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Sample records for university students participated

  1. Attitudes of female university students towards participation in sports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes of female university students towards participation in sports. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... linked to attitude but no studies to date have explored such links, particularly in respect of black undergraduate ...

  2. Impacting university physics students through participation in informal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Informal education programs organized by university physics departments are a popular means of reaching out to communities and satisfying grant requirements. The outcomes of these programs are often described in terms of broader impacts on the community. Comparatively little attention, however, has been paid to the influence of such programs on those students facilitating the informal science programs. Through Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC) at the University of Colorado Boulder, undergraduate and graduate physics students coach elementary and middle school children during an inquiry-based science afterschool program. As part of their participation in PISEC, university students complete preparation in pedagogy, communication and diversity, engage with children on a weekly basis and provide regular feedback about the program. We present findings that indicate these experiences improve the ability of university students to communicate in everyday language and positively influence their perspectives on teaching and learning.

  3. Students' Participation Styles in Two University Weight Training Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gregg

    2000-01-01

    Described the participation styles of college students enrolled in two basic weight training classes. Participation styles fell onto a continuum between slackin' and sweatin'. Observation and interview data indicated that there were four participation styles in the slackin' category and two in the sweatin' category. The transtheoretical model for…

  4. Sport participation of female university students | Nxumalo | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... The main reasons for non-participation were: 'no time' (68%), transport problems (8%) ... The university management should address the constraints to promote ...

  5. Understanding the Effect of Loneliness on Academic Participation and Success among International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of loneliness on academic participation and success among 213 students studying at Usak University. A total of 213 international students studying at Usak University, including 151 males and 62 females, were selected and participated in the research voluntarily. In the study, feelings of…

  6. Gender Differences on Attitudes and Participation in an Extracurricular Gymnastics Course among Greek University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosis, Dimitrios; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.; Siatras, Theophanis A.; Proios, Miltiadis; Proios, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were (a) to test the effectiveness of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict Greek university students' voluntary participation in an extracurricular gymnastics course, and (b) to evaluate gender differences. Two hundred sixty-three (127 female, 136 male) students participated in the study. Students' attitudes,…

  7. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  8. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  9. Informal science participation positively affects the communication and pedagogical skills of university physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah

    2013-04-01

    Many undergraduate and graduate physics students choose to participate in an informal science program at the University of Colorado Boulder (Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC)). They coach elementary and middle school students in inquiry-based physics activities during weekly, afterschool sessions. Observations from the afterschool sessions, field notes from the students, and pre/post surveys are collected. University students are also pre/post- videotaped explaining a textbook passage on a physics concept to an imagined audience for the Communications in Everyday Language assessment (CELA). We present findings from these data that indicate informal experiences improve the communication and pedagogical skills of the university student as well as positively influence their self-efficacy as scientific communicators and teachers.

  10. Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Amanda M; Zamboanga, Byron L

    2018-05-15

    Most drinking game (DG) research among university students has been conducted among USA college samples. The extent to which demographics and game type (e.g. team and sculling games) are linked to DG behaviours/consequences among non-USA students is not well understood. As such, the current study investigated characteristics of DG participation (and associated outcomes) among a sample of Australian university students. University students (N = 252; aged 18-24 years; 67% female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year completed an online survey. Measures included demographics, DG behaviours (lifetime, frequency and consumption) and gaming-specific consequences. Most of the students reported lifetime DG participation (85%). Among those who played a DG in the prior 6 months (69%), most had experienced a negative gaming-specific consequence. While team games were the most popular DG played, regression analysis demonstrated that participation in games which encouraged consumption (e.g. sculling) were associated with increased alcohol consumption during play. In addition to being older, playing DGs more frequently, and consuming more alcohol while playing, participation in both consumption and dice games (e.g. 7-11, doubles) predicted more negative gaming-specific consequences. DG participation is common among Australian university students, as it is in other parts of the world. The importance of game type is clear, particularly the risk of consumption games. Findings could help inform interventions to reduce participation in consumption games and identify students who might be especially at-risk for experiencing negative DG consequences. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. Exercise Participation Motives and Engaging In Sports Activity among University of Ljubljana Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerar, Katja; Kondrič, Miran; Ochiana, Nicolae; Sindik, Joško

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The main aim of this study was to examine differences in sport participation motives, the frequency of engaging in sports activities according to gender, region and field of study, but also the association between the incidence of engaging in sports activity and the motivation for sports activity of students at the University of Ljubljana. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five thousand two hundred seventy-one students completed The Exercise Motivations Inventory (EMI-2), with additional questions about 12 socio-demographic parameters. RESULTS: The results reveal that most of the students are engaged in unorganized sports activities. Male students engage in sports activity more often than female students do. For male students, dominant participation motives are enjoyment, challenge, social recognition, affiliation, competition and strength but also endurance, for female students these are: stress and weight management, revitalisation, ill-health avoidance, positive health, appearance and nimbleness. Gender differences in participation motives are partly reflected also in differences according to the field of study. The correlations between the frequency of engaging in sports activity and the participation motives are mainly statistically significant. We did not find any significant differences in participation motives by region. CONCLUSION: In spite of these discouraging findings, increasing physical activity among students continues to be a national priority. PMID:29104693

  12. Ways to Promote the Classroom Participation of International Students by Understanding the Silence of Japanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soonhyang; Ates, Burcu; Grigsby, Yurimi; Kraker, Stefani; Micek, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored the role of silence and deciphered its meaning and usefulness as a teaching and learning strategy for Japanese students through a survey of Japanese university students in their home country. This study has revealed that participant responses were evenly divided among comfortable with silence, uncomfortable with silence, and…

  13. Social anxiety and drinking game participation among university students: the moderating role of drinking to cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Ellen J; George, Amanda M; Brown, Patricia M

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship of social anxiety with drinking game participation. Drinking games represent a popular form of drinking in university settings. Due to their structure, games may appeal to socially anxious drinkers, particularly among those seeking to fit in or cope with the social setting. To examine the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation among a university undergraduate sample and to investigate if drinking motives moderate this association. A total of 227 undergraduate students aged 18-24 years (73% female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year were included in the current investigation. Hierarchical regression examined the influences of social anxiety and drinking motives on frequency of drinking game participation, as well the interactions of social anxiety with drinking for coping motives and conformity motives. Social anxiety failed to emerge as a significant predictor of frequency of drinking game participation. However, drinking to cope moderated the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation. Socially anxious students who drank to cope were more likely to participate in drinking games on occasions when they consumed alcohol than those who did not endorse this drinking motive. Results demonstrated the influence of drinking to cope in the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation. Future work should examine the relationship with other indicators of drinking game activity. Intervention efforts addressing social anxiety and drinking should consider motives for drinking, as well as drinking patterns.

  14. RECREATIONAL TENDENCIES AND THE FACTORS PREVENTING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS PARTICIPATING TO RECREATIONAL ACTIVITES ACCORDING TO GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar ÇORUH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study of university students according to gender; recreational activity participation trends and participation in these events in the factors which may impede the examination of population of the study, Agri Ibrahim Chechen University 2012 - 2013 academic year, students who are studying the sample group the Islamic Sciences Faculty, Faculty of Arts and Education at the Faculty of normal and used in teaching students selected by the random sampling method and volunteered to participate in the research consisted of 490 individuals . Working as a data collection tool "Leisure Barriers" scale is used. Working for the analysis of two independent sample t - test and ANOVA were applied, no significant differences found as a result of these practices in order to determine the source of the Duncan test was performed. The scale used in the study in three of the six factors of the variations observed according to the specified arguments, but this perspective more " time and lack of interest in" the focus has been understood that.

  15. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS OF FEMALE STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE SPORT OLYMPIAD OF IRANIAN UNIVERSITIES: A CORRELATIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Hassan Bahrololoum

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at studying the relationship between happiness and emotional intelligence among female students participating in the 10th Sport Olympiad of Iranian universities held in Semnan province. To do this survey, 302 female students were randomly selected from the total population of female students participating in the 10th sport Olympiad of Iranian Universities. To collect data, the study used three standardized questionnaires: Oxford's Happiness Questionnaire; Brodberry's Emotional...

  16. Association Between Exercise Participation and Quality of Sleep and Life Among University Students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Pei; Shih, Kuo-Sen; Chi, Chung-Pu; Chang, Chin-Ming; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional survey study examined exercise, sleep quality, and quality of life (QOL) in 1230 Taiwanese university students. Compared with women, men had higher body mass index (BMI) (22.3 ± 4.1 vs 20.7 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)), higher exercise frequency (2.6 ± 1.7 vs 2.0 ± 1.4 d/wk), better sleep quality (global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index 6.0 ± 2.8 vs 6.5 ± 2.7), better physical QOL (physical component summary 52.7 ± 6.2 vs 51.7 ± 6.6), and higher reporting of good self-perceived health (62.2% vs 43.3%) (P Students with better self-perceived health or satisfaction with exercise participation also had better quality of sleep and better QOL. © 2016 APJPH.

  17. Levels of physical activity, motivation and barriers to participation in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevil, Javier; Práxedes, Alba; Abarca-Sos, Alberto; Del Villar, Fernando; García-González, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory and trans-theoretical model applied to exercise, the aim of this study was to analyse the existing relationships between physical activity (PA) carried out by university students, perceived barriers to PA, motivation to PA and stages of change. 901 Spanish students took part in the study (408 men, 493 women; mean age 22.59±3.59), who completed the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-3), Scale of Barriers to PA, Stages of Change and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Short Form (IPAQ-SF). Noteworthy among the findings is the positive relationship between the more autonomous regulation forms, especially integrated regulation, and the moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) levels. However, barriers to participatrion are negatively related to PA levels and the more self-determined forms of motivation. Finally, students in action and maintenance stages, and those who comply with the recommendations on PA present higher values in the more self-determined motivation forms and lower values in barriers to participation in PA. The study shows the importance of addressing the analysis of variables associated with engagement in PA in the university population to develop healthy policies and intervention programmes that can establish a series of healthy and more active habits in the youth-adult stage. The appropriateness of promoting more self-determined motivation forms is highlighted, especially integrated regulation, to have an impact on higher levels of MVPA.

  18. Drinking game participation, gender performance and normalization of intoxication among Nigerian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbili, Emeka; Williams, Clare

    2017-06-01

    Most research on drinking games (DGs) and the associated risks focuses on Western countries. In the Nigerian context, DGs activity has not attracted scholarly attention but growing media reports indicate that Nigerian youths play DGs, and that a number of gamers have died during or immediately after game-playing. Drawing on gender performance scripts, we explored the performance of gender through DGs practices and the factors that motivate DGs participation. Thirty-one in-depth interviews were conducted with male and female college students (aged 19-23 years) at a university in south-eastern Nigeria. The participants discussed the popularity of the DGs that students play on this campus, identifying the spaces where each game is played and the motivations for game-playing. Collective, contextual constructions of gender identities through 'Fastest-Drinker' DG were identified, and the participants also performed gender through 'Truth-or-Dare' and 'Endurance' DGs. Men dominated 'First-to-Finish' DGs, which are played at parties and bars, and consumed beer or stout, while women, who mainly played Truth-or-Dare games, drank spirits or sweetened alcoholic beverages. Boredom and fun seeking provoked game-playing among women while adherence to masculinity norms, which engendered the public performance of masculinity and gambling activities, motivated men to play DGs. To avoid 'collective shame', men's friendship groups provided support/care for inebriated game-playing members, but the immediacy of this support/care varied according to DGs type. DGs appear to normalize heavy drinking and the culture of intoxication on this campus. Measures to monitor alcohol sales outlets around campuses and interventions that target students' leisure spaces should be developed.

  19. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  20. Sensation Seeking and Locus of Control in University Students in the Context of Regular Exercise Participation and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Ali; Tekin, Gülcan; Çalisir, Melih

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the locus of control (LC) and sensation seeking (SS) levels of university female students according to regular exercise participation (REP) and gender (G). This descriptive study was initiated in 2016 and finished in 2017. A total of 623 students, 306 females and 317 males, from different academic departments…

  1. Peer Assessment of Oral Presentations: Effects of Student Gender, University Affiliation and Participation in the Development of Assessment Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Mark A.; Wheater, Philip C.; Shaw, Emma M.; Haines, Ben J.; Cullen, Rod W.; Boyle, Jennefer C.; Penney, David; Oldekop, Johan A.; Ashcroft, Carl; Lockey, Les; Preziosi, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Peer assessment provides a useful mechanism to develop many positive qualities in students studying in higher education (HE). Potential influences on peer-awarded marks include student qualities such as gender, HE background (e.g. university affiliation) and participation in the development of the assessment criteria. Many studies that have…

  2. Selection and Participation in Higher Education: University Selection in Support of Student Success and Diversity of Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nigel; Bexley, Emmaline; James, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A range of imperatives underpin university selection practices. These include demonstrating merit based on prior academic achievement and supporting successful graduate outcomes in the professions and in broader fields of endeavour. They also include improving diversity of participation and equality of educational opportunity. Selection for…

  3. Participant Perceptions of an Online Discussion among University Students in Israel, Taiwan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Lynn W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether and how online discussions used in learning situations help to develop interactive intercultural communication. Undergraduate university students in the US, Taiwan, and Israel engaged in an online discussion about gender stereotypes. This study examines their perceptions of the interactions. There were 31 undergraduate…

  4. Prediction of Participation of Undergraduate University Students in a Music and Dance Master’s Degree Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Bebetsos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the investigation of students’ attitudes and intention towards their possible participation in a graduate Music and Dance Distance Learning Master’s Degree Program. The sample consisted of consisted of 229 undergraduate University students, between the ages of 20 to 63 yrs. of age (M=34.24, SD=10.70. More specifically, 134 were students of the Hellenic Open University and 95 were students of the School of Physical Education and Sport Science, of the Democritus University of Thrace. The sample completed the version the “Planned Behavior Theory” questionnaire. Results revealed differences among students of both Universities, between experienced and less experienced ones, and also among age groups. On the contrary, no sex differences in any of the questionnaire’s factors were indicated. In conclusion, the findings of this research allow a better understanding of the distance education process, which explains the attitudes and intention(s of students’ participation, and the factors that might influence theirparticular participation.

  5. Factors Affecting Consumer Participation In Online Shopping In Malaysia: The Case Of University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Shamsul Chowdhury; Nadiah Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Since lack of trust has remained one of the barriers to online shopping, this study is intended to explore the factors that affect the perceptions of trust for students’ intent to participate in online shopping. We used non-probability procedure to select respondents since we do not know how many students have access to the internet and are engaged in online shopping. Pearson correlation, multiple regression were used to test the hypotheses. The regression analysis in this study clearly suppo...

  6. Can smartphones measure momentary quality of life and participation? A proof of concept using experience sampling surveys with university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jacki; Wishink, Anna; Springfield, Liz; Gustafsson, Louise; Ireland, David; Silburn, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Understanding quality of life and participation is a key aspect of occupational therapy research. The use of smartphones to deliver experience-sampling surveys may provide an accessible way to monitor these outcomes. This study used smartphone-based experience sampling methods (ESM) to investigate factors influencing momentary quality of life (mQOL) of university students. A convenience sample of students at an Australian university participated. Using a custom smartphone application, ESM surveys were sent six to eight times, every second day, over a week. Participants indicated their mQOL, occupational participation, occupational enjoyment, social context and location via surveys and provided demographic and health information in a single self-report questionnaire. The relationship between mQOL and variables was analysed at the survey level using logistic regression. Forty students completed 391 surveys. Higher mQOL was significantly related to participation in productive occupations (z = 3.48; P = 0.001), moderate (z = 4.00; P sample, analysing at the individual level, and using ESM in conjunction with other methodologies is recommended. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  7. Demonstrating the unit hydrograph and flow routing processes involving active student participation - a university lecture experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karsten; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Klotz, Daniel; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph (UH) has been one of the most widely employed hydrological modelling techniques to predict rainfall-runoff behaviour of hydrological catchments, and is still used to this day. Its concept is based on the idea that a unit of effective precipitation per time unit (e.g. mm h-1) will always lead to a specific catchment response in runoff. Given its relevance, the UH is an important topic that is addressed in most (engineering) hydrology courses at all academic levels. While the principles of the UH seem to be simple and easy to understand, teaching experiences in the past suggest strong difficulties in students' perception of the UH theory and application. In order to facilitate a deeper understanding of the theory and application of the UH for students, we developed a simple and cheap lecture theatre experiment which involved active student participation. The seating of the students in the lecture theatre represented the hydrological catchment in its size and form. A set of plastic balls, prepared with a piece of magnetic strip to be tacked to any white/black board, each represented a unit amount of effective precipitation. The balls are evenly distributed over the lecture theatre and routed by some given rules down the catchment to the catchment outlet, where the resulting hydrograph is monitored and illustrated at the black/white board. The experiment allowed an illustration of the underlying principles of the UH, including stationarity, linearity, and superposition of the generated runoff and subsequent routing. In addition, some variations of the experimental setup extended the UH concept to demonstrate the impact of elevation, different runoff regimes, and non-uniform precipitation events on the resulting hydrograph. In summary, our own experience in the classroom, a first set of student exams, as well as student feedback and formal evaluation suggest that the integration of such an experiment deepened the learning experience by active

  8. A cross-sectional investigation of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and health-behavior participation in Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Geoff P; Nash, Kim; Sharman, Rachael; Lane, Ben R

    2014-05-06

    Transitioning to university involves a major life change that can have implications for physical and mental health. This study had three objectives: first, assess the mental health and health-behavior participation of Australian university students; second, evaluate clustering of health behaviors; and third, examine how mental health relates to health behaviors. University students (n = 751) enrolled at an Australian regional university completed an online survey containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and a health-behavior questionnaire. Over one-third of students reported mild or higher mental illness symptoms and most reported engaging in multiple unhealthy behaviors. Furthermore, mental health was associated with unhealthy behaviors. For males, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast and poor sleep quality. For females, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast, inadequate vigorous physical activity, and short or long sleep hours. Stress symptoms in females were associated with healthy sleep hours, but poor sleep quality. Future research may consider whether an intervention targeting one or two key health behaviors has utility in improving participation in other health behaviors and mental health. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Experiences and perceptions of students with disabilities concerning factors influencing participation in recreational sports at a university in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, S.A.; Titus, S.

    2013-01-01

    South African universities share a common purpose to make sport and recreation accessible to students at higher education institutions, including students with disabilities.Therefore, integrating students with disabilities into the daily activities of any university institution is important as it may be beneficial for them to participate in recreational activities on campus. This study focuses on the experiences and perceptions of students with disabilities regarding recreational sport whilst...

  10. What Else after Behavior Was Changed? the Effects of a University's Policy on Student Participation in Motorcycle Emission Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    With an attempt to realize the effectiveness of a university's policy on motorcycle emission, this study compared its students' participation behavior, associated knowledge, and attitudes toward relevant environmental issues with those of three other universities without similar measures. The results of a survey on a total of 504 students revealed…

  11. The Relationship of Organizational Identity and Alumni Participation Interest among Online, Non-Traditional, Undergraduate Students at a Southeastern Private Religious University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Mary Carol

    2017-01-01

    Colleges and universities depend heavily on alumni participation in the areas of financial contributions, positive advertising, and student recruitment. As higher education institutions increase the number of fully online programs, it is important to ensure that students feel a sense of connectedness to the university. The purpose of this study is…

  12. Investigation of Factors That May Constrain Participation of Sportive and Non-Sportive Recreational Activities Among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Emir Ekinci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze, which recreational sport or non- sport such as cultural/ art activities that university students prefer in their leisure time and underlying reasons that constrains participating in these activities with regard to different variables. Randomly chosen 339 students from The Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Sciences and Engineering at University of Dumlupiınar volunteered for the study. In this research as a data collection tool “Leisure Constraint Scale” was used. During the evaluation of the data in addition to descriptive statistical methods such as Percentage (% and frequency (f Independent Samples t-test and One way Anova were used. As a result it was found that 19.2% participants choose recreational sport activities in their leisure time. In addition, significant differences have emerged between participants’ gender and constrains to leisure in "lack of information", "lack of friends" and "time" sub-dimensions, between age and barriers to leisure in "time" sub-dimension, and between average monthly income levels and constrains to leisure in "individual psychology" and "facilities / services" sub dimensions (p <0.05. But no significant differences were found according to activities that they choose in their leisure time.

  13. Drinking game participation, gender performance and normalization of intoxication among Nigerian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka Dumbili

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: DGs appear to normalize heavy drinking and the culture of intoxication on this campus. Measures to monitor alcohol sales outlets around campuses and interventions that target students' leisure spaces should be developed.

  14. Online Teaching Evaluation for Higher Quality Education: Strategies to Increase University Students' Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Cathy; Weng, Apollo; Tsai, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to uncover determines of students' intention to adopt online teaching evaluation at the end of semester by proposing a research model based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The second purpose was to investigate the efficacy of the theory for predicting such intention. Besides users' attitude and…

  15. Relation between Metacognitive Awareness and Participation to Class Discussion of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan; Alagöz, Bülent

    2018-01-01

    Form of inquiry should be based on cognitive approach, student-centered, question and inquiry-based, free of memorization and focused on high-level cognitive skills (critical-creative thinking and problem-solving) rather than conventional teacher-centered teaching and learning based on memorization and behavioral approach. The life quality of…

  16. Student Participation in Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    The success of student government activities on any campus is significantly affected by the amount of student participation permitted in the institution's decision-making processes. The traditional" model of government--characterized by tokenism--often results in the separate jurisdictions" model-- characterized by fragmentation and interest…

  17. Income Disparities in the Use of Health Screening Services Among University Students in Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study of 2479 Participants in a University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Joh, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Soojin; Oh, Seung-Won; Lee, Cheol Min; Kwon, Hyuktae

    2016-05-01

    Public health insurance coverage for preventive care in young adults is incomplete in Korea. Few studies have focused on young adults' socioeconomic disparities in preventive care utilization. We aimed to explore household income disparities in the use of different types of health screening services among university students in Korea.This cross-sectional study used a web-based self-administered survey of students at a university in Korea from January to February 2013. To examine the associations between household income levels and health screening service use within the past 2 years, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression with adjustment for various covariables.Of 2479 participants, 45.5% reported using health screening services within 2 years (university-provided screening 32.9%, private sector screening 16.7%, and both 4.1%). Household income levels were not significantly associated with overall rates of health screening service use with a multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) in the lowest versus highest income group of 1.12 (0.87-1.45, Ptrend = 0.35). However, we found significantly different associations in specific types of utilized screening services by household income levels. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of university-provided health screening service use in the lowest versus highest income level was 1.74 (1.30-2.34; Ptrend income level was 0.45 (0.31-0.66; Ptrend income groups among university students in Korea, although overall rates of health screening service use were similar across income levels. Low-income students were more likely to use university-provided health screening services, and less likely to use private sector screening services. To ensure appropriate preventive care delivery for young adults and to address disparities in disadvantaged groups, the expansion of medical insurance coverage for preventive health care, establishment of a usual source of care, focusing on

  18. Active Citizens, Good Citizens, and Insouciant Bystanders: The Educational Implications of Chinese University Students' Civic Participation via Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Lin; Starkey, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This virtual ethnographic study explores how Chinese university students use social network sites (SNSs) to participate in civic activities. An ideal of "active" citizens is contrasted with good citizens (Crick) and insouciant bystanders. We find that students engage with the civic issues embedded in everyday life; their online civic…

  19. Actions and Achievements of Self-Regulated Learning in Personal Environments. Research on Students Participating in the Graduate Program in Preschool Education at the University of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Barboza, Eduardo; Trujillo-Torres, Juan Manuel; López-Núñez, Juan Antonio; Sola-Martínez, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    This paper is intended to study the self-regulated learning (SRL) process in personal learning environments (PLEs) among students participating in the Graduate Program for Preschool Education at the University of Granada (Spain). The study is focused on self-regulatory actions carried out by students, and on their self-regulated learning…

  20. The Economic Analysis of University Participation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallis, George

    2015-01-01

    Over the postwar period in most developed countries, the university participation rate has risen steadily to well over 30 percent, although there remain differences between countries. Students from lower income families have lower participation rates than those from higher income families. The article provides an economic analysis of these…

  1. A Study of Female Students' Perceptions of the Barriers to Participate in Physical and Sports Activities at Al-Hussein Bin Talal University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawel, Adnan M.; AlJa'afreh, Ibraheem A.

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the perceived barriers to participate in physical and sports activities among female university students as well as the potential differences of their perceptions of the barriers based on their academic discipline, academic year, and Grade Point Average (GPA) level. The participants in this study were 221 female students…

  2. My Experience as a Student Participant in the Institute for Geophysics/Huston-Tillotson University Geodiversity Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, N.; Ellins, K.; Holt, J.; Olson, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    As a senior pre-service teacher at Huston-Tillotson University, a minority-serving institution in Texas, I found myself in need of a science course and reluctantly enrolled in "Special Topics in the Geosciences," a survey course taught by visiting scientists from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). I had no idea what the geosciences were about. On the first day of class we took a test and I began to feel a sense of foreboding, but after speaking with the instructors, I left filled with excitement. With my limited background in science, I knew that the class was going to be challenging and require a lot of studying. I took every opportunity offered in the class to learn more about the geosciences. If there was a field trip, I went. If there was an opportunity for me to speak to children about what I learned, I did. For example, I participated in the Explore UT open house event where, rather than being an observer as I had expected, I found myself explaining earthquake seismology to students, parents and visitors. The experience was pivotal. As I explained to a small group of 3rd graders how they could use computer applications to observe and understand seismic waves, I realized I wanted to be a science teacher and not an elementary level-teacher as I had planned. Since completing "Special Topics in the Geosciences," I've been an undergraduate research assistant at UTIG. Over the summer, I adapted approximately ten existing UTIG Earth Science learning activities into the 5-E instructional model for the fall 2006 professional development Earth Science Revolution Workshops for in- service teachers, and I developed a new lesson on tides for these workshops. I also participated in presenting both a workshop for minority-serving elementary teachers and a class for alternative certification teachers at HTU. In early September, I joined a group of scientists, engineers, and space-suited "astronauts" in the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater

  3. Online Debating to Encourage Student Participation in Online Learning Environments: A Qualitative Case Study at a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl; Mostert, Markus

    2005-01-01

    The use of computer-mediated communication in higher education presents opportunities for students to be part of an online learning community irrespective of their geographical location. However, students do not always avail themselves of this opportunity and pedagogic strategies for encouraging participation are therefore constantly being…

  4. External Stakeholders' Roles and Factors Influencing Their Participation in Developing Generic Skills for Students in Vietnamese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu

    2018-01-01

    External stakeholders have increasingly participated in instructional and training activities in higher education; however, their contribution has not yet been adequately documented, especially in non-Western university contexts. This article reports a study that examined external stakeholders' roles and factors influencing their participation in…

  5. Mindfulness in higher education: awareness and attention in university students increase during and after participation in a mindfulness curriculum course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.I.; Meppelink, R.; Bögels, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a mindfulness course in the curriculum of international students (n = 104) from 16 different countries at the University of Amsterdam. The curriculum consisted of seven weekly lectures, as well as studying scientific articles on mindfulness research and gaining

  6. Flexner 2.0—Longitudinal Study of Student Participation in a Campus-Wide General Pathology Course for Graduate Students at The University of Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Briehl PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty members from the Department of Pathology at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson have offered a 4-credit course on enhanced general pathology for graduate students since 1996. The course is titled, “Mechanisms of Human Disease.” Between 1997 and 2016, 270 graduate students completed Mechanisms of Human Disease. The students came from 21 programs of study. Analysis of Variance, using course grade as the dependent and degree, program, gender, and year (1997-2016 as independent variables, indicated that there was no significant difference in final grade (F = 0.112; P = .8856 as a function of degree (doctorate: mean = 89.60, standard deviation = 5.75; master’s: mean = 89.34, standard deviation = 6.00; certificate program: mean = 88.64, standard deviation = 8.25, specific type of degree program (F = 2.066, P = .1316; life sciences: mean = 89.95, standard deviation = 6.40; pharmaceutical sciences: mean = 90.71, standard deviation = 4.57; physical sciences: mean = 87.79, standard deviation = 5.17, or as a function of gender (F = 2.96, P = .0865; males: mean = 88.09, standard deviation = 8.36; females: mean = 89.58, standard deviation = 5.82. Students in the physical and life sciences performed equally well. Mechanisms of Human Disease is a popular course that provides students enrolled in a variety of graduate programs with a medical school-based course on mechanisms of diseases. The addition of 2 new medically oriented Master of Science degree programs has nearly tripled enrollment. This graduate level course also potentially expands the interdisciplinary diversity of participants in our interprofessional education and collaborative practice exercises.

  7. College Graduation Rates for Minority Students in a Selective Technical University: Will Participation in a Summer Bridge Program Contribute to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Terrence E; Gaughan, Monica; Hume, Robert; Moore, S Gordon

    2010-03-01

    There are many approaches to solving the problem of underrepresentation of some racial and ethnic groups and women in scientific and technical disciplines. Here, the authors evaluate the association of a summer bridge program with the graduation rate of underrepresented minority (URM) students at a selective technical university. They demonstrate that this 5-week program prior to the fall of the 1st year contains elements reported as vital for successful student retention. Using multivariable survival analysis, they show that for URM students entering as fall-semester freshmen, relative to their nonparticipating peers, participation in this accelerated summer bridge program is associated with higher likelihood of graduation. The longitudinal panel data include more than 2,200 URM students.

  8. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M Salto

    Full Text Available An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS and undergraduate (UG student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical

  9. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  10. Participation in Sex Work: Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ron; Sanders, Teela; Myers, Ellie; Smith, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to student involvement in the sex industry. The current study comprised a cross-sectional sample of 315 undergraduates at a London university. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, data were gathered on students' financial and employment circumstances and their views on participation in sex work. Results suggested…

  11. Use of Online Information Resources by RMIT University Economics, Finance, and Marketing Students Participating in a Cooperative Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the use of online information resources by Economics, Finance, and Marketing 3rd year students in a cooperative education program and explores some possible factors and issues that influence how students use these resources. The nature of Work Integrated Learning (WIL) programs, the business information environment, and the…

  12. Examining the Role of Ideological and Political Education on University Students' Civic Perceptions and Civic Participation in Mainland China: Some Hints from Contemporary Citizenship Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Fagan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    A long existing compulsive curriculum of ideological and political education is employed by the Chinese government to promote citizenship education among Chinese university students. This article builds on the findings of a mixed-methods research that examined the role of ideological and political education on university students' civic…

  13. Applying Equity Theory to Students' Perceptions of Research Participation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Shannon R.; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    Human subject pools have been a valuable resource to universities conducting research with student participants. However, the costs and benefits to student participants must be carefully weighed by students, researchers, and institutional review board administrators in order to avoid coercion. Participant perceptions are pivotal in deciding…

  14. Student teacher training: participant motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; van Diggele, Christie; Mellis, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Teaching, assessment and feedback skills are documented globally as required graduate attributes for medical students. By integrating teacher training into curricula, the importance of teaching and educational scholarship is highlighted. In this study, we used self-determination theory (SDT) to consider medical students' motivation to voluntarily participate in a short teacher training programme. Thirty-eight senior medical students were invited to attend a teacher training programme at a major tertiary teaching hospital. Participating students were asked to respond to one question: 'Why did you volunteer to take part in the teacher training course?' Self-determination theory was used as a conceptual framework to identify and code recurrent themes in the data. In total, 23/38 (61%) of invited students chose to participate in the programme, and 21/23 (91%) of the students responded to the survey. Students' motivation to participate in the teacher training programme were related to: (1) autonomy - their enjoyment of their current voluntary involvement in teaching; (2) competence - a recognition of the need for formal training and certification in teaching, and as an essential part of their future career in medicine; (3) relatedness - the joint recognition of the importance of quality in teaching, as emphasised by their own learning experiences in the medical programme. Students reported being motivated to take part in teacher training because of their enjoyment of teaching, their desire to increase the quality of teaching within medical education, their desire for formal recognition of teaching as a learned skill, plus their recognition of teaching as a requirement within the medical profession. By integrating teacher training into curricula, the importance of teaching and educational scholarship is highlighted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  16. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  17. Ethnic Identities of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Özdikmenli-Demir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to understand the relationship between ethnic identity, victimization/witnessing community violence, ethnic discrimination, and aggression in a sample of university students living in the South East Region of Turkey. The participants were 263 university students of predominantly Kurdish ethnic origin. The results showed that males had higher levels of ethnic identity in the dimensions of exploration and commitment. Males also presented higher scores for witnessing community violence and lifetime exposure to ethnic discrimination. The most important predictor of participants’ ethnic identity was witnessing community violence. Participants who witnessed violent acts in their social environment had higher ethnic identity levels. Although the predictor variables could not explain an important part of the participants’ aggression levels, only perceived ethnic discrimination was positively related to aggressive behavior. The role of native language efficiency in ethnic identity is also discussed.

  18. Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Nevin; Keskin, Muzaffer Toprak; Erdugan, Fuat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities. While the study's universe consists of all 11th graders studying at High school, the sample includes 32 of the 11th grade students who participated in arrow shooting activities in…

  19. University Students' Perceptions of Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, James F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the perceptions of American and international students on conflict resolution, and to determine if the students were willing to participate in conflict resolution. A survey was given to 226 students at an eastern university that asked them to identify a major international conflict and whether they felt…

  20. Collaboration in nuclear engineering education between France and the United States: Participation of French students at Texas A ampersand M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Durand, J.L.; Gousty, Y.; Jeneveau, A.; Erdman, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Universities in the United States have had a long tradition of accepting students from other countries to pursue graduate degrees. This has particularly been the case in the fields of engineering and science. This trend has grown to the point that in several graduate engineering fields, the percentage of foreign nationals outnumbers US enrollees. Historically, most foreign students studying in the US universities have been from developing countries. Usually these students apply and are accepted on a case-by-case basis. For a number of reasons, less emphasis has been placed on programs with western Europe. In this paper, a program of collaboration is described in which the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Texas A ampersand M University has entered into memoranda of agreement with two institutions in France. The two universities are the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (INPG) in Grenoble and the Ecole Polytechnique Feminine (EPF) in Sceaux. The purpose of the program is to enable students in nuclear engineering to simultaneously complete requirements for the diploma and the MS degree

  1. Encouraging Student Participation While Designing Writing Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2017-12-01

    Encouraging student participation while designing writing exercises requires a certain pragmatic approach. Wilbert James McKeachie is the author of a widely read textbook on college teaching. McKeachie was a longtime faculty member at the University of Michigan. He served as president of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Foundation and the American Association of Higher Education. In his famous book Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, McKeachie provides an introduction and notes the role of research in identifying new goals for higher education. He also offers a conceptual framework based on a student mediation model and a focuses on the processs-product relationships between faculty teacher behavior and student learning outcomes. McKeachie' s Teaching Tips provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday problems of university teaching and those that arise in trying to maximize learning for every student. The book does not suggest a set of recipes to be followed mechanically; it gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning. First, it is extremely important to define the target skill areas and means of implementation. Next, the professor can then proceed to focus on the techniques that could be employed to ensure student participation. This includes selection of an appropriate topic that is relevant to the field of study as well as classroom learning experiences. By pragmatically combining these objectives, the teacher can expect both enthusiasm and effective learning among the student population. McKeachie, Wilbert James. (1980) Learning, Cognition and College Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey - Bass McKeachie, Wilbert James. (1980) Teaching Tips: A Guidebook for the Beginning College Teacher Lexington, MASS. : Heath. 1986. ISBN: 0669067520 McKeachie, Wilbert James., et. al. (2001) Teaching Tips (Eleventh Edition): Strategies, Research, and Theory for

  2. Factors affecting sports participation among female students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary aim of this study was to examine factors affecting sport participation among resident and non- resident female students at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT), Pretoria, South Africa. The study targeted all students participating in 12 registered sports but due to the fact that only a limited number of the total ...

  3. Student Counselling at Utrecht University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The enormous increase in the number of students at Dutch universities in the sixties and seventies made it impossible for professors to deal with the many different questions students confronted them with. New professionals, student counsellors/psychologists and student advisers entered the

  4. Active student participation and citizenship education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugelers, W.

    2009-01-01

    What are the possibilities for active student participation in citizenship education and how are students involved in the school as a community? We researched active student participation in schools and in out-of-school learning activities: students’ own lessons, their own school, their own

  5. Self-Esteem & Academic Performance among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Zaidi, Syed Muhammad Imran Haider; Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The current study was conducted to assess the self-esteem and academic performance among university students after arising of several behavioral and educational problems. A total number of 80 students, 40 male students and 40 female students were selected through purposive sampling from G. C. University Faisalabad. The participants were…

  6. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  7. [Smoking among undergraduate university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra C, Lisseth; Fernández P, Paola; Granada G, Felipe; Ávila C, Paula; Mallea M, Javier; Rodríguez M, Yeniffer

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is one of the major Public Health problems worldwide. To study the frequency of tobacco smoking among undergraduate students of a Chilean university. An opinion survey was sent by e-mail to all undergraduate students of a university, registering gender, age, study years, study area, smoking behavior, motivation (reason for smoking), intention to quit and tobacco law perception. 1,008 (57% females) out of 11,679 surveys were answered back. Prevalence of active smoking among respondents was 36%, without association with gender, age or years of study. However, students from scientific areas had a lower prevalence. Seventy seven percent of smokers manifested the intention to quit the habit or have started quitting already. Ninety six percent were acquainted with the tobacco law and by 73% agreed with it. Smoking is highly prevalent among university students. It is necessary to develop strategies for smoking cessation within universities that may prevent or reduce tobacco smoking among students.

  8. ICT uses between university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyse gender differences in the use of ICT among university students. We present the results of a study about the uses and the perception in relation to ICT in everyday life and in academia. The study is based on a statistical simple of 1042 students from 5 different universities. The results show gender differences, both with respect to use as their perception of technology.

  9. Participation and Non-Participation in Student Activism

    OpenAIRE

    Hensby, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong need to understand the changing dynamics of contemporary youth participation: how they engage, what repertoires are considered efficacious, and their motivations to get involved.This book uses the 2010/11 UK student protests against fees and cuts as a case study for analysing some of the key paths and barriers to political participation today. These paths and barriers – which include an individual’s family socialisation, network positioning, and group identification (and dis...

  10. Barriers to Physical Activity on University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajat; Sultoni, K.; Suherman, A.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the research is to analyze the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students based on physical activity level. An internet-based survey was conducted. The participants were 158 University students from Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. Barriers to Physical Activity Quiz (BPAQ) were used to assessed the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students. IPAQ (short form) were used to assessed physical activity level. The results show there was no differences BPAQ based on IPAQ level. But when analyzed further based on seven factors barriers there are differences in factors “social influence and lack of willpower” based IPAQ level. Based on this it was concluded that the “influence from other and lack of willpower” an inhibiting factor on students to perform physical activity.

  11. Food intake of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyce Luci BERNARDO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This narrative literature review aimed to analyze the results of studies on the food intake of university students. A literature search was conducted in July 2014 and updated in July 2016 in the Scopus, MedLine/PubMed, and SciELO databases, using descriptors related to university students and food intake in English and Portuguese. Overall, 37 studies that analyzed university students’ food intake were included in this review, eight of which were conducted in Brazil. The results demonstrated that most university students have unhealthy eating behaviors, such as high intake of fast foods, snacks, sweets, soft drinks, and alcoholic beverages, and low intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, and legumes. Undergraduate students of health sciences, such as nursing, nutrition, and medicine, did not have healthier diets. University students’ food intake was characterized as unhealthy, regardless of undergraduate program or sex, especially among students who left the parents’ home and became responsible for their own food. Therefore, there is a need of developing public policies that promote healthy eating habits among students, such as interventions to change their eating habits and increase their access to healthy foods at the university environment.

  12. Cheating among University of Transkei students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwamwenda, T S; Monyooe, L A

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which cheating in academic work occurs at this university. 58 participants registered for a postgraduate diploma in education responded to a questionnaire on cheating. Some students admitted engaging in every behaviour; however, the percentage of students so engaged was much lower than those reported among British and American institutions of higher learning. This may partly be attributed to respondents being reluctant to divulge their dishonesty.

  13. Determinants of Happiness in Undergraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Deborah M.; MacLeod, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between happiness, and six other life domains: Academic Success, Financial Security, Familial Support, Living Environment, Self-Image and Social Relations. Participants were one hundred and ninety- two students from a small undergraduate university. The purpose of the study was to determine which life domain…

  14. Bullying amongst University Students in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Helen; Myers, Carrie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    This study with 20 university students examined perspectives in three different participant roles: the perpetrator, the target and the bystander. The purpose of the exercise was to resolve the outcome of an alleged incident of cyberbullying using a social network site via the means of a restorative conference. The findings suggest that the power…

  15. Participating Unequally: Student Experiences at UWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowes, Lindsay; Shefer, Tamara; Ngabaza, Sisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses Nancy Fraser's concept of participatory parity to reflect on data gathered by and from third year students in a final year research module in the Women's and Gender Studies Department at the University of the Western Cape in 2015. During the course students developed a research proposal, collected and shared data with other…

  16. Trade Union Participation in University Research Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    1984-01-01

    The recent development of Dutch research coordination agencies, the Science Shops, forms the context for a description of the relationship between university research and policy at Amsterdam University and the national trade union organization. Management tools such as project financing and other elements of this system are discussed. (MSE)

  17. The Geology of Mexico: A Quantitative Evaluation of a Course Designed to Increase the Number of Hispanic Students Participating in the Geosciences at California State University, Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Lisa C.; Levine, R.; Cornwell, K.; Kusnick, J. E.; Hausback, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of a newly developed introductory course, Geology of Mexico, in attracting Hispanic students, encouraging them to take more geology courses, and recruiting them to the major. The student population in the Geology of Mexico course was 93% Hispanic compared with 18.5% in Physical Geology. We…

  18. Lifestyle practice among Malaysian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Mohd Noor, Nor Aini Binti

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that a healthy lifestyle is of benefit in the prevention of diseases such as cancer and promotion of well-being. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine lifestyle practice and associated factors among university students in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted over six months from November 2011 until May 2012 among the students from the Management and Science University. This study was approved by its ethical committee , the students being explained the objective and invited to participate. A consent form was signed by all study participants. Questionnaire was distributed randomly to the students of the five faculties through their lecturers in different faculty. For univariate analysis t-test and ANOVA test were performed. Multiple linear regression used for multivariate analysis using SPSS 13.0. A total number of 1100 students participated with a mean age of 22.1±2.21 (SD) years. The majority were 22 years or younger (56.3%), female (54%), Malay (61.5%), single (92.3%), with family monthly income ≥5000 Ringgit Malaysia (41.2%). Regarding lifestyle, about were 31.6% smokers, 75.6% never drank alcohol and 53.7% never exercised. Multivariate analysis showed that age, sex, race, parent marital status, participant marital status, type of faculty, living status, smoking status, exercise, residency, brushing teeth, fiber intake and avoid fatty food significantly influenced the practice of drinking alcohol among university students (p=0.006, p=0.042, pexercise, residency, brushing teeth and fiber intake significantly influenced the practice of sun protection (pexercise, taking non- prescribed medication, brushing the teeth, coffee consumption and fiber intake were significantly influenced the practice of fruits consumption (p=0.008, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p=0.002, p<0.001, P<0.001; respectively). This study showed a poor practice of healthy lifestyle among university students

  19. Establishment of an Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.; Cerefice, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) established an Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) University Participation Program in March 2001 to develop a world-class research program for accelerator-driven transmutation technology while building core competencies and facilities to promote the University's strategic growth goals. The goal of this program is to involve UNLV students in research on the cutting edge of science and engineering as an integrated part of the national program to develop this emerging technology. This program augments UNLV's research capabilities and infrastructure, while establishing national and international research collaborations with national laboratories, industrial partners, and other universities, increasing the UNL V research community's presence in the global scientific community. The UNL V Program is closely integrated into the national project led by Los Alamos and Argonne National Laboratories. The primary mechanism to insure this degree of integration is the teaming of national laboratory scientists with UNL V faculty and students on student research proposals. The Program was implemented under an aggressive schedule with faculty response that surpassed expectations. A total of 12 multi-tasked projects that involve 21 graduate students and 13 faculty members began under first year funding. Other major accomplishments include establishment of an administrative structure implementing all the components of the Program and establishment of a communications network between national laboratory project leaders and UNL V faculty. (authors)

  20. Student Participation: A Democratic Education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health Promoting Schools, and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Netwo...... and token participation are presented and discussed in the paper. Underpinning values that these models endorse as important for the processes of health promotion in schools include self-determination, participation, democracy, diversity, and equity....

  1. Participation of Student Authors in Reports on Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeps, Andreas; Hemmer, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Since 2012, the University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt has been publishing an annual report on sustainability as part of its whole institution approach (WIA). This study aims to examine the participation in writing this report as it is experienced by the student stakeholders involved. The overall goal is to gain expertise concerning further…

  2. Nutritional knowledge assessment of syrian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louay Labban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that affect nutritional status and nutritional habits of individuals, families, and societies. Nutrition knowledge is an important tool in assessing the nutritional status of an individual, group or community. Researchers have been trying to design and develop reliable and valid questionnaires that distinguish and measure nutrition knowledge and its impact on dietary behavior and diet-health awareness. Many studies have shown that nutrition knowledge can affect someone to follow dietary recommendations. The aim of this study was to assess the nutrition knowledge of Syrian university students and to find out if there was any relationship between anthropometric measurements, socioeconomic status, type of university and nutrition knowledge of the students. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using valid nutrition knowledge questionnaire, which covered six main sections. The questionnaire was designed for this study and was adapted from Parameter and Wardle. The number of students participated in the study was 998 students and were selected from four universities in Syria. They were asked to complete the nutrition knowledge questionnaire under supervision of trained nutritionist. Anthropometric measurements were taken for all participants by trained professional. The results were statistically analyzed and P 30 had the highest points in TNK. Females had higher TNK score as compared with males. Furthermore, students enrolled in the private university and in health-related programs showed typically better TNK scores than those enrolled in public universities and in nonhealth-related programs. The highest TNK score based on BMI was found among students with BMI >30. The results support the likely value of including nutrition knowledge as a target for health education campaigns aimed at promoting healthy eating.

  3. Psychology students from Leiden University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    We are glad to share with our department that a group of 41 Psychology students from Leiden university, Holland were on a three hours visit to RUC Psychology department on Friday , 10.3.2017. The department is a valuable partner for students’ exchange , almost every semester there are RUC students...... travelling to Leiden. The trip was planned by Study Association Labyrint Leiden, and consisted of students at all levels from the bachelor as well as masters programs. A group of RUC psychology students Wiebke Sandermann; Emma Stinne Engstrøm; Mikkel Brilner Lund were in the organising group along...... with the study director Hans Sønderstrup Hansen and Rashmi Singla. It was an enriching experience for the RUC organizing group. International coordinator for Psychology Dieuwerke de Groot in Leiden reciprocated by writing: “A very enthusiastic mail from our students telling me they had such a wonderful time...

  4. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  5. University Learning Systems for Participative Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, Carol J.; Harper, William W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the instructional development of a course for advanced finance students on the use of data files and/or databases for solving complex finance problems. Areas covered include course goals and the design. The course class schedule and sample learning assessment assignments are provided. (JD)

  6. Obstetric Patients Who Select and Those Who Refuse Medical Students' Participation in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 222 obstetrics patients assisted by medical clerkship students from the University of Vermont and 78 who refused student participation found privacy the primary motivation for refusal and a desire to contribute to students' education a primary reason for accepting student participation. Patients frequently erroneously anticipated the…

  7. Student Participation in Brazil--The Case of the "Gremio Estudantil"

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Roussel

    2012-01-01

    Student participation in the education policy debate in Brazil has a long history, albeit focused mainly at the university level. In secondary schools (students aged 14-17) participation has been much more patchy and with variable results. The gremio associations (similar to student councils in the UK) are the main pathway to student voice within…

  8. Migraine among medical students in Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ahmed, Samar Farouk; Alroughani, Raed; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-10

    Medical students routinely have triggers, notably stress and irregular sleep, which are typically associated with migraine. We hypothesized that they may be at higher risk to manifest migraine. We aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine among medical students in Kuwait University. This is cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months were subjected to two preliminary questions and participants with at least one positive response were asked to perform the validated Identification of Migraine (ID Migraine™) test. Frequency of headache per month and its severity were also reported. Migraine headache was suggested in 27.9% subjects based on ID-Migraine™. Migraine prevalence (35.5% and 44%, versus 31.1%, 25%, 21.1%, 14.8%, 26.5%, p Kuwait University compared to other published studies. The migraine prevalence, frequency and headache severity, all increased in the final two years of education.

  9. Users or Students? Privacy in University MOOCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meg Leta; Regner, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Two terms, student privacy and Massive Open Online Courses, have received a significant amount of attention recently. Both represent interesting sites of change in entrenched structures, one educational and one legal. MOOCs represent something college courses have never been able to provide: universal access. Universities not wanting to miss the MOOC wave have started to build MOOC courses and integrate them into the university system in various ways. However, the design and scale of university MOOCs create tension for privacy laws intended to regulate information practices exercised by educational institutions. Are MOOCs part of the educational institutions these laws and policies aim to regulate? Are MOOC users students whose data are protected by aforementioned laws and policies? Many university researchers and faculty members are asked to participate as designers and instructors in MOOCs but may not know how to approach the issues proposed. While recent scholarship has addressed the disruptive nature of MOOCs, student privacy generally, and data privacy in the K-12 system, we provide an in-depth description and analysis of the MOOC phenomenon and the privacy laws and policies that guide and regulate educational institutions today. We offer privacy case studies of three major MOOC providers active in the market today to reveal inconsistencies among MOOC platform and the level and type of legal uncertainty surrounding them. Finally, we provide a list of organizational questions to pose internally to navigate the uncertainty presented to university MOOC teams.

  10. Participation in Students' Industrial Work Experience Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIWES has been part of the training requirement of Pharmacy students at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, for a long time now. At inception, it was done during vacations until about ten years ago when it was incorporated into the semester period. This work was done to find out the feelings and ...

  11. Study of university students' attitudes toward office space at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Eteadifard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Office space is the space where students first experience the university. In this paper, the attitude of students toward office space in the public sphere of university is discussed. This article is the result of the research conducted for the “Institute for Social and Cultural Studies” by the author. The main issues in this paper are: university students' attitudes towards quality office space at the universities and mental basis of common issues among students at the universities. Data were collected through individual and group interviews. More than eighty interviews with activists and students of University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Sharif University of Technology and Kharazmi University were done. The main indicators of office space in this study include: students’ satisfaction of office space, students’ welfare affairs and students’ feedback about this space. Problems and obstacles relating to the office space and their solutions were also studied in this paper.

  12. Knowledge and Attitudes toward Hookah Usage among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Babinski, Dara; Merlo, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Hookah smoking is a popular form of tobacco use on university campuses. This study documented use, attitudes, and knowledge of hookah smoking among college students. Participants: The sample included 943 university students recruited between February 2009 and January 2010. Respondents ("M" age = 20.02) included 376 males, 533…

  13. Prediction of Problematic Internet Use by Attachment in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Hatice Irem Ozteke; Kesici, Sahin; Buyukbayraktar, Cagla Girgin; Yalcin, S. Barbaros

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this research is to examine the predictive power of attachment style on problematic internet use among university students. Participants of study consist of 481 university students (230 girls). Results indicate that there is a negative correlation between secure attachment style and social benefit/social comfort and there is a positive…

  14. Sibling Relationships Cognition in Japanese Female University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Misae; Kato, Daiki

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of sibling relationships in Japanese female university students. Two hundred and fifteen Japanese female university students participated in this study. The Adult Sibling Relationship Scale (ASRQ, Stocker et al., 1997) was used to measure sibling relationship cognition. The model was constructed as a result…

  15. Aerobic Capacity and Anaerobic Power Levels of the University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to analyze aerobic capacity and anaerobic power levels of the university students. Total forty university students who is department physical education and department business (age means; 21.15±1.46 years for male and age means; 20.55±1.79 years for female in department physical education), volunteered to participate in this…

  16. Neck Flexor and Extensor Muscle Endurance in Subclinical Neck Pain: Intrarater Reliability, Standard Error of Measurement, Minimal Detectable Change, and Comparison With Asymptomatic Participants in a University Student Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Ana S; Lameiras, Carina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess intrarater reliability and to calculate the standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC) for deep neck flexor and neck extensor muscle endurance tests, and compare the results between individuals with and without subclinical neck pain. Participants were students of the University of Aveiro reporting subclinical neck pain and asymptomatic participants matched for sex and age to the neck pain group. Data on endurance capacity of the deep neck flexors and neck extensors were collected by a blinded assessor using the deep neck flexor endurance test and the extensor endurance test, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), SEM, and MDC were calculated for measurements taken within a session by the same assessor. Differences between groups for endurance capacity were investigated using a Mann-Whitney U test. The deep neck flexor endurance test (ICC = 0.71; SEM = 6.91 seconds; MDC = 19.15 seconds) and neck extensor endurance test (ICC = 0.73; SEM = 9.84 minutes; MDC = 2.34 minutes) are reliable. No significant differences were found between participants with and without neck pain for both tests of muscle endurance (P > .05). The endurance capacity of the deep neck flexors and neck extensors can be reliably measured in participants with subclinical neck pain. However, the wide SEM and MDC might limit the sensitivity of these tests. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Are Turkish University Students Autonomous or Not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Kırtık

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tried to determine Turkish learners’ attitudes, and the Turkish education system’s approach towards learner autonomy with regard to three main points: 1 whether Turkish university students are aware of learner autonomy or not 2 whether Turkish university students have the characteristics of autonomous learners (whether they are autonomous learners or not, and 3 if the Turkish education system is suitable for fostering learner autonomy or not from the viewpoint of the participants. Participants were 50 second grade learners in the English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe University (N=10, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University (N=10, and Uludag University (N=30 who had already taken courses about learner autonomy.  The data were collected by means of a questionnaire which had two Likert-scale sections and an open-ended questions section. The first Likert-scale section contained 15 characteristics of autonomous learners each of which was rated by the participants in a scale from strongly disagree to agree, from 1 to 5. In the second Likert-scale section, the participants were asked to rate the Turkish education system’s five basic elements such as school curriculums, course materials, approaches used by the teachers in classrooms, learning activities, and classroom settings. Additionally, learners’ opinions about their awareness and understanding of learner autonomy were gathered by five open ended questions. The results proposed that the participants were aware of learner autonomy, and had the characteristics of autonomous learners. On the other hand, results showed that the Turkish education system was not suitable for autonomous learners and did not foster learner autonomy. The findings suggested that the Turkish education system should be designed again in such a way to support the autonomous learners and to foster learner autonomy in all sections of the education.

  18. University of Washington Participation in SAFARI-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a summary, of the participation in the 6-week field study in southern Africa. During the field study there were flown 119.02 research hours (31 research flights). In these flights the researchers obtained many unique data sets for evaluating the effects of biomass burning and other sources of particles and gases on the climate of southern Africa, and obtained simultaneous measurements with NASA ER-2 and Terra overflights. They also analyzed portions of the large data sets acquired in SAFARI-2000. They attended several SAFARI-2000 workshops, national and international conferences to present SAFARI-2000 results.

  19. An Analysis of University Students' Attitudes towards Personalized Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muhittin; Kisla, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze university students' attitudes towards personalized learning environments with respect to the independent variables of gender, age, university, year of study, knowledge about the environment, participation in the environment and being willing to participate in the environment. The correlative survey model is…

  20. Health Attitudes and Suicidal Ideation among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafioun, Lisham; Bonar, Erin; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether positive health attitudes are associated with suicidal ideation among university students after accounting for other health risk factors linked to suicidal ideation. Participants: Participants were 690 undergraduates from a large midwestern university during fall semester 2011. Methods:…

  1. Practice and Experience of Task Management of University Students: Case of University of Tsukuba, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Ryoko; Joho, Hideo; Maeshiro, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey that investigated the practice and experience of task management of university students. A total of 202 tasks identified by 24 university students were analyzed. The results suggest that participants had a reasonable sense of priority of tasks, that they tend to perceive a task as a big chunk, not a…

  2. Students Union, University Administration and Political Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students Union, University Administration and Political Development of Nations. ... African Research Review ... resting on the reciprocal determinism of the social learning theory, that students union makes university administration smooth.

  3. Participation Apprehensive Students: The Influence of Face Support and Instructor-Student Rapport on Classroom Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Brandi N.; Berger, Erin; Burchett, Molly; Herovic, Emina; Strawser, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Participation is considered a positive student classroom behavior that can also create a face-threatening classroom climate that may be alleviated through interpersonal relationships with the instructor. Participants (N?=?189) categorized as low apprehensives perceived less face threat and more face support when participating; moderate…

  4. Factors of Students Participating in Online Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugilar Sugilar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to discover determinant factors of students' participation in online examination based on expectancy-value theory. The method used was group comparison between the groups of participating and nonparticipating students. The results showed that the following factors differentiated the two groups, i.e.: (1 self efficacy in using computers (t=12.81, p<0.01, (2 perceived of easiness in operating an online examination (t=9.51, p<0.01, (3 perceived of the importance of online examination (t=5.58, t<0.01, (4 intrinsic value of online examination (t=10.58, p<001, and (5 cost of online examination (t=-2.05, p=0.029. In addition, the following students' personal factors were also compared and the results were (1 age (t=-2.01, p=0.46, (2 grade point average (t=-5.546, 0<0.01, (3 sex (x2=28.51, p<0.01, and (4 marital status (x2=6.50, p=0.011. The results concluded that the expectancy and value theory was useful for explaining and predicting students' participation in online examinations.

  5. Bullying amongst University Students in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cowie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study with 20 university students examined perspectives in three different participant roles: the perpetrator, the target and the bystander. The purpose of the exercise was to resolve the outcome of an alleged incident of cyberbullying using a social network site via the means of a restorative conference. The findings suggest that the power of the peer group needs to be fully understood if cyberbullying, is to be tackled efficiently. The bystanders tended to blame the victim and were reluctant to intervene, the victim felt let down and marginalised by peers’ indifference and hostility, and the bully failed to realise or understand the consequences of their actions. The study offers ideas for strategies and policies to address the issue of cyberbullying with university students.

  6. Students Inspiring Students: An Online Tool for Science Fair Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.; Lawrence, Tom

    2011-01-01

    One goal of 21st-century education is to develop mature citizens who can identify issues, solve problems, and communicate solutions. What better way for students to learn these skills than by participating in a science and engineering fair? Fair participants face the same challenges as professional scientists and engineers, even Nobel laureates.…

  7. Enlistment Propensities of University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moskos, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Enlistment propensities of undergraduates were assessed through surveys conducted at Northwestern University, University of Arizona, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Illinois-Chicago...

  8. Difficulties EFL Jordanian University Students Encounter in Translating English Idioms into Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrishan, Amal; Smadi, Oqlah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the difficulties that Jordanian EFL University students encounter in translating English idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at Yarmouk University and the University of Jordan who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students who participated in the…

  9. Strategies Used by Jordanian EFL University Graduate Students in Translating Idioms into Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Oqlah; Alrishan, Amal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the strategies utilized by Jordanian EFL University graduate students in translating idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at the University of Jordan and Yarmouk University who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students was 90 who participated in a…

  10. Investigation of Scalar Implicatures of Binus University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herlina Karjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scalar implicatures are based on a range of quantifiers ordered in terms of informational strength, for example in quantity: some, most, all; in frequency: sometimes, often, and always. This study measures the scalar implicatures among university students who learn English as a foreign language. The participants for this study are fourth semester English Department students at Binus University. Using the same instruments as in Slabakova (2009 and Noveck’s study (2001 the present study aims to find out the general ability of the university students of computing scalar implicatures and to discover the level of pragmatic/logical competence of the university students with regards to their gender and grade point average. The results show that the students with GPA lower than three are more logical than those with GPA higher than three; while female students are more pragmatic than male students.

  11. Broadening Participation: Mentoring Community College Students in a Geoscience REU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Osborn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, REUs are recruiting from community colleges as a means of broadening participation of underrepresented minorities, women, and low-income students in STEM. As inclusion of community college students becomes normalized, defining the role of science faculty and preparing them to serve as mentors to community college students is a key component of well-designed programs. This session will present empirical research regarding faculty mentoring in the first two years of an NSF-REU grant to support community college students in a university's earth and environmental science labs. Given the documented benefits of undergraduate research on students' integration into the scientific community and their career trajectory in STEM, the focus of the investigation has been on the processes and impact of mentoring community college STEM researchers at a university serving a more traditionally privileged population; the degree to which the mentoring relationships have addressed community college students needs including their emotional, cultural and resource needs; and gaps in mentor training and the mentoring relationship identified by mentors and students.

  12. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  13. University Students' Attitudes toward Physical Education Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjuan; Chen, Junjun; Baker, Miles

    2014-01-01

    While there have been many studies into students' attitudes toward Physical Education at the school level, far fewer studies have been conducted at the university level, especially in China. This study explored 949 students' attitudes toward their university Physical Education experiences in four Chinese universities. An intercorrelated model of…

  14. International Students' Perceptions of University Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cody J.; Lausch, David W.; Weatherford, Jenny; Goeken, Ryan; Almendares, Maria

    2017-01-01

    International students provide economic, cultural, and academic benefits to universities throughout the nation. However, many international students lack the support necessary to be successful and satisfied with their education. In order to determine international students' perceptions of their university experience, an online survey was emailed…

  15. A survey of university students' vitamin D-related knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Shaunessey; Irwin, Jennifer D; Johnson, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    To survey Canadian university students' vitamin D-related knowledge. Undergraduate university students (n = 1,088) were surveyed as to their vitamin D-related knowledge, including its sources, health benefits, and recommended intake. Overall, students answered 29% of questions correctly on the knowledge test. In addition, the overall test was subdivided into 3 subtests, and students scored 26% on vitamin D source knowledge, 23% on factors affecting vitamin D levels, and 37% on health effects of vitamin D. Only 8% of participants correctly identified the recommended vitamin D intake; 14% correctly identified the amount of time in the sun required to produce adequate vitamin D. These results suggest that Canadian university students have poor knowledge concerning vitamin D. Program planners should consider improving vitamin D knowledge as a component of future health promotion programs for university students. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Student Participation and Parental Involvement in Relation to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niia, Anna; Almqvist, Lena; Brunnberg, Elinor; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely…

  17. Practices of Citizenship Rights among Minority Students at Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenzhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how Chinese minority students participate and defend citizenship rights on a university campus against the backdrop of ongoing social changes. Three rights are focused on: freedom of religion, freedom of association, and freedom to use an ethnic language. The data were collected at three universities. Research methods involved…

  18. The Work Values of First Year Spanish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Pascual, P. A.; Cano-Escoriaza, J.; Orejudo, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the work values of 2,951 first-year university students in Spain enrolled in degree programs within the five major areas of university studies. For our research, participants were asked to respond to a Scale of Work Values in which intrinsic, social, and pragmatic extrinsic values as well as extrinsic values related to…

  19. Stressful life events and alcohol use among university students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the association between stressful life events and alcohol use among young adults pursuing university education in a university in Botswana was studied. A total of 312 young adults participated in the study (55.4% females, mean age = 21.58 (SD =1.87)). Student Stress Scale adapted from Holmes and Rahe's ...

  20. The Mental Health of University Students in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing concerns globally about the mental health of students. In the UK, the actual incidence of mental disturbance is unknown, although university counselling services report increased referrals. This study assesses the levels of mental illness in undergraduate students to examine whether widening participation in education has…

  1. Stigmatised Learners: Mature-Age Students Negotiating University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Research on the socially-situated nature of learning shows how practices and identities are affected by participation in communities, but very little is known about how mature-age students experience the relational dynamics of university. Based on data from a qualitative study of first-year students, we consider written accounts by older learners…

  2. Mass Media Campaign Impacts Influenza Vaccine Obtainment of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Ali M.; Brent-Hotchkiss, Renee; Andrews, Urkovia K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effectiveness of a mass media campaign in increasing the rate of college student influenza vaccine obtainment. Participants/Methods: Students ("N" = 721) at a large southern university completed a survey between September 2011 and January 2012 assessing what flu clinic media sources were visualized and if they…

  3. The Motivational Factor of Erasmus Students at the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fombona, Javier; Rodríguez, Celestino; Sevillano, Ángeles Pascual

    2013-01-01

    This study involved 377 ERASMUS students from the University of Oviedo in an academic year. An ad-hoc questionnaire was applied in on-line format to determine students' perceptions and opinions and to understand the motivations that impel them to participate in these activities and their degree of satisfaction. The study analyzes the process of…

  4. University Experiences and Women Engineering Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, LoAnn Debra Gienger

    Riverside University (a pseudonym), like many universities, has not significantly increased the number of women who graduate with bachelor's degrees in engineering. The purpose of the study is to understand how the university experiences of women students influence the decision to persist in an undergraduate engineering degree and to understand the role of self-perception in how the students perceive experiences as supporting or hindering their persistence in the major. Archival data, documents and artifacts, observations, individual interviews, and a focus group with women engineering students provide insights into students' perceived barriers and supports of student success. Analysis of the data results in two major themes. First, students' self-confidence and self-efficacy influence how women assimilate university experiences as either supportive or diminishing of academic success. Second, university policies and practices shape the campus environment within which student experiences are formed and influence a student's level of institutional, academic, and social integration. The results of the study indicate opportunities for university leadership to enhance strategies that positively shape students' institutional, academic and social integration as precursors toward increasing the number of women students who successfully complete undergraduate engineering degrees at Riverside University. Future research is indicated to better understand how gender and gender identity intersects with other demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, immigration status, and life stage (e.g., traditional versus non-traditional students), to support or deter the persistence of engineering students to degree completion.

  5. Stressors and reactions to stressors among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2011-01-01

    University students are prone to stressors due to the transitional nature of university life. High levels of stress are believed to affect students' health as well as their academic performance. The aims of this study were to identify stressors and reactions to stressors among university students, and to examine the correlations between student stressors and study variables. A correlational descriptive design was used. Student-life Stress Inventory (SSI) was used to measure the stressors and reactions to stressors. Stratified random sampling was employed to recruit participants. The final sample consisted of 877 participants (students). s indicated that the highest group of stressors experienced by students were 'self-imposed' stressors followed by 'pressures'. Cognitive responses were found to be the highest responses to stressors experienced by students. Negative correlations were found with student's perception of health, and father's and mother's level of education. This study revealed that stressors among university students come from 'self-imposed' stressors and 'pressures'. Stress management, assertiveness skills, time management and counselling sessions will be effective in reducing stress experienced by students.

  6. university students` perception and utilization of technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in. Ethiopia (as a ... teaching and learning in classroom can greatly enhance the ..... benefits that it should be deliver. Looking at ...

  7. Attitudes of university precalculus students toward mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M; Mji, Andile

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the attitudes of 200 university students (83% freshmen) toward mathematics, a questionnaire was administered to report on their attitudes toward mathematics. Analysis indicated that students studying precalculus had a somewhat positive attitude toward mathematics.

  8. Student Academic Support as a Predictor of Life Satisfaction in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Çelik, Eyüp; Kaya, Çinar; Arslan, Nihan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between Academic Support and Life Satisfaction. Participants were 458 university students who voluntarily filled out a package of self-report instruments. Student Academic Support Scale and Satisfaction with Life Scale were used as measures. The relationships between student academic support…

  9. The protagonic participation of the students since the educational comunication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoselin Guerrero-Aragón

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The pedagogical group of the first year of the pedagogical careers has verified how the teacher of Integral Practice of the Spanish Language from the class of its subject, the educational communication allows to form positive motivations towards the learning and to create the conditions psycho-pedagogical for the collective search and the joint reflections. An educational strategy is proposed to achieve protagonist participation of the students from the Integral Practice classes of the Spanish Language at the University of Sancti Spiritus Jose Marti Perez. They were applied theoretical and empirical as: inductive-deductive, analytical-synthetic and the pedagogic observation. Across participative activities in the process of education - learning in the analysis of texts has been achieved to develop the educational labor and to educate values in the students.

  10. The problems of female students at Jimma University, Ethiopia, with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Education is perhaps the single essential measure to ensure a full participation of women in development. Women's participation in all fields of the world has become significant. Objective: This study was conducted to identify gender related problems of female students in Jimma University (JU). Methods: This ...

  11. A Comparative Study on American and Turkish Students? Self Esteem in Terms of Sport Participation: A Study on Psychological Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigiter, Korkmaz

    2014-01-01

    The present research was conducted in order to compare self-esteem of American students with Turkish students in terms of the sport participation at the universities. For this purpose, a total of 460 students (M age = 19,61 ± 1,64) voluntarily participated in the study from two universities. As data collection tool, Rosenberg (1965) Self-esteem…

  12. Fostering Student Entrepreneurship and University Spinoff Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Bailetti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A student spinoff company strives to transform knowledge acquired by students into an income-generating business. This article outlines how a university can increase the number of spinoff companies created by its student entrepreneurs. Student spinoff companies are of interest to all forward-thinking universities, particularly those that support research and teaching programs in the field of entrepreneurship. The spinoff companies provide tangible evidence that students acquire viable entrepreneurial skills while studying at the university. In addition, student spinoff companies contribute to regional economic development, commercialize knowledge that otherwise would go undeveloped, help universities attain and expand their core missions, and increase the return on the investments in university R&D. University policies developed specifically for student spinoff companies significantly affect the growth potential of such ventures. This article provides a model and a set of principles that universities can use to support and increase the number of student entrepreneurs at their institutions. The model and principles are grounded in research findings and practical experience. In addition, the article suggests that universities adopt a results-based management approach to plan and deploy initiatives to support student entrepreneurs. The approach is widely used by government agencies interested in increasing the outcomes from their investments.

  13. The Effect of Synchronous and Asynchronous Participation on Students' Performance in Online Accounting Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Keith; Kenworthy, Amy; McNamara, Ray

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between MBA students' performance and participation in two online environments: a synchronous forum (chat room) and an asynchronous forum (discussion board) at an Australian university. The "quality" and "quantity" of students' participation is used to predict their final examination and…

  14. 'I've got to get something out of it. And so do they': experiences of people with aphasia and university students participating in a communication partner training programme for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ashley; Hudson, Kyla; Finch, Emma; Fleming, Jennifer; Lethlean, Jennifer; McPhail, Steven

    2018-06-05

    Communication partner training (CPT) has been used to support communication partners to interact successfully with people with aphasia (PWA). Through successful CPT interaction PWA's accessibility to healthcare is notably improved. The present study sought to build on prior studies by investigating the experiences of individuals with aphasia and healthcare providers to ascertain what they deemed to be beneficial from CPT and what could be refined or improved, dependent on the setting and skill set of those participating. To gain an understanding of the experiences of PWA involved in the provision of CPT to health professional (HP) students. Also to investigate the experiences of HP students who participated in the CPT programme. Eight PWA and 77 HP students who had completed a CPT programme participated in a focus group/semi-structured interview (PWA) and feedback session (HP students) moderated by two speech-language pathologists (SLPs). These sessions were recorded (audio and video), transcribed verbatim, including non-verbal communication, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Overall, the study sought to understand experiences of the training. Both the PWA and HP students reported positive experiences of CPT. PWA discussed their perception that CPT improved HPs and HP students' understanding and interactions conversing with them and emphasized the need for training and education for all health related professions. HP students enjoyed the opportunity to experience interacting with PWA, without being 'assessed' and felt it consolidated their learning based on lecture content. Inclusive and accessible healthcare is paramount to ensure the engagement of patients and providers. Based on the experiences and feedback of the participants in this current study, CPT offers a salient and practical training method with potential to improve practice. Participants perceived CPT to be beneficial and validated the need for the training to support PWA accessing

  15. Seven Birds with One Magic Bullet: Designing Assignments that Encourage Student Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    At the Danish University School of Education we have experimented with a form of assessment called "active participation". A week before each class students are given reading guidelines and questions to help them approach the texts, and on the basis of one of those questions the students each write a two-page essay. The students are…

  16. Effects of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resilience on Social Media Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Okan; Tas, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of perceived social support and psychological resilience on social media addiction among university students. The research group was composed of 503 university students. The ages of participant students varied between 17 and 31 years old. 340 (67.6%) of the participants are female and 163 (32.4%) of them are…

  17. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  18. University Students' Intentions to Report Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozencroft, Kelly; Campbell, Marilyn; Orel, Alexandria; Kimpton, Melanie; Leong, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and less about whether they utilise anti-bullying policies. However, failure to report cyberbullying incidents to authorities would lessen the efficacy of these policies. This study investigated the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and their…

  19. Core Knowledge Confusions among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Svedholm, Annika M.; Takada, Mikito; Lonnqvist, Jan-Erik; Verkasalo, Markku

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that university students hold several paranormal beliefs and that paranormal beliefs can be best explained with core knowledge confusions. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent university students confuse the core ontological attributes of lifeless material objects (e.g. a house, a stone), living…

  20. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  1. Various Portraits of Finnish Open University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Arto; Nori, Hanna; Alho-Malmelin, Marika

    2007-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the background and goals of students at the Finnish open university in the beginning of the twenty-first century. The material consists of statistics based on the student records of the Finnish open university in 2000 (n = 9080) and of the stories, educational autobiographies written by the adult learners (n =…

  2. Matching Expectations for Successful University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam; MacCallum, Judith; Young, Susan; Walker, Gabrielle; Holmes, Kirsten; Haski-Leventha, Debbie; Scott, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts. Design/methodology/approach: This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six…

  3. Understanding Durban University of Technology Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African university students' perceptions and understandings of biodiversity. This paper seeks to describe the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of students at Durban University of ..... Doctoral dissertation, New York State School of Industrial and Labor ... Journal of Counseling and Development, 85(2), 189–195.

  4. University Students' Meta-Modelling Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background: As one part of scientific meta-knowledge, students' meta-modelling knowledge should be promoted on different educational levels such as primary school, secondary school and university. This study focuses on the assessment of university students' meta-modelling knowledge using a paper-pencil questionnaire. Purpose: The general purpose…

  5. Internet Censorship in Turkey: University Students' Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study university students' opinions toward online censorship with references to their socio-political and economic variables. Considering the upwards trend and the increasing number of online restrictions in Turkey, the opinions of university students (n=138) are thought to give significant findings. The questionnaire…

  6. Ethnic Differences of University Students with Respect to the Activity in Student Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Serajzadeh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Student societies and associations are developed in universities in order to provide a healthy and reasonable means for students to spend their leisure time and to develop their social skills. Meanwhile, it seems that the level of membership and participation of different groups of students in these societies and associations is not the same. Some evidences imply that students of special ethnicities participate in these societies more than others and these societies function as a place for regeneration of ethnic and regional relations among the students. This is the main question of the paper: is the level of participation in these societies varying among the students of different ethnicities? This question examined by a secondary analysis of the data of two surveys conducted among a sample of students of state non-medical universities all-over the country. The findings were analyzed on the basis of the historical and cultural characteristics of ethnic relations in Iran.

  7. University Student Awareness of Skin Cancer: Behaviors, Recognition, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Estaville, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer, and it often is preventable. The authors sought to evaluate behavior and knowledge regarding skin cancer among students at a Texas university. The authors recruited a diverse group of students in terms of sex, age, and ethnicity to participate in a survey regarding knowledge of skin cancer signs, use of tanning beds, and performance of self-assessment for skin cancer. Participating students could complete surveys in classrooms, at health fairs, or online via Survey Monkey. The authors examined data for the 3 variables in relation to sex, ethnicity, and age. A total of 512 responses were completed. Female students completed 371 (72.46%) surveys, and male students completed 141 (27.54%). The ethnicity of student participants was nearly evenly split among whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. Ethnicity was the most significant factor influencing the knowledge of skin cancer and behaviors to prevent it. Specifically, Hispanic and African American students possessed a lower level of skin cancer awareness. More female students than male students used tanning beds, and although use was self-reported as infrequent, the results imply that 4500 of the university's students might use tanning beds, which is concerning if extrapolated to other university student populations in Texas. Behavioral intervention is critical in reducing students' risk of skin cancer in later years, and university students must acquire knowledge to increase their awareness of skin health and to minimize their risk of developing skin cancer. Radiation therapists are uniquely positioned to share knowledge of skin cancer. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  8. Analyzing Interpersonal Problem Solving in Terms of Solution Focused Approach and Humor Styles of University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Hayri; Arslan, Coskun

    2017-01-01

    In this study university students interpersonal problem solving approaches were investigated in terms of solution focused approach and humor styles. The participants were 773 (542 female and 231 male, between 17-33 years old) university students. To determine the university students' problem solving approaches "Interpersonal Problem Solving…

  9. Beverage Alcohol Choice Among University Students: Perception, Consumption and Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Liana SALANTA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze and compare the beverage alcohol choice among university students. The study was carried out on a total of 1069 students (men and women from University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Romania. A general questionnaire assessed alcoholic beverage consumption, perception and preference. The main reasons associated with alcohol consumption were relaxation and socialization followed by taste and flavour. The most respondents are attracted by flavor and aroma of the favourite beverage. The participants in the study were not heavy social drinkers (only 1.7 % of participants consume alcohol every day. Beer and wine, were the alcoholic beverages ranked in the top of preferences. Our findings can provide information for educators and policymakers in Romania to implement target-orientated interventions against alcohol abuse at universities. The results of this study may also add evidence to university administrators and public health educators elsewhere dealing with students from Romania.

  10. Trends in sport participation at South African universities | Burnett ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participation figures of sixteen universities obtained through two questionnaires, six interviews and nineteen focus groups reveal high success rates in league competitions, ranging between 62.1 per ... Issues of inclusion and gender equality should be addressed, as the majority of sports uphold the ethos of masculinity.

  11. Optimising Tertiary Student Accommodation within University Neighbourhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Ike, Nnenna; Baldwin, Claudia; Lathouras, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary students’ activities within neighbourhoods adjacent to universities engender positive and negative impacts that have consequences for neighbourhood sustainability. This might lead to studentification, a process that triggers physical, economic and socio-cultural transformation of university towns. Where non-student residents perceive negative impacts, it can lead to conflict and resentment towards the student population, mistrust between student and local resident groups and a decrea...

  12. University Students' Perceptions of Their Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Kilic, Ziya; Akdeniz, Ali Riza

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dimensions of the university students' perceptions of their science classes and whether or not the students' perceptions differ significantly as regards to the gender and grade level in six main categories namely; (1) pedagogical strategies, (2) faculty interest in teaching, (3) students interest…

  13. Depression and Anxiety in University Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wristen, Brenda G.

    2013-01-01

    Performance anxiety among musicians and music students has been widely addressed, but far less attention has been given to examining the rates and characteristics of broader mental distress in this population. This study examined depression and anxiety in music students at one university. A considerable number of students reported symptoms…

  14. MENTAL HEALTH AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Woodgate, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    We want to learn from university students about your experiences and perspectives on mental health and well-being in the context of being a student. Your input can help us develop evidence-based intervention programs that can help address the mental health needs of students. This survey should take 15-20 minutes to complete.

  15. Perceptions of acceptable conducts by university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Nazaré Marques

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Academic misconducts were mainly considered more acceptable than professional misconducts. Our results show that perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst optometry students are not very different from other students, and, against our initial prediction, do not show a general change in misconduct perception when students become more mature. Universities should pay more attention to this problem and take action.

  16. Parents Influencing Secondary Students' University Aspirations: A Multilevel Approach Using School-SES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart; Vernon, Lynette; Seddon, Sarah; Andrews, Yolanda; Wang, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Students' university aspirational capacity and expectancies are key factors in predicting future university participation. Aspirations and expectations to attend university are strongly influenced by parent educational socialisation and school culture. This study investigates associations between students' university discussions with parents and…

  17. Australian University International Student Finances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2009-01-01

    The omission of international students from the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that Australians perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study…

  18. Student Engagement and Academic Performance in the Colombian University Context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineda-Báez, Clelia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increase in Latin America of Higher Education coverage, grave dropout problems persist that question the role of educational experiences to foster students’ academic engagement. This study was carried out in Colombia and sought to establish the relationship between the five benchmarks that compose academic engagement and the academic performance of a group of Colombian university students. The transversal and correlational study used the Spanish version of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE that measures students’ level of participation in five dimensions: Academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and supportive campus environment and its relationship to academic performance. The findings of 1906 students from 7 universities indicate that there are statistically significant, but weak correlations between the items that compose the benchmarks and students’ academic performance, which lead to reflect upon key aspects to strengthen the education experiences offered to university students.

  19. MOTIVATING STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED EVENTS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shulgina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, increasing the motivation of future specialists’ to mastering general and special professional competences is one of the acute issues of the higher education system. Despite a wide-spread popularity and a considerable amount of studies on the problem connected with motivation of training in higher education institution, researchers have not dealt with a mechanism of start of a motivational impulse of professional self-determination and professionalizing such as participation of students in extra-curricular activities and events of professionally oriented format. At the same time, students can find many skills demanded in the chosen profession and practical experience only on condition of their active participation in extra-curricular activities, which allow them to expand and deepen knowledge of the chosen profession received during the classroom activities; to solidify separate blocks of theoretical material in an informal situation.The aims of the research presented in the article are the following: to identify and study the process of motivation to participation in the organization of extra-curricular activities and events of professional orientation among students of different university courses; to disclose the potential of similar work for formation of additional research, organizational, communicatory and other skills and abilities necessary for becoming a valuable specialist. Methodology and research methods. Analytical review and generalization of psychological, pedagogical and methodical literature on the considered problem was conducted at the initial stage of work. The methodological research base involves: conceptual substantive and procedural approaches to studying the phenomenon of motivation; David McClelland’s Human Motivation Theory; Participatory Management Theory; Active Training Theory. Interactive game technologies, anonymous questioning, methods of descriptive and variation statistics were

  20. UNIVERSITY STUDENTS? ATTITUDES TOWARDS ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek OZMEN

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine university students? attitudes towards environmental problems and the influence of socio-demographic characteristics on it. The present descriptive study was carried out at the Celal Bayar University School of Health, SHMYO and Faculty of Medicine (N=742. A questionnaire designed by researches and Environmental Attitudes Scale (EAS were applied to n=410 students who were present at the school at the time of applying. Although 65,0% of the students have stated that they were sensitive to environmental issues, 84,9% of them have not participitated to an activity about environmental issues. Total score of EAS of the students of Faculty of Medicine and School of Health, the students whose age were higher than 20, female students, the students who lived longest at city, the students who were sensitive to environmental issues, the students who thought an education must be given in high school, the students who has siblings fewer than 3 and the students whose parents were university graduate were higher than other students (p < 0,05. An education program should be developed for the students who were sensitive about the environmental issues to change their behavior about environmental matters. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 330-344

  1. [Changes in body weight of the university students at university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Ruiz, María Nelia; Aguinaga Ontonso, Inés; Canga Armayor, Navidad; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Hermoso de Mendoza, Juana; Serrano Monzo, Inmaculada; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2015-06-01

    One of the strategies for the prevention of the obesity is the identification of critical periods of gain weight. Some studies confirm gain weight during the university period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the changes in the body weight of the university students in Navarre. Prospective cohort study. Public University of Navarre and the University of Navarre, in Pamplona. Study examined weight change among 452 students attending at university in Pamplona, during first and third course. Four hundred and fifty two students completed the questionnaire. Weight and height were measures and body mass index was calculated. The mean body weight increased 0,600 kg, 1,8 kg for males and no change in body weight was observed in female. 44,7 % of students gained weight (60,8 % of men and 36,8 % of women), and the gain weight was of 3,4 kg. University years are a critical factor for the gain weight, particularly males. Consideration of this, is necessary the development of effective weight gain prevention strategies during the university. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceptions of acceptable conducts by university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Dora Nazaré; Macedo, António Filipe

    2016-01-01

    To determine perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst under and postgraduate optometry students and to compare them with students from other disciplines. Students (under/postgraduate) of optometry (n=156) and other courses (n=54) from University of Minho participated in a voluntary online questionnaire about perception of conducts, classifying as acceptable or unacceptable 15 academic or professional scenarios. 210 questionnaires were analyzed. Differences in perceptions were found between optometry under and postgraduates in scenario 5, Chi-square(2,156)=4.3, p=0.038, and scenario 7, Chi-square(2,156)=7.0, p=0.008 (both with cheating more acceptable for postgrads). Differences between under and postgraduates from other courses were found in scenario 9 (taking supplies from classroom more acceptable for undergrads), Chi-square(1,54)=5.0, p=0.025, and scenario 14 (forging a signature more acceptable for postgrads), Chi-square(1,54)=3.9, p=0.046. Differences between optometry and other courses undergraduates were observed in scenario 2 (plagiarism more acceptable for optometry undergrads), Chi-square(1,154)=8.3, p=0.004 and scenario 9 (taking supplies from classroom more acceptable for other undergrads), chi-square(1,54)=7.8, p=0.005. Differences between optometry and other courses postgraduates were observed in scenario 7, Chi-square(1,56)=5.8, p=0.016, scenario 10 (both with cheating more acceptable for optometry postgrads), chi-square(1,54)=8.1, p=0.004 and scenario 14 (forging a signature more acceptable for other postgrads), Chi-square(1,54)=6.1, p=0.026. Academic misconducts were mainly considered more acceptable than professional misconducts. Our results show that perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst optometry students are not very different from other students, and, against our initial prediction, do not show a general change in misconduct perception when students become more mature. Universities should pay more attention to this problem and take

  3. Pittsburgh Public School District / Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Team Participation in the US First Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    FIRST, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, is an international program designed to encourage junior and senior high school students to participate in science and technology related activities. FIRST attempts to increase enthusiasm for technology by providing a competitive environment in which to demonstrate robotics technology designed for a particular set of tasks. Carnegie Mellon University provided student members of the project the opportunity to complete the design, construction, testing, and operation of a robot. Electrical, mechanical, and programming skills were stressed, with both adult and senior students acting as mentors for more junior members. Teamwork and integration was also stressed in order to provide students with a realistic feel for project-based work. Finally, an emphasis was placed on recruiting students with greater difficulty in entering technological fields: girls and ethnic minorities and students leaning toward humanities (especially art). Carnegie Mellon built a relationship with Taylor Allderdice High School that lasted four years. For four years, the success of the project increased each year. Each term, the students successfully designed and built a working robot that could fully participate in the competition. The enthusiasm of the students has been the cornerstone of the recruit of new students, keeping the project growing and vital. Carnegie Mellon's participation with Allderdice has been an overall great success.

  4. Self-esteem and organizational values in university students and not university students from Lima

    OpenAIRE

    Loli Pineda, Alejandro E.; López Vega, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    The selfesteem and the organizationals values in university students and not university students of Lima, is a study developed in a sample of 3215 students belonging to four universities of Lima; and not students conformed by egressions, professional and postgraduados, many of which show off directive charges in public or private companies, with the purpose to know the existing relation among the selfesteem and the values organizational of the same, in Lima Metropolitan, and to determine the ...

  5. University of Houston Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Talbot, R. W.; Hampton, D. L.; Molders, N.; Millan, R. M.; Halford, A. J.; Dunbar, B.; Morris, G. A.; Prince, J.; Gamblin, R.; Ehteshami, A.; Lehnen, J. N.; Greer, M.; Porat, I.; Alozie, M.; Behrend, C. C.; Bias, C.; Fenton, A.; Gunawan, B.; Harrison, W.; Martinez, A.; Mathur, S.; Medillin, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T. V.; Nowling, M.; Perez, D.; Pham, M.; Pina, M.; Thomas, G.; Velasquez, B.; Victor, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) is a NASA program to engage undergraduate students in rigorous scientific research, for the purposes of innovation and developing the next generation of professionals for an array of fields. The program is student led and executed from initial ideation to research to the design and deployment of scientific payloads. The University of Houston has been selected twice to participate in the USIP programs. The first program (USIP_UH I) ran from 2013 to 2016. USIP_UH II started in January of 2016, with funding starting at the end of May. USIP_UH I (USIP_UH II) at the University of Houston was (is) composed of eight (seven) research teams developing six (seven), distinct, balloon-based scientific instruments. These instruments will contribute to a broad range of geophysical sciences from Very Low Frequency recording and Total Electron Content to exobiology and ozone profiling. USIP_UH I had 12 successful launches with 9 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2015, and 4 piggyback flights with BARREL 3 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2015. USIP_UH II had 8 successful launches with 5 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2017, 3 piggyback flights with BARREL 4 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2016, and 1 flight each from CSBF and UH. The great opportunity of this program is capitalizing on the proliferation of electronics miniaturization to create new generations of scientific instruments that are smaller and lighter than ever before. This situation allows experiments to be done more cheaply which ultimately allows many more experiments to be done.

  6. Dual Enrollment Participation from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanny, M. Allison

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the experiences of five high school students previously enrolled in dual enrollment courses, and discusses the perceived benefits and disadvantages of these experiences from the student perspective.

  7. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  8. Mental health among students of pedagogical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinauskas R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

  9. Older medical students' performances at McGill University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, D; Kristian, M; Mitchell, N

    1998-01-01

    To compare admission data and academic performances of medical students younger and older than 25, and to qualify older students' experiences and perceptions in medical school. The authors reviewed 1988-1991 data for applications to the McGill University Faculty of Medicine. Data included GPAs and MCAT scores, as well as ratings for reference letters, autobiographical statements, and interviews. For those same years, the authors measured students' academic performances in the preclinical and clinical years. The authors compared the data by students' age: "younger" students, aged 17 to 24; and "older" students, aged 25 and above. All enrolled students took the Derogatis Stress Profile, and the older students participated in focus groups. The older applicants had lower GPAs and MCAT scores, but higher interview and reference letter ratings. For older accepted students, basic science course scores were lower than those of younger students, but clinical scores did not differ significantly between the groups. The two groups had similar stress levels, although older students tested lower in driven behavior, relaxation potential, attitude posture, and hostility. In focus groups, the older students spoke of learning style differences, loss of social support, and loss of professional identity. Different scores in admission criteria suggest that McGill uses different standards to select older medical students. Older students admitted under different criteria, however, do just as well as do younger students by their clinical years. A broad-based study of admission criteria and outcomes for the older student population is warranted.

  10. The napping behaviour of Australian university students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Lovato

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported sleep and napping behaviour of Australian university students and the relationship between napping and daytime functioning. A sample of 280 university first-year psychology students (median age  = 19.00 years completed a 6-item napping behaviour questionnaire, a 12-item Daytime Feelings and Functioning Scale, the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results indicated that 53.6% of students reported napping with 34% napping at least 1-2 times per week, and 17% napping three or more occasions per week. Long naps, those over 30 minutes, were taken by 77% of the napping students. Sixty-one percent of students reported they took long naps during the post-lunch dip period, from 2-4 pm. Students who nap at least once per week reported significantly more problems organizing their thoughts, gaining motivation, concentrating, and finishing tasks than students who did not nap. Students who napped also felt significantly more sleepy and depressed when compared to students who did not nap. The results also indicated that nap frequency increased with daytime sleepiness. The majority of students (51% reported sleeping 6-7 hours per night or less. Overall, the results from this study suggest that among this population of Australian first-year university students habitual napping is common and may be used in an attempt to compensate for the detrimental effects of excessive sleepiness.

  11. The napping behaviour of Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported sleep and napping behaviour of Australian university students and the relationship between napping and daytime functioning. A sample of 280 university first-year psychology students (median age  = 19.00 years) completed a 6-item napping behaviour questionnaire, a 12-item Daytime Feelings and Functioning Scale, the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results indicated that 53.6% of students reported napping with 34% napping at least 1-2 times per week, and 17% napping three or more occasions per week. Long naps, those over 30 minutes, were taken by 77% of the napping students. Sixty-one percent of students reported they took long naps during the post-lunch dip period, from 2-4 pm. Students who nap at least once per week reported significantly more problems organizing their thoughts, gaining motivation, concentrating, and finishing tasks than students who did not nap. Students who napped also felt significantly more sleepy and depressed when compared to students who did not nap. The results also indicated that nap frequency increased with daytime sleepiness. The majority of students (51%) reported sleeping 6-7 hours per night or less. Overall, the results from this study suggest that among this population of Australian first-year university students habitual napping is common and may be used in an attempt to compensate for the detrimental effects of excessive sleepiness.

  12. Are psychology university student gamblers representative of non-university students and general gamblers? A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Russell, Alex; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Students recruited from psychology undergraduate university populations are commonly used in psychology research, including gambling studies. However, the extent to which the use of this subpopulation produces findings that can be extrapolated to other groups is questionable. The present study was designed to compare results from university-recruited psychology student gamblers to those obtained from a sample of gamblers recruited from the general population that also included students. An online survey measuring gambling behavior and Internet gambling, attitudes and knowledge about gambling and problem gambling severity was posted on websites accessed by gamblers. Participants were recruited from two sources, a psychology undergraduate university population (n = 461) and online websites (n = 4,801). Results showed university-recruited students differed significantly from both adults and students recruited from the general population in respect to demographic variables and gambling behavior. Psychology undergraduate students were younger, more likely to be female, and had lower incomes. When relevant demographic variables were controlled, psychology undergraduate students were found to gamble less frequently, at different times, and to be at lower-risk for gambling-related problems, but had more irrational beliefs and more negative attitudes towards gambling than gamblers recruited from the general population. Results suggest that caution should be used in extrapolating findings from research using university-recruited psychology student gamblers to wide community populations due to differences related to gambling thoughts, attitudes and behaviors.

  13. The need to support students with autism at university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Ann M; Cashin, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Publicity surrounds the increased prevalence of autism. However, in contrast to support in primary and secondary schools, there exists little focus on supporting students with autism at university. Mental health nurses are well placed to facilitate support programmes for students with autism who have the capacity for higher education. This article examines the international literature around the support needs for these students and discusses opportunities that exist to support these students, their families, and higher education staff. Research is urgently needed to evaluate the success of such interventions, particularly in light of the low participation rates in study and work for people with autism.

  14. Healthy Lifestyle of Czech University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Marholdová, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The thesis deals with the healthy lifestyle of Czech university students. The main objectives are to map the healthy lifestyle of Czech university students, especially to find out whether they follow the principles of healthy lifestyle, to find out their knowledge concerning this issue, to find out if there are any obstacles to follow the healthy lifestyle and to find out whether they know any projects supporting health and healthy lifestyle. In the theoretical part of the thesis the basic te...

  15. Tutorials in university students with a disability

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquín Gairín Sallán; José Luís Muñoz Moreno

    2013-01-01

    This article places an emphasis on the importance of tutorials for students with a disability in universities. It presented the most significant results of the study of tutorials carried out in help services, units or offices for students with a disability inmore than 45 Spanish universities, in relation to promotion, reception, completion and graduation. The contributions highlight the importance of organising a response through a Tutorial Action Plan made up of the stages of motivation and ...

  16. Health-related quality of life among online university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Pamela L; Rohrer, James E; Fulton, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Online university students are a growing population whose health has received minimal attention. The purpose of this cross-sectional Internet survey was to identify risk factors for the health status among online university students. This online survey collected data from 301 online university students through a large, US-based participant pool and LinkedIn. Health status was measured using 3 elements of health-related quality of life (HRQOL): self-rated overall health (SRH), unhealthy days, and recent activity limitation days. All 3 measures were dichotomized. The odds of poor SRH were higher for people who reported a body mass index in the overweight and obese categories (odds ratio [OR] = 2.99, P students who are low income, in disadvantaged racial groups, who are overweight, smoke, and who do not exercise. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Students with Sickle Cell Anemia Participating in Recess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Devlin, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The participation of a student with Sickle Cell Anemia in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with Sickle Cell Anemia and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially the definition,…

  18. Basic needs of Universiti Utara Malaysia students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Suzilah; Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Enn, Chang Tzu

    2017-11-01

    Basic needs are defined as goods or services that are essential for human to live and function. Wants on the other hand, are goods or services that are not necessary but we desire or wish for in order to fulfil our needs. In university, students' needs and wants are not always easily detectable due to different generations of students. The students' desires are also caused by peer interactions, course needs and cultural differences. For example older generations requires typewriter but new generations need a laptop. Many university students have difficulty to differentiate between basic needs and wants. This leads to financial management problem which can affect their academic performance. The purpose of this study is to identify students of Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) basic needs. Based on past studies conducted by 3 universities, 12 items related to students' basic needs were identified. However, only 9 items are considered relevant to UUM students. A study on a focus group consist of 18 students from different background was conducted to validate the 9 items of basic needs by using in depth interviews. The findings indicated food, clothing, books, stationery, photocopying, printing & binding, information & communication technology (ICT), mobile phone bills, transportation and others (which includes toiletries, groceries, sport, & entertainment) as the 9 items. The findings also revealed that student basic needs for ICT are not only laptop and printer but also a smartphone. As for clothing, requirements are different according to programs the student majors in. A business student need full business attire, law students need a proper robe for moot courts and curriculum activities require the students to be in uniform. These are basic needs and not desires or wants.

  19. Popularity of the internet with university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Szpringer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Virtual reality constitutes an exceptional chance to support personal development, but it also creates new barriers and inequalities and it brings about many threats, both to the person and to society in general. Besides the indubitable advantages of the Internet, it more and more often endangers the harmonious development of a person. Virtual reality puts users in a situation in which interaction and communication is conducted differently to what they are used to based on their everyday experience. Aim of the research: The aim of the research was an analysis of the Internet’s popularity among university students. The method that was used was a diagnostic survey, carried out using questionnaires, which were the tools used to achieve the goal. Chosen results of the research, essential from the point of view of the formulated problem, were presented in the project. The research issue is encapsulated in the question: How popular is the Internet among university students? Material and methods: Empirical research was conducted in the academic year 2010/2011 at universities in the Świętokrzyskie province. A total of 950 students attending medical majors (nursing, physiotherapy, medical rescue, pedagogical majors (social rehabilitation, integrated pre-school and early education, pedagogy with logopaedics and technical majors (mechatronics, construction took part in the research. Results: More than 50% of the people that took part in the research were between 20 and 25 years of age. Over 33% of them were aged between 26 and 30. More than 87% of the participants used the Internet, 88% of the respondents had created a Facebook account, 81% of the students logged into the Nasza Klasa website and over 76% of them admitted to frequent use of scientific information found in the Internet. More than 55% of them benefited from psychological counselling via the Internet. In the presented research 75% of the students used the GG (Gadu

  20. University Students' Perceptions of the Life Effects of Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie; Gabel, Rodney; Irani, Farzan; Schlagheck, Adam

    2010-01-01

    An open-ended, written survey was administered to 146 university students who did not stutter to obtain their impressions of the effects of stuttering on the lives of people who stutter (PWS). Participants first wrote about the general effects of stuttering and then considered how their lives would be different if they stuttered. Both types of…

  1. Perceptions of HPV Vaccine amongst UK University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ellen; Senior, Naomi; Abdullah, Ammar; Brown, Janine; Collings, Suzanne; Racktoo, Sophie; Walpole, Sarah; Zeiton, Moez; Heffernan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this small-scale focus group study is to explore the impact the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has on attitudes towards HPV, cervical cancer and sexual risk taking amongst university students in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were recruited through advertisements placed on notice boards throughout the…

  2. Undergraduate Arab International Students' Adjustment to U.S. Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Rabia, Hazza M.

    2017-01-01

    The adjustment process and issues of 16 Arab international students enrolled at two universities in the Northeast of the United States were examined through this qualitative, exploratory study. The participants were from Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and United Arab Emirates and had been in the US for 2 to 5 years. In-depth…

  3. First-year University Students' Productive Knowledge of Collocations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study examines productive knowledge of collocations of tertiary-level second language (L2) learners of English in an attempt to make estimates of the size of their knowledge. Participants involved first-year students at North-West University who sat a collocation test modelled on that developed by Laufer and ...

  4. Examining University Students' Anger and Satisfaction with Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Gülsen Büyüksahin

    2017-01-01

    The current research aims to study university students' levels of anger and satisfaction with life, based on gender, years of attendance, accommodation, and whether they experience adjustment problems. The current research participants included a total of 484 individuals (X-bar age = 22.56; SD = 1.72; range = 19-37), with 269 (55.6%) males and 215…

  5. English Grammar and Thai University Students: An Insurmountable Linguistic Battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengboon, Saksit

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating English grammar knowledge of a group of Thai university students. The three main research questions revolved around their knowledge of English grammar, the kinds of difficulties they had encountered in using the grammar as well as their perceptions of the roles of grammar in using English. The participants were…

  6. The effects of perceived leisure constraints among Korean university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Sook Oh; Sei-Yi Oh; Linda L. Caldwell

    2002-01-01

    This study is based on Crawford, Jackson, and Godbey's model of leisure constraints (1991), and examines the relationships between the influences of perceived constraints, frequency of participation, and health status in the context of leisure-time outdoor activities. The study was based on a sample of 234 Korean university students. This study provides further...

  7. Psychological Well-Being and Internet Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardak, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between Internet addiction and psychological well-being. Participants were 479 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale and the Scales of Psychological Well-Being. The relationships between Internet addiction and psychological…

  8. Propelling Students into Active Grammar Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurhill, Dennis A.

    2011-01-01

    "O! this learning, what a thing it is." -W. Shakespeare, "The Taming of the Shrew." The aim of this action research was to find out if active grammar involvement amongst students might lead to better results. My approach was to activate my students during grammar instruction by using cooperative learning: that is a form of…

  9. Evaluating the Struggles with International Students and Local Community Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusek, Weronika A.

    2015-01-01

    International students are not only important for universities, but even more so to the host communities, towns and regions where higher education institutions are located. This pilot study looked at a public university located in a small college town in Ohio. The study explored the relationship between international students and the local…

  10. Enhancing first year chemistry student's participation in practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, enhancing student's participation in practical analytical ... The data were collected from I year chemistry undergraduate students of class size 56 of ... learning practical Chemistry were mainly due to problems in preparing a flow ...

  11. Attrition of undergraduate nursing students at selected South African universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Roos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The nursing profession forms the backbone of many healthcare systems. It therefore needs a consistent supply of registered nurses to deliver continuous and safe quality healthcare, and to replace the nurses leaving or retiring from the profession. Attrition actively occurs among nursing students in South Africa and threatens the future supply of registered nurses. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the attrition rate at selected South African universities and the factors influencing undergraduate nursing students to discontinue their nursing studies at these universities. Method: A quantitative descriptive design was followed. Heads of the nursing departments at the selected universities captured data with a specifically designed questionnaire. Thereafter their former nursing students provided information via a structured telephonic interview on the reasons why they discontinued the nursing programme. Results: The study revealed that attrition of undergraduate nursing students for three intake years (2007, 2008 and 2009 at the participating universities was between 39.3% and 58.7%. Academic and financial reasons as well as poor wellness and health were the main causes for attrition. Another factor was failure to cope with the demands of the clinical environment. Conclusion: Attrition might not occur immediately when a nursing student is challenged, as the student might exploit the various types of support offered. Although some nursing students do benefit from the offered support, a large number of nursing students still discontinue the undergraduate nursing programme.

  12. Behavior of Engineering Students in Kuwait University

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Al-Ajmi; R. S. Al-Kandari

    2015-01-01

    This initial study is concerned with the behavior of engineering students in Kuwait University which became a concern due to the global issues of education in all levels. A survey has been conducted to identify academic and societal issues affecting the engineering student performance. The study is drawing major conclusions with regard to private tutoring and the online availability of textbooks’ solution manuals.

  13. University Undergraduate Students, Perceptions of The Wireless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on Uni versity Undergraduate students' perceptions of the use of the wireless internet of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria. Using emperical and new field data, this exploratory study investigated the students' perceptions of internet use in relation to library use. The study adopted a ...

  14. Depression and Related Problems in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2012-01-01

    Method: Depression and related problems were studied in a sample of 283 university students. Results: The students with high depression scores also had high scores on anxiety, intrusive thoughts, controlling intrusive thoughts and sleep disturbances scales. A stepwise regression suggested that those problems contributed to a significant proportion…

  15. Ideals of ITE students at Glasgow University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruyter, D.J.; Conroy, J.C.; Lappin, M.; McKinney, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of a questionnaire completed by initial teacher education (ITE) students at the University of Glasgow shows a clear divergence between their personal and professional ideals. The students define their own ideals predominantly in terms of situations, like being married, having children or

  16. FORECASTING CAREER PLANNING OF STUDENT OF UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Danilenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the forecasting model of career planning of student of University. This model has an empirical nature and lets to control the process and the content of student learning taking into account of his individual characteristics and the predictions of his potential careers.

  17. Supporting University Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ashleigh; Goldstein, Jody; Murphy, Deirdra; Trietsch, Rhoda; Keeves, Jacqueline; Mendes, Eva; Queenan, Alexa

    2018-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with autism spectrum disorder are entering higher education. Their success can be jeopardized by organizational, social/emotional, and academic challenges if appropriate supports are not in place. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group model for university students with autism spectrum…

  18. Cyberbullying and Victimisation among Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Yavuz; Eristi, Bahadir

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent of cyberbullying and victimisation among Turkish university students at a state college of education. A personal information form and 56 scaled items were administered to 254 students. Items addressing cyberbullying victimisation were adopted from a recent study, whereas parallel cyberbullying items were…

  19. University Students Alternative Conceptions On Circular Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Phil Canlas

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to find out university students alternative conceptions on circular motion. An 18-item researcher-compiled and content-validated questionnaire was administered to twenty-six 26 students taking up a program in Bachelor in Secondary Education-Physical Science in their second year enrolled in a course on mechanics. Results revealed that majority of the students possess alternative conceptions on circular motion specifically along velocity acceleration and force. Moreover res...

  20. Chinese and Taiwanese International College Students' Participation in Social Organizations: Implications for College Counseling Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chun; Wong, Y. Joel

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative focus group study explored the meaning of Chinese and Taiwanese international students' lived experiences in social organizations. Participants were 9 Chinese and Taiwanese international college students in a midwestern U.S. university. The analyses uncovered 7 themes: social support, recreation, emotional support, practical…

  1. An Investigation of Suicide Risk and Counseling Participation among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Carli H.

    2010-01-01

    College suicide research consistently shows that fewer than 20 percent of college students who commit suicide were clients at their university counseling centers. Counseling participation is a known protective factor from suicide. However, to date, few studies have examined the differences between college students at risk of suicide who…

  2. Internationalizing Business Education: Factors Affecting Student Participation in Overseas Study Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlak, Roger J.; Jones, Raymond M.

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated factors encouraging and inhibiting business administration students' participation in study abroad. Subjects were 128 undergraduate and graduate students at a large urban state university. Results indicated personal factors were the strongest encouraging variables, while financial considerations were the most limiting, and a…

  3. The Effect of Quality of School Life on Sense of Happiness: A Study on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökler, Riza; Gürgan, Ugur; Tastan, Nuray

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between quality of school life and happiness among university students. For this purpose, 326 students from five different faculties in Çankiri Karatekin University participated in the study. Participants filled in the "scale for quality of school life" and "scale for Oxford happiness-Compact…

  4. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  5. Prevalence of metabolic components in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Ana Roberta Vilarouca da; Sousa, Luana Savana Nascimento de; Rocha, Telma de Sousa; Cortez, Ramiro Marx Alves; Macêdo, Layla Gonçalves do Nascimento; Almeida, Paulo César de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the frequency of components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among university students.METHOD: descriptive study with 550 students, from various courses run by a public university. The socioeconomic data, lifestyle, and components of MetS were filled out using a questionnaire. Blood sample collection was undertaken in the university itself by a contracted clinical analysis laboratory.RESULTS: 66.2% were female, with a mean age of 22.6±4.41; 71.7% were sedentary; 1.8% stated...

  6. Addressing the Factors Inhibiting Students' Participation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    history and year two history students respectively and each class had an average of ... particularly classroom learning and teaching, marketing, administration, and so on. ... enable people to explain their thoughts, feelings, or beliefs in detail.

  7. Breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambanje, Martha Nyanungo; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2012-01-01

    The high breast cancer mortality rate in Sub-Saharan Africa has been attributed to a lack of public awareness of the disease which often leads to late diagnosis of the disease. Little is known about the level of knowledge and awareness of breast cancer in Angola. Previous studies have shown that breast cancer awareness is higher among well-educated people. The goal of this study was to assess breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of university students using a self-administered questionnaire to investigate participants' awareness and knowledge of breast cancer. A total of 595 university students in medical and non-medical programs successfully completed the survey. Our results showed insufficient knowledge of breast cancer among university students in Angola irrespective of whether they were in medical or non-medical programs. The majority of the participants were not aware of some of the early signs of breast cancer such as change in color or shape of the nipple, even though they appreciated the need for monthly breast self-examination. Overall most of the participants indicated the need for increased breast cancer awareness among university students. The study points to the insufficient knowledge of university students in Angola about breast cancer. We expect that our results may provide useful data that may be used by the department of health in Angola and other African countries to formulate health education programs aimed at increasing awareness and promote screening and early detection of breast cancer in the continent.

  8. Self-medication practices with antibiotics among Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Pan, H; Yang, Z; Cui, B; Zhang, D; Ba-Thein, W

    2016-01-01

    Self-medication with antibiotics (SMA) is a serious global health problem. We sought to investigate SMA behaviors and risk factors among Chinese university students, and further explore the association between SMA practices and adverse drug events (ADEs). Cross-sectional study. An online survey was conducted at Jiangsu University (JSU) in eastern China in July 2011 using a pretested questionnaire. Out of 2608 website visitors, 1086 participated in the survey (response rate: 41.6%), 426 respondents were excluded for not being a JSU student or repeat participation, 660 (2.2% of JSU students) were included in analysis, and 316 students (47.9%) had a lifetime history of SMA. Among self-treated students, 43.5% believed that antibiotic was suitable for viral infections, 65.9% had more than one SMA episode in the previous year, 73.5% self-medicated with at least two different antibiotics, 57.1% and 64.4% changed antibiotic dosage and antibiotics during the course, respectively. Female gender, older age, and prior knowledge of antibiotics (PKA) were identified as independent risk factors of SMA. There was no difference between students with and without PKA regarding SMA frequency, use of polyantibiotics, and switching antibiotic dosage or antibiotics. ADEs happened to 13.3% of self-medicated students. Frequent change of dosage and simultaneous use of the same antibiotic with different names were independent risk practices associated with an ADE. Our findings substantiate high SMA prevalence among Chinese university students. Older age and PKA are independent SMA risk factors common to Chinese university students and female gender is exclusive SMA risk factor for JSU students. Poor SMA practices are associated with ADEs. Strict regulations on antibiotic sales and public education reinforced by further health care reform are recommended. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. University Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Lori G.

    2009-01-01

    Plagiarism is an intriguing topic with many avenues for exploration. Students' perceptions of plagiarism certainly differ from their professors' and it is valuable to attempt to listen in some small measure to what those perceptions are. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of some of the ways first- and second-year university…

  10. Tutorials in university students with a disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Gairín Sallán

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article places an emphasis on the importance of tutorials for students with a disability in universities. It presented the most significant results of the study of tutorials carried out in help services, units or offices for students with a disability inmore than 45 Spanish universities, in relation to promotion, reception, completion and graduation. The contributions highlight the importance of organising a response through a Tutorial Action Plan made up of the stages of motivation and awareness-raisin, planning, execution, evaluation and institutionalisation. Among the principle conclusions, the importance of moving towards a truly inclusive university through tutorial activity is highlighted, thereby providing a guide for providing assistance to university students with a disability.

  11. Attitudes Toward Euthanasia Among Turkish University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas Karaahmetoglu, Gulsen; Kutahyalioglu, Nesibe Sumeyye

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine perceptions and attitudes toward euthanasia among university students who are pursuing bachelor's degrees. Although the legalization and application of euthanasia are discussed commonly by health-care professionals and partially by lawyers, the ideas of other segments of society, especially university students, are taken place very rarely. The research was conducted descriptively to determine the ideas of 1,170 students at Kastamonu University from six different departments: arts and sciences, theology, tourism, nursing, school of physical education, and sports with using a questionnaire. Findings demonstrated that 73.2% of the students do not approve euthanasia. Also, it was found that there are significant differences depending on age, gender, department of study, income level, place of living, and the loss of kinsmen. This study serves as a resource for future research to understand the effects of sociodemographic characteristics on the decision of euthanasia.

  12. Entrepreneurship Antecedent on Student (Case : Female Students Final Year on Gunadarma University)

    OpenAIRE

    Ganefi, Marliza; Ratih, Sri Wulan Windu; Harmoni, Ati

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine and identify antecedents of female student entrepreneurial intention. This research attempts to investigate whether self-efficacy, perceptions of opportunities, prior knowledge of other entrepreneurs, and fear of failure are predictors of female student intention to be entrepreneur. As much as 233 students in their final year, selected proportionally from 12 study programs in Gunadarma University participated in the survey. Data was collected using ques...

  13. STUDENT ACADEMIC SUPPORT AS A PREDICTOR OF LIFE SATISFACTION IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Akýn; Serhat Arslan; Eyüp Çelik; Çýnar Kaya; Nihan Arslan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between Academic Support and Life Satisfaction. Participants were 458 university students who voluntarily filled out a package of self-report instruments. Student Academic Support Scale and Satisfaction with Life Scale were used as measures. The relationships between student academic support and life satisfaction were examined using correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis. Life satisfaction was predicted positively by info...

  14. Were Knowledge Management Abilities of University Students Enhanced after Creating Personal Blog-Based Portfolios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Tseng, Ju-Shih; Chen, To-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The effect of creating blog-based portfolios on knowledge management (KM) abilities among university students was examined in the present study. Participants included 43 students majoring in Multimedia and Game Science at a University in Taiwan. Students spent nine weeks creating their personal portfolios by using a blog. The "t"-test…

  15. Student Co-Creation Behavior in Higher Education: The Role of Satisfaction with the University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharnouby, Tamer H.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what constitutes students' satisfaction with university experience and examines the influence of overall satisfaction with the university experience on students' co-creation behavior-- namely, participation behavior and citizenship behavior. Drawing upon a sample of 379 students and using structural equation modeling, the…

  16. Personality and psychopathology of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosevski, Dusica L; Milovancevic, Milica P; Gajic, Saveta D

    2010-01-01

    University students represent the national capital and investment for the future, with an implicit mission both for their families and for society as a whole. However, they face multiple stressors such as academic overload, constant pressure to succeed, competition with peers and in some countries financial burden and concerns about the future. As all this may lead to psychopathology, the health of university students has been the subject of increasing focus in recent years. Multiple protective and risk factors are involved in the psychological well being and distress of university students. Specific risk factors for the development of psychopathology are high test anxiety, lower self-efficacy, as well as certain personality traits. Moreover, some students arrive at college with already existing mental health problems. The most frequent mental disorders among students are substance abuse, depression, self-harm and suicide, eating and anxiety disorders. Acquiring and improving knowledge about the student population is a crucial factor in the development of mental health promotion programs in order to meet their needs and to help them cope with various problems. Better understanding and care of the personality profile of university students can be helpful in academic and career choice and prevention of future mental health problems.

  17. Burnout among Finnish and Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernesniemi, Elina; Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati; Cheng, Xuejiao; Hong, Jianzhong; Kuittinen, Matti

    2017-10-01

    In this study the levels of experienced burnout of Finnish and Chinese university students are compared using School Burnout Inventory (SBI). This study is motivated by earlier studies, which suggest that the level of student burnout is different in the culturally distinct Finnish and Chinese university systems, but which are based on different research instruments for the two groups. The sample studied consisted of 3,035 Finnish students and 2,309 Chinese students. Because of the cross-cultural nature of this study the level of structural equivalence of SBI between the cultural groups was examined and the effect of different response styles on the results was taken into account. Both standard and robust statistical methods were used for the analyses. The results showed that SBI with two extracted components is suitable for cross-cultural analysis between Finnish and Chinese university students. Virtually no difference was found in experienced overall burnout between the Finnish and Chinese students, which means that both university systems contain factors causing similar levels of student burnout. This study also verified that controlling for the response styles is important in cross-cultural studies as it was found to have a distinct effect on the results obtained from mean-level comparisons. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. "Class-Bucks": A Motivational Tool to Encourage Active Student Participation during Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the influence of an extrinsic motivational tool, "class-bucks," on the possibility of improving first year student-teachers' participation in active learning at Tshwane University of Technology in South Africa. Research participants (n=289) were divided into four classes and engaged in this…

  19. Undergraduate student mental health at Makerere University, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    OVUGA, EMILIO; BOARDMAN, JED; WASSERMAN, DANUTA

    2006-01-01

    There is little information on the current mental health of University students in Uganda. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of depressed mood and suicidal ideation among students at Makerere University. Two student samples participated. Sample I comprised 253 fresh students admitted to all faculties at the University in the academic year 2000/2001, selected by a simple random sampling procedure. Sample II comprised 101 students admitted to the Faculty of Medicine during the academic year 2002/2003. The prevalence of depressed mood was measured using the 13-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The prevalence of depressed mood (BDI score 10 or more) was significantly higher in sample I (16.2%) than sample II (4.0%). Sample I members were significantly more likely than those of sample II to report lifetime and past week suicide ideation. Thus, there is a high prevalence of mental health problems among the general population of new students entering Makerere University and this is significantly higher than for new students in the Faculty of Medicine. PMID:16757997

  20. Gender Constructions and Legitimacy among University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    serious difficulties in being accepted in a group and thus to complete their education. Second, I found that the negative categories were attributed to the students due to their gender. In Denmark we are very concerned of eliminating inequality and creating equal possibilities according to race, social...... background and gender. Thus, we tend to believe that gender play no role at all for the possibilities of university students to complete their education at a high level. Contrary to this assumption, my studies show that students used gender stereotypies to select and limit fellow students....

  1. Gender Constructions and Legitimacy among University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    -social had serious difficulties in being accepted in a group and thus to complete their education. Second, I found that the negative categories were attributed to the students due to their gender. In Denmark we are very concerned of eliminating inequality and creating equal possibilities according to race......, social background and gender. Thus, we tend to believe that gender play no role at all for the possibilities of university students to complete their education at a high level. Contrary to this assumption, my studies show that students used gender stereotypies to select and limit fellow students....

  2. University Students Alternative Conceptions On Circular Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Phil Canlas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to find out university students alternative conceptions on circular motion. An 18-item researcher-compiled and content-validated questionnaire was administered to twenty-six 26 students taking up a program in Bachelor in Secondary Education-Physical Science in their second year enrolled in a course on mechanics. Results revealed that majority of the students possess alternative conceptions on circular motion specifically along velocity acceleration and force. Moreover results showed the inconsistencies in the students understanding of circular motion concepts.

  3. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  4. Student Protests. Three Periods of University Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Ramon Rodriguez-Amat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Exploring the idea of student protests as an autonomous object of research and discussion, this paper leads to the understanding that the transforming role of the university and its governance defines the possibilities for the political role of students. In this perspective, there is a particular constellation of the different forms of higher education governance that provides students with the right and even the responsibility of protesting as politically engaged citizens of the university and of the state. Approaching the transformation of the models of university governance as a set of archaeologically organised states this paper identifies the sequential roles provided to the students and the meaning of their protests and demonstrations. After visiting some antecedents of more contemporaneous student movements and protests, this paper focuses on the UK to explore three manifestations of university governance that can be roughly differentiated as the enduring democratic period that extends from the late 1960s to the late 1980s, the globalisation period that extends from the early 1990s to the mid-2000s and as the post-millennial turn. These periods, embodying three different styles of governance of higher education, not only demonstrate conformity with the political and economic contexts in which they are embeded, they also correspond to particular socio-technological and communicative ecosystems and determine the specificities of the role of the students and their capacity for political action.

  5. What Does Political Participation Mean to Spanish Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, Edda

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how a group of Spanish students (aged 11-19) understand the meaning of "political participation" in society and discusses the implications of their views for debates and practices in citizenship education. The ways in which these students (n = 112) describe and interpret political participation are analysed using an…

  6. Game Play Participation of Amotivated Students during Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Garn, Alex C.; Vidoni, Carla; Youngberg, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Sport Education has embedded pedagogical strategies proposed to reduce the prevalence of amotivation in physical education. The purpose of this study was to provide an examination of the game play participation rates of amotivated students within a Sport Education season. A sample of 395 high school students participated in a season of team…

  7. 'Neknomination': Predictors in a sample of UK university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Antony C; Spada, Marcantonio M; Harkin, Jamila; Albery, Ian P; Rycroft, Nicola; Nikčević, Ana V

    2015-06-01

    To identify prevalence and predictors of participation in the online drinking game 'neknomination' amongst university students. A convenience sample of 145 university students participated in a study about drinking behaviours, completing a questionnaire about their participation in neknomination, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and the Resistance to Peer Influence Scale. Out of 145 students sampled, 54% took part in neknomination in the previous month. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed significantly higher scores on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and significantly lower scores on the Resistance to Peer Influence Scale, for those who had participated in neknomination. A significant correlation was also shown between specific peer pressure to neknominate, and engagement in neknomination. A logistic regression analysis indicated that scores on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, but not the Resistance to Peer Influence Scale, predicted classification as an individual who participated in neknomination. We found that over half of respondents had participated in a neknomination game in the past month, with almost all male respondents having done so. Participation in neknomination was strongly associated with general hazardous drinking behaviour but not with resistance to peer influence. Further research is needed to understand the role of engagement with social media in drinking games and risky drinking.

  8. Searching for Psychological Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelino António Gonçalves Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aims to identify psychological predictors of suicidal ideation in university students. We collected a sample of 366 participants, representing a population of 7102 students from a university in northern Portugal (95% CI. Both in the whole sample and in the intra-gender analysis, students with suicidal ideation revealed higher levels of depressive symptoms, loneliness, social anxiety and fears of abandonment, and lower levels of comfort with intimacy and trust in others. Loneliness and depression are significant predictors of suicidal ideation, with an odds ratio of 1.095 and 1.108, respectively. The results were consistent with those found in the literature, and call for more research and implementation of intervention protocols in university populations.

  9. Relationship between gender and university students' academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was based on the impact of gender on academic performance ON Arts-related subjects, a case study of Nasarawa State University, Keffi, using a sample of 160 participants derived from Art-based faculties. A questionnaire was used as the prime instrument to correlate the participant's responses to their ...

  10. Universal Interventions for Students with ADHD--and All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenka, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    This article describes effective classroom intervention strategies for students experiencing symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), regardless of the severity and whether the student has a diagnosis of ADHD. These suggestions incorporate the universal design for learning (UDL) framework. This framework does not limit…

  11. Increasing Student Participation in Online Group Discussions via Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study between two different methods of conducting online discussions in an introductory astronomy course was performed to determine if the use of Facebook as an online discussion tool has an impact on student participation as well as student response time. This study shows that students using Facebook for their online discussions…

  12. A survey on lifestyle and attitudes on fruit and vegetable consumption and participation in physical activity in a sample of secondary school and university students from Palermo, Western Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Sidoti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Fruit and vegetable (F&V consumption, and physical activity (PA, are thought to be some of the most important protective factors that can improve long-term health quality of life. Many epidemiological studies indicate, in fact, that F&V consumption and PA are health-promoting and are correlated with the beneficial effects and positive outcomes such as preventing some chronic diseases. Evidence, however, indicates that large proportions of adolescents are not consuming the minimum servings of F&V as recommended by experts and a high percentage of them have sedentary habits.

    Objective and method: The purpose of this research was to investigate knowledge and behaviors in a sample of secondary school, (250, and university students, (200, referred to F&V consumption and PA. The instrument used for the survey was a questionnaire containing 19 items with multiple choice answers. Data were codified, descriptive analysis and ÷2 tests were computed through Openstat and Statistica software.

    Results: Only 24,2% of the individuals identified welfare as including healthy eating, and this attitude seemed to be associated with the students’ families educational level. Educational level was also positively associated with the awareness of the importance of a healthy diet for well-being and with PA practice. The percentage of students having knowledge of the expert recommendations on PA and eating guidelines about F&V consumption was about one third of the entire population. Students who met the expert recommendation for daily servings of fruit and vegetables were 27,8%, while only 17,8% practiced regular PA. The principal source of information was university/school, (48,0% and 57,0%.

    Conclusions: Healthy dietary and PA habits are far from the optimal in our sample of students. Because of the importance for the prevention of many diseases and long term health

  13. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university..

  14. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university.

  15. First Aid Knowledge of University Students in Poisoning Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Sonay; Yildirim, Gulay; Kose, Selmin; Yildirim, Senay; Ozhan, Fatma; Senturan, Leman

    2014-12-01

    Poisoning is a crucial public health problem which needs serious approach and response to treatment. In case of poisoning, proper first aid is lifesaving and application should be applied in every condition. This research was conducted in order to evaluate first aid knowledge of university students for poisoning. The research was conducted between the dates of May 2013-June 2013 with the permission gained from the University Rectorship. The cohort of the research contained 4,560 students who received education in Istanbul. The sample of the study included 936 students who accepted to participate in the research and attended the school during the research. The data were collected by using a questionnaire form, which had 21 questions prepared by researchers. Analysis of the data was carried out with a percentage evaluation method and chi square tests in a computer environment. In our study, 92.6% of students (n=867) knew the phone number of the ambulance in case of emergency. In addition, 57.3% of students (n=536) knew the phone number of the poison hotline, and it was seen that they answered correctly the questions regarding the relation between body system and indications of poisoning. It was determined that the students who received education in medical departments answered the questions correctly more than the students who had education in other departments. (p≤0.001, p≤0.01). It was observed that the university students in medical departments had more first aid knowledge on poisoning cases compared to the students in other departments who did not have sufficient information regarding these issues. It is thought that first aid education in all departments of universities, both poisoning and other first aid issues, should be conveyed to all students.

  16. Teachers' participation in research programs improves their students' achievement in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Samuel C; Dubner, Jay; Miller, Jon; Glied, Sherry; Loike, John D

    2009-10-16

    Research experience programs engage teachers in the hands-on practice of science. Program advocates assert that program participation enhances teachers' skills in communicating science to students. We measured the impact of New York City public high-school science teachers' participation in Columbia University's Summer Research Program on their students' academic performance in science. In the year before program entry, students of participating and nonparticipating teachers passed a New York State Regents science examination at the same rate. In years three and four after program entry, participating teachers' students passed Regents science exams at a rate that was 10.1% higher (P = 0.049) than that of nonparticipating teachers' students. Other program benefits include decreased teacher attrition from classroom teaching and school cost savings of U.S. $1.14 per $1 invested in the program.

  17. Northern Illinois U. students participate in particle research

    CERN Multimedia

    Goluszka, J

    2003-01-01

    University students are diligently working on a variety of high-tech research topics designed to improve digital technology. A typical project is "evaluating scintillation material for digital hadron calorimeters" (1 page).

  18. Time and Money Explain Social Class Differences in Students' Social Integration at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark; Wright, Chrysalis L.

    2017-01-01

    Working-class students tend to be less socially integrated at university than middle-class students. The present research investigated two potential reasons for this working-class social exclusion effect. First, working-class students may have fewer finances available to participate in social activities. Second, working-class students tend to be…

  19. Student representation and activism in universities in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher education; student politics; student activism; student unionism; university governance; ..... These titles may differ from one university to another, but ..... Qualitative Research for Education: An Introduction to Theory and .... Doctoral thesis.

  20. Princeton University Materials Academy for underrepresented students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daniel; Rodriguez Martinez, Sara; Cody, Linda

    Summer 2016 gave underrepresented high school students from Trenton New Jersey the opportunity to learn materials science, sustainability and the physics and chemistry of energy storage from Princeton University professors. New efforts to place this curriculum online so that teachers across the United States can teach materials science as a tool to teach ``real'' interdisciplinary science and meet the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The Princeton University Materials Academy (PUMA) is an education outreach program for underrepresented high school students. It is part of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (PCCM), a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Materials Research Engineering and Science Center (MRSEC). PUMA has been serving the community of Trenton New Jersey which is only eight miles from the Princeton University campus. We reached over 250 students from 2003-2016 with many students repeating for multiple years. 100% of our PUMA students have graduated high school and 98% have gone on for college. This is compared with overall Trenton district graduation rate of 48% and a free and reduced lunch of 83%. We discuss initiatives to share the curriculum online to enhance the reach of PCCM' PUMA and to help teachers use materials science to meet NGSS and give their students opportunities to learn interdisciplinary science. MRSEC, NSF (DMR-1420541).

  1. Perceived stress and bruxism in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Carpinelli, Luna; Savarese, Giulia

    2016-12-21

    Many studies have shown the correlation between bruxism and stress that affects the quality of life of university students. The present study highlights this correlation-for the first time-in a group of university students in Italy. We have investigated the prevalence of awake and asleep bruxism and its correlation with perceived stress in a group of 278 Italian undergraduate students (117 M). A self report questionnaire was constructed using a socio-demographic test, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the item n. 8 of the Fonseca Questionnaire for presence of bruxism. The perceived stress score using PSS-10 scale was 32.2 (SD 4.6, 95% CL 31.6-32.7) for all the subjects, with significant gender difference: M = 31.2 and F = 32.9 (P = 0.0019). The prevalence for awake bruxism was 37.9% (F = 40.8%; M = 34.2%,), while for sleep bruxism was 31.8% (F = 33.3%; M = 29.1%), both without significant gender difference. A positive correlation, with significant concordance and dependence, between stress score and awake bruxism was present for male students only. University students showed higher bruxism and stress levels compared to the general population, with higher stress for females, but, even if female students show higher stress, a correlation between stress and bruxism exists only for male gender. Further studies should be performed.

  2. Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Åke; Taube, Karin; Ahl, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Food patterns and nutritional assessment in Galician university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Arias, José J; Lorenzo, Tania; Lamas, Alexandre; Regal, Patricia; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Cepeda, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    The access of the young people to the university marks a fundamental break in their lives that may also result in a substantial change in their dietary habits. The aim of this study was to characterize the food patterns, body composition and biochemical profiles of Galician university students from the University of Santiago de Compostela (Campus de Lugo). A total of 62 students participated in this survey. For each individual, anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, blood glucose and lipid profile were measured. Also, the participants filled questionnaires of dietary habits, Mediterranean and Atlantic diet adherence, risk of type II diabetes and physical activity, lifestyle and personal and family histories. A BMI within the normal range was shown by 72% of students. Eight volunteers (12.90%) presented high levels of total cholesterol (>200 mg/dL), and 54.55% of women had levels of HDL-cholesterol above 60 mg/dL. Five students had levels of glucose above 100 mg/dL, being four men and one woman. None of the participants presented high blood pressure, but 11.29% were in pre-hypertension status. The intake of carbohydrates was below the recommendations, while protein and lipids were above. There was an excessive consumption of bakery, alcohol beverages, sausages and ready-made food. The students showed medium adherence to Atlantic and Mediterranean diet and low risk of type II diabetes mellitus and a sedentary lifestyle. Since university students are a group especially prone to poor dietary habits, it seems necessary to promote changes towards healthier meals and rescue the Mediterranean-like dietary pattern.

  4. The California State University Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (CSU-LSAMP): A Collaborative, Comprehensive Approach to Broadening Participation in STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program supports alliances of institutions in their efforts to broaden participation in STEM and diversify the STEM workforce. There are currently 42 LSAMP alliances across the nation. Formed in 1993, the California State University LSAMP program (CSU-LSAMP) is an alliance of all 23 campuses of the CSU system and serves over 3,000 students per year. The primary goals of CSU-LSAMP are to increase persistence and graduation rates for URM participants, increase the number of STEM degrees awarded by the CSU to URM students, and increase the number of CSU-LSAMP students who advance to STEM graduate study. CSU-LSAMP activities are focused on four objectives - academic support (e.g. supplemental instruction & peer mentoring), support at transition points (e.g. first time freshmen & transfer students), research experiences (including international research experiences), and professional development (e.g. conference presentations & graduate school preparation activities). Financial support is offered in the form of textbook assistance, research stipends, and travel awards. We maintain a structure that allows campuses to tailor their programs to meet the needs of their own student populations but that also ties the Alliance together with a set of common activities, goals and policies. External evaluation of the program shows that our approach has been highly successful and can provide useful lessons for other programs focused on broadening participation. Since 1994, the number of URM students enrolled in STEM disciplines at CSU campuses has more than doubled and the number of STEM degrees to URM students has almost tripled. Persistence and graduation rates for URM students who participate in CSU-LSAMP are almost twice those of URM non-participants and equal to those of non-URM students. Of the students who participated in the past 15 years, 42 percent either earned a post

  5. Computer Mediated Communication and University International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nancy; Lo, Yen-Hai; Hou, Feng-Heiung; Chou, Tsai-Sheng; Chen, Chin-Hung; Chen, Chao-Chien; Chen, Wen-Chiang; Chen, Yen-Chuan; Wang, Shih-Jen; Huang, Shih-Yu; Lii, Jong-Yiing

    2002-01-01

    The design for this preliminary study was based on the experiences of the international students and faculty members of a small southwest university being surveyed and interviewed. The data collection procedure blends qualitative and quantitative data. A strong consensus was found that supports the study's premise that there is an association…

  6. Student Target Marketing Strategies for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Dale M.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2007-01-01

    As colleges and universities adopt marketing orientations to an ever-increasing extent, the relative merits of mass marketing and target marketing must also be explored. Researchers identify buyer types as potential students focused on quality, value or economy. On the other axis, learner types are described as those who focus on career,…

  7. University Students' Attitudes: Croatia versus Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Norman V.; Racic, Stanko; Gelo, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed Croatian and Turkish business school students, from universities emphasizing globalization, to analyze whether consideration for travel to the USA is affected by attitude toward their own country and the USA. The results from comparing and contrasting differences between these countries and differences between males and females in each…

  8. Empowering University Students through Physical Fitness for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated 252 University of Ilorin students' awareness of the benefits of physical fitness and the need for empowering them for lifetime productivity. Data were collected using a self developed questionnaire and analysed using frequency counts, percentage and chi-square.

  9. The Military Socialization of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzel, Ted; Hengst, Acco

    1971-01-01

    Revision of a paper presented at the American Sociological Association meetings, Denver, Colo., 1971. The effects of military training in a university setting on the attitudes of prospective army officers are examined. ROTC recruits students with militaristic attitudes; the Corps serves to insulate cadets from the liberalizing effects of the…

  10. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  11. Mindfulness, Stress, and Coping among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Angele; Rodger, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 135 first-year university students living in residence completed questionnaires that measured individual differences in mindfulness, coping styles, and perceived stress. Findings revealed significant positive relationships between mindfulness and rational coping, and significant negative relationships with emotional and avoidant coping…

  12. Correlation between physical activity and self-efficacy in Chinese university students

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity is becoming increasingly prevalent in Chinese university students. This study aims to assess the leisure-time physical activity level of the Chinese university students and to examine the correlation between the physical activity level and the self-efficacy to overcome barriers to physical activity. Five hundred and thirty Chinese university students participated in the study voluntarily. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, Chinese Short version) and t...

  13. Attitudes of nursing students on consumer participation: the effectiveness of the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this article were to evaluate the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire, and measure nursing students' attitudes to consumer participation. Undergraduate nursing students (n = 116) completed the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire at the start of a course on recovery for mental health nursing practice. The current findings confirm an endorsement of consumer participation in individual care processes, but less agreement with participation in organizational-level processes, such as management of mental health services and education of providers. This article also confirms that the questionnaire can effectively measure attitudes to consumer participation. The participation of consumers is critical for achieving person-centered services mental health services. It is important that nursing education influence positive attitudes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ontological Hermeneusis of the University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Eduvigis Jiménez Campos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available University education must promote teaching aimed to mediate the full development of each student human potentialities during the academic training, so the students can know, value, recognize themselves as persons, citizens and future professionals and thus, they can achieve their complete self-realization. The purpose of this essay is to perform an ontological hermeneusis of the university student. The methodology was based on the review of theoretical aspects constituting the philosophical constructs exposed by Husserl, Heidegger and Gadamer, among others, with the purpose of knowing and interpreting the student Dasein from the elements that make up their bio-psycho-social-cultural capacity which allows them to develop as professionals from a conception of integral citizens capable of assuming reality as actors who are there in time and place to become their own history main characters. Finally, the hermeneusis of the university student ontology can be understood as a comprehensive academic training that leads to develop the autonomy to carry out the professional performance with spontaneity, independence, suitability and determination, toward the fulfillment of their personal goals that contribute to the contemporary society solutions.

  15. First Aid Knowledge Among University Students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatatbeh, Moawiah

    2016-01-01

    This study has aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge about the first aid process among the university students in Jordan. The study population consisted of students of the 14 scientific and unscientific faculties at Yarmouk University, Jordan. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 883 students. The majority of participants were females (65.9%) with mean age (standard deviation) of 19.9 (2.6) years. Only 29.2% of students had previous first aid experience. When asked, only 11% of students knew the normal respiration rate of an adult in 1 min. Results revealed that female students, having previous first aid experience, and being a student of the health sciences and scientific colleges were the only factors had significant statistical associations with better level of first aid knowledge. The students' knowledge about first aid is not at an adequate level. It would be advisable that first aid course be handled as a separate and practical course at secondary school level.

  16. Lifestyle of health sciences students at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Alfhaid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We all want to live a long, happy and healthy life with an abundance of energy and vitality to perform well both mentally and physically. A healthy lifestyle is a valuable resource for reducing the incidence and impact of health problems, enabling you better to cope with life stressors, as well as improving your quality of life. Aims The study was aimed to assess the lifestyle (eating habits and physical activity of health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. Methods This cross-sectional institutional based study was conducted from 25th November 2014-3rd May 2015. A total of 450 students (370 males and 80 females aged between 18–28 years were randomly chosen. Self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection from the College of Medicine, College of Applied Medical Sciences and College of Dentistry. Results Majority of the students, 62.4 per cent, were physically inactive. Students from the College of Medicine, 40.4 per cent, were the most physically active. The most common reason that restrained the students from being active was time limitation. In addition to that, many of the participants, 29.6 per cent, have never had breakfast at home. Also, most of the participants, 42.7 per cent, were not satisfied with their eating habits. Almost one quarter of students were consuming soft drinks more than four times a day. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of sedentary lifestyle, physical inactivity and unhealthy dietary habits among health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. There is an urgent need for arranging health education programs for promoting healthy and active living among health sciences students of Majmaah University in Saudi Arabia.

  17. Original article University students with learning disabilities at the Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague

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    Anna Kucharská

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The paper deals with learning disabilities (LD of university students in the Czech Republic. The first part describes most common trends in professional care of students with LD in historical context, the second part analyses contemporary situation of support of students with LD during their university studies. Pivotal part of the text describes the situation at Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague, from the perspective of state LD students, their difficulties and means of possible support. PARTICIPANTS AND PROCEDURE Qualitative analysis of functional diagnostics took place in the frame of evidence of 15 students with learning disabilities. Focal point of the functional diagnostics is a structured interview in which an identification of needed modification for studying with specific educational needs of students with LD takes place. RESULTS From our analyses it can be stated, that students with LD apply for registration basing on their experience with high school status of a student with SD, or that their decision is influenced by their current study problems or the fact that they went through a modified entrance exam. We have also discovered the fact, that except for the difficulties which result from the type and degree of the disability and which can be compensated by specific approaches, students also need an emotional and social support. Learning disability is not, however, perceived only as a disadvantage, many students have stated that it has motivated them in their further development. CONCLUSIONS Achieved results point to general specifics to the perceived difficulties, to the specifics of the concrete degrees and to the further personal (emotional, social characteristics of LD students and they support recommended modification for successful studies.

  18. Digital reading practices of university students

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    Karen Shirley LÓPEZ GIL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on digital reading. The main objective of the research was to analyze the reading on screens practices of university students and how their practices are guided by professors and institutions of higher education. The research design was mixed and the type of study was descriptive of cross-sectional. The data collection techniques were questionnaire, document analysis and discussion group. ibm spss v.22 was used for statistical treatment of data and Atlas.Ti 7.0 was used for content analysis of qualitative information. The study showed that students usually read on screens, although many of their reading practices have recreational purposes. Students have troubles to find reliable information on the Internet when they have academic pursuits and frequently consult secondary sources. When texts are on screens, students generally scan information and surf from one document to another along hyperlinks. The boundaries between academic and leisure activities are not well defined; multitasking appears frequently. Students indicate there is a little guidance received from their professors or university. These findings show that students are constantly faced with digital reading, but practices do not always allow them to achieve their academic purposes, so it is necessary to strengthen the support offered to them, mainly from the classroom language. 

  19. [Knowledge about sexuality in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P; Alvarado, R

    1989-01-01

    This study explores the level of sexual knowledge among chilean university students in 4 different professions, compares their responses and verifies them with selected socio-demographic variables. 813 university students were interviewed in 1st and 3rd year medical school, law and engineering from the University of Chile and in education, from the Superior Blas Canas Institute of Pedagogy. The group is equally divided between each of the 4 professions; 64.7% are men with 95.5% single and 84.7% are between 17.22; only 37.5% attended a mixed school; 73.1% are Catholic. The survey aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) but this article only analyzes the attitudes of students through 6 variables: anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery, contraception, venereal diseases, sources claimed by the interviewee to receive information and self-evaluation of actual levels of knowledge. Results demonstrated knowledge about anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery and venereal diseases, but great disparity with contraception. Students are not learning about methods of contraception in school, possibly due to fear on the part of the faculty or their own lack of information. 3 factors influenced levels of knowledge: 1) formal education; 2) experience; and 3) personal interest. The highest results were from students of medicine with the lowest being students in engineering and education. Those that were in their 3rd year of school or married appeared more knowledgeable possibly due to more sexual experience and the need to prevent pregnancies. The females in all variables scored higher due to their own interest in preventing pregnancies, and because women are socialized in interpersonal relations and maternity issues. More than 1/2 the students gave themselves bad evaluations concerning their levels of sexual knowledge.

  20. Students' perceptions of sexual harassment at a Gauteng university campus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. South African society is experiencing high levels of violence against women. Various research studies have been conducted in South Africa and at international universities: they all indicate the presence of violence on campus. The researcher used a quantitative approach to gather information on students‟ perceptions of sexual violence and focused on gender differences and similarities. Both undergraduate and postgraduate students living in residence were invited to participate in the ...

  1. Teacher's and Students' Beliefs on English for General Academic Purposes: The Case of Iranian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojour, Masoud Kermani; Heirati, Javad Kia

    2015-01-01

    This study was framed in the sociocultural theory to look into the evolution of L2 learners' beliefs about the general English course during a term. One hundred ninety-eight male and female university students and their general English course teacher were randomly selected as the participants of the study. Data were gathered through the…

  2. The Need for Visually Impaired Students Participation in Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the counselling implication of the need for the visually impaired students' participation in science education. Descriptive research design was adopted for the study while a validated structured questionnaire tagged visually impaired students perception of science education (VISPSE) was administered ...

  3. Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Participating in Recess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Justice, Michael J.; Rosko, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    The participation of a student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of children with ADHD and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these children in the recess setting. Initially, the…

  4. Factors Influencing or Discouraging Secondary School Students' FFA Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Kirstin; Henry, Anna L.; Bird, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern adolescents are faced with a variety of choices regarding how to spend their free time. As recruitment and increased student participation continues to be a major priority of the National FFA Organization, it is essential to explore the reasons why students make the choice to become or not to become a member of FFA. This study was a part of…

  5. Effective Participation and Motivation: An Investigation on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasgin, Adnan; Tunc, Yunus

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the secondary school students' level of effective participation and their motivation. This study employs a survey consisting of 251 secondary school students from the schools located in Igdir and Erzurum, in East of Turkey. The data of the study were gathered through "Effective…

  6. The HAWK Highway: A Vertical Model for Student IEP Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quann, Monica; Lyman, Jennifer; Crumlish, Jamie; Hines, Sally; Williams, Lynn; Pleet-Odle, Amy; Eisenman, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Special educators at an inclusive career-technical high school created a model to support annually increasing expectations for self-determination and levels of student participation in Individualized Education Program (IEP) planning and implementation. The grade-specific components of the model and supporting context are described. Students were…

  7. Students' Autobiographical Memory of Participation in Multiple Sport Education Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the recollections of the Sport Education experiences of a cohort of students (15 boys and 19 girls) who had participated in seasons of basketball, soccer and badminton across grades six through eight (average age at data collection = 15.6 years). Using autobiographic memory theory techniques, the students completed surveys and…

  8. Risky behaviours among university students in Italy

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    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of psychoactive substances is one of the most important public health issues. Tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs are among the top risk factors for ill-health defined by World Health Organisation. The risky behaviours acquired in teenage can be magnified or decreased during university when a person starts having more awareness about the importance of own wellness. This paper describes the results of the project "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" with respect to risky behaviours in a large sample of Italian university students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 18 questions of the survey "Sportello Salute Giovani" dealing with risky behaviors, the use of psychoactive substances such as tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs were included. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Besides, chi square test were used to test the differences in sex, age class and socio-economic status. RESULTS: About 24% of the interviewed students currently smokes. 89% and 42.2% respectively drinks at least rarely or weekly beer, wine or spirits. About 40% of students smoked at least a joint and about 2% used other drugs (mostly cocaine. CONCLUSION: The "Sportello Salute Giovani" survey suggests that the frequency of risky behaviours in Italian university students is not reassuring, although they should be aware about the negative consequences on their and others health because of their educational level.

  9. Smoking Habits among Greek University Students after the Financial Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridi, Maria; Nanou, Anastasia; Vasilopoulos, Christos; Kourakos, Michael; Skliros, Efstathios; Toska, Aikaterini; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2017-05-01

    Background: University students worldwide seem to have increased rates of smoking, alcohol abuse, binge drinking episodes and harmful consumption trends, raising a serious public health issue. The aim of the present study was to investigate university students’ smoking habits and exposure to secondary smoke amid a financial crisis. Methods: The present descriptive, correlational analysis was conducted at the University of Peloponnese. Results: The average age of the sample (n=203) was 24.9 years (±7.6 years) with 36.0% of the participants (n=73) being postgraduate students. Some 51.2% (n=104) of the participants said they didn’t smoke and 46.3% (n=94, p=0.003) reported no secondary smoke exposure during the past week at home. The majority of the remainder initiated smoking at age 16-17 (48.5%, n=48), and 64.6% (n=42) said the financial crisis did not lead them to change their smoking habits. Conclusions: The majority of students support smoking ban laws in enclosed public spaces, but also their replies highlighted poor implementation on behalf of the state and the authorities. The financial crisis did not appear to have affected student smoking habits. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Nutritional habits in Italian university students

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    Adele Anna Teleman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dietary habits have been indicated by research as key elements in both disease pathogenesis and prevention and health promotion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day and regularity of breakfast habits. RESULTS: 44% of the university student population eats in average at least 1 portion of fruit per day. 22.5% eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. 8.5% eats in average 5 times per day with 48.6% declaring an average of 3 eating episodes per day. 11.3% consumes eccessive amounts of caffeine. 49.1% of the females reaches the recommended consumption of fruit, compared to only 33.8% of males (p < 0.05. 27.7% of females eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day, compared to 12.0% of males (p < 0.05. Eccessive coffee drinkers pass from 8.9% in the 18-21 age group to 16% in the 25-30 year old age group (p < 0.05. DISCUSSION: This study showed that the eating habits of young adults do not follow national recommendations. Less than 50% of university students eats at least 1 portion of fruit per day and less than 1 out of 4 eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. Less than 10% of the students eats in average 5 times per day and more than 1 out of 3 does not have breakfast regularly every morning. CONCLUSION: Interventions targeting university students are required in order to increase their knowledge on healthy eating habits and to ameliorate their dietary behaviours.

  11. Nutritional habits in Italian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleman, Adele Anna; de Waure, Chiara; Soffiani, Valentina; Poscia, Andrea; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Dietary habits have been indicated by research as key elements in both disease pathogenesis and prevention and health promotion. We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day and regularity of breakfast habits. 44% of the university student population eats in average at least 1 portion of fruit per day. 22.5% eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. 8.5% eats in average 5 times per day with 48.6% declaring an average of 3 eating episodes per day. 11.3% consumes eccessive amounts of caffeine. 49.1% of the females reaches the recommended consumption of fruit, compared to only 33.8% of males (p coffee drinkers pass from 8.9% in the 18-21 age group to 16% in the 25-30 year old age group (p < 0.05). This study showed that the eating habits of young adults do not follow national recommendations. Less than 50% of university students eats at least 1 portion of fruit per day and less than 1 out of 4 eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. Less than 10% of the students eats in average 5 times per day and more than 1 out of 3 does not have breakfast regularly every morning. Interventions targeting university students are required in order to increase their knowledge on healthy eating habits and to ameliorate their dietary behaviours.

  12. Problematic Alcohol Use among University Students

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    Tesfa Mekonen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlcohol is attributable to many diseases and injury-related health conditions, and it is the fifth leading risk factor of premature death globally. Hence, the objective of this study was to assess the proportion and associated factors of problematic alcohol use among University students.Material and methodsCross-sectional study was conducted among 725 randomly selected University students from November to December 2015. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire, and problematic alcohol use was assessed by Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Chi-square test was used to show association of problematic use and each variable and major predicators was identified using logistic regression with 95% confidence interval (CI; and variables with p-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsAbout 83 (11.4% of the samples were problematic alcohol users of which 6.8% had medium level problems and 4.6% had high level problems. Significantly associated variables with problematic alcohol use among students were presence of social phobia (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.8, lifetime use of any substance (AOR = 6.9, 95% CI: 3.8, 12.7, higher score in students cumulative grade point average (AOR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 0.9, and having intimate friend who use alcohol (AOR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.8.ConclusionProblematic alcohol use among university students was common and associated with social phobia, poor academic achievement, lifetime use of any substance, and peer pressure. Strong legislative control of alcohol in universities is important to reduce the burden of alcohol.

  13. University students' attitudes towards peer assessment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the whole, the findings show that students were happy to peer assess but not so much to be peer assessed. Also, half of the participants estimated that their assessments did not match those to be expected by their course instructor even if the same assessment criteria were to be used. Some recommendations are ...

  14. The Interrelationship of Self-Determination, Mental Illness, and Grades among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockelman, Karin F.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the relationships among self-determination, mental illness, and GPAs of university students. Participants were 375 undergraduate students at a large state university. Two instruments based on Self-determination theory were used in this study: the Basic Needs Scale (see Baard, Deci, & Ryan, 2004) and the…

  15. The Investigation of Social Problem Solving Abilities of University Students in Terms of Perceived Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tras, Zeliha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze of university students' perceived social support and social problem solving. The participants were 827 (474 female and 353 male) university students. Data were collected Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised (Yildirim, 2004) and Social Problem Solving (Maydeu-Olivares and D'Zurilla, 1996) translated and…

  16. University Students' Problematic Internet Use and Communication Skills According to the Internet Use Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Aydogan Aykut

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether the levels of university students' problematic internet use and of perceived communication skills differ with respect to their basic internet use purposes. The participants were 411 university students [215 of whom were females (52.30%) and 196 of whom were males (47.70%)]. In the study, the…

  17. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  18. Assessment of Communication Skills of Physical Education and Sport Students in Turkish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali Dursun

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the communication skills of the students studying in physical education and sports schools in various universities in Turkey. A total of 1,854 Physical Education and Sports students in five Turkish universities participated in the study. The instrument used to gather information for this study comprised the demographic…

  19. The Impact of Institutional Culture, Policy and Process on Student Engagement in University Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There is a strong focus on the importance of student engagement in higher education, with increasing attention on how students can participate in their university's decision-making processes. Yet, although the concept appears to be almost universally accepted, it is rarely problematised. This has led some commentators to conclude that student…

  20. Negative Automatic Thoughts, Emotional Intelligence and Demographical Different Variables Affecting University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direktor, Cemaliye; Simsek, Angelika H.; Serin, Nerguz Bulut

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship of negative automatic thoughts, emotional intelligence subscales, gender, and department of university students. The participants are 291 students (170 female and 121 male) of Department of Psychology, Department of Counselling and Department of Preschool Education, of Private University in North Cyprus.…

  1. The Role of Basic Needs Fulfillment in Prediction of Subjective Well-Being among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkdogan, Turgut; Duru, Erdinc

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the role of fulfillment level of university students' basic needs in predicting the level of their subjective well being. The participants were 627 students (56% female, 44% male) attending different faculties of Pamukkale University. In this study, subjective well being was measured with Life Satisfaction Scale…

  2. Exploring Telecollaboration through the Lens of University Students: A Spanish-Cypriot Telecollaborative Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Anna; Sevilla-Pavón, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines university students' views about a Cypriot-Spanish telecollaboration project through which participants used Google+ Communities for intercultural exchange over the course of one semester. The project was established through the UNICollaboration platform and it involved first-year students at the Cyprus University of Technology…

  3. The Impact of the University Students' Level of Alienation on Their Perception of General Satistaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçire, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of university students' level of alienation on their general satisfaction. The study was carried out using rational screening model. The total participants of this study were 551 Dicle University students, studying at Medical, Technology, and Ziya Gökalp Education Faculty departments. The…

  4. The Effect of Diversity Climate Perception on Alienation of Students to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the effect of diversity climate perception on alienation of students to university. The research was carried out with relational survey model. 333 undergraduate students in Faculty of Education, Medical, and Faculty of Theology of Dicle University constituted the participant group. Research data were…

  5. The Relationship between Leisure Constraints, Constraint Negotiation Strategies and Facilitators with Recreational Sport Activity Participation of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Funda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the constraints in participating the leisure activities for college students, the strategies of negotiation regarding these constraints and the relationship between the facilitators and activity participation. The population of the study consists of currently registered students from Ankara University.…

  6. Non-Performativity of University and Subjectification of Students: The Question of Equality and Diversity in UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom have experienced a transformation in the context of the government's initiatives to widen participation and rapid socio-economic changes locally and globally. With more diverse students entering higher education, universities need to consider how they can create an inclusive environment. Indeed, in order to…

  7. "What Today's University Students Have Taught Us”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Head

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, more students in the US are attending university than ever before. An unprecedented number of these students were born digital—meaning digital technologies have been a constant feature in their lives. For these young adults, information literacy competencies are always being formed, practiced, and learned. Project Information Literacy (PIL is a series of ongoing quantitative and qualitative research studies in the US that investigates what it is like to be a university student in the digital age. This research study has investigated how students find information and conduct research—in their words and through their experiences—for coursework, use in their everyday lives, and, once they graduate, in the workplace and their communities. Since 2008, more than 11,000 university students at nearly 60 US higher education institutions have been surveyed or interviewed, making PIL the largest study of information literacy ever conducted. Results from PIL’s studies have concluded students’ information competencies are put to the test in the vast information landscape they inhabit. Furthermore, finding and using information is exponentially more complex than it was a generation ago, especially since the information landscape has shifted from one of scarce resources to one of overload. In this keynote, five research takeaways were presented from PIL’s eight studies: (1 Students find research more difficult than ever before, (2 getting started is the hardest part of research, (3 frustrations begin with finding context, i.e., big picture, information-gathering, language, and situational context, (4 search strategies are based on predictability, familiarity, and efficiency, and (5 evaluation is the one information skills most learn to use. Discussion included implications of these findings for teaching, learning, work, and librarianship in the 21st century.

  8. Physical activity participation and constraints among athletic training students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Justin; Rogers, Katherine; Anderson, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have examined the physical activity (PA) habits of certified athletic trainers; however, none have looked specifically at athletic training students. To assess PA participation and constraints to participation among athletic training students. Cross-sectional study. Entry-level athletic training education programs (undergraduate and graduate) across the United States. Participants were 1125 entry-level athletic training students. Self-reported PA participation, including a calculated PA index based on a typical week. Leisure constraints and demographic data were also collected. Only 22.8% (252/1105) of athletic training students were meeting the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for PA through moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise. Although 52.3% (580/1105) were meeting the recommendations through vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, 60.5% (681/1125) were meeting the recommendations based on the combined total of moderate or vigorous cardiorespiratory exercise. In addition, 57.2% (643/1125) of respondents met the recommendations for resistance exercise. Exercise habits of athletic training students appear to be better than the national average and similar to those of practicing athletic trainers. Students reported structural constraints such as lack of time due to work or studies as the most significant barrier to exercise participation. Athletic training students experienced similar constraints to PA participation as practicing athletic trainers, and these constraints appeared to influence their exercise participation during their entry-level education. Athletic training students may benefit from a greater emphasis on work-life balance during their entry-level education to promote better health and fitness habits.

  9. Parental Influences on Hmong University Students' Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports findings from a series of focus groups conducted on Hmong American university students. The purpose of the focus groups was to understand how, from the perspective of Hmong American students themselves, acculturative stress and parents influencedacademic success. Findings of a thematic analysis centered on general themes across focus group respondents that related to parental socialization, gendered socialization, and ethnic identification. Each identified themes is discussed in reference to gendered patterns of experiences in Hmong American families and in reference to academic success.

  10. Students' and Teachers' Participation in Decision-Making and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that students and teachers, irrespective of sex, indicated alike a low level of participation in administrative creative decisions which influenced their attitude to school work and school internal discipline. Furthermore, low level of participation was found to have significant unwholesome impact on their attitude ...

  11. Effects of student participation in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griebler, Ursula; Rojatz, Daniela; Simovska, Venka

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize systematically the existing evidence for the effects of student participation in designing, planning, implementing and/or evaluating school health promotion measures. The focus was on the effects of participation in school health promotion measur...

  12. Promoting IEP Participation: Effects of Interventions, Considerations for CLD Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Various interventions have been developed to promote student individualized education program (IEP) participation. Although they are generally endorsed by educators and researchers, critics argue that interventions to promote self-determination and IEP participation may be counter to the values of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD)…

  13. Business Students' Views of Peer Assessment on Class Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Fidella

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to introduce peer and self assessment on tutorial class participation to a marketing unit at Curtin Sarawak. This assessment strategy was introduced with desire to improve class participation and increase student involvement in assessment. At the end of semester, a questionnaire was used to gather responses from a…

  14. Depression in university students: associations with impulse control disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Eric W; Lust, Katherine; Grant, Jon E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the implications of depression in a sample of university students, particularly relating to impulse control disorders. While previous studies have shown high rates of depression among university students, no study to date has assessed whether levels of depression show associations with the incidence of impulse control disorders in this population. In all, 6000 students participated in the College Student Computer Use Survey. A total of 1717 students completed the scales of interest for this analysis. Participants were assigned to groups based on depression scores: severe (N = 75), mild/moderate (N = 647) and none (N = 995). The three groups were assessed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) or chi-square test. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate associations between depression and impulse control disorder diagnoses. Groups differed across demographic, health and academic variables. The severe depression group reported higher rates of skin-picking disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour and compulsive buying. Results suggest a significant association between depression and impulse control disorders. One possibility is that a facet of impulsivity contributes to both problems, which could be important information for clinicians. Future studies will need to clarify the exact nature of the relationship between depression and impulse control disorders.

  15. Some observations in university participation in nuclear engineering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eickhoff, K.G.; Hill, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A general discussion is presented on the kinds of problem which with suitable co-ordination would form appropriate topics for university research. R and D work can be done in-house, or with an industrial contractor, or with a university or polytechnic. The criteria are examined. Involvement by universities and polytechnics, and topics and location, are considered further. (U.K.)

  16. Marijuana use and associated motives in Colorado university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristina T; Lalonde, Trent L; Phillips, Michael M; Schneider, Maryia M

    2017-12-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug among college students, with heavy use leading to negative outcomes. Use of marijuana for medical and recreational purposes in select U.S. states has been controversial, with concerns surrounding increased prevalence rates and harm. The current exploratory study aimed to assess marijuana use in college students in Colorado, demographic differences in frequency of use, and motives for using. College students (N = 300; 61% female) were recruited through introductory psychology courses and completed a series of questionnaires and a marijuana urine screen. Almost three-fourths of the sample reported lifetime use of marijuana. Sixty-five percent used marijuana within the last year and 29% tested positive on the urine screen. Hurdle Poisson regression models with a subset of participants (n = 117) showed non-Greek and freshman status were associated with increased number of days participants used marijuana in the last month. Problem marijuana use was positively associated with a range of motives-of note-motives focused on coping, boredom, alcohol, and food. Prevalence rates of marijuana use were high in this sample of college students in a state with legal recreational marijuana use. Particular students (eg, students who use marijuana to cope) may be at higher risk for problem marijuana use. Developing effective, tailored interventions for university students is warranted. (Am J Addict 2017;26:830-837). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  17. Toward equity through participation in Modeling Instruction in introductory university physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric; Sawtelle, Vashti; Kramer, Laird H.; O'Brien, George E.; Rodriguez, Idaykis; Pamelá, Priscilla

    2010-06-01

    We report the results of a five year evaluation of the reform of introductory calculus-based physics by implementation of Modeling Instruction (MI) at Florida International University (FIU), a Hispanic-serving institution. MI is described in the context of FIU’s overall effort to enhance student participation in physics and science broadly. Our analysis of MI from a “participationist” perspective on learning identifies aspects of MI including conceptually based instruction, culturally sensitive instruction, and cooperative group learning, which are consistent with research on supporting equitable learning and participation by students historically under-represented in physics (i.e., Black, Hispanic, women). This study uses markers of conceptual understanding as measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and odds of success as measured by the ratio of students completing introductory physics and earning a passing grade (i.e., C- or better) by students historically under-represented in physics to reflect equity and participation in introductory physics. FCI pre and post scores for students in MI are compared with lecture-format taught students. Modeling Instruction students outperform students taught in lecture-format classes on post instruction FCI (61.9% vs 47.9%, p<0.001 ), where these benefits are seen across both ethnic and gender comparisons. In addition, we report that the odds of success in MI are 6.73 times greater than in lecture instruction. Both odds of success and FCI scores within Modeling Instruction are further disaggregated by ethnicity and by gender to address the question of equity within the treatment. The results of this disaggregation indicate that although ethnically under-represented students enter with lower overall conceptual understanding scores, the gap is not widened during introductory physics but instead is maintained, and the odds of success for under-represented students is not different from majority students. Women

  18. Toward equity through participation in Modeling Instruction in introductory university physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Brewe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a five year evaluation of the reform of introductory calculus-based physics by implementation of Modeling Instruction (MI at Florida International University (FIU, a Hispanic-serving institution. MI is described in the context of FIU’s overall effort to enhance student participation in physics and science broadly. Our analysis of MI from a “participationist” perspective on learning identifies aspects of MI including conceptually based instruction, culturally sensitive instruction, and cooperative group learning, which are consistent with research on supporting equitable learning and participation by students historically under-represented in physics (i.e., Black, Hispanic, women. This study uses markers of conceptual understanding as measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI and odds of success as measured by the ratio of students completing introductory physics and earning a passing grade (i.e., C− or better by students historically under-represented in physics to reflect equity and participation in introductory physics. FCI pre and post scores for students in MI are compared with lecture-format taught students. Modeling Instruction students outperform students taught in lecture-format classes on post instruction FCI (61.9% vs 47.9%, p<0.001, where these benefits are seen across both ethnic and gender comparisons. In addition, we report that the odds of success in MI are 6.73 times greater than in lecture instruction. Both odds of success and FCI scores within Modeling Instruction are further disaggregated by ethnicity and by gender to address the question of equity within the treatment. The results of this disaggregation indicate that although ethnically under-represented students enter with lower overall conceptual understanding scores, the gap is not widened during introductory physics but instead is maintained, and the odds of success for under-represented students is not different from majority students

  19. Features of adaptation of first-year students who participated in the project «Proryv»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina A.V.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available this article deals with the problem of adaptation of students to the university. Particular attention is drawn to the results of a pilot study to identify important psychological qualities of the person of the student who contributed to the effective adaptation of students in the framework of participation in All-Russian innovation project «Breakthrough».

  20. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  1. Classification via Clustering for Predicting Final Marks Based on Student Participation in Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M. I.; Luna, J. M.; Romero, C.; Ventura, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a classification via clustering approach to predict the final marks in a university course on the basis of forum data. The objective is twofold: to determine if student participation in the course forum can be a good predictor of the final marks for the course and to examine whether the proposed classification via clustering…

  2. Influences of Leadership Program Participation on Students' Capacities for Socially Responsible Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, John P.; Bohle, Christopher W.; Gebhardt, Matt; Hofert, Meghan; Wilk, Emily; Cooney, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of various types of individual leadership experiences (e.g., retreats, academic minors) on college students' capacities for socially responsible leadership using data from 8,961 seniors representing 99 colleges and universities. Participation in individual leadership experiences explained a significant,…

  3. Factors Affecting Nontraditional African American Students' Participation in Online World Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrills, J. Maria Sweeney

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how communication preferences, learning preferences, and perceptions about online learning affect nontraditional African American students' participation in online world literature courses at a historically Black university (HBCU) in the southeastern United States. An instrumental case study was…

  4. An Aspect of Political Socialization of Student Movement Participants in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeong-chul

    1993-01-01

    Tests hypotheses from lineage socialization and generation unit perspectives on Korean student protest participation using 360 self-administered questionnaires collected at 3 Korean universities. Results indicate that these hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but support the generation unit model. (SLD)

  5. Exploring Perceptions of University Students Pertaining to Grades over Knowledge and Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Asma; Bhamani, Shelina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was to study the phenomenon surrounding the perspective of university students preferring grades to knowledge and skills. Three currently enrolled participants were selected from different private universities of Karachi. Participants' interviews were examined through thematic analysis. The findings suggested that students…

  6. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  7. [Trends in food consumption of university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Piero, Alexia; Bassett, Natalia; Rossi, Analia; Sammán, Norma

    2015-04-01

    The university students need to consolidate good dietary habits based on an adequate selection of food, which is a factor of fundamental importance to maintain good health and prevent disease. to evaluate the food intake and diet profile of university students from Tucumán and its variation over time. Analyse if they accomplish current dietary recommendations. Data collection was carried out during the years 1998-1999 (G1) and 2012-2013 (G2); was performed by a self-survey and food frequency questionnaire of food consumption. It was applied to 329 university students selected randomly. The dietary pattern was described by frequency of usual consumption of principal food groups. Students were 25.2% male and 74.8% female, mean age 23 ± 3 years. In general, in both groups most of the students had a normal BMI, but had a high percentage of men with overweight (18.2%) and obesity (12.1%) and women with underweight (11.6%). According to the groups and sex analysis some significant statistically differences in macronutrient composition of the diet were observed: the G1 was higher carbohydrate intake than proteins and lipids; also differences in the intake of some micronutrients were found, with a higher intake of iron and less intake of vitamins B1, B2, niacin and C in G2. The diet was monotonous for both groups and with differences in the profile of nutrients. The most notable was the gradual increase consumption of sugary products, processed foods, snacks and decrease consumption of dairy, fish, fruits and vegetables in G2. In both groups, adequacy of dietary intake of the university students did not cover the recommendations of iron, calcium and vitamin A. Given the food profile observed in the student population, is warned the need to promote changes to prevent the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease in adulthood; it should be convenient to carrying out food and nutrition education. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life in University Dance Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Hayley M; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew C

    2018-03-01

    Injuries are common among dancers and may negatively affect health-related quality of life (HRQL). The modified Disablement in the Physically Active Scale (mDPA) is a generic patient-reported outcome instrument that could be used when providing care to patients participating in performing arts. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the internal consistency of the mDPA and assess overall HRQL using the mDPA in university dance students. Thirty-one female university dance students completed the mDPA during one data collection session. Higher scores on the Physical Summary Component (mDPA-PSC), the Mental Summary Component (mDPAMSC), and mDPA-Total indicated increased disablement. The internal consistency was determined using Cronbachs alpha. The mDPA-Total, mDPA-PSC, and mDPAMSC scores were examined descriptively using mean and standard deviations. Individual item responses were also examined. The proportion of university dance students with clinically relevant levels of disablement on the mDPA-Total was examined using a previously established minimally clinically important difference value. The internal consistency for the mDPA-MSC (a=0.91) and mDPATotal (a=0.90) was excellent and good for the mDPA-PSC (a=0.88). A large proportion (71%) of university dance students demonstrated clinically relevant levels of disablement despite fully participating in dance-related activities. Pain, impaired motion, and stress were the greatest contributors to increased disablement in these individuals. The mDPA scores observed in this pilot study indicate that many dance students experience levels of disablement and decreased HRQL which may warrant physical and mental intervention. Clinicians providing healthcare services to performing artists should consider using the mDPA to provide patient-centered care.

  9. The relationship between demographic variables and leisure perceptions of selected South African first year university students / J.T. Weilbach.

    OpenAIRE

    Weilbach, Johannes Theron

    2013-01-01

    Participation in campus leisure and recreation programmes can provide university students with various benefits, but the provision of effective leisure programmes are complicated by the changes that have taken place in the demographic composition of the student population attending South African universities. Increases in the proportion of black students attending university, and decreases in the proportion of white students means that current students possibly exhibit leisure behaviours that...

  10. [Psychosocial aspects regarding pregnant university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñán-Aponte, María R; Rodríguez-Barreto, Lucía

    2009-12-01

    Determining the subjective construction of psychosocial factors affecting pregnancy in adolescents in a sample of students. 68 students who had become pregnant during their adolescence were selected after reviewing their files and sampling by logical criteria. The implications of pregnancy on personal, family and academic conditions were analysed by means of life stories and in-depth interviews. Crises and adjustments appeared in family and affective structure during the first trimester of pregnancy which culminated in them accepting motherhood as part of their life project, thereby reproducing the single-mother stereotype. Accompaniment of the pair occurred mainly during the first months, followed by abandonment. Although prejudiced, the university community's support had a bearing on interest in personal and academic development and in the baby. Specialised referents were consulted which scared the girls due to their pathological emphasis, thereby leading to them consulting family sources. The pregnant girls' mothers provided ongoing support for their daughters; this was not true of the fathers with whom constant conflict was presented. The services offered by the university were little used even though their importance was recognised. Forming integral students require programmes preparing students to be responsible for motherhood and fatherhood. Prevention was conveyed as promoting healthy affective links and strengthening family and social communication.

  11. Sexual Violence Screening Practices of Student Health Centers Located on Universities in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Valerie; Williams, Jessica R.; Gattamorta, Karina; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe current sexual violence screening practices of student health centers located on universities in Florida. Participants: Institutional level data was collected from 33 student health centers from November 2015 through January 2016. The student health centers were located on public or private…

  12. Student Perceptions of Writing Projects in a University Differential-Equations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Christine; Latulippe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study surveyed 102 differential-equations students in order to investigate how students participating in writing projects in university-level mathematics courses perceive the benefits of writing in the mathematics classroom. Based on previous literature on writing in mathematics, students were asked specifically about the benefits…

  13. University Students Meeting the Recommended Standards of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaofen; Castelli, Darla; Castro-Pinero, Jose; Guan, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated student physical activity (PA) and body mass index (BMI) in relation to the "Healthy Campus 2010" objectives set by the American College Health Association in 2002. Students (N = 1125) at a U.S. southern state university participated in the study. The percentages of students who were physically active and whose…

  14. The Risks of "University Speak": Relationship Management and Identity Negotiation by Mature Students off Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Research finds that participation in higher education is generally empowering for mature students but that it can also create tensions in their off-campus relationships. This article reports on findings from an ongoing study of the experiences of mature students at university in Ireland and draws from interviews with 15 such students in the final…

  15. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  16. Challenges of University Adjustment in the UK: A Study of East Asian Master's Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenli; Hammond, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the adjustment of East Asian Master's level students who came to study at a campus-based university in the UK during 2004-05. International students face challenges in respect to language proficiency, academic expectations and social participation. In this longitudinal study the experiences of a group of students from East…

  17. University Students Leaving Relationships (USLR): Scale Development and Gender Differences in Decisions to Leave Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Helen M.; Can, S. Hakan; Joseph, Lauren J.; Scherer, Cory R.

    2013-01-01

    The University Students Leaving Relationships scale was developed to identify student concerns when contemplating dissolution of romantic relationships. Participants included 1,106 students who rated the importance of issues when deciding to leave relationships. Factor analysis produced three dimensions: Missing the Relationship, Social…

  18. Self esteem and assertiveness of final year Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagözoğlu, Serife; Kahve, Emine; Koç, Oznur; Adamişoğlu, Derya

    2008-07-01

    This study developed a quantitative methodology to ascertain the level of self esteem and assertiveness of last year students in baccalaureate degree programs at Cumhuriyet University Nursing School, School for Health Sciences' Midwifery School, Education Faculty's Mathematics Teacher, Classroom Teacher, and Social Sciences Teacher programs and to determine if there is a correlation between self esteem and assertiveness. The research population was a total of 372 students who were in their final year of university in these programs. Sampling was not done in the research, the entire population was studied. However there was a total of 82 students who were not included in the research because of illness, absenteeism, registration on hold, who could not be found on campus or who did not want to participate in the research and who did not correctly complete the survey form. The research was conducted with total of 290 students. Total response rate was 77.9%. The data were collected using a "Personal Information Form," Stanley Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory (SEI) and Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS). Frequency distribution, t test, correlation and variance analysis were used in the analysis of the data. The results of the study were that the nursing students had the highest scores from SEI (80.64+/-15.83). Similarly the nursing students had the highest scores on the RAS (36.29+/-25.33).

  19. Methods for evaluating educational programs: does Writing Center participation affect student achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredtmann, Julia; Crede, Carsten J; Otten, Sebastian

    2013-02-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the introduction of a Writing Center at a university, which aims at improving students' scientific writing abilities. In order to deal with the presumed limited utility of student feedback surveys for evaluating the effectiveness of educational programs, we use students' actual learning outcomes as our quality measure. Based on this objective measure, different statistical evaluation methods established in the labor market treatment literature are applied. We present and discuss the validity of these methods to evaluate educational programs and compare the results of these approaches to implications obtained using corresponding student surveys. Although almost all students reported the writing courses to be helpful, we find no significant effect of course participation on students' grades. This result highlights the need for institutions not to rely solely on student course evaluations for evidence-based policy decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and Perceptions Toward Anabolicandrogenic Steroid Use Amongst University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kargarfard M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs are highly sought-after in order to achieve muscle growth and better physical attributes. The study was conducted to measure the prevalence and attitudes towards the use of AASs among university students. 1008 male students from Isfahan University, Iran, between the ages of 18 and 25 years (23.3 ± 1.2 years completed a questionnaire that investigated participation in bodybuilding, level of sport competition, participation in sports and recreational activities, AASs use, prevalence, knowledge among users, attitudes, as well as intent to continue using AASs in the future. 8% of respondents had used AASs and 6% currently use AASs. 71% of users believed using only a small amount of AASs or using AASs with anti-toxic drugs would not result in any harm, 10% indicated that AASs were harmless and 19% admitted to taking AASs despite knowing the adverse effects. 33% of respondents believed that they needed to use AASs to ensure athletic success and 26% believed that athletes should be allowed to use AASs without consequence. The prevalent use of AASs is a public health concern which implies that educational programmes at university level are needed to educate students about the adverse effects of AASs use

  1. Ten-year cardiovascular risk assessment in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvacsek, Martina; Kneffel, Zs; Tóth, M; Johnson, A W; Vehrs, P; Myrer, J W; Hager, R

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for more than half of all deaths in the European region. The aim of the study was to compare body composition, blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), family history, activity behaviors, and the 10-year risk of having a heart attack between 166 university students (21.62 ± 2.59 yrs) from Utah (USA) and 198 students (22.11 ± 2.51 yrs) from Hungary. Ninety-two percent of the Hungarian students and 100% of the Utah students had an estimated 10-year Framingham risk score of 1% or less. The high prevalence of low risk was primarily due to the young age of study participants, healthy body composition and non-smoking behavior. Hungarians who had higher 10-year risk of heart attack had significantly higher waist hip ratio (WHR), TC, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and were smokers compared to those Hungarians with lower risk. The self-reported physical activity levels between the two groups of students were not different. In conclusion the young men and women who participated in this study were, for the most part healthy; however the smoking habits and the lower physical activity of the Hungarian students likely elevated their risk of CVD.

  2. Maori University Graduates: Indigenous Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Reremoana; Tustin, Karen; Kiro, Cynthia; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Taylor, Nicola; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Hunter, Jackie; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand, are gaining university qualifications in greater numbers. This article describes the history of Maori university graduates, their current situation and the implications for indigenous futures. Section one provides a brief overview of historical policies and practices that, similar to those used on…

  3. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  4. Professional Student Organizations and Experiential Learning Activities: What Drives Student Intentions to Participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Laura; Miller, Richard; Poole, Sonja Martin

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning theory has been referenced as a possible method for attracting and retaining members in student organizations. In a survey, undergraduate students evaluated a variety of organizational features pertaining to their intention to participate in professional student organizations. The study found that students value activities…

  5. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  6. International Students' Experiences of University Libraries and Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    International students constitute a significant proportion of the Australian university population, and thus of the university library-using population. Drawing on qualitative research findings, this paper discusses the library-related experiences and perceptions of international students at two Australian universities. While the students'…

  7. Psychosocial Factors Affecting Smartphone Addiction in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aker, Servet; Şahin, Mustafa Kürşat; Sezgin, Serap; Oğuz, Gülay

    Smartphone addiction is a recent concern that has resulted from the dramatic increase in worldwide smartphone use. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate psychosocial factors affecting smartphone addiction in university students. The study was performed among students at the Ondokuz Mayis University Samsun School of Health (Samsun, Turkey) on October-December 2015. Four hundred ninety-four students possessing smartphones and agreeing to participate were included. A sociodemographic data form produced by the authors and consisting of 10 questions was administered together with a questionnaire involving the Smartphone Addiction Scale-Short Version (SAS-SV), the Flourishing Scale, the General Health Questionnaire, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. The questionnaires were applied in a class environment at face-to-face interviews. SAS-SV scores of 6.47% of students were "significantly higher" than the participating group mean SAS-SV score. Multiple regression analysis revealed that depression, anxiety and insomnia, and familial social support statistically, significantly predicted smartphone addiction. Further studies of smartphone addiction in different age groups and with different educational levels are now needed.

  8. Students' perceptions of contraceptives in university of ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Nimo Appiah-Agyekum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to explore University of Ghana Business School diploma student's knowledge of contraceptives, types of contraceptives, attitudes towards contraceptive users, preference for contraceptives, benefits, and side-effects of contraceptives.Data was conducted with three sets of focus group discussions. Participants were systematically sampled from accounting and public administration departments.Findings showed that students had little knowledge of contraceptives. The male and female condoms were the main contraceptive types reported out of the many modern and traditional methods of contraceptives. The main benefits of contraceptives were; ability to protect against STIs, abortions, unwanted pregnancy and psychological trauma. Whilst most respondents preferred future use of pills, side-effects of contraceptives were mostly reported for condoms than other contraceptive methods. Results showed that participants had bad attitudes towards unmarried contraceptive users.Generally, our findings show that detailed knowledge about contraceptives is low. There is a little gap of information on contraception knowledge, timing, and contraceptive types among university diploma students. Reproductive and maternal services should be available and accessible for tertiary students.

  9. Hand hygiene knowledge and practice among university students: evidence from Private Universities of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Marufa Sultana,1 Rashidul Alam Mahumud,1 Abdur Razzaque Sarker,1 Sarder Mahmud Hossain,21Health Economics and Financing Research Group, Centre for Equity and Health System (CEHS, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, 2Department of Public Health, Northern University Bangladesh, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Hand hygiene has achieved the reputation of being a convenient means of preventing communicable diseases. Although causal links between hand hygiene and rates of infectious disease have also been established earlier, studies focusing on hand hygiene among university-going students are not adequate in number. This study evaluated handwashing knowledge, practice, and other related factors among the selected university students in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 undergraduate students from four selected universities. A pretested, semistructured questionnaire, that included a checklist associated with handwashing practice, was applied to capture all relevant data. The mean (± SD age of the participants was 20.4 (±1.8 years. The majority of the students washed their hands with water, but only 22.5% washed their hands effectively by maintaining the correct steps and frequency of handwashing with water, and soap or hand sanitizer. The mean (± SD score of the participants’ hand hygiene practice was 50.81 (±4.79, while the total score with all perfect answers was considered as 66. Regression coefficient demonstrated that age has a negative influence on hand hygiene practice, as older students have lower scores compared to the younger ones (P<0.01. However, the unmarried students were a significant predictor for influencing the incensement of handwashing practice compared to the married ones (P<0.01. Findings of this study designate widespread insufficient hand hygiene practice in the university-going students and indicate a need for an extensive public health education

  10. Medical student and senior participants' perceptions of a mentoring program designed to enhance geriatric medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Sara J; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A; Rheaume, Carol E; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second- year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards the Senior Mentor Program as an effective learning modality. A total of 36 second-year students from two consecutive classes (2002-2003) and 42 senior mentors at USC's School of Medicine participated in five and seven separate focus group interviews, respectively. The group discussions were transcribed and a content analysis performed using NVivo. The coding scheme and analyses were driven by the data collected and recurrent themes were examined across all focus groups. Overall, student and senior mentor participants viewed the program positively. Thematic comparisons by participant type indicate a shared view that the mentoring relationship has a far-reaching, educational, professional, and personal impact. Both students and seniors agreed that myths and stereotypes about aging were dispelled and students indicated that a close, caring relationship with an older person will change they way they practice. A longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with community-dwelling seniors can be a valuable addition to traditional geriatric curricular activities designed to increase students' skills and compassion for caring for older adults.

  11. Using Attendance Worksheets to Improve Student Attendance, Participation, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Edward

    2013-06-01

    As science instructors we are faced with two main barriers with respect to student learning. The first is motivating our students to attend class and the second is to make them active participants in the learning process once we have gotten them to class. As we head further into the internet age this problem only gets exacerbated as students have replaced newspapers with cell phones which can surf the web, check their emails, and play games. Quizzes can motivated the students to attend class but do not necessarily motivate them to pay attention. Active learning techniques work but we as instructors have been bombarded by the active learning message to the point that we either do it already or refuse to. I present another option which in my classroom has doubled the rate at which students learn my material. By using attendance worksheets instead of end of class quizzes I hold students accountable for not just their attendance but for when they show up and when they leave the class. In addition it makes the students an active participant in the class even without using active learning techniques as they are writing notes and answering the questions you have posed while the class is in progress. Therefore using attendance worksheets is an effective tool to use in order to guide student learning.

  12. On Cleaning: Student Activism in the Corporate and Imperial University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Carey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past year, over 100 university campuses in the United States and elsewhere have witnessed student protest, specifically against institutionalized racism and in response to symptoms of the university’s neoliberal, capitalist and imperial culture. This article outlines the emergence and confluence of the corporate and imperial university, producing and reproducing the violence of consumer culture, academic containment, and institutional control. This case study of a small, elite, liberal arts college in the United States will unravel the messiness of the contact zone where university administration and student protest meet, and its meanings for those of us who find ourselves ever-contained within spaces of higher education. Through critical discourse analysis and participant observation, I provide some preliminary mapping of how the university sanitizes—how it keeps itself ‘clean’—and the different ways this is interpreted, confirmed, and resisted by its campus community. Queer and feminist readings of pollution, dirt, and bacteria contextualize the university’s response to student activism, and daily operation, in the politics of containment and cleanliness.

  13. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African university students

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    Chrisma Pretorius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the incidence and type of misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs harboured by university students.  Method. A convenience sample of 705 university students were recruited and data were collected using an electronic survey. The link to the survey was sent via e-mail to all registered students at Stellenbosch University. The participants had to complete the Common Misconceptions about Traumatic Brain Injury (CM-TBI questionnaire.  Results. The findings of this study suggest that the students subscribe to misconceptions from each of the 7 categories of misconceptions about TBIs. The mean percentages of misconceptions about TBIs were calculated and the amnesia (mean 49.7% and unconsciousness (mean 46.1% categories were identified as the categories about which the respondents had the most misconceptions, while the mean percentages of misconceptions were lower for the categories of recovery (mean 27.6%, rehabilitation (mean 26.56%, prevention (mean 20.8%, brain injury sequelae (mean 18.7% and brain damage (mean 8.4%.  Conclusion. Generally, these findings appear to be in keeping with previous literature, which suggests that misconceptions about TBIs are common among the general population. This study’s identification of these misconceptions could help create awareness, provide a focus for information provision, and contribute to the development of educational intervention programmes tailored for the South African context.

  14. The religious lives of students at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Whilst significant research has been conducted on religious affiliation and on general levels of religiosity in the South African context, few studies specifically investigated the religious lives of South African university students in a comprehensive way. This is unfortunate as such research could significantly inform and support the effectiveness of youth and student ministries. As such, this article explored the religious lives of students at a university in the Gauteng province of South Africa, focusing specifically on students’ self-assessed religiosity, the maturity of their religious attitudes, their spiritual well-being, the religious practices in which they engage and the relationship between such practices and their spiritual well-being. Gender, racial and religious differences concerning these variables were also investigated. Data were collected from 356 undergraduate students by means of a structured survey consisting of the Spiritual Well-Being Questionnaire, the Religious Fundamentalism Scale and two other scales aimed at assessing religiosity and religious practices. Results indicated that 98.9% of participants were religious with the majority (86.9% being Christian. Generally, students espoused highly fundamentalist religious attitudes but had high levels of spiritual well-being. Prayer and virtual or in-person attendance of religious gatherings such as church services were the most prevalent religious practices whereas fasting and meditation were practiced least. All practices were positively correlated with students’ spiritual well-being. Based on these findings, the article concludes with several specific, practical recommendations relevant to student ministries and those working with university students in religious contexts.

  15. Sexual behavior and health problems in university students, University of Antioquia, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga Posada, L; Soto Vélez, C; Vélez, D J

    1995-12-01

    Authorities at the University of Antioquia, Colombia, felt it would be advisable to institute a student orientation program aimed at preventing health problems resulting from risky sexual behavior related to new cultural trends. The purpose of the work reported in this article was to collect information on the existing situation and provide appropriate advice to the Health Division of the University Welfare Office. For this purpose a survey was conducted with the voluntary participation of 836 students enrolled in their final year of study. A survey form containing 45 questions designed to elicit demographic and sexual behavior data was self-administered anonymously by the participating students. Among the participants who were sexually active, 10.9% (17.2% of the men, 3.3% of the women) said they had contracted some variety of sexually transmitted disease (STD). The most common diagnoses were gonorrhea (42%), genital warts (23%), and genital herpes (19%). The risk of contracting STD was 4.2 times greater in those reporting sex with strangers; 3.4 times greater in those reporting four or more sexual partners; and 2.5 times greater in those reporting homosexual relations, as compared to students not practicing such behaviors. Some 28.4% of 790 survey respondents or their partners had been pregnant; 49% of these pregnancies had terminated in abortions, 77% of these being induced abortions. Only 51.3% of the survey participants reported customary use of contraceptives, those most frequently cited being condoms (by 32% of the users), pills (20%), the rhythm method (18%), and extravaginal ejaculation (17%). Generally speaking, it appears that participating students had received little sex education. To obtain information, they had turned primarily to friends and books. Those who said they had received adequate sex education at home participated somewhat less frequently in risky behaviors but appeared a little less apt to have used contraceptives and a little more apt to

  16. Daily participation in sports and students' sexual activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Melissa A; Dittus, Patricia J; De Rosa, Christine J; Chung, Emily Q; Kerndt, Peter R

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that student athletes may be less likely than nonathletes to engage in sexual behavior. However, few have explored sexual risk behavior among athletes in early adolescence. In 2005, a sample of 10,487 students in 26 Los Angeles public middle and high schools completed a self-administered survey that asked about their demographic characteristics, sports participation, sexual behaviors and expectations, and parental relationships. Chi-square analyses compared reported levels of daily participation in sports, experience with intercourse, experience with oral sex and condom use at last intercourse by selected characteristics. Predictors of sexual experience and condom use were assessed in multivariate logistic regression analyses. One-third of students reported daily participation in sports. This group had higher odds of ever having had intercourse and ever having had oral sex than their peers who did not play a sport daily (odds ratios, 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). The increases in risk were greater for middle school sports participants than for their high school counterparts (1.5 and 1.6, respectively). Among sexually experienced students, daily sports participants also had elevated odds of reporting condom use at last intercourse (1.4). Students as young as middle school age who participate in sports daily may have an elevated risk for STDs and pregnancy. Health professionals should counsel middle school athletes about sexual risk reduction, given that young students may find it particularly difficult to obtain contraceptives, STD testing and prevention counseling. Copyright © 2010 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  17. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  18. Social support over Facebook as predictor of life satisfaction among Malaysian university students

    OpenAIRE

    SHOK HONG OOI

    2017-01-01

    Many young people interact and thus receive and communicate social support over the online world, particularly through Facebook. This paper focuses on how Malaysian university students perceived social support over Facebook. More specifically, this study focuses on how perceived social support influence university students’ life satisfaction. Participants were 800 university students from southern of Malaysia (178 male and 622 female). The finding showed that social support is related to univ...

  19. 〈Original Papers〉Examination of Factors Related to University Life Satisfaction for Students

    OpenAIRE

    大対, 香奈子

    2015-01-01

    (Abstract) The purpose of the present study was to examine factors related to university life satisfaction for students, and specifically to identify social skills related to satisfaction with peer relationships. Participants included 352 university students in their freshman or sophomore year that responded to a questionnaire. The results show that satisfaction with peer relationships is strongly related to more general university life satisfaction. It is also found that social skills requir...

  20. Investigation of self-esteem for university students in terms of doing sports

    OpenAIRE

    CIMEN, Fadime; KUMARTASLI, Mehmet; SOYLEYICI, Senem

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate self-esteem of university students in terms of doing exercise variable. Totally 300 students from Suleyman Demirel University voluntarily participated in the research. The students were grouped into two: doing exercises (n: 150) and not doing exercises (n: 150). In the research, Self-respect scale developed by Arıcak (1999) was used. In the analysis of findings obtained, frequency analysis, independent ''t'' test and One Way ANOVA s...

  1. DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF KNOWLEDGE OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ON GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    AYDIN, Fatih

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the levelof knowledge of undergraduate students on the formation, causes and results ofglobal warming and steps to be taken. Furthermore, this study investigated thelevel of knowledge of university students in terms of their genre anddepartment in which they study. This study was designed under survey model. Atotal of 472 final year undergraduate students studying in Karabuk UniversityFaculty of Letters in 2016-2017 education year participated in thi...

  2. Adversity in University: Cyberbullying and Its Impacts on Students, Faculty and Administrators

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, Wanda; Faucher, Chantal; Jackson, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers a qualitative thematic analysis of the impacts of cyberbullying on post-secondary students, faculty, and administrators from four participating Canadian universities. These findings were drawn from data obtained from online surveys of students and faculty, student focus groups, and semi-structured interviews with faculty members and university administrators. The key themes discussed include: negative affect, impacts on mental and physical health, perceptions of self, impact...

  3. Health care voluntourism: addressing ethical concerns of undergraduate student participation in global health volunteer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Daniel; Iltis, Ana S

    2014-12-01

    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in "voluntourism," health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource poor countries, a practice that has become popular among pre-health professions students. We argue that the participation of undergraduate students in global health experiences raises many of the ethical concerns associated with voluntourism and global health experiences for medical students. Some of these may be exacerbated by or emerge in unique ways when undergraduates volunteer. Guidelines and curricula for medical student engagement in global health experiences have been developed. Guidelines specific to undergraduate involvement in such trips and pre-departure curricula to prepare students should be developed and such training should be required of volunteers. We propose a framework for such guidelines and curricula, argue that universities should be the primary point of delivery even when universities are not organizing the trips, and recommend that curricula should be developed in light of additional data.

  4. Avaliação da participação de pequeno número de estudantes universitários em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo Evaluation of the limited participation by university students in a smoking cessation program

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    Wilson Paloschi Spiandorello

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a participação de pequeno número de estudantes da Universidade de Caxias do Sul em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo. MÉTODOS: Delineamento transversal e comparativo entre alunos que se inscreveram em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo e alunos que não se inscreveram. RESULTADOS: De 108 alunos não inscritos, 102 não mostraram intenção de parar de fumar (94,4%, intervalo de confiança de 95% de 88,29% a 97,93%. As comparações entre inscritos e não inscritos mostraram diferenças estatísticas, respectivamente: nas idades 35 e 23 anos, p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the limited participation by university students in a smoking cessation program. METHODS: A cross-sectional, comparative study was conducted at the University of Caxias do Sul, located in Caxias do Sul, Brazil, involving students who enrolled in a smoking cessation program, together with those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 108 student who did not enroll in the program, 102 (94.4% stated that they had no intention to quit smoking (95% confidence interval: 88.29-97.93%. Comparisons between the enrolled and nonenrolled students revealed the following statistical differences: in mean age (35 vs. 23 years, p < 0.01; mean duration of the smoking habit (19.42 vs. 7.36 years, p < 0.01; considering oneself addicted (100% vs. 58.5%, p = 0.047; believing oneself able to stop smoking at any time (7.1% vs. 22.6%, p = 0.02; having no knowledge of any reasons to quit smoking (37.5% vs. 12%, p = 0.03; having suffered discrimination (42.9% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: Among the university students evaluated, there was a phase, classified as precontemplative or contemplative, during which they were refractory to smoking cessation. Although all of the students were aware of the diseases caused by smoking, 41.5% did not consider themselves addicted. The concept of substance dependence does not apply to these students. It would seem more appropriate to define nicotine

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of orofacial pain in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljic, Sonja; Savic, Sladjana; Stevanovic, Jasmina; Kostic, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the characteristics and prevalence of orofacial pain, and its associations with sociodemographic characteristics, in 319 university students: 188 second-year students in the Medical Faculty and 131 students in the Faculty of Technical Sciences at the University of Kosovska Mitrovica. A specially designed questionnaire was used to assess the prevalence and characteristics of pain. Among the 319 students, 101 (32%) reported previous orofacial pain, and pain was more frequent among women (P pain and that the risk for pain development among women was 1.8 times that among men. Place of residence and relationship status were not associated with frequency of orofacial pain. The regions with the highest pain prevalences were the temporal region (7%; 95% confidence interval, 4-10%) and the region around the eye (6%; 95% confidence interval, 4-9%). The first episode of orofacial pain was less than 3 months previously in 59% of the participants, and 39% of students had sought professional medical help. (J Oral Sci 58, 7-13, 2016).

  6. Increased body weight affects academic performance in university students

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    Angela S. Anderson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For K-12 students, obesity has been linked to student educational achievements. The study objective was to determine whether academic performance in university students is correlated with BMI. Students from two consecutive academic years (Jan–May 2013 and Jan–May 2014 were given an optional class survey in May, as extra credit. Of the 452 students that completed the survey, 204 females and 75 males (N = 279; 73% female and 27% male consented to participate in the study. The number of correct answers to problem-solving questions (PSQs and the overall final grade for the class were compared to the calculated BMI using linear regression with a Pearson's R correlation and unpaired t-tests. BMI was significantly negatively correlated with student's final grades (P = 0.001 Pearson's r = −0.190 and PSQs were positively correlated with final grades (P < 0.001; Pearson's r = 0.357. Our findings show a correlation between healthy body weight and improved academic performance. Further, the data suggest that future research in the area of body weight, diet, and exercise and any correlations of these with academic performance in college students are warranted.

  7. Transition to University Life: Insights from High School and University Female Students in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Edda, Medhanit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to get an insight about how high school female students perceive the transition to university life, and to understand the transition experience of university female students in the first semester. An exploratory study design was used where 166 high school female students and 88 first year university female students…

  8. Approaches for University Students and their Relationship to Academic Performance

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    Evelyn Fernández-Castillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The way students perceive learning is influenced by multiple factors. The present study aimed at establishing relationships between the learning approaches, academic performance, and the academic year in a sample of students from different courses of Universidad Central  “Marta Abreu”, Las Villas. For this ex post facto study, a probabilistic sample was used based on a simple random sampling of 524 university students who participated in the Study Process Questionnaire.  The analysis of variance (MANOVA and ANOVA and the analysis of clusters reported associations between a deep approach to learning and a better academic performance.  These analyses showed differences in the learning approach in the different courses, predominantly a soft approach.

  9. Investigation of internet addiction and personality relationship among university students

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    Fatih Özgen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, it was aimed to examine to internet addiction and personality relation among university students. Material and Methods: Totally 527 students, studying at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart university participated to this study as a volunteer. Internet addiction scale and Eysenck personality scale were used to collect data. Kruskal Wallis was used to investigate differences between groups and Pearson Correlation was also used to investigate the relation between variables in SPSS. Findings were accepted at p<0.05 level. Results: Total internet addiction scores of participants were 26.85±14.41 point, %94 of them were average internet user. It was determined that they are mostly connected the internet from the mobile phone (%58, 5.8±1.8 days a week and 4.7±3.0 hours a day, and that they mostly use social network and chat sites (%30. There were statistical differences between departments (p<0.05. The internet addiction score of students of Faculty of Science and Literature, School of Health and Theology was significantly lower than other sections. internet addiction scores were higher in males (p<0.05. In terms of personality characteristics of participants, it was found that they had a higher score (3.9±1.8 in the "Outward Turnover". It was determined that there is a statistically positive relationship between internet addiction score and Neurotism, Psychotism but the negative relationship with the "Lie" personality sub-dimensions. Conclusion: Internet dependency score was found low in this study. Although this is a desirable situation, it would be useful to ensure participation of students in the recreational activities to protect this situation.

  10. The impact of materialism on the entrepreneurial intention of university students in South Africa

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    Olawale Fatoki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between materialism and the entrepreneurial intention of students at a South African university. In addition, the study examined if there is a significant gender difference in the materialistic values of university students. The quantitative research technique was adopted for the study. The survey method and the self-administered approach were used for data collection. The research participants comprised of 169 conveniently sampled business students. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to ensure reliability. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, T-test, Pearson correlation and regression. The results indicated that there is a positive but insignificant relationship between materialism and the entrepreneurial intention of university students. There is no significant gender difference in the materialistic values of university students. Recommendations were suggested in order to manage the materialistic values of university students.

  11. Bydgoszcz universities students' awareness about melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mirończuk, Katarzyna; Kałużna, Lucyna; Łakomski, Mateusz; Zukow, Walery

    2017-01-01

    Mirończuk Katarzyna, Kałużna Lucyna, Łakomski Mateusz, Zukow Walery. Bydgoszcz universities students' awareness about melanoma. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(8):566-575. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.887380 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4784 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 1223 (26.01.2017). 1223 Journal of Edu...

  12. 40 CFR 262.107 - Under what circumstances will a university's participation in this environmental management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... university's participation in this environmental management standard pilot be terminated? 262.107 Section 262... Environmental Management Standard § 262.107 Under what circumstances will a university's participation in this environmental management standard pilot be terminated? (a) EPA retains the right to terminate a University's...

  13. Adversity in University: Cyberbullying and Its Impacts on Students, Faculty and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Wanda; Faucher, Chantal; Jackson, Margaret

    2017-08-08

    This paper offers a qualitative thematic analysis of the impacts of cyberbullying on post-secondary students, faculty, and administrators from four participating Canadian universities. These findings were drawn from data obtained from online surveys of students and faculty, student focus groups, and semi-structured interviews with faculty members and university administrators. The key themes discussed include: negative affect, impacts on mental and physical health, perceptions of self, impacts regarding one's personal and professional lives, concern for one's safety, and the impact of authorities' (non) response. Students reported primarily being cyberbullied by other students, while faculty were cyberbullied by both students and colleagues. Although students and faculty represent different age levels and statuses at the university, both groups reported similar impacts and similar frustrations at finding solutions, especially when their situations were reported to authorities. It is important that universities pay greater attention to developing effective research-based cyberbullying policies and to work towards fostering a more respectful online campus culture.

  14. The Relation of Eating Habits with Obesity in University Students

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    Mehmet Altın

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to determine the relation of eating habits with obesity in university students. Hereby, totally 604 students including 226 females and 378 males, studying at 5 different faculties of Selcuk University in the 2013-2014 academic year, participated in this study. The students’ heights, weights and body mass indexes (BMI were estimated, their BMI values were calculated by dividing body weights (cm into square meter (m² of height. A questionnaire was applied to the relevant students in order to assess their eating habits through the BAI (Eating Habits Index developed by Demirezen and Coşansu in 2005. The BAI internal consistency analysis the Cronbach alpha value was estimated as 0,76. To determine the differences from the total points in BAI between the female and male students, t-test was used in the independent groups; the answers to the questions by the students were expressed as percentages and frequencies. Within this study; the female students’ BMI value was found out as 26,23 ± 7,74, the male students’ BMI value was also found out as 23,43 ± 8,12, in all of the groups this value was estimated as 24,77 ± 7,02 as well. According to the reports of the World Health Organization, these values are regarded as a category of overweight ones (Table 1. While the total BAI value of females was 13,2, the BAI value of males was 12,4, when considering the all relevant students in the research, this value was calculated as 12,7. According to these results, considering the university students’ eating habits, it is concluded that males have risks at a medium level while females have higher risks of obesity.

  15. Gender Differences in Osteoporosis Health Beliefs and Knowledge and Their Relation to Vigorous Physical Activity in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammage, Kimberley L.; Gasparotto, Jennifer; Mack, Diane E.; Klentrou, Panagiota

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this cross-sectional investigation was to examine (1) gender differences in osteoporosis-related knowledge and beliefs and (2) if these beliefs could predict vigorous physical activity behavior in university students. Participants: Male (n = 176) and female (n = 351) university students participated in the study. Methods:…

  16. The Critical Purchase of Genealogy: Critiquing Student Participation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Until recently the dominant critique of "student participation" projects was one based on the theoretical assumptions of critical theory in the form of critical pedagogy. Over the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of a critical education discourse that theorises and critically analyses such projects using Foucault's notion of…

  17. Factors That Influence Students to Participate in Team Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality on participation in decision making in a sample of 225 business students. The Neo-FFI scale was used to measure the five personality dimensions of openness, agreeableness, extroversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism. Analysis indicated that personality dimensions, extroversion and…

  18. Participant Observation: Teaching Students the Benefits of Using a Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, Karen L.; McBride, M. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Participant observation is a topic covered in most Introduction to Communication Research classes and specialized courses on qualitative inquiry. However, as humans are natural observers in everyday life, students may not appreciate the importance of systematic and thoughtful observation and note taking. The purpose of the one-to-two class period…

  19. Promoting Athletic Participation for Students with Disabilities: Trends and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Melissa; Ennis, Robin Parks; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2018-01-01

    Engaging in physical activity is important for school-age children, as it promotes a healthy and active lifestyle. However, barriers to participation in physical education and athletics often prevent students with disabilities from engaging in these important activities. There are several legal precedents that should be considered as schools seek…

  20. Increasing Participation of Rural and Regional Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Michele J.; Grace, Diana M.

    2014-01-01

    Regional and rural students in Australia face unique challenges when aspiring to higher education. These challenges reflect systematic disadvantage experienced by rural and regional populations as a whole. In an effort to redress these inequities, and aided by the Australian Government's Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program…

  1. Increasing Shore-based Participation of Scientists & Students in Telepresence-enabled Nautilus Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. L. C.; Raineault, N.; Carey, S.; Eberli, G. P.; John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; German, C. R.; Mirmalek, Z.; Pallant, A.

    2016-02-01

    As the US oceanographic research fleet shrinks, reducing seagoing opportunities for scientists and students, remote participation in cruises via telepresence will become increasingly vital. The Nautilus Exploration Program is improving the experience of shoreside participants through the development of new tools and methodologies for connecting them to expeditions in real time increasing accessibility to oceanographic cruises. The Scientist Ashore Program is a network of scientists around the world who participate in Exploration Vessel Nautilus expeditions from their own labs or homes. We have developed a suite of collaboration tools to allow scientists to view video and data in real time, as well as to communicate with ship-based and other shore-based participants to enable remote participation in cruises. Post-cruise, scientists and students may access digital data and biological and geological samples from our partner shore-based repositories: the University of Rhode Island Inner Space Center, Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, and URI Marine Geological Samples Lab. We present examples of successful shore-based participation by scientists and students in Nautilus expeditions. In 2013, Drs. Cheadle and John stood watch 24/7 with ten undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Wyoming, recording geologic features and samples, during a cruise to the Cayman Rise. The Straits of Florida & Great Bahama Bank cruise was co-led by Dr. Eberli at the University of Miami in 2014, greatly complementing existing data. That same year, the ISC hosted four early career scientists and their twelve undergraduate students who led dives from shore in collaboration with Dr. Carey, Lead Scientist at sea on the Kick'em Jenny Volcano & the Barbados Mud Volcanoes cruise. In 2015, 12 Scientists Ashore worked in collaboration with the ship-based team on the exploration of Galapagos National Park, and more than 20 are working with OET on post-cruise data & sample analysis.

  2. University student’s engagement: development of the University Student Engagement Inventory (USEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Maroco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Student engagement is a key factor in academic achievement and degree completion, though there is much debate about the operationalization and dimensionality of this construct. The goal of this paper is to describe the development of an psycho-educational oriented measure – the University Student Engagement Inventory (USEI. This measure draws on the conceptualization of engagement as a multidimensional construct, including cognitive, behavioural and emotional engagement. Participants were 609 Portuguese University students (67 % female majoring in Social Sciences, Biological Sciences or Engineering and Exact Sciences. The content, construct and predictive validity, and reliability of the USEI were tested. The validated USEI was composed of 15 items, and supported the tri-factorial structure of student engagement. We documented evidence of adequate reliability, factorial, convergent and discriminant validities. USEI’s concurrent validity, with the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Survey, and the predictive validity for self-reported academic achievement and intention to dropout from school were also observed.

  3. Indonesian students' participation in an interprofessional learning workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional learning activities, such as workshops allow students to learn from, with and about each other. This study assessed the impact on Indonesian health students' attitudes towards interprofessional education (IPE) from participating in a workshop on medication safety. The students attended a two-day IPE workshop on medication safety. Thirty-five (48.6%) students completed pre-/post-workshop surveys using a modified Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) survey. The post-workshop survey also had a series of open-ended questions. Students' responses to each RIPLS statement pre-/post-workshop were compared, whilst their responses to open-ended questions in post-workshop survey were thematically analysed. Students reported positive attitudinal changes on statements of shared learning and teamwork sub-scale (Wilcoxon p value importance of teamwork and communication skills. This study found that learning with other health students through an IPE workshop improved medical, nursing and pharmacy students' attitudes towards the importance of shared learning, teamwork and communication in healthcare service.

  4. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinec, Emil J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.

    2013-06-27

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  5. Political apathy amongst students: A case study of Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntsikelelo B. Breakfast

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary motivation for this research, in which a qualitative method was employed, was to examine political apathy amongst students at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. The secondary motivation was to question whether youth political apathy threatens the consolidation of democracy. The researchers arranged four focus groups at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. A purposive sampling technique was utilised. All 50 participants in the study were Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University undergraduate and postgraduate black students, with ages ranging from 21 to 35 years. The researchers encouraged participants to have maximum participation in the focus group deliberations. The researchers also made use of elite interviews in the study. The findings of this study suggest that political apathy does exist amongst students at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Most of the participants in the focus groups indicated that young people in post-apartheid South Africa have no interest in politics.

  6. Assessment of values in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Manuel MORALES RODRÍGUEZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a questionnaire for assessing social values in university students (VASOL. Increasingly, society demands that its professionals must know how to cope with complexity, considering the human and social aspects of such situations. The European Higher Education Area (ehea has emphasized the interest in training future professionals as agents of social change, not only as regards the creation and management of new knowledge but also in the action of citizens who contribute to greater social cohesion. This research team has developed a new questionnaire to assess social justice and solidarity values. The questionnaire revealed a unifactorial configuration coherent with the theory. A sample of 945 university students completed the VASOL and these were subjected to a series of instruments aimed at evaluating the validity of the questionnaire. The VASOL proved to be a reliable and valid instrument. We discuss the usefulness of this new instrument for the screening of social justice and solidarity values, specifically for their detection, and for assessing social or interpersonal skills in the current model of the ehea and validation of psycho-educational programs.

  7. Coping Styles, Social Support, Relational Self-Construal, and Resilience in Predicting Students' Adjustment to University Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahat, Enes; Ilhan, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate how well coping styles, social support, relational self-construal, and resilience characteristics predict first year university students' ability to adjust to university life. Participants consisted of 527 at-risk students attending a state university in Turkey. The Personal Information Form, Risk…

  8. Sexual violence against female university students in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinew, Yohannes Mehretie; Hagos, Mihiret Abreham

    2017-07-24

    Though many women are suffering the consequences of sexual violence, only few victims speak out as it is sensitive and prone to stigma. This lack of data made it difficult to get full picture of the problem and design proper interventions. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and factors associated with sexual violence among female students of Wolaita Sodo University, south Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 462 regular female Wolaita Sodo University students on April 7/2015. Participants were selected by simple random sampling. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire. Data entry and analysis was done by EPI info and SPSS statistical packages respectively. Descriptive statistics were done. Moreover, bivariate and multivariate analyses were also carried out to identify predictors of sexual violence. The age of respondents ranged from 18 to 26 years. Lifetime sexual violence was found to be 45.4%. However, 36.1% and 24.4% of respondents reported experiencing sexual violence since entering university and in the current academic year respectively. Life time sexual violence was positively associated with witnessing inter-parental violence as a child, rural childhood residence, having regular boyfriend, alcohol consumption and having friends who drink regularly; while it was negatively associated with discussing sexual issues with parents. Sexual violence is a common phenomenon among the students. More detailed research has to be conducted to develop prevention and intervention strategies.

  9. Academic Goals and Self-Handicapping Strategies in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradás, María del Mar; Freire, Carlos; Valle, Antonio; Núñez, José Carlos

    2016-05-23

    In highly competitive settings like university, the fear of failure leads some students to protect their self-worth using self-handicapping strategies. The present investigation examines to what extent academic goals are related to those tactics in university students. Specifically, MANCOVA was applied to estimate statistical differences linked to behavioral and claimed self-handicapping strategies according to the level (high/medium/low) of four types of academic goal (achievement approach, achievement avoidance, mastery approach, and work avoidance). Degree, year in school, and gender were entered as covariates. 940 students (86.5% women) from University of A Coruña (M = 20.44; SD = 1.73) participated. Results show that: (a) both behavioral and claimed self-handicapping are promoted by ego-oriented goals (achievement avoidance, F(2, 937) = 23.56, p self-handicapping (F(2, 937) = 9.09, p self-handicapping; and (c) mastery approach goals are significantly, negatively related to both types of self-handicapping (F(2, 937) = 20.09, p < .001, η p 2 = .041). Psychological and educational implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Effects of Students' Participation in Authoring of Multimedia Materials on Student Acquisition of Vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Ofelia R.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effects on vocabulary acquisition of student participation in authoring a multimedia institutional module. Sixty-two subjects were randomly assigned to two groups, and each group was randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Showed evidence that students learn vocabulary significantly better when they participate in the creation…

  11. Exploring participation and non-participation in the 2010/11 student protests against fees and cuts

    OpenAIRE

    Hensby, Alexander Richard

    2014-01-01

    This research project uses the 2010/11 student protests in the UK as a case study to understand why certain individuals mobilise for forms of political participation and activism and why others do not. The student protests are ideal as a case study of participation and non-participation for a number of reasons. The UK Government’s proposal to treble the cap tuition fees for students in England represented an issue of widespread grievance for the student population, a grievance ...

  12. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  13. AN INVESTIGATION FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' SELF PERCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL MEDIA ADDICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Necmi Esgi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the self-perceptions of university students about social media addiction who are aged between 18 and 21 and up. In the research, the social media addiction scale was employed in order to determine students' self-perceptions. The scale was administered to 180 students. Of the participant students in the research, 25% described themselves as individuals experiencing problems in Social media addiction. On the other hand, it was determined that the factors of ag...

  14. Testing the Muslim Students Attitude towards Wearing Hijab at Prince of Songkla University Pattani Campus, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Afifi Lateh; Hamdia Mudor

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the attitude towards wearing Hijab of the Muslim students putting on a Hijab at Prince of Songkla University, Pattani campus. The participants were 367 Muslim women students of the first semester of academic year 2012. The findings showed that the interaction of attitude towards wearing Hijab between the students? hometown and students? group year was no statistically significant relationship and there was no statistical difference of the attitude generated by differenc...

  15. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Hassan; Patel, Hamza; Aslam, Hafiz Muhammad; Ansari, Iqra Qamar; Khan, Mariya; Iqbal, Noureen; Rasheed, Hira; Jabbar, Qamar; Khan, Saqib Raza; Khalid, Barira; Nadeem, Anum; Afroz, Raunaq; Shafiq, Sara; Mustafa, Arwa; Asad, Nazia

    2013-10-17

    Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18-25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3-4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and entertainment or whatever satisfaction they get

  16. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. Methodology It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18–25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3–4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Conclusion Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and

  17. Case Study: Students of University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Samim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the existence of probable relationship between the popular music consumption and aggressive, anti-social behaviors. we took the fact of the existence of some kind of anti-social aggression amongst the students interested in popular music, as the basis for the this study The instrument used to collect data for this project was a self-report questionnaire, not objective observation The questionnaires were distributed to 410 students of the University of Isfahan The interpretation of survey results indicates the existence of an actual and meaningful relationship between the use of popular music and aggressive behaviors Survey results indicate negative feedback about the popular music consumption from the post-Revolutionary era (referring to 1978 Revolution in Iran, and reveal positive response with regard to the use of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era Another interesting result uncovers that the most aggressive students are amongst the audience for the Western genres of popular music (rap, rock, heavy metal As a result and considering the musicological features of the "popular music" as well as the socio-psychological characteristics of the youth, one may conclude that all types and genres of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era, seem to be more appropriate to the young population of nowadays Iran.

  18. From Participation to Dropout: Quantitative Participation Patterns in Online University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Nicolae; Neubauer, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The academic e-learning practice has to deal with various participation patterns and types of online learners with different support needs. The online instructors are challenged to recognize these and react accordingly. Among the participation patterns, special attention is requested by dropouts, which can perturbate online collaboration.…

  19. Perceived value of student participation in the field of aerospace engineering from a student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langen, Sven Kevin; Bentum, Marinus Jan; de Vries, Rowan; Grootjans, Robert; Grootjans, Roelof; Brethouwer, Martijn F.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of student participation in space projects is well known. New students are needed to supplement the future workforce and both experience and enthusiasm are important factors to join any industry. Students can also offer fresh perspectives to existing problems in any field of

  20. Student Government and Student Participation in Junior College Governance--Models for the 1970's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    It is the author's contention that student government revitalization will come only when student government begins to play a substantive role in policy making and implementation. The purpose of this paper is to consider, criticize, and propose a number of models for student participation in junior college governance. The first, a traditional…

  1. Food insecurity and Mediterranean diet adherence among Greek university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, X; Grammatikopoulou, M G; Gkiouras, K; Papadopoulou, S E; Agorastou, T; Gkika, I; Maraki, M I; Dardavessis, T; Chourdakis, M

    2018-05-01

    To assess Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence and food insecurity (FI) among university students in Greece. A non-probability sample of 236 students was recruited from Athens and Thessaloniki during 2016. FI was assessed with the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale and MD adherence with the MEDAS questionnaire. Mean MEDAS score of the sample was 6.4 ± 1.9, with women demonstrating greater MD adherence compared to men (p = 0.016) and Dietetics students exhibiting increased score compared to the rest (p ≤ 0.001). A low proportion of participants were food-secure (17.8%), 45.3% were severely food-insecure, 22.0% experienced moderate FI and the remaining 14.8% had low FI. Participants studying in the city they grew up exhibited lower FI compared to those studying in other cities (p = 0.009), while, additionally, a trend was noted for increased FI among students with an unemployed family member (p = 0.05). Students working night shifts had lower MD adherence and increased FI compared to the rest (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). The same pattern was observed among participants who smoked (p = 0.003 for MD adherence and p = 0.009 for FI, respectively). Multivariate regression analyses did not reveal any connections between FI categories, waist circumference or BMI, but showed an inverse relationship between severe FI and MD adherence. The majority of the surveyed university students from Greece demonstrate some degree of FI, with a great proportion being severely food-insecure. Increased FI is inversely associated with MD adherence. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. University students with learning disabilities advocating for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roer-Strier, D

    2002-11-20

    In recent decades Western psychology has conceptualized learning disabilities (LD) in terms of deficits and such related 'social emotional issues' as insecurity, low self-esteem and social isolation that can be rehabilitated through combined remedial teaching and psychological intervention. With increasing advocacy and legislation on behalf of people with disabilities in the US, UK and Australia, more resources are being made available to students with LD in institutions of higher education. Due to this increase in the quantity of services, written programmes and accommodations made to their needs, increased numbers of students with LD have been graduating successfully from institutions of higher education. This paper describes an option for treating students with LD that is based on a theoretical perspective that understands these students as an excluded population and emphasizes the importance of their empowerment. A project involving social work students with LD at Hebrew University in Jerusalem is presented as a case study. Case-study investigation, one of the common methods of qualitative research, explores social and human problems in their natural context. A 6-year evaluation of this project was conducted based on questionnaires, focus groups, documentation of all activities related to the project, in-depth interviews and outcome measures. The results suggest that the project developed in three stages: raising awareness, building partnerships, and lobbying for rights and services. Outcome measures indicate that the project was successful in lowering dropout rates and improving students' academic achievement. Analysis of interviews with students suggests that the project positively affected the students' perceptions by helping them reframe the social and emotional connotations of their learning disability. Students reported marked social and emotional change, including reduced stress and anxiety levels and increased self-esteem. Empowerment practices that are

  3. Evaluation of an Intercultural Peer Training for Incoming Undergraduate Students at an International University in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina K. Kedzior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available University education is increasingly becoming international. Therefore, it is important that universities prepare their new students for the challenges of an intercultural academic environment. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of an intercultural peer-to-peer training offered to all new incoming students at Jacobs University Bremen, Germany. The training aims to facilitate the social and academic integration of students at this international university. A total of 117 first-year undergraduate students completed a pen-and-paper questionnaire with 47 items one semester (6 months after attending the intercultural training. The results suggest that participants liked the structure of the training and the use of senior students as peer trainers. It appears that the training improved the awareness of the effects of culture (own and other on the social life of students. However, the training was less adequate at preparing the participants for the student-centered academic culture at this university. In light of its cost-effectiveness, the intercultural training could be easily adopted for use at other universities as part of the campus-wide orientation activities. However, regardless of their culture, all new university students require more assistance to academically adapt to and succeed in multicultural classrooms.

  4. "You Have to Be a Bit Brave": Barriers to Scottish Student-Teachers' Participation in Study-Abroad Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ninetta; Sosu, Edward; Fassetta, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined Scottish student teachers' attitudes to study-abroad and the reasons underpinning their reluctance to participate in these programmes. Data collection comprised a mixed-methods approach consisting of a survey of 318 student-teachers in one Scottish university followed by semi-structured interviews with…

  5. Examination of Socialization Level of University Students Engaged in Sports Activities According to Their Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Mehmet; Karagözoglu, Cengiz; Dervent, Fatih; Arslantas, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the university students who participate in sports have been examined in terms of their socialization relative to the participation in sport activities and the locus of control. Students are thought to be engaged in many activities in addition to their lessons during their student tenure at higher education institutions. Their…

  6. Disability and Spanish University: Protection of university students with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Álvarez Robles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Right to education is a fundamental right, internationally recognized. However, this assumption is conditioned by personal circumstances, details, of the holder. In any case, we should emphasize the double dimension of this, firstly the right to receive education/teaching, secondly its consideration as a channel of integration and social participation. It is due to this situation, the involvement of the public powers, in order to implement and develop of this right, must be promoted.   The application of the right to education to people that suffer disabilities has got a great degree of importance under The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, held in New York in December 2006. At that time the international community implications were really consolidated. This situation has changed dramatically with the economic crisis that we are suffering in recent times. This is the main reason for the present study, an appeal to implement and apply regulation about disabilities at University studies trough the reform of their statutes and by the increase of the level of the information and training of their workers, especially professors. The universalization of rights, such as education, faces difficulties in achieving its fullness as all holders differ with respect to other recipients of this right. The challenge of this work is to visualize the situation in a very specific environment, university education, and in a very precise context that is the Kingdom of Spain. However, globalization should assume ownership the main problems and challenges identified in this work.  It will be checked in the prolix character of legislation that rules theright af everyone, although you were different to be the holder of the right to education. The existence of a huge number of authorities who supports an inclusive model collides with exogenous difficulties, especially the lack of means, but also endogenous, as the lack of involvement of any of the

  7. Budgeting and spending habits of university students in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the budgeting and spending habits of university students at a South African university. In addition, the study examined if there is a significant gender difference in the budgeting and spending habits of university students. The study adopted a quantitative research approach with a ...

  8. Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.…

  9. Motivating students' participation in a computer networks course by means of magic, drama and games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilas, Constantinos S; Politis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    The recent economic crisis has forced many universities to cut down expenses by packing students into large lecture groups. The problem with large auditoria is that they discourage dialogue between students and faculty and they burden participation. Adding to this, students in computer science courses usually find the field to be full of theoretical and technical concepts. Lack of understanding leads them to lose interest and / or motivation. Classroom experience shows that the lecturer could employ alternative teaching methods, especially for early-year undergraduate students, in order to grasp their interest and introduce basic concepts. This paper describes some of the approaches that may be used to keep students interested and make them feel comfortable as they comprehend basic concepts in computer networks. The lecturing procedure was enriched with games, magic tricks and dramatic representations. This approach was used experimentally for two semesters and the results were more than encouraging.

  10. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  11. Alcohol-Related Injuries among Eastern Croatian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskulin, Ivan; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Miskulin, Maja

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the alcohol consumption patterns and to identify the association of injury with excess drinking among Croatian students. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 845 university students by the use of the WHO AUDIT questionnaire. A total of 39.9% of the university students reported some level of excess…

  12. Effects of Cooperative Education on Student Adaptation to University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrell, Suzanne E.; Rowe, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    In a comparison of cooperative education and regular students in arts, math, and science (n=267), co-op students reported better social adjustment and attachment to the university and greater commitment to educational goals. Arts students were better adapted to university than others. (SK)

  13. University Students' Online Information Searching Strategies in Different Search Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Hou, Huei-Tse; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of search context played in university students' online information searching strategies. A total of 304 university students in Taiwan were surveyed with questionnaires in which two search contexts were defined as searching for learning, and searching for daily life information. Students' online search strategies…

  14. Measuring University Students' Approaches to Learning Statistics: An Invariance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesi, Francesca; Primi, Caterina; Bilgin, Ayse Aysin; Lopez, Maria Virginia; del Carmen Fabrizio, Maria; Gozlu, Sitki; Tuan, Nguyen Minh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to provide evidence that an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) was invariant across different languages and educational contexts in measuring university students' learning approaches to statistics. Data were collected on samples of university students attending…

  15. Factors Influencing Students' Attrition at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghanboosi, Salim Saleen

    2013-01-01

    The students' attrition rates among students enrolled at SQU ranged between 6.8% (1998), 7.8% (1999), and 7.9% (2000). However, the drop-out rate at the Sultan Qaboos University is increasing gradually, and this increase represents a problem for the university that provides free education and financial aid for all male students coming from areas…

  16. IRIS, Gender, and Student Achievement at University of Genova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfa, Antonella; Freddano, Michela

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the gender effects on student achievement at University of Genova and it is a part of the research performed by the University of Genova called "Benchmarks interfaculty students: Development of a gender perspective to find strategies to understand what leads students to success in their studies", financed by the…

  17. Assessing Weather Curiosity in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses upon measuring an individual's level of trait curiosity about the weather using the Weather Curiosity Scale (WCS). The measure consists of 15 self-report items that describe weather preferences and/or behaviors that people may perform more or less frequently. The author reports on two initial studies of the WCS that have used the responses of 710 undergraduate students from a large university in the southeastern United States. In the first study, factor analysis of the 15 items indicated that the measure was unidimensional - suggesting that its items singularly assessed weather curiosity. The WCS also was internally consistent as evidenced by an acceptable Cronbach's alpha, a = .81). The second study sought to identify other personality variables that may relate with the WCS scores and thus illuminate the nature of weather curiosity. Several clusters of personality variables appear to underlie the curiosity levels people exhibited, the first of which related to perceptual curiosity (r = .59). Being curious about sights, sounds, smells, and textures generally related somewhat to curiosity about weather. Two measures of trait sensitivity to environmental stimulation, the Highly Sensitive Person Scale (r = .47) and the Orientation Sensitivity Scale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (r = .43), also predicted weather curiosity levels. Finally, possessing extraverted personality traits (r = .34) and an intense style of experiencing one's emotions (r = .33) related to weather curiosity. How can this measure be used in K-12 or post-secondary settings to further climate literacy? First, the WCS can identify students with natural curiosities about weather and climate so these students may be given more challenging instruction that will leverage their natural interests. Second, high-WCS students may function as weather and climate ambassadors during inquiry-based learning activities and thus help other students who are not as oriented to the

  18. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M; ElRefae, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students' preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics.

  19. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in University Students: Occurrence and Associated Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Attlee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and its association with body composition among students in University of Sharjah (UOS. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included a total sample size of 50 female students registering in undergraduate programs at the University of Sharjah using convenience sampling technique. A pretested interview schedule was administered to elicit information pertaining to personal background and medical history related to PCOS. A diagnostic ultrasound scan was performed for determining PCOS along with a body composition analysis using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA technology. Results: Twenty percent (10 out of 50 participants were diagnosed with PCOS, of whom only 4 individuals were previously diagnosed with PCOS and aware of their conditions, while the reports showed 16% with oligomenorrhea, 4% with polymenorrhea, and none with amenorrhea. A positive family history was indicated as reported by 22% of the total participants. Significant difference between the body weights of participants having PCOS (66.7 kg and those without it (58.8 kg were noted (p=0.043, t=2.084. On the other hand, the body composition related variables including waist-hip ratio (WHR, fat-free mass (FFM, percent body fat (PBF and visceral fat area (VFA were relatively higher in participants having PCOS than those without it. However, there was no statistical significance of differences. Comparatively, the participants with PCOS had lower bone mineral density (BMD than those without it, whereas the difference was statistically non-significant. Conclusion: The occurrence of PCOS in the present study is consistent with the global prevalence. Comparatively, the body composition of PCOS females is different from the normal females. Further studies are required in the Middle East region on larger sample sizes and broader aspects of health including lifestyle and dietary

  20. Assessment of Reduced Tolerance to Sound (Hyperacusis in University Students

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    Sule Yilmaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperacusis is defined as a reduction in tolerance to ordinary environmental sounds. Hyperacusis can occur in individuals of all age groups, making daily life difficult for the sufferers. Although there is no objective test to accurately diagnose hyperacusis, questionnaires are useful for the assessment of hyperacusis. The aim of this study was to explore the reduced sound tolerance in university students using a hyperacusis questionnaire (HQ. Materials and Methods: A total of 536 university students (300 females and 236 males aged between 18 and 25 years, with a mean age of 21.34 ± 1.87 years, were assessed using an HQ developed by Khalfa. The mean total score of all the participants was 16.34 ± 7.91, and 5.78% of the participants had total scores indicating hyperacusis, where a majority of them were females. Results: Females had significantly higher scores than men in terms of both the total and the attentional and emotional dimensions. The scores of the participants who reported noise exposure or a decrease in their tolerance to noise were significantly higher than those of the other participants. Even among young adults, there was a group of participants suffering from some problems related to decreased tolerance to everyday sounds. Discussion: Although the Turkish translation of the HQ seems to be a reliable tool for evaluating hyperacusis in young adults, further work with various populations of different age groups is required to establish validity and to assess the psychometric qualities of the Turkish form.

  1. Getting the engine started: motivations for participation in a university outdoor recreation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan L. Sharp; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the motivations of trip participants in the Georgia Outdoor Recreation Program at the University of Georgia during the fall semester of 2007, and to collect baseline data about their participation. Participants were asked to fill out a survey and return it to the trip leader at the conclusion of each trip. Participants'...

  2. Selected anthropometric indices of maritime university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rębacz-Maron, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity during working life are becoming an increasingly serious challenge to various professional groups where recruits and personnel must be healthy and fit. Marine recruitment, even at the training stage, should be open to applicants who meet health and fitness criteria. The objective of the study is to determine the overweight and adiposity rates among seafarer candidates (n = 368). Based on anthropometric measurements and somatic indices the extent of obesity among marine students/ /future seafarers was investigated. In the groups identified according to the year of study, arithmetic averages (SD - standard deviation) were calculated for somatometric characteristics, and were then used to analyse the phenomena of overweight and obesity. The comparison was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks. The highest average body mass index (BMI) score was found in fourth-year students (mean BMI 25.7 ± 2.8). The average BMI for years one and two was in the upper range of 'healthy' weight. In 24.0% of first-year students and 32.2% of second-year students, the waist circumference was higher than half of the body height. Body fat percentage results indicate that this feature is highly variable, with a strong upward trend. Findings regarding overweight among future seamen give cause for concern. The participants of the study were characterised by excessive weight and adiposity. Recruitment criteria for uniformed services are not as restrictive as they used to be, as it is getting increasingly more difficult to find sufficiently slim and fit applicants.

  3. PARTICIPATION MOTIVATION AND STUDENT'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG SPORT STUDENTS IN THREE COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Kondric

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the differences in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries. On a sample of 390 sports students from Slovenia, Croatia and Germany we studied what motivates an interest in being sports active. The sample was stratified across the choice to attend table tennis lessons at all three institutions and all students have completed the Participation Motivation Questionnaire (PMQ. The results revealed that the latent structure of the types of sports students' motives consisted of six factors (sport action with friend, popularity, fitness & health, social status, sports events, relaxation through sports. We also found significant sex differences in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students from the three different countries. We did not find relevant age-based differences among the students, and this is the only initial hypothesis that we can reject.

  4. Participation Motivation and Student's Physical Activity among Sport Students in Three Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondric, Miran; Sindik, Joško; Furjan-Mandic, Gordana; Schiefler, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the differences in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries. On a sample of 390 sports students from Slovenia, Croatia and Germany we studied what motivates an interest in being sports active. The sample was stratified across the choice to attend table tennis lessons at all three institutions and all students have completed the Participation Motivation Questionnaire (PMQ). The results revealed that the latent structure of the types of sports students' motives consisted of six factors (sport action with friend, popularity, fitness & health, social status, sports events, relaxation through sports). We also found significant sex differences in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students from the three different countries. We did not find relevant age-based differences among the students, and this is the only initial hypothesis that we can reject. Key pointsThe potential implications of the result can be in better understanding the relationship between different motivational orientations - in particular, extrinsic motivation - and sport motivation among school-aged individuals.In the context of Self Determination Theory, students can be encouraged in developing more autonomous orientations for sport activity, rather than controlled and impersonal, especially in certain countries.Significant factors of differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries and also some significant sex differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students.

  5. Assessing study skills among a sample of university students: an Iranian survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Didarloo

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: Although the majority of the participants had moderate study skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

  6. Exploring Levels of Student-Athlete Burnout at Two Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc-Charbonneau, Nicole; Durand-Bush, Natalie; Forneris, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the levels of burnout among student-athletes at two Canadian universities and to investigate whether there were significant differences related to gender, sport, year of university sport participation, academic year, and academic program. Burnout was measured by administering Raedeke and Smith's…

  7. Mediating the Effect of Gratitude in the Relationship between Forgiveness and Life Satisfaction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricioglu, Ahu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of gratitude in the relationship between forgiveness and life satisfaction. A convenience sample of 396 (234 (59%) females, 162 (41%) males) university students was recruited from a University in Denizli, Turkey. The participants' ages ranged between 18 and 27 years, with an average of…

  8. Yoga therapy for promoting emotional sensitivity in University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganpat, Tikhe Sham; Dash, Sasmita; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra

    2014-01-01

    Students need emotional intelligence (EI) for their better academic excellence. There are three important psychological dimensions of EI: Emotional sensitivity (ES), emotional maturity (EM) and emotional competency (EC), which motivate students to recognize truthfully, interpret honestly and handle tactfully the dynamics of their behavioral pattern. The study was designed to assess ES in the students undergoing yoga therapy program in the form of yoga instructor's course (YIC) module. One hundred and eighty four YIC students with 25.77 ± 4.85 years of mean age participated in this study of 21 days duration (a single group pre-post design). The ES data was collected before (pre) and after (post) YIC module using Emotional Quotient test developed by Dr Dalip Singh and Dr N K Chadha. Means, standard deviations, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for analyzing the data with the help of SPSS 16. The data analysis showed 3.63% significant increase (P < 0.01) in ES. The present study suggests that YIC module can result in improvement of ES among university students, thus paving the way for their academic success. Additional well-designed studies are needed before a strong recommendation can be made.

  9. [Epidemiologiy of obesity among university students in Douala, Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandengue, S H; Bita Fouda, A A; Epacka Ewane, M; Moumbe Tamba, S; Kollo, B

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of obesity, its risk factors, and its health risks among students of the University of Douala. In April, 2011, 2696 students volunteered to participate in a screening campaign for diabetes, high blood pressure (HBP), and obesity. Their physical activity (PA) level was also evaluated. The sample consisted of 1276 (47.3%) men and 1420 (52.7%) women with a mean age of 23.8 ± 3.5 years. The general prevalence of obesity was 4.1%, and it was more common among women (p = 0.043). The age group most highly affected was those 35 years or older, with a prevalence of 39.5% (pobese, the risk level was high in 78 (70.9%) women. The prevalence of HBP was higher among obese than non-obese students (20.9% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.019), and the prevalence of diabetes five times higher (4.5% vs. 0.8%, p = 0.003). Obesity was highly associated with alcohol consumption (p = 0.01), physical inactivity (p = 0.007), and family history of diabetes (p = 0.008). Obesity is a worrisome disorder among students in Douala. Educating students about this topic and developing an obesity prevention and management program may improve their health.

  10. Determination of university students' most preferred mobile application for gamification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Bicen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this digital age of technological advancement, mobile applications are fastly approaching acme of development. In order to increase the efficiency of the developed applications, mobile applications which are suitable for gamification have become a contemporary issue. In this study, the applications of Kahoot, ClassDojo, Classcraft and Socrative which are suitable for gamification were examined. The study was conducted with the students in the department of preschool education at Near East University. 130 students participated in this research. The data were collected with survey method and analyzed with the SPSS program. According to the results, it was revealed that Kahoot was the mostly preferred application by students who used applications designed or suitable for the gamification method and Android was the mostly preferred operating system in the mobile devices of the students. Future research should determine the achievements, motivations and opinions of the students related with the gamification method. Besides, it can be inferred that Kahoot would be the learning platform of the future and it should be integrated into classroom activities.

  11. Exploring entrepreneurial intentions in Latin American university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoise Contreras Torres

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if entrepreneurial intention, based on Ajzen’s model of planned behavior (1991, can be predicted by risk propensity, internal locus of control and leadership skills. Six standardized and reliable instruments were applied to 1493 undergraduate university business students in Latin American countries, selected through non-random quota sampling in accordance with their formation level in each of the five participating universities. Using structural equation techniques, the research model was validated and intention estimated and analyzed in relation to a set of socio-demographic variables. According to the results, entrepreneurial intention can be significantly predicted by the psychological variables under consideration and, contrary to what has been reported in other research, no gender differences were found in the intention of entrepreneurship. These findings are discussed.

  12. Chinese University Students and Their Experiences of Acculturation at an Ethnic Christian Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyang; Rhoads, Robert A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the experiences of Chinese international students from East Coast University (a pseudonym) in the United States through their participation in a Chinese ethnic-based Christian church (CCC). Employing ethnographic-based fieldwork, the study highlights how Chinese international students see their experiences in CCC as a source of…

  13. Academic and Social Experiences of Exchange Students from Japan Attending an American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the views of exchange students from Japan about their sojourn experiences at an American university. The participants were eight exchange students from Japan (four males and four females). This descriptive-qualitative study was conceptualized within sojourner theory (Siu, 1952). The data…

  14. Beliefs about Meditating among University Students, Faculty, and Staff: A Theory-Based Salient Belief Elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Alyssa M.; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Stress impacts college students, faculty, and staff alike. Although meditation has been found to decrease stress, it is an underutilized strategy. This study used the Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) to identify beliefs underlying university constituents' decision to meditate. Participants: N = 96 students, faculty, and staff at a large…

  15. Eating Disorder Risk and Body Dissatisfaction Based on Muscularity and Body Fat in Male University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Carrie; George, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between risk of eating disorders, body dissatisfaction, and perceptual attractiveness in male university students. Participants: Research was conducted January-April 2012 and involved 339 male and 441 female students. Methods: Eating disorder risk was assessed with the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and body…

  16. The Meaning of Work among Chinese University Students: Findings from Prototype Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sili; Leung, S. Alvin; Li, Xu

    2012-01-01

    This study examined Chinese university students' conceptualization of the meaning of work. One hundred and ninety students (93 male, 97 female) from Beijing, China, participated in the study. Prototype research methodology (J. Li, 2001) was used to explore the meaning of work and the associations among the identified meanings. Cluster analysis was…

  17. Effect of Foreign Language Anxiety on Gender and Academic Achievement among Yemeni University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Norizan Abdul; Yassin, Amr Abdullatif; Maasum, Tengku Nor Rizan Bt Tengku Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the gender differences in terms of anxiety among Yemeni university EFL learners. It also aimed to investigate the correlation between the level of anxiety and the academic achievement of the students. The participants of this study were 155 students chosen from the population through stratified random sampling. The…

  18. Acculturative Stress and Coping: Gender Differences among Korean and Korean American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diane Sookyoung; Padilla, Amado M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined acculturative stress and coping among 86 students of Korean heritage at an American university. Participants indicated their stress levels on 3 scales of cultural adaptation: discrimination, language and cultural ties, and social distance. Findings show that self-identified Korean students displayed higher levels of…

  19. A Case Study on Primary, Secondary and University Students' Environmentally Responsible Behaviors in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to prove the environmentally responsible behaviors of primary, secondary and university students in Turkey. The students', who attended the study as participants, environmentally political behaviors, consumer/economical behaviors, direct behaviors toward protecting the environment and individual and public persuasion…

  20. Investigating the Perceptions and Behaviors of Elementary Students and Teachers when Internet Access is Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a preliminary investigation into changes in the perceptions and behaviors of teachers and students when all have universal Internet access at home and school using Internet-on-TV technology. Four hundred fourth-grade students and their teachers from seven schools participated in the WISH TV (WorldGate Internet School to Home)…

  1. Education, Language, and Identity amongst Students at a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Crouch, Alison

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study of language and cultural identity of mother-tongue Zulu students at an English-medium South African university. The data consist of focus group interviews, questionnaires, and student opinions in essays. Findings include a strong identification of the participants with the Zulu language and Zulu culture, and a view…

  2. Female Students Opinion about Women’s Participation in Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Younis Khan; Asif Jamil; Umar Ali Khan; Uzma Kareem; Ghazanfar Imran

    2012-01-01

    A research study was conducted to know about the participation of Muslim girls and women in sports and philosophy of Islam in this regard. The population of this study was all female students of Government Girls Degree Colleges of District Dera Ismail Khan. Total 100 respondents selected from within the population through convenient or available sampling technique. For the purpose of collection of data a structured questionnaire on three point Likert scale, ranging from disagree (DA= 1 point)...

  3. Introducing sit-stand desks increases classroom standing time among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Jerome

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sedentary behavior has been associated with many negative health outcomes. While an understudied health topic, there is evidence that university students are excessively sedentary. Sit-stand desks have been shown to reduce sedentary time among pre-university students (ages 5–18years and sedentary workers but have not been tested in university classrooms. This study tested the effects of introducing sit-stand desks into a university classroom on student's classroom sitting and standing behaviors. Using a cross-over design, students received access to both traditional seated desks and sit-stand desks for six weeks. Data were collected between September and December, 2016. We recruited 304 healthy undergraduate university students enrolled in one of two small (25 seats classrooms at a large Midwestern university during the fall of 2016. Average minutes of standing/hour/student, average percent class time spent standing, and the number of sit-stand transitions/student/hour were directly observed with video camera surveillance. Participants stood significantly more (p<0.001 when provided access to sit-stand desks (7.2min/h/student; 9.3% of class time spent standing compared to when they had access to seated desks (0.7min/h/student; 1.6% of class time spent standing but no differences were observed for the number of sit-stand transitions (p=0.47. Students reported high favorability for the sit-stand desks and improvements in several student engagement and affective outcomes while using the sit-stand desks. These findings support introducing sit-stand desks in university classrooms as an approach to reduce sedentary behaviors of university students. Keywords: Sedentary, University students, Sit-stand desk

  4. Ready for University? A Cross-National Study of Students' Perceived Preparedness for University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; van der Meer, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured "before" students commenced their study at a university in New Zealand or in the Netherlands. This…

  5. Ready for university? A cross national study on students' perceived preparedness for university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; van der Meer, J.

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured before students commenced their study at a university in New

  6. Fruit, Vegatables and Fast Food Consumption among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Avram; Mihaela Oravitan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the prevalence of fruit, vegetables and fast food consumption among students from Timisoara university center and provide evidence based information for increasing healthy food choices in order to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Material and Methods: We perform a cross-sectional study on 435 university students from the Timisoara university center, Romania (mean age: 22±4.8 years). The students were recruited using internet and public announcements in the student’s cam...

  7. Shyness and cognitions: an examination of Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Selda; Demir, Ayhan

    2008-11-01

    The authors aimed to examine the relation between shyness and dysfunctional relationship beliefs and to extend findings of previous studies to understand the role of fear of negative evaluation and self-esteem in shyness. Participants were 415 Turkish undergraduate students at Middle East Technical University. The participants completed Turkish versions of the J. M. Cheek and A. H. Buss (1981) Shyness Scale, the Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale (Z. Hamamci & S. Büyükoztürk, 2004) the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (M. R. Leary, 1983), and the M. Rosenberg (1965) Self-Esteem Scale. Bivariate correlations showed that shyness had a significant positive correlation with unrealistic relationship expectations and interpersonal rejection. Fear of negative evaluation and self-esteem also had significant relations to shyness. A stepwise regression analysis indicated that fear of negative evaluation, self-esteem, and interpersonal rejection were significant predictors of shyness, and self-esteem was the best predictor. These results provided evidence of the role of distorted relationship beliefs, approval concerns, and self-evaluations in shyness for Turkish university students. The authors discuss the findings in terms of relevant literature and cultural issues.

  8. Delayed Sleep and Sleep Loss in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Leon C.

    1986-01-01

    A sample of 211 first-year psychology students completed a questionnaire of sleep habits and difficulities. It was discovered that Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome may be a significant problem in university student populations. (Author/JD)

  9. Students' Perception of the National Open University of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Hence the need for distance education (National Open University of Nigeria) ... students was used and with a single hypothesis formulated, a t-test analysis .... whether the students' apprehension to NOUN scheme is influenced by sex.

  10. University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences in a public hospital at ... was applied to explore and describe the experiences of student nurses' clinical learning ... The ethical principles relevant to the study were observed.

  11. Perceptions of Nigerian university students about the influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions of Nigerian university students about the influence of cigarette advertisement on smoking habit: a ... students about the influence of cigarette advertisement on smoking habit: a quantitative analysis ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  12. Interventions to reduce stress in university students: a review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Cheryl; Glancy, Dylan; Pitts, Annabel

    2013-05-15

    Recent research has revealed concerning rates of anxiety and depression among university students. Nevertheless, only a small percentage of these students receive treatment from university health services. Universities are thus challenged with instituting preventative programs that address student stress and reduce resultant anxiety and depression. A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted to examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing stress in university students. Studies were eligible for inclusion if the assignment of study participants to experimental or control groups was by random allocation or parallel cohort design. Retrieved studies represented a variety of intervention approaches with students in a broad range of programs and disciplines. Twenty-four studies, involving 1431 students were included in the meta-analysis. Cognitive, behavioral and mindfulness interventions were associated with decreased symptoms of anxiety. Secondary outcomes included lower levels of depression and cortisol. Included studies were limited to those published in peer reviewed journals. These studies over-represent interventions with female students in Western countries. Studies on some types of interventions such as psycho-educational and arts based interventions did not have sufficient data for inclusion in the meta-analysis. This review provides evidence that cognitive, behavioral, and mindfulness interventions are effective in reducing stress in university students. Universities are encouraged to make such programs widely available to students. In addition however, future work should focus on developing stress reduction programs that attract male students and address their needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. appeals among male university students in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Khandaker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Smoking causes ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and lung cancer killing 15,000 Australians every year. Despite extensive publicity of the harmful health effects of smoking, one in six Australian aged 15 years and over smoked daily representing 2.7 million active smokers. Objectives. The research aimed to comprehend how active university student smokers respond to different appeals employed in public service antismoking campaigns in Western Australia. Material and methods. The study examined the Quit Victoria 2006–2008 antismoking campaign using qualitative research method involving four in-depth focus group discussions with a total of twenty-four (N = 24 active male university student smokers in Western Australia between the age group of 18 to 24 years. Results . Male university students became active smokers because of the perceived image of ‘coolness,’ ‘macho,’ media influence and experimentation. Impact on sports performances predominantly encouraged respondents in attempting to quit smoking. Sixteen students (67% felt that graphic warning messages on cigarette packs had no effect on them due to desensitizing effects of repeated messages. Twenty-one participants (87.5% felt that health shock appeal was ineffective in making them quit. Emotional appeals like humor, fear, and health shock were most persuasive in advertising messages which would assist in smoking cessation. Therefore, antismoking campaigns with shock health appeals were ineffective in helping smokers to abdicate smoking. Results suggested employing emotional or combination of rational and emotional appeals in maximizing the effectiveness of antismoking advertisements. Conclusions . The study broadens the scope of devising effective antismoking campaigns and provide insightful implications for public health promoters as well as individualized care providers.

  14. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susan A.; Boden, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs. PMID:25918485

  15. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susan A; Boden, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs.

  16. USE Efficiency -- Universities and Students for Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melandri, Daniela

    2010-09-15

    Universities and Student for Energy Efficiency is a European Project within the Intelligent Energy Programme. It intends to create a common stream for energy efficiency systems in university buildings. Universities and students are proposed as shining examples for energy efficiency solutions and behaviour. The Project involves 10 countries and has the aim to improve energy efficiency in university buildings. Students are the main actors of the project together with professors and technicians. To act on students means to act on direct future market players in diffusion of public opinions. A strong communication action supports the succeeding of the action.

  17. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia R.S. Rocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. METHOD: This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288 from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-university courses - a middle-class neighborhood in the city of São Paulo - aged between 16 and 19 years old. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI - a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: The participants (52.9% took about 30 minutes to fall asleep, with an average of 306.4 minutes asleep, moderate daytime sleepiness (n=243, 45.9% and indisposition (n=402, 75.9% to develop the activities. The scores (M and F were similar regarding problems that affect sleep. CONCLUSION: The investigated population showed sleep disorders and poor sleep quality.

  18. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Célia R S; Rossini, Sueli; Reimão, Rubens

    2010-12-01

    Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288) from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-university courses - a middle-class neighborhood in the city of São Paulo - aged between 16 and 19 years old. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) - a standardized questionnaire. The participants (52.9%) took about 30 minutes to fall asleep, with an average of 306.4 minutes asleep, moderate daytime sleepiness (n=243, 45.9%) and indisposition (n=402, 75.9%) to develop the activities. The scores (M and F) were similar regarding problems that affect sleep. The investigated population showed sleep disorders and poor sleep quality.

  19. Predictors of Student Satisfaction with University Psychology Courses: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Heather J.; Hood, Michelle; Neumann, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction at university is receiving increasing attention. While academic discipline has been associated with student satisfaction in many studies, we found no previous reviews of student satisfaction within psychology, a discipline with among the largest undergraduate enrolments. In this paper, we review the student satisfaction…

  20. An Empirical Study of State University Students' Perceived Service Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaedi, Sik; Bakti, Gede Mahatma Yuda; Metasari, Nur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify: university students' perceived service quality dimensions; the dimensions contributing most towards overall students' perceived service quality; and whether there is a difference in perceived quality level of each dimension based on students' year of study and gender in the context of undergraduate students of…

  1. Student Satisfaction with Using Online Discussion Forums at Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Majed Gharmallah

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate student satisfaction with using online discussion forums (ODFs). It also aims to examine the relationships between student satisfaction with using ODFs and student demographics as well as with their experience with ICT and online education. Data are collected from 2171 students from four leading universities at Saudi…

  2. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  3. How Can We Prevent and Reduce Bullying amongst University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Carrie Anne; Cowie, Helen

    2016-01-01

    While it has long been recognized that bullying occurs at school and in the workplace, recent research confirms that bullying also takes place among university students, including undergraduates, post-graduates and doctoral research students. In the UK, the National Union of Students (NUS) alerted staff and students to the issue in a series of…

  4. Modeling Environmental Literacy of Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamuganathan, Sheila; Karpudewan, Mageswary

    2015-01-01

    In this study attempt was made to model the environmental literacy of Malaysian pre-university students enrolled in a matriculation college. Students enrolled in the matriculation colleges in Malaysia are the top notch students in the country. Environmental literacy of this group is perceived important because in the future these students will be…

  5. Investigating undergraduate students' ideas about the fate of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Mallory; Coble, Kim; Bailey, Janelle M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2017-12-01

    As astronomers further develop an understanding of the fate of the Universe, it is essential to study students' ideas on the fate of the Universe so that instructors can communicate the field's current status more effectively. In this study, we examine undergraduate students' preinstruction ideas of the fate of the Universe in ten semester-long introductory astronomy course sections (ASTRO 101) at three institutions. We also examine students' postinstruction ideas about the fate of the Universe in ASTRO 101 over five semester-long course sections at one institution. The data include precourse surveys given during the first week of instruction (N =264 ), postinstruction exam questions (N =59 ), and interviews. We find that, preinstruction, more than a quarter of ASTRO 101 students either do not respond or respond with "I don't know" when asked what the long-term fate of the Universe is. We also find that, though the term was not necessarily used, students tend to describe a "big chill" scenario in the preinstruction surveys, among a wide variety of other scenarios. A fraction of students describe the fate of smaller-scale systems, possibly due to confusion of the hierarchical nature of structure in the Universe. Preinstruction, students mention the Universe's expansion when describing how astronomers know the fate of the Universe but do not discuss how we know the Universe is expanding or the relationship between expansion and the fate of the Universe. Postinstruction, students' responses shift toward greater degrees of completeness and correctness.

  6. Changing Trends in Nutritional Behavior among University Students in Greece, between 2006 and 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Kyrkou, Charikleia; Tsakoumaki, Foteini; Fotiou, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Aristea; Symeonidou, Maria; Menexes, Georgios; Biliaderis, Costas G.; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study the dietary behavior of university students residing away from the family home. In this context, we (a) compared their dietary habits in two time periods, namely 2006 and 2016; and (b) explored the possible impact of gender on the behavioral changes in nutritional choices. A total of four hundred and five university students (2006, n = 242; 2016, n = 163) participated in the study. Dietary assessment was carried out using a qualitative Food Fre...

  7. Time Perspective, Life Satisfaction and Social Comparison Orientation in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nazmiye ÇİVİTCİ; Hülya ŞAHİN BALTACI

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictive power of time perspective for the life satisfaction and social comparison in university students. The participants (n= 441; 321 female and 120 male) are undergraduate students at a state university. The data of the study were collected through the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, The Satisfaction with Life Scale and IOWA-Netherlands Social Comparison Orientation Measure. In order to determine the prediction power of the time ...

  8. Poor Physical Performance is Associated with Obesity Among University Students in China

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Tianhua; Zhu, Ergang; Jiao, Suhua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between physical performance and BMI (body mass index) of university students in China. Material/Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study evaluating the physical performance and BMI of university students. BMI was calculated based on height and weight. Overweight and obesity were defined by the Working Group on Obesity references in China. Results A total of 2313 participants (978 males and 1335 females) were recruited in ou...

  9. Relationship of Smartphone Use Severity with Sleep Quality, Depression, and Anxiety in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Demi?rci?, Kadi?r; Akg?n?l, Mehmet; Akpinar, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The usage of smartphones has increased rapidly in recent years, and this has brought about addiction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between smartphone use severity and sleep quality, depression, and anxiety in university students. Methods In total, 319 university students (203 females and 116 males; mean age = 20.5 ? 2.45) were included in the study. Participants were divided into the following three groups: a smartphone non-user group (n...

  10. Factors Which Affect Academic Achievement of University Students

    OpenAIRE

    RENÇBER, Bahman Alp

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate by analysing factors affecting academic achievement of university students. Also effects of these factors are studied. For this purpose, the students attending “Statistics and Transport Technology” course at Gazi University, Industrial Arts Education and Arts Faculty, Industrial Technology Education Department, in the 2008-2009 academic year have been identified as the study universe. Analysis has been done by taking examples for this universe. The ...

  11. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  12. What Arab Students Say about Their Linguistic and Educational Experiences in Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukhattala, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    In this inquiry, I examine the cross educational experiences of ten Arab undergraduate students in two English-language universities in Montreal. Participants were from Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco and have been in Canada for three to seven years. Classic qualitative methodological tools of in-depth interviews, participant observation and…

  13. Cultural Influences on Chinese Students' Asynchronous Online Learning in a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Naxin; McDougall, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This study explored six Chinese graduate students' asynchronous online learning in a large urban Canadian university. Individual interviews in Mandarin elicited their perceptions of online learning, their participation in it, and the cultural factors that influenced their experiences. In general, the participants had a positive attitude towards…

  14. Mobile Phone Applications in the University Classroom: Perceptions of Undergraduate Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Rateb; Alzghool, Haneen; Iyadat, Yousef; Abu-Alruz, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the level of mobile phone applications in university classrooms in Jordan. A sample of 313 undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the researchers' designed questionnaire, which is composed of 13 items. The results of the study indicate that participants perceived a high…

  15. The Impact of Tuition Fees and Support on University Participation in the UK. CEE DP 126

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Lorraine; Fitzsimons, Emla; Wyness, Gill

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how policy can affect university education is important for understanding how governments can promote human capital accumulation. This paper exploits historic changes to university funding policies in the UK to estimate the impact of tuition fees and maintenance grants on university participation. Previous work on this, which largely…

  16. Length of migration and eating habits of Portuguese university students living in London, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Sofia; Santos, Susana; Padrão, Patrícia; Caraher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have pointed adverse effects of long term migration on eating habits. Research is needed to understand if this effect occurs also with a short length of migration, as is the case of international students. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of short and long term migration on eating habits of Portuguese university students. Participants were 46 English and 55 Portuguese students from universities in London, United Kingdom. The findings from this study highlight the difficulties that Portuguese students faced in maintaining a traditional Mediterranean diet after moving to a Northern European environment.

  17. Is "Being Green" a Determinant of Participation in University Sustainability Initiatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Felita R.; Tsarenko, Yelena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to develop and test a model to explain students' willingness to participate in sustainability programs. Specifically, the authors aimed to determine those factors, apart from students' environmental orientation (self-perception of "being green"), that influence students' willingness to participate…

  18. The evaluation of first aid and basic life support training for the first year university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintaş, Kerim Hakan; Aslan, Dilek; Yildiz, Ali Naci; Subaşi, Nüket; Elçin, Melih; Odabaşi, Orhan; Bilir, Nazmi; Sayek, Iskender

    2005-02-01

    In Turkey, the first aiders are few in quantity and yet they are required in many settings, such as earthquakes. It was thought that training first year university students in first aid and basic life support (FA-BLS) techniques would serve to increase the number of first aiders. It was also thought that another problem, the lack of first aid trainers, might be addressed by training medical students to perform this function. A project aimed at training first year university students in FA-BLS was conducted at Hacettepe University. In the first phase, medical student first aid trainers (MeSFAT) were trained in FA-BLS training techniques by academic trainers and in the second phase, first year university students were trained in FA-BLS techniques by these peer trainers under the academic trainers' supervision. The purpose of this study was to assess the participants' evaluation of this project and to propose a new program to increase the number of first aiders in the country. In total, 31 medical students were certified as MeSFATs and 12 of these trained 40 first year university students in FA-BLS. Various questionnaires were applied to the participants to determine their evaluation of the training program. Most of the participants and the authors considered the program to be successful and effective. This method may be used to increase the number of first aid trainers and first aiders in the community.

  19. Effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive and physical performance in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick, Yusuf; Lee, Alice; Raha, Oishik; Pillai, Kavya; Gupta, Shubham; Sethi, Sonika; Mukeshimana, Felicite; Gerard, Lothaire; Moghal, Mohammad U.; Saleh, Sohag N.; Smith, Susan F.; Morrell, Mary J.; Moss, James

    2017-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is common among university students, and has been associated with poor academic performance and physical dysfunction. However, current literature has a narrow focus in regard to domains tested, this study aimed to investigate the effects of a night of sleep deprivation on cognitive and physical performance in students. A randomized controlled crossover study was carried out with 64 participants [58% male (n?=?37); 22???4 years old (mean???SD)]. Participants were randomized i...

  20. Students? attitude and smoking behaviour following the implementation of a university smoke-free policy: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Chaaya, Monique; Alameddine, Maysam; Nakkash, Rima; Afifi, Rima A; Khalil, Joanna; Nahhas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective In view of the high-smoking rate among university students in Lebanon and the known adverse effects of second-hand smoking, the American University of Beirut (AUB) decided to implement a non-smoking policy on campus. This study sought to examine the students? compliance and attitudes following the ban. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A private university in Lebanon. Participants 545 randomly selected students were approached. A stratified cluster sample of classes offered in t...

  1. Introducing sit-stand desks increases classroom standing time among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Matthew; Janz, Kathleen F; Baquero, Barbara; Carr, Lucas J

    2017-12-01

    Excessive sedentary behavior has been associated with many negative health outcomes. While an understudied health topic, there is evidence that university students are excessively sedentary. Sit-stand desks have been shown to reduce sedentary time among pre-university students (ages 5-18 years) and sedentary workers but have not been tested in university classrooms. This study tested the effects of introducing sit-stand desks into a university classroom on student's classroom sitting and standing behaviors. Using a cross-over design, students received access to both traditional seated desks and sit-stand desks for six weeks. Data were collected between September and December, 2016. We recruited 304 healthy undergraduate university students enrolled in one of two small (25 seats) classrooms at a large Midwestern university during the fall of 2016. Average minutes of standing/hour/student, average percent class time spent standing, and the number of sit-stand transitions/student/hour were directly observed with video camera surveillance. Participants stood significantly more (p classrooms as an approach to reduce sedentary behaviors of university students.

  2. Examination of burnout levels and academic procrastination of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekkurşun Demir Gönül

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between the academic procrastination and the students’ burnout levels was examined. 406 students from different departments at Gazi University Sports Sciences Faculty participated in the research. In order to collect data, the student version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory and the Academic Procrastination Scale (APS were used in the study. It was determined that the students at the faculty of sports science did not show any significant difference in terms of gender variable according to MBI-SF and APS. When analyzed in terms of department variable, there was a significant difference in the MBI-SF subscales, while no significance was observed in the total score of APS. Similar results were obtained in the APS total scores among the grades; but there was significance in the subscales of MBI-SF. The analyses indicated that a statistically significant negative relationship at medium level was found between the MBI-SF and APS. The results of the analyses also indicated that there was a statistically significant negative relationship between academic procrastination and student burnout levels.

  3. Survey on a sleep habits for university and high school students.

    OpenAIRE

    林, 光緒; 堀, 忠雄

    1988-01-01

    A survey was performed on 466 high school students and 403 university students. 86% of high school students and 89% of university students estimated their customary sleep time to be 6-8 hours. Although there was no significant difference between high school students and university students with awake time, bed time was later for university students than high school students. So that sleep time was shorter for university students. Also there was more regular sleepers for high school students a...

  4. Longitudinal multigroup invariance analysis of the satisfaction with food-related life scale in university students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda, Horacio; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo

    2017-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal measurement invariance in the Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL) scale using follow-up data from university students. We examined this measure of the SWFL in different groups of students, separated by various characteristics. Through non......-probabilistic longitudinal sampling, 114 university students (65.8% female, mean age: 22.5) completed the SWFL questionnaire three times, over intervals of approximately one year. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine longitudinal measurement invariance. Two types of analysis were conducted: first, a longitudinal...... students of both sexes, and among those older and younger than 22 years. Generally, these findings suggest that the SWFL scale has satisfactory psychometric properties for longitudinal measurement invariance in university students with similar characteristics as the students that participated...

  5. Transformational Leadership in the Classroom: Fostering Student Learning, Student Participation, and Teacher Credibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between transformational leadership in college classrooms (i.e., charisma, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation), student learning outcomes (i.e., cognitive learning, affective learning, state motivation, communication satisfaction), student participation, and student…

  6. Worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic and administrative staff at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuli Ngonyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly it investigated the relationship between worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic staff and administrative staff at a South African university. Secondly it investigated if there is a statistically significant difference between worker participation levels of academic and non-academic staff. Most empirical work on worker participation has focused on workers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors of the economy, with limited focus on worker participation in the services sector. This study aims to address this gap through this exploratory study of the impact of worker participation on job satisfaction at a South African University.

  7. Empathy Levels of University Students Who Do and Not Do Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Tülin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the empathy levels of university students who do sports and who don't do sports in terms of different variables. For this purpose, 200 Sports Faculty students who do sports at least four days a week for two hours and 200 students from other faculties who don't do sports participated in the study. In the…

  8. Body Image and Attachment Style Among University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Inger Glavind

    2018-01-01

    The main focus of this study is to investigate how body image and attachment style among university students are related. We approach these different student types on a cross sectional dataset including 898 university students from Denmark, Germany, Portugal, Croatia and Czechoslovakia. Based...... on the combination of the Body Esteem Scale (BES) and the Attachment Style Scale (WASQ) we create four types: "double jeopardy students", "well-balanced students", "nurturing solitude students" and "social mirroring students". The "double jeopardy students" are students with low social attachment and a high dislike...... of their body. Based on this combination of body image and social attachment we investigate how these four student types are related to three different dimensions: parental characteristics, northern versus southern countries and different field of study....

  9. Do university students know how they perform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa VARSARI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to study the capacity for self-evaluation of University students undergoing tests involving mathematics, linguistic and formal reasoning. Subjects were asked to estimate the number of correct answers and subsequently to compare their performance with that of their peers. We divided the subjects into three groups on the basis of performance: poor, middle and top performers. The results demonstrate that all the subjects in all tests showed good awareness of their level of actual performance. Analyzing comparative assessments, the results reported in literature by Kruger and Dunning were confirmed: poor performers tend to significantly overestimate their own performance whilst top performers tend to underestimate it. This can be interpreted as a demonstration that the accuracy of comparative self-evaluations depends on a number of variables: cognitive and metacognitive factors and aspects associated with self-representation. Our conclusion is that cognitive and metacognitive processes work as “submerged” in highly subjective representations, allowing dynamics related to safeguarding the image one has of oneself to play a role.

  10. Dental Erosion and Caries Status of Chinese University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun Hung; Ng, Alice; Chau, Alex Man Him; Lo, Edward Chin Man

    2015-01-01

    To describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosion and caries experience of Chinese university students in Hong Kong. First-year Chinese students were invited to attend a dental clinic at a university campus in Hong Kong during their freshman orientation. A questionnaire was used to investigate the potential factors affecting their dental status, including sociodemographic factors, toothbrushing habits, dietary habits (consumption of sugary drinks), time elapsed since last dental check-up and self-perceived dental erosion status. Three calibrated dentists performed the clinical examinations. Dental erosion was evaluated using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) and dental caries experience was measured using the DMFT index. In total, 600 participants aged 18-21 were examined and 44% showed some signs of dental erosion (maximum BEWE > 0). Severe dental erosion (BEWE = 3) was found in 1% of the adults. Many (69%) had caries experience (DMFT > 0); their mean DMFT score was 2.5 ± 2.7 (± SD). The total BEWE scores were found to be associated with age and self-perception of tooth misalignment. No correlation was found between BEWE score and dietary habits, oral hygiene practices or self-perceived dental erosion status. Females, those whose last dental check-up was more than a year ago and those who perceived having dental decay or tooth wear had higher caries experience. Nearly half of the Chinese Hong Kong university students had signs of dental erosion, but very few showed signs of severe erosion. Caries experience was widespread but not high.

  11. Peer Effects in Exogenously Formed University Student Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Androushchak; Oleg Poldin; Maria Yudkevich

    2012-01-01

    We estimate the influence of classmates’ ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed student groups. The study uses administrative data on undergraduate students at a large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has a positive effect on individual academic performance, and students at the top of the ability distribution derive the greatest benefit from their presence. An increase in the proportion of less able students has an insignifi...

  12. Preventing halo bias in grading the work of university students

    OpenAIRE

    John M. Malouff; Sarah J. Stein; Lodewicka N. Bothma; Kimberley Coulter; Ashley J. Emmerton

    2014-01-01

    Experts have advocated anonymous marking as a means of minimizing bias in subjective student assessment. In the present study, 159 faculty members or teaching assistants across disciplines were randomly assigned (1) to grade a poor oral presentation of a university student, (2) to grade a good oral presentation of the same student, or (3) not to grade any oral presentation of the student. All graders then assessed the same written work by the student. A linear-contrasts analysis showed that, ...

  13. Entrepreneurial Attributes among Postgraduate Students of a Pakistani University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Akhtar; Topping, Keith J.; Tariq, Riaz H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores entrepreneurial attributes among the students of The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, a public sector Pakistani university. Multistage sampling was employed to maximize the representation. Five hundred and twenty one master's level students from thirty departments returned completed questionnaires. Three factors emerged: self…

  14. Taiwanese University Students' Perspectives on Experiential Learning and Psychosocial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Nii; Lai, Pi-Hui; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study described the relations of experiential learning and psychosocial development of Taiwanese university students through the qualitative method of phenomenology. Thirty-six students, age ranged from 19 to 25 years, from three research-oriented universities in northern Taiwan were interviewed. Seven themes were delineated: (1) discovering…

  15. Mindfulness Correlates with Stress and Coping in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pierdomenico, Emily-Ann; Kadziolka, Marta; Miller, Carlin J.

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness has received significant attention in the empirical literature during the past decade, but few studies have focused on mindfulness in university students and how it may influence problematic behaviours. This study examined the relationships among mindfulness, coping, and physiological reactivity in a sample of university students.…

  16. Recruiting Nonresident Students and the Privatization of Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael S.; Smith, Marybeth

    2016-01-01

    As state appropriations for higher education decrease, public universities rely increasingly on student tuition to meet their operating expenses. Many public universities depend on tuition paid by out-of-state students. Institutions maximize revenue-enhancing opportunities resulting from a supportive public policy and cultural environment.…

  17. Social Anxiety Experiences and Responses of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akacan, Behiye; Secim, Gurcan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the responses of university students in social anxiety situations in order to create a psychological counselling program with a structured group based on Cognitive Behavioural and Existential Approaches. These responses involve the behaviour and thoughts of the university students in situations where they…

  18. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  19. Providing for Disabled Students: University of Grenoble, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEB Exchange, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines how France's University of Grenoble provides for its disabled students in its residence halls, including a description of the university's service for disabled service. A hospital/education center where disabled students can receive care and physiotherapy while attending school is highlighted. (GR)

  20. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  1. Relationships between Alexithymia and Machiavellian Personality Beliefs among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Siamak; Issazadegan, Ali; Norozy, Merseda; Saboory, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    The present study considered the relationships between alexithymia and Machiavellian personality beliefs among university students. Two hundred and thirteen students (95 women and 118 men) studying Master's degrees in psychology, education, law, political sciences, and social sciences at the University of Tehran were randomly chosen using…

  2. An analysis of the language of attribution in university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certificate in Education (PGCE) students at Rhodes University, as a microcosm of ... academic writing and publishing which derives from English's unrivalled status as a global lingua franca. ... (2003:32) note that at university level, “…disciplinary knowledge and ...... Chinese International Graduate Students' Views of English.

  3. European University Students' Experiences and Attitudes toward Campus Alcohol Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hal, Guido; Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Stock, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many studies indicate that a substantial part of the student population drinks excessively, yet most European universities do not have an alcohol policy. In the absence of an alcohol guideline at universities and the easy access to alcohol sold at the student cafeteria, for instance, ...

  4. University Students' Depression: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Santos, Maria Luisa R.; Habibi, Mojtaba; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Australian, Iranian and Portuguese university students ("n"?=?967) completed the University Students Depression Inventory (USDI) in English, Persian and Portuguese languages, respectively. A series of MANOVA analyses were used to examine differences in depression symptoms as an effect of the country and demographic variables.…

  5. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  6. Language Learning Motivation among Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The study describes and examines Malaysian pre-university students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning English language. In this study, 182 non-English major students in one of the Malaysian public universities are selected to fill out a questionnaire reflecting their attitudes and motivation towards learning English. The…

  7. Assessing Goal Intent and Achievement of University Learning Community Students

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    Pfeffer-Lachs, Carole F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the goal intent and achievement of university students, during the Fall 2011 semester, at Blue Wave University, a high research activity public institution in the southeast United States. This study merged theories of motivation to measure goal setting and goal attainment to examine if students who chose to…

  8. The Nigerian University Teachers' Effectiveness as Perceived by Their Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Nnamdi S.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the Delta State University, Abraka, Students' concept of the "effective teacher". A sample of 200 second year university students selected from four faculties were asked to select three most important characteristics of a good teacher from a list of ten. The data obtained were analysed using the percentage…

  9. A Study of Digital Communications between Universities and Students

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    Drake, Perry D.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the digital and social media communication practices of nine urban universities including UMSL and compared those to known corporate best practices. The purpose of this study was to (1) research how these universities are using social/digital communications to engage with students and prospective students; (2) compare the…

  10. Conceptions of Creativity among Hong Kong University Students

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    Zhang, Li-fang

    2013-01-01

    This research had two objectives. The first was to determine the reliability and validity of the multifaceted assessment of creativity (MAC) for evaluating Hong Kong university students' conceptions of creativity. The second was to establish if the theory-practice and gender gaps discovered among mainland Chinese university students would be…

  11. Effects of student participation in school health promotion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebler, Ursula; Rojatz, Daniela; Simovska, Venka; Forster, Rudolf

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize systematically the existing evidence for the effects of student participation in designing, planning, implementing and/or evaluating school health promotion measures. The focus was on the effects of participation in school health promotion measures rather than on student involvement at school in general. Participation is a core value for health promotion but empirical evidence of its outcomes is scarce. We searched major bibliographic databases (including ASSIA, ERIC, PsycINFO, Scopus, PubMed and the Social Sciences Citation Index). Two reviewers independently decided about inclusion and exclusion of the identified abstracts (n = 5075) and full text articles. Of the 90 full text articles screened, 26 papers met the inclusion criteria. We identified evidence for positive effects, especially for the students themselves, the school as organization, and interactions and social relations at school. Almost all included studies showed personal effects on students referring to an increased satisfaction, motivation and ownership, an increase in skills, competencies and knowledge, personal development, health-related effects and influence on student perspective. Given that student participation has more been discussed as a value, or ideal of health promotion in schools, these findings documenting its effectiveness are important. However, further research is needed to consider the level or intensity of involvement, different approaches and stages of participation in the health promotion intervention, as well as mediating factors such as gender, socio-cultural background or academic achievement, in a more systematic manner. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Attitudes of Lebanese university students towards surgical hymen reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Johnny; Nassar, Anwar; Usta, Ihab; Shaya, Monique; Younes, Zeina; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-11-01

    Many cultural and religious beliefs place virginity at a high level of social significance, in that women who lose their virginity before marriage may face humiliation, ostracism, divorce, and extreme violence. This led to an increase in the demand for virginity restoration through surgical hymen reconstruction among these cultures. However, data regarding the acceptance of hymenoplasty in societies that consider sexuality a taboo are scarce. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the effects of gender and religion on sexual attitudes towards hymenoplasty, premarital sex, and virginity in a sample of 600 Lebanese university students. Our findings showed that approval of hymenoplasty was low among participants regardless of gender (25.7 % men vs. 19.1 % women) and religious affiliations (22.5 % Muslims vs. 22.3 % Christians). Arguments for rejection were rooted in moral ethics and personal convictions: "form of deceiving and cheating" (80.7 %) and "betrayal of honesty in the relationship" (80.4 %). Reasons for acceptance included: personal belief in "women's rights, autonomy, and freedom" (72.2 %) and "physical harm and death" (63.5 %).Male participants were more likely to approve premarital coital sex than females (61.0 vs. 27.3 %). Muslims were also more likely to reject marrying a non-virgin than Christians (39.9 vs. 18.0 %). Female participants expressed more tolerance towards marrying a non-virgin male partner (78.3 vs. 57.3 %). Low acceptance of hymenoplasty among Lebanese university students was found to be related to moral ethics and personal convictions independently from gender and religious affiliation. Differences in sexual attitudes towards premarital coital sex and virginity, however, were more significantly influenced by culture and religion.

  13. Librarian participation in expanding the pool of potential medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Rose

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the results of an exploratory survey to determine if librarians actively participate in medical school student recruiting programs. It looks specifically at what librarians are doing to assist with recruitment and what biomedical career resources their libraries offer. The survey link was e-mailed to all U.S. medical school library directors, who were asked to forward it to the appropriate librarian. Out of 113 medical schools, 68 (60%) responded to most questions. Forty-three (86%) of 50 item respondents do participate in such activities, and 29 (67%) of 43 item respondents have been doing so for more than five years. Thirty-two (64%) of 50 item respondents provide resources on biomedical careers in the libraries. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  14. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

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    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  15. [Eating habits and attitudes towards change in Spanish university students and workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazpe, Itziar; Marqués, María; Sánchez-Tainta, Ana; Rodríguez-Mourille, Ana; Beunza, Juan-José; Santiago, Susana; Fernández-Montero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Universities and workplaces are important targets for the promotion of the nutritional interventions in adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary habits and attitudes towards change in workers and university students from different academic fields. The study data came from a cross-sectional study of a Spanish University population of 1,429 participants. We analyzed the dietary habits and the attitudes toward dietary change. The mean age of workers and students was 37 and 23 years, respectively. Both groups reported eating four meals per day. Among students, the consumption of vegetables, wine, fish and nuts was less frequent whereas carbonated beverages, commercial bakery, fast food and red meat was higher. On the other hand, overall dietary pattern of science students was healthier than other students. Although no significant differences were found between students and workers in attitudes towards change, 32% of employees and 39% of students said they were seriously considering changing them. The dietary pattern was healthier among workers than among students, particularly those participants that studied social sciences degrees. They constituted the most vulnerable segment of the university population from a nutritional point of view. About a third of workers and students considered changing their habits. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of Prevention Failure in College Students Participating in Two Indicated Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L.; Otero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1) for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2) for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3) for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force. PMID:24714056

  17. Psychosocial correlates of Internet addiction among Jordanian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-04-01

    Internet addiction is a significant international mental health problem among university students. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the correlation of Internet addiction with university students' characteristics in Jordan using a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design. The Internet Addiction Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were administered to a random sample of 587 undergraduate university students. The findings demonstrated that university year level, student age, depression, and family support were significant correlates of Internet addiction. The current study should raise awareness in nurses and other health care providers that Internet addiction is a potential mental health problem for this student population. The findings from the current study will help develop appropriate interventions for these students and inform future research. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Comparison of psychomotor function between music students and students participating in music training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansirinukor, Wunpen; Khemthong, Supalak

    2014-07-01

    To compare psychomotor function between a music student group who had music education and a non-music student group who participated in music training. Consecutive sampling was used for completing questionnaires, testing reaction times (visual, auditory, and tactile system), measuring electromyography of upper trapezius muscles both sides and taking photos of the Craniovertebral (CV) angle in the sitting position. Data collection was made twice for each student group: the music students at one-hour intervals for resting and conducting nonmusic activities, the non-music students at two-day intervals, 20 minutes/session, and performed music training (by a manual of keyboard notation). The non-music students (n = 65) improved reaction times, but responded slower than the music students except for the tactile system. The music students (n = 28) showed faster reaction times and higher activities of the trapezius muscle than the non-music students at post-test. In addition, the CV angle of the non-music students was significantly improved. The level of musical ability may influence the psychomotor function. Significant improvement was observed in visual, auditory and tactile reaction time, and CV angle in the non-music students. However upper trapezius muscle activities between both student groups were unchanged.

  19. Predictiveness of Identity Status, Main Internet Use Purposes and Gender on University Students' the Problematic Internet Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Esra

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at revealing the relationships between the problematic Internet use of university students and their identity status, main Internet use purposes, and gender. A total of 464 university students participated in the study, and the research data were collected through the Problematic Internet Use Scale, the Extended Objective Measure…

  20. The Investigation of University Students' Forgiveness Levels in Terms of Self-Compassion, Rumination and Personality Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Tuncay; Arslan, Coskun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate forgiveness levels of university students in terms of self-compassion, rumination and personality traits. A descriptive-correlational was used and self-administered questionnaires were conducted in this study. Participants of the study were 840 university students (460 females, 380 males) from different…