarithmic architectures, which are easily capable of wide dynamic range imaging, at video rates, but which are vulnerable to image quality issues. To minimize fixed pattern noise (FPN) and maximize photometric accuracy, pixel responses must be calibrated and corrected due to mismatch and process variation during fabrication. Unlike literature approaches, which employ circuit-based models of varying complexity, this paper introduces a novel approach based on low-degree polynomials. Although each pixel may have a highly nonlinear response, an approximately-linear FPN calibration is possible by exploiting the monotonic nature of imaging. Moreover, FPN correction requires only arithmetic, and an optimal fixed-point implementation is readily derived, subject to a user-specified number of bits per pixel. Using a monotonic spline, involving cubic polynomials, photometric calibration is also possible without a circuit-based model, and fixed-point photometric correction requires only a look-up table. The approach is experimentally validated with a logarithmic CMOS image sensor and is compared to a leading approach from the literature. The novel approach proves effective and efficient.

  4. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric red-shifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (nu/nu(0))beta where beta = +1.8 and nu(0) = c/100 micrometers. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |delta z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |delta z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z greater than 3 when compared to 850 micrometer selected samples.

  5. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Block, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micron by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm sources with reliable radio identifications in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole North fields, 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm color evolution with redshift, finding that the colors of mm sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (Nu/nu(sub 0))(exp Beta), where Beta = +1.8 and nu(sub 0) = c/100 micron. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation, we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE-detected mm sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic or good quality optical/near-IR photometric redshifts, we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.16 (absolute value of Delta sub (z)) = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far-IR correlation, the accuracy is improved to (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.14 (((absolute value of Delta sub (z))) = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at Z > 3 when compared to approx 8S0 micron selected samples.

  6. Designing future dark energy space missions. II. Photometric redshift of space weak lensing optimized surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvel, S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Bernstein, G.; Ilbert, O.; Jelinsky, P.; Milliard, B.; Ealet, A.; Schimd, C.; Dahlen, T.; Arnouts, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. With the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe, different observational probes have been proposed to investigate the presence of dark energy, including possible modifications to the gravitation laws by accurately measuring the expansion of the Universe and the growth of structures. We need to optimize the return from future dark energy surveys to obtain the best results from these probes. Aims: A high precision weak-lensing analysis requires not an only accurate measurement of galaxy shapes but also a precise and unbiased measurement of galaxy redshifts. The survey strategy has to be defined following both the photometric redshift and shape measurement accuracy. Methods: We define the key properties of the weak-lensing instrument and compute the effective PSF and the overall throughput and sensitivities. We then investigate the impact of the pixel scale on the sampling of the effective PSF, and place upper limits on the pixel scale. We then define the survey strategy computing the survey area including in particular both the Galactic absorption and Zodiacal light variation accross the sky. Using the Le Phare photometric redshift code and realistic galaxy mock catalog, we investigate the properties of different filter-sets and the importance of the u-band photometry quality to optimize the photometric redshift and the dark energy figure of merit (FoM). Results: Using the predicted photometric redshift quality, simple shape measurement requirements, and a proper sky model, we explore what could be an optimal weak-lensing dark energy mission based on FoM calculation. We find that we can derive the most accurate the photometric redshifts for the bulk of the faint galaxy population when filters have a resolution ℛ ~ 3.2. We show that an optimal mission would survey the sky through eight filters using two cameras (visible and near infrared). Assuming a five-year mission duration, a mirror size of 1.5 m and a 0.5 deg2 FOV with a visible pixel

  7. A new photometric metal abundance and luminosity calibration for field G and K giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennens, P.A.; Helfer, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Photometry of 260 G and K giants, using a fast broad-intermediate band photometric system (UBViyz system) is used to calibrate chemical composition, Fe/H], luminosity, Mv and colour excess, E(B-V). A single S-20 surface photomultiplier is used. The UBVi photometry is transformed to be on the Johnson UBVRI system. Calibrations applicable to the ranges 0.40< R-I<0.65 (G2-K3), 0.65< R-I<0.90 (K3-K5) are given. A photometric luminosity index, Mv(yz), is derived for which rms errors are +-1 mag. Several indices are calibrated for chemical composition, [Fe/H], and typical rms errors of +-0.15 in [Fe/H] are obtained for stars of known colour excess, E(B-V). For stars of unknown colour excess, E(B-V) is determined with an rms error of +-0.06 and [Fe/H] with an rms error of approximately +-0.4. For stars with Mv-1, the errors are larger. (author)

  8. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: A GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Co-add Data. We use the artificial neural network (ANN) technique to calculate the photo-z and the nearest neighbor error method to estimate photo-z errors for ∼13 million objects classified as galaxies in the co-add with r 68 = 0.031. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  9. Long photometric cycles in hot algols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennickent R.E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the development of the field of Double Periodic Variables (DPVs, Mennickent et al. 2003 during the last fourteen years, placing these objects in the context of intermediate-mass close interacting binaries similar to β Persei (Algol and β Lyrae (Sheliak which are generally called Algols. DPVs show enigmatic long photometric cycles lasting on average about 33 times the orbital period, and have physical properties resembling, in some aspects, β Lyrae. About 200 of these objects have been found in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Light curve models and orbitally resolved spectroscopy indicate that DPVs are semi-detached interacting binaries consisting of a near main-sequence B-type star accreting matter from a cooler giant and surrounded by an optically thick disc. This disc contributes a significant fraction of the system luminosity and its luminosity is larger than expected from the phenomenon of mass accretion alone. In some systems, an optically thin disc component is observed in well developed Balmer emission lines. The optically thick disc shows bright zones up to tens percent hotter than the disc, probably indicating shocks resulting from the gas and disc stream dynamics. We conjecture that a hotspot wind might be one of the channels for a mild systemic mass loss, since evidence for jets, winds or general mass loss has been found in β Lyrae, AUMon, HD170582, OGLE05155332-6925581 and V393 Sco. Also, theoretical work by Van Rensbergen et al. (2008 and Deschamps et al. (2013 suggests that hotspot could drive mass loss from Algols. We give special consideration to the recently published hypothesis for the long-cycle, consisting of variable mass transfer driven by a magnetic dynamo (Schleicher and Mennickent 2017. The Applegate (1992 mechanism should modify cyclically the equatorial radius of the chromospherically active donor producing cycles of enhanced mass loss through the inner Lagrangian point. Chromospheric emission in

  10. Optical Photometric Observations of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Horstman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We report on a continuing program of optical photometric measurements of faint orbital debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). These observations can be compared with laboratory studies of actual spacecraft materials in an effort to determine what the faint debris at GEO may be. We have optical observations from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile of two samples of debris: 1. GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Curtis-Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 t11 magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. 2. A smaller sample of high area to mass ratio (AMR) objects discovered independently, and acquired using predictions from orbits derived from independent tracking data collected days prior to the observations. Our optical observations in standard astronomical BVRI filters are done with either telescope, and with the telescope tracking the debris object at the object's angular rate. Observations in different filters are obtained sequentially. We have obtained 71 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes. A total of 66 of these sequences have 3 or more good measurements in all filters (not contaminated by star streaks or in Earth's shadow). Most of these sequences show brightness variations, but a small subset has observed brightness variations consistent with that expected from observational errors alone. The majority of these stable objects are redder than a solar color in both B-R and R-I. There is no dependence on color with brightness. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and

  11. Photometric Studies of GEO Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R=15th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? More than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes for a sample of 50 objects have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the

  12. Photometric redshifts of galaxies from SDSS and 2MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Gu Qiusheng; Huang Jiasheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to find the physical parameters which determine the accuracy of photometric redshifts, we compare the spectroscopic and photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for a large sample of ∼ 80000 SDSS-2MASS galaxies. Photo-z's in this paper are estimated by using the artificial neural network photometric redshift method (ANNz). For a subset of ∼40000 randomly selected galaxies, we find that the photometric redshift recovers the spectroscopic redshift distribution very well with rms of 0.016. Our main results are as follows: (1) Using magnitudes directly as input parameters produces more accurate photo-z's than using colors; (2) The inclusion of 2MASS (J, H, K s ) bands does not improve photo-z's significantly, which indicates that near infrared data might not be important for the low-redshift sample; (3) Adding the concentration index (essentially the steepness of the galaxy brightness profile) as an extra input can improve the photo-z's estimation up to ∼ 10 percent; (4) Dividing the sample into early- and late-type galaxies by using the concentration index, normal and abnormal galaxies by using the emission line flux ratios, and red and blue galaxies by using color index (g - r), we can improve the accuracy of photo-z's significantly; (5) Our analysis shows that the outliers (where there is a big difference between the spectroscopic and photometric redshifts) are mainly correlated with galaxy types, e.g., most outliers are late-type (blue) galaxies.

  13. Cosmological forecasts from photometric measurements of the angular correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobreira, F.; Rosenfeld, R.; Simoni, F. de; Costa, L. A. N. da; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.

    2011-01-01

    We study forecasts for the accuracy of the determination of cosmological parameters from future large-scale photometric surveys obtained using the full shape of the 2-point galaxy angular correlation function. The effects of linear redshift-space distortion, photometric redshift Gaussian errors, galaxy bias and nonlinearities in the power spectrum are included on our analysis. The Fisher information matrix is constructed with the full covariance matrix, including the correlation between nearby redshift shells arising from the photometric redshift error. We show that under some reasonable assumptions, a survey such as the imminent Dark Energy Survey should be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w and the cold dark matter density Ω cdm with a precision of the order of 20% and 13%, respectively, from the full shape of the angular correlation function alone. When combined with priors from other observations the precision in the determination of these parameters improve to 8% and 4%, respectively.

  14. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Filliard, C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Maurin, L; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Techene, S; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 \\GHz\\ data are calibrated using Uranus and Neptune flux density measurements, compared with models of their atmospheric emissions to calibrate the data. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the cosmological microwave background dipole.One of the components of this anisotropy results from the orbital motion of the satellite in the Solar System, and is therefore time-variable. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low frequency noise removal. The 2013 released HFI data show some evidence for apparent gain variations of the HFI bolometers' detection chain. These variations were identified by comparing obse...

  15. Morphological and photometric studies of galaxies by electronography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youll, D.P.

    1978-10-01

    Astronomical sources of low surface brightness, or sources with high luminosity gradients can be difficult to observe with photographic techniques. However, developments in electronographic techniques over recent years have made them suitable for precise observations of such objects. The use of these techniques for morphological and photometric studies of galaxies is discussed. Where appropriate, improvements in the methods for recovering information from electronographs, and analysing the data with computers are suggested. These techniques were used to study eight galaxy systems which have compact parts where the luminosity gradients are relatively high. Morphological studies of these systems are presented, together with measurements of some of their photometric parameters. The galaxy NGC 4881 was also studied so that the photometric calibration could be checked against previous studies, and so that the parameters of compact galaxies could be compared against this elliptical galaxy. (author)

  16. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  17. Photometric behavior of SS 433 in 1979 and 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeh, T.; Tel Aviv University; Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv, Israel); Leibowitz, E.M.; Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv, Israel)

    1981-01-01

    Results and analysis of photometric measurements performed in the last two observing seasons of SS 433 are presented. The light of the star in the V and the B photometric bands varies with a period of either 6.55 or 6.43 days. The periodicity of approximately 164 days is also apparent in the photometric data, with its first and third harmonics. Fluctuations of the order of a half a magnitude within a few hours have also been recorded. The B-V color shows no dependence on the phase of the periodic variations, while it does change by up to 0.25 mag, in an apparent association with the short time scale fluctuations

  18. Photometric imaging in particle size measurement and surface visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Niklas

    2011-09-30

    The aim of this paper is to give an insight into photometric particle sizing approaches, which differ from the typical particle size measurement of dispersed particles. These approaches can often be advantageous especially for samples that are moist or cohesive, when dispersion of particles is difficult or sometimes impossible. The main focus of this paper is in the use of photometric stereo imaging. The technique allows the reconstruction of three-dimensional images of objects using multiple light sources in illumination. The use of photometric techniques is demonstrated in at-line measurement of granules and on-line measurement during granulation and dry milling. Also, surface visualization and roughness measurements are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. METAPHOR: Probability density estimation for machine learning based photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, V.; Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Vellucci, C.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.

    2017-06-01

    We present METAPHOR (Machine-learning Estimation Tool for Accurate PHOtometric Redshifts), a method able to provide a reliable PDF for photometric galaxy redshifts estimated through empirical techniques. METAPHOR is a modular workflow, mainly based on the MLPQNA neural network as internal engine to derive photometric galaxy redshifts, but giving the possibility to easily replace MLPQNA with any other method to predict photo-z's and their PDF. We present here the results about a validation test of the workflow on the galaxies from SDSS-DR9, showing also the universality of the method by replacing MLPQNA with KNN and Random Forest models. The validation test include also a comparison with the PDF's derived from a traditional SED template fitting method (Le Phare).

  20. Photometric measurements of solar irradiance variations due to sunspots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, G.A.; Herzog, A.D.; Laico, D.E.; Lawrence, J.K.; Templer, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    A photometric telescope constructed to obtain photometric sunspot areas and deficits on a daily basis is described. Data from this Cartesian full disk telescope (CFDT) are analyzed with attention given to the period between June 4 and June 17, 1985 because of the availability of overlapping sunspot area and irradiance deficit data from high-resolution digital spectroheliograms made with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph. The CFDT sunspot deficits suggest a substantial irradiance contribution from faculae and active region plage. 23 refs

  1. Galaxy Tagging: photometric redshift refinement and group richness enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, P. R.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Driver, S. P.; Deeley, S.; Norberg, P.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Davies, L. J.

    2018-06-01

    We present a new scheme, galtag, for refining the photometric redshift measurements of faint galaxies by probabilistically tagging them to observed galaxy groups constructed from a brighter, magnitude-limited spectroscopy survey. First, this method is tested on the DESI light-cone data constructed on the GALFORM galaxy formation model to tests its validity. We then apply it to the photometric observations of galaxies in the Kilo-Degree Imaging Survey (KiDS) over a 1 deg2 region centred at 15h. This region contains Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) deep spectroscopic observations (i-bandhttps://github.com/pkaf/galtag.git.

  2. Photometric investigation of the magnetic star 53 Camelopardalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muciek, M.; Gertner, J.; North, P.; Rufener, F.

    1985-01-01

    New photometric results obtained in the Geneva system are presented for the star 53 Cam. Earlier photometric results obtained in another system are used as well to show the existence of about four ''null-wavelength regions'' between 3400 and 7700 A and to draw the pseudocontinuum of this star. Assuming axisymmetry about the magnetic axis, a simple model of brightness and equivalent width distribution on the surface of the star are proposed. The distribution of the intensity of the γ 5200 depression is given and a slight inhomogeneity of the distribution of effective temperature is suggested. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  3. [Determination of aluminium in flour foods with photometric method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Shuang; Yang, Dajin

    2012-05-01

    To establish a determination method for aluminium in flour foods with photometric method. After samples being treated with microwave digestion and wet digestion, aluminium in staple flour foods was determined by photometric method. There was a good linearity of the result in the range of 0.25 - 5.0 microg/ml aluminium, r = 0.9998; limit of detection (LOD) : 2.3 ng/ml; limit of quantitation (LOQ) : 7 ng/ml. This method of determining aluminium in flour foods is simple, rapid and reliable.

  4. Kinematics and age of 15 stars-photometric solar analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeev, A. I.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    The radial and space velocities are inferred for 15 stars that are photometric analogs of the Sun. The space velocity components (U, V, W) of most of these stars lie within the 10-60 km/s interval. The star HD 225239, which in our previous papers we classified as a subgiant, has a space velocity exceeding 100 km/s, and belongs to the thick disk. The inferred fundamental parameters of the atmospheres of solar analogs are combined with published evolutionary tracks to estimate the masses and ages of the stars studied. The kinematics of photometric analogs is compared to the data for a large group of solar-type stars.

  5. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to

  6. A Photometric Observing Program at the VATT: Setting Up a Calibration Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis Philip, A. G.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Philip and Boyle have been making Strömgren and then Strömvil photometric observations of open and globular clusters at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. Our aim is to obtain CCD photometric indices good to 0.01 magnitude. Indices of this quality can later be analyzed to yield estimates of temperature, luminosity and metallicity. But we have found that the CCD chip does not yield photometry of this quality without further corrections. Our most observed cluster is the open cluster, M 67. This cluster is also very well observed in the literature. We took the best published values and created a set of "standard" stars for our field. Taking our CCD results we could calculate deltas, as a function of position on the chip, which we then applied to all the CCD frames that we obtained. With this procedure we were able to obtain the precision of 0.01 magnitudes in all the fields that we observed. When we started we were able to use the "A" two-inch square Strömgren four-color set from KPNO. Later the Vatican Observatory bought a set of 3.48 inch square Strömgren filters, The Vatican Observatory had a set of circular Vilnius filters There was also an X filter. These eight filters made our Strömvil set.

  7. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ER-Orionis ... February to April 2008 with the 51 cm telescope of Biruni Observatory of Shiraz University in U, B and V filters (Johnson system) and an RCA 4509 photomultiplier. ... Articles are also visible in Web of Science immediately.

  8. Photometric Study of Fourteen Low-mass Binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korda, D.; Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Vraštil, J.; Hoňková, K.

    2017-01-01

    New CCD photometric observations of fourteen short-period low-mass eclipsing binaries (LMBs) in the photometric filters I, R, and V were used for a light curve analysis. A discrepancy remains between observed radii and those derived from the theoretical modeling for LMBs, in general. Mass calibration of all observed LMBs was performed using only the photometric indices. The light curve modeling of these selected systems was completed, yielding the new derived masses and radii for both components. We compared these systems with the compilation of other known double-lined LMB systems with uncertainties of masses and radii less then 5%, which includes 66 components of binaries where both spectroscopy and photometry were combined together. All of our systems are circular short-period binaries, and for some of them, the photospheric spots were also used. A purely photometric study of the light curves without spectroscopy seems unable to achieve high enough precision and accuracy in the masses and radii to act as meaningful test of the M–R relation for low-mass stars.

  9. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  10. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  11. Solving the uncalibrated photometric stereo problem using total variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new method to solve the problem of uncalibrated photometric stereo, making very weak assumptions on the properties of the scene to be reconstructed. Our goal is to solve the generalized bas-relief ambiguity (GBR) by performing a total variation regularization of both...

  12. Photometric observations of Earth-impacting asteroid 2008 TC(3)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubal, M.; Gasdia, F.W.; Dantowitz, R.; Scheirich, Peter; Harris, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2011), s. 534-542 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : asteroid * photometric observations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2011

  13. PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR THE OSMOTIC BEHAVIOR OF RAT LIVER MICROSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Henry; James, Joseph M.; Anthony, William

    1963-01-01

    Electron microscope observations are consistent with the interpretation that the elements of the endoplasmic reticulum are osmotically active in situ as well as after isolation. More recently, it has been reported that microsomal suspensions equilibrate almost completely with added C14-sucrose and that no osmotic behavior is evident from photometric data. These findings were considered at variance with the electron microscope data. However, equilibration with added label simply attests to a relatively high permeability, and, in addition, the photometric data need not be critical. Osmotic volume changes, measured photometrically, may be masked by concomitant events (e.g., changes in the refractive index of the test solutions at varying osmotic pressures, breakdown of the particles, and agglutination). For these reasons the photometric experiments were repeated. In this work, the reciprocal of optical density of microsomal suspensions was found to vary linearly with the reciprocal of concentration of the medium at constant refractive index. These changes probably correspond to osmotic volume changes, since the effect was found to be (a) independent of substance used and (b) osmotically reversible. The transmission of the suspension was found to vary with the refractive index of the medium, the concentration of particles, and the wavelength of incident light, according to relationships that are similar to or identical with those obtained for mitochondrial suspensions. PMID:14064105

  14. Photometric Study of Fourteen Low-mass Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korda, D.; Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Vraštil, J. [Astronomical Institute, Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, CZ-180 00, Praha 8, V Holešovičkách 2 (Czech Republic); Hoňková, K., E-mail: korda@sirrah.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of Czech Astronomical Society, Vsetínská 941/78, CZ-757 01, Valašské Meziříčí (Czech Republic)

    2017-07-01

    New CCD photometric observations of fourteen short-period low-mass eclipsing binaries (LMBs) in the photometric filters I, R, and V were used for a light curve analysis. A discrepancy remains between observed radii and those derived from the theoretical modeling for LMBs, in general. Mass calibration of all observed LMBs was performed using only the photometric indices. The light curve modeling of these selected systems was completed, yielding the new derived masses and radii for both components. We compared these systems with the compilation of other known double-lined LMB systems with uncertainties of masses and radii less then 5%, which includes 66 components of binaries where both spectroscopy and photometry were combined together. All of our systems are circular short-period binaries, and for some of them, the photospheric spots were also used. A purely photometric study of the light curves without spectroscopy seems unable to achieve high enough precision and accuracy in the masses and radii to act as meaningful test of the M–R relation for low-mass stars.

  15. The Young Solar Analogs Project: Initial Photometric Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saken, Jon M.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2013-06-01

    Since 2007 we have been conducting spectroscopic monitoring of the Ca II H & K lines and G-band for a sample of 31 YSAs in order to better understand their activity cycles and variations, as well as the effects of young stars on their solar systems. The targets cover the spectral range of stars most likely to contain Earth analogs, F8-K2, and a broad enough range of ages, 0.3 Gyr - 1.5 Gyr, to investigate how activity level changes with stellar age. These studies are already showing possible evidence for activity cycles, large variations in starspot activity, and flaring events. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the nature of the stars' activity and examine the correlations between stellar brightness and chromospheric activity, we have started a complimentary campaign of photometric monitoring of these targets in Johnson B, V, and R, Stromgren v and H-alpha, with the use of a small robotic telescope dedicated to this project. This poster will present some results from the first year of photometric monitoring, focusing on the correlations between the photometric bands, and between the photometric and spectroscopic data, as well as an investigation of short-term (1-2 minutes) spectroscopic variations using data obtained earlier this year on the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT).

  16. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Photometric observations of the over-contact binary ER ORI were performed during November 2007 and February to April 2008 with the 51cm telescope of Biruni Observatory of Shiraz University in U, B and V filters (Johnson system) and an RCA 4509 photomultiplier. We used these data to obtain the light curves ...

  17. On the Photometric Error Calibration for the Differential Light Curves ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a value of 1.75 was estimated using the DLCs derived for pairs of steady stars ... apparently steady comparison stars present on the same CCD frame. ...... (2)) on the 262 steady star–star DLCs after accounting for the photometric error.

  18. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use is a device intended to duplicate...

  19. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA COSMOLOGY WITH BEAMS AND SDSS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlozek, Renee [Oxford Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kunz, Martin [Department de physique theorique, Universite de Geneve, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 68 Melrose Road, Muizenberg 7945 (South Africa); Varughese, Melvin [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7700 (South Africa); Kessler, Rick; Frieman, Joshua [The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 933 East 56th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Marriner, John [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building Burnaby Road Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Falck, Bridget; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 203 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: rhlozek@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Supernova (SN) cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier, which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of SNe with their probabilities derived from their multi-band light curves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 10{sup 4} SNe, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric SN cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples that have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically either are biased due to contamination or have significantly larger contours in the cosmological parameters due to small data sets. We then apply BEAMS to the 792 SDSS-II photometric SNe with host spectroscopic redshifts. In this case, BEAMS reduces the area of the {Omega}{sub m}, {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} contours by a factor of three relative to the case where only spectroscopically confirmed data are used (297 SNe). In the case of flatness, the constraints obtained on the matter density applying BEAMS to the photometric SDSS-II data are {Omega}{sup BEAMS}{sub m} = 0.194 {+-} 0.07. This illustrates the potential power of BEAMS for future large photometric SN surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  20. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA COSMOLOGY WITH BEAMS AND SDSS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlozek, Renée; Kunz, Martin; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James; Varughese, Melvin; Kessler, Rick; Frieman, Joshua; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Marriner, John; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Dilday, Ben; Falck, Bridget; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova (SN) cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier, which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of SNe with their probabilities derived from their multi-band light curves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 10 4 SNe, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric SN cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples that have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically either are biased due to contamination or have significantly larger contours in the cosmological parameters due to small data sets. We then apply BEAMS to the 792 SDSS-II photometric SNe with host spectroscopic redshifts. In this case, BEAMS reduces the area of the Ω m , Ω Λ contours by a factor of three relative to the case where only spectroscopically confirmed data are used (297 SNe). In the case of flatness, the constraints obtained on the matter density applying BEAMS to the photometric SDSS-II data are Ω BEAMS m = 0.194 ± 0.07. This illustrates the potential power of BEAMS for future large photometric SN surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  1. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Wright, Jason T. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16803 (United States); Aigrain, Suzanne [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Basri, Gibor [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Walkowicz, Lucianne M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  2. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Víctor; Cardiel, Nicolás; Espino, Néstor; Gallego, Jesús; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Espinosa, José Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Cenarro, Javier; Charlot, Stéphane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Donley, Jennifer; Gobat, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin 2 at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R ∼ 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3σ level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z ∼< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1.0-1.4 are well

  3. SHARDS: An Optical Spectro-photometric Survey of Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Víctor; Cardiel, Nicolás; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Espinosa, José Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Balcells, Marc; Cenarro, Javier; Cepa, Jordi; Charlot, Stéphane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Donley, Jennifer; Elbaz, David; Espino, Néstor; Gallego, Jesús; Gobat, R.; González-Martín, Omaira; Guzmán, Rafael; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Renzini, Alvio; Rodríguez-Zaurín, Javier; Tresse, Laurence; Trujillo, Ignacio; Zamorano, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin2 at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R ~ 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3σ level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1.0-1.4 are well described by an exponentially decaying star formation history with scale τ = 100-200 Myr, age around 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V) ~ 0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This

  4. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Victor; Cardiel, Nicolas; Espino, Nestor; Gallego, Jesus [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ferreras, Ignacio [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Cenarro, Javier [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon, Plaza San Juan 1, Planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Charlot, Stephane [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, UMR 7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Cimatti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Conselice, Christopher J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Donley, Jennifer [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gobat, R. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin{sup 2} at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R {approx} 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3{sigma} level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z {approx}< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at

  5. Quantum circuits cannot control unknown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, Mateus; Feix, Adrien; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential building blocks of classical computer programs is the ‘if’ clause, which executes a subroutine depending on the value of a control variable. Similarly, several quantum algorithms rely on applying a unitary operation conditioned on the state of a control system. Here we show that this control cannot be performed by a quantum circuit if the unitary is completely unknown. The task remains impossible even if we allow the control to be done modulo a global phase. However, this no-go theorem does not prevent implementing quantum control of unknown unitaries in practice, as any physical implementation of an unknown unitary provides additional information that makes the control possible. We then argue that one should extend the quantum circuit formalism to capture this possibility in a straightforward way. This is done by allowing unknown unitaries to be applied to subspaces and not only to subsystems. (paper)

  6. Multifocal, chronic osteomyelitis of unknown etiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Feltham, C.; James, M.; Nespoli, L.; Tamaela, L.; Pavia Univ.; Municipal Hospital, Nelson; Medical School, Jakarta

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of multifocal osteomyelitis of unknown origin in childhood are reported. The variable clinical and radiographic appearances of the disease are illustrated and the diagnostic difficulties in the early stages of the disease are stressed. (orig.) [de

  7. Known Unknowns in Judgment and Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how people make inferences about missing information. Whereas most prior literature focuses on how people process known information, I show that the extent to which people make inferences about missing information impacts judgments and choices. Specifically, I investigate how (1) awareness of known unknowns affects overconfidence in judgment in Chapter 1, (2) beliefs about the knowability of unknowns impacts investment strategies in Chapter 2, and (3) inferences...

  8. Mobile assistant for unknown caller identification

    OpenAIRE

    Hribernik, Andraž

    2012-01-01

    The main motivation of this diploma thesis is a development of Android application, which helps user of application to find out who is the owner of unknown phone number. Data source for finding unknown phone number are free available web sources. Through the development of prototype, data from different web sources were integrated. Result of this integration is shown in Android application. Data integration includes access to semi-structured data on web portal of Phone Directory of Slovenia, ...

  9. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g P1 r P1 i P1 z P1 y P1 ) over the entire sky north of declination –30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, ≈19% for stars, and ≈28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 × Median|z phot – z spec |/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (–0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average –0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  10. IDENTIFICATIONS AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF THE 2 Ms CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Rafferty, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Brusa, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Bauer, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Vignali, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the ∼2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 442 (95.7%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of ∼ 6.2%; we also selected four additional likely counterparts. The majority of the other 16 X-ray sources appear to be off-nuclear sources, sources associated with galaxy groups and clusters, high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or spurious X-ray sources. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). High accuracy in the derived photo-z's is accomplished owing to (1) the up-to-date photometric data covering the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the X-ray sources, (2) more accurate photometric data as a result of source deblending for ∼10% of the sources in the infrared bands and a few percent in the optical and near-infrared bands, (3) a set of 265 galaxy, AGN, and galaxy/AGN hybrid templates carefully constructed to best represent all possible SEDs, (4) the Zurich Extragalactic Bayesian Redshift Analyzer used to derive the photo-z's, which corrects the SED templates to best represent the SEDs of real sources at different redshifts and thus improves the photo-z quality. The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of |Δz|/(1 + z) ∼ 1% and an outlier [with |

  11. Identifications and Photometric Redshifts of the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Brusa, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Mainieri, V.; Rafferty, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Silverman, J. D.; Vignali, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the ≈2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 442 (95.7%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of ≈ 6.2%; we also selected four additional likely counterparts. The majority of the other 16 X-ray sources appear to be off-nuclear sources, sources associated with galaxy groups and clusters, high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or spurious X-ray sources. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). High accuracy in the derived photo-z's is accomplished owing to (1) the up-to-date photometric data covering the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the X-ray sources, (2) more accurate photometric data as a result of source deblending for ≈10% of the sources in the infrared bands and a few percent in the optical and near-infrared bands, (3) a set of 265 galaxy, AGN, and galaxy/AGN hybrid templates carefully constructed to best represent all possible SEDs, (4) the Zurich Extragalactic Bayesian Redshift Analyzer used to derive the photo-z's, which corrects the SED templates to best represent the SEDs of real sources at different redshifts and thus improves the photo-z quality. The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of |Δz|/(1 + z) ≈ 1% and an outlier [with |

  12. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  13. Selective extraction-photometric determination of cadmium by basic dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, P P; Balog, J S [Uzhgorodskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-12-01

    Two variants of selective extraction-photometric determination of cadmium with basic dyes have been developed. In the first one, cadmium is extracted as the iodide by a tributyl phosphate solution in benzene from aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M KI (pH 6-10). Then the cadmium is transformed into a coloured ion associate by treatment of the extracts with Malachite Green in the presence of iodide ions. In the second case, the extract is equilibrated with an equeous solutions of Rhodamine B in the presence of KBr. In this variant, the cadmium is transformed into an anionic iodide-bromide complex which reacts with Rhodamine B cations to form an ion associate. Procedures have been developed of selective extraction-photometric determination of cadmium in sulphur, indium-gallium and zinc concentrates, Zn-As-Cd-Se and Zn-As-Cd-Te films, Cd-S-In and Ga-Sb-Cd-Te alloys.

  14. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' machine-learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  15. Photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO DRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Tian, J. F.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Luo, C. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.; Luo, Z. Q.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO Dra. Simultaneous B- and V-band photometry of the star was carried out on 14 nights. A revised orbital period and a new ephemeris were derived from the data. The first photometric solution of the binary system and the physical parameters of the component stars are determined. They reveal that OO Dra could be a detached system with a less-massive secondary component nearly filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. A frequency analysis of the residual light yields two confident pulsation modes in both B- and V-band data with the dominant frequency detected at 41.865 c/d. A brief discussion concerning the evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of the binary system is finally given.

  16. Physical characterization of asteroid surfaces from photometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.

    1989-01-01

    Rigorous photometric models, like Hapke's equation, can be applied to the analysis of disk-integrated phase curves in order to estimate a variety of regolith physical properties (average particle single-scattering albedo, particle transparency, soil compaction and large-scale roughness). Unfortunately, unambiguous interpretation is difficult due to uncertainties introduced by the irregular shapes of many asteroids and because Earth-based observations are often restricted to small phase angles (<30 degrees). In this chapter, the authors explore in detail how incomplete phase-angle coverage and nonsphericity of asteroids limits the reliable determination of Hapke's photometric parameters from asteroid phase curves. From obtainable Earth-based observations, it is possible to derive useful relative comparisons of single-scattering albedos, opposition-surge amplitudes, and regolith compaction states for different asteroids

  17. An optrode for photometric detection of ammonia in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzanovskii, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    A scheme of constructing an LED optrode for photometric detection of ammonia in air is considered. The components of the device are (1) a glass plate coated with a film of polydimethylsiloxane with an ion-coupled cation of brilliant-green dye, (2) an LED emitting at a wavelength of 655 nm, and (3) a metal housing. The nominal static conversion function, sensitivity, and relative measurement error of the device are analyzed on the basis of mathematical modeling. The obtained results allow one to design an LED optrode capable of carrying out control for automated technological processes, solving problems in the area of security, etc. The device provides the ability to create photometric gas analyzers of ammonia with small overall dimensions, power consumption, and cost.

  18. MYRaf: A new Approach with IRAF for Astronomical Photometric Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Y.; Shameoni Niaei, M.; Özeren, F. F.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the design and some developments of MYRaf software for astronomical photometric reduction are presented. MYRaf software is an easy to use, reliable, and has a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tools. MYRaf software is an important step for the automated software process of robotic telescopes, and uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and Sextractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python and uses the QT framework.

  19. Photometric classification and redshift estimation of LSST Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mi; Kuhlmann, Steve; Wang, Yun; Kovacs, Eve

    2018-04-01

    Supernova (SN) classification and redshift estimation using photometric data only have become very important for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), given the large number of SNe that LSST will observe and the impossibility of spectroscopically following up all the SNe. We investigate the performance of a SN classifier that uses SN colors to classify LSST SNe with the Random Forest classification algorithm. Our classifier results in an AUC of 0.98 which represents excellent classification. We are able to obtain a photometric SN sample containing 99% SNe Ia by choosing a probability threshold. We estimate the photometric redshifts (photo-z) of SNe in our sample by fitting the SN light curves using the SALT2 model with nested sampling. We obtain a mean bias () of 0.012 with σ ( z_phot-z_spec/1+z_spec) = 0.0294 without using a host-galaxy photo-z prior, and a mean bias () of 0.0017 with σ ( z_phot-z_spec/1+z_spec) = 0.0116 using a host-galaxy photo-z prior. Assuming a flat ΛCDM model with Ωm = 0.3, we obtain Ωm of 0.305 ± 0.008 (statistical errors only), using the simulated LSST sample of photometric SNe Ia (with intrinsic scatter σint = 0.11) derived using our methodology without using host-galaxy photo-z prior. Our method will help boost the power of SNe from the LSST as cosmological probes.

  20. Extractive photometric determination of zirconium in magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutyrev, I.M.; Chernysheva, G.M.; Basargin, N.N.; Mikheev, N.I.

    1996-01-01

    A method for extractive photometric determination of Zr in magnetic alloys is presented. Extractive system - trioctylamine in toluene -H 2 SO 4 -Zr ensure selective and rapid (in single extraction) separation of Zr from Fe(3), Fe(2), Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ti, Cr(3), Mn, Si, P, Nb, and Ta. The reliability of the method is confirmed in determination of Zr in the standerd sample SS 132c

  1. Photometric properties of galaxies in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, D. W.; Blanton, M.; SDSS Collaboration

    2001-12-01

    We analyze the number density distribution of galaxy properties in a sample of 8x 104 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, in the redshift range 0.02calculated for each galaxy. The photometry is of excellent quality; every galaxy has CCD imaging with signal-to-noise for the flux well above 100. The distribution of galaxies in the (six-dimensional) space spanned by four colors, central surface-brightness, and radial concentration is described and analyzed, with the following results: \\textsl{(1)} The galaxies occupy only a small part of the six-dimensional space. \\textsl{(2)} The distribution of galaxy number density in the space is a strong function of intrinsic galaxy luminosity. \\textsl{(3)} Elliptical (or early type) and spiral (or late type) galaxies are clearly separated in the space. The ratio of early-type to late-type galaxy contributions to the luminosity density of the Universe is computed, as a function of wavelength. At 1 {μm }, early-type galaxies dominate the luminosity density. \\textsl{(4)} Outliers in color tend to be lower surface-brightness galaxies. Funding for the SDSS has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the SDSS member institutions, NASA, NSF, DOE, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, and the Max Planck Society. This research has been supported by the NYU Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

  2. Dynamical and photometric models of star formation in tidal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Test particles are initially placed in circular orbits around a softened point mass and then perturbed by a companion passing in a parabotic orbit. During the passage, the density evolution of the galaxy is examined both in regions within the disk and in selected comoving regions in the tidal features. Even without the inclusion of self-gravity and hydrodynamics, regions of compression form inside the disk, along the tidal tail, and in the tidal bridge causing local density increases of up to 500 percent. By assuming that the density changes relate to the star-formation rate via a Schmidt (1959) law, limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star-formation rate are explored using a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Density changes similar to those found in the dynamical models will cause detectable changes in the colors of a stellar population. From these models, it is determined that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. 52 refs

  3. Photometric Calibration of the SPRED at the FTU Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M J

    1999-01-01

    The SPRED spectrometer was photometrically calibrated by using the FTU tokamak plasma and the Grazing Incidence Time Resolving Spectrometer (GRITS) from the Johns Hopkins University [Stratton, Nucl. Fusion, Vol. 24, No. 6, pp. 767-777, 1984]. The photometric calibration of the GRITS spectrometer was transferred to the SPRED [Fonck, R.J., Applied Optics, Vol. 21, No. 12, p. 2115 (1982)] by directly comparing the intensity of bright lines emitted from the FTU tokamak plasma that were simultaneously measured by both spectrometers. The GRITS spectrometer (λ = 10 - 360 (angstrom); Δλ ∼ 0.7 (angstrom)) was photometrically calibrated in the 50 - 360 (angstrom) spectral range at the SURF II synchrotron light source at NIST in Gaithersburg MD in August 1997. The calibration of each SPRED grating was performed separately. These gratings covered the short wavelengths: 100 - 300 (angstrom)(Δλ - 1.4 (angstrom)) and the long wavelengths: 200 - 1800 (angstrom) (Δλ ∼ 7 (angstrom)). This calibration should be accurate until the microchannel plate of the SPRED is exposed to atmospheric pressure. This calibration is similar to the one obtained by Stratton [Stratton, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 57 (8), pp. 204,3 August 1986

  4. Multicolor photometric study of M31 globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhou; Ma Jun; Zhou Xu

    2009-01-01

    We present the photometry of 30 globular clusters (GCs) and GC candidates in 15 intermediate-band filters covering the wavelength region from ∼3000 to ∼10000 A using the archival CCD images of M31 observed as part of the Beijing - Arizona - Taiwan - Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey. We transform these intermediate-band photometric data into the photometry in the standard U BV RI broad-bands. These M31 GC candidates are selected from the Revised Bologna Catalog (RBC V.3.5), and most of these candidates do not have any photometric data. Therefore, the presented photometric data are a supplement to the RBC V.3.5. We find that 4 out of 61 GCs and GC candidates in RBC V.3.5 do not show any signal on the BATC images at their locations. By applying a linear fit of the distribution in the color-magnitude diagram of blue GCs and GC candidates using data from the RBC V.3.5, in this study, we find the 'blue-tilt' of blue M31 GCs with a high confidence at 99.95% or 3.47σ for the confirmed GCs, and > 99.99% or 4.87σ for GCs and GC candidates. (research papers)

  5. Infrared and CCD photometric study of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manousoyannaki, I.

    1986-01-01

    Infrared J (1.2 μm), H (1.6 μm), and K (2.2 μm) photometry is presented for a subsample of galaxies with morphological types of Sc and Sb of the sample types Sc and Sb of the sample by Rubin et al. and one edge-on spiral galaxy. After an overview of the science of infrared photometry, accurate photometric magnitudes are derived via curves of growth that have been computed using a compiled catalogue of galaxies observed in the infrared. The catalogue is presented in Appendix I. The photometric data are used to derive mass to light ratio distribution and the colors for each galaxy. Several correlations of photometric and dynamical quantities are examined and discussed as integral properties of the two morphological types. The main result of this analysis is that the mass to H-light ratio is independent of radius and of H-luminosity and is a good measure of the stellar component of the galaxy. Emphasis is placed on the Tully-Fisher, absolute magnitude vs log (rotational velocity), relation and its application to derive distances of galaxies. The data are used to derive surface brightness distribution profiles and decompose the profiles to spheroidal and disk components. The radial distribution of color in these galaxies is also discussed

  6. A simple micro-photometric method for urinary iodine determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Gabriele; Lindorfer, Heidelinde; Kieweg, Heidi; Marculescu, Rodrig; Hoffmann, Martha; Gessl, Alois; Sager, Manfred; Bieglmayer, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Urinary iodide concentration (UIC) is useful to evaluate nutritional iodine status. In clinical settings UIC helps to exclude blocking of the thyroid gland by excessive endogenous iodine, if diagnostic or therapeutic administration of radio-iodine is indicated. Therefore, this study established a simple test for the measurement of UIC. UIC was analyzed in urine samples of 200 patients. Samples were pre-treated at 95°C for 45 min with ammonium persulfate in a thermal cycler, followed by a photometric Sandell-Kolthoff reaction (SK) carried out in microtiter plates. For method comparison, UIC was analyzed in 30 samples by inductivity coupled plasma mass spectro-metry (ICP-MS) as a reference method. Incubation conditions were optimized concerning recovery. The photometric test correlated well to the reference method (SK=0.91*ICP-MS+1, r=0.962) and presented with a functional sensitivity of 20 μg/L. UIC of patient samples ranged from photometric test provides satisfactory results and can be performed with the basic equipment of a clinical laboratory.

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; email = neilsen@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data

  8. A PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SEVENTEEN BINARY STARS USING SPECKLE IMAGING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, James W.; Baptista, Brian J.; Horch, Elliott P.; Franz, Otto; Van Altena, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Magnitude differences obtained from speckle imaging are used in combination with other data in the literature to place the components of binary star systems on the H-R diagram. Isochrones are compared with the positions obtained, and a best-fit isochrone is determined for each system, yielding both masses of the components as well as an age range consistent with the system parameters. Seventeen systems are studied, 12 of which were observed with the 0.6 m Lowell-Tololo Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and six of which were observed with the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope (The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories) at Kitt Peak. One system was observed from both sites. In comparing photometric masses to mass information from orbit determinations, we find that the photometric masses agree very well with the dynamical masses, and are generally more precise. For three systems, no dynamical masses exist at present, and therefore the photometrically determined values are the first mass estimates derived for these components.

  9. Derivation of photometric redshifts for the 3XMM catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Mountrichas, G.; Ruiz, A.; Masoura, V.; Fotopoulou, S.; Watson, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results from our ESA Prodex project that aims to derive photometric redshifts for the 3XMM catalogue. The 3XMM DR-6 offers the largest X-ray survey, containing 470,000 unique sources over 1000 sq. degrees. We cross-correlate the X-ray positions with optical and near-IR catalogues using Bayesian statistics. The optical catalogue used so far is the SDSS while currently we are employing the recently released PANSTARRS catalogue. In the near IR we use the Viking, VHS, UKIDS surveys and also the WISE W1 and W2 filters. The estimation of photometric redshifts is based on the TPZ software. The training sample is based on X-ray selected samples with available SDSS spectroscopy. We present here the results for the 40,000 3XMM sources with available SDSS counterparts. Our analysis provides very reliable photometric redshifts with sigma(mad)=0.05 and a fraction of outliers of 8% for the optically extended sources. We discuss the wide range of applications that are feasible using this unprecedented resource.

  10. Protocol for counterfactually transporting an unknown qubit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim eSalih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum teleportation circumvents the uncertainty principle using dual channels: a quantum one consisting of previously-shared entanglement, and a classical one, together allowing the disembodied transport of an unknown quantum state over distance. It has recently been shown that a classical bit can be counterfactually communicated between two parties in empty space, Alice and Bob. Here, by using our dual version of the chained quantum Zeno effect to achieve a counterfactual CNOT gate, we propose a protocol for transporting an unknown qubit counterfactually, that is without any physical particles travelling between Alice and Bob—no classical channel and no previously-shared entanglement.

  11. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION USING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, B. H. F.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R. L. C.; De Simoni, F.; Benoist, C.; Makler, M.; Mesquita, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of using photometric redshifts for studying the evolution of both the global galaxy luminosity function (LF) and that for different galaxy types. To this end, we compare the LFs obtained using photometric redshifts from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) D1 field with those from the spectroscopic survey VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) comprising ∼4800 galaxies. We find that for z ≤ 2.0, in the interval of magnitudes considered by this survey, the LFs obtained using photometric and spectroscopic redshifts show a remarkable agreement. This good agreement led us to use all four Deep fields of the CFHTLS comprising ∼386,000 galaxies to compute the LF of the combined fields and directly estimate the error in the parameters based on the field-to-field variation. We find that the characteristic absolute magnitude M* of Schechter fits fades by ∼0.7 mag from z ∼ 1.8 to z ∼ 0.3, while the characteristic density φ* increases by a factor of ∼4 in the same redshift interval. We use the galaxy classification provided by the template fitting program used to compute photometric redshifts and split the sample into galaxy types. We find that these Schechter parameters evolve differently for each galaxy type, an indication that their evolution is a combination of several effects: galaxy merging, star formation quenching, and mass assembly. All these results are compatible with those obtained by different spectroscopic surveys such as VVDS, DEEP2, and zCosmos, which reinforces the fact that photometric redshifts can be used to study galaxy evolution, at least for the redshift bins adopted so far. This is of great interest since future very large imaging surveys containing hundreds of millions of galaxies will allow us to obtain important precise measurements to constrain the evolution of the LF and to explore the dependence of this evolution on morphology and/or color helping constrain the mechanisms of galaxy evolution.

  12. CALIBRATION OF THE MEARTH PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM: OPTICAL MAGNITUDES AND PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR 1802 NEARBY M-DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color–magnitude–metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = −0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = −0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet–metallicity correlation

  13. CALIBRATION OF THE MEARTH PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM: OPTICAL MAGNITUDES AND PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR 1802 NEARBY M-DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color–magnitude–metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = −0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = −0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet–metallicity correlation.

  14. Multifocal chronic osteomyelitis of unknown etiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, K.; Masel, J.; Harbison, S.; Yu, J.; Royal Brisbane Children Hospital; Regional Hospital Bowral

    1983-01-01

    Five cases of chronic, inflammatory, multifocal bone lesions of unknown etiology are reported. Although bone biopsy confirmed osteomyelitis in each case in none of them were organisms found inspite of an extensive work up. Different clinical course of the disease reflects different aetiology in respective cases. These cases present changing aspects of osteomyelitis emerging since introduction of antibiotics. (orig.)

  15. Photometric investigation of the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 297. I. Quasisimultaneous UBVRIJHK observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Yu.K.; Kozlov, V.P.; Krivtsov, A.A.; Miroshnichenko, A.S.; Yudin, R.V.; Yutanov, N.Yu.; Dzhakusheva, K.G.; Kuratov, K.S.; Mukanov, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    In order to make a statistical investigation of the photometric variability of the young star MWC 297 a number of quasisimultaneous observations in the photometric bands UBVRIJHK has been made. The coefficients of the correlation between the variations of the brightness in the different photometric bands have been determined by the proposed method. An anticorrelation between the variations in the bands U and K has been found. A possible mechanisms of the irregular variability of the star is proposed

  16. Melanoma of unknown origin: a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, J

    2010-12-01

    The natural history of metastatic melanoma involving lymph nodes, in the absence of a known primary site (cutaneous, ocular or mucosal) has, to date, been poorly defined; and the optimal management of this rare subtype of disease is therefore unclear. Melanomas of unknown primary site (MUP) are estimated to comprise between 3.7 and 6% of all melanomas (Anbari et al. in Cancer 79:1861-1821, 1997).

  17. Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton; He, Ruijie; Roy, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are already commodities on ground vehicles, air vehicles seeking the same performance face unique challenges. In this paper, we describe the difficulties in achieving fully autonomous helicopter flight, highlighting the differences between ground and helicopter robots that make it ...

  18. Multidimensional procurement auctions with unknown weights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Thomas

    This paper studies the consequences of holding a procurement auction when the principal chooses not to show its preferences. My paper extends the procurement auction model of Che (1993) to a situation where both the principal and the agents have private information. Thus, unknown parameters of bo...... gives rise to an analysis of a principal that can not fully commit to the outcome induced by the scoring rule. Therefore, my result apply to contract theory and it’s problems with imperfect commitment....

  19. Dynamic and photometric evolutionary models of tidal tails and ripples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broad-band photometric evolutionary code. In these models, regions of compression form inside the disk and along the tidal tail and tidal bridge. The effects these density changes have on the colors of the tidal features are examined with a broad-band photometric evolutionary code. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star formation rate are explored. Limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated using a Schmidt (1959) law. These models suggest that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. The Lynds and Toomre (1976) interpretation of ring galaxies as the natural result of a nearly head-on collision between a disk galaxy and a companion galaxy has become widely accepted. Similarly, Quinn's (1984) interpretation of the shells in elliptical galaxies as the aftermath of the cannibalization of a low-mass companion has been quite successful in accounting for the observations. Restricted three-body calculations of high inclination, low impact parameter encounters demonstrate that the shell-like ripples observed in a number of disk galaxies can also be produced as collisional artifacts from internal oscillations much as in ring galaxies

  20. The VISTA ZYJHKs photometric system: calibration from 2MASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, C.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Irwin, M. J.; González-Solares, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Lewis, J. R.; Emerson, J. P.; Hewett, P. C.; Yoldaş, A. K.; Riello, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the routine photometric calibration of data taken with the VISTA infrared camera (VIRCAM) instrument on the ESO Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) telescope. The broad-band ZYJHKs data are directly calibrated from Two Micron all Sky Survey (2MASS) point sources visible in every VISTA image. We present the empirical transformations between the 2MASS and VISTA, and Wide-Field Camera and VISTA, photometric systems for regions of low reddening. We investigate the long-term performance of VISTA+VIRCAM. An investigation of the dependence of the photometric calibration on interstellar reddening leads to these conclusions: (1) For all broad-band filters, a linear colour-dependent correction compensates the gross effects of reddening where E(B - V) < 5.0. (2) For Z and Y, there is a significantly larger scatter above E(B - V) = 5.0, and insufficient measurements to adequately constrain the relation beyond this value. (3) The JHKs filters can be corrected to a few per cent up to E(B - V) = 10.0. We analyse spatial systematics over month-long time-scales, both inter- and intradetector and show that these are present only at very low levels in VISTA. We monitor and remove residual detector-to-detector offsets. We compare the calibration of the main pipeline products: pawprints and tiles. We show how variable seeing and transparency affect the final calibration accuracy of VISTA tiles, and discuss a technique, grouting, for mitigating these effects. Comparison between repeated reference fields is used to demonstrate that the VISTA photometry is precise to better than ≃ 2 per cent for the YJHKs bands and 3 per cent for the Z bands. Finally, we present empirically determined offsets to transform VISTA magnitudes into a true Vega system.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; O' Connell, Ross [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong; Schlegel, David; Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94702 (United States); Ross, Ashley [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Hirata, Christopher; Huff, Eric; Weinberg, David [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Strauss, Michael; Bahcall, Neta [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie, E-mail: shirleyh@andrew.cmu.edu [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0∼ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h{sup −3} Gpc{sup 3}. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ∼ 25% over a bin width of δ{sub l} ∼ 10−15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0ℓ ∼ 2−3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of f{sub NL} = −113{sup +154}{sub −154} (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be

  2. Photometric and emission-spectrometric determination of boron in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierig, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the photometric determination of boron in unalloyed and alloyed steels is described, in which Curcumine is used as reagent. A separation of boron is not necessary. Limit of detection: 0.0003% B. The decomposition of boron nitride in the steel is achieved by heating the whole sample in fuming sulphuric acid/phosphoric acid. For the emission spectrometric investigation of solid steel samples and for the spectrochemical analysis of solutions with plasma excitation working parameters are given and possibilities of interferences are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  3. A photometric map of interstellar reddening within 100 PC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C. L.; Johnston, L.; Crawford, D. L.

    1982-12-01

    Color excesses and distances are calculated for 300 bright, northern, late F stars using uvby beta photometric indices. The data allow an extension of the earlier maps by Perry and Johnston of the spatial distribution of interstellar reddening into the local (r less than 100 pc) solar neighborhood. Some definite conclusions are made regarding the distribution of interstellar dust in the northern hemisphere and within 300 pc of the sun by merging these results and the polarimetric observations by Tinbergen (1982) for 180 stars within 35 pc of the sun.

  4. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.

  5. Photometric determination of yttrium in zirconium-containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbina, T.M.; Polezhaev, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of different ways of eliminating the zirconium interfering effect on the results of yttrium photometric determination with arsenazo 2 in artificial mixtures of Y 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 , containing 5 and 10 mol.% Y 2 O 3 , has been carried out. The effect of Zr is eliminated by means of its precipitation by ammonium solution in the form of hydroxide and using camouflaging with 25% sulfosalicylic acid. Both ways do not provide a correct enough result. The use of non-reagent thermohydrolytic Zr precipitation during the analysis of zirconium-containing materials permits to obtain correct and well-reproducible results

  6. Photometric monitoring of pre-main sequence stars - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.; Davies, J.K.; Kilkenny, D.; Bode, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the infrared and optical photometric variability of the pre-main sequence stars BF Ori and UX Ori. In the former case, the reddening that occurs during decline, at both optical and infrared wavelengths, is consistent with variable extinction by circumstellar grains having an interstellar-like reddening law. While in the case of UX Ori, the data suggest variability due to starspots. In both cases, a study of the polarimetric variability would be valuable to confirm these conclusions. (author)

  7. Evolution of the clustering of photometrically selected SDSS galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Ashley; Percival, Will; Brunner, R.

    2010-01-01

    We measure the angular auto-correlation functions, ω(θ), of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies selected to have photometric redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.4 and absolute r-band magnitudes Mr < −21.2. We split these galaxies into five overlapping redshift shells of width 0.1 and measure ω(θ) in each subsample in order to investigate the evolution of SDSS galaxies. We find that the bias increases substantially with redshift – much more so than one would expect for a passively evolving sample. We u...

  8. SymPS: BRDF Symmetry Guided Photometric Stereo for Shape and Light Source Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feng; Chen, Xiaowu; Sato, Imari; Sato, Yoichi

    2018-01-01

    We propose uncalibrated photometric stereo methods that address the problem due to unknown isotropic reflectance. At the core of our methods is the notion of "constrained half-vector symmetry" for general isotropic BRDFs. We show that such symmetry can be observed in various real-world materials, and it leads to new techniques for shape and light source estimation. Based on the 1D and 2D representations of the symmetry, we propose two methods for surface normal estimation; one focuses on accurate elevation angle recovery for surface normals when the light sources only cover the visible hemisphere, and the other for comprehensive surface normal optimization in the case that the light sources are also non-uniformly distributed. The proposed robust light source estimation method also plays an essential role to let our methods work in an uncalibrated manner with good accuracy. Quantitative evaluations are conducted with both synthetic and real-world scenes, which produce the state-of-the-art accuracy for all of the non-Lambertian materials in MERL database and the real-world datasets.

  9. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H 2 knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H 2 emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  10. DETECTION OF KOI-13.01 USING THE PHOTOMETRIC ORBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shporer, Avi; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Still, Martin D.; Welsh, William F.

    2011-01-01

    We use the KOI-13 transiting star-planet system as a test case for the recently developed BEER algorithm, aimed at identifying non-transiting low-mass companions by detecting the photometric variability induced by the companion along its orbit. Such photometric variability is generated by three mechanisms: the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and reflection/heating. We use data from three Kepler quarters, from the first year of the mission, while ignoring measurements within the transit and occultation, and show that the planet's ephemeris is clearly detected. We fit for the amplitude of each of the three effects and use the beaming effect amplitude to estimate the planet's minimum mass, which results in M p sin i = 9.2 ± 1.1 M J (assuming the host star parameters derived by Szabo et al.). Our results show that non-transiting star-planet systems similar to KOI-13.01 can be detected in Kepler data, including a measurement of the orbital ephemeris and the planet's minimum mass. Moreover, we derive a realistic estimate of the amplitudes uncertainties, and use it to show that data obtained during the entire lifetime of the Kepler mission of 3.5 years will allow detecting non-transiting close-in low-mass companions orbiting bright stars, down to the few Jupiter mass level. Data from the Kepler Extended Mission, if funded by NASA, will further improve the detection capabilities.

  11. Hierarchical Matching and Regression with Application to Photometric Redshift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Fionn

    2017-06-01

    This work emphasizes that heterogeneity, diversity, discontinuity, and discreteness in data is to be exploited in classification and regression problems. A global a priori model may not be desirable. For data analytics in cosmology, this is motivated by the variety of cosmological objects such as elliptical, spiral, active, and merging galaxies at a wide range of redshifts. Our aim is matching and similarity-based analytics that takes account of discrete relationships in the data. The information structure of the data is represented by a hierarchy or tree where the branch structure, rather than just the proximity, is important. The representation is related to p-adic number theory. The clustering or binning of the data values, related to the precision of the measurements, has a central role in this methodology. If used for regression, our approach is a method of cluster-wise regression, generalizing nearest neighbour regression. Both to exemplify this analytics approach, and to demonstrate computational benefits, we address the well-known photometric redshift or `photo-z' problem, seeking to match Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic and photometric redshifts.

  12. Photometric Calibration of the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Sarah Anne; Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is an instrument available on the Gemini South telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, utilizing the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). In order to allow users to easily perform photometry with this instrument and to monitor any changes in the instrument in the future, we seek to set up a process for performing photometric calibration with standard star observations taken across the time of the instrument’s operation. We construct a Python-based pipeline that includes IRAF wrappers for reduction and combines the AstroPy photutils package and original Python scripts with the IRAF apphot and photcal packages to carry out photometry and linear regression fitting. Using the pipeline, we examine standard star observations made with GSAOI on 68 nights between 2013 and 2015 in order to determine the nightly photometric zero points in the J, H, Kshort, and K bands. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, processed using the Gemini IRAF and gemini_python packages, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  13. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the first point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric flux within the camera bandpass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at approx. 0.20 mag, and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to 0.05 - 0.10 mag in both filtered and unfiltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics. These improvements are essential to accurately measuring photometric masses of individual meteors and source mass indexes.

  14. Astrometric and photometric study of the open cluster NGC 2323

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin M.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the open cluster NGC 2323 using astrometric and photometric data. In our study we used two methods that are able to separate open cluster’s stars from those that belong to the stellar background. Our results of calculations by these two methods indicate that: 1 according to the membership probability, NGC 2323 should contain 497 stars, 2 the cluster center should be at 07h 02m 48.s02 and -08° 20' 17''74,3 the limiting radius of NGC 2323 is 2.31 ± 0.04 pc, the surface number density at this radius is 98.16 stars pc −2, 4 the magnitude function has a maximum at about mv = 14 mag, 5 the total mass of NGC 2323 is estimated dynamically by using astrometric data to be 890 M_, and statistically by using photometric data to be 900 M_, and 6 the distance and age of the cluster are found to be equal to 900 ± 100 pc, and 140 ± 20 Myr, respectively. Finally the dynamical evolution parameter τ of the cluster is about 436.2.

  15. PNN NGC 246: A Complex Photometric Behaviour That Requires Wet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez J. M. González

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a study over three single-site campaigns to investigate the photometric behaviour of the PNN NGC 246. We observed this object in 2000 and 2001. The analysis of the light curves indicates complex and variable temporal spectra. Using wavelet analysis we have found evidences for changes on time scales of hours in the 2000 dataset. The temporal spectra obtained during 2001 are quite different from the results of the previous year. The modulations in the light curve are more noticeable and the temporal spectra present a higher number of modulation frequencies. One peculiar characteristic is the presence of a variable harmonic structure related to one of these modulation frequencies. This complex photometric behaviour may be explained by a more complicated unresolved combination of modulation frequencies, but more likely due to a combination of pulsations of the star plus modulations related to interaction with a close companion, maybe indicating a disc. However, these characteristics cannot be confirmed from single site observations. The complex and variable behaviour of NGC 246 needs the WET co-operation in order to completely resolve its light curve.

  16. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' < or = 18 mag), with 4500 K < or = Teff < or = 7000 K, corresponding to those with the most reliable SSPP estimates, I find that the model predicts [Fe/H] values with a root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of approx.0.27 dex. The RMSE from this machine-learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  17. A PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATE OF THE VIRGO STELLAR OVERDENSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Deokkeun; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Masseron, Thomas; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Delahaye, Franck; Yanny, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 deg 2 on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 ± 0.1(internal) ± 0.5(systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from ∼10 kpc to ∼20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within Δ[Fe/H] ≤ 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond ∼10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passband.

  18. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Scolnic, Daniel; Riess, Adam; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert; Berger, Edo; Kessler, Rick; Pan, Yen-Chen; Foley, Ryan; Chornock, Ryan; Ortega, Carolyn; Challis, Peter; Burgett, William; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter; Flewelling, Heather; Huber, Mark; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Chris; Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken

    2018-01-01

    We use nearly 1,200 supernovae (SNe) from Pan-STARRS and ~200 low-z (z energy equation of state parameter w to be -0.986±0.058 (stat+sys). If we allow w to evolve with redshift as w(a) = w0 + wa(1-a), we find w0 = -0.923±0.148 and wa = -0.404±0.797. These results are consistent with measurements of cosmological parameters from the JLA and from a new analysis of 1049 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (Scolnic et al. 2017). We try four different photometric classification priors for Pan-STARRS SNe and two alternate ways of modeling the CC SN contamination, finding that none of these variants gives a w that differs by more than 1% from the baseline measurement. The systematic uncertainty on w due to marginalizing over the CC SN contamination, σwCC = 0.019, is approximately equal to the photometric calibration uncertainty and is lower than the systematic uncertainty in the SN\\,Ia dispersion model (σwdisp = 0.024). Our data provide one of the best current constraints on w, demonstrating that samples with ~5% CC SN contamination can give competitive cosmological constraints when the contaminating distribution is marginalized over in a Bayesian framework.

  19. A photometric function of planetary surfaces for gourmets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkuratov, Yuriy; Korokhin, Viktor; Shevchenko, Vasilij; Mikhalchenko, Olga; Belskaya, Irina; Kaydash, Vadym; Videen, Gorden; Zubko, Evgenij; Velikodsky, Yuriy

    2018-03-01

    A new photometric model with small number of parameters is presented. The model is based on an assumption that there exist such surfaces for which spatial brightness variations caused by small topography undulations can be reproduced exactly by corresponding spatial variations of albedo. This indistinguishability results in a differential equation suggesting a new photometric function that generalizes, in particular, the Akimov disk-function. Our model provides excellent fits in a wide phase-angle range for integral observations of asteroids of different albedos. We also carried out fitting to integral observations of the Moon and Mercury, confirming difficulties in describing Mercury's phase function at large phase angles, which were also found for the Hapke model. Comparisons of global latitude and longitude trends with our model calculations have shown good coincidence for the Moon. To retrieve the lunar trends, we use the phase-ratio technique, applying it to our telescope observations. Mapping the model parameters using LROC WAC data were carried out for a region comprising the Reiner Gamma formation. This mapping allows us to calculate phase-ratio images of the region, showing at large phase angles systematically steeper phase curves of young craters and smaller steepness for the very Reiner Gamma formation.

  20. AMICO: optimized detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Roncarelli, Mauro; Maturi, Matteo; Moscardini, Lauro

    2018-02-01

    We present Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO), a new algorithm for the detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys. AMICO is based on the Optimal Filtering technique, which allows to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the clusters. In this work, we focus on the new iterative approach to the extraction of cluster candidates from the map produced by the filter. In particular, we provide a definition of membership probability for the galaxies close to any cluster candidate, which allows us to remove its imprint from the map, allowing the detection of smaller structures. As demonstrated in our tests, this method allows the deblending of close-by and aligned structures in more than 50 per cent of the cases for objects at radial distance equal to 0.5 × R200 or redshift distance equal to 2 × σz, being σz the typical uncertainty of photometric redshifts. Running AMICO on mocks derived from N-body simulations and semi-analytical modelling of the galaxy evolution, we obtain a consistent mass-amplitude relation through the redshift range of 0.3 slope of ∼0.55 and a logarithmic scatter of ∼0.14. The fraction of false detections is steeply decreasing with S/N and negligible at S/N > 5.

  1. USING COLORS TO IMPROVE PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Levesque, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a well known correlation between the mass and metallicity of star-forming galaxies. Because mass is correlated with luminosity, this relation is often exploited, when spectroscopy is not available, to estimate galaxy metallicities based on single band photometry. However, we show that galaxy color is typically more effective than luminosity as a predictor of metallicity. This is a consequence of the correlation between color and the galaxy mass-to-light ratio and the recently discovered correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and residuals from the mass-metallicity relation. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy of ∼180, 000 nearby galaxies, we derive 'LZC relations', empirical relations between metallicity (in seven common strong line diagnostics), luminosity, and color (in 10 filter pairs and four methods of photometry). We show that these relations allow photometric metallicity estimates, based on luminosity and a single optical color, that are ∼50% more precise than those made based on luminosity alone; galaxy metallicity can be estimated to within ∼0.05-0.1 dex of the spectroscopically derived value depending on the diagnostic used. Including color information in photometric metallicity estimates also reduces systematic biases for populations skewed toward high or low SFR environments, as we illustrate using the host galaxy of the supernova SN 2010ay. This new tool will lend more statistical power to studies of galaxy populations, such as supernova and gamma-ray burst host environments, in ongoing and future wide-field imaging surveys

  2. Photometric Metallicities of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Amy Elizabeth

    2018-06-01

    In the field of astronomy, the study of galaxies is vitally important to understanding the structure and evolution of the universe. Within the study of galaxies, of particular interest are the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively), two of the Milky Way’s closest and most massive satellite galaxies. Their close proximity make them ideal candidates for understanding astrophysical processes such as galaxy interactions. In order to fully understand the Magellanic Clouds, it is imperative that the metallicity of the clouds be mapped in detail. In order to accomplish this task, I will use data from the Survey of Magellanic Stellar History (SMASH) which is a deep, multi-band (ugriz) photometric survey of the Magellanic Clouds that contains approximately 400 million objects in 197 fully-calibrated fields. SMASH is an extensive and deep photometric data set that enables the full-scale study of the galactic structure in the Clouds. The SMASH u-band is sensitive to metallicity for main-sequence turn-off stars which we calibrate using SDSS spectroscopy in overlapping regions (mainly standard star fields). The final steps will be to make metallicity maps of the main bodies and peripheries of the LMC and SMC. Ultimately, these metallicity maps will help us trace out population gradients in the Clouds and uncover the origin of their very extended stellar peripheries.

  3. Photometric metallicity map of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, S.; Subramaniam, A.; Cole, A. A.; Sohn, Y.-J.

    2018-04-01

    We have created an estimated metallicity map of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) photometric data. This is a first of its kind map of metallicity up to a radius of ˜2.5°. We identify the Red Giant Branch (RGB) in the V, (V - I) colour-magnitude diagrams of small sub-regions of varying sizes in both data sets. We use the slope of the RGB as an indicator of the average metallicity of a sub-region and calibrate the RGB slope to metallicity using available spectroscopic data for selected sub-regions. The average metallicity of the SMC is found to be [Fe/H] = -0.94 dex (σ[Fe/H] = 0.09) from OGLE III and [Fe/H] = -0.95 dex (σ[Fe/H] = 0.08) from MCPS. We confirm a shallow but significant metallicity gradient within the inner SMC up to a radius of 2.5° (-0.045 ± 0.004 to -0.067 ± 0.006 dex deg-1).

  4. Towards surface analysis on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations using photometric stereo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2012-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 15% to 25% of patients with Type I and Type II diabetes eventually develop feet ulcers. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to total (or partial) lower extremity amputation, which means a great loss in health-related quality of life. The incidence of foot ulcers may be prevented by early identification and subsequent treatment of pre-signs of ulceration, such as callus formation, redness, fissures, and blisters. Therefore, frequent examination of the feet is necessary, preferably on a daily basis. However, self-examination is difficult or impossible due to consequences of the diabetes. Moreover, frequent examination by health care professionals is costly and not feasible. The objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system that can be deployed at the patients' home environment for frequent examination of patients feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. The current paper reports the preliminary results of an implementation of a photometric stereo imaging system to detect 3D geometric abnormalities of the skin surfaces of foot soles. Using a flexible experimental setup, the system parameters such as number and positions of the illuminators have been selected so as to optimize the performance with respect to reconstructed surface. The system has been applied to a dummy foot sole. Finally, the curvature on the resulting 3D topography of the foot sole is implemented to show the feasibility of detecting the pre-signs of ulceration using photometric stereo imaging. The obtained results indicate clinical potential of this technology for detecting the pre-signs of ulceration on diabetic feet soles.

  5. Random uncertainty of photometric determination of hemolysis index on the Abbott Architect c16000 platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Elena; Carnevale, Assunta; Pasqualetti, Sara; Birindelli, Sarah; Dolci, Alberto; Panteghini, Mauro

    2018-01-16

    Automatic photometric determination of the hemolysis index (HI) on serum and plasma samples is central to detect potential interferences of in vitro hemolysis on laboratory tests. When HI is above an established cut-off for interference, results may suffer from a significant bias and undermine clinical reliability of the test. Despite its undeniable importance for patient safety, the analytical performance of HI estimation is not usually checked in laboratories. Here we evaluated for the first time the random source of measurement uncertainty of HI determination on the two Abbott Architect c16000 platforms in use in our laboratory. From January 2016 to September 2017, we collected data from daily photometric determination of HI on a fresh-frozen serum pool with a predetermined HI value of ~100 (corresponding to ~1g/L of free hemoglobin). Monthly and cumulative CVs were calculated. During 21months, 442 and 451 measurements were performed on the two platforms, respectively. Monthly CVs ranged from 0.7% to 2.7% on c16000-1 and from 0.8% to 2.5% on c16000-2, with a between-platform cumulative CV of 1.82% (corresponding to an expanded uncertainty of 3.64%). Mean HI values on the two platforms were just slightly biased (101.3 vs. 103.1, 1.76%), but, due to the high precision of measurements, this difference assumed statistical significance (p<0.0001). Even though no quality specifications are available to date, our study shows that the HI measurement on Architect c16000 platform has nice reproducibility that could be considered in establishing the state of the art of the measurement. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. TOURISM PROMOTION FOR UNKNOWN AREAS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotache Lacramioara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an effort to unknown areas identity affirmation, through collaborative development of advertising mix, with an emphasis on virtual platforms as admissible solution for increasing visibility. Based upon comparative effective analysis of categories of communication particularities, it is suggested a positioning strategic solution, via virtual advertising platform as unique, integrated, complex and very attractive tourism product promotion, fitted for the internal and international tourism circuit. The active promotion of the specified territorial identity will launch a brand with an impact among tourists by using marketing techniques and innovating technical means and prioritizing tourism as a principal vector of local and regional development.

  7. Metastasis to neck from unknown primary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, B.; Bosch, A.; Caldwell, W.L.; Frias, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 54 consecutive patients who were irradiated for metastatic disease in the neck from an unknown primary tumor were reviewed. The overall survival results are comparable to those of other reported series. Patients with high or posterior cervical lymph node involvement were irradiated with fields including the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Patients with high neck nodes had a better survival rate than those with low neck nodes. The size of the neck tumors and the local control after treatment also have prognostic significance. (Auth.)

  8. Effect of realistic and filtered stellar photometric noise on the detection of moons using photometric transit timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis K.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The photometric transit timing technique was proposed by Szabó et al. (2006 as a method for discovering moons of transiting extrasolar planets. In the preliminary analysis of this technique, it was assumed that the noise in the transit lightcurve was well described by uncorrelated white noise. However, this assumption is not necessarily realistic. To determine the effect of using more realistic lightcurves, transit timing uncertainties are calculated for the case of white noise, measured solar photometric noise and measured solar photometric noise that has been filtered. It is found that for light curves contaminated with realistic photometric noise, the transit timing uncertainties are dramatically increased (and thus moon detection reduced. In addition, we find that while filtering reduced this problem, it did not negate it.

  9. A non-convex variational approach to photometric stereo under inaccurate lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Wu, Tao; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2017-01-01

    This paper tackles the photometric stereo problem in the presence of inaccurate lighting, obtained either by calibration or by an uncalibrated photometric stereo method. Based on a precise modeling of noise and outliers, a robust variational approach is introduced. It explicitly accounts for self...

  10. Photometric data from some photographs of Mars obtained with the Automatic Interplanetary Station 'Mars 3'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botvinova, V.V.; Bugaenko, O.I.; Koval, I.K.; Narajeva, M.K.; Selivanov, A.S.

    1974-01-01

    The results of detailed photometric treatment of Mars photographs obtained with the Automatic Interplanetary Station 'Mars 3' in three wavelengths are given. Photometric maps of the Martian surface have been constructed; a thin layer observed near the limb has been investigated. (Auth.)

  11. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric

  12. Methods of photometric analysis of ore-enclosing rocks and ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchev, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    A photometric method for investigation of colour of sedimentary rocks being of importance in prospecting for uranium deposits is considered. Attention is paid to sample preparation for analysis, protometry procedure. An example of using the photometric method for studying carbonate uranium-bearing rocks is given

  13. Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, N.; Jeffries, J.; Mach, J.; Robson, M.; Pajot, D.; Harrigan, J.; Lebsack, T.; Mullen, D.; Rat, F.; Theys, P.

    1993-01-01

    What is quality? How do you achieve it? How do you keep it once you have got it. The answer for industry at large is the three-step hierarchy of quality control, quality assurance and Total quality Management. An overview is given of the history of quality movement, illustrated with examples from Schlumberger operations, as well as the oil industry's approach to quality. An introduction of the Schlumberger's quality-associated ClientLink program is presented. 15 figs., 4 ills., 16 refs

  14. Simulation analysis of photometric data for attitude estimation of unresolved space objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoping; Gou, Ruixin; Liu, Hao; Hu, Heng; Wang, Yang

    2017-10-01

    The attitude information acquisition of unresolved space objects, such as micro-nano satellites and GEO objects under the way of ground-based optical observations, is a challenge to space surveillance. In this paper, a useful method is proposed to estimate the SO attitude state according to the simulation analysis of photometric data in different attitude states. The object shape model was established and the parameters of the BRDF model were determined, then the space object photometric model was established. Furthermore, the photometric data of space objects in different states are analyzed by simulation and the regular characteristics of the photometric curves are summarized. The simulation results show that the photometric characteristics are useful for attitude inversion in a unique way. Thus, a new idea is provided for space object identification in this paper.

  15. Adresse inconnue / Address unknown / Suchwiin Bulmyeong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Gruzinski

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Tous les films asiatiques parlent de métissage, même ceux qui se présentent comme de vastes fresques historiques perdues dans le temps. Les emprunts aux traditions hollywoodiennes et européennes n'ont cessé d'enrichir une cinématographie aussi ancienne que celle du monde occidental. Dans Adresse inconnue (Address unknown le cinéaste coréen Kim Ki-duk explore l'expérience du métissage et le corps du métis à la frontière entre Corée du Nord et Corée du sud. Fils d'un GI américain et noir et d...

  16. Adresse inconnue / Address unknown / Suchwiin Bulmyeong

    OpenAIRE

    Serge Gruzinski

    2005-01-01

    Tous les films asiatiques parlent de métissage, même ceux qui se présentent comme de vastes fresques historiques perdues dans le temps. Les emprunts aux traditions hollywoodiennes et européennes n'ont cessé d'enrichir une cinématographie aussi ancienne que celle du monde occidental. Dans Adresse inconnue (Address unknown) le cinéaste coréen Kim Ki-duk explore l'expérience du métissage et le corps du métis à la frontière entre Corée du Nord et Corée du sud. Fils d'un GI américain et noir et d'...

  17. The Unknown Component Problem Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, Tiziano; Brayton, Robert K; Mishchenko, Alan; Petrenko, Alexandre; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The Problem of the Unknown Component: Theory and Applications addresses the issue of designing a component that, combined with a known part of a system, conforms to an overall specification. The authors tackle this problem by solving abstract equations over a language. The most general solutions are studied when both synchronous and parallel composition operators are used. The abstract equations are specialized to languages associated with important classes of automata used for modeling systems. The book is a blend of theory and practice, which includes a description of a software package with applications to sequential synthesis of finite state machines. Specific topologies interconnecting the components, exact and heuristic techniques, and optimization scenarios are studied. Finally the scope is enlarged to domains like testing, supervisory control, game theory and synthesis for special omega languages. The authors present original results of the authors along with an overview of existing ones.

  18. Education Through Exploration: Evaluating the Unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mastery of the peculiar and powerful practices of science is increasingly important for the average citizen. With the rise of the Internet, most of human knowledge is at our fingertips. As content becomes a commodity, success and survival aren't about who knows the most, but who is better able to explore the unknown, actively applying and extending knowledge through critical thinking and hypothesis-driven problem-solving. This applies to the economic livelihoods of individuals and to society at large as we grapple with climate change and other science-infused challenges. Unfortunately, science is too often taught as an encyclopedic collection of settled facts to be mastered rather than as a process of exploration that embraces curiosity, inquiry, testing, and communication to reduce uncertainty about the unknown. This problem is exacerbated by the continued prevalence of teacher-centric pedagogy, which promotes learning-from-authority and passive learning. The initial wave of massively open online courses (MOOCs) generally mimic this teaching style in virtual form. It is hypothesized that emerging digital teaching technologies can help address this challenge at Internet scale in "next generation" MOOCs and flipped classroom experiences. Interactive simulations, immersive virtual field trips, gamified elements, rapid adaptive feedback, intelligent tutoring systems, and personalized pathways, should motivate and enhance learning. Through lab-like projects and tutorials, students should be able to construct knowledge from interactive experiences, modeling the authentic practice of science while mastering complex concepts. Freed from lecturing, teaching staff should be available for direct and intense student-teacher interactions. These claims are difficult to evaluate with traditional assessment instruments, but digital technologies provide powerful new ways to evaluate student learning and learn from student behaviors. We will describe ongoing experiences with such

  19. Eclipsing binaries observed with the WIRE satellite I. Discovery and photometric analysis of the new bright A0 IV eclipsing binary psi centauri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruntt, Hans; Southworth, J.; Penny, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters, binaries: close, eclipsing, techniques: photometric Udgivelsesdato: Sep.......Stars: fundamental parameters, binaries: close, eclipsing, techniques: photometric Udgivelsesdato: Sep....

  20. Photometric Separation of Stellar Properties Using SDSS Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Dawn D.; Newberg, Jo; Rosner, Robert; Richards, Gordon T.; Stoughton, Chris

    1998-12-01

    Using synthetic photometry of Kurucz model spectra, we explore the colors of stars as a function of temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) filters, u'g'r'i'z'. The synthetic colors show qualitative agreement with the few published observations in these filters. We find that the locus of synthetic stars is basically two-dimensional for 4500 advantageous to use more than two colors when determining stellar properties by color. Strategic observations in SDSS filters are required to resolve the source of a ~5% discrepancy between synthetic colors of Gunn-Stryker stars, Kurucz models, and external determinations of the metallicities and surface gravities. The synthetic star colors can be used to investigate the properties of any normal star and to construct analytic expressions for the photometric prediction of stellar properties in special cases.

  1. Photometric determination of phosphorus in zircon concentrate and potassium hexafluorozirconate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polonskaya, I.A.; Fominykh, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    A method for direct photometric phosphorus determination in the materials, containing considerable zirconium amounts is developed. Phosphorus is determined in a form of reduced heteropolyacid with the use of ascorbic acid and potassium antimonyltartrate in sulfuric acid medium. To remove zirconium effect, a graduation diagram is drawn at the background of zirconium, which is bound into a stable fluoride complex in the presence of H 3 BO 3 . Under the above conditions the coloring developes after 30-40 min and remains stable for 24 hrs. A proportional dependence between phosphorus concentration and optical density is observed in the range of 10-160 mg of Zr. The method sensitivity is 5x10 -5 %

  2. Revised photometric elements of the eclipsing binary TW Dra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Predolin, F.

    1980-01-01

    The photoelectric light curves of TW Dra obtained by Baglow (1952) and by Waltser (1978) have been re-analysed by means of Wood's (1972) model in order to obtain accurate photometric elements. Significantly different elements have resulted from the two sets of observations, but more confidence can be given to the elements deduced from Walter's (1978) data. Radii and luminosities have been computed with the aid of Popper's (1978) new values for masses. TW Dra is confirmed to be a typical sd-system, having a distrinctly oversized and overluminous secondary. Interestingly, the primary appears to be slightly more luminous than expected for a Main-Sequences star, in agreement with theoretical predictions for present primaries of mass-exchange binaries systems. (orig.)

  3. Direct photometric determination of fluorides in potassium chloride and iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedkova, V.P.; Savvin, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to apply the technique of determining fluorides with xylenol orange and sulfochlorophenol S as being the most sensitive in the analysis of of fiber optics. It is known that an increase of the sensitivity of the determination can be achieved on increasing the sample size of the substance to be analyzed, and the length of the absorbing layer. However, a high salt background may have a strong influence on the course of the reaction, and a supplementary of this effect is mad. Potassium chloride and iodide were selected as model compounds. A direct photometric procedure is proposed for determining fluorides in the samples, with a determination limit of 5 x 10 -6 %. Such a low determination limit is achieved by increasing the sample weight to 3 g, by increasing the length of the absorbing layer in the cell to 50 mm, and by using a highly sensitive reaction for determining fluorides with zirconium and xylenol orange

  4. Photometric observations of V470 Cygni (HD 228911)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbighausen, E.G.; Lester, D.; Stearns, S.; Straton, P; Sykes, M.

    1975-01-01

    Previous photometric observations of this type B2 spectroscopic binary with a 1.87d period have shown small but not well-defined light variations suggesting that it is an eclipsing binary with a rather small orbital inclination. In the summer of 1974 the authors obtained photoelectrically 2060 individual V observations and 2100 B observations of V470 Cygni at the Pine Mountain Observatory of the University of Oregon. The total light range in both colors is nearly 0.02m and the form of the light curve suggests that this object is an ellipsoidal binary. A new epoch of primary minimum and period are derived. All of the data combined are insufficient to confirm Pearce's suggestion of apsidal motion

  5. Optical and near-infrared photometric study of NGC 6724

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendary, Reda; Tadross, Ashraf; Hasan, Priya; Osman, Anas; Essam, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    BVRI CCD photometry of the poorly studied open cluster NGC 6724 has been carried out down to a limiting magnitude of V∼20 mag. The stars of the cluster have been observed using the Newtonian focus (f/4.84) of the 74-inch telescope at Kottamia Astronomical Observatory in Egypt. Also, the 2MASS - JHK system is used to confirm the results we obtained. The main photometric parameters have been estimated for the present object; the diameter is found to be 6 arcmin, the distance is 1530±60 pc from the Sun and the age is 900±50 Myr. The optical reddening E(B-V)=0.65 {mag}, while the infrared reddening is E(J-H)=0.20 {mag}. The slope of the mass function distribution and the relaxation time estimations indicate that cluster NGC 6724 is dynamically relaxed.

  6. Photometric observations of nine Transneptunian objects and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromakina, T.; Perna, D.; Belskaya, I.; Dotto, E.; Rossi, A.; Bisi, F.

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of photometric observations of six Transneptunian objects and three Centaurs, estimations of their rotational periods and corresponding amplitudes. For six of them we present also lower limits of density values. All observations were made using 3.6-m TNG telescope (La Palma, Spain). For four objects - (148975) 2001 XA255, (281371) 2008 FC76, (315898) 2008 QD4, and 2008 CT190 - the estimation of short-term variability was made for the first time. We confirm rotation period values for two objects: (55636) 2002 TX300 and (202421) 2005 UQ513, and improve the precision of previously reported rotational period values for other three - (120178) 2003 OP32, (145452) 2005 RN43, (444030) 2004 NT33 - by using both our and literature data. We also discuss here that small distant bodies, similar to asteroids in the Main belt, tend to have double-peaked rotational periods caused by the elongated shape rather than surface albedo variations.

  7. Spectral classification by the near infrared photometric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tignanelli, H.L.; Feinstein, A.

    1985-01-01

    From the analysis of the measurements of KM-type stars done in the near infrared (1 to 3.5 microns: the JHKL bands of Johnsons's system), with an 83 cm reflector and a PbS detector at La Plata Observatory, we try to establish a new photometric classification system that discriminates luminosity class by means of certain parameters defined by infrared colours and infrared magnitudes. Data compiled and homogenized by J.Koornneef of southern bright stars in those bands were also included. The results give us information about the spectral types and reddening of those stars. We also indicate how to calculate the radiation excess that those stars could have. (author)

  8. Photometric intensity and polarization measurements of the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a satellite photometric observatory (SPO) to measure the solar corona from Miahuatlan, Mexico during the Mar. 7, 1970, total eclipse of the sun. The SPO is equipped with a 24-in. Cassegrainian telescope, a four-channel photoelectric photometer, a Wollaston prism, and a rotating half-wave plate. Simultaneous measurements were made of the two orthogonal components of coronal light in the B and R bands of the UBVRI system. A 1-minute arc aperture was scanned from the lunar disk center out to five solar radii in a series of spirals of gradually increasing radius. For the first time, simultaneous multicolor intensity, degree, and angle of polarization profiles are computed from photoelectric measurements. Comparison of the variations of the measurements for each spiral scan yield a detailed picture of the intensity and polarization features in the K corona.

  9. Forward Global Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D. L.; Rykoff, E. S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Finley, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, J.; Tucker, D. L.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Many scientific goals for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) require the calibration of optical/NIR broadband b = grizY photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the celestial sky to one percent or better. It is also necessary to limit to similar accuracy systematic uncertainty in the calibrated broadband magnitudes due to uncertainty in the spectrum of the source. Here we present a “Forward Global Calibration Method (FGCM)” for photometric calibration of the DES, and we present results of its application to the first three years of the survey (Y3A1). The FGCM combines data taken with auxiliary instrumentation at the observatory with data from the broadband survey imaging itself and models of the instrument and atmosphere to estimate the spatial and time dependences of the passbands of individual DES survey exposures. “Standard” passbands that are typical of the passbands encountered during the survey are chosen. The passband of any individual observation is combined with an estimate of the source spectral shape to yield a magnitude {m}b{std} in the standard system. This “chromatic correction” to the standard system is necessary to achieve subpercent calibrations and in particular, to resolve ambiguity between the broadband brightness of a source and the shape of its SED. The FGCM achieves a reproducible and stable photometric calibration of standard magnitudes {m}b{std} of stellar sources over the multiyear Y3A1 data sample with residual random calibration errors of σ =6{--}7 {mmag} per exposure. The accuracy of the calibration is uniform across the 5000 {\\deg }2 DES footprint to within σ =7 {mmag}. The systematic uncertainties of magnitudes in the standard system due to the spectra of sources are less than 5 {mmag} for main-sequence stars with 0.5< g-i< 3.0.

  10. Forward Global Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D. L.; Rykoff, E. S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Finley, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, J.; Tucker, D. L.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-12-28

    Many scientific goals for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) require calibration of optical/NIR broadband $b = grizY$ photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the celestial sky to one percent or better. It is also necessary to limit to similar accuracy systematic uncertainty in the calibrated broadband magnitudes due to uncertainty in the spectrum of the source. Here we present a "Forward Global Calibration Method (FGCM)" for photometric calibration of the DES, and we present results of its application to the first three years of the survey (Y3A1). The FGCM combines data taken with auxiliary instrumentation at the observatory with data from the broad-band survey imaging itself and models of the instrument and atmosphere to estimate the spatial- and time-dependence of the passbands of individual DES survey exposures. "Standard" passbands are chosen that are typical of the passbands encountered during the survey. The passband of any individual observation is combined with an estimate of the source spectral shape to yield a magnitude $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ in the standard system. This "chromatic correction" to the standard system is necessary to achieve sub-percent calibrations. The FGCM achieves reproducible and stable photometric calibration of standard magnitudes $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ of stellar sources over the multi-year Y3A1 data sample with residual random calibration errors of $\\sigma=5-6\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ per exposure. The accuracy of the calibration is uniform across the $5000\\,\\mathrm{deg}^2$ DES footprint to within $\\sigma=7\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$. The systematic uncertainties of magnitudes in the standard system due to the spectra of sources are less than $5\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ for main sequence stars with $0.5

  11. RSO Characterization from Photometric Data Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M.; Klem, B.; Gorman, J.

    Object characterization is the description of a resident space object (RSO), its capabilities and its behavior. While astrometric data has been used extensively for object detection, location, and characterization, photometric data has been less widely applied and remains a promising area for improving RSO characterization. RSO characteristics which may influence changes in light intensity with respect to changes in viewing angle or orientation signature include geometry, orientation, components material properties, stability and other characteristics. However, most RSO characterization is presently performed manually and on an individual basis by space analysts and there is a need for efficient and automated methods to perform characterization. This paper discusses the application of machine learning techniques to characterization of RSOs in the geosynchronous altitude regime using photometric data. We develop simulated signatures in the visible spectral band of three basic RSO types, with variations in object orientation, material characteristics, size and attitude and attempt to recover these properties through object characterization techniques. We generate observations by sampling noisy measurements from the simulated signature. Next, we extract a set of features from the observations and train machine learning algorithms to classify the signatures. We consider the effectiveness of a set of binary classifiers trained to individually recognize separate cases. The results of each classifier are combined together to produce a final output characterization of an input observation. Experiments with varying levels of noise are presented, and we evaluate models with respect to classification accuracy and other criteria. The end result of this process is a unique methodology for exploiting the use usefulness and applicability of machine learning to an important space sensing and identification process. This material is based upon work supported by the United States

  12. High Valence, Normal Valence and Unknown Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul

    the serendipitous synthesis of the nitrido-bridged [Rh(en)3]2- [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]. The complex anion have previously been studied in the form of the mixed Rb4Na2-salt. In this earlier study, the nitrido-bridge was found to be asymmetrical with the axial ligands in an eclipsed formation. The complex was described...... the [Rh(en)3]2-salt is best described as Mn3.5/Mn3.5. This means that the [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]6􀀀 ion displays crystal packing induced oxidation state isomerism, a rare phenomenon. Chapter 4 details the synthesis and characterisation of group 9 dithiolene complexes with focus on the hitherto unknown...... homoleptic iridium dithiolene complexes. When the complexes [M(mnt)3]3􀀀, M = Rh and Co are chemically oxidized, they decompose to yield dinuclear complexes with the metal still in oxidation state III. This is not the case for the corresponding Ir complex which can be oxidized and the oxidation...

  13. Lung Lesions During Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Renata; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Hadzik-Blaszczyk, Malgorzata; Wardyn, Kazimierz A; Zycinska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges. The causes of FUO can be various diseases located in different organs. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and nature of pulmonary lesions during FUO. One hundred and sixty one patients with FUO participated in this prospective study. We performed a detailed comprehensive history, physical examination, and a wide spectrum of tests. The most common causes of FUO were infections (39%), autoimmune conditions (28%), and neoplasms (17%). Lung lesions were found in 30% of patients. In this group 35% were infections, 30% autoimmune diseases, and 4% cancer. Among patients with respiratory infections, there were cases of tuberculosis, atypical pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchiectases. Autoimmune pulmonary lesions were observed during vasculitis and systemic lupus. The causes of FUO in the group of patients with lung lesions were also pulmonary embolism, sarcoidosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Chest CT played an important role in the diagnosis of the causes of FUO with pulmonary manifestations. Pulmonary lesions are a common cause of FUO. Most FUO with pulmonary lesions are recognized during infections and autoimmune diseases. An important part of diagnosing FUO is a detailed evaluation of the respiratory system.

  14. Unknown Risks: Parental Hesitation about Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Laura L; Gutheil, Caitlin; Hootsmans, Norbert A M; Han, Paul K J

    2016-05-01

    This qualitative study of a select sample of vaccine-hesitant parents (VHPs) explores perceived and constructed personal judgments about the risks and uncertainties associated with vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) and how these subjective risk judgments influence parents' decisions about childhood vaccination. The study employed semistructured focus group interviews with 42 VHPs to elicit parents' perceptions and thought processes regarding the risks associated with vaccination and nonvaccination, the sources of these perceptions, and their approach to decision making about vaccination for their children. VHPs engage in various reasoning processes and tend to perceive risks of vaccination as greater than the risks of VPDs. At the same time, VHPs engage in other reasoning processes that lead them to perceive ambiguity in information about the harms of vaccination-citing concerns about the missing, conflicting, changing, or otherwise unreliable nature of information. VHPs' refusal of vaccination may reflect their aversion to both the risk and ambiguity they perceive to be associated with vaccination. Mitigating this vaccine hesitancy likely requires reconstructing the risks and ambiguities associated with vaccination-a challenging task that requires providing parents with meaningful evidence-based information on the known risks of vaccination versus VPDs and explicitly acknowledging the risks that remain truly unknown. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The energy equation with three unknowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schifano, Fabio; Moriconi, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the alarming situation of energy in Italy as this country depends at 82 per cent on its imports (oil, natural gas and electricity), a dependence which could even increase. The authors first propose overviews of the situation regarding oil, natural gas and electric power (origins of imports, role of Italian companies, status of infrastructures), and also briefly of renewable energies. They recall the history of the use of nuclear energy: Italy has been one of the first country to use nuclear energy to produce electric power, but a referendum organised after Chernobyl resulted in phasing out nuclear. Then, the authors discuss perspectives associated with three main strategic unknowns: an increase of energy dependence with respect to hydrocarbons and to foreign nuclear power, a supply insecurity due to a dependence concentrated on a small number of countries (notably as far as natural gas is concerned), and an increasing interdependence between economic growth and sustainable development (the reduction of greenhouse emissions is a prevailing parameter for future energetic choices)

  16. Quasar Photometric Redshifts and Candidate Selection: A New Algorithm Based on Optical and Mid-infrared Photometric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Green, Richard; Yang, Jinyi; Schindler, Jan-Torge; Wang, Feige; Zuo, Wenwen; Fu, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    We present a new algorithm to estimate quasar photometric redshifts (photo-zs), by considering the asymmetries in the relative flux distributions of quasars. The relative flux models are built with multivariate Skew-t distributions in the multidimensional space of relative fluxes as a function of redshift and magnitude. For 151,392 quasars in the SDSS, we achieve a photo-z accuracy, defined as the fraction of quasars with the difference between the photo-z z p and the spectroscopic redshift z s , | {{Δ }}z| =| {z}s-{z}p| /(1+{z}s) within 0.1, of 74%. Combining the WISE W1 and W2 infrared data with the SDSS data, the photo-z accuracy is enhanced to 87%. Using the Pan-STARRS1 or DECaLS photometry with WISE W1 and W2 data, the photo-z accuracies are 79% and 72%, respectively. The prior probabilities as a function of magnitude for quasars, stars, and galaxies are calculated, respectively, based on (1) the quasar luminosity function, (2) the Milky Way synthetic simulation with the Besançon model, and (3) the Bayesian Galaxy Photometric Redshift estimation. The relative fluxes of stars are obtained with the Padova isochrones, and the relative fluxes of galaxies are modeled through galaxy templates. We test our classification method to select quasars using the DECaLS g, r, z, and WISE W1 and W2 photometry. The quasar selection completeness is higher than 70% for a wide redshift range 0.5publicly available.

  17. A simple and robust method for automated photometric classification of supernovae using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenka, N. V.; Feroz, F.; Hobson, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    A method is presented for automated photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) as Type Ia or non-Ia. A two-step approach is adopted in which (i) the SN light curve flux measurements in each observing filter are fitted separately to an analytical parametrized function that is sufficiently flexible to accommodate virtually all types of SNe and (ii) the fitted function parameters and their associated uncertainties, along with the number of flux measurements, the maximum-likelihood value of the fit and Bayesian evidence for the model, are used as the input feature vector to a classification neural network that outputs the probability that the SN under consideration is of Type Ia. The method is trained and tested using data released following the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), consisting of light curves for 20 895 SNe in total. We consider several random divisions of the data into training and testing sets: for instance, for our sample D_1 (D_4), a total of 10 (40) per cent of the data are involved in training the algorithm and the remainder used for blind testing of the resulting classifier; we make no selection cuts. Assigning a canonical threshold probability of pth = 0.5 on the network output to class an SN as Type Ia, for the sample D_1 (D_4) we obtain a completeness of 0.78 (0.82), purity of 0.77 (0.82) and SNPCC figure of merit of 0.41 (0.50). Including the SN host-galaxy redshift and its uncertainty as additional inputs to the classification network results in a modest 5-10 per cent increase in these values. We find that the quality of the classification does not vary significantly with SN redshift. Moreover, our probabilistic classification method allows one to calculate the expected completeness, purity and figure of merit (or other measures of classification quality) as a function of the threshold probability pth, without knowing the true classes of the SNe in the testing sample, as is the case in the classification of real SNe

  18. Leveraging 3D-HST Grism Redshifts to Quantify Photometric Redshift Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanson, Rachel; Wake, David A.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of photometric redshift accuracy in the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using 3D-HST grism redshifts to quantify and dissect trends in redshift accuracy for galaxies brighter than JH IR > 24 with an unprecedented and representative high-redshift galaxy sample. We find an average scatter of 0.0197 ± 0.0003(1 + z) in the Skelton et al. photometric redshifts. Photometric redshift accuracy decreases with magnitude and redshift, but does not vary monotonically with color or stellar mass. The 1σ scatter lies between 0.01 and 0.03 (1 + z) for galaxies of all masses and colors below z 2), dusty star-forming galaxies for which the scatter increases to ˜0.1 (1 + z). We find that photometric redshifts depend significantly on galaxy size; the largest galaxies at fixed magnitude have photo-zs with up to ˜30% more scatter and ˜5 times the outlier rate. Although the overall photometric redshift accuracy for quiescent galaxies is better than that for star-forming galaxies, scatter depends more strongly on magnitude and redshift than on galaxy type. We verify these trends using the redshift distributions of close pairs and extend the analysis to fainter objects, where photometric redshift errors further increase to ˜0.046 (1 + z) at {H}F160W=26. We demonstrate that photometric redshift accuracy is strongly filter dependent and quantify the contribution of multiple filter combinations. We evaluate the widths of redshift probability distribution functions and find that error estimates are underestimated by a factor of ˜1.1-1.6, but that uniformly broadening the distribution does not adequately account for fitting outliers. Finally, we suggest possible applications of these data in planning for current and future surveys and simulate photometric redshift performance in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Dark Energy Survey (DES), and combined DES and Vista Hemisphere surveys.

  19. A Spectroscopic and Photometric Study of Gravitational Microlensing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2000-08-01

    Gravitational microlensing has generated a great deal of scientific interest over recent years. This has been largely due to the realization of its wide-reaching applications, such as the search for dark matter, the detection of planets, and the study of Galactic structure. A significant observational advance has been that most microlensing events can be identified in real-time while the source is still being lensed. More than 400 microlensing events have now been detected towards the Galactic bulge and Magellanic Clouds by the microlensing survey teams EROS, MACHO, OGLE, DUO, and MOA. The real-time detection of these events allows detailed follow-up observations with much denser sampling, both photometrically and spectroscopically. The research undertaken in this project on photometric studies of gravitational microlensing events has been performed as a member of the PLANET (Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) collaboration. This is a worldwide collaboration formed in the early part of 1995 to study microlensing anomalies - departures from an achromatic point source, point lens light curve - through rapidly-sampled, multi-band, photometry. PLANET has demonstrated that it can achieve 1% photometry under ideal circumstances, making PLANET observations sensitive to detection of Earth-mass planets which require characterization of 1%--2% deviations from a standard microlensing light curve. The photometric work in this project involved over 5 months using the 1.0 m telescope at Canopus Observatory in Australia, and 3 separate observing runs using the 0.9 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. Methods were developed to reduce the vast amount of photometric data using the image analysis software MIDAS and the photometry package DoPHOT. Modelling routines were then written to analyse a selection of the resulting light curves in order to detect any deviation from an achromatic point source - point lens light curve. The photometric

  20. Calibration of the photometric method of heavy ion charge measurements in emulsion using a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudzia, D.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2002-01-01

    A previously developed method of heavy ion charge measurements in emulsion has been significantly improved. The charge measurements are based on analysis of photometric profiles of the particle tracks in emulsion. These profiles are obtained using a CCD camera mounted on an optical microscope. So far, the manual charge determination by delta ray counting had to be used for calibration of the photometric method. In this paper a complete procedure for calibration of the photometric method is shown, without resorting to the manual method

  1. Uric Acid: The Unknown Uremic Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    This review brings together concepts of uric acid metabolism affecting renal parenchyma and its function and the current therapies to reduce hyperuricemia (HyU) and avoid renal disease progression. High uric acid plays an important role in several chronic diseases including kidney diseases such as lithiasis, gout nephropathy, and preeclampsia. In the last 30 years, it has been shown that reducing HyU with low protein and low purine diets in addition to allopurinol creates physiopathological conditions that produce a slight increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In recent years, in a new era of research in clinical, genetics, pharmacological, and epidemiologic fields, they have been moving forward to support the idea that reduction in HyU could benefit the chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (stage III-IV), thereby avoiding the drop of GFR for undefined mechanisms. There are several clinical trials in progress that show the HyU reducing to very low values and an increased GFR. In a young population, when treating HyU there is a reduction in high blood pressure. There are some reports showing that HyU could play a role in the diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, there have been some speculations that HyU treatment could stop the progression of CRF modifying the natural history of the diseases. So there will be new clinical trials with old and new medication and metabolic procedure to maintain a very low blood levels in the unknown uremic toxin know as uric acid which seems to be the toxin to the damage kidney. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XXVI. The Issues of Photometric Age and Metallicity Estimates for Globular Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane; Duc, Pierre-Alain [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Zhang, Hongxin [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Peng, Eric W. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Roediger, Joel; Gwyn, S. D. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Durrell, Patrick R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH (United States); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu,Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hudelot, Patrick, E-mail: mathieu.powalka@astro.unistra.fr [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); and others

    2017-08-01

    Large samples of globular clusters (GC) with precise multi-wavelength photometry are becoming increasingly available and can be used to constrain the formation history of galaxies. We present the results of an analysis of Milky Way (MW) and Virgo core GCs based on 5 optical-near-infrared colors and 10 synthetic stellar population models. For the MW GCs, the models tend to agree on photometric ages and metallicities, with values similar to those obtained with previous studies. When used with Virgo core GCs, for which photometry is provided by the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), the same models generically return younger ages. This is a consequence of the systematic differences observed between the locus occupied by Virgo core GCs and models in panchromatic color space. Only extreme fine-tuning of the adjustable parameters available to us can make the majority of the best-fit ages old. Although we cannot exclude that the formation history of the Virgo core may lead to more conspicuous populations of relatively young GCs than in other environments, we emphasize that the intrinsic properties of the Virgo GCs are likely to differ systematically from those assumed in the models. Thus, the large wavelength coverage and photometric quality of modern GC samples, such as those used here, is not by itself sufficient to better constrain the GC formation histories. Models matching the environment-dependent characteristics of GCs in multi-dimensional color space are needed to improve the situation.

  3. Spectro-photometric calibration of the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph in the Nearby Supernova Factory collaboration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buton, Clement

    2009-01-01

    Ten years ago, type Ia supernovae used as distances indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe. Today, a second generation of surveys has significantly increased the high-redshift type Ia supernovae sample. The low-redshift sample was however still limiting the cosmological analysis using SNe. In this framework, the Nearby Supernova Factory has followed 200 nearby type Ia supernovae using the dedicated Supernovae Integral Field Spectrograph with spectro-photometric capacities. My PhD thesis has been carried out at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the framework of the international cosmological project SNfactory. In order to reach the design spectrophotometric accuracy, attention has been focused on several key aspects of the calibration procedure, including: determination of a dedicated point spread function for 3D point source extraction, estimating the nightly photometric quality, derivation of the nightly sky extinction over the extended optical domain, its modeling in terms of physical components and its variability within a given night. A full multi-standards calibration pipeline has been implemented using approximately 4000 observations of spectrophotometric standard stars taken throughout the night over nearly 500 individual nights. Preliminary scientific results of the whole SNfactory collaboration will be presented at the end of this thesis. (author)

  4. Creation of a Unified Set of Core-Collapse Supernovae for Training of Photometric Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy Kenworthy, William; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard

    2017-01-01

    One of the key tasks for future supernova cosmology analyses is to photometrically distinguish type Ia supernovae (SNe) from their core collapse (CC) counterparts. In order to train programs for this purpose, it is necessary to train on a large number of core-collapse SNe. However, there are only a handful used for current programs. We plan to use the large amount of CC lightcurves available on the Open Supernova Catalog (OSC). Since this data is scraped from many different surveys, it is given in a number of photometric systems with different calibration and filters. We therefore created a program to fit smooth lightcurves (as a function of time) to photometric observations of arbitrary SNe. The Supercal method is then used to translate the smoothed lightcurves to a single photometric system. We can thus compile a training set of 782 supernovae, of which 127 are not type Ia. These smoothed lightcurves are also being contributed upstream to the OSC as derived data.

  5. Photometry of long-period Algol binaries. VI. Multicolor photometric solutions for RZ Cancri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, E.C.

    1989-01-01

    New intermediate-band photometry of the late-giant eclipsing system RZ CNc is used to obtain photometric solutions, both with the Popper (1976) spectroscopic mass ratio and by allowing the mass ratio and gravity-darkening coefficients to vary. New y observations are combined with earlier V data of Lenouvel (1957) and Broglia and Conconi (1973) in one solution set. Additional solutions are obtained from the new observations. The mean photometric mass ratio is somewhat larger than Popper's spectroscopic values; the general indeterminacy of photometric solutions may explain this apparent discrepancy. Possible photometric effects of a mass-transferring stream are discussed, and it is concluded that such effects cannot account for the mass-ratio discrepancy. 26 refs

  6. Photometry of long-period Algol binaries. VI. Multicolor photometric solutions for RZ Cancri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, E.C. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA))

    1989-09-01

    New intermediate-band photometry of the late-giant eclipsing system RZ CNc is used to obtain photometric solutions, both with the Popper (1976) spectroscopic mass ratio and by allowing the mass ratio and gravity-darkening coefficients to vary. New y observations are combined with earlier V data of Lenouvel (1957) and Broglia and Conconi (1973) in one solution set. Additional solutions are obtained from the new observations. The mean photometric mass ratio is somewhat larger than Popper's spectroscopic values; the general indeterminacy of photometric solutions may explain this apparent discrepancy. Possible photometric effects of a mass-transferring stream are discussed, and it is concluded that such effects cannot account for the mass-ratio discrepancy. 26 refs.

  7. Standard Test Method for Solar Photometric Transmittance of Sheet Materials Using Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of solar photometric transmittance of materials in sheet form. Solar photometric transmittance is measured using a photometer (illuminance meter) in an enclosure with the sun and sky as the source of radiation. The enclosure and method of test is specified in Test Method E 1175 (or Test Method E 1084). 1.2 The purpose of this test method is to specify a photometric sensor to be used with the procedure for measuring the solar photometric transmittance of sheet materials containing inhomogeneities in their optical properties. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. The walraven VBLUW photometric system : 32 years of 5-channel photometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, Jan Willem; Lub, Jan; Sterken, C

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the Walraven V BLUW photometric system. We concentrate on the aspects of stability, internal and external precison of the standard system, flux calibration and theoretical model grids.

  9. Improving photometric redshift estimation using GPZ: size information, post processing, and improved photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Zahra; Jarvis, Matt J.; Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2018-03-01

    The next generation of large-scale imaging surveys (such as those conducted with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Euclid) will require accurate photometric redshifts in order to optimally extract cosmological information. Gaussian Process for photometric redshift estimation (GPZ) is a promising new method that has been proven to provide efficient, accurate photometric redshift estimations with reliable variance predictions. In this paper, we investigate a number of methods for improving the photometric redshift estimations obtained using GPZ (but which are also applicable to others). We use spectroscopy from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Data Release 2 with a limiting magnitude of r Program Data Release 1 and find that it produces significant improvements in accuracy, similar to the effect of including additional features.

  10. Development of fluorescent, oscillometric and photometric methods to determine absorbed dose in irradiated fruits and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Foeldiak, G.; Hargittai, P.; Miller, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    To ensure suitable quality control at food irradiation technologies and for quarantine authorities, simple routine dosimetry methods are needed for absorbed dose control. Taking into account the requirements at quarantine locations these methods would require nondestructive analysis for repeated measurements. Different dosimetry systems with different analytical evaluation methods have been tested and/or developed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose range of 0.1-10 kGy. In order to use the well accepted ethanolmonochlorobenzene dosimeter solution and the recently developed aqueous alanine solution in small volume sealed vials, a new portable, digital, and programmable oscillometric reader was developed. To make use of the availability of the very sensitive fluorimetric evaluation method, liquid and solid inorganic and organic dosimetry systems were developed for dose control using a new routine, portable, and computer controlled fluorimeter. Absorption or transmission photometric methods were also applied for dose measurements of solid or liquid phase dosimeter systems containing radiochromic dye agents, which change colour upon irradiation. (author)

  11. PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY IN KEPLER TARGET STARS: THE SUN AMONG STARS-A FIRST LOOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basri, Gibor; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Batalha, Natalie; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission provides an exciting opportunity to study the light curves of stars with unprecedented precision and continuity of coverage. This is the first look at a large sample of stars with photometric data of a quality that has heretofore been only available for our Sun. It provides the first opportunity to compare the irradiance variations of our Sun to a large cohort of stars ranging from very similar to rather different stellar properties, at a wide variety of ages. Although Kepler data are in an early phase of maturity, and we only analyze the first month of coverage, it is sufficient to garner the first meaningful measurements of our Sun's variability in the context of a large cohort of main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. We find that nearly half of the full sample is more active than the active Sun, although most of them are not more than twice as active. The active fraction is closer to a third for the stars most similar to the Sun, and rises to well more than half for stars cooler than mid-K spectral types.

  12. Photometric study of the eclipsing binary U Sagittae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, D.H.; Feltz, K.A. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The geometric and photometric elements of the eclipsing star U Sge have been derived from uvby observations secured in 1973-74. The ''best'' elements are r 1 = 0.296, r 2 = 0.225, i = 90 0 ; and L 1 = 0.130, L 2 = 0.870 in yellow light where the subscript 1 refers to the G2 IV-III component and the subscript 2 refers to the B8 V component. Radii and masses of the two stars can be derived by assuming that the larger star fills its Roche lobe. This assumption yields r 1 = 3.32 R/sub solar mass/, r 2 = 2.52 R/sub solar mass/, M 1 = 1.4 solar mass, and M 2 = 3.5 solar mass. The absolute magnitudes are found by two different methods and yield M/sub v/ = -0/sup m/4 for the B star and M/sub v/ = + 1.8/sup m/ for the G star. If corrections for radiative interactions are made, the absolute magnitude of the G star is M/sub v/ is approximately equal + 2.2/sup m/. Observational data secured in the u filter suggest that Balmer continuum emission can be detected from an emitting gas stream or disk. The gas must be concentrated near the following hemisphere of the B Star. The m 1 measurements of the secondary component suggest a metal deficiency of [Fe/H] = -0.6

  13. Bifurcations in two-image photometric stereo for orthogonal illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozera, R.; Prokopenya, A.; Noakes, L.; Śluzek, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the ambiguous shape recovery in two-image photometric stereo for a Lambertian surface. The current uniqueness analysis refers to linearly independent light-source directions p = (0, 0, -1) and q arbitrary. For this case necessary and sufficient condition determining ambiguous reconstruction is governed by a second-order linear partial differential equation with constant coefficients. In contrast, a general position of both non-colinear illumination directions p and q leads to a highly non-linear PDE which raises a number of technical difficulties. As recently shown, the latter can also be handled for another family of orthogonal illuminations parallel to the OXZ-plane. For the special case of p = (0, 0, -1) a potential ambiguity stems also from the possible bifurcations of sub-local solutions glued together along a curve defined by an algebraic equation in terms of the data. This paper discusses the occurrence of similar bifurcations for such configurations of orthogonal light-source directions. The discussion to follow is supplemented with examples based on continuous reflectance map model and generated synthetic images.

  14. Infrared photometric behavior and opposition effect of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erard, S.; Bibring, J-P.; Drossart, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although the instrument wasn't designed for this purpose, data from the imaging spectrometer ISM may be used for studying photometric variations of Mars reflectance, that are related to the surface materials and aerosols physical properties. ISM flew aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft which orbited Mars from January to March, 1989. About 40,000 spectra were acquired in 128 channels ranging from 0.76 to 3.16 micro-m, with a spatial resolution of 25 km and a signal-to-noise ratio ranging up to 1000. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: width variations of the opposition surge can be related to differences in porosity or grain size distribution on the various domains, with little or no effect from suspended dust. As the biggest effects are observed on dark and bright materials, intermediate behaviors on average-bright regions cannot result from a mixing process, but are more likely to come from either cementation processes or modification of the grain size distribution under the influence of wind, which under Martian conditions preferentially removes the biggest particles. Thus, a surface dust consisting in big bright and small dark grains could explain the observations.

  15. Unexpected Far-Ultraviolet Photometric Characteristics On Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    While infrared and visible are the most common wavelength domains used to investigate planetary surfaces, ultraviolet (UV) data are significant and useful. Here, we present the first far-UV phase curves of Mimas, thus displaying another piece of the Saturnian System puzzle. Our preliminary results shows that, one more time, Mimas surface properties are far from what we was expected. Namely, we observe a leading hemisphere brighter than the trailing hemisphere at some far-UV wavelengths. We used the far-UV channel of the Cassini/UVIS instrument, ranging from 118 to 190 nm. Disk-integrated phase curves for the leading hemisphere and the trailing hemisphere, at 180nm, have been produced. Data points span from 0.5 to 163.5 degrees in phase angle. Mimas displays a leading hemisphere brighter than its trailing hemisphere, when theory and previous Voyager observations at longer wavelengths attest of a brighter trailing hemisphere due to the impact of the E-ring grains on this face of the satellite. Surprisingly, UVIS data show a very bright opposition effect on Mimas leading hemisphere, greater than what is observed on Tethys or Dione leading hemisphere at the same wavelength of 180 nm. Preliminary results of photometric properties modeling seem to indicate an important contribution of the coherent-backscattering process in the opposition surge. Exogenic processes such as bombardment by energetic electrons and/or E-ring grains are discussed to explain this unexpected surface property of Mimas.

  16. Reduction and analysis of photometric data on Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Fink, U.; Wehinger, P.; Spinrad, H.; Meech, K.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery that periodic variations in the brightness of Comet Halley were characterized by two unrelated frequencies implies that the nucleus is in a complex state of rotation. It either nutates as a result of the random addition of small torque perturbations accumulated over many perihelion passages, or the jet activity torques are so strong that it precesses wildly at each perihelion passage. To diagnose the state of nuclear rotation, researchers began a program to acquire photometric time series of the comet as it recedes from the sun. The intention is to observe the decay of the comet's atmosphere and then, when it is unemcumbered by the light of the coma, follow the light variation of the nucleus itself. The latter will be compared with preperihelion time series and the orientation of the nucleus at the time of Vega and Giotto flybys and an accurate rotational ephemeris constructed. Halley was observed on 38 nights during 1987 and approximately 21 nights in 1988. The comet moved from 5 AU to 8.5 AU during this time. The brightness of the coma was found to rapidly decrease in 1988 as the coma and cometary activity collapses. The magnitude in April 1988 was 19 mag (visual) and it is predicted that the nucleus itself will be the major contributor to the brightness in the 1988 and 1989 season

  17. Tracing The Sound Horizon Scale With Photometric Redshift Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, E; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; de Simoni, F; Crocce, M; Cabre, A; Fosalba, P; Alonso, D

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for cosmological parameters extraction using the baryon acoustic oscillation scale as a standard ruler in deep galaxy surveys with photometric determination of redshifts. The method consists in a simple empirical parametric fit to the angular 2-point correlation function w(theta). It is parametrized as a power law to describe the continuum plus a Gaussian to describe the BAO bump. The location of the Gaussian is used as the basis for the measurement of the sound horizon scale. This method, although simple, actually provides a robust estimation, since the inclusion of the power law and the use of the Gaussian removes the shifts which affect the local maximum. We discuss the effects of projection bias, non-linearities, redshift space distortions and photo-z precision, and apply our method to a mock catalog of the Dark Energy Survey, built upon a large N-body simulation provided by the MICE collaboration. We discuss the main systematic errors associated to our method and show that they ar...

  18. Getting leverage on inflation with a large photometric redshift survey

    CERN Document Server

    Basse, Tobias; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2015-01-01

    We assess the potential of a future large-volume photometric redshift survey to constrain observational inflationary parameters using three large-scale structure observables: the angular shear and galaxy power spectra, and the cluster mass function measured through weak lensing. When used in combination with Planck-like CMB measurements, we find that the spectral index n_s can be constrained to a 1 sigma precision of up to 0.0025. The sensitivity to the running of the spectral index can potentially improve to 0.0017, roughly a factor of five better than the present 1 sigma~constraint from Planck and auxiliary CMB data, allowing us to test the assumptions of the slow-roll scenario with unprecedented accuracy. Interestingly, neither CMB+shear nor CMB+galaxy nor CMB+clusters alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined power of all three probes that conspires to break the different parameter degeneracies inherent in each type of observations. We make our forecast software publicly available vi...

  19. Photometric studies of δ Scuti stars. I. IP Virginis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Collier, Matthew W.

    1998-01-01

    We report 15 new times of maximum light for the δ Scuti star IP Virginis (formerly known as SA 106‐1024). An analysis of all times of maximum light indicates that IP Vir has been decreasing in period at a constant rate of − days day−1. Evidence is also presented that IP Vir is a double‐mode variable with a period ratio of . This period ratio predicts a [Fe/H] value of −0.3. From photometric (uvbyβ) observations, we find a foreground reddening of .008 mag and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.05. It is shown that [Fe/H] = −0.3 is most likely the correct value. Intrinsic ‐ and c1‐values, plotted in a model atmosphere grid, indicate a mean effective temperature, K, and a mean surface gravity, . All of these physical parameters support Landolt's initial conclusion that IP Vir is an ordinary δ Sct star.

  20. Photometric and Spectral Study of the Saturnian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sarah F.

    2005-01-01

    Photometric and spectra analysis of data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has yielded intriguing findings regarding the surface properties of several of the icy Saturnian satellites. Spectral cubes were obtained of these satellites with a wavelength distribution in the IR far more extensive than from any previous observations. Disk-integrated solar phase curves were constructed in several key IR wavelengths that are indicative of key properties of the surface of the body, such as macroscopic roughness, fluffiness (or the porosity of the surface), global albedo and scattering properties of surface particles. Polynomial fits to these phase curves indicate a linear albedo trend of the curvature of the phase functions. Rotational phase functions from Enceladus were found to exhibit a double-peaked sinusoidal curve, which shows larger amplitudes for bands corresponding to water ice and a linear amplitude-albedo trend. These functions indicate regions on the surface of the satellite of more recent geologic activity. In addition, recent images of Enceladus show tectonic features and an absence of impact craters on Southern latitudes which could be indicative of a younger surface. Investigations into the properties of these features using VIMS are underway.

  1. An improved multiple flame photometric detector for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2015-11-20

    An improved multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) is introduced, based upon interconnecting fluidic channels within a planar stainless steel (SS) plate. Relative to the previous quartz tube mFPD prototype, the SS mFPD provides a 50% reduction in background emission levels, an orthogonal analytical flame, and easier more sensitive operation. As a result, sulfur response in the SS mFPD spans 4 orders of magnitude, yields a minimum detectable limit near 9×10(-12)gS/s, and has a selectivity approaching 10(4) over carbon. The device also exhibits exceptionally large resistance to hydrocarbon response quenching. Additionally, the SS mFPD uniquely allows analyte emission monitoring in the multiple worker flames for the first time. The findings suggest that this mode can potentially further improve upon the analytical flame response of sulfur (both linear HSO, and quadratic S2) and also phosphorus. Of note, the latter is nearly 20-fold stronger in S/N in the collective worker flames response and provides 6 orders of linearity with a detection limit of about 2.0×10(-13)gP/s. Overall, the results indicate that this new SS design notably improves the analytical performance of the mFPD and can provide a versatile and beneficial monitoring tool for gas chromatography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SPLASH-SXDF Multi-wavelength Photometric Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Capak, Peter; Davidzon, Iary; Faisst, Andreas; Hsieh, Bau Ching; Ilbert, Olivier; Jarvis, Matt; Laigle, Clotilde; Phillips, John; Silverman, John; Strauss, Michael A.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bowler, Rebecca; Coupon, Jean; Foucaud, Sébastien; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Masters, Daniel; McCracken, Henry Joy; Mobasher, Bahram; Ouchi, Masami; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2018-04-01

    We present a multi-wavelength catalog in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF) as part of the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We include the newly acquired optical data from the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program, accompanied by IRAC coverage from the SPLASH survey. All available optical and near-infrared data is homogenized and resampled on a common astrometric reference frame. Source detection is done using a multi-wavelength detection image including the u-band to recover the bluest objects. We measure multi-wavelength photometry and compute photometric redshifts as well as physical properties for ∼1.17 million objects over ∼4.2 deg2, with ∼800,000 objects in the 2.4 deg2 HSC-Ultra-Deep coverage. Using the available spectroscopic redshifts from various surveys over the range of 0 fraction of 3.2%. The SPLASH-SXDF catalog is a valuable, publicly available resource, perfectly suited for studying galaxies in the early universe and tracing their evolution through cosmic time.

  3. Lunar photometric modelling with SMART-1/AMIE imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.; Videen, G.; Josset, J.-L.; Souchon, A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the light-scattering properties of the lunar mare areas. A large photometric dataset was extracted from images taken by the AMIE camera on board the SMART-1 spacecraft. Inter-particle shadowing effects in the regolith are modelled using ray-tracing simulations, and then a phase function is fit to the data using Bayesian techniques and Markov chain Monte Carlo. Additionally, the data are fit with phase functions computed from radiative-transfer coherent-backscatter (RT-CB) simulations. The results indicate that the lunar photometry, including both the opposition effect and azimuthal effects, can be explained well with a combination of inter-particle shadowing and coherent backscattering. Our results produce loose constraints on the mare physical properties. The RT-CB results indicate that the scattering volume element is optically thick. In both the Bayesian analysis and the RT-CB fit, models with lower packing density and/or higher surface roughness always produce better fits to the data than densely packed, smoother ones

  4. Apparent rotation properties of space debris extracted from photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilha, Jiří; Pittet, Jean-Noël; Hamara, Michal; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the rotation properties of space debris objects is essential for the active debris removal missions, accurate re-entry predictions and to investigate the long-term effects of the space environment on the attitude motion change. Different orbital regions and object's physical properties lead to different attitude states and their change over time. Since 2007 the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) performs photometric measurements of space debris objects. To June 2016 almost 2000 light curves of more than 400 individual objects have been acquired and processed. These objects are situated in all orbital regions, from low Earth orbit (LEO), via global navigation systems orbits and high eccentricity orbit (HEO), to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). All types of objects were observed including the non-functional spacecraft, rocket bodies, fragmentation debris and uncorrelated objects discovered during dedicated surveys. For data acquisition, we used the 1-meter Zimmerwald Laser and Astrometry Telescope (ZIMLAT) at the Swiss Optical Ground Station and Geodynamics Observatory Zimmerwald, Switzerland. We applied our own method of phase-diagram reconstruction to extract the apparent rotation period from the light curve. Presented is the AIUB's light curve database and the obtained rotation properties of space debris as a function of object type and orbit.

  5. Photometric studies of globular clusters in the Andromeda nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, A.S.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The comparison of the frequency distribution of Bergh Q and Racine R metallicity parameters for globular clusters in the Galaxy and M31 is given. Mean values of the parameters are: in the Galaxy anti Q=-0.31 and anti R=0.40, in M31 anti Q=-0.32 and anti R=0.42. Hence the mean metallicity of globular clusters in two galaxies is identical. The differences in the observed frequency distribution of the parameters, in particular in the limits of general metallicity, are related to the random errors of photometrical measurements of globular clusters, considerably greater in the case of M31. Thereby the preference should be given to Hanes conclusion that globular clusters form a uniform population at least in two close systems. It should not be excepted that in other galaxies mean colour characteristics and hence metallicity of clusters may be of other type. Thus globular clusters related to the M31-NGC 205 satellite have somewhat minor B-V colour factors

  6. Photometric redshift requirements for lens galaxies in galaxy-galaxy lensing analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Seljak, U.; Cohn, J. D.; Reyes, R.; Cool, R.

    2012-03-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is a valuable probe of galaxy formation and cosmology. Here we quantify the effects of using photometric redshifts (photo-z) in galaxy-galaxy lensing, for both sources and lenses, both for the immediate goal of using galaxies with photo-z as lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and as a demonstration of methodology for large, upcoming weak lensing surveys that will by necessity be dominated by lens samples with photo-z. We calculate the bias in the lensing mass calibration as well as consequences for absolute magnitude (i.e. k-corrections) and stellar mass estimates for a large sample of SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8) galaxies. The redshifts are obtained with the template-based photo-z code ZEBRA on the SDSS DR8 ugriz photometry. We assemble and characterize the calibration samples (˜9000 spectroscopic redshifts from four surveys) to obtain photometric redshift errors and lensing biases corresponding to our full SDSS DR8 lens and source catalogues. Our tests of the calibration sample also highlight the impact of observing conditions in the imaging survey when the spectroscopic calibration covers a small fraction of its footprint; atypical imaging conditions in calibration fields can lead to incorrect conclusions regarding the photo-z of the full survey. For the SDSS DR8 catalogue, we find σΔz/(1+z)= 0.096 and 0.113 for the lens and source catalogues, with flux limits of r= 21 and 21.8, respectively. The photo-z bias and scatter is a function of photo-z and template types, which we exploit to apply photo-z quality cuts. By using photo-z rather than spectroscopy for lenses, dim blue galaxies and L* galaxies up to z˜ 0.4 can be used as lenses, thus expanding into unexplored areas of parameter space. We also explore the systematic uncertainty in the lensing signal calibration when using source photo-z, and both lens and source photo-z; given the size of existing training samples, we can constrain the lensing signal calibration (and

  7. Revised photometric elements of QY Aql, V388 Cyg and HS Her

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.

    1981-01-01

    Using Wood's model we have reanalyzed the light curves of the eclipsing binaries QY Aql, V388 Cyg, and HS Her. For QY Aql and HS Her our photometric solutions substantially confirm previous results, thus respectively supporting an sd-d classification and a main sequence detached view. On the other hand, significantly different photometric elements have been derived for V388 Cyg, which is likely to be an evolved contact binary. (orig.)

  8. Photometric type Ia supernova candidates from the three-year SDSS-II SN survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U.; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U., Dept. Math.; Connolly, Brian; /Pennsylvania U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Las Cumbres Observ. /UC, Santa Barbara /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Cambell, Heather; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP /Fermilab; Gladney, Larry; /Pennsylvania U.; Kessler, Richard; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miquel, Ramon; /Barcelona, IFAE /ICREA, Barcelona /Portsmouth U., ICG

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the three-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey data and identify a sample of 1070 photometric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) candidates based on their multiband light curve data. This sample consists of SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, with a subset of 210 candidates having spectroscopic redshifts of their host galaxies measured while the remaining 860 candidates are purely photometric in their identification. We describe a method for estimating the efficiency and purity of photometric SN Ia classification when spectroscopic confirmation of only a limited sample is available, and demonstrate that SN Ia candidates from SDSS-II can be identified photometrically with {approx}91% efficiency and with a contamination of {approx}6%. Although this is the largest uniform sample of SN candidates to date for studying photometric identification, we find that a larger spectroscopic sample of contaminating sources is required to obtain a better characterization of the background events. A Hubble diagram using SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, but with host galaxy spectroscopic redshifts, yields a distance modulus dispersion that is only {approx}20%-40% larger than that of the spectroscopically confirmed SN Ia sample alone with no significant bias. A Hubble diagram with purely photometric classification and redshift-distance measurements, however, exhibits biases that require further investigation for precision cosmology.

  9. PHOTOMETRY AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOGS FOR THE LOCKMAN HOLE DEEP FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Rovilos, E.; Brusa, M.; Lutz, D.; Burwitz, V.; Egami, E.; Henry, J. P.; Huang, J. H.; Rigopoulou, D.; Vaccari, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present broadband photometry and photometric redshifts for 187,611 sources located in ∼0.5 deg 2 in the Lockman Hole area. The catalog includes 388 X-ray-detected sources identified with the very deep XMM-Newton observations available for an area of 0.2 deg 2 . The source detection was performed on the R c -, z'-, and B-band images and the available photometry is spanning from the far-ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, reaching in the best-case scenario 21 bands. Astrometry corrections and photometric cross-calibrations over the entire data set allowed the computation of accurate photometric redshifts. Special treatment is undertaken for the X-ray sources, the majority of which are active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For normal galaxies, comparing the photometric redshifts to the 253 available spectroscopic redshifts, we achieve an accuracy of σ Δz/(1+z) = 0.036, with 12.6% outliers. For the X-ray-detected sources, compared to 115 spectroscopic redshifts, the accuracy is σ Δz/(1+z) = 0.069, with 18.3% outliers, where the outliers are defined as sources with |z phot – z spec | > 0.15 × (1 + z spec ). These results are a significant improvement over the previously available photometric redshifts for normal galaxies in the Lockman Hole, while it is the first time that photometric redshifts are computed and made public for AGNs for this field.

  10. PHOTOMETRIC TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CANDIDATES FROM THE THREE-YEAR SDSS-II SN SURVEY DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Masao; Connolly, Brian; Gladney, Larry; Bassett, Bruce; Dilday, Benjamin; Cambell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the three-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey data and identify a sample of 1070 photometric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) candidates based on their multiband light curve data. This sample consists of SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, with a subset of 210 candidates having spectroscopic redshifts of their host galaxies measured while the remaining 860 candidates are purely photometric in their identification. We describe a method for estimating the efficiency and purity of photometric SN Ia classification when spectroscopic confirmation of only a limited sample is available, and demonstrate that SN Ia candidates from SDSS-II can be identified photometrically with ∼91% efficiency and with a contamination of ∼6%. Although this is the largest uniform sample of SN candidates to date for studying photometric identification, we find that a larger spectroscopic sample of contaminating sources is required to obtain a better characterization of the background events. A Hubble diagram using SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, but with host galaxy spectroscopic redshifts, yields a distance modulus dispersion that is only ∼20%-40% larger than that of the spectroscopically confirmed SN Ia sample alone with no significant bias. A Hubble diagram with purely photometric classification and redshift-distance measurements, however, exhibits biases that require further investigation for precision cosmology.

  11. Overview of Marfan Syndrome: knowns and unknowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiek N Matkar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a relatively rare disease of the connective tissue that affects several organs of the body. Cardiovascular abnormalities such as aortic root dilatation and mitral valve prolapse are the two main life-threatening complications associated with MFS. The complete pathogenesis of MFS is yet unclear. However, fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene mutations and mutations in the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ signaling pathway are the leading causes of this lethal disease. Detailed assessment based on several major and minor clinical manifestations has led to the evolution of different nosologies for MFS diagnoses with reliable accuracies. Nevertheless, heterogeneous disease advancement and overlapping clinical outcomes make MFS diagnosis challenging. Rapid strides in research and surgical avenues over the last two decades have improved the life expectancy and the quality of life of MFS patients remarkably. More specific diagnostic criteria have been established, novel therapeutic targets for pharmacotherapy have been identified and validated, and newer surgical techniques have been tested. Current research efforts are focusing on the identification of prognostic biomarkers, gene modifiers, drug targets, and surgical procedures. This review aims to provide a brief overview of these aspects associated with MFS.

  12. OPTICAL PHOTOMETRIC AND POLARIMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF NGC 1931

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Eswaraiah, C.; Sharma, Saurabh; Yadav, Ram Kesh; Samal, M. R.; Chauhan, N.; Chen, W. P.; Jose, J.; Ojha, D. K.; Chandola, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present optical photometric and polarimetric observations of stars toward NGC 1931 with the aim of deriving cluster parameters such as distance, reddening, age, and luminosity/mass function as well as understanding dust properties and star formation in the region. The distance to the cluster is found to be 2.3 ± 0.3 kpc and the reddening E(B – V) in the region is found to be variable. The stellar density contours reveal two clusters in the region. The observations suggest a differing reddening law within the cluster region. Polarization efficiency of the dust grains toward the direction of the cluster is found to be less than that for the general diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The slope of the mass function (–0.98 ± 0.22) in the southern region in the mass range of 0.8 ☉ < 9.8 is found to be shallower in comparison to that in the northern region (–1.26 ± 0.23), which is comparable to the Salpeter value (–1.35). The K-band luminosity function (KLF) of the region is found to be comparable to the average value of the slope (∼0.4) for young clusters obtained by Lada and Lada; however, the slope of the KLF is steeper in the northern region as compared to the southern region. The region is probably ionized by two B2 main-sequence-type stars. The mean age of the young stellar objects (YSOs) is found to be 2 ± 1 Myr, which suggests that the identified YSOs could be younger than the ionizing sources of the region. The morphology of the region, the distribution and ages of the YSOs, and ionizing sources indicate a triggered star formation in the region.

  13. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G. [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); D' Abrusco, R., E-mail: brescia@oacn.inaf.it [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  14. The Photometric lightcurve of Comet 1P/Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Allison N.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is considered an important object for a number of reasons. Not only is it the first-identified and brightest periodic comet, being the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye at every apparition, but in 1986 Halley became the first comet to be imaged by fly-by spacecraft. The NASA-funded International Halley Watch (IHW) directly supported the spacecraft by providing narrowband filters for groundbased photometric observations, and until the arrival of Hale-Bopp (1995 O1), Halley was the subject of the largest groundbased observational campaign in history. Following considerable controversy regarding its rotation period, it was eventually determined to be in complex rotation -- the first comet to be so identified. While the overall brightness variations of the coma repeated with a period of about 7.4 days, the detailed period and shape of the lightcurve constantly evolved. The determination of the specific characteristics of each of the two components of its non-principal axis rotational state has remained elusive.To resolve this situation we have now incorporated all of the narrowband photometry, taken by 21 telescopes from around the world and submitted to the IHW archive, to create the most complete homogeneous lightcurve possible. Using measurements of three gas species and the dust, the lightcurve was investigated and found to alternate between a double- and triple-peaked shape, with no single feature being present throughout the entire duration of our dataset (316 days). The apparent period as a function of time was extracted and seen to vary in a step-wise manner between 7.27 and 7.60 days. Taken together, these results were used to produce a synthetic lightcurve revealing Halley's behavior even when no data were available. Details of this and other results, to be used to constrain future detailed modeling, will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  15. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitan, Santiago; Galbany, Lluis; Dessart, Luc; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Folatelli, Gastón

    2017-11-01

    We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion, where the majority of the sample is likely to be under similar physical conditions. Several correlation matrices are produced to search for interesting trends between more than 30 distinct light-curve and spectral properties that characterize the diversity of SNe II. Overall, SNe with higher expansion velocities are brighter, have more rapidly declining light curves, shorter plateau durations, and higher 56Ni masses. Using a larger sample than previous studies, we argue that “Pd”—the plateau duration from the transition of the initial to “plateau” decline rates to the end of the “plateau”—is a better indicator of the hydrogen envelope mass than the traditionally used optically thick phase duration (OPTd: explosion epoch to end of plateau). This argument is supported by the fact that Pd also correlates with s 3, the light-curve decline rate at late times: lower Pd values correlate with larger s 3 decline rates. Large s 3 decline rates are likely related to lower envelope masses, which enables gamma-ray escape. We also find a significant anticorrelation between Pd and s 2 (the plateau decline rate), confirming the long standing hypothesis that faster declining SNe II (SNe IIL) are the result of explosions with lower hydrogen envelope masses and therefore have shorter Pd values. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS- 2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programs 076.A-0156, 078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  16. Infrared Photometric Study of Wolf–Rayet Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. S.; Yang, X. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G.

    2018-01-01

    We collected observational data on 781 Wolf–Rayet (WR) galaxies from the literature to photometrically study their infrared properties measured by the 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, AKARI, and Herschel missions. It is found that in the 1–5 μm range the radiations of WR galaxies are dominated by the free–free emissions from the stellar winds and the circumstellar dust from the late-type stars in the host galaxy. In the 5–22 μm range, the radiation of WR galaxies is dominated by the free–free emissions and the synchrotron radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN; but not always present). In the 22–140 μm range, the radiations of WR galaxies are dominated by the free–free emissions and the star formation/starburst activities. In the 250–500 μm range, the radiation of WR galaxies is dominated by the free–free emissions. In addition, the comparison with the non-WR galaxies is made. It is shown that some star formation WR galaxies have redder near-infrared colors than non-WR star-forming galaxies probably due to the gas emission in the near-infrared. In the 2–5 μm region WR galaxies have redder colors due to the thermal emission from circumstellar dust of late-type stars and the enhanced gas emission. In the 5–22 μm region, both WR galaxies and non-WR galaxies have similar behavior, indicative of having similar free–free emission as the dominant radiation. In the 25–140 μm region, both types of galaxies also have similar behavior, indicative of having free–free emission from the stellar winds or the thermal radiation from the starburst/star formation as the dominant radiation.

  17. GEO Optical Data Association with Concurrent Metric and Photometric Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, P.; Monet, D.

    Data association in a congested area of the GEO belt with occasional visits by non-resident objects can be treated as a Multi-Target-Tracking (MTT) problem. For a stationary sensor surveilling the GEO belt, geosynchronous and near GEO objects are not completely motionless in the earth-fixed frame and can be observed as moving targets. In some clusters, metric or positional information is insufficiently accurate or up-to-date to associate the measurements. In the presence of measurements with uncertain origin, star tracks (residuals) and other sensor artifacts, heuristic techniques based on hard decision assignment do not perform adequately. In the MMT community, Bar-Shalom [2009 Bar-Shalom] was first in introducing the use of measurements to update the state of the target of interest in the tracking filter, e.g. Kalman filter. Following Bar-Shalom’s idea, we use the Probabilistic Data Association Filter (PDAF) but to make use of all information obtainable in the measurement of three-axis-stabilized GEO satellites, we combine photometric with metric measurements to update the filter. Therefore, our technique Concurrent Spatio- Temporal and Brightness (COSTB) has the stand-alone ability of associating a track with its identity –for resident objects. That is possible because the light curve of a stabilized GEO satellite changes minimally from night to night. We exercised COSTB on camera cadence data to associate measurements, correct mistags and detect non-residents in a simulated near real time cadence. Data on GEO clusters were used.

  18. Unknown grapevine genetic resources in Asturias (Spain on the edge of extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moreno-Sanz

    2013-12-01

    Significance and impact of the study: Considering the limited number of accessions of the unknown cultivars and the replanting of old vineyards with vines approved by Cangas Quality Wine regulations, their conservation and study is vital to provide genetic resources for potential breeding or technological purposes in the future.

  19. Exploration of Unknown Spaces by People Who Are Blind Using a Multi-sensory Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Orly; Mioduser, David

    2004-01-01

    The ability to explore unknown spaces independently, safely and efficiently is a combined product of motor, sensory, and cognitive skills. Normal exercise of this ability directly affects an individual?s quality of life. Mental mapping of spaces and of the possible paths for navigating these spaces is essential for the development of efficient…

  20. HFF-DeepSpace Photometric Catalogs of the 12 Hubble Frontier Fields, Clusters, and Parallels: Photometry, Photometric Redshifts, and Stellar Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Heath V.; Lange-Vagle, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferrarese, Laura; Stefanon, Mauro; Kado-Fong, Erin; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Oesch, Pascal A.; Feinstein, Adina D.; Labbé, Ivo; Lundgren, Britt; Martis, Nicholas; Muzzin, Adam; Nedkova, Kalina; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen

    2018-03-01

    We present Hubble multi-wavelength photometric catalogs, including (up to) 17 filters with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 from the ultra-violet to near-infrared for the Hubble Frontier Fields and associated parallels. We have constructed homogeneous photometric catalogs for all six clusters and their parallels. To further expand these data catalogs, we have added ultra-deep K S -band imaging at 2.2 μm from the Very Large Telescope HAWK-I and Keck-I MOSFIRE instruments. We also add post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), as well as archival IRAC 5.8 and 8.0 μm imaging when available. We introduce the public release of the multi-wavelength (0.2–8 μm) photometric catalogs, and we describe the unique steps applied for the construction of these catalogs. Particular emphasis is given to the source detection band, the contamination of light from the bright cluster galaxies (bCGs), and intra-cluster light (ICL). In addition to the photometric catalogs, we provide catalogs of photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Furthermore, this includes all the images used in the construction of the catalogs, including the combined models of bCGs and ICL, the residual images, segmentation maps, and more. These catalogs are a robust data set of the Hubble Frontier Fields and will be an important aid in designing future surveys, as well as planning follow-up programs with current and future observatories to answer key questions remaining about first light, reionization, the assembly of galaxies, and many more topics, most notably by identifying high-redshift sources to target.

  1. A DETAILED STUDY OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR GOODS-SOUTH GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton; Mobasher, Bahram; Dickinson, Mark; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng; Salimbeni, Sara; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Riess, Adam G.; Nonino, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We use the deepest and the most comprehensive photometric data currently available for GOODS-South (GOODS-S) galaxies to measure their photometric redshifts. The photometry includes VLT/VIMOS (U band), HST/ACS (F435W, F606W, F775W, and F850LP bands), VLT/ISAAC (J, H, and K s bands), and four Spitzer/IRAC channels (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm). The catalog is selected in the z band (F850LP) and photometry in each band is carried out using the recently completed TFIT algorithm, which performs point-spread function (PSF) matched photometry uniformly across different instruments and filters, despite large variations in PSFs and pixel scales. Photometric redshifts are derived using the GOODZ code, which is based on the template fitting method using priors. The code also implements 'training' of the template spectral energy distribution (SED) set, using available spectroscopic redshifts in order to minimize systematic differences between the templates and the SEDs of the observed galaxies. Our final catalog covers an area of 153 arcmin 2 and includes photometric redshifts for a total of 32,505 objects. The scatter between our estimated photometric and spectroscopic redshifts is σ = 0.040 with 3.7% outliers to the full z-band depth of our catalog, decreasing to σ = 0.039 and 2.1% outliers at a magnitude limit m z < 24.5. This is consistent with the best results previously published for GOODS-S galaxies, however, the present catalog is the deepest yet available and provides photometric redshifts for significantly more objects to deeper flux limits and higher redshifts than earlier works. Furthermore, we show that the photometric redshifts estimated here for galaxies selected as dropouts are consistent with those expected based on the Lyman break technique.

  2. Radiotherapeutic concepts in cancer of unknown primary site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, D.; Debus, J.; Sterzing, F.

    2014-01-01

    The term cancer of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a group of entities which differ to a great extent regarding etiology, prognosis and therapeutic management. The aim of the study was an elaboration of the role of radiotherapy in CUP syndrome. Systematic literature search and specification of the available treatment options. Radiotherapy is an integral part of interdisciplinary management approaches for patients with CUP in both curative and palliative situations. Radio-oncological techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy increase the therapeutic window. Modern diagnostic modalities from radiology and nuclear medicine are the cornerstone of radiotherapeutic interventions, especially in terms of target volume definition and pretherapeutic staging. In the interdisciplinary setting radiation oncology offers the possibility of curative and often organ preserving approaches in patients with axillary and cervical CUP. In addition, improvement and preservation of quality of life can be achieved in patients with metastatic disease. Radiation oncology is a crucial component of the interdisciplinary management of patients with CUP. Therapeutic decisions in patients with CUP should be made in an interdisciplinary setting. (orig.) [de

  3. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object

  4. Long-Period Exoplanets from Photometric Transit Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Hugh

    2017-10-01

    Photometric transit surveys on the ground & in space have detected thousands of transiting exoplanets, typically by analytically combining the signals from multiple transits. This technique of exoplanet detection was exploited in K2 to detect nearly 200 candidate planets, and extensive follow-up was able to confirm the planet K2-110b as a 2.6±0.1R⊕, 16.7±3.2M⊙ planet on a 14d orbit around a K-dwarf. The ability to push beyond the time limit set by transit surveys to detect long-period transiting objects from a single eclipse was also studied. This was performed by developing a search technique to search for planets around bright stars in WASP and NGTS photometry, finding NGTS to be marginally better than WASP at detecting such planets with 4.14±0.16 per year compared to 1.43±0.15, and detecting many planet candidates for which follow-up is on-going. This search was then adapted to search for deep, long-duration eclipses in all WASP targets. The results of this survey are described in this thesis, as well as detailed results for the candidate PDS-110, a young T-Tauri star which exhibited ∼20d-long, 30%-deep eclipses in 2008 and 2011. Space-based photometers such as Kepler have the precision to identify small exoplanets and eclipsing binary candidates from only a single eclipse. K2, with its 75d campaign duration and high-precision photometry, is not only ideally suited to detect significant numbers of single-eclipsing objects, but also to characterise them from a single event. The Bayesian transit-fitting tool ("Namaste: An MCMC Analysis of Single Transit Exoplanets") was developed to extract planetary and orbital information from single transits, and was applied to 71 candidate events detected in K2 photometry. The techniques developed in this thesis are highly applicable to future transit surveys such as TESS & PLATO, which will be able to discover & characterise large numbers of long period planets in this way

  5. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Carlos E. [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Huterer, Dragan [Michigan U.; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Busha, Michael T. [Zurich U.; Wechsler, Risa H. [SLAC

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  6. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C.; Bolt, L.; Burns, C. R.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; Krisciunas, K.; Krzeminski, W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data

  7. NICOLAU: compact unit for photometric characterization of automotive lighting from near-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Santiago; Arranz, Maria J.; Arasa, Josep; Cattoen, Michel; Bosch, Thierry

    2005-02-01

    The present works depicts a measurement technique intended to enhance the characterization procedures of the photometric emissions of automotive headlamps, with potential applications to any light source emission, either automotive or non-automotive. A CCD array with a precisely characterized optical system is used for sampling the luminance field of the headlamp just a few centimetres in front of it, by combining deflectometric techniques (yielding the direction of the light beams) and photometric techniques (yielding the energy travelling in each direction). The CCD array scans the measurement plane using a self-developed mechanical unit and electronics, and then image-processing techniques are used for obtaining the photometric behaviour of the headlamp in any given plane, in particular in the plane and positions required by current normative, but also on the road, on traffic signs, etc. An overview of the construction of the system, of the considered principle of measurement, and of the main calibrations performed on the unit is presented. First results concerning relative measurements are presented compared both to reference data from a photometric tunnel and from a plane placed 5m away from the source. Preliminary results for the absolute photometric calibration of the system are also presented for different illumination beams of different headlamps (driving and passing beam).

  8. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, J. P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bolt, L. [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Folatelli, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CONICET, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Freedman, W. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krisciunas, K. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, W., E-mail: dthomas@das.uchile.cl [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2015-12-20

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.

  9. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, G

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions.

  10. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaou, G.

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions

  11. Perihelion asymmetry in the photometric parameters of long-period comets at large heliocentric distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoren, J.

    1982-01-01

    The present statistical analysis is based on a sample of long-period comets selected according to two criteria: (1) availability of photometric observations made at large distances from the Sun and covering an orbital arc long enough for a reliable determination of the photometric parameters, and (2) availability of a well determined orbit making it possible to classify the comet as new or old in Oort's (1950) sense. The selection was confined to comets with nearly parabolic orbits. 67 objects were found to satisfy the selection criteria. Photometric data referring to heliocentric distances of r > 2.5 AU were only used, yielding a total of 2,842 individual estimates and measurements. (Auth.)

  12. Titrimetric and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite in commercial bleaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B; Gengan, Prabhashini

    2010-01-01

    Two methods, simple titration and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite are developed, based its reaction with hydrogen peroxide and titration of the residual peroxide by acidic permanganate. In the titration method, the residual hydrogen peroxide is estimated by titration with standard permanganate solution to estimate the hypochlorite concentration. The photometric method is devised to measure the concentration of remaining permanganate, after the reaction with residual hydrogen peroxide. It employs 4 ranges of calibration curves to enable the determination of hypochlorite accurately. The new photometric method measures hypochlorite in the range 1.90 x 10(-3) to 1.90 x 10(-2) M, with high accuracy and with low variance. The concentrations of hypochlorite in diverse commercial bleach samples and in seawater which is enriched with hypochlorite were estimated using the proposed method and compared with the arsenite method. The statistical analysis validates the superiority of the proposed method.

  13. On-line monitoring of fluid bed granulation by photometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppela, Ira; Antikainen, Osmo; Sandler, Niklas; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a photometric surface imaging approach for on-line monitoring of fluid bed granulation. Five granule batches consisting of paracetamol and varying amounts of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose were manufactured with an instrumented fluid bed granulator. Photometric images and NIR spectra were continuously captured on-line and particle size information was extracted from them. Also key process parameters were recorded. The images provided direct real-time information on the growth, attrition and packing behaviour of the batches. Moreover, decreasing image brightness in the drying phase was found to indicate granule drying. The changes observed in the image data were also linked to the moisture and temperature profiles of the processes. Combined with complementary process analytical tools, photometric imaging opens up possibilities for improved real-time evaluation fluid bed granulation. Furthermore, images can give valuable insight into the behaviour of excipients or formulations during product development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. UBVRI PHOTOMETRIC STANDARD STARS AROUND THE CELESTIAL EQUATOR: UPDATES AND ADDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.

    2009-01-01

    New broadband UBVRI photoelectric observations on the Johnson-Kron-Cousins photometric system have been made of 202 stars around the sky, and centered at the celestial equator. These stars constitute both an update of and additions to a previously published list of equatorial photometric standard stars. The list is capable of providing, for both celestial hemispheres, an internally consistent homogeneous broadband standard photometric system around the sky. When these new measurements are included with those previously published by Landolt (1992), the entire list of standard stars in this paper encompasses the magnitude range 8.90 < V < 16.30, and the color index range -0.35 < (B - V) < +2.30.

  15. A Photometric Stereo Using Re-Projected Images for Active Stereo Vision System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keonhwa Jung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In optical 3D shape measurement, stereo vision with structured light can measure 3D scan data with high accuracy and is used in many applications, but fine surface detail is difficult to obtain. On the other hand, photometric stereo can capture surface details but has disadvantages, in that its 3D data accuracy drops and it requires multiple light sources. When the two measurement methods are combined, more accurate 3D scan data and detailed surface features can be obtained at the same time. In this paper, we present a 3D optical measurement technique that uses re-projection of images to implement photometric stereo without an external light source. 3D scan data is enhanced by combining normal vector from this photometric stereo method, and the result is evaluated with the ground truth.

  16. Yonsei Evolutionary Population Synthesis (YEPS). II. Spectro-photometric Evolution of Helium-enhanced Stellar Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chul; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook, E-mail: chulchung@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: sjyoon0691@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-20

    The discovery of multiple stellar populations in Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) has stimulated various follow-up studies on helium-enhanced stellar populations. Here we present the evolutionary population synthesis models for the spectro-photometric evolution of simple stellar populations (SSPs) with varying initial helium abundance ( Y {sub ini}). We show that Y {sub ini} brings about dramatic changes in spectro-photometric properties of SSPs. Like the normal-helium SSPs, the integrated spectro-photometric evolution of helium-enhanced SSPs is also dependent on metallicity and age for a given Y {sub ini}. We discuss the implications and prospects for the helium-enhanced populations in relation to the second-generation populations found in the Milky Way GCs. All of the models are available at http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/cosmic/data/YEPS.htm.

  17. Yonsei Evolutionary Population Synthesis (YEPS). II. Spectro-photometric Evolution of Helium-enhanced Stellar Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chul; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of multiple stellar populations in Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) has stimulated various follow-up studies on helium-enhanced stellar populations. Here we present the evolutionary population synthesis models for the spectro-photometric evolution of simple stellar populations (SSPs) with varying initial helium abundance ( Y ini ). We show that Y ini brings about dramatic changes in spectro-photometric properties of SSPs. Like the normal-helium SSPs, the integrated spectro-photometric evolution of helium-enhanced SSPs is also dependent on metallicity and age for a given Y ini . We discuss the implications and prospects for the helium-enhanced populations in relation to the second-generation populations found in the Milky Way GCs. All of the models are available at http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/cosmic/data/YEPS.htm.

  18. Psychological profile: the problem of modeling the unknown criminal personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. М. Гетьман

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the problem of modeling an unknown person in the preparation of criminal psychological profile. Some approaches to the concept of "psychological profile" and "psychological portrait", in particular the proposed delineation of these terms. We consider the system steps in the development of the psychological profile of an unknown perpetrator.

  19. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND QUASAR PROBABILITIES FROM A SINGLE, DATA-DRIVEN GENERATIVE MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Myers, Adam D.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; McMahon, Richard G.; Schiminovich, David; Sheldon, Erin S.; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a technique for simultaneously classifying and estimating the redshift of quasars. It can separate quasars from stars in arbitrary redshift ranges, estimate full posterior distribution functions for the redshift, and naturally incorporate flux uncertainties, missing data, and multi-wavelength photometry. We build models of quasars in flux-redshift space by applying the extreme deconvolution technique to estimate the underlying density. By integrating this density over redshift, one can obtain quasar flux densities in different redshift ranges. This approach allows for efficient, consistent, and fast classification and photometric redshift estimation. This is achieved by combining the speed obtained by choosing simple analytical forms as the basis of our density model with the flexibility of non-parametric models through the use of many simple components with many parameters. We show that this technique is competitive with the best photometric quasar classification techniques—which are limited to fixed, broad redshift ranges and high signal-to-noise ratio data—and with the best photometric redshift techniques when applied to broadband optical data. We demonstrate that the inclusion of UV and NIR data significantly improves photometric quasar-star separation and essentially resolves all of the redshift degeneracies for quasars inherent to the ugriz filter system, even when included data have a low signal-to-noise ratio. For quasars spectroscopically confirmed by the SDSS 84% and 97% of the objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and UKIDSS NIR data have photometric redshifts within 0.1 and 0.3, respectively, of the spectroscopic redshift; this amounts to about a factor of three improvement over ugriz-only photometric redshifts. Our code to calculate quasar probabilities and redshift probability distributions is publicly available.

  20. Stellar variability and its implications for photometric planet detection with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, N. M.; Jenkins, J.; Basri, G. S.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    Kepler is one of three candidates for the next NASA Discovery Mission and will survey the extended solar neighborhood to detect and characterize hundreds of terrestrial (and larger) planets in or near the habitable zone. Its strength lies in its ability to detect large numbers of Earth-sized planets - planets which produced a 10-4 change in relative stellar brightness during a transit across the disk of a sun-like parent star. Such a detection requires high instrumental relative precision and is facilitated by observing stars which are photometrically quiet on hourly timescales. Probing stellar variability across the HR diagram, one finds that many of the photometrically quietest stars are the F and G dwarfs. The Hipparcos photometric database shows the lowest photometric variances among stars of this spectral class. Our own Sun is a prime example with RMS variations over a few rotational cycles of typically (3 - 4)×10-4 (computed from VIRGO/DIARAD data taken Jan-Mar 2001). And variability on the hourly time scales crucial for planet detection is significantly smaller: just (2 - 5)×10-5. This bodes well for planet detection programs such as Kepler and Eddington. With significant numbers of photometrically quiet solar-type stars, Earth-sized planets should be readily identified provided they are abundant in the solar neighborhood. In support of the Kepler science objectives, we have initiated a study of stellar variability and its implications for planet detection. Herein, we summarize existing observational and theoretrical work with the objective of determining the percentage of stars in the Kepler field of view expected to be photometrically stable at a level which allows for Earth-sized planet detection.

  1. A multi-channel photometric detector for multi-component analysis in flow injection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A; Huang, J; Geng, L; Xu, J; Zhao, X

    1994-01-01

    The detector, a multi-channel photometric detector, described in this paper was developed using multi-wavelength LEDs (light emitting diode) and phototransistors for absorbance measurement controlled by an Intel 8031 8-bit single chip microcomputer. Up to four flow cells can be attached to the detector. The LEDs and phototransistors are both inexpensive, and reliable. The results given by the detector for simultaneous determination of trace amounts of cobalt and cadmium in zinc sulphate electrolyte are reported. Because of the newly developed detector, this approach employs much less hardware apparatus than by employing conventional photometric detectors.

  2. Indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions electrophoretically separated in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítová, Lada; Fojt, Lukáš; Vespalec, Radim

    2014-04-18

    3,5-Dinitrobenzoate and picrate are light absorbing anions pertinent to indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions in buffered methanolic background electrolytes (BGEs). Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and morpholine have been used as buffering bases, which eliminated baseline steps, and minimized the baseline noise. In methanolic BGEs, mobilities of boron cluster anions depend on both ionic constituents of the BGE buffer. This dependence can be explained by ion pair interaction of detected anions with BGE cations, which are not bonded into ion pairs with the BGE anions. The former ion pair interaction decreases sensitivity of the indirect photometric detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Flame photometric determination of Na, K and Li in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    A flame photometric method for the determination of Na, K and Li in uranium compounds is described. The uranium is separated by solvent extraction from hydrochloric acid medium with tri-butyl phosphate. Amounts of uranium in order of 20 μg/ml don't cause any interference in the photometric results. The element Na presents a residual concentration due to the contamination of the reagents. The relative standard deviation is about 10% for the three elements. The relative error varies with the concentration of the element and it is between 1 and 24% for Na, between O and 12% for K and between O and 33% for Li. (Author) [pt

  4. Microgeometry capture and RGB albedo estimation by photometric stereo without demosaicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéau, Yvain; Pizenberg, Mathieu; Durou, Jean-Denis; Cremers, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    We present a photometric stereo-based system for retrieving the RGB albedo and the fine-scale details of an opaque surface. In order to limit specularities, the system uses a controllable diffuse illumination, which is calibrated using a dedicated procedure. In addition, we rather handle RAW, non-demosaiced RGB images, which both avoids uncontrolled operations on the sensor data and simplifies the estimation of the albedo in each color channel and of the normals. We finally show on real-world examples the potential of photometric stereo for the 3D-reconstruction of very thin structures from a wide variety of surfaces.

  5. Photometric behaviour and the orbital period of the system HDE 245770=A 0535+26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnedin, Yu.N.; Zajtseva, G.V.; Larionov, V.M.; Lyutyj, V.M.; Khozov, G.V.; Sheffer, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    The results of photometric observations (1981-1985) are given for the transient X-ray source A 0535+26, whose optical component is the Be star HDE 245770. An analysis of the photometric data enabled us to detect radiation of a disc of accreting matter that is gradually accumulated, precipitating afterwards on to the neutron star surface. The latter leads to an X-ray flare. Physical parameters of the accreting accumulating disc are determined. The characteristic timescale of formation of such a disc is likely to be ∼ 1000 days

  6. Photometric Lambert Correction for Global Mosaicking of HRSC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Sebastian; Michael, Greg; van Gasselt, Stephan; Kneissl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) is a push-broom image sensor onboard Mars Express recording the Martian surface in 3D and color. Being in orbit since 2004, the camera has obtained over 3,600 panchromatic image sequences covering about 70% of the planet's surface at 10-20 m/pixel. The composition of an homogenous global mosaic is a major challenge due to the strong elliptical and highly irregular orbit of the spacecraft, which often results in large variations of illumination and atmospheric conditions between individual images. For the purpose of a global mosaic in the full Nadir resolution of 12.5 m per pixel we present a first-order systematic photometric correction for the individual image sequences based on a Lambertian reflection model. During the radiometric calibration of the HRSC data, values for the reflectance scaling factor and the reflectance offset are added to the individual image labels. These parameters can be used for a linear transformation from the original DN values into spectral reflectance values. The spectral reflectance varies with the solar incidence angle, topography (changing the local incidence angle and therefore adding an exta geometry factor for each ground pixel), the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the surface, and atmospheric effects. Mosaicking the spectral values together as images sometimes shows large brightness differences. One major contributor to the brightness differences between two images is the differing solar geometry due to the varying time of day when the individual images were obtained. This variation causes two images of the same or adjacent areas to have different image brightnesses. As a first-order correction for the varying illumination conditions and resulting brightness variations, the images are corrected for the solar incidence angle by assuming an ideal diffusely reflecting behaviour of the surface. This correction requires the calculation of the solar geometry for each

  7. Known unknowns: indirect energy effects of information and communication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Nathaniel C.; Shehabi, Arman; Azevedo, Inês L.

    2016-10-01

    Background. There has been sustained and growing interest in characterizing the net energy impact of information and communication technology (ICT), which results from indirect effects offsetting (or amplifying) the energy directly consumed by ICT equipment. These indirect effects may be either positive or negative, and there is considerable disagreement as to the direction of this sign as well as the effect magnitude. Literature in this area ranges from studies focused on a single service (such as e-commerce versus traditional retail) to macroeconomic studies attempting to characterize the overall impact of ICT. Methods. We review the literature on the indirect energy effect of ICT found via Google Scholar, our own research, and input from other researchers in the field. The various studies are linked to an effect taxonomy, which is synthesized from several different hierarchies present in the literature. References are further grouped according to ICT service (e.g., e-commerce, telework) and summarized by scope, method, and quantitative and qualitative findings. Review results. Uncertainty persists in understanding the net energy effects of ICT. Results of indirect energy effect studies are highly sensitive to scoping decisions and assumptions made by the analyst. Uncertainty increases as the impact scope broadens, due to complex and interconnected effects. However, there is general agreement that ICT has large energy savings potential, but that the realization of this potential is highly dependent on deployment details and user behavior. Discussion. While the overall net effect of ICT is likely to remain unknown, this review suggests several guidelines for improving research quality in this area, including increased data collection, enhancing traditional modeling studies with sensitivity analysis, greater care in scoping, less confidence in characterizing aggregate impacts, more effort on understanding user behavior, and more contextual integration across the

  8. Vestibular Function in Adults With Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Tohamy, Amal M; Oseilly, Amira M

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate vestibular function in adults with chronic epilepsy of unknown etiology in the inter-ictal period. Epilepsy is a chronic medical disorder. Life-long therapy may be required in one-third of patients. Epilepsy is associated with comorbid somatic conditions which impairs patients' quality of life. This cross-sectional study included 28 with generalized tonic clonic (GTC) convulsions and 14 and 3 with temporal (TLE) and frontal lobe (FLE) epilepsies with secondary generalization (all were on regular carbamazepine therapy) and 40 healthy control subjects. The patients' mean age was 34.97 ± 7.35 years and the duration of illness was 18.75 ± 7.99 years. All underwent videonystagmography (VNG). Compared with controls, patients had frequent vestibular symptoms including dizziness (62.22%) (p = 0.0001) and sense of imbalance (44.44%) (p = 0.0001). Eleven patients (24.44%) had central vestibular dysfunction (p = 0.0001); 9 (20%) had mixed vestibular dysfunction and one (2.22%) had peripheral vestibular dysfunction (p = 0.0001). Abnormalities were observed in saccadic (44.4%) and pursuit (42.2%) eye movements, optokinetic nystagmus (42.2%) and positioning/positional (11.11%) and caloric (13.33%) testing. TLE and FLE were associated with more VNG abnormalities than GTC. No significant differences were observed in the demographic and clinical characteristics between patients with and without VNG abnormalities. Vestibular manifestations are frequent in patients with epilepsy. This may be a result of the permanent damaging effect of chronic epilepsy on the vestibular cortical areas and/or a toxic effect from prolonged carbamazepine therapy on the peripheral and central vestibular systems.

  9. Robust Fault Detection for Switched Fuzzy Systems With Unknown Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Yingchun; Sun, Xun

    2017-10-03

    This paper investigates the fault detection problem for a class of switched nonlinear systems in the T-S fuzzy framework. The unknown input is considered in the systems. A novel fault detection unknown input observer design method is proposed. Based on the proposed observer, the unknown input can be removed from the fault detection residual. The weighted H∞ performance level is considered to ensure the robustness. In addition, the weighted H₋ performance level is introduced, which can increase the sensibility of the proposed detection method. To verify the proposed scheme, a numerical simulation example and an electromechanical system simulation example are provided at the end of this paper.

  10. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat

  11. The Surveillance Dynamic State GSS "Intelsat 10-02" on Base Multicolored Photometrical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Epishev, V. P.; Motrunich, I. I.

    2011-09-01

    Complex coordinate and multicolored photometric observations of active geostationary satellite (GSS) "Intelsat 10-02" (28358/2004022A, sub point GSS 359.0 E, with inclination to the equator i=0.05, the eccentricity e=0.00) took place at the "Mayaki" station, located nearby Odessa, on October 6,7,12,13,14, 2010 and on March 4, 2011. On those dates the satellite was nearby the border of the Earth's shadow. On basis of multicolored photometric observations some of its optical and geometrical characteristics were calculated. The analysis of light variation of GSS in B,V,R spectral regions of Johnson's system and the color indexes variation show that during the dates of observation the systems of stabilization of the platform of the transceiver antenna and the solar panels worked in the normal operating mode. During the observations the tracking panels of GSS "Intelsat 10-02" are well preserved relatively to the direction of Sun. The rotation of SB panels happens about axis, which is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. The orientation of the main axis of the platform, within calculation errors, remained unchanged in to the direction of the Earth's mass center. The analyses of the coordinate and photometric information for this GSS show how we can effectively control the dynamic state of the satellite and evaluate the optical characteristics of visible surface of spacecraft components and their behavior on its orbit using the photometric observations

  12. Automatic photometric titration of fluoride with thorium nitrate and alizarin S as indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliefert, C.; Sobek, M.

    1978-01-01

    The photometric titration of fluoride with thorium nitrate and Alizarin S as indicator has been automated and optimized for fluoride levels between 1 and 20mg/85ml solution. The interference of several ions has been investigated. This procedure is particularly useful for the determination of fluoride after fusion with peroxides as fluxing agents. (orig.) [de

  13. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: The Photometric Data Set for Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drlica-Wagner, A.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Rykoff, E. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Yanny, B.; Tucker, D. L.; Hoyle, B.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Davis, C.; de Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Leistedt, B.; Li, T. S.; Marshall, J. L.; Neilsen, E.; Rau, M. M.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, J.; Troxel, M. A.; Wyatt, S.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    We describe the creation, content, and validation of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) internal year-one cosmology data set, Y1A1 GOLD, in support of upcoming cosmological analyses. The Y1A1 GOLD data set is assembled from multiple epochs of DES imaging and consists of calibrated photometric zero-points, object catalogs, and ancillary data products—e.g., maps of survey depth and observing conditions, star–galaxy classification, and photometric redshift estimates—that are necessary for accurate cosmological analyses. The Y1A1 GOLD wide-area object catalog consists of ∼ 137 million objects detected in co-added images covering ∼ 1800 {\\deg }2 in the DES grizY filters. The 10σ limiting magnitude for galaxies is g=23.4, r=23.2, i=22.5, z=21.8, and Y=20.1. Photometric calibration of Y1A1 GOLD was performed by combining nightly zero-point solutions with stellar locus regression, and the absolute calibration accuracy is better than 2% over the survey area. DES Y1A1 GOLD is the largest photometric data set at the achieved depth to date, enabling precise measurements of cosmic acceleration at z ≲ 1.

  14. Classification of Metal-Deficient Dwarfs in the Vilnius Photometric System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazauskaitė R.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods used for the quantitative classification of metal-deficient stars in the Vilnius photometric system are reviewed. We present a new calibration of absolute magnitudes for dwarfs and subdwarfs, based on Hipparcos parallaxes. The new classification scheme is applied to a sample of Population II visual binaries.

  15. Photometric Observations of Soils and Rocks at the Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Arvidson, R. A.; Bell, J. F., III; Farrand, W.; Guinness, E.; Johnson, M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Lemmon, M.; Morris, R. V.; Seelos, F., IV

    2005-01-01

    The Panoramic Cameras (Pancam) on the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Exploration Rovers have acquired multispectral reflectance observations of rocks and soils at different incidence, emission, and phase angles that will be used for photometric modeling of surface materials. Phase angle coverage at both sites extends from approx. 0 deg. to approx. 155 deg.

  16. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno II, Jim

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we

  17. The Dynamic Photometric Stereo Method Using a Multi-Tap CMOS Image Sensor †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Takuya; Nagahara, Hajime; Taniguchi, Rin-ichiro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    The photometric stereo method enables estimation of surface normals from images that have been captured using different but known lighting directions. The classical photometric stereo method requires at least three images to determine the normals in a given scene. However, this method cannot be applied to dynamic scenes because it is assumed that the scene remains static while the required images are captured. In this work, we present a dynamic photometric stereo method for estimation of the surface normals in a dynamic scene. We use a multi-tap complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to capture the input images required for the proposed photometric stereo method. This image sensor can divide the electrons from the photodiode from a single pixel into the different taps of the exposures and can thus capture multiple images under different lighting conditions with almost identical timing. We implemented a camera lighting system and created a software application to enable estimation of the normal map in real time. We also evaluated the accuracy of the estimated surface normals and demonstrated that our proposed method can estimate the surface normals of dynamic scenes. PMID:29510599

  18. The Dynamic Photometric Stereo Method Using a Multi-Tap CMOS Image Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Takuya; Nagahara, Hajime; Taniguchi, Rin-Ichiro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2018-03-05

    The photometric stereo method enables estimation of surface normals from images that have been captured using different but known lighting directions. The classical photometric stereo method requires at least three images to determine the normals in a given scene. However, this method cannot be applied to dynamic scenes because it is assumed that the scene remains static while the required images are captured. In this work, we present a dynamic photometric stereo method for estimation of the surface normals in a dynamic scene. We use a multi-tap complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to capture the input images required for the proposed photometric stereo method. This image sensor can divide the electrons from the photodiode from a single pixel into the different taps of the exposures and can thus capture multiple images under different lighting conditions with almost identical timing. We implemented a camera lighting system and created a software application to enable estimation of the normal map in real time. We also evaluated the accuracy of the estimated surface normals and demonstrated that our proposed method can estimate the surface normals of dynamic scenes.

  19. GALAXY ZOO MORPHOLOGY AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that one can accurately derive galaxy morphology from particular primary and secondary isophotal shape estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging catalog. This was accomplished by applying Machine Learning techniques to the Galaxy Zoo morphology catalog. Using the broad bandpass photometry of the SDSS in combination with precise knowledge of galaxy morphology should help in estimating more accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies. Using the Galaxy Zoo separation for spirals and ellipticals in combination with SDSS photometry we attempt to calculate photometric redshifts. In the best case we find that the root-mean-square error for luminous red galaxies classified as ellipticals is as low as 0.0118. Given these promising results we believe better photometric redshift estimates for all galaxies in the SDSS (∼350 million) will be feasible if researchers can also leverage their derived morphologies via Machine Learning. These initial results look to be promising for those interested in estimating weak lensing, baryonic acoustic oscillation, and other fields dependent upon accurate photometric redshifts.

  20. COMPARISON OF KEPLER PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY WITH THE SUN ON DIFFERENT TIMESCALES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basri, Gibor; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Reiners, Ansgar

    2013-01-01

    We utilize Kepler data to study the precision differential photometric variability of solar-type and cooler stars at different timescales, ranging from half an hour to three months. We define a diagnostic that characterizes the median differential intensity change between data bins of a given timescale. We apply the same diagnostics to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data that has been rendered comparable to Kepler. The Sun exhibits similar photometric variability on all timescales as comparable solar-type stars in the Kepler field. The previously defined photometric ''range'' serves as our activity proxy (driven by starspot coverage). We revisit the fraction of comparable stars in the Kepler field that are more active than the Sun. The exact active fraction depends on what is meant by ''more active than the Sun'' and on the magnitude limit of the sample of stars considered. This active fraction is between a quarter and a third (depending on the timescale). We argue that a reliable result requires timescales of half a day or longer and stars brighter than M Kep of 14, otherwise non-stellar noise distorts it. We also analyze main sequence stars grouped by temperature from 6500 to 3500 K. As one moves to cooler stars, the active fraction of stars becomes steadily larger (greater than 90% for early M dwarfs). The Sun is a good photometric model at all timescales for those cooler stars that have long-term variability within the span of solar variability.

  1. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  2. CALiPER Report 23: Photometric Testing of White Tunable LED Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-01

    This report documents an initial investigation of photometric testing procedures for white-tunable LED luminaires and summarizes the key features of those products. Goals of the study include understanding the amount of testing required to characterize a white-tunable product, and documenting the performance of available color-tunable luminaires that are intended for architectural lighting.

  3. Iterative Selection of Unknown Weights in Direct Weight Optimization Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To the direct weight optimization identification of the nonlinear system, we add some linear terms about input sequences in the former linear affine function so as to approximate the nonlinear property. To choose the two classes of unknown weights in the more linear terms, this paper derives the detailed process on how to choose these unknown weights from theoretical analysis and engineering practice, respectively, and makes sure of their key roles between the unknown weights. From the theoretical analysis, the added unknown weights’ auxiliary role can be known in the whole process of approximating the nonlinear system. From the practical analysis, we learn how to transform one complex optimization problem to its corresponding common quadratic program problem. Then, the common quadratic program problem can be solved by the basic interior point method. Finally, the efficiency and possibility of the proposed strategies can be confirmed by the simulation results.

  4. Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), treatment can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis and treatment of CUP in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. RBF neural network based H∞ synchronization for unknown chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , 172 ... the effect of disturbance to an H∞ norm constraint. It is shown that ... unknown chaotic systems; linear matrix inequality (LMI); learning law. 1. Introduction .... (9) is RBFNN H∞ synchronized if the synchronization error e(t) satisfies. ∫ ∞.

  6. Classification of Unknown Thermocouple Types Using Similarity Factor Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshu K. DAMARLA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to classification using PCA method, a new methodology is proposed for type identification of unknown thermocouple. The new methodology is based on calculating the degree of similarity between two multivariate datasets using two types of similarity factors. One similarity factor is based on principle component analysis and the angles between the principle component subspaces while the other is based on the Mahalanobis distance between the datasets. Datasets containing thermo-emfs against given temperature ranges are formed for each type of thermocouple (e.g. J, K, S, T, R, E, B and N type by experimentation are considered as reference datasets. Datasets corresponding to unknown type are captured. Similarity factor between the datasets one of which being the unknown type and the other being each known type are compared. When maximum similarity factor occurs, then the class of unknown type is allocated to that of known type.

  7. Photometric Analysis of Pi of the Sky Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Opiela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two fully automatic Pi of the Sky detectors with a large field of view, located in Spain (INTA and in Chile (SPDA observe the sky in search of rare optical phenomena, and also collect observations which include many kinds of variable stars. To be able to draw proper conclusions from the data that is received, adequate quality of the detectors is very important. Pi of the Sky data are subject to systematic errors caused by various factors, e.g. cloud cover seen as significant fluctuations in the number of stars observed by the detector, problems with conducting mounting, a strong background of the moon or the passage of a bright object, e.g. a planet, near the observed star. Some of these adverse effects are already detected during cataloging of the individual measurements, but this is not sufficient to make the quality of the data satisfactory for us. In order to improve the quality of our data, we developed two new procedures based on two different approaches. In this paper we will say some words about these procedures, give some examples, and show how these procedures improve the quality of our data.

  8. Chinese Unknown Word Recognition for PCFG-LA Parsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuping Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the recognition of unknown words in Chinese parsing. Two methods are proposed to handle this problem. One is the modification of a character-based model. We model the emission probability of an unknown word using the first and last characters in the word. It aims to reduce the POS tag ambiguities of unknown words to improve the parsing performance. In addition, a novel method, using graph-based semisupervised learning (SSL, is proposed to improve the syntax parsing of unknown words. Its goal is to discover additional lexical knowledge from a large amount of unlabeled data to help the syntax parsing. The method is mainly to propagate lexical emission probabilities to unknown words by building the similarity graphs over the words of labeled and unlabeled data. The derived distributions are incorporated into the parsing process. The proposed methods are effective in dealing with the unknown words to improve the parsing. Empirical results for Penn Chinese Treebank and TCT Treebank revealed its effectiveness.

  9. A MACHINE-LEARNING METHOD TO INFER FUNDAMENTAL STELLAR PARAMETERS FROM PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Richards, J. W.; Starr, D. L.; Lee, Y. S.; Butler, N. R.; Tokarz, S.; Smith, N.; Eisner, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for wide-field imaging surveys is obtaining follow-up spectroscopic observations: there are >10 9 photometrically cataloged sources, yet modern spectroscopic surveys are limited to ∼few× 10 6 targets. As we approach the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope era, new algorithmic solutions are required to cope with the data deluge. Here we report the development of a machine-learning framework capable of inferring fundamental stellar parameters (T eff , log g, and [Fe/H]) using photometric-brightness variations and color alone. A training set is constructed from a systematic spectroscopic survey of variables with Hectospec/Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, the training set includes ∼9000 spectra, for which stellar parameters are measured using the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). We employed the random forest algorithm to perform a non-parametric regression that predicts T eff , log g, and [Fe/H] from photometric time-domain observations. Our final optimized model produces a cross-validated rms error (RMSE) of 165 K, 0.39 dex, and 0.33 dex for T eff , log g, and [Fe/H], respectively. Examining the subset of sources for which the SSPP measurements are most reliable, the RMSE reduces to 125 K, 0.37 dex, and 0.27 dex, respectively, comparable to what is achievable via low-resolution spectroscopy. For variable stars this represents a ≈12%-20% improvement in RMSE relative to models trained with single-epoch photometric colors. As an application of our method, we estimate stellar parameters for ∼54,000 known variables. We argue that this method may convert photometric time-domain surveys into pseudo-spectrographic engines, enabling the construction of extremely detailed maps of the Milky Way, its structure, and history

  10. Photometric Properties of Network and Faculae Derived from HMI Data Compensated for Scattered Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuoli, Serena; Whitney, Taylor [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Norton, Aimee [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    We report on the photometric properties of faculae and network, as observed in full-disk, scattered-light-corrected images from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We use a Lucy–Richardson deconvolution routine that corrects an image in less than one second. Faculae are distinguished from network through proximity to active regions. This is the first report that full-disk observations, including center-to-limb variations, reproduce the photometric properties of faculae and network observed previously only in sub-arcsecond-resolution; small field-of-view studies, i.e. that network, as defined by distance from active regions, exhibit higher photometric contrasts. Specifically, for magnetic flux values larger than approximately 300 G, the network is brighter than faculae and the contrast differences increase toward the limb, where the network contrast is about twice the facular one. For lower magnetic flux values, network appear darker than faculae. Contrary to reports from previous full-disk observations, we also found that network exhibits a higher center-to-limb variation. Our results are in agreement with reports from simulations that indicate magnetic flux alone is a poor proxy of the photometric properties of magnetic features. We estimate that the contribution of faculae and network to Total Solar Irradiance variability of the current Cycle 24 is overestimated by at least 11%, due to the photometric properties of network and faculae not being recognized as different. This estimate is specific to the method employed in this study to reconstruct irradiance variations, so caution should be paid when extending it to other techniques.

  11. Photometric classification of type Ia supernovae in the SuperNova Legacy Survey with supervised learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möller, A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Leloup, C.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J. [Irfu, SPP, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Carlberg, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lidman, C. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Pritchet, C., E-mail: anais.moller@anu.edu.au, E-mail: vanina.ruhlmann-kleider@cea.fr, E-mail: clement.leloup@cea.fr, E-mail: jneveu@lal.in2p3.fr, E-mail: nathalie.palanque-delabrouille@cea.fr, E-mail: james.rich@cea.fr, E-mail: raymond.carlberg@utoronto.ca, E-mail: chris.lidman@aao.gov.au, E-mail: pritchet@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    In the era of large astronomical surveys, photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) has become an important research field due to limited spectroscopic resources for candidate follow-up and classification. In this work, we present a method to photometrically classify type Ia supernovae based on machine learning with redshifts that are derived from the SN light-curves. This method is implemented on real data from the SNLS deferred pipeline, a purely photometric pipeline that identifies SNe Ia at high-redshifts (0.2 < z < 1.1). Our method consists of two stages: feature extraction (obtaining the SN redshift from photometry and estimating light-curve shape parameters) and machine learning classification. We study the performance of different algorithms such as Random Forest and Boosted Decision Trees. We evaluate the performance using SN simulations and real data from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which contains large spectroscopically and photometrically classified type Ia samples. Using the Area Under the Curve (AUC) metric, where perfect classification is given by 1, we find that our best-performing classifier (Extreme Gradient Boosting Decision Tree) has an AUC of 0.98.We show that it is possible to obtain a large photometrically selected type Ia SN sample with an estimated contamination of less than 5%. When applied to data from the first three years of SNLS, we obtain 529 events. We investigate the differences between classifying simulated SNe, and real SN survey data. In particular, we find that applying a thorough set of selection cuts to the SN sample is essential for good classification. This work demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of machine learning classification in a high- z SN survey with application to real SN data.

  12. Photometric Properties of Network and Faculae Derived from HMI Data Compensated for Scattered Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criscuoli, Serena; Whitney, Taylor; Norton, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    We report on the photometric properties of faculae and network, as observed in full-disk, scattered-light-corrected images from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We use a Lucy–Richardson deconvolution routine that corrects an image in less than one second. Faculae are distinguished from network through proximity to active regions. This is the first report that full-disk observations, including center-to-limb variations, reproduce the photometric properties of faculae and network observed previously only in sub-arcsecond-resolution; small field-of-view studies, i.e. that network, as defined by distance from active regions, exhibit higher photometric contrasts. Specifically, for magnetic flux values larger than approximately 300 G, the network is brighter than faculae and the contrast differences increase toward the limb, where the network contrast is about twice the facular one. For lower magnetic flux values, network appear darker than faculae. Contrary to reports from previous full-disk observations, we also found that network exhibits a higher center-to-limb variation. Our results are in agreement with reports from simulations that indicate magnetic flux alone is a poor proxy of the photometric properties of magnetic features. We estimate that the contribution of faculae and network to Total Solar Irradiance variability of the current Cycle 24 is overestimated by at least 11%, due to the photometric properties of network and faculae not being recognized as different. This estimate is specific to the method employed in this study to reconstruct irradiance variations, so caution should be paid when extending it to other techniques.

  13. Photometric classification of type Ia supernovae in the SuperNova Legacy Survey with supervised learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, A.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Leloup, C.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Carlberg, R.; Lidman, C.; Pritchet, C.

    2016-01-01

    In the era of large astronomical surveys, photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) has become an important research field due to limited spectroscopic resources for candidate follow-up and classification. In this work, we present a method to photometrically classify type Ia supernovae based on machine learning with redshifts that are derived from the SN light-curves. This method is implemented on real data from the SNLS deferred pipeline, a purely photometric pipeline that identifies SNe Ia at high-redshifts (0.2 < z < 1.1). Our method consists of two stages: feature extraction (obtaining the SN redshift from photometry and estimating light-curve shape parameters) and machine learning classification. We study the performance of different algorithms such as Random Forest and Boosted Decision Trees. We evaluate the performance using SN simulations and real data from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which contains large spectroscopically and photometrically classified type Ia samples. Using the Area Under the Curve (AUC) metric, where perfect classification is given by 1, we find that our best-performing classifier (Extreme Gradient Boosting Decision Tree) has an AUC of 0.98.We show that it is possible to obtain a large photometrically selected type Ia SN sample with an estimated contamination of less than 5%. When applied to data from the first three years of SNLS, we obtain 529 events. We investigate the differences between classifying simulated SNe, and real SN survey data. In particular, we find that applying a thorough set of selection cuts to the SN sample is essential for good classification. This work demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of machine learning classification in a high- z SN survey with application to real SN data.

  14. Characterization and photometric performance of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Software Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Leauthaud, Alexie; Murata, Ryoma; Bosch, James; Price, Paul; Lupton, Robert; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Lackner, Claire; Bickerton, Steven; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Coupon, Jean; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2018-01-01

    The Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) is an ambitious multi-band survey using the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru telescope. The Wide layer of the SSP is both wide and deep, reaching a detection limit of i ˜ 26.0 mag. At these depths, it is challenging to achieve accurate, unbiased, and consistent photometry across all five bands. The HSC data are reduced using a pipeline that builds on the prototype pipeline for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. We have developed a Python-based, flexible framework to inject synthetic galaxies into real HSC images, called SynPipe. Here we explain the design and implementation of SynPipe and generate a sample of synthetic galaxies to examine the photometric performance of the HSC pipeline. For stars, we achieve 1% photometric precision at i ˜ 19.0 mag and 6% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.01 and ˜0.06 mag respectively). For synthetic galaxies with single-Sérsic profiles, forced CModel photometry achieves 13% photometric precision at i ˜ 20.0 mag and 18% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.15 and ˜0.22 mag respectively). We show that both forced point spread function and CModel photometry yield unbiased color estimates that are robust to seeing conditions. We identify several caveats that apply to the version of HSC pipeline used for the first public HSC data release (DR1) that need to be taking into consideration. First, the degree to which an object is blended with other objects impacts the overall photometric performance. This is especially true for point sources. Highly blended objects tend to have larger photometric uncertainties, systematically underestimated fluxes, and slightly biased colors. Secondly, >20% of stars at 22.5 21.5 mag.

  15. COMPREHENSIVE PHOTOMETRIC HISTORIES OF ALL KNOWN GALACTIC RECURRENT NOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2010-01-01

    I collect virtually all photometry of the 10 known galactic recurrent novae (RNe) and their 37 known eruptions. This consists of my modern measures of nearly all archival plates (providing the only data for half of 37 known eruptions), my own 10,000 CCD magnitudes from 1987 to present (providing virtually all of the magnitudes in quiescence for seven RNe), over 140,000 visual magnitude estimates recorded by amateur astronomers (who discovered half the known eruptions), and the small scattering of magnitudes from all the literature. From this, I produce various uniform products: (1) BVRIJHK comparison star magnitudes and BV comparison star sequences to cover the entire range of eruption; (2) complete light curves for all eruptions; (3) best-fit B and V light curve templates; (4) orbital periods for all but one RN; (5) exhaustive searches for all missed eruptions; (6) measured discovery efficiencies since 1890; (7) true recurrence time scales; (8) predicted next eruption dates; (9) variations on time scales of minutes, hours, days, months, years, decades, and century; (10) uniform distances and extinctions to all RNe; (11) BV colors at peak and UBVRIJHK colors at minimum, all with extinction corrections; and (12) the spectral energy distributions over UBVRIJHK. Highlights of this work include the discoveries of one new RN, six previously unknown eruptions, and the orbital periods for half the RNe. The goal of this work is to provide uniform demographics for answering questions like the 'What is the death rate of RNe in our Galaxy?' and 'Are the white dwarfs gaining or losing mass over each eruption cycle?.' An important use of this work is for the question of whether RNe can be the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  16. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 9, Observatory, Cape Town 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Förster Schreiber, Natascha [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Magee, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Marchesini, Danilo, E-mail: ros@saao.ac.za [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  17. 3D-HST WFC3-selected Photometric Catalogs in the Five CANDELS/3D-HST Fields: Photometry, Photometric Redshifts, and Stellar Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Fumagalli, Mattia; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael V.; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Rix, Hans-Walter; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu).

  18. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin 2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  19. MoCha: Molecular Characterization of Unknown Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Daniel; Hammelman, Jennifer; Levin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Automated methods for the reverse-engineering of complex regulatory networks are paving the way for the inference of mechanistic comprehensive models directly from experimental data. These novel methods can infer not only the relations and parameters of the known molecules defined in their input datasets, but also unknown components and pathways identified as necessary by the automated algorithms. Identifying the molecular nature of these unknown components is a crucial step for making testable predictions and experimentally validating the models, yet no specific and efficient tools exist to aid in this process. To this end, we present here MoCha (Molecular Characterization), a tool optimized for the search of unknown proteins and their pathways from a given set of known interacting proteins. MoCha uses the comprehensive dataset of protein-protein interactions provided by the STRING database, which currently includes more than a billion interactions from over 2,000 organisms. MoCha is highly optimized, performing typical searches within seconds. We demonstrate the use of MoCha with the characterization of unknown components from reverse-engineered models from the literature. MoCha is useful for working on network models by hand or as a downstream step of a model inference engine workflow and represents a valuable and efficient tool for the characterization of unknown pathways using known data from thousands of organisms. MoCha and its source code are freely available online under the GPLv3 license.

  20. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, L-J; Girwidz, R

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net. (paper)

  1. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net.

  2. High-Amplitude, Rapid Photometric Variation of the New Polar Master OT J132104.0+560957.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-05

    HIGH-AMPLITUDE, RAPID PHOTOMETRIC VARIATION OF THE NEW POLAR MASTER OT J132104.04+560957.8 LITTLEFIELD, COLIN;1,2 GARNAVICH, PETER;1 MAGNO, KATRINA;1...18.5 during each photometric cycle, becoming so faint that we could no longer detect it. The data showed a period of roughly 91 minutes with each...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High-Amplitude, Rapid Photometric Variation Of The New Polar Master OT

  3. Grasping Unknown Objects in an Early Cognitive Vision System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, Mila

    2011-01-01

    Grasping of unknown objects presents an important and challenging part of robot manipulation. The growing area of service robotics depends upon the ability of robots to autonomously grasp and manipulate a wide range of objects in everyday environments. Simple, non task-specific grasps of unknown ...... and comparing vision-based grasping methods, and the creation of algorithms for bootstrapping a process of acquiring world understanding for artificial cognitive agents....... presents a system for robotic grasping of unknown objects us- ing stereo vision. Grasps are defined based on contour and surface information provided by the Early Cognitive Vision System, that organizes visual informa- tion into a biologically motivated hierarchical representation. The contributions...... of the thesis are: the extension of the Early Cognitive Vision representation with a new type of feature hierarchy in the texture domain, the definition and evaluation of contour based grasping methods, the definition and evaluation of surface based grasping methods, the definition of a benchmark for testing...

  4. Magnetic cycles and rotation periods of late-type stars from photometric time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Mascareño, A.; Rebolo, R.; González Hernández, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the photometric modulation induced by magnetic activity cycles and study the relationship between rotation period and activity cycle(s) in late-type (FGKM) stars. Methods: We analysed light curves, spanning up to nine years, of 125 nearby stars provided by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). The sample is mainly composed of low-activity, main-sequence late-A to mid-M-type stars. We performed a search for short (days) and long-term (years) periodic variations in the photometry. We modelled the light curves with combinations of sinusoids to measure the properties of these periodic signals. To provide a better statistical interpretation of our results, we complement our new results with results from previous similar works. Results: We have been able to measure long-term photometric cycles of 47 stars, out of which 39 have been derived with false alarm probabilities (FAP) of less than 0.1 per cent. Rotational modulation was also detected and rotational periods were measured in 36 stars. For 28 stars we have simultaneous measurements of activity cycles and rotational periods, 17 of which are M-type stars. We measured both photometric amplitudes and periods from sinusoidal fits. The measured cycle periods range from 2 to 14 yr with photometric amplitudes in the range of 5-20 mmag. We found that the distribution of cycle lengths for the different spectral types is similar, as the mean cycle is 9.5 yr for F-type stars, 6.7 yr for G-type stars, 8.5 yr for K-type stars, 6.0 yr for early M-type stars, and 7.1 yr for mid-M-type stars. On the other hand, the distribution of rotation periods is completely different, trending to longer periods for later type stars, from a mean rotation of 8.6 days for F-type stars to 85.4 days in mid-M-type stars. The amplitudes induced by magnetic cycles and rotation show a clear correlation. A trend of photometric amplitudes with rotation period is also outlined in the data. The amplitudes of the photometric variability

  5. Celiac Disease Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune enteropathy that occurs, in affected individuals, with exposure to gluten in the diet and improves with removal of dietary gluten. Although CD is readily considered in patients with classical presentations of the disease, atypical manifestations may be the only presenting symptoms. We present a case of CD in a 16-year-old female presenting as fever of unknown origin, which has not been reported previously. The postulated mechanism for fever in CD and the importance of clinicians having a low threshold for considering CD in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and other enigmatic clinical presentations is discussed.

  6. Adaptive Incentive Controls for Stackelberg Games with Unknown Cost Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    APR EZT:: F I AN 73S e OsL:-: UNCLASSI?:-- Q4~.’~- .A.., 6, *~*i i~~*~~*.- U ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH UNKNOWN COST...AD-A161 885 ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH i/1 UNKNOWN COST FUNCTIONALSCU) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DECISION AND CONTROL LAB T...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7.. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION CoriaeLcenef~pda~ Joint Services Electronics Program Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois N/A

  7. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Mei-Feng; Ma Song-She

    2008-01-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system.The scheme only requires a single laser beam.It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons,e.g.a thermal motion.Furthermore,it works in the regime,where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency.Thus,the teleportation speed is greatly increased,which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect.This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  8. Photometric redshifts for Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Data Release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Mineo, Sogo; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Speagle, Joshua; Furusawa, Hisanori; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Photometric redshifts are a key component of many science objectives in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). In this paper, we describe and compare the codes used to compute photometric redshifts for HSC-SSP, how we calibrate them, and the typical accuracy we achieve with the HSC five-band photometry (grizy). We introduce a new point estimator based on an improved loss function and demonstrate that it works better than other commonly used estimators. We find that our photo-z's are most accurate at 0.2 ≲ zphot ≲ 1.5, where we can straddle the 4000 Å break. We achieve σ[Δzphot/(1 + zphot)] ˜ 0.05 and an outlier rate of about 15% for galaxies down to i = 25 within this redshift range. If we limit ourselves to a brighter sample of i https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/".

  9. A photometric analysis of ZZ Ceti stars: A parameter-free temperature indicator?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, P [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Leggett, S K [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Harris, H C, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.c, E-mail: sleggett@gemini.ed, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mi [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of optical VRI and infrared JHK photometric data of about two dozen ZZ Ceti stars. We first show from a theoretical point of view that the resulting energy distributions are not particularly sensitive to surface gravity or to the assumed convective efficiency, a result which suggests a parameter-free effective temperature indicator for ZZ Ceti stars. We then fit the observed energy distributions with our grid of model atmospheres and compare the photometric effective temperatures with the spectroscopic values obtained from fits to the hydrogen line profiles. Our results are finally discussed in the context of the determination of the empirical boundaries of the ZZ Ceti instability strip.

  10. Inferring Binary and Trinary Stellar Populations in Photometric and Astrometric Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmark, Axel; Leistedt, Boris; Hogg, David W.

    2018-04-01

    Multiple stellar systems are ubiquitous in the Milky Way but are often unresolved and seen as single objects in spectroscopic, photometric, and astrometric surveys. However, modeling them is essential for developing a full understanding of large surveys such as Gaia and connecting them to stellar and Galactic models. In this paper, we address this problem by jointly fitting the Gaia and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric and astrometric data using a data-driven Bayesian hierarchical model that includes populations of binary and trinary systems. This allows us to classify observations into singles, binaries, and trinaries, in a robust and efficient manner, without resorting to external models. We are able to identify multiple systems and, in some cases, make strong predictions for the properties of their unresolved stars. We will be able to compare such predictions with Gaia Data Release 4, which will contain astrometric identification and analysis of binary systems.

  11. Extracting cosmological information from the angular power spectrum of the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Bilicki, M.; Branchini, E.; Postiglione, A.

    2018-05-01

    Using the almost all-sky 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalogue (2MPZ) we perform for the first time a tomographic analysis of galaxy angular clustering in the local Universe (z baryon fraction fb=0.14^{+0.09}_{-0.06}, the total matter density parameter Ωm = 0.30 ± 0.06, and the effective linear bias of 2MPZ galaxies beff, which grows from 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} at = 0.05 up to 2.1^{+0.3}_{-0.5} at = 0.2, largely because of the flux-limited nature of the data set. The results obtained here for the local Universe agree with those derived with the same methodology at higher redshifts, and confirm the importance of the tomographic technique for next-generation photometric surveys such as Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Standard Practice for Calculation of Photometric Transmittance and Reflectance of Materials to Solar Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1988-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the calculation of luminous (photometric) transmittance and reflectance of materials from spectral radiant transmittance and reflectance data obtained from Test Method E 903. 1.2 Determination of luminous transmittance by this practice is preferred over measurement of photometric transmittance by methods using the sun as a source and a photometer as detector except for transmitting sheet materials that are inhomogeneous, patterned, or corrugated. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. The Impact of JWST Broadband Filter Choice on Photometric Redshift Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisigello, L.; Caputi, K. I.; Colina, L.

    2016-01-01

    The determination of galaxy redshifts in the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6–5.0 μm and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at λ 5.0 μm. In this work we analyze...... the impact of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broadband filters (F070W to F770W), as well as having ancillary data at λ 0.6 μm, on the derived photometric redshifts (z phot) of a total of 5921 real and simulated galaxies, with known input redshifts z = 0–10....

  14. 1969 - 2010: Multicolor Photometric Observations of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2010-05-01

    From 1969 to 2010 I have been involved in a photometric study of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch stars. I started by making Stromgren four-color observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory and then Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. I had taken spectral plates of all my selected areas on which I marked all the A-type stars. These stars were then observed photometrically. New FHB stars could be identified by their large c1 indices, caused by their greater (u-b) colors. Later four new filters were added ( U V B S ). With Richard Boyle of the Vatican Observatory we observed on Mt. Graham (Arizona) on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope.We plan follow-up observations of the new FHB stars found.

  15. 1969 to 2010: Multicolor Photometric Observations of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, A. G. D.

    2011-04-01

    From 1969 to 2010 I have been involved in a photometric study of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars and published several papers on this topic in BOTT from 1967 thru 1972. I started by making Strömgren four-color observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory and then at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. I had taken spectral plates of all my selected areas on which I marked all the A-type stars. These stars were then observed photometrically. New FHB stars could be identified by their large c indices, caused by their greater (u-b) colors. Later four new filters were added (U, V, B, S). With Richard Boyle of the Vatican Observatory we observed on Mt. Graham (Arizona) on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We are making follow-up observations of the new FHB stars found.

  16. Designing towards the Unknown: Engaging with Material and Aesthetic Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Wilde

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New materials with new capabilities demand new ways of approaching design. Destabilising existing methods is crucial to develop new methods. Yet, radical destabilisation—where outcomes remain unknown long enough that new discoveries become possible—is not easy in technology design where complex interdisciplinary teams with time and resource constraints need to deliver concrete outcomes on schedule. The Poetic Kinaesthetic Interface project (PKI engages with this problematic directly. In PKI we use unfolding processes—informed by participatory, speculative and critical design—in emergent actions, to design towards unknown outcomes, using unknown materials. The impossibility of this task is proving as useful as it is disruptive. At its most potent, it is destabilising expectations, aesthetics and processes. Keeping the researchers, collaborators and participants in a state of unknowing, is opening the research potential to far-ranging possibilities. In this article we unpack the motivations driving the PKI project. We present our mixed-methodology, which entangles textile crafts, design interactions and materiality to shape an embodied enquiry. Our research outcomes are procedural and methodological. PKI brings together diverse human, non-human, known and unknown actors to discover where the emergent assemblages might lead. Our approach is re-invigorating—as it demands re-envisioning of—the design process.

  17. Liability for Unknown Risks: A Law and Economics Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Faure (Michael); L.T. Visscher (Louis); F. Weber (Franziska)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn the law and economics literature liability is generally regarded as an instrument which provides potential tortfeasors with incentives for optimal care taking. The question, however, arises whether liability can still provide those incentives when risks are unknown. That is the

  18. Fault tolerant control of wind turbines using unknown input observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for accommodating faults in the rotor and generator speed sensors in a wind turbine. These measured values are important both for the wind turbine controller as well as the supervisory control of the wind turbine. The scheme is based on unknown input observers, which...

  19. Value of Bone marrow Examination in Pyrexia of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrexia of unknown origin is a common diagnostic dilemma. Series of diagnostic modalities are required to arrive at diagnosis. Bone marrow examination is one of the common tests implicated in the diagnosis in combination with other diagnostic modalities. Present study has attempted to explore the causes of pyrexia of unknown origin based on bone marrow morphological study. Materials and Methods: In a one year prospective study conducted at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal; bone marrow aspiration and biopsy was performed and evaluated morphologically, in 57 patients fulfilling the criteria of classic pyrexia of unknown origin. Results: In 42% cases; specific diagnosis could be made and hematological neoplasm was the most common finding followed by megaloblastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia and one case each of hemophagocytosis, malaria and tuberculosis. Acute leukemia was the most frequently encountered hematological malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, chronic myeloid leukemia, essential thrombocythemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conclusion: Morphological examination of bone marrow has important role in diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin. However, yield of diagnosis can be increased if it is combined with other diagnostic modalities including radiological, microbiological and serological tests. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8991 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 447-451

  20. Fast grasping of unknown objects using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qujiang; Chen, Guangming; Wisse, Martijn

    2017-09-01

    Fast grasping of unknown objects has crucial impact on the efficiency of robot manipulation especially subjected to unfamiliar environments. In order to accelerate grasping speed of unknown objects, principal component analysis is utilized to direct the grasping process. In particular, a single-view partial point cloud is constructed and grasp candidates are allocated along the principal axis. Force balance optimization is employed to analyze possible graspable areas. The obtained graspable area with the minimal resultant force is the best zone for the final grasping execution. It is shown that an unknown object can be more quickly grasped provided that the component analysis principle axis is determined using single-view partial point cloud. To cope with the grasp uncertainty, robot motion is assisted to obtain a new viewpoint. Virtual exploration and experimental tests are carried out to verify this fast gasping algorithm. Both simulation and experimental tests demonstrated excellent performances based on the results of grasping a series of unknown objects. To minimize the grasping uncertainty, the merits of the robot hardware with two 3D cameras can be utilized to suffice the partial point cloud. As a result of utilizing the robot hardware, the grasping reliance is highly enhanced. Therefore, this research demonstrates practical significance for increasing grasping speed and thus increasing robot efficiency under unpredictable environments.

  1. A Size Exclusion Chromatography Laboratory with Unknowns for Introductory Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntee, Edward J.; Graham, Kate J.; Colosky, Edward C.; Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2015-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography is an important technique in the separation of biological and polymeric samples by molecular weight. While a number of laboratory experiments have been published that use this technique for the purification of large molecules, this is the first report of an experiment that focuses on purifying an unknown small…

  2. Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    The key is to develop online learning strategies at each individual node. Specifically, through local information exchange with its neighbors, each...infinitely repeated game with incomplete information and developed a dynamic pricing strategy referred to as Competitive and Cooperative Demand Learning...Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models This research aims to develop fundamental theories and practical algorithms for

  3. Multiple analysis of an unknown optical multilayer coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrowolski, J.A.; Ho, F.C.; Waldorf, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are given of the analysis at five different laboratories of an unknown optical multilayer coating. In all, eleven different analytical and laboratory techniques were applied to the problem. The multilayer nominally consisted of three dielectric and two metallic layers. It was demonstrated convincingly that with present day techniques it is possible to determine the basic structure of such a coating

  4. Inventory control in case of unknown demand and control parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with unknown demand and control parameters in inventory control. Inventory control involves decisions on what to order when and in what quantity. These decisions are based on information about the demand. Models are constructed using complete demand information; these models ensure

  5. Editoria: EBOLA: Fear of the unknown | Comoro | Tanzania Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Journal of Health Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editoria: EBOLA: Fear of the unknown. C. Comoro, J.

  6. Lod score curves for phase-unknown matings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert-Shearon, T; Boehnke, M; Lange, K

    1996-01-01

    For a phase-unknown nuclear family, we show that the likelihood and lod score are unimodal, and we describe conditions under which the maximum occurs at recombination fraction theta = 0, theta = 1/2, and 0 < theta < 1/2. These simply stated necessary and sufficient conditions seem to have escaped the notice of previous statistical geneticists.

  7. Teleportation of Unknown Superpositions of Collective Atomic Coherent States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG ShiBiao

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme to teleport an unknown superposition of two atomic coherent states with different phases. Our scheme is based on resonant and dispersive atom-field interaction. Our scheme provides a possibility of teleporting macroscopic superposition states of many atoms first time.``

  8. Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic State via Adiabatic Passage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state via adiabatic passage. Taking advantage of adiabatic passage, the atom has no probability of being excited and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed.We also show that the fidelity can reach 1 under certain condition.

  9. Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown significance in adults in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Abstract. Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes a high burden of disease in high-resource healthcare systems, with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial implications. CDI is a ...

  10. Severe scratcher-reaction: an unknown health hazard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tattoos are well known to cause skin problems and the number of reported adverse reactions after tattooing has increased. Illegally imported tattoo ink is unrestrained and can contain unknown ingredients and contamination thereby posing a serious health hazard. We present a case illustrating the risk of pronounced phototoxic allergic reaction and other severe complications after using home kit tattoo ink.

  11. Vision-based autonomous grasping of unknown piled objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Computer vision techniques have been used to develop a vision-based grasping capability for autonomously picking and placing unknown piled objects. This work is currently being applied to the problem of hazardous waste sorting in support of the Department of Energy's Mixed Waste Operations Program

  12. Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Presenting as Jugular Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Cheriyan Modayil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis is unusual and is associated with central venous catheterisation, intravenous drug abuse and head and neck sepsis. It is rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in a forty year old female which presented with jugular venous thrombosis. The discussion includes investigation and treatment options for this condition.

  13. Cancer of unknown primitive metastatic. About two clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawen, L; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the two clinical cases about the unknown primitive metastatic cancer. The main techniques used for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of different s carcinomas are: Electronic microscope, molecular biology and genetics, especially histopathological study, topographic survey, ultrasound, radiography, chemotherapy, radiotherapy

  14. Photometric determination of the composition and dissociation constants of niobium (5) citrate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, V.V.; Golubeva, I.V.

    1979-01-01

    Niobium (5) citrate complexes in aqueous solution (pH 1-6) are investigated. To determine the complexes composition the metal-indicator method has been applied. Experimental data have been treated by the method of equilibrium shift using somewhat changed variant of the metal-indicator method. The complex ion charge in the solution has been determined by the ion-exchange method. Dissociation constants of citrate complexes have been determined photometrically

  15. Search for relation between flares and photometric variability outside of flares in EV Lac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojzman, G.Sh.

    1984-01-01

    The observations of the flare star EV Lac in July-September 1981 have confirmed the existence of photometric variability outside the flares during the night. It was found that, as a rule, a slow increase of brightness in U and B bands during 1-2 hours preceded the flares. It is suggested that the variability outside the flares is the result of the variability of chpomospheric emission lines and continuum that are emitted by the chromospheric preflare formations

  16. Photometric titration of arsenate with thorium nitrate on the microgram and milligram scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzdorf, C.; Fallah-Tafti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is decribed for the photometric titration of arsenate with thorium nitrate using pyrocatecholviolet as indicator. The method works at a low pH level and is therefore not subject to the most cationic interferences. Alkali salts do not affect the determination even at high concentrations if present as halides, nitrates or perchlorates. This makes the method particularly suitable for the analysis of arsenic in organic and inorganic compounds after decomposition. (orig.) [de

  17. Empirical photometric calibration of the Gaia red clump: Colours, effective temperature, and absolute magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dern, L.; Babusiaux, C.; Arenou, F.; Turon, C.; Lallement, R.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Gaia Data Release 1 allows the recalibration of standard candles such as the red clump stars. To use those stars, they first need to be accurately characterised. In particular, colours are needed to derive interstellar extinction. As no filter is available for the first Gaia data release and to avoid the atmosphere model mismatch, an empirical calibration is unavoidable. Aims: The purpose of this work is to provide the first complete and robust photometric empirical calibration of the Gaia red clump stars of the solar neighbourhood through colour-colour, effective temperature-colour, and absolute magnitude-colour relations from the Gaia, Johnson, 2MASS, HIPPARCOS, Tycho-2, APASS-SLOAN, and WISE photometric systems, and the APOGEE DR13 spectroscopic temperatures. Methods: We used a 3D extinction map to select low reddening red giants. To calibrate the colour-colour and the effective temperature-colour relations, we developed a MCMC method that accounts for all variable uncertainties and selects the best model for each photometric relation. We estimated the red clump absolute magnitude through the mode of a kernel-based distribution function. Results: We provide 20 colour versus G-Ks relations and the first Teff versus G-Ks calibration. We obtained the red clump absolute magnitudes for 15 photometric bands with, in particular, MKs = (-1.606 ± 0.009) and MG = (0.495 ± 0.009) + (1.121 ± 0.128)(G-Ks-2.1). We present a dereddened Gaia-TGAS HR diagram and use the calibrations to compare its red clump and its red giant branch bump with Padova isochrones. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/609/A116

  18. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, I A T; Tarbert, C M; Giardini, M E; Bastawrous, A; Middleton, D; Hamilton, R

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  19. THE DISTANCE TO THE MASSIVE GALACTIC CLUSTER WESTERLUND 2 FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC AND HST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Álvarez, Carlos A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Bradley, David R.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Norris, Mark A.; Cool, Richard J.; Miller, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified 15 new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened spectral energy distributions based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters R V and A V for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values (R V ) = 3.77 ± 0.09 and (A V ) = 6.51 ± 0.38 mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance (d) = 4.16 ± 0.07 (random) +0.26 (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP 18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2.

  20. Detecting paraprotein interference on a direct bilirubin assay by reviewing the photometric reaction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Elena; Aramendía, Maite; González-Tarancón, Ricardo; Romero-Sánchez, Naiara; Rello, Luis

    2017-07-26

    The direct bilirubin (D-Bil) assay on the AU Beckman Coulter instrumentation can be interfered by paraproteins, which may result in spurious D-Bil results. In a previous work, we took advantage of this fact to detect this interference, thus helping with the identification of patients with unsuspected monoclonal gammopathies. In this work, we investigate the possibility to detect interference based on the review of the photometric reactions, regardless of the D-Bil result. The D-Bil assay was carried out in a set of 2164 samples. It included a group of 164 samples with paraproteins (67 of which caused interference on the assay), as well as different groups of samples for which high absorbance background readings could also be expected (i.e. hemolyzed, lipemic, or icteric samples). Photometric reaction data were reviewed and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to establish a cut-off for absorbance that best discriminates interference. The best cut-off was 0.0100 for the absorbance at the first photometric point of the complementary wavelength in the blank cuvette. Once the optimal cut-off for probable interference was selected, all samples analyzed in our laboratory that provided absorbance values above this cut-off were further investigated to try to discover paraproteins. During a period of 6 months, we detected 44 samples containing paraproteins, five of which belonged to patients with non-diagnosed monoclonal gammopathies. Review of the photometric reaction data permits the systematic detection of paraprotein interference on the D-Bil AU assay, even for samples for which reasonable results are obtained.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SED PARAMETERS: IMPROVED TECHNIQUES AND A REALISTIC ERROR BUDGET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand; Gawiser, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties in the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multi-dimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations. While the performance of joint SED fitting and photo-z estimation might be hindered by template incompleteness, we demonstrate that the latter is “flagged” by a large fraction of outliers in redshift, and that significant improvements can be achieved by using flexible stellar populations synthesis models and more realistic star formation histories. In all cases, we find that the median stellar age is better recovered than the time elapsed from the onset of star formation. Finally, we show that using a photometric redshift code such as EAZY to obtain redshift probability distributions that are then used as priors for SED fitting codes leads to only a modest bias in the SED fitting parameters and is thus a viable alternative to the simultaneous estimation of SED parameters and photometric redshifts

  2. A contribution to the study of plasmas. An ultra rapid photometric camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpern, Marc R.

    1971-01-01

    The limitations of image converters in ultra-rapid photography were discussed, and an electronographic camera designed, to make photometric measurements on plasmas was presented. The electron optics was then studied and the performance attainable, particularly in dynamic operation, was assessed. The experimental facts concerning the interaction between a laser beam and a thin layer of gold was finally established using this camera, the complexity of the mechanism involved in this interaction was shown. (author) [fr

  3. THE DISTANCE TO THE MASSIVE GALACTIC CLUSTER WESTERLUND 2 FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC AND HST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas Alvarez, Carlos A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3905, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Bradley, David R.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Norris, Mark A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, CB 3255, Phillips Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Cool, Richard J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Miller, Brendan P., E-mail: cvargasa@uwyo.edu, E-mail: chipk@uwyo.edu, E-mail: davidbradley512@gmail.com, E-mail: sheila@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: manorris@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: rcool@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: mbrendan@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 745 Dennison Building, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified 15 new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened spectral energy distributions based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters R{sub V} and A{sub V} for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values (R{sub V} ) = 3.77 {+-} 0.09 and (A{sub V} ) = 6.51 {+-} 0.38 mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance (d) = 4.16 {+-} 0.07 (random) +0.26 (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP 18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2.

  4. Time-series photometric spot modeling. I - Parameter study and application to HD 17433 = VY Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Bopp, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    New UBVRI photometry of the active chromosphere binary HD 17433 (VY) Ari from 1987 through 1991 is presented, and the long-term and short-term spot behavior is studied. A 0.2 mag variation of the mean brightness and a maximum wave amplitude of up to 0.4 mag in 1988 are found. The newly measured photometric period of 16.42 d suggests asynchronous rotation of the primary component by about 30 percent.

  5. Photometrically measured continuous personal PM(2.5) exposure: levels and correlation to a gravimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanki, Timo; Alm, Sari; Ruuskanen, Juhani; Janssen, Nicole A H; Jantunen, Matti; Pekkanen, Juha

    2002-05-01

    There is evidence that hourly variations in exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) may be associated with adverse health effects. Still there are only few published data on short-term levels of personal exposure to PM in community settings. The objectives of the study were to assess hourly and shorter-term variations in personal PM(2.5) exposure in Helsinki, Finland, and to compare results from portable photometers to simultaneously measured gravimetric concentrations. The effect of relative humidity on the photometric results was also evaluated. Personal PM(2.5) exposures of elderly persons were assessed for 24 h every second week, resulting in 308 successful measurements from 47 different subjects. Large changes in concentrations in minutes after cooking or changing microenvironment were seen. The median of daily 1-h maxima was over twice the median of 24-h averages. There was a strong significant association between the two means, which was not linear. Median (95th percentile) of the photometric 24-h concentrations was 12.1 (37.7) and of the 24-h gravimetric concentrations 9.2 (21.3) microg/m3. The correlation between the photometric and the gravimetric method was quite good (R2=0.86). Participants spent 94.1% of their time indoors or in a vehicle, where relative humidity is usually low and thus not likely to cause significant effects on photometric results. Even outdoors, the relative humidity had only modest effect on concentrations. Photometers are a promising method to explore the health effects of short-term variation in personal PM(2.5) exposure.

  6. Flame-photometric determination of boron in alloys with chromatographic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, G.F.; Popandopulo, Yu.I.; Grazhuiene, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made on the possibility of using flame-photometric method for boron determination in iron base alloys. The method of extraction chromatography was used for boron separation from iron. It is possible to reliably determine boron in Fesub(x)Bsub(100-x) alloys only at a concentration ratio of iron to boron <=0.2. The technique for determination of boron in Fesub(x)Bsub(100-x) alloys was developed on the base of the conducted investigation

  7. Flame-photometric determination of boron in alloys with chromatographic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G.F.; Popandopulo, Yu.I.; Grazhuiene, S.S. (AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela)

    1983-01-01

    A study was made on the possibility of using flame-photometric method for boron determination in iron base alloys. The method of extraction chromatography was used for boron separation from iron. It is possible to reliably determine boron in Fesub(x)Bsub(100-x) alloys only at a concentration ratio of iron to boron <=0.2. The technique for determination of boron in Fesub(x)Bsub(100-x) alloys was developed on the base of the conducted investigation.

  8. Refraction in exoplanet atmospheres: Photometric signatures, implications for transmission spectroscopy, and search in Kepler data

    OpenAIRE

    Alp, Dennis; Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Refraction deflects photons that pass through atmospheres, which affects transit light curves. Refraction thus provides an avenue to probe physical properties of exoplanet atmospheres and to constrain the presence of clouds and hazes. In addition, an effective surface can be imposed by refraction, thereby limiting the pressure levels probed by transmission spectroscopy. The main objective of the paper is to model the effects of refraction on photometric light curves for realistic planets and ...

  9. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I A T Livingstone

    Full Text Available Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc. and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2 providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90% regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%. Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2 and Weber contrast (≥ 90%, but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%. Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  10. Bayesian source term determination with unknown covariance of measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Alkomiet; Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2017-04-01

    Determination of a source term of release of a hazardous material into the atmosphere is a very important task for emergency response. We are concerned with the problem of estimation of the source term in the conventional linear inverse problem, y = Mx, where the relationship between the vector of observations y is described using the source-receptor-sensitivity (SRS) matrix M and the unknown source term x. Since the system is typically ill-conditioned, the problem is recast as an optimization problem minR,B(y - Mx)TR-1(y - Mx) + xTB-1x. The first term minimizes the error of the measurements with covariance matrix R, and the second term is a regularization of the source term. There are different types of regularization arising for different choices of matrices R and B, for example, Tikhonov regularization assumes covariance matrix B as the identity matrix multiplied by scalar parameter. In this contribution, we adopt a Bayesian approach to make inference on the unknown source term x as well as unknown R and B. We assume prior on x to be a Gaussian with zero mean and unknown diagonal covariance matrix B. The covariance matrix of the likelihood R is also unknown. We consider two potential choices of the structure of the matrix R. First is the diagonal matrix and the second is a locally correlated structure using information on topology of the measuring network. Since the inference of the model is intractable, iterative variational Bayes algorithm is used for simultaneous estimation of all model parameters. The practical usefulness of our contribution is demonstrated on an application of the resulting algorithm to real data from the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). This research is supported by EEA/Norwegian Financial Mechanism under project MSMT-28477/2014 Source-Term Determination of Radionuclide Releases by Inverse Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling (STRADI).

  11. Photometric facial analysis of the Igbo Nigerian adult male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukoha, Ukoha Ukoha; Udemezue, Onochie Okwudili; Oranusi, Chidi Kingsley; Asomugha, Azuoma Lasbrey; Dimkpa, Uchechukwu; Nzeukwu, Lynda Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background: A carefully performed facial analysis can serve as a strong foundation for successful facial reconstructive and plastic surgeries, rhinoplasty or orthodontics. Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the facial features and qualities of the Igbo Nigerian adult male using photometry. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty subjects aged between 18 and 28 years were studied at the Anambra State University, Uli, Nigeria. The frontal and right lateral view photographs of their faces were taken and traced out on tracing papers. On these, two vertical distances, nasion to subnasal and subnasale to menton, and four angles, nasofrontal (NF), nasofacial, nasomental (NM) and mentocervical, were measured. Results: The result showed that the Igbo Nigerian adult male had a middle face that was shorter than the lower one (41.76% vs.58.24%), a moderate glabella (NF=133.97°), a projected nose (NM=38.68°) and a less prominent chin (NM=125.87°). Conclusion: This study is very important in medical practice as it can be used to compare the pre- and post-operative results of plastic surgery and other related surgeries of the face. PMID:23661886

  12. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  13. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY IN THE A0 SUPERGIANT HR 1040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corliss, David J.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    A time-series analysis of spectroscopic and photometric observables of the A0 Ia supergiant HR 1040 has been performed, including equivalent widths, radial velocities, and Strömgren photometric indices. The data, obtained from 1993 through 2007, include 152 spectroscopic observations from the Ritter Observatory 1 m telescope and 269 Strömgren photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope. Typical of late B- and early A-type supergiants, HR 1040 has a highly variable Hα profile. The star was found to have an intermittent active phase marked by correlation between the Hα absorption equivalent width and blue-edge radial velocity and by photospheric connections observed in correlations to equivalent width, second moment and radial velocity in Si ii λλ6347, 6371. High-velocity absorption (HVA) events were observed only during this active phase. HVA events in the wind were preceded by photospheric activity, including Si ii radial velocity oscillations 19–42 days prior to onset of an HVA event and correlated increases in Si ii W λ and second moment from 13 to 23 days before the start of the HVA event. While increases in various line equivalent widths in the wind prior to HVA events have been reported in the past in other stars, our finding of precursors in enhanced radial velocity variations in the wind and at the photosphere is a new result

  14. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. IX. A photometric survey of planetary nebulae in M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyette, Mark J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Balick, Bruce; Fouesneau, Morgan [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rosenfield, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy G. Galilei, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Seth, Anil C., E-mail: mveyette@uw.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We search the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 broadband imaging data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey to identify detections of cataloged planetary nebulae (PNs). Of the 711 PNs currently in the literature within the PHAT footprint, we find 467 detected in the broadband. For these 467, we are able to refine their astrometric accuracy from ∼0.''3 to 0.''05. Using the resolution of the HST, we are able to show that 152 objects currently in the catalogs are definitively not PNs, and we show that 32 objects thought to be extended in ground-based images are actually point-like and therefore good PN candidates. We also find one PN candidate that is marginally resolved. If this is a PN, it is up to 0.7 pc in diameter. With our new photometric data, we develop a method of measuring the level of excitation in individual PNs by comparing broadband and narrowband imaging and describe the effects of excitation on a PN's photometric signature. Using the photometric properties of the known PNs in the PHAT catalogs, we search for more PNs, but do not find any new candidates, suggesting that ground-based emission-line surveys are complete in the PHAT footprint to F475W ≅ 24.

  15. RECONSTRUCTING THE PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES OF EARTH AS A PLANET ALONG ITS HISTORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.

    2012-01-01

    By utilizing satellite-based estimations of the distribution of clouds, we have studied Earth's large-scale cloudiness behavior according to latitude and surface types (ice, water, vegetation, and desert). These empirical relationships are used here to reconstruct the possible cloud distribution of historical epochs of Earth's history such as the Late Cretaceous (90 Ma ago), the Late Triassic (230 Ma ago), the Mississippian (340 Ma ago), and the Late Cambrian (500 Ma ago), when the landmass distributions were different from today's. With this information, we have been able to simulate the globally integrated photometric variability of the planet at these epochs. We find that our simple model reproduces well the observed cloud distribution and albedo variability of the modern Earth. Moreover, the model suggests that the photometric variability of the Earth was probably much larger in past epochs. This enhanced photometric variability could improve the chances for the difficult determination of the rotational period and the identification of continental landmasses for a distant planets.

  16. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  17. Photometric calibration of the COMBO-17 survey with the Softassign Procrustes Matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaee, Z.; Nakajima, R.; Erben, T.; Schneider, P.; Hildebrandt, H.; Becker, A. C.

    2017-11-01

    Accurate photometric calibration of optical data is crucial for photometric redshift estimation. We present the Softassign Procrustes Matching (SPM) method to improve the colour calibration upon the commonly used Stellar Locus Regression (SLR) method for the COMBO-17 survey. Our colour calibration approach can be categorised as a point-set matching method, which is frequently used in medical imaging and pattern recognition. We attain a photometric redshift precision Δz/(1 + zs) of better than 2 per cent. Our method is based on aligning the stellar locus of the uncalibrated stars to that of a spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey standard stars. We achieve our goal by finding a correspondence matrix between the two point-sets and applying the matrix to estimate the appropriate translations in multidimensional colour space. The SPM method is able to find the translation between two point-sets, despite the existence of noise and incompleteness of the common structures in the sets, as long as there is a distinct structure in at least one of the colour-colour pairs. We demonstrate the precision of our colour calibration method with a mock catalogue. The SPM colour calibration code is publicly available at https://neuronphysics@bitbucket.org/neuronphysics/spm.git.

  18. Turbidimetric and photometric determination of total tannins in tea using a micro-flow-batch analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marcelo B; Andrade, Stéfani I E; Harding, David P; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Band, Beatriz S F; Araújo, Mário C U

    2012-01-15

    Both turbidimetric and photometric determinations of total tannins in samples of green and black tea, using a micro-flow-batch analyzer (μFBA) were studied. The miniaturized system was formed using photocurable urethane-acrylate resin and ultraviolet lithography technique. The turbidimetric method was based on the precipitation reaction of Cu (II) with tannins in acetate medium at a pH of 4.5. The photometric method was based on the complexation reaction of tannins with ferrous tartrate. The turbidimetric μFBA was able to test 200 samples per hour. The photometric μFBA allowed 300 analyses per hour, generating 136μL of residue per analysis. The paired t test, at a 95% confidence level, showed no statistically significant differences between results obtained by both methods and the reference method. The urethane-acrylate μFBA maintained satisfactory physical and chemical properties, and represents an improvement over conventional flow-batch analyzer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photometric variability of the SS 433 (V 1343 Aq1) in 1979-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, S.A.; Goranskij, V.P.; Cherepashchuk, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results of photometric observations of SS 433 carried out in 1981 are presented, the 164-day and 13-day variability of this ob ect being confirmed. All available photometric observations of SS 433 during 1979-1981 are summarized in order to investigate main regularities in brightness variability. Using the photometric data of three years the precessing period of 164sup(d)+-1sup(d) is determined. The orbital period is 13sup(d).086+-0sup(d).006. The maximum of the uneclipsed brightness of SS 433 is observed at the moment of maximum separation of ''relativistic'' emission lines. At this moment the orbital brightness curve is most similar to that of #betta# Lyr-type eclipsing variables. The amplitude of the orbital 13-day variability is minimal near the moments of coincidence of relativistic emissions (''cross-over'' dates). New observational data confirm the model of SS 433 as a massive eclipsing binary with a ''slaved'' bright accretion disk

  20. PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF NOVAE IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafter, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    The photometric and spectroscopic properties of the 43 known LMC nova candidates are summarized and reviewed. Of these, photometric data sufficient to establish decline rates are available for 29 novae, while spectroscopic data sufficient to establish the spectroscopic classes are available for 18 systems. Half of the 18 novae belong to the Fe II class, with the remaining nine belonging to either the He/N or the Fe IIb classes. As seen in previous nova studies of M31 and M33, the He/N and Fe IIb novae have on average faster photometric developments than do their Fe II counterparts. Overall, the available photometry confirms earlier studies, and shows conclusively that LMC novae have faster rates of decline than do novae in the Galaxy and M31. It appears that the increased fraction of faster, He/N and Fe IIb novae observed in the LMC compared with M31 is almost certainly the result of differences in the underlying stellar population between the two galaxies. We propose that the younger population seen in the LMC compared with M31's bulge (where most of the novae are found), produces progenitor binaries with higher average white dwarf masses. The higher mean white dwarf mass not only produces a larger fraction of fast, He/N novae compared with M31, but also results in a relatively large recurrent nova population.

  1. Photometric redshifts for the next generation of deep radio continuum surveys - I. Template fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kenneth J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Williams, Wendy L.; Best, Philip N.; Buat, Veronique; Burgarella, Denis; Jarvis, Matt J.; Małek, Katarzyna; Oliver, S. J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Smith, Daniel J. B.

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of photometric redshift performance for galaxies and active galactic nuclei detected in deep radio continuum surveys. Using two multiwavelength data sets, over the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Boötes and COSMOS fields, we assess photometric redshift (photo-z) performance for a sample of ∼4500 radio continuum sources with spectroscopic redshifts relative to those of ∼63 000 non-radio-detected sources in the same fields. We investigate the performance of three photometric redshift template sets as a function of redshift, radio luminosity and infrared/X-ray properties. We find that no single template library is able to provide the best performance across all subsets of the radio-detected population, with variation in the optimum template set both between subsets and between fields. Through a hierarchical Bayesian combination of the photo-z estimates from all three template sets, we are able to produce a consensus photo-z estimate that equals or improves upon the performance of any individual template set.

  2. Analysis of optically variable devices using a photometric light-field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Daniel; Å tolc, Svorad; Huber-Mörk, Reinhold

    2015-03-01

    Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVIDs), sometimes loosely referred to as holograms, are popular security features for protecting banknotes, ID cards, or other security documents. Inspection, authentication, as well as forensic analysis of these security features are still demanding tasks requiring special hardware tools and expert knowledge. Existing equipment for such analyses is based either on a microscopic analysis of the grating structure or a point-wise projection and recording of the diffraction patterns. We investigated approaches for an examination of DOVID security features based on sampling the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of DOVIDs using photometric stereo- and light-field-based methods. Our approach is demonstrated on the practical task of automated discrimination between genuine and counterfeited DOVIDs on banknotes. For this purpose, we propose a tailored feature descriptor which is robust against several expected sources of inaccuracy but still specific enough for the given task. The suggested approach is analyzed from both theoretical as well as practical viewpoints and w.r.t. analysis based on photometric stereo and light fields. We show that especially the photometric method provides a reliable and robust tool for revealing DOVID behavior and authenticity.

  3. GASDRA: Galaxy Spectrum Dynamic Range Analysis for Photometric Redshift Filter Partition Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Castilla, J.; Ponce, R.; Sanchez, F. J.

    2012-04-11

    The photometric redshift is an active area of research. It is becoming the preferred method for redshift measurement above spectroscopy one for large surveys. In these surveys, the requirement in redshift precision is relaxed in benefit of obtaining the measurements of large number of galaxies. One of the more relevant decisions to be taken in the design of a photometric redshift experiment is the number of filters since it affects deeply to the precision and survey time. Currently, there is not a clear method for evaluating the impact in both precision and exposure time of a determined filter partition set and usually it is determined by detailed simulations on the behavior of photo-z algorithms. In this note we describe GASDRA, a new method for extracting the minimal signal to noise requirement, depending on the number of filters needed for preserving the filtered spectrum shape, and hence to make feasible the spectrum identification. The application of this requirement guaranties a determined precision in the spectrum measurement. Although it cannot be translated directly to absolute photometric redshift error, it does provide a method for comparing the relative precision achieved in the spectrum representation by different sets of filters. We foresee that this relative precision is close related to photo-z error. In addition, we can evaluate the impact in the exposure time of any filter partition set with respect to other. (Author) 11 refs.

  4. Confirming LBV Candidates Through Variability: A Photometric and Spectroscopic Monitoring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Guy; Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    2013-02-01

    Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars represent an extremely rare class of luminous massive stars with high mass loss rates. The paucity ( 12) of confirmed Galactic LBV precludes determining a solid evolutionary connection between LBV and other intermediate (e.g. Ofpe/WN9, WNL) phases in the life of very massive stars. We've been conducting an optical/near-IR spectral survey of a large subset of central stars residing within newly discovered it Spitzer nebulae and have identified over two dozen new candidate LBVs (cLBVs) based on spectral similarity alone; confirming them as bona fide LBVs requires demonstrating 1-3 mag photometric and spectroscopic variability. This marks a significant advancement in the study of massive stars, far outweighing the return from many studies searching for LBVs and WRs the past several decades. Monitoring from semesters 2011B-2012A already has confirmed one new cLBV as a bona fide LBV. We propose to continue optical-IR photometric monitoring of these cLBVS with the 1.3m. Chiron, replacing the RC spectrograph on the 1.5m, now allows high-resolution optical spectroscopic monitoring of bright cLBVs, 11 of which are proposed herein. Spectra are important for understanding the physics driving photometric variability, properties of the wind, and allow analysis of line profiles.

  5. An imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for characterizing OLED panels for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiting; Narendran, Nadarajah; Tan, Jianchuan; Mou, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has demonstrated its novelty in displays and certain lighting applications. Similar to white light-emitting diode (LED) technology, it also holds the promise of saving energy. Even though the luminous efficacy values of OLED products have been steadily growing, their longevity is still not well understood. Furthermore, currently there is no industry standard for photometric and colorimetric testing, short and long term, of OLEDs. Each OLED manufacturer tests its OLED panels under different electrical and thermal conditions using different measurement methods. In this study, an imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for OLED panels was investigated. Unlike an LED that can be considered as a point source, the OLED is a large form area source. Therefore, for an area source to satisfy lighting application needs, it is important that it maintains uniform light level and color properties across the emitting surface of the panel over a long period. This study intended to develop a measurement procedure that can be used to test long-term photometric and colorimetric properties of OLED panels. The objective was to better understand how test parameters such as drive current or luminance and temperature affect the degradation rate. In addition, this study investigated whether data interpolation could allow for determination of degradation and lifetime, L70, at application conditions based on the degradation rates measured at different operating conditions.

  6. GASDRA: Galaxy Spectrum Dynamic Range Analysis for Photometric Redshift Filter Partition Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, J. de; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Castilla, J.; Ponce, R.; Sanchez, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The photometric redshift is an active area of research. It is becoming the preferred method for redshift measurement above spectroscopy one for large surveys. In these surveys, the requirement in redshift precision is relaxed in benefit of obtaining the measurements of large number of galaxies. One of the more relevant decisions to be taken in the design of a photometric redshift experiment is the number of filters since it affects deeply to the precision and survey time. Currently, there is not a clear method for evaluating the impact in both precision and exposure time of a determined filter partition set and usually it is determined by detailed simulations on the behavior of photo-z algorithms. In this note we describe GASDRA, a new method for extracting the minimal signal to noise requirement, depending on the number of filters needed for preserving the filtered spectrum shape, and hence to make feasible the spectrum identification. The application of this requirement guaranties a determined precision in the spectrum measurement. Although it cannot be translated directly to absolute photometric redshift error, it does provide a method for comparing the relative precision achieved in the spectrum representation by different sets of filters. We foresee that this relative precision is close related to photo-z error. In addition, we can evaluate the impact in the exposure time of any filter partition set with respect to other. (Author) 11 refs.

  7. Method for estimating effects of unknown correlations in spectral irradiance data on uncertainties of spectrally integrated colorimetric quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärhä, Petri; Vaskuri, Anna; Mäntynen, Henrik; Mikkonen, Nikke; Ikonen, Erkki

    2017-08-01

    Spectral irradiance data are often used to calculate colorimetric properties, such as color coordinates and color temperatures of light sources by integration. The spectral data may contain unknown correlations that should be accounted for in the uncertainty estimation. We propose a new method for estimating uncertainties in such cases. The method goes through all possible scenarios of deviations using Monte Carlo analysis. Varying spectral error functions are produced by combining spectral base functions, and the distorted spectra are used to calculate the colorimetric quantities. Standard deviations of the colorimetric quantities at different scenarios give uncertainties assuming no correlations, uncertainties assuming full correlation, and uncertainties for an unfavorable case of unknown correlations, which turn out to be a significant source of uncertainty. With 1% standard uncertainty in spectral irradiance, the expanded uncertainty of the correlated color temperature of a source corresponding to the CIE Standard Illuminant A may reach as high as 37.2 K in unfavorable conditions, when calculations assuming full correlation give zero uncertainty, and calculations assuming no correlations yield the expanded uncertainties of 5.6 K and 12.1 K, with wavelength steps of 1 nm and 5 nm used in spectral integrations, respectively. We also show that there is an absolute limit of 60.2 K in the error of the correlated color temperature for Standard Illuminant A when assuming 1% standard uncertainty in the spectral irradiance. A comparison of our uncorrelated uncertainties with those obtained using analytical methods by other research groups shows good agreement. We re-estimated the uncertainties for the colorimetric properties of our 1 kW photometric standard lamps using the new method. The revised uncertainty of color temperature is a factor of 2.5 higher than the uncertainty assuming no correlations.

  8. Towards high-speed autonomous navigation of unknown environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Charles; Roy, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize recent research enabling high-speed navigation in unknown environments for dynamic robots that perceive the world through onboard sensors. Many existing solutions to this problem guarantee safety by making the conservative assumption that any unknown portion of the map may contain an obstacle, and therefore constrain planned motions to lie entirely within known free space. In this work, we observe that safety constraints may significantly limit performance and that faster navigation is possible if the planner reasons about collision with unobserved obstacles probabilistically. Our overall approach is to use machine learning to approximate the expected costs of collision using the current state of the map and the planned trajectory. Our contribution is to demonstrate fast but safe planning using a learned function to predict future collision probabilities.

  9. Renal disease masquerading as pyrexia of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Korivi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrexia of unknown origin is a challenging clinical problem. Infections, malignancies, and connective tissue diseases form the major etiologies for this condition. We report a case of a 57-year-old diabetic male who presented with fever of unknown origin for several months. The course of investigations led to a kidney biopsy which clinched the cause of his fever as well as the underlying diagnosis. The light microscopy findings of expansile storiform fibrosis with a dense inflammatory infiltrate suggested the diagnosis which was confirmed by positive staining of Immunoglobulin G4, the dense lympho-plasmacytic infiltrate and elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. A course of steroids followed by mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance immunosuppression rendered the patient afebrile with improvement of renal function.

  10. Learning Unknown Structure in CRFs via Adaptive Gradient Projection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of fitting probabilistic graphical models to the given data when the structure is not known. More specifically, we focus on learning unknown structure in conditional random fields, especially learning both the structure and parameters of a conditional random field model simultaneously. To do this, we first formulate the learning problem as a convex minimization problem by adding an l_2-regularization to the node parameters and a group l_1-regularization to the edge parameters, and then a gradient-based projection method is proposed to solve it which combines an adaptive stepsize selection strategy with a nonmonotone line search. Extensive simulation experiments are presented to show the performance of our approach in solving unknown structure learning problems.

  11. Quadrotor Control in the Presence of Unknown Mass Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duivenvoorden, Rikky Ricardo Petrus Rufino

    Quadrotor UAVs are popular due to their mechanical simplicity, as well as their capability to hover and vertically take-off and land. As applications diversify, quadrotors are increasingly required to operate under unknown mass properties, for example as a multirole sensor platform or for package delivery operations. The work presented here consists of the derivation of a generalized quadrotor dynamic model without the typical simplifying assumptions on the first and second moments of mass. The maximum payload capacity of a quadrotor in hover, and the observability of the unknown mass properties are discussed. A brief introduction of L1 adaptive control is provided, and three different L 1 adaptive controllers were designed for the Parrot AR.Drone quadrotor. Their tracking and disturbance rejection performance was compared to the baseline nonlinear controller in experiments. Finally, the results of the combination of L1 adaptive control with iterative learning control are presented, showing high performance trajectory tracking under uncertainty.

  12. Characterization of Inactive Rocket Bodies Via Non-Resolved Photometric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, R.; Palmer, D.; Thompson, D.; Klimenko, A.

    2014-09-01

    impact assessment via improved physics-based modeling. As part of this effort calibration satellite observations are used to dynamically calibrate the physics-based model and to improve its forecasting capability. The observations are collected from a variety of sources, including from LANLs own Raven-class optical telescope. This system collects both astrometric and photometric data on space objects. The photometric data will be used to estimate the space objects attitude and shape. Non-resolved photometric data have been studied by many as a mechanism for space object characterization. Photometry is the measurement of an objects flux or apparent brightness measured over a wavelength band. The temporal variation of photometric measurements is referred to as photometric signature. The photometric optical signature of an object contains information about shape, attitude, size and material composition. This work focuses on the processing of the data collected with LANLs telescope in an effort to use photometric data to expand the number of space objects that can be used as calibration satellites. A nonlinear least squares is used to estimate the attitude and angular velocity of the space object; a number of real data examples are shown. Inactive space objects are used for the real data examples and good estimation results are shown.

  13. Diagnosis of the cancer of unknown primary origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurisova, S.; Poersoek, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP) is one of the ten most frequent cancers worldwide. It constitutes of 3-5% of all human malignancies. At time of diagnosis patients with CUP present with disseminated metastases without established primary origin. CUP manifests as heterogenous group of mainly epithelial cancers recognised by distinct clinico pathological entities. The diagnostic work-up includes extensive histopathology investigations and modern imaging technology. Nevertheless, the primary tumour remains undetected most of the time. (author)

  14. Biomarkers for Ectopic Pregnancy and Pregnancy of Unknown Location

    OpenAIRE

    Senapati, Suneeta; Barnhart, Kurt T.

    2013-01-01

    Early pregnancy failure is the most common complication of pregnancy, and 1–2% of all pregnancies will be ectopic. As one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality, diagnosing ectopic pregnancy and determining the fate of a pregnancy of unknown location are of great clinical concern. Several serum and plasma biomarkers for ectopic pregnancy have been investigated independently and in combination. The following is a review of the state of biomarker discovery and development for...

  15. Metastatic meningioma presenting as cancer of unknown primary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of anaplastic meningioma presenting in an extracranial osseous location, initially diagnosed as cancer of unknown primary. Although anaplastic meningioma comprise 3% of all meningiomas, this subtype is more likely to be associated with metastases. The increased degree of dedifferentiation in anaplastic meningioma makes diagnosis difficult, especially if characteristic imaging findings of meningioma are not identified. Adequate tissue for diagnostic purposes and appropriate imaging studies may help in establishing a definitive diagnosis.

  16. Transfer of an unknown quantum state, quantum networks, and memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Agarwal, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present a protocol for transfer of an unknown quantum state. The protocol is based on a two-mode cavity interacting dispersively in a sequential manner with three-level atoms in the Λ configuration. We propose a scheme for quantum networking using an atomic channel. We investigate the effect of cavity decoherence in the entire process. Further, we demonstrate the possibility of an efficient quantum memory for arbitrary superposition of two modes of a cavity containing one photon

  17. Quantum key distribution with an unknown and untrusted source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2009-03-01

    The security of a standard bi-directional ``plug & play'' quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been an open question for a long time. This is mainly because its source is equivalently controlled by an eavesdropper, which means the source is unknown and untrusted. Qualitative discussion on this subject has been made previously. In this paper, we present the first quantitative security analysis on a general class of QKD protocols whose sources are unknown and untrusted. The securities of standard BB84 protocol, weak+vacuum decoy state protocol, and one-decoy decoy state protocol, with unknown and untrusted sources are rigorously proved. We derive rigorous lower bounds to the secure key generation rates of the above three protocols. Our numerical simulation results show that QKD with an untrusted source gives a key generation rate that is close to that with a trusted source. Our work is published in [1]. [4pt] [1] Y. Zhao, B. Qi, and H.-K. Lo, Phys. Rev. A, 77:052327 (2008).

  18. Navigation through unknown and dynamic open spaces using topological notions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Tomé, Sergio

    2018-04-01

    Until now, most algorithms used for navigation have had the purpose of directing system towards one point in space. However, humans communicate tasks by specifying spatial relations among elements or places. In addition, the environments in which humans develop their activities are extremely dynamic. The only option that allows for successful navigation in dynamic and unknown environments is making real-time decisions. Therefore, robots capable of collaborating closely with human beings must be able to make decisions based on the local information registered by the sensors and interpret and express spatial relations. Furthermore, when one person is asked to perform a task in an environment, this task is communicated given a category of goals so the person does not need to be supervised. Thus, two problems appear when one wants to create multifunctional robots: how to navigate in dynamic and unknown environments using spatial relations and how to accomplish this without supervision. In this article, a new architecture to address the two cited problems is presented, called the topological qualitative navigation architecture. In previous works, a qualitative heuristic called the heuristic of topological qualitative semantics (HTQS) has been developed to establish and identify spatial relations. However, that heuristic only allows for establishing one spatial relation with a specific object. In contrast, navigation requires a temporal sequence of goals with different objects. The new architecture attains continuous generation of goals and resolves them using HTQS. Thus, the new architecture achieves autonomous navigation in dynamic or unknown open environments.

  19. Prevalence and Impact of Unknown Diabetes in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Xu, Kejun; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with diabetes and their care providers are unaware of the presence of the disease. Dysglycemia encompassing hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glucose variability is common in the ICU in patients with and without diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of unknown diabetes on glycemic control in the ICU. Prospective observational study. Nine ICUs in an academic, tertiary hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. Hemoglobin A1c levels were ordered at all ICU admissions from March 1, 2011 to September 30, 2013. Electronic medical records were examined for a history of antihyperglycemic medications or International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition diagnosis of diabetes. Patients were categorized as having unknown diabetes (hemoglobin A1c > 6.5%, without history of diabetes), no diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5%, with documented history of diabetes). None. A total of 15,737 patients had an hemoglobin A1c and medical record evaluable for the history of diabetes, and 5,635 patients had diabetes diagnosed by either medical history or an elevated hemoglobin A1c in the ICU. Of these, 1,460 patients had unknown diabetes, accounting for 26.0% of all patients with diabetes. This represented 41.0% of patients with an hemoglobin A1c > 6.5% and 9.3% of all ICU patients. Compared with patients without diabetes, patients with unknown diabetes had a higher likelihood of requiring an insulin infusion (44.3% vs 29.3%; p 180 mg/dL; p < 0.0001) and hypoglycemia (8.9% vs 2.5%; blood glucose < 70 mg/dL; p < 0.0001), higher glycemic variability (55.6 vs 28.8, average of patient SD of glucose; p < 0.0001), and increased mortality (13.8% vs 11.4%; p = 0.01). Patients with unknown diabetes represent a significant percentage of ICU admissions. Measurement of hemoglobin A1c at admission can prospectively identify a population that are not known to have diabetes but have significant challenges in glycemic control in the ICU.

  20. A GENERAL STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF CATASTROPHIC PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ERRORS ON COSMOLOGY WITH COSMIC SHEAR TOMOGRAPHY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Ma Zhaoming; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-01

    A goal of forthcoming imaging surveys is to use weak gravitational lensing shear measurements to constrain dark energy. A challenge to this program is that redshifts to the lensed, source galaxies must be determined using photometric, rather than spectroscopic, information. We quantify the importance of uncalibrated photometric redshift outliers to the dark energy goals of forthcoming imaging surveys in a manner that does not assume any particular photometric redshift technique or template. In so doing, we provide an approximate blueprint for computing the influence of specific outlier populations on dark energy constraints. We find that outlier populations whose photo-z distributions are tightly localized about a significantly biased redshift must be controlled to a per-galaxy rate of (1-3) x 10 -3 to insure that systematic errors on dark energy parameters are rendered negligible. In the complementary limit, a subset of imaged galaxies with uncalibrated photometric redshifts distributed over a broad range must be limited to fewer than a per-galaxy error rate of F cat ∼ -4 . Additionally, we explore the relative importance of calibrating the photo-z's of a core set of relatively well-understood galaxies as compared to the need to identify potential catastrophic photo-z outliers. We discuss the degradation of the statistical constraints on dark energy parameters induced by excising source galaxies at high- and low-photometric redshifts, concluding that removing galaxies with photometric redshifts z ph ∼> 2.4 and z ph ∼< 0.3 may mitigate damaging catastrophic redshift outliers at a relatively small (∼<20%) cost in statistical error. In an Appendix, we show that forecasts for the degradation in dark energy parameter constraints due to uncertain photometric redshifts depend sensitively on the treatment of the nonlinear matter power spectrum. In particular, previous work using Peacock and Dodds may have overestimated the photo-z calibration requirements of

  1. Estimation of the false discovery proportion with unknown dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Han, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale multiple testing with correlated test statistics arises frequently in many scientific research. Incorporating correlation information in approximating false discovery proportion has attracted increasing attention in recent years. When the covariance matrix of test statistics is known, Fan, Han & Gu (2012) provided an accurate approximation of False Discovery Proportion (FDP) under arbitrary dependence structure and some sparsity assumption. However, the covariance matrix is often unknown in many applications and such dependence information has to be estimated before approximating FDP. The estimation accuracy can greatly affect FDP approximation. In the current paper, we aim to theoretically study the impact of unknown dependence on the testing procedure and establish a general framework such that FDP can be well approximated. The impacts of unknown dependence on approximating FDP are in the following two major aspects: through estimating eigenvalues/eigenvectors and through estimating marginal variances. To address the challenges in these two aspects, we firstly develop general requirements on estimates of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for a good approximation of FDP. We then give conditions on the structures of covariance matrices that satisfy such requirements. Such dependence structures include banded/sparse covariance matrices and (conditional) sparse precision matrices. Within this framework, we also consider a special example to illustrate our method where data are sampled from an approximate factor model, which encompasses most practical situations. We provide a good approximation of FDP via exploiting this specific dependence structure. The results are further generalized to the situation where the multivariate normality assumption is relaxed. Our results are demonstrated by simulation studies and some real data applications.

  2. Neurological autoantibodies in drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden; Kamisli, Suat; Yucel, Fatma Ebru; Ozcan, Cemal

    2018-03-09

    Autoimmune epilepsy is a rarely diagnosed condition. Recognition of the underlying autoimmune condition is important, as these patients can be resistant to antiepileptic drugs. To determine the autoimmune and oncological antibodies in adult drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause and identify the clinical, radiological, and EEG findings associated with these antibodies according to data in the literature. Eighty-two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause were prospectively identified. Clinical features were recorded. The levels of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex (anti-VGKCc), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), anti-phospholipid IgG and IgM, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, and onconeural antibodies were determined. Serum antibody positivity suggesting the potential role of autoimmunity in the aetiology was present in 17 patients with resistant epilepsy (22.0%). Multiple antibodies were found in two patients (2.6%). One of these patients (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and ANA, whereas another (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and anti-TPO. A single antibody was present in 15 patients (19.5%). Of the 77 patients finally included in the study, 4 had anti-TPO (5.2%), 1 had anti-GAD (1.3%), 4 had anti-VGKCc (5.2%) 8 had ANA (10.3%), and 2 had onconeural antibodies (2.6%) (1 patient had anti-Yo and 1 had anti-MA2/TA). The other antibodies investigated were not detected. EEG abnormality (focal), focal seizure incidence, and frequent seizures were more common in antibody-positive patients. Autoimmune factors may be aetiologically relevant in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause, especially if focal seizures are present together with focal EEG abnormality and frequent seizures.

  3. Optimal unambiguous comparison of two unknown squeezed vacua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Sedlak, Michal; Rapsan, Peter; Busek, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the unambiguous state comparison (USC) of two unknown squeezed vacuum states of the electromagnetic field. Our setup is based on linear optical elements and photon-number detectors, and it achieves optimal USC in an ideal case of unit quantum efficiency. In realistic conditions, i.e., for nonunit quantum efficiency of photodetectors, we evaluate the probability of getting an ambiguous result as well as the reliability of the scheme, thus showing its robustness in comparison to previous proposals.

  4. Fast entanglement detection for unknown states of two spatial qutrits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G.; Gomez, E. S.; Saavedra, C.; Vargas, A.; Vianna, R. O.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the practicality of the method proposed by Maciel et al. [Phys. Rev. A. 80, 032325 (2009).] for detecting the entanglement of two spatial qutrits (three-dimensional quantum systems), which are encoded in the discrete transverse momentum of single photons transmitted through a multislit aperture. The method is based on the acquisition of partial information of the quantum state through projective measurements, and a data processing analysis done with semidefinite programs. This analysis relies on generating gradually an optimal entanglement witness operator, and numerical investigations have shown that it allows for the entanglement detection of unknown states with a cost much lower than full state tomography.

  5. Algorithms for Rapidly Dispersing Robot Swarms in Unknown Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang, Tien-Ruey; Arkin, Esther M.; Bender, Michael; Fekete, Sandor P.; Mitchell, Joseph S. B.

    2002-01-01

    We develop and analyze algorithms for dispersing a swarm of primitive robots in an unknown environment, R. The primary objective is to minimize the makespan, that is, the time to fill the entire region. An environment is composed of pixels that form a connected subset of the integer grid. There is at most one robot per pixel and robots move horizontally or vertically at unit speed. Robots enter R by means of k>=1 door pixels Robots are primitive finite automata, only having local communicatio...

  6. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied....... This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the actual force(s) applied to the structure. The white noise input(s) and the structures responses are then used...

  7. Photometric Modeling and VIS-IR Albedo Maps of Dione From Cassini-VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; D'Aversa, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Stephan, K.; Plainaki, C.

    2018-03-01

    We report about visible and infrared albedo maps and spectral indicators of Dione's surface derived from the complete Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data set acquired between 2004 and 2017 during the Cassini tour in Saturn's system. Maps are derived by applying a photometric correction necessary to disentangle the intrinsic albedo of the surface from illumination and viewing geometry occurring at the time of the observation. The photometric correction is based on the Shkuratov et al. (2011, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2011.06.011) method which yields values of the surface equigonal albedo. Dione's surface albedo maps are rendered at five visible (VIS: 0.35, 0.44, 0.55, 0.7, and 0.95 μm) and five infrared (IR: 1.046, 1.540, 1.822, 2.050, and 2.200 μm) wavelengths in cylindrical projection with a 0.5° × 0.5° angular resolution in latitude and longitude, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 4.5 km/bin. Apart from visible and infrared albedo maps, we report about the distribution of the two visible spectral slopes (0.35-0.55 and 0.55-0.95 μm) and water ice 2.050 μm band depth computed after having applied the photometric correction. The derived spectral indicators are employed to trace Dione's composition variability on both global and local scales allowing to study the dichotomy between the bright‐leading and dark‐trailing hemispheres, the distribution of fresh material on the impact craters and surrounding ejecta, and the resurfacing of the bright material within the chasmata caused by tectonism.

  8. A VOLUME-LIMITED PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF 114 γ DORADUS CANDIDATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    We have carried out a photometric survey of a complete, volume-limited sample of γ Doradus candidates. The sample was extracted from the Hipparcos catalog and consists of 114 stars with colors and absolute magnitudes within the range of known γ Doradus stars and that also lie within a specified volume of 266,600 pc 3 . We devoted one year of observing time with our T12 0.8 m automatic photometric telescope to acquire nightly observations of the complete sample of stars. From these survey observations, we identify 37 stars with intrinsic variability of 0.002 mag or more. Of these 37 variables, 8 have already been confirmed as γ Doradus stars in our earlier papers; we scheduled the remaining 29 variables on our T3 0.4 m automatic telescope to acquire more intensive observations over the next two years. As promising new γ Doradus candidates were identified from the photometry, we obtained complementary spectroscopic observations of each candidate with the Kitt Peak coude feed telescope. Analysis of our new photometric and spectroscopic data reveals 15 new γ Doradus variables (and confirms two others), 8 new δ Scuti variables (and confirms one other), and 3 new variables with unresolved periodicity. Therefore, of the 114 γ Doradus candidates in our volume-limited sample, we find 25 stars that are new or previously known γ Doradus variables. This results in an incidence of 22% for γ Doradus variability among candidate field stars for this volume of the solar neighborhood. The corresponding space density of γ Doradus stars in this volume of space is 0.094 stars per 10 3 pc 3 or 94 stars per 10 6 pc 3 . We provide an updated list of 86 bright, confirmed, γ Doradus field stars.

  9. THE SYNTHETIC-OVERSAMPLING METHOD: USING PHOTOMETRIC COLORS TO DISCOVER EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A. A., E-mail: amiller@astro.caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-09-20

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars ([Fe/H] ≤ −3.0 dex) provide a unique window into understanding the first generation of stars and early chemical enrichment of the universe. EMP stars are exceptionally rare, however, and the relatively small number of confirmed discoveries limits our ability to exploit these near-field probes of the first ∼500 Myr after the Big Bang. Here, a new method to photometrically estimate [Fe/H] from only broadband photometric colors is presented. I show that the method, which utilizes machine-learning algorithms and a training set of ∼170,000 stars with spectroscopically measured [Fe/H], produces a typical scatter of ∼0.29 dex. This performance is similar to what is achievable via low-resolution spectroscopy, and outperforms other photometric techniques, while also being more general. I further show that a slight alteration to the model, wherein synthetic EMP stars are added to the training set, yields the robust identification of EMP candidates. In particular, this synthetic-oversampling method recovers ∼20% of the EMP stars in the training set, at a precision of ∼0.05. Furthermore, ∼65% of the false positives from the model are very metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] ≤ −2.0 dex). The synthetic-oversampling method is biased toward the discovery of warm (∼F-type) stars, a consequence of the targeting bias from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding survey. This EMP selection method represents a significant improvement over alternative broadband optical selection techniques. The models are applied to >12 million stars, with an expected yield of ∼600 new EMP stars, which promises to open new avenues for exploring the early universe.

  10. Types of Information Expected from a Photometric Search for Extra-Solar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Bell, James, III; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The current theory postulates that planets are a consequence of the formation of stars from viscous accretion disks. Condensation from the hotter, inner portion of the accretion disk favors the formation of small rocky planets in the inner portion and the formation of gas giants in the cuter, cooler part. Consequently, terrestrial-type planets in inner orbits must be commonplace (Wetheril 1991). From the geometry of the situation (Borucki and Summers 1984), it can be shown that 1% of those planetary systems that resemble our solar system should show transits for Earth-sized (or larger) planets. Thus a photometric satellite that uses a wide field of view telescope and a large CCD array to simultaneously monitor 5000 target stars should detect 50 planetary systems. To verify that regularly recurring transits are occurring rather than statistical fluctuations of the stellar flux, demands observations that extend over several orbital periods so that the constancy of the orbital period, signal amplitude, and duration can be measured. Therefore, to examine the region from Mercury's orbit to that of the Earth requires a duration of three years whereas a search out to the orbit of mars requires about six years. The results of the observations should provide estimates of the distributions of planetary size and orbital radius, and the frequency of planetary systems that have Earth-sized planets in inner orbits. Because approximately one half of the star systems observed will be binary systems, the frequency of planetary systems orbit ' ing either one or both of the stars can also be determined. Furthermore, the complexity of the photometric signature of a planet transiting a pair of stars provides enough information to estimate the eccentricities of the planetary orbits. In summary, the statistical evidence from a photometric search of solar-like stars should be able to either confirm or deny the applicability of the current theory of planet formation and provide new

  11. LOWER BOUNDS ON PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ERRORS FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asztalos, S.; Nikolaev, S.; De Vries, W.; Olivier, S.; Cook, K.; Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmology with Type Ia supernova heretofore has required extensive spectroscopic follow-up to establish an accurate redshift. Though this resource-intensive approach is tolerable at the present discovery rate, the next generation of ground-based all-sky survey instruments will render it unsustainable. Photometry-based redshift determination may be a viable alternative, though the technique introduces non-negligible errors that ultimately degrade the ability to discriminate between competing cosmologies. We present a strictly template-based photometric redshift estimator and compute redshift reconstruction errors in the presence of statistical errors. Under highly degraded photometric conditions corresponding to a statistical error σ of 0.5, the residual redshift error is found to be 0.236 when assuming a nightly observing cadence and a single Large Synoptic Science Telescope (LSST) u-band filter. Utilizing all six LSST bandpass filters reduces the residual redshift error to 9.1 x 10 -3 . Assuming a more optimistic statistical error σ of 0.05, we derive residual redshift errors of 4.2 x 10 -4 , 5.2 x 10 -4 , 9.2 x 10 -4 , and 1.8 x 10 -3 for observations occuring nightly, every 5th, 20th and 45th night, respectively, in each of the six LSST bandpass filters. Adopting an observing cadence in which photometry is acquired with all six filters every 5th night and a realistic supernova distribution, binned redshift errors are combined with photometric errors with a σ of 0.17 and systematic errors with a σ∼ 0.003 to derive joint errors (σ w , σ w ' ) of (0.012, 0.066), respectively, in (w,w') with 68% confidence using Fisher matrix formalism. Though highly idealized in the present context, the methodology is nonetheless quite relevant for the next generation of ground-based all-sky surveys.

  12. Inferring the photometric and size evolution of galaxies from image simulations. I. Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carassou, Sébastien; de Lapparent, Valérie; Bertin, Emmanuel; Le Borgne, Damien

    2017-09-01

    Context. Current constraints on models of galaxy evolution rely on morphometric catalogs extracted from multi-band photometric surveys. However, these catalogs are altered by selection effects that are difficult to model, that correlate in non trivial ways, and that can lead to contradictory predictions if not taken into account carefully. Aims: To address this issue, we have developed a new approach combining parametric Bayesian indirect likelihood (pBIL) techniques and empirical modeling with realistic image simulations that reproduce a large fraction of these selection effects. This allows us to perform a direct comparison between observed and simulated images and to infer robust constraints on model parameters. Methods: We use a semi-empirical forward model to generate a distribution of mock galaxies from a set of physical parameters. These galaxies are passed through an image simulator reproducing the instrumental characteristics of any survey and are then extracted in the same way as the observed data. The discrepancy between the simulated and observed data is quantified, and minimized with a custom sampling process based on adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Results: Using synthetic data matching most of the properties of a Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep field, we demonstrate the robustness and internal consistency of our approach by inferring the parameters governing the size and luminosity functions and their evolutions for different realistic populations of galaxies. We also compare the results of our approach with those obtained from the classical spectral energy distribution fitting and photometric redshift approach. Conclusions: Our pipeline infers efficiently the luminosity and size distribution and evolution parameters with a very limited number of observables (three photometric bands). When compared to SED fitting based on the same set of observables, our method yields results that are more accurate and free from

  13. Optimizing Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-Sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Donnacha [University Coll. London; Lahav, Ofer [University Coll. London; Bridle, Sarah [Manchester U.; Jouvel, Stephanie [Barcelona, IEEC; Abdalla, Filipe B. [University Coll. London; Frieman, Joshua A. [Chicago U., KICP

    2015-08-21

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a non-overlapping joint figure of merit nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than either alone. Our projected angular power spectrum formalism makes it easy to model the cross-correlation observable when the surveys overlap on the sky, producing a joint data vector and full covariance matrix. We calculate a same-sky improvement factor, from the inclusion of these cross-correlations, relative to non-overlapping surveys. We find nearly a factor of 4 for dark energy and more than a factor of 2 for modified gravity. The exact forecast figures of merit and same-sky benefits can be radically affected by a range of forecasts assumption, which we explore methodically in a sensitivity analysis. We show that that our fiducial assumptions produce robust results which give a good average picture of the science return from combining photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  14. Mars Exploration Rover Pancam Photometric Data QUBs: Definition and Example Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J. M.; Bell, J. F.; Arvidson, R. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, M. J.; Seelos, F. P.

    2004-12-01

    Pancam multi-spectral observations acquired at the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and Opportunity landing sites are being assembled into a multi-layer format know as a QUB. For any given pixel in a Pancam image the QUB will contain values for the radiance factor, incidence (i), emission (e), and phase (g) angles, X, Y, and Z distance in a rover-based coordinate system, disparity in number of pixels between the left and right eye images and range data. Good range data is required for the generation of a Pancam QUB. The radiance factor (I/F, where I is the measured scene radiance on sensor and π F is the incident solar irradiance) is calculated using a combination of preflight calibration data and information obtained from near-simultaneous observations of an onboard reflectance calibration target. The range, X, Y, Z and disparity data, and i, e, and g are calculated using routines developed by JPL's MIPL and Cornell. When possible, these data have been interpolated to maximize parameter coverage; a map of non-interpolated data is also included in each QUB. QUBs should prove very useful in photometric studies (e.g., Johnson et al.; Seelos, et al., this conference), detailed spectral analyses (e.g., Bell et al., this conference), and detailed topographic/DTM studies. Here we present two examples of the utilization of the information contained in Pancam QUBs. In one example we remove the photometric variability from spectra collected from multiple facets of a rock using knowledge of i, e, g and derived photometric functions. This is necessary if one wishes to conduct comparative studies of observations acquired under varying geometries and lighting conditions. In another example we present an analysis using the discrete ordinate multiple scattering radiative transfer code DISORT where we separate the atmosphere and surface contributions of the surface reflectance.

  15. Optical - Near Infrared Photometric Calibration of M-dwarf Metallicity and Its Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hejazi, Neda; De Robertis, Michael M.; Dawson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a carefully constructed sample of dwarf stars, a new optical-near infrared photometric calibration to estimate the metallicity of late-type K and early-to-mid-type M dwarfs is presented. The calibration sample has two parts; the first part includes 18 M dwarfs with metallicities determined by high-resolution spectroscopy and the second part contains 49 dwarfs with metallicities obtained through moderate-resolution spectra. By applying this calibration to a large sample of around 1.3 ...

  16. Photometric determination of niobium in materials with high content of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navrotskaya, V.A.; Aleksandrova, E.I.; Kletenik, Yu.B.

    1982-01-01

    To determine niobium in various samples of niobium concentrates with a high phosphorus content, a photometric method with pyridylazoresorcinol (PAR) is used. It is shown that all the elements indicated (Fe, Si, Ti, Al, Ca) including phosphorus do not interfere with the niobium determination with the use of PAR. The method has been tried on artificial samples with different content of the base components. Variation coefficient constitutes 4.5%. No systematic errors, due to a high content of any concomitant element, are detected. The determination threshold is 10 - 2 %

  17. Early Photometric and Spectral Evolution of Nova Cygni 2014 (V2659 Cyg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlak M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present optical spectroscopic and UBV (RIC photometric observations of Nova Cygni 2014 (V2659 Cyg from its rebrightening to the nebular stage. After the first maximum, the nova underwent several irregular flare-like rebrightenings, with amplitudes up to two magnitudes, accompanied with spectral changes. During the bright state, forbidden lines became weaker; the absorption components of Balmer, He I, Fe II, N I, N II, O I lines strengthened, indicating an increase in the density and mass-loss rate in the form of a wind.

  18. Extraction photometric determination of uranium (6) with use of malachite green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, Yu.V.; Bagdasarov, K.N.; Shchemeleva, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the reaction between uranium (6) and malachite green in the presence of sodium benzoate has indicated that, in a weakly acid medium (pH 4.5 to 5.5), the reaction yields a poorly soluble greenish compound which tends to be extracted by a 1-to-1 mixture of benzene and chloroform. The compound comprises uranium, a benzoate and a malachite green in a ratio of 1/3/1. A method has been developed for an extraction-photometric determination of uranium in metallic lead

  19. Extraction photometric determination of uranium (6) with use of malachite green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Yu V; Bagdasarov, K N; Shchemeleva, G G [Rostovskij-na-Donu Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1975-12-01

    A study of the reaction between uranium (6) and malachite green in the presence of sodium benzoate has indicated that, in a weakly acid medium (pH 4.5 to 5.5), the reaction yields a poorly soluble greenish compound which tends to be extracted by a 1-to-1 mixture of benzene and chloroform. The compound comprises uranium, a benzoate and a malachite green in a ratio of 1/3/1. A method has been developed for an extraction-photometric determination of uranium in metallic lead.

  20. A homogeneous photometric and spectroscopic survey of open clusters in the Perseus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio; Monguió, Maria

    2015-08-01

    We are carrying out a homogeneous photometric survey of all young (Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma. We intend to derive relative ages and distances with typical accuracies of 5 Ma and 200 pc. Our data will allow us to test the predictions of different models for the main mechanism producing the spiral structure of the Milky Way. In addition, we will enormously improve our knowledge of stellar evolution for stars in the 6-15 Msolar range. Moreover, the huge dataset of homogeneous photometry for thousands of stars (including ~2000 B-type stars) will have an enormous legacy value

  1. Extractive-photometric determination of niobium with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine and lumogallion in alloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patratij, Yu.V.; Pilipenko, A.T.

    1978-01-01

    An extractive-photometric method has been developed to determine niobium (5) present as a heteroligand complex with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPH) and lumogallion in alloyed steels. The method is based on preliminary extraction of niobium in a complex with BPH from concentrated HCl and subsequent determination of niobium in a 5-n (with respect to HCl) solution with lumogallion added. Sensitivity of the method is 2.0 μg of niobium in 10 ml of extract. The method has been tested on standard steels specimens

  2. An easy-to-perform photometric assay for methyltransferase activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäberle, Till F; Siba, Christian; Höver, Thomas; König, Gabriele M

    2013-01-01

    Methyltransferases (MTs) catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to a suitable substrate. Such methylations are important modifications in secondary metabolisms, especially on natural products produced by polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases, many of which are of special interest due to their prominent pharmacological activities (e.g., lovastatin, cyclosporin). To gain basic biochemical knowledge on the methylation process, it is of immense relevance to simplify methods concerning experimental problems caused by a large variety in substrates. Here, we present a photometric method to analyze MT activity by measuring SAM consumption in a coupled enzyme assay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential and Limitations of Photometric Reconstruction Through a Flock of Dove Cubesats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altena, B.; Mousivand, A.; Mascaro, J.; Kääb, A.

    2017-10-01

    When Earth observation satellite systems are designed, one typically prefers a sun-synchronous orbit. However, the first generations of cubesats from Planet were deployed out of the International Space Station (ISS) and therefore do not obey such an orbit. Their configuration samples at different local times within the mid-latitudes. Consequently, it is in theory possible to exploit photometric techniques and extract highly detailed topographic information. In this study we demonstrate and explore photometry based on Planet cubesat images for Tyndall glacier at the Southern Patagonian icefield, and Zhadang glacier situated on the Tibetan plateau.

  4. Rapid photometric determination of phosphorus in iron ores and related materials as phosphomolybdenum-blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, O P; Gmitro, M

    1984-04-01

    A rapid, simple and accurate method for determining phosphorus photometrically in iron ores and related materials, obviating the use of perchloric acid, is described. The sample is fused with sodium peroxide in a zirconium crucible and the melt dissolved in hydrochloric acid. The molybdenum-blue complex is developed by the addition of ammonium molybdate and hydrazine sulphate and the absorbance is measured at 725 nm. The range of the method is from 0.005 to 1.0% P. A batch of 6 samples can be analysed in about 2 hr.

  5. Interstellar extinction from photometric surveys: application to four high-latitude areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Oleg; Karpov, Sergey; Kilpio, Elena; Sichevsky, Sergey; Chulkov, Dmitry; Dluzhnevskaya, Olga; Kovaleva, Dana; Kniazev, Alexei; Mickaelian, Areg; Mironov, Alexey; Murthy, Jayant; Sytov, Alexey; Zhao, Gang; Zhukov, Aleksandr

    2018-04-01

    Information on interstellar extinction and dust properties may be obtained from modern large photometric surveys data. Virtual Observatory facilities allow users to make a fast and correct cross-identification of objects from various surveys. It yields a multicolor photometry data on detected objects and makes it possible to estimate stellar parameters and calculate interstellar extinction. A 3D extinction map then can be constructed. The method was applied to 2MASS, SDSS, GALEX and UKIDSS surveys. Results for several high-latitude areas are obtained, compared with independent sources and discussed here.

  6. Interstellar extinction from photometric surveys: application to four high-latitude areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkov Oleg

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Information on interstellar extinction and dust properties may be obtained from modern large photometric surveys data. Virtual Observatory facilities allow users to make a fast and correct cross-identification of objects from various surveys. It yields a multicolor photometry data on detected objects and makes it possible to estimate stellar parameters and calculate interstellar extinction. A 3D extinction map then can be constructed. The method was applied to 2MASS, SDSS, GALEX and UKIDSS surveys. Results for several high-latitude areas are obtained, compared with independent sources and discussed here.

  7. Photometric determination of zirconium in phosphorites by reaction with arsenazo III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikol' skaya, I V; Maksimov, A V

    1976-05-01

    The reaction between zirconium and arsenazo III has been studied over a wide range of hydrochloric acid concentration and under different conditions. 6 and 9 M HCl solutions are optimal for determining zirconium; the least effect of phosphate ions and color stability in time are observed in this case. The determination of zirconium should be carried out using 10-fold reagent excess and in 15-20 min after adding the reagent. The interference of phosphate ions has been estimated. A procedure has been developed for photometric determination of zirconium in phosphorites with prior acid separation of soluble impurities.

  8. A control system of a mini survey facility for photometric monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hironori; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hanaue, Takumi; Ita, Yoshifusa; Ichikawa, Takashi; Komiyama, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    We have built a control system for a mini survey facility dedicated to photometric monitoring of nearby bright (Kdome and a small (30-mm aperture) wide-field (5 × 5 sq. deg. field of view) infrared (1.0-2.5 microns) camera on an equatorial fork mount, as well as power sources and other associated equipment. All the components other than the camera are controlled by microcomputerbased I/O boards that were developed in-house and are in many of the open-use instruments in our observatory. We present the specifications and configuration of the facility hardware, as well as the structure of its control software.

  9. Photometric redshifts as a tool for studying the Coma cluster galaxy populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, C.; Ilbert, O.; Pelló, R.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Durret, F.; Mazure, A.; Picat, J. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: We apply photometric redshift techniques to an investigation of the Coma cluster galaxy luminosity function (GLF) at faint magnitudes, in particular in the u* band where basically no studies are presently available at these magnitudes. Methods: Cluster members were selected based on probability distribution function from photometric redshift calculations applied to deep u^*, B, V, R, I images covering a region of almost 1 deg2 (completeness limit R ~ 24). In the area covered only by the u* image, the GLF was also derived after a statistical background subtraction. Results: Global and local GLFs in the B, V, R, and I bands obtained with photometric redshift selection are consistent with our previous results based on a statistical background subtraction. The GLF in the u* band shows an increase in the faint end slope towards the outer regions of the cluster. The analysis of the multicolor type spatial distribution reveals that late type galaxies are distributed in clumps in the cluster outskirts, where X-ray substructures are also detected and where the GLF in the u* band is steeper. Conclusions: We can reproduce the GLFs computed with classical statistical subtraction methods by applying a photometric redshift technique. The u* GLF slope is steeper in the cluster outskirts, varying from α ~ -1 in the cluster center to α ~ -2 in the cluster periphery. The concentrations of faint late type galaxies in the cluster outskirts could explain these very steep slopes, assuming a short burst of star formation in these galaxies when entering the cluster. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is also partly based on data products produced at

  10. Photometrical analysis of the Neck-Line structure of Comet Bennet 1970II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulle, M.; Sedmak, G.

    1988-01-01

    The Kimura and Liu (1977) analysis of the motion in space of cometary dust tail grains, which furnished information on the size-dependence of the dust ejection velocity from the inner coma and the size distribution on a millimetric scale, is presently applied to the Neck-Line Structure (NLS) displayed by Comet Bennett 1970II at the begining of May, 1970. Attention is given to two photographs of the comet which have been analyzed by digital image processing in order to extract reliable photometric data; the strong excess of millimetric grains noted is in agreement with the Fulle (1987) results for preperihelion times. 24 references

  11. Simultaneous extractive-photometric determination of Zr and Mo in multicomponent alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutyrev, I.M.; Chernysheva, G.M.; Chebotnikovz, Yu.A.; Basargin, N.N.

    2000-01-01

    Nonaqueous buffer solutions of different acidity are developed for simultaneous photometric determination of Zr and Mo in the extract. Trioctylamine extraction system in toluene - sulfuric acid - molybdenum, zirconium provides selective isolation of the aforementioned elements in one extraction and makes it possible to remove the interfering effect of Fe(2,3), Co(2), Ni(2), Cu(2), Al(3), Ti(4), Cr(3), Mn(2), V(4), Si(4). The reliability of the method is confirmed by determination of the elements in SS123v standard sample [ru

  12. Photometric correction for an optical CCD-based system based on the sparsity of an eight-neighborhood gray gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    In an optical measurement and analysis system based on a CCD, due to the existence of optical vignetting and natural vignetting, photometric distortion, in which the intensity falls off away from the image center, affects the subsequent processing and measuring precision severely. To deal with this problem, an easy and straightforward method used for photometric distortion correction is presented in this paper. This method introduces a simple polynomial fitting model of the photometric distortion function and employs a particle swarm optimization algorithm to get these model parameters by means of a minimizing eight-neighborhood gray gradient. Compared with conventional calibration methods, this method can obtain the profile information of photometric distortion from only a single common image captured by the optical CCD-based system, with no need for a uniform luminance area source used as a standard reference source and relevant optical and geometric parameters in advance. To illustrate the applicability of this method, numerical simulations and photometric distortions with different lens parameters are evaluated using this method in this paper. Moreover, the application example of temperature field correction for casting billets also demonstrates the effectiveness of this method. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to achieve the maximum absolute error for vignetting estimation of 0.0765 and the relative error for vignetting estimation from different background images of 3.86%.

  13. Group prioritisation with unknown expert weights in incomplete linguistic context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dong; Cheng, Faxin; Zhou, Zhili; Wang, Juan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study a group prioritisation problem in situations when the expert weights are completely unknown and their judgement preferences are linguistic and incomplete. Starting from the theory of relative entropy (RE) and multiplicative consistency, an optimisation model is provided for deriving an individual priority vector without estimating the missing value(s) of an incomplete linguistic preference relation. In order to address the unknown expert weights in the group aggregating process, we define two new kinds of expert weight indicators based on RE: proximity entropy weight and similarity entropy weight. Furthermore, a dynamic-adjusting algorithm (DAA) is proposed to obtain an objective expert weight vector and capture the dynamic properties involved in it. Unlike the extant literature of group prioritisation, the proposed RE approach does not require pre-allocation of expert weights and can solve incomplete preference relations. An interesting finding is that once all the experts express their preference relations, the final expert weight vector derived from the DAA is fixed irrespective of the initial settings of expert weights. Finally, an application example is conducted to validate the effectiveness and robustness of the RE approach.

  14. Unknown facets of Well-Known Scientists Series - Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Dixit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 1st in the series of articles on “Unknown Facets of well-known Scientists” was about Sir Frederick Grant Banting, co-discoverer of Insulin, who also researched in Aviation and Diving Medicines, results of which brought extraordinary benefits for Flight crew during the World War II. The article was published in the previous issue of the Journal Unknown facets could be celebrated attributes, talents or otherwise, but it is necessary that we get to know fully about the “great mind". THIS ARTICLE IS ABOUT DR WERNER THEODOR OTTO FORSSMANN, A CARDIOLOGIST, WHO BECAME A UROLOGIST! Does the name Dr Forssmann ring a bell? He shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with “Andre Cournand and Dickinson Richards". The trio was awarded for their “discoveries concerning heart catheterization and pathological changes in the circulatory system". Dr Forssmann was nominated for performing an experiment in which he introduced a catheter into a vein of his arm, further passing it onward into his heart It was risky. This was in the year 1929. Subject of this article is the self-experimentation he carried out and what happened later.

  15. Parameter identification of chaos system based on unknown parameter observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaoming; Luo Haigeng; Yue Chaoyuan; Liao Xiaoxin

    2008-01-01

    Parameter identification of chaos system based on unknown parameter observer is discussed generally. Based on the work of Guan et al. [X.P. Guan, H.P. Peng, L.X. Li, et al., Acta Phys. Sinica 50 (2001) 26], the design of unknown parameter observer is improved. The application of the improved approach is extended greatly. The works in some literatures [X.P. Guan, H.P. Peng, L.X. Li, et al., Acta Phys. Sinica 50 (2001) 26; J.H. Lue, S.C. Zhang, Phys. Lett. A 286 (2001) 148; X.Q. Wu, J.A. Lu, Chaos Solitons Fractals 18 (2003) 721; J. Liu, S.H. Chen, J. Xie, Chaos Solitons Fractals 19 (2004) 533] are only the special cases of our Corollaries 1 and 2. Some observers for Lue system and a new chaos system are designed to test our improved method, and simulations results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the improved approach

  16. Unknown quantum states: The quantum de Finetti representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caves, Carlton M.; Fuchs, Christopher A.; Schack, Ruediger

    2002-01-01

    We present an elementary proof of the quantum de Finetti representation theorem, a quantum analog of de Finetti's classical theorem on exchangeable probability assignments. This contrasts with the original proof of Hudson and Moody [Z. Wahrschein. verw. Geb. 33, 343 (1976)], which relies on advanced mathematics and does not share the same potential for generalization. The classical de Finetti theorem provides an operational definition of the concept of an unknown probability in Bayesian probability theory, where probabilities are taken to be degrees of belief instead of objective states of nature. The quantum de Finetti theorem, in a closely analogous fashion, deals with exchangeable density-operator assignments and provides an operational definition of the concept of an ''unknown quantum state'' in quantum-state tomography. This result is especially important for information-based interpretations of quantum mechanics, where quantum states, like probabilities, are taken to be states of knowledge rather than states of nature. We further demonstrate that the theorem fails for real Hilbert spaces and discuss the significance of this point

  17. Atmospheric turbulence profiling with unknown power spectral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin, Tapio; Kindermann, Stefan; Lehtonen, Jonatan; Ramlau, Ronny

    2018-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology in modern ground-based optical telescopes to compensate for the wavefront distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. One method that allows to retrieve information about the atmosphere from telescope data is so-called SLODAR, where the atmospheric turbulence profile is estimated based on correlation data of Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurements. This approach relies on a layered Kolmogorov turbulence model. In this article, we propose a novel extension of the SLODAR concept by including a general non-Kolmogorov turbulence layer close to the ground with an unknown power spectral density. We prove that the joint estimation problem of the turbulence profile above ground simultaneously with the unknown power spectral density at the ground is ill-posed and propose three numerical reconstruction methods. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that our methods lead to substantial improvements in the turbulence profile reconstruction compared to the standard SLODAR-type approach. Also, our methods can accurately locate local perturbations in non-Kolmogorov power spectral densities.

  18. Three-dimensional cinematography with control object of unknown shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapena, J; Harman, E A; Miller, J A

    1982-01-01

    A technique for reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) motion which involves a simple filming procedure but allows the deduction of coordinates in large object volumes was developed. Internal camera parameters are calculated from measurements of the film images of two calibrated crosses while external camera parameters are calculated from the film images of points in a control object of unknown shape but at least one known length. The control object, which includes the volume in which the activity is to take place, is formed by a series of poles placed at unknown locations, each carrying two targets. From the internal and external camera parameters, and from locations of the images of point in the films of the two cameras, 3D coordinates of the point can be calculated. Root mean square errors of the three coordinates of points in a large object volume (5m x 5m x 1.5m) were 15 mm, 13 mm, 13 mm and 6 mm, and relative errors in lengths averaged 0.5%, 0.7% and 0.5%, respectively.

  19. Reactive Path Planning Approach for Docking Robots in Unknown Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robots need to be recharged and exchange information with the host through docking in the long-distance tasks. Therefore, feasible path is required in the docking process to guide the robot and adjust its pose. However, when there are unknown obstacles in the work area, it becomes difficult to determine the feasible path for docking. This paper presents a reactive path planning approach named Dubins-APF (DAPF to solve the path planning problem for docking in unknown environment with obstacles. In this proposed approach the Dubins curves are combined with the designed obstacle avoidance potential field to plan the feasible path. Firstly, an initial path is planned and followed according to the configurations of the robot and the docking station. Then when the followed path is evaluated to be infeasible, the intermediate configuration is calculated as well as the replanned path based on the obstacle avoidance potential field. The robot will be navigated to the docking station with proper pose eventually via the DAPF approach. The proposed DAPF approach is efficient and does not require the prior knowledge about the environment. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed approach.

  20. Neurological Autoantibody Prevalence in Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Alqallaf, Abdulradha; Hays, Ryan; Freeman, Matthew; Chen, Kevin; Ding, Kan; Agostini, Mark; Vernino, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an underrecognized condition, and its true incidence is unknown. Identifying patients with an underlying autoimmune origin is critical because these patients' condition may remain refractory to conventional antiseizure medications but may respond to immunotherapy. To determine the prevalence of neurological autoantibodies (Abs) among adult patients with epilepsy of unknown etiology. Consecutive patients presenting to neurology services with new-onset epilepsy or established epilepsy of unknown etiology were identified. Serum samples were tested for autoimmune encephalitis Abs as well as thyroperoxidase (TPO) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) Abs. An antibody prevalence in epilepsy (APE) score based on clinical characteristics was assigned prospectively. Data were collected from June 1, 2015, to June 1, 2016. Presence of neurological Abs. A score based on clinical characteristics was assigned to estimate the probability of seropositivity prior to antibody test results. Good seizure outcome was estimated on the basis of significant reduction of seizure frequency at the first follow-up or seizure freedom. Of the 127 patients (68 males and 59 females) enrolled in the study, 15 were subsequently excluded after identification of an alternative diagnosis. Serum Abs suggesting a potential autoimmune etiology were detected in 39 (34.8%) cases. More than 1 Ab was detected in 7 patients (6.3%): 3 (2.7%) had TPO-Ab and voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKCc) Ab, 2 (1.8%) had GAD65-Ab and VGKCc-Ab, 1 had TPO-Ab and GAD65-Ab, and 1 had anti-Hu Ab and GAD65-Ab. Thirty-two patients (28.6%) had a single Ab marker. Among 112 patients included in the study, 15 (13.4%) had TPO-Ab, 14 (12.5%) had GAD65-Ab, 12 (10.7%) had VGKCc (4 of whom were positive for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 [LGI1] Ab), and 4 (3.6%) had N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) Ab. Even after excluding TPO-Ab and low-titer GAD65-Ab, Abs strongly suggesting an

  1. IMPROVED VARIABLE STAR SEARCH IN LARGE PHOTOMETRIC DATA SETS: NEW VARIABLES IN CoRoT FIELD LRa02 DETECTED BY BEST II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruth, T.; Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Eigmüller, P.; Erikson, A.; Kirste, S.; Pasternacki, T.; Rauer, H.; Titz-Weider, R.; Kabath, P.; Chini, R.; Lemke, R.; Murphy, M.

    2012-01-01

    The CoRoT field LRa02 has been observed with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II (BEST II) during the southern summer 2007/2008. A first analysis of stellar variability led to the publication of 345 newly discovered variable stars. Now, a deeper analysis of this data set was used to optimize the variability search procedure. Several methods and parameters have been tested in order to improve the selection process compared to the widely used J index for variability ranking. This paper describes an empirical approach to treat systematic trends in photometric data based upon the analysis of variance statistics that can significantly decrease the rate of false detections. Finally, the process of reanalysis and method improvement has virtually doubled the number of variable stars compared to the first analysis by Kabath et al. A supplementary catalog of 272 previously unknown periodic variables plus 52 stars with suspected variability is presented. Improved ephemerides are given for 19 known variables in the field. In addition, the BEST II results are compared with CoRoT data and its automatic variability classification.

  2. PHOTOMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF SELECTED, OPTICALLY BRIGHT QUASARS FOR SPACE INTERFEROMETRY MISSION AND OTHER FUTURE CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Zacharias, Norbert; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Gaume, Ralph A.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    Photometric observations of 235 extragalactic objects that are potential targets for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) are presented. Mean B, V, R, I magnitudes at the 5% level are obtained at 1-4 epochs between 2005 and 2007 using the 1 m telescopes at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station. Of the 134 sources that have V magnitudes in the Veron and Veron-Cetty catalog, a difference of over 1.0 mag is found for the observed-catalog magnitudes for about 36% of the common sources, and 10 sources show over 3 mag difference. Our first set of observations presented here form the basis of a long-term photometric variability study of the selected reference frame sources to assist in mission target selection and to support QSO multicolor photometric variability studies in general.

  3. OPTICAL–NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF M DWARF METALLICITY AND ITS APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejazi, N.; Robertis, M. M. De; Dawson, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a carefully constructed sample of dwarf stars, a new optical–near-infrared photometric calibration to estimate the metallicity of late-type K and early-to-mid-type M dwarfs is presented. The calibration sample has two parts; the first part includes 18 M dwarfs with metallicities determined by high-resolution spectroscopy and the second part contains 49 dwarfs with metallicities obtained through moderate-resolution spectra. By applying this calibration to a large sample of around 1.3 million M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2MASS, the metallicity distribution of this sample is determined and compared with those of previous studies. Using photometric parallaxes, the Galactic heights of M dwarfs in the large sample are also estimated. Our results show that stars farther from the Galactic plane, on average, have lower metallicity, which can be attributed to the age–metallicity relation. A scarcity of metal-poor dwarf stars in the metallicity distribution relative to the Simple Closed Box Model indicates the existence of the “M dwarf problem,” similar to the previously known G and K dwarf problems. Several more complicated Galactic chemical evolution models which have been proposed to resolve the G and K dwarf problems are tested and it is shown that these models could, to some extent, mitigate the M dwarf problem as well

  4. Photometric solution and frequency analysis of the oEA system EW Boo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Wang, K.; Luo, Y. P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first photometric solution and frequency analysis of the neglected oscillating Algol-type (oEA) binary EW Boo. B- and V-band light curves of the star were obtained on 11 nights in 2014. Using the Wilson–Devinney code, the eclipsing light curves were synthesized and the first photometric solution was derived for the binary system. The results reveal that EW Boo could be a semi-detached system with the less-massive secondary component filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. Frequency analysis of residual light shows multi-mode pulsation with the dominant period at 0.01909 days. A preliminary mode identification suggests that the star could be pulsating in non-radial (l = 1) modes. The long-term orbital period variation of the system was also investigated for the first time. An improved orbital period and new ephemerides of the eclipsing binary are given. The O−C analysis indicates a secular period increasing at a rate of dP/dt=2.9×10 −7 days yr −1 , which could be interpreted as mass transfer from the cooler secondary to the primary component.

  5. THE MISSION ACCESSIBLE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS SURVEY (MANOS): FIRST PHOTOMETRIC RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirouin, A.; Moskovitz, N.; Burt, B. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Rd, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Person, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, E. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Polishook, D. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute, Herzl St 234, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Thomas, C. A. [Planetary Science Institute (PSI), 1700 E Fort Lowell Road 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Trilling, D.; Hinkle, M.; Avner, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 6010, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Willman, M. [University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI 96788 (United States); Aceituno, F. J., E-mail: thirouin@lowell.edu [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, S/N, Granada, E-18008 (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey aims to physically characterize sub-km near-Earth objects (NEOs). We report the first photometric results from the survey that began in 2013 August. Photometric observations were performed using 1–4 m class telescopes around the world. We present rotational periods and light curve amplitudes for 86 sub-km NEOs, though in some cases only lower limits are provided. Our main goal is to obtain light curves for small NEOs (typically, sub-km objects) and estimate their rotational periods, light curve amplitudes, and shapes. These properties are used for a statistical study to constrain overall properties of the NEO population. A weak correlation seems to indicate that smaller objects are more spherical than larger ones. We also report seven NEOs that are fully characterized (light curve and visible spectra) as the most suitable candidates for a future human or robotic mission. Viable mission targets are objects fully characterized, with Δ v {sup NHATS} ≤ 12 km s{sup −1}, and a rotational period P  > 1 hr. Assuming a similar rate of object characterization as reported in this paper, approximately 1230 NEOs need to be characterized in order to find 100 viable mission targets.

  6. Dynamical evolution of V-type photometric candidates in the central and outer main belt asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruba, V.; Huaman, M.

    2014-07-01

    V-type asteroids are associated with basaltic composition, and are supposed to be fragments of crust of differentiated objects. Most V-type asteroids in the main belt are found in the inner main belt, and are either current members of the Vesta dynamical family (Vestoids), or past members that drifted away. However, several V-type photometric candidates have been recently identified in the central and outer main belt. The origin of this large population of V-type objects is not well understood, since it seems unlikely that Vestoids crossing the 3:1 and 5:2 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter could account for the whole observed population. In this work, we investigated a possible origin of the bodies from local sources, such as the parent bodies of the Eunomia, Merxia, and Agnia asteroid families in the central main belt, and Dembowska, Eos and Magnya asteroid families in the outer main belt. Our results show that dynamical evolution from the parent bodies of the Eunomia and Merxia/Agnia families on timescales of 2 Gyr or more could be responsible for the current orbital location of most of the V-type photometric candidates in the central main belt. Studies for the outer main belt are currently in progress. by the FAPESP (grant 2011/19863-3) and CAPES (grant 15029-12-3) funding agencies.

  7. Study of LED modulation effect on the photometric quantities and beam homogeneity of automotive lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, Petr; Hanulak, Patrik; Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Latal, Jan; Siska, Petr; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a light emitting diode based visible light communication system for optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications in road safety applications. The widespread use of LEDs as light sources has reached into automotive fields. For example, LEDs are used for taillights, daytime running lights, brake lights, headlights, and traffic signals. Future in the optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications will be based on an optical wireless communication technology that using LED transmitter and a camera receiver (OCI; optical communication image sensor). Utilization of optical V2V communication systems in automotive industry naturally brings a lot of problems. Among them belongs necessity of circuit implementation into the current concepts of electronic LED lights control that allows LED modulation. These circuits are quite complicated especially in case of luxury cars. Other problem is correct design of modulation circuits so that final vehicle lightning using optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication meets standard requirements on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity. Authors of this article performed research on optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication possibilities of headlight (Jaguar) and taillight (Skoda) in terms of modulation circuits (M-PSK, M-QAM) implementation into the lamp concepts and final fulfilment of mandatory standards on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity.

  8. The central star candidate of the planetary nebula Sh2-71: photometric and spectroscopic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Močnik, T.; Lloyd, M.; Pollacco, D.; Street, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the analysis of several newly obtained and archived photometric and spectroscopic data sets of the intriguing and yet poorly understood 13.5 mag central star candidate of the bipolar planetary nebula Sh2-71. Photometric observations confirmed the previously determined quasi-sinusoidal light curve with a period of 68 d and also indicated periodic sharp brightness dips, possibly eclipses, with a period of 17.2 d. In addition, the comparison between U and V light curves revealed that the 68 d brightness variations are accompanied by a variable reddening effect of ΔE(U - V) = 0.38. Spectroscopic data sets demonstrated pronounced variations in spectral profiles of Balmer, helium and singly ionized metal lines and indicated that these variations occur on a time-scale of a few days. The most accurate verification to date revealed that spectral variability is not correlated with the 68 d brightness variations. The mean radial velocity of the observed star was measured to be ˜26 km s-1 with an amplitude of ±40 km s-1. The spectral type was determined to be B8V through spectral comparison with synthetic and standard spectra. The newly proposed model for the central star candidate is a Be binary with a misaligned precessing disc.

  9. Using photometrically selected metal-poor stars to study dwarf galaxies and the Galactic stellar halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youakim, Kris; Starkenburg, Else; Martin, Nicolas; Pristine Team

    2018-06-01

    The Pristine survey is a narrow-band photometric survey designed to efficiently search for extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. In the first three years of the survey, it has demonstrated great efficiency at finding EMP stars, and also great promise for increasing the current, small sample of the most metal-poor stars. The present sky coverage is ~2500 square degrees in the Northern Galactic Halo, including several individual fields targeting dwarf galaxies. By efficiently identifying member stars in the outskirts of known faint dwarf galaxies, the dynamical histories and chemical abundance patterns of these systems can be understood in greater detail. Additionally, with reliable photometric metallicities over a large sky coverage it is possible to perform a large scale clustering analysis in the Milky Way halo, and investigate the characteristic scale of substructure at different metallicities. This can reveal important details about the process of building up the halo through dwarf galaxy accretion, and offer insight into the connection between dwarf galaxies and the Milky Way halo. In this talk I will outline our results on the search for the most pristine stars, with a focus on how we are using this information to advance our understanding of dwarf galaxies and their contribution to the formation of the Galactic stellar halo.

  10. Lebedev acceleration and comparison of different photometric models in the inversion of lightcurves for asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Xiang-Jie; Ip, Wing-Huen; Hsia, Chi-Hao

    2018-04-01

    In the lightcurve inversion process where asteroid's physical parameters such as rotational period, pole orientation and overall shape are searched, the numerical calculations of the synthetic photometric brightness based on different shape models are frequently implemented. Lebedev quadrature is an efficient method to numerically calculate the surface integral on the unit sphere. By transforming the surface integral on the Cellinoid shape model to that on the unit sphere, the lightcurve inversion process based on the Cellinoid shape model can be remarkably accelerated. Furthermore, Matlab codes of the lightcurve inversion process based on the Cellinoid shape model are available on Github for free downloading. The photometric models, i.e., the scattering laws, also play an important role in the lightcurve inversion process, although the shape variations of asteroids dominate the morphologies of the lightcurves. Derived from the radiative transfer theory, the Hapke model can describe the light reflectance behaviors from the viewpoint of physics, while there are also many empirical models in numerical applications. Numerical simulations are implemented for the comparison of the Hapke model with the other three numerical models, including the Lommel-Seeliger, Minnaert, and Kaasalainen models. The results show that the numerical models with simple function expressions can fit well with the synthetic lightcurves generated based on the Hapke model; this good fit implies that they can be adopted in the lightcurve inversion process for asteroids to improve the numerical efficiency and derive similar results to those of the Hapke model.

  11. Spectro-photometric determinations of Mn, Fe and Cu in aluminum master alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan; Naveed, A.; Shan, A.; Afzal, M.; Saleem, J.; Noshad, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Highly reliable, fast and cost effective Spectro-photometric methods have been developed for the determination of Mn, Fe & Cu in aluminum master alloys, based on the development of calibration curves being prepared via laboratory standards. The calibration curves are designed so as to induce maximum sensitivity and minimum instrumental error (Mn 1mg/100ml-2mg/100ml, Fe 0.01mg/100ml-0.2mg/100ml and Cu 2mg/100ml-10mg/ 100ml). The developed Spectro-photometric methods produce accurate results while analyzing Mn, Fe and Cu in certified reference materials. Particularly, these methods are suitable for all types of Al-Mn, Al-Fe and Al-Cu master alloys (5%, 10%, 50% etc. master alloys).Moreover, the sampling practices suggested herein include a reasonable amount of analytical sample, which truly represent the whole lot of a particular master alloy. Successive dilution technique was utilized to meet the calibration curve range. Furthermore, the workout methods were also found suitable for the analysis of said elements in ordinary aluminum alloys. However, it was observed that Cush owed a considerable interference with Fe, the later one may not be accurately measured in the presence of Cu greater than 0.01 %.

  12. Determination of polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride using photometric colloidal titration with crystal violet as a color indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadome, Takashi; Miyanishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Keita; Ueda, Hiroshi; Hattori, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A solution of polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB-HCl) was titrated with a standard solution of potassium poly(vinyl sulfate) (PVSK) using crystal violet (CV) as an photometric indicator cation. The end point was detected by a sharp absorbance change due to an abrupt decrease in the concentration of CV. A linear relationship between the concentration of PHMB-HCl and the end-point volume of the titrant existed in the concentration range from 2 to 10 × 10(-6) eq mol L(-1). Back-titration was based on adding an excess amount of PVSK to a sample solution containing CV, which was titrated with a standard solution of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC). The calibration curve of the PHMB-HCl concentration to the end point volume of the titrant was also linear in the concentration range from 2 to 8 × 10(-6) eq mol L(-1). Both photometric titrations were applied to the determination of PHMB-HCl in a few contact-lens detergents. Back-titration showed a clear end point, but direct titration showed an unclear end point. The results of the back-titration of PHMB-HCl were compared with the content registered in its labels. 2011 © The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry

  13. Photometric Modeling of a Cometary Nucleus: Taking Hapke Modeling to the Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Soderblom, L.; Hillier, J.; Britt, D.

    2002-01-01

    In the past two decades, photometric models developed by Bruce Hapke have been fit to a wide range of bodies in the Solar System: The Moon, Mercury, several asteroids, and many icy and rocky satellites. These models have enabled comparative descriptions of the physical attributes of planetary surfaces, including macroscopic roughness, particle size and size-distribution, the single scattering albedo, and the compaction state of the optically active portion of the regolith. One challenging type of body to observe and model, a cometary nucleus, awaited the first space based mission to obtain images unobscured by coma. The NASA-JPL Deep Space 1 Mission (DS1) encountered the short-period Jupiter-family comet 19/P Borrelly on September 22, 2001, about 8 days after perihelion. Prior to its closest approach of 2171 km, the remote-sensing package on the spacecraft obtained 25 CCD images of the comet, representing the first closeup, unobscured view of a comet's nucleus. At closest approach, corresponding to a resolution of 47 meters per pixel, the intensity of the coma was less than 1% of that of the nucleus. An unprecedented range of high solar phase angles (52-89 degrees), viewing geometries that are in general attainable only when a comet is active, enabled the first quantitative and disk-resolved modeling of surface photometric physical parameters.

  14. Characterization of Orbital Debris Photometric Properties Derived from Laboratory-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, Pat; Abercromby, Kira; Barker, Ed; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Capitalizing on optical data products and applying them to generate a more complete understanding of orbital space objects, is a key objective of NASA's Optical Measurement Program, and a primary objective for the creation of the Optical Measurements Center(OMC). The OMC attempts to emulate space-based illumination conditions using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The data acquired in the OMC are a function of known shape, size, and material. These three physical parameters are key to understanding the orbital debris environment in more depth. For optical observations, one must rely on spectroscopic or photometric measurements to ascertain an object's material type. Determination of an object s shape using remote observations is more complicated due to the various light scattering properties each object present and is a subject that requires more study. It is much easier to look at the periodicity of the light curve and analyze its structure for rotation. In order to best simulate the orbital debris population, three main sources were used as test fragments for optical measurements: flight-ready materials, destructive hypervelocity testing (simulating on-orbit collisions) and destructive pressure testing (simulating on-orbit explosions). Laboratory optical characteristics of fragments were measured, including light curve shape, phase angle dependence, and photometric and spectroscopic color indices. These characteristics were then compared with similar optical measurements acquired from telescopic observations in order to correlate remote and laboratory properties with the intent of ascertaining the intrinsic properties of the observed orbital debris

  15. LCDs are better: psychophysical and photometric estimates of the temporal characteristics of CRT and LCD monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagroix, Hayley E P; Yanko, Matthew R; Spalek, Thomas M

    2012-07-01

    Many cognitive and perceptual phenomena, such as iconic memory and temporal integration, require brief displays. A critical requirement is that the image not remain visible after its offset. It is commonly believed that liquid crystal displays (LCD) are unsuitable because of their poor temporal response characteristics relative to cathode-ray-tube (CRT) screens. Remarkably, no psychophysical estimates of visible persistence are available to verify this belief. A series of experiments in which white stimuli on a black background produced discernible persistence on CRT but not on LCD screens, during both dark- and light-adapted viewing, falsified this belief. Similar estimates using black stimuli on a white background produced no visible persistence on either screen. That said, photometric measurements are available that seem to confirm the poor temporal characteristics of LCD screens, but they were obtained before recent advances in LCD technology. Using current LCD screens, we obtained photometric estimates of rise time far shorter (1-6 ms) than earlier estimates (20-150 ms), and approaching those of CRTs (<1 ms). We conclude that LCDs are preferable to CRTs when visible persistence is a concern, except when black-on-white displays are used.

  16. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we selected a parent disk sample of 170,000 galaxies from SDSS DR7, with redshifts between 0.02 and 0.10 and r band absolute magnitudes between -18.0 and -22.5. Then, we constructed a child disk sample of 189 galaxies that span the parameter space-- in absolute magnitude, color, and disk size-- covered by the parent sample, and for which we have obtained kinematic data. Long-slit spectroscopy were obtained from the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m for 99 galaxies, and from Pizagno et al. (2007) for 95 galaxies (five have repeat observations). We find the best photometric estimator of disk rotation velocity to be a synthetic magnitude with a color correction that is consistent with the Bell et al. (2003) color-based stellar mass ratio. The improved rotation velocity estimates have a wide range of scientific applications, and in particular, in combination with weak lensing measurements, they enable us to constrain the ratio of optical-to-virial velocity in disk galaxies.

  17. A COMPREHENSIVE PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE CONTACT BINARY GN BOO WITH POSSIBLE MAGNETIC ACTIVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; Zhang, J.; He, J. J.; Zhao, E. G.; Zhu, L. Y.; Liao, W. P.; Liu, L.; Zhang, Y. P.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-color photometric data of GN Boo observed from 2010 to 2013 are presented. The intrinsic variations of the light curves are remarkable, and their phenomena are probable evidence of stronger magnetic activities on the surfaces of the components. Based on all CCD times of minimum light, a secular increase superimposed on a cyclic oscillation is found. The orbital period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +1.74 × 10 −7 days yr −1 , which can be explained by mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. The period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P = 9.5632 yr and A = 0.0046 days, respectively, which correspond to the previous published results. Using the 2010 version of the W–D code, five sets of photometric solutions were derived from our new data. The results imply that the stellar spot, the degree of fill-out, and the temperature difference ΔT between the components of GN Boo are variable. It is inferred that the magnetic activities perhaps influence the outer radius of the component, causing the temperature of the component star and the level of contact to change

  18. Photometric redshifts for weak lensing tomography from space: the role of optical and near infrared photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, F. B.; Amara, A.; Capak, P.; Cypriano, E. S.; Lahav, O.; Rhodes, J.

    2008-07-01

    We study in detail the photometric redshift requirements needed for tomographic weak gravitational lensing in order to measure accurately the dark energy equation of state. In particular, we examine how ground-based photometry (u, g, r, i, z, y) can be complemented by space-based near-infrared (near-IR) photometry (J, H), e.g. onboard the planned DUNE satellite. Using realistic photometric redshift simulations and an artificial neural network photo-z method we evaluate the figure of merit for the dark energy parameters (w0, wa). We consider a DUNE-like broad optical filter supplemented with ground-based multiband optical data from surveys like the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS and LSST. We show that the dark energy figure of merit would be improved by a factor of 1.3-1.7 if IR filters are added onboard DUNE. Furthermore we show that with IR data catastrophic photo-z outliers can be removed effectively. There is an interplay between the choice of filters, the magnitude limits and the removal of outliers. We draw attention to the dependence of the results on the galaxy formation scenarios encoded into the mock galaxies, e.g. the galaxy reddening. For example, very deep u-band data could be as effective as the IR. We also find that about 105-106 spectroscopic redshifts are needed for calibration of the full survey.

  19. NEW HIGH- z FERMI BL LACS WITH THE PHOTOMETRIC DROPOUT TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, A.; Ajello, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Paliya, V. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Rau, A.; Greiner, J.; Bolmer, J.; Schady, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Domínguez, A., E-mail: akaur@g.clemson.edu [Grupo de Altas Energías, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Determining redshifts for BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects using the traditional spectroscopic method is challenging due to the absence of strong emission lines in their optical spectra. We employ the photometric dropout technique to determine redshifts for this class of blazars using the combined 13 broadband filters from Swift -UVOT and the multi-channel imager GROND at the MPG 2.2 m telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory. The wavelength range covered by these 13 filters extends from far-ultraviolet to the near-infrared. We report results on 40 new Fermi- detected BL Lacs with the photometric redshift determinations for five sources, with 3FGL J1918.2–4110 being the most distant in our sample at z  = 2.16. Reliable upper limits are provided for 20 sources in this sample. Using the highest energy photons for these Fermi -LAT sources, we evaluate the consistency with the gamma-ray horizon due to the extragalactic background light.

  20. The first photometric analysis of the near contact binary IR Cas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kai; Hu, S.-M.; Guo, D.-F.; Jiang, Y.-G.; Gao, D.-Y.; Chen, X.

    2014-01-01

    The first photometric analysis of IR Cas was carried out based on the new observed BVRI light curves. The symmetric light curves and nearly flat secondary minimum indicate that very precise photometric results can be determined. We found that IR Cas is a near contact binary with the primary component filling its Roche lobe. An analysis of the O – C diagram based on all available times of minimum light reveals evidence for a periodic change with a semi-amplitude of 0.0153 days and a period of 39.7 yr superimposed on a secular decrease at a rate of dp/dt = –1.28(± 0.09) × 10 –7 days yr –1 . The most reasonable explanation for the periodic change is the light time-travel effect due to a third body. The period decrease may be caused by mass transfer from the primary component to the secondary. With the decreasing period, IR Cas would eventually evolve into a contact system.