WorldWideScience

Sample records for university reading clinics

  1. Using Computers for Intervention and Remediation of Severely Reading-Impaired Children in a University Literacy Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Reuber, Kristin; Damon, Corrine J.

    A study investigated software choices of graduate-level clinicians in a university reading clinic to determine computer use and effectiveness in literacy instruction. The clinic involved students of varying ability, ages 7-12, using 24 Power Macintosh computers equipped with "ClarisWorks,""Kid Pix,""Student Writing…

  2. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  3. Collaborative Strategic Reading with University EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghi, Masoud; Mustapha, Ramlee; Maasum, Tg. Nor Rizan Mohd.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to probe into the feasibility and effectiveness of a reading instructional approach called MCSR--Modified Collaborative Strategic Reading. Based on a pretest-posttest design, MCSR was implemented with 42 university-level EFL freshmen. They met once a week and received EFL reading instruction according to MCSR for…

  4. Write to read: the brain's universal reading and writing network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Charles A; Tan, Li-Hai

    2013-02-01

    Do differences in writing systems translate into differences in the brain's reading network? Or is this network universal, relatively impervious to variation in writing systems? A new study adds intriguing evidence to these questions by showing that reading handwritten words activates a pre-motor area across writing systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating the Efficacy of Using a Digital Reading Environment to Improve Reading Comprehension within a Reading Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortlieb, Evan; Sargent, Stephan; Moreland, Meagan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using the online digital reading environment to increase elementary students' comprehension within a reading clinic. Preservice teachers at a four-year university in the Midwest worked one-on-one with 58 fourth-grade students from three schools who were assigned to one of three conditions: print-based text…

  6. Digital reading practices of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Shirley LÓPEZ GIL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on digital reading. The main objective of the research was to analyze the reading on screens practices of university students and how their practices are guided by professors and institutions of higher education. The research design was mixed and the type of study was descriptive of cross-sectional. The data collection techniques were questionnaire, document analysis and discussion group. ibm spss v.22 was used for statistical treatment of data and Atlas.Ti 7.0 was used for content analysis of qualitative information. The study showed that students usually read on screens, although many of their reading practices have recreational purposes. Students have troubles to find reliable information on the Internet when they have academic pursuits and frequently consult secondary sources. When texts are on screens, students generally scan information and surf from one document to another along hyperlinks. The boundaries between academic and leisure activities are not well defined; multitasking appears frequently. Students indicate there is a little guidance received from their professors or university. These findings show that students are constantly faced with digital reading, but practices do not always allow them to achieve their academic purposes, so it is necessary to strengthen the support offered to them, mainly from the classroom language. 

  7. Reading Culture in An African University: Problems And Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading Culture in An African University: Problems And Prospects. ... This paper examined if undergraduates of African universities have reading culture or not. To elicit the necessary information ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  8. Towards a universal model of reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ram

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the special way in which the human brain encodes the position of letters in printed words. The present article discusses the theoretical shortcomings and misconceptions of this approach to visual word recognition. A systematic review of data obtained from a variety of languages demonstrates that letter-order insensitivity is neither a general property of the cognitive system nor a property of the brain in encoding letters. Rather, it is a variant and idiosyncratic characteristic of some languages, mostly European, reflecting a strategy of optimizing encoding resources, given the specific structure of words. Since the main goal of reading research is to develop theories that describe the fundamental and invariant phenomena of reading across orthographies, an alternative approach to model visual word recognition is offered. The dimensions of a possible universal model of reading, which outlines the common cognitive operations involved in orthographic processing in all writing systems, are discussed.

  9. Reading Strategies Employed by University Business English Majors with Different Levels of Reading Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Intaraprasert, Channarong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of reading strategies by the university Business English majors in relation to their levels of reading proficiency. The participants were 926 university Business English majors from 6 universities in southwest China. The Strategy Questionnaire for Business English Reading (SQBER) and the…

  10. Assessment of reading habits of national open university of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of reading habits of national open university of Nigeria students in Abuja. ... A general recommendation was made to the ministry of education in Nigeria to make reading a subject of its own which ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  11. An investigation of Chinese university EFL learner’s foreign language reading anxiety, reading strategy use and reading comprehension performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongshe Lu; Meihua Liu

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the interrelations between foreign language (FL) reading anxiety, FL reading strategy use and their interactive effect on FL reading comprehension performance at the tertiary level in China. Analyses of the survey data collected from 1702 university students yielded the following results: (a) Both Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale (FLRAS) and Foreign Language Reading Strategy Use Scale (FLRSUS) had important subcomponents, (b) more than half of the stu...

  12. L2 Reading Motivation among Sri Lankan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapala, Kusumi Vasantha; Hirakawa, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the extent of the motivational processes that facilitated the text comprehension among 406 Sri Lankan university students in Sri Lanka. Students' L2 text comprehension and reading motivation were assessed using a reading comprehension test and a reading motivation and attitude questionnaire. The Principal Componential…

  13. An investigation of Chinese university EFL learner’s foreign language reading anxiety, reading strategy use and reading comprehension performance

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    Zhongshe Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the interrelations between foreign language (FL reading anxiety, FL reading strategy use and their interactive effect on FL reading comprehension performance at the tertiary level in China. Analyses of the survey data collected from 1702 university students yielded the following results: (a Both Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale (FLRAS and Foreign Language Reading Strategy Use Scale (FLRSUS had important subcomponents, (b more than half of the students generally did not feel anxious when reading English, and were confident in and satisfied with their English reading proficiency. Meanwhile, (c more than half of them moderately used different types of reading strategies such as planning, checking and confirming, predicting and assessing, when reading English, (d compared with their female peers, male students felt significantly more anxious when facing reading activities, less satisfied with their English reading proficiency, and used specific analyzing and planning strategies significantly less often during a reading activity, (e FLRAS was significantly inversely related to FLRSUS, and both were significantly correlated with the students’ FL reading comprehension performance, and (f FLRAS (overall FL reading anxiety, FLRAS1 (general anxiety about FL reading, and FLRSUS2 (predicting strategies were good predictors of FL reading comprehension performance. Based on the findings, some implications are discussed.

  14. Reading Approach Use Effectiveness And EFL Reading Comprehension In University Muhammadiyah Of Parepare

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    Baharuddin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated Indonesian EFL learners approach of two reading approaches cognitive and metacognitive their perceived contact on effectiveness and the association between reading approach and effectiveness on their English reading comprehension. Fifty-Three English-major freshmen from University Muhammadiyah of Parepare participated in these lessons. Two principal questions were addressed 1 what is the most frequent use of reading approach reported by individual students 2 Is there any significant association between reading approach and effectiveness on their English reading comprehension To examine the effects of approach instruction on students reading performance a qualitative interview technique and quantitative research methods including a paired-sample t-test and Person Product Moment Correlation were used to estimate the relationship between reading approach use and effectiveness on students reading accomplishment. Significance showed that the most frequent use of reading approach was found to be metacognitive approach followed by the cognitive approach. In addition there was a significant positive connection between reading approach and effectiveness on their English reading comprehension. Reading approach on the other hand was unrelated to reading achievement. Results of interview findings were analyzed to explore in-depth in sequence about the condition of approach used. The implications of these findings for implementing effective reading strategy instruction are discussed.

  15. Reading Processes of University Students with Dyslexia - An Examination of the Relationship between Oral Reading and Reading Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henriette Folkmann; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Lauridsen, Lene Louise; Parrila, Rauno

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of oral reading and how it relates to reading comprehension in students with dyslexia. A group of Danish university students with dyslexia (n = 16) and a comparison group of students with no history of reading problems (n = 16) were assessed on their oral reading performance when reading a complex text. Along with reading speed, we measured not only the number and quality of reading errors but also the extent and semantic nature of the self-corrections during reading. The reading comprehension was measured through aided text retellings. The results showed that, as a group, the dyslexics performed poorer on most measures, but there were notable within-group differences in the reading behaviours and little association between how well university students with dyslexia read aloud and comprehended the text. These findings suggest that many dyslexics in higher education tend to focus their attention on one subcomponent of the reading process, for example, decoding or comprehension, because engaging in both simultaneously may be too demanding for them. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Universality in eye movements and reading: A trilingual investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liversedge, Simon P; Drieghe, Denis; Li, Xin; Yan, Guoli; Bai, Xuejun; Hyönä, Jukka

    2016-02-01

    Universality in language has been a core issue in the fields of linguistics and psycholinguistics for many years (e.g., Chomsky, 1965). Recently, Frost (2012) has argued that establishing universals of process is critical to the development of meaningful, theoretically motivated, cross-linguistic models of reading. In contrast, other researchers argue that there is no such thing as universals of reading (e.g., Coltheart & Crain, 2012). Reading is a complex, visually mediated psychological process, and eye movements are the behavioural means by which we encode the visual information required for linguistic processing. To investigate universality of representation and process across languages we examined eye movement behaviour during reading of very comparable stimuli in three languages, Chinese, English and Finnish. These languages differ in numerous respects (character based vs. alphabetic, visual density, informational density, word spacing, orthographic depth, agglutination, etc.). We used linear mixed modelling techniques to identify variables that captured common variance across languages. Despite fundamental visual and linguistic differences in the orthographies, statistical models of reading behaviour were strikingly similar in a number of respects, and thus, we argue that their composition might reflect universality of representation and process in reading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Study On English Reading Habits Of Students Of English Study Program Of Riau University

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nazhari, Hafiz; Delfi, Syofia; ', Syafri K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the habits of English reading among the students of English Study Program of Riau University. The method used in this research is quantitative research and the design is survey study. A questionnaire was used as the instrument of this research. The questionnaire involved seven indicators of reading habits: attitudes toward reading, reading frequency, reading materials read, time spend on academic reading, time spend on non-academic reading, motivation in t...

  18. Reading log: pedagogical device accompanying training university paths

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    Marisa Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of the research on teacher training in Physical Education, developed in Bariloche Regional University Center of the National University of Comahue (CRUB-UNCo. Due to the steady increase in the number of students who drop out of course of study on the first two years, projects thatfollow this line of investigation are seeking to question university teaching practices in this field, unravel their particular ways of production and to analyse their impact on the constitution of the formative stages of the students. In the research we have found evidence of a systematic teaching work to improve the learning and teaching conditions and have identified pedagogical devices, both at institutional and classroom levels, as resources for scaffolding student paths and different modes of reception of the students doing the introductory course. Here, we describe and analyse one of these devices, called "reading log" generated in Subject Pedagogy for the 1st year of the School of Physical Education of abovementioned University. This instrument is part of a series of pedagogical practices deliberately planned in connection with the entrance, continuity and graduation stages of undergraduate students; it aims to promote better contexts for the development of the educational processes. This device, created as a way of scaffolding the reading practices of the students, is thought to contribute to the promotion of democratic formative paths and attempts to provide new explanations, which would anchor the transformation and construction of new knowledge and would achieve better pedagogical interventions.

  19. The universal read-out controller for CBM at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Sebastian; Abel, Norbert; Gebelein, Jano [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    Since 2007 we design and develop the firmware for the read-out controller (ROC) for data acquisition of the CBM detector at FAIR. While our first implementation solely focused on the nXYTER chip, today we are also designing and implementing readout logic for the GET4 chip which is supposed to be part of the time of flight (TOF) detector. Furthermore, we fully support both Ethernet and Optical transport as two transparent solutions. This addresses the different requirements of a laboratory setup and the final detector setup respectively. The usage of a strict modularization of the Read Out Controller firmware enables us to provide an Universal ROC where front-end specific logic and transport logic can be combined in a very flexible way. Fault tolerance techniques are only required for some of those modules and hence are only implemented there.

  20. Investigating Metacognitive Awareness and Reading Strategy Use of EFL Korean University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Nam, Kay; Page, Larkin

    2014-01-01

    The metacognitive awareness and reading strategy use by Korean university students in Korea was investigated. The relationships between reading strategy use, self-rated English proficiency, and self-rated reading proficiency were examined. Differences in reading strategy use were also explored by gender and academic classification. Problem-solving…

  1. The Impact of Reading for Pleasure on Georgian University EFL Students' Reading Comprehension (IBSU Case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goctu, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Reading is one of the most significant skills, particularly for EFL students. Many students today do not have the reading skills needed to do effective work in their courses. This paper explores reading for pleasure, its importance and impact on reading comprehension. Pleasure reading helps students to communicate, listen and, most importantly, to…

  2. Metacognitive awareness of reading strategies of University of Botswana English as Second Language students of different academic reading proficiencies

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    Joel M. Magogwe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored metacognitive awareness level of University of Botswana students in the Faculty of Social Sciences. It also considered the more recent research focusing on the role of metacognitive awareness in reading and how it relates to proficiency. The following questions are addressed: (1 What are the self-reported reading proficiencies of the University of Botswana students? (2 Are the University of Botswana students aware of their metacognitive reading strategies? (3 What kind of metacognitive reading strategies are frequently used? (4 Is there a difference in metacognitive awareness of reading strategies used by high- and low-proficiency students respectively? The Survey of Reading Strategies Questionnaire (SORS developed by Mokhtari and Sheorey (2002, and the semi-structured interview technique were used to collect data for this study. The findings indicate that University of Botswana English as Second Language (ESL students reported high reading proficiency and high use of metacognitive strategies, but there was no vast difference in terms of proficiency. Students who reported their proficiency as high had an edge over low-proficiency ones mainly because their management and monitoring of reading was guided more by the goals they have set themselves than by the tests and assignments they were supposed to write.

  3. Central endoscopy reads in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials: The role of the imaging core lab.

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    Ahmad, Harris; Berzin, Tyler M; Yu, Hui Jing; Huang, Christopher S; Mishkin, Daniel S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are evolving at a rapid pace by employing central reading for endoscopic mucosal assessment in a field that was, historically, largely based on assessments by local physicians. This transition from local to central reading carries with it numerous technical, operational, and scientific challenges, many of which can be resolved by imaging core laboratories (ICLs), a concept that has a longer history in clinical trials in a number of diseases outside the realm of gastroenterology. For IBD trials, ICLs have the dual goals of providing objective, consistent assessments of endoscopic findings using central-reading paradigms whilst providing important expertise with regard to operational issues and regulatory expectations. This review focuses on current approaches to using ICLs for central endoscopic reading in IBD trials. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  4. University Students' Reading of Their First-Year Mathematics Textbooks

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    Shepherd, Mary D.; Selden, Annie; Selden, John

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the observed behaviors and difficulties that 11 precalculus and calculus students exhibited in reading new passages from their mathematics textbooks. To gauge the "effectiveness" of these students' reading, we asked them to attempt straightforward mathematical tasks, based directly on what they had just read. The…

  5. Extensive Reading in the Korean EAP University Context: A Reconsideration of Its Goals

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    Grace H. Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive reading for English language learners is commonly promoted as reading for pleasure rather than reading for information. However, Park (2005 observes that the changing trend in the reading habits of the South Korean people over the past decade has been one from reading-for-pleasure to that of reading-for-survival. Globally, people are being met with increasingly difficult economic times and South Korea is no exception. Reading habits are fuelled by need, whether that need may be for pleasure or information. When it comes to the needs of the adult English language learner concerning extensive reading (ER, however, we may sometimes overlook their real needs for practical information in areas of language proficiency and skills development. Rather, in an effort to foster strong reading habits, we may tend to emphasize reading for pleasure through materials that have been written more to entertain than to inform. Korean university students, in particular, are driven by the need to read for information. In this paper, I argue, by reference to Day and Bamford’s (1998 Expectancy-value Model of Motivation for Second Language Reading, that driving university students’ motivation to read extensively in English may be better accomplished by raising both the expectancy and value factors with texts that students are able to read reasonably well, which they also consider very worthwhile reading. These materials, for example, could deal with topics that help learners prepare for academic studies abroad and further their career development. The paper concludes that, for university students, at least, the goals of extensive reading may need to be modified so as not to focus exclusively on ease of reading and entertainment.

  6. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Because faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the prerequisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care.

  7. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Since faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the pre-requisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care. PMID:26200577

  8. READING HABITS IN DIGITAL ERA: A RESEARCH ON THE STUDENTS IN BORNEO UNIVERSITY

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    Firima Zona Tanjung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore the current reading habits of university students. Moreover, it aims to determine the effects of widespread use of the internet and other digital resources in reading habits and to give some possible recommendation to improve students’ reading habits in the digital era. The research design was descriptive survey research. The instrument of the research was questionnaire, which is based on Akarsu and Dariyemez (2014 and Chauhan and Lal (2012. The participants of the research were 320 students studying in six majors in Faculty of Teachers Training and Education at Borneo University. They were selected through the cluster random sampling. The questionnaire involved six categories, namely demographic information, frequency of items read, contents of online reading, online activities, content first clicked when online, and techniques to develop reading habits. All research data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 22 program.

  9. Practices of reading and writing in five diferent programs of the Sergio Arboleda university

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    Blanca González

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into the practices of reading and writing present in five courses of different programs assigned at the Sergio Arboleda University (Bogotá. The research derives from the following questions: What is the role of reading and writing process in the course of some programs at the University? How is assign, directed and accompanied the task of reading and writing? and how are assessed the progress and results in the process of reading and writing? The information was obtained from written tests, surveys, classroom observations and interviews with teachers of these programs. After the analysis process, were set up five units of information, which in the case of reading were reading assignment, intervention guidance, intervention to clarify, evaluation and assessments of teachers, and for the case of writing: defining text types, intervention process, intervention in the correction process, evaluation and assessments of teachers.

  10. Health Sciences Library Support of a University Common Reading Program: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2017-01-01

    Common reading programs have become increasingly popular on college and university campuses as a means for increasing student engagement, retention, and success. This article describes the characteristics, goals, and benefits of common reading programs and provides examples from the literature of academic library involvement in them. Finally, an example is provided of how one academic health sciences library participated in its institution's First-Year Summer Reading program.

  11. Teaching and Learning Critical Reading with Transnational Texts at a Mexican University: An Emergentist Case Study

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    Perales Escudero, Moises Damian

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation project examines the implementation of a critical reading intervention in a Mexican university, and the emergence of target critical reading processes in Mexican college-level EFL readers. It uses a Complexity Theory-inspired, qualitative methodology. Orienting the selection and design of materials is a deep view of culture that…

  12. Passageless Comprehension on the "Nelson-Denny Reading Test": Well above Chance for University Students

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    Coleman, Chris; Lindstrom, Jennifer; Nelson, Jason; Lindstrom, William; Gregg, K. Noel

    2010-01-01

    The comprehension section of the "Nelson-Denny Reading Test" (NDRT) is widely used to assess the reading comprehension skills of adolescents and adults in the United States. In this study, the authors explored the content validity of the NDRT Comprehension Test (Forms G and H) by asking university students (with and without at-risk…

  13. How Are Colleges and Universities Preparing Reading Specialist Candidates for Leadership Positions in the Schools?

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    Wepner, Shelley B.; Quatroche, Diana J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the results of 11 interviews conducted as a follow-up to a survey that examined the perceptions of university faculty regarding the importance of graduate programs preparing reading specialists for leadership roles. The results of the interviews indicate that programs require a leadership course that has reading specialist…

  14. Reading competency of first-year undergraduate students at University of Botswana: A case study

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    Beauty B. Ntereke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read and interpret textbooks and other assigned material is a critical component of success at university level. Therefore, the aims of this study are twofold: to evaluate the reading levels of first-year students when they first enter the university to determine how adequately prepared they are for university reading. It is also to find out if there will be any significant improvement after going through the academic literacy course offered to first-year students. The participants were 51 first-year undergraduate humanities students enrolled in the Communication and Academic Literacy course at the University of Botswana. The data were collected through a reading test adopted from Zulu which was administered at the beginning of the first semester. The same test was administered at the end of the semester after the students had gone through the academic literacy course to see if there was any difference in performance. The findings of this study indicate that there is a mixed and wide variation of students reading competency levels when students first enter the university and that a significant number of first-year entrants are inadequately prepared for university reading.

  15. HAVE YOU READ THIS?: Life, the universe(s) and everything

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    Dobson, Ken

    1998-09-01

    One of the consequences of belonging to a book club is the pressure it exerts to buy something from each monthly brochure. Paying later by credit card also seems, utterly illogically, less traumatic than forking out real money in a bookshop. So I get to read books that might otherwise pass me by, some of which I even finish reading. The book of the year (1997) for me was undoubtedly The Life of the Cosmos by Lee Smolin. Lee Smolin is a physics professor at Penn State University, and his expertise is in the rarefied field of quantum gravity, an entity that not everyone agrees exists. At the age of 65 going on 16 the first thing that revived my anarchic tendencies was his account of how he came to be a physicist. It all started by his being refused entry to the advanced math (as they say) class at high school, because his teachers thought he wasn't good enough. So he decided to learn maths on his own. One thing led to another, and maths led to architecture, which led to geodesic domes, tensors, Einstein and then a teenage decision to devote his life to physics so that he could sort out the problems of linking quantum theory and gravity. What else was there for a `failed rock-and-roll star' to do? By this time he had been refused entry to the physics class at high school (blame possibly a mixture of rock-and-roll and politics; after all, this was California) so he taught himself enough to get into university anyway. I can understand how some students prosper in spite of their teachers, but this is the only one I have heard of who did so just to spite them. But all this happens in the first few pages. What was really fascinating about the book - which should entrance any sixth-former - is Smolin's ideas in physics. In developing these he avoids all equations and gives us clear and well-written accounts of cosmology, the evolution of stars and the universe, string theory, relativity, quantum physics and gravity, and the `dream of unification'. His approach may be too

  16. The Effects of an Extensive Reading Program on Improving English as Foreign Language Proficiency in University Level Education

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    Alzu'bi, Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of extensive reading on improving reading proficiency. The study tried to find the effect of ER on EFL student's reading, vocabulary and grammar. The researcher designed two instruments; a program based on the extensive reading strategy and general test. Forty-one university students who study English…

  17. Academic Reading Difficulties Encountered by International Graduate Students in a Malaysian University

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    Alghail, Ali Abdullah Ali; Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how international graduate students in a Malaysian public university perceive and overcome academic reading difficulties. The target population included all graduate students from Yemen, an Arab country, studying at Universiti Sains Malaysia. Data were collected using questionnaires, focus group interviews, and journal writing.…

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Reading Performance Using the Salzburg Reading Desk With a Refractive Rotational Asymmetric Multifocal Intraocular Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Katharina; Attia, Mary S A; Khoramnia, Ramin; Tandogan, Tamer; Kretz, Florian T; Auffarth, Gerd Uwe

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate functional results and reading performance using the Salzburg Reading Desk after implantation of a sector-shaped near-embedded, rotational asymmetrical multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) and a multifocal toric IOL with a +3.00 diopter (D) near addition. In a prospective study, the LentisMplus and Mplus toric IOLs (Oculentis GmbH, Berlin, Germany) were implanted in 34 eyes of 18 patients at the University Eye Hospital of Heidelberg. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA) and uncorrected and corrected near visual acuity (UNVA, CNVA) were evaluated using standardized visual acuity charts (ETDRS). The Salzburg Reading Desk was used to analyze unilateral and bilateral uncorrected and corrected reading acuity, reading distance, reading speed, and the smallest log-scaled print size that could be read effectively at a set (40 cm/80 cm) and subjective chosen near and intermediate distance. Postoperatively, the median UDVA was 0.08 logMAR (20/25 Snellen) and the median CDVA was 0.01 logMAR (20/20 Snellen). The median UNVA was 0.12 logMAR (20/25 Snellen) and the median CNVA was 0.03 logMAR (20/20 Snellen). The median uncorrected reading acuity measured with the Salzburg Reading Desk for near distance at 40 cm was 0.18 logMAR (20/32 Snellen). The subjectively preferred near distance was 39 cm and revealed similar visual acuity results. The best reading acuity for intermediate distance with a median of 0.22 logMAR (20/32 Snellen) was achieved at a median distance of 62 cm. Reading performance of the multifocal IOL corresponded for near standardized and individual distance, whereas reading function was better at the patient's preferred intermediate distance. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(8):526-532.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Reading habits in university students of careers in science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornejo, Jorge Norberto;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication and dissemination of science are an integral part of science itself, where the reading, in addition, must be a constitutive aspect of scientific training. Especially, reading works of scientific divulgation can become an excellent tool for the integral formation of students in scientific or technological careers. This research is a preliminary diagnosis on the reading habits of 158 students of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Buenos Aires, conducted by a written survey. From the results, we conclude that students are not whitout reading habits, but that they have little interaction with his training as a professionals. The printed book is still the main vehicle for reading, well above the electronic formats. A problem arises with the issue of scientific divulgation, as students manifest ignore to the very nature of this genre. Future work is proposed for the development of intervention strategies that take into account the results of this research.

  20. The Effects of Reading Ability and Sex Difference on Recall Protocols of Japanese University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Kinue

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the concurrent validity of a recall test as a measure of reading comprehension and the effects of the level of reading ability and sex difference on the written recalls of 70 Japanese EFL university students. Results showed that there were moderate significant correlations between a recall test and a standardized reading test (i.e., FCE): for all the students, r = .64, p < .01; for males, r = .61, p < .01; for females, r = .67, p < .01, suggesting that a recall test is...

  1. Universal brain systems for recognizing word shapes and handwriting gestures during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kimihiro; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Pegado, Felipe; Cohen, Laurent; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2012-12-11

    Do the neural circuits for reading vary across culture? Reading of visually complex writing systems such as Chinese has been proposed to rely on areas outside the classical left-hemisphere network for alphabetic reading. Here, however, we show that, once potential confounds in cross-cultural comparisons are controlled for by presenting handwritten stimuli to both Chinese and French readers, the underlying network for visual word recognition may be more universal than previously suspected. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a semantic task with words written in cursive font, we demonstrate that two universal circuits, a shape recognition system (reading by eye) and a gesture recognition system (reading by hand), are similarly activated and show identical patterns of activation and repetition priming in the two language groups. These activations cover most of the brain regions previously associated with culture-specific tuning. Our results point to an extended reading network that invariably comprises the occipitotemporal visual word-form system, which is sensitive to well-formed static letter strings, and a distinct left premotor region, Exner's area, which is sensitive to the forward or backward direction with which cursive letters are dynamically presented. These findings suggest that cultural effects in reading merely modulate a fixed set of invariant macroscopic brain circuits, depending on surface features of orthographies.

  2. Reading and writing in order not to drop out of university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giohanny Olave Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.38folios45.59 This text investigates the relationships between dropping out of university and difficulties in reading and writing, in accordance with the recent overview of both phenomena. After a general review of the studies on dropping out of university, in which their importance for the continued development of Colombia’s professionalization is gauged, the practices of reading comprehension and producing texts are problematized specifically in the field of higher education and are then causally related to the phenomenon of dropping out of university. Finally, the current processes of literacy at university, based on recognition of its relevance in the educational mission of higher education, are discussed.

  3. Reading Comprehension and Translation Performance of English Linguistics Students of Hung Vuong University: A Correlational Study

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    Cuc Thi Kim Pham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to correlate the reading comprehension and translation performance of English linguistic students, then inform some pedagogical implications for the teaching of reading comprehension in translation classes in order to enhance the translation quality performed by the students. To this end, 45 junior students of English linguistics specialization of Hung Vuong University, including 5 males and 40 females, aged from 20 to 22, were subject to a TOEFL reading comprehension test and a translation performance test (ATA guidelines, 2011. Data were analyzed using the Pearson Correlation, SPSS version 20.0. The coefficient correlation of students’ reading comprehension and their translation performance was noted 0.721 at the significant level of 0.01. It was found that the Reading comprehension was closely related to translation performance. Along the reading comprehension question types, translation performance was affected by the ability to determine gist and main ideas of the text, identify the vocabulary, infer the implied meanings and identify the writer’s style and attitudes. The results were discussed, and implications for teaching reading comprehension to enhance translation performance were presented.

  4. Developing a universal model of reading necessitates cracking the orthographic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Colin J

    2012-10-01

    I argue, contra Frost, that when prime lexicality and target density are considered, it is not clear that there are fundamental differences between form priming effects in Semitic and European languages. Furthermore, identifying and naming printed words in these languages raises common theoretical problems. Solving these problems and developing a universal model of reading necessitates "cracking" the orthographic input code.

  5. Connecting Reading and Writing Using Children's Literature in the University L2 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Priscila

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the potential benefits of using children's literature in adult second language (L2) classrooms. A short-term, intensive university course for English reading and writing was designed incorporating children's literature into the curriculum. The author describes the course and discusses how children's literature can be used…

  6. Multilingual Dyslexia in University Students: Reading and Writing Patterns in Three Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    We investigated reading and writing in two domestic languages (Swedish and Finnish) and one foreign language (English) among multilingual university students with (n = 20) versus without dyslexia (n = 20). Our analyses encompassed overall speed and accuracy measures and an in-depth analysis of grapheme-phoneme-grapheme errors and inflectional…

  7. How University Students with Reading Difficulties Are Supported in Achieving Their Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack-Cutler, Holly L.; Parrila, Rauno K.; Jokisaari, Markku; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    We examine (a) what social ties university students with a history of reading difficulty (RD) report assisting them to achieve their goals, (b) outlets available for developing social ties, (c) resources mobilized within these relationships, and (d) the impact of social ties' status on academic achievement. Participants were 107 university…

  8. [Relationship between clinical symptoms and Hiragana reading ability in children with difficulties in reading and writing:usefulness of a clinical-symptoms-checklist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Tomoka; Koike, Toshihide; Koeda, Tatsuya; Wakamiya, Eiji; Hosokawa, Torn; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the clinical symptoms of children with developmental dyslexia (DD) and evaluated the relationship between these symptoms and their Hiragana reading abilities. In order to detect the clinical symptoms of DD, we newly developed a clinical-symptoms-checklist (CL), which consisted of a total of 30 yes/no questions regarding symptoms linked to reading (15 questions) and writing (15 questions). Subjects were 98 Japanese school grade (1 to 9) children, aged 6 to 15 years old, with normal intelligence confirmed by the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children (WISC-Ill) and they were divided into 2 groups according to their diagnosis. Twenty four children diagnosed as developmental dyslexia consisted the DD group, and the remaining 74 children were grouped in the non-DD group. CL showed significant construct validity (pHiragana reading ability of articulation time in all Hiragana reading tasks (pJapanese children.

  9. Teachers' Use of Technology in a Reading Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Reuber, Kristin; Robinson, Corrine

    2001-01-01

    Explains results when graduate students studying to become reading specialists tutored struggling readers in one-on-one sessions in which the clinicians were required to make significant use of technology in their instruction. Concludes that clinicians often did not have clear reading or literacy objectives when using computer-based instruction.…

  10. Reading Clinics on University Campuses: A Way Forward for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preponderance of pidgin and slang as campus languages, the large classes that limit students' oral participation at lectures and a host of other factors also limit students' language use/output. The result of these limitations can be witnessed in their poor performance at both productive and receptive language skills.

  11. teachers say reading and writing in a university degree in the colombian caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Cárdenas Cárdenas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Literacy practices in higher education: what students andThis article is the result of a survey conducted in 10 degrees in a University Colombian Caribbean whose general purpose was to describe, interpret and understand the literacy practices that take place in these degrees. To achieve this article was taken into account one aspect that research in general was conceived as the first specific objective. This aspect refers to the conceptions which teachers and students of the degrees on the teaching and learning of reading and writing academic texts in college. The study usually takes as a theoretical concept of academic literacy. Data collected through classroom observations, also came from surveys and interviews with students and teachers of the degrees. The results of the investigation determined that the teaching and learning of reading and writing in the undergraduate classroom is very limited. The development of pedagogical and didactic classes lacks reading and writing practices. 

  12. Students’ Perception on Pre-reading Activities in Basic Reading II Class of the English Language Education Study Program of Sanata Dharma University

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    Vindy Cahya Ekaningrum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The students’ perception on the teacher instruction shows whether the teaching techniques meet the students’ need or not. Because of this reason, the researcher wants to find out the varieties of pre-reading activities used by the teacher and the students’ perception on the implementation of the pre-reading activities. There were two problem formulations in this study: 1 What kinds of pre-reading activities that are used by Basic Reading II teacher in the English Language Education Study Program of Sanata Dharma University? 2 How is the students’ perception on pre-reading activities used by the teacher? This research was a survey research. In gathering the data, there were two instruments used in this research. They were interview and questionnaire. The interview was done by interviewing the teacher of Basic Reading II Class. The interview was used to answer the first research question about the varieties of pre-reading activities in Basic Reading II class. Then, the researcher distributed the questionnaire to 56 students of Basic Reading II class. The questionnaire was used to answer the second research question about the students’ perception on pre-reading activities used by the teacher. The result of this research showed that brainstorming, pre-teaching vocabulary, pre-questioning, visual aids, and KWL strategy were the varieties of pre-reading activities used by the teacher. There were two different implementation of pre-teaching vocabulary. There were also two activities combined together, they were the use of visual aids and KWL strategy. The students had positive perception on the implementation of pre-reading activities in Basic Reading II Class.   DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2015.180206

  13. Ethics in the medieval university: the importance of classics reading for the elaboration of Thomas Aquinas

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    Tatyana Murer Cavalcante

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present some considerations about the importance of reading to the development of the ethics conceptions of Thomas Aquinas (1224 - 5? / 1274. At the dawn of the thirteenth century, the townspeople of Medieval West created a new institution designed for knowledge and education: the University. In it, teachers and disciples were debating key issues for the new society using mainly texts of Ancient Philosophy and Christians, but also Arab and Jewish writings. The literacy forms used encompassed mainly lectio and disputatio , and counteracted by distinct theoretical bases, those thinkers eventually recreated the summa , in a original and fundamental form to the philosophical elaboration of that time. To discuss the importance of reading in the formulation of the concept of ethics in the medieval university, we will present some characteristics of the production of knowledge in the thirteenth century linked to its historical context and then discuss some ethical considerations of Thomas Aquinas, one of the most prominent authors of that period. Considering the limits of this article, only one text, “The object of charity” based on Aquinas major work, the Summa of Theology, will be discussed in depth. Preliminarily, it is possible to state that as well as the reading of classical authors by Thomas Aquinas and other masters of the thirteenth century, helped them develop knowledge about ethics conforming to their time, historical reading of these authors helps in the understanding of today.

  14. Patron-driven acquisition of journal articles using ReadCube at the University of Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark England

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The University of Utah Library has teamed with a new company, Labtiva, to experiment with a product called ReadCube Access. This product allows the library to provide access to journal articles using a patron-driven acquisition (PDA mechanism, using a tiered pricing structure based on level and permanence of access. Outcomes of the pilot program and a value analysis are discussed. Overall, the program is deemed a success by the Library.

  15. Universal Visual Features Might Be Necessary for Fluent Reading. A Longitudinal Study of Visual Reading in Braille and Cyrillic Alphabets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Łukasz; Radziun, Dominika; Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Sowa, Joanna E; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Szwed, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that efficient reading is possible because all reading scripts have been matched, through cultural evolution, to the natural capabilities of the visual cortex. This matching has resulted in all scripts being made of line-junctions, such as T, X, or L. Our aim was to test a critical prediction of this hypothesis: visual reading in an atypical script that is devoid of line-junctions (such as the Braille alphabet read visually) should be much less efficient than reading in a "normal" script (e.g., Cyrillic). Using a lexical decision task, we examined Visual Braille reading speed and efficiency in sighted Braille teachers. As a control, we tested learners of a natural visual script, Cyrillic. Both groups participated in a two semester course of either visual Braille or Russian while their reading speed and accuracy was tested at regular intervals. The results show that visual Braille reading is slow, prone to errors and highly serial, even in Braille readers with years of prior reading experience. Although subjects showed some improvements in their visual Braille reading accuracy and speed following the course, the effect of word length on reading speed (typically observed in beginning readers) was remained very sizeable through all testing sessions. These results are in stark contrast to Cyrillic, a natural script, where only 3 months of learning were sufficient to achieve relative proficiency. Taken together, these results suggest that visual features such as line junctions and their combinations might be necessary for efficient reading.

  16. Effects of Personal Intelligence Reading Instruction on personal intelligence profiles of Thai university students

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    Salila Vongkrahchang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the impact of reading instruction using personal intelligence (PI on Thai university students' PI profiles. Thirty-nine undergraduates majoring in English involved in the study for ten weeks. Their PI profiles were measured twice at the pre-and post-interventions. The mixed methods research design was employed. The results showed that the students developed more personal intelligence in the post-intervention profiles (x¯ = 2.72, SD = 0.80 than in their pre-intervention ones (x¯ = 2.54, SD = 0.82. The students showed a preference for intrapersonal intelligence, in goal setting (x¯ = 2.85, SD = 0.78, monitoring (x¯ = 2.85, SD = 0.74, and evaluation strategy (x¯ = 3.21, SD = 0.77. Their interaction assessed by classroom observation and student worksheets also highlighted the PI profile findings. Personal Intelligence Reading Instruction facilitated the students setting specific and achievable goals, making overt and doable plans for their reading tasks, adjusting strategies helping them understand the text better, and identifying sources of difficulties while reading.

  17. Implications of Student and Lecturer Qualitative Views on Reading Lists: A Case Study at Loughborough University, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewerton, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This case study explores student and lecturer views of reading lists at Loughborough University. Taking the qualitative data from two surveys previously undertaken at the institution, it uses the grounded theory approach to identify key issues regarding the purpose, importance, visibility, content, currency, and length of reading lists, as well as…

  18. Multiple Intelligence Scores of Science Stream Students and Their Relation with Reading Competency in Malaysian University English Test (MUET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Norizan Abdul; Zaini, Nuramirah

    2014-01-01

    Many researches have shown that different approach needed in analysing linear and non-linear reading comprehension texts and different cognitive skills are required. This research attempts to discover the relationship between Science Stream students' reading competency on linear and non-linear texts in Malaysian University English Test (MUET) with…

  19. Reading and writing academic practices in the phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mirely Chois-Lenis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some results of an investigation aimed to characterize the academic literacy practices that are developed in the Phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca. In this descriptive study, a sample of 24 students was taken from those in the last semester of the first academic period of 2009, who answered a survey of 26 multiple choice questions. The results indicate that the academic moment for which the students write and read the most is for the courses, who develop these practices primarily to be assessed and predominantly read and write their own lecture notes and the materials prepared by their faculty, to the detriment of scientific articles or papers for publication. It is expected, from these results, to generate reflexion processes and actions that qualify the practices of academic literacy within the program for the benefit of academic and professional performance of their students and graduates.

  20. The 2 + 1 paradigm: an efficient algorithm for central reading of Mayo endoscopic subscores in global multicenter phase 3 ulcerative colitis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Harris A; Gottlieb, Klaus; Hussain, Fez

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance and potential impact in clinical trials, central reading continues to be an under-represented topic in the literature about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) clinical trials. Although several IBD studies have incorporated central reading to date, none have fully detailed the specific methodology with which the reads were conducted. Here we outline key principles for designing an efficient central reading paradigm for an ulcerative colitis (UC) study that addresses regulatory, operational and clinical expectations. As a step towards standardization of read methodology for the growing number of multicenter phase 3 clinical trials in IBD, we have applied these principles to the design of an optimal read methodology that we call the '2 + 1 paradigm.' The 2 + 1 paradigm involves the use of both site and central readers, validated scoring criteria and multiple measures for blinding readers, all of which contribute to reducing bias and generating a reliable endoscopic subscore that reflects endoscopic disease severity. The paradigm can be utilized while maintaining a practical workflow compatible with an operationally feasible clinical trial. The 2 + 1 paradigm represents a logical approach to endoscopic assessment in IBD clinical trials, one that should be considered attractive to prospective sponsors, contract research organizations, key opinion leaders and regulatory authorities and be ready for implementation and further evaluation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  1. Maintenance of Clinical Expertise and Clinical Research by the Clinical Professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Tomoya; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2017-01-01

    The clinical professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University (GPU) provide pharmaceutical services at GPU Pharmacy, Gifu University Hospital, and Gifu Municipal Hospital to keep their clinical skills up-to-date; they also perform clinical research in collaboration with many clinical institutes. The Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy is part of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, to which the clinical professors belong, and is composed of three clinical professors (a professor, an associate professor, and an assistant professor). The professor administers the GPU Pharmacy as its director, while the associate professor and assistant professor provide pharmaceutical services to patients at Gifu Municipal Hospital, and also provide practical training for students in the GPU Pharmacy. Collectively, they have performed research on such topics as medication education for students, clinical communication education, and analysis of clinical big data. They have also conducted research in collaboration with clinical institutes, hospitals, and pharmacies. Here, we introduce the collaborative research between the Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy and Gifu Municipal Hospital. These studies include "Risk factors contributing to urinary protein expression resulting from bevacizumab combination chemotherapy", "Hyponatremia and hypokalemia as risk factors for falls", "Economic evaluation of adjustments of levofloxacin dosage by dispensing pharmacists for patients with renal dysfunction", and "Effect of patient education upon discharge for use of a medication notebook on purchasing over-the-counter drugs and health foods". In this symposium, we would like to demonstrate one model of the association and collaborative research between these clinical professors and clinical institutes.

  2. The Explorer's Guide to the Universe: A Reading List for Planetary and Space Science. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Bevan M. (Compiler); McDonagh, Mark S. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    During the last decade, both scientists and the public have been engulfed by a flood of discoveries and information from outer space. Distant worlds have become familiar landscapes. Instruments in space have shown us a different Sun by the "light" of ultraviolet radiation and X-rays. Beyond the solar system, we have detected a strange universe of unsuspected violence, unexplained objects, and unimaginable energies. We are completely remarking our picture of the universe around us, and scientists and the general public alike are curious and excited about what we see. The public has participated in this period of exploration and discovery to an extent never possible before. In real time, TV screens show moonwalks, the sands of Mars, the volcanoes of Io, and the rings of Saturn. But after the initial excitement, it is hard for the curious non-scientist to learn more details or even to stay in touch with what is going on. Each space mission or new discovery is quickly skimmed over by newspapers and TV and then preserved in technical journals that are neither accessible nor easily read by the average reader. This reading list is an attempt to bridge the gap between the people who make discoveries in space and the people who would like to read about them. The aim has been to provide to many different people--teachers, students, scientists, other professionals, and curious citizens of all kinds--a list of readings where they can find out what the universe is like and what we have learned about it. We have included sections on the objects that seem to be of general interest--the Moon, the planets, the Sun, comets, and the universe beyond. We have also included material on related subjects that people are interested in--the history of space exploration, space habitats, extraterrestrial life, and U F O ' s . The list is intended to be self-contained; it includes both general references to supply background and more specific sources for new discoveries. Although the list can

  3. University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences in a public hospital at ... was applied to explore and describe the experiences of student nurses' clinical learning ... The ethical principles relevant to the study were observed.

  4. Reading in the 80's: Where Are We Going? Volume 5. Fifth Yearbook of the Arizona State University Reading Conference, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Joan, Ed.

    Contained in this yearbook are the proceedings of the fifth annual Arizona State University Reading Conference. This edition reflects an emphasis on a wide range of topics, including study skills, oral language, and teaching strategies. Following a foreword, the conference articles discuss the following: (1) study skills across the curriculum, (2)…

  5. How university students with reading difficulties are supported in achieving their goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack-Cutler, Holly L; Parrila, Rauno K; Jokisaari, Markku; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    We examine (a) what social ties university students with a history of reading difficulty (RD) report assisting them to achieve their goals, (b) outlets available for developing social ties, (c) resources mobilized within these relationships, and (d) the impact of social ties' status on academic achievement. Participants were 107 university students with RD who were currently completing or had recently completed a university degree. Results showed that university students with RD named friends, parents, and significant others (e.g., boy/girlfriend, spouse) as social ties most often. Personal social ties were developed through social media networking sites and within close relationships, and institutional social ties through academic centers and university general services, among others. Resources mobilized among personal and institutional social ties included emotional and social support, advice and planning, writing and studying help, and goal setting. Institutional social ties also afforded job search assistance, accommodations, skill development, financial support, and mental health services. Finally, the status of employed, but not student, social ties explained academic achievement. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  6. Recovering the Power Inside: A Qualitative Study of Critical Reading in an Iranian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-san Ghahremani Ghajar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental goal of critical literacy approaches is to bring a change and empower students as critical agents and subjects of decision making. Students are expected to do more than simply accumulate information; they are encouraged to challenge their ‘taken for granted’ belief structures and transform themselves as well as their immediate social environment. In this article, we present a qualitative enquiry in a university reading course based on critical literacy. We explored how learners reflected on their individual/community and word/world concerns through critical understanding of texts and how they challenged and shattered their ‘taken for granted’ beliefs and started to transform into critical agents of voice and position. The data consists of 400 concept maps, called webs, and personal journals by fifty undergraduate English literature students at an Iranian University, as well as oral and written interviews. The data was qualitatively analyzed in search of themes that could illustrate students’ early thinking structures and their empowerment and transformations into subjects of decisions. The study revealed that, through webbing words/worlds and critically challenging texts, students took the opportunity to approach the knowledge and information presented to them analytically and critically. On this basis, we discuss how students were able to gain the power of critiquing, freeing their thoughts, finding and expressing their voice and position, discovering personal meanings in texts and contexts, cooperating and participating, and understanding learning for meaning through the critical act of reading.

  7. Patients' Positive and Negative Responses to Reading Mental Health Clinical Notes Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneson, Lauren M; Chen, Jason I; Pisciotta, Maura; Tuepker, Anais; Dobscha, Steven K

    2018-05-01

    This study describes responses to OpenNotes, clinical notes available online, among patients receiving mental health care and explores whether responses vary by patient demographic or clinical characteristics. Survey data from 178 veterans receiving mental health treatment at a large Veterans Affairs medical center included patient-reported health self-efficacy, health knowledge, alliance with clinicians, and negative emotional responses after reading OpenNotes. Health care data were extracted from the patient care database. Reading OpenNotes helped many participants feel in control of their health care (49%) and have more trust in clinicians (45%), although a few (8%) frequently felt upset after reading their notes. In multivariate models, posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with increased patient-clinician alliance (p=.046) but also with negative emotional responses (p<.01). Patients receiving mental health care frequently reported benefits from reading OpenNotes, yet some experienced negative responses.

  8. An evaluation of clinical treatment of convergence insufficiency for children with reading difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusek Wolfgang A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study investigates two different treatment options for convergence insufficiency CI for a group of children with reading difficulties referred by educational institutes to a specialist eye clinic in Vienna. Methods One hundred and thirty four subjects (aged 7-14 years with reading difficulties were referred from an educational institute in Vienna, Austria for visual assessment. Each child was given either 8Δ base-in reading spectacles (n = 51 or computerised home vision therapy (HTS (n = 51. Thirty two participants refused all treatment offered (clinical control group. A full visual assessment including reading speed and accuracy were conducted pre- and post-treatment. Results Factorial analyses demonstrated statistically significant changes between results obtained for visits 1 and 2 for total reading time, reading error score, amplitude of accommodation and binocular accommodative facility (within subjects effects (p Conclusions Reading difficulties with no apparent intellectual or psychological foundation may be due to a binocular vision anomaly such as convergence insufficiency. Both the HTS and prismatic correction are highly effective treatment options for convergence insufficiency. Prismatic correction can be considered an effective alternative to HTS.

  9. Research on natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries in Jinan under the perspective of energy-efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zengzhang

    2017-11-01

    The natural lighting design in the reading spaces of university libraries not only influences physical and mental health of readers but also concerns the energy consumption of the libraries. The scientific and rational design of natural lighting is the key to the design of energy saving for physical environment of the reading space. The paper elaborates the present situation and existed problems of natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries across Jinan region based on characteristics of light climate of Jinan region and concrete utilization of reading spaces in university libraries, and combining field measurement, survey, research and data analysis of reading spaces in Shandong Women’s University’s library. The paper, under the perspective of energy-efficiency, puts forward proposals to improve natural lighting in the reading spaces of university libraries from five aspects, such as adjustment of interior layout, optimization of outer windows design, employment of the reflector panel, design lighting windows on inner walls and utilization of adjustable sun shading facilities.

  10. Critical reading and critical thinking--study design and methodology: a personal approach on how to read the clinical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Timothy O

    2013-04-01

    The volume of medical literature grows exponentially. Yet we are faced with the necessity to make clinical decisions based on the availability and quality of scientific information. The general strength (reliability, robustness) of any interpretation that guides us in clinical decision making is dependent on how information was obtained. All information and medical studies and, consequently, all conclusions are not created equal. It is incumbent upon us to be able to assess the quality of the information that guides us in the care of our patients. Being able to assess medical literature critically requires use of critical reading and critical thinking skills. To achieve these skills, to be able to analyze medical literature critically, takes a combination of education and practice, practice, and more practice.

  11. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  12. Is There Value in Having Radiology Provide a Second Reading in Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek; Bosch, Patrick; Dede, Ozgur; Deeney, Vincent; Mendelson, Stephen; Ward, Timothy; Brooks, Maria; Kenkre, Tanya; Roach, James

    2017-06-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations specifically mandates the dual interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs by a radiologist in addition to the orthopaedist in all hospital-based orthopaedic clinics. Previous studies have questioned the utility of this practice. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the clinical significance of having the radiologist provide a second interpretation in a hospital-based pediatric orthopaedic clinic. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who had plain radiographs obtained in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic at an academic children's hospital over a 4-month period. For each radiographic series, the orthopaedist's note and the radiology interpretation were reviewed and a determination was made of whether the radiology read provided new clinically useful information and/or a new diagnosis, whether it recommended further imaging, or if it missed a diagnosis that was reflected in the orthopaedist's note. The hospital charges associated with the radiology read for each study were also quantified. The charts of 1570 consecutive clinic patients who were seen in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic from January to April, 2012 were reviewed. There were 2509 radiographic studies performed, of which 2264 had both a documented orthopaedist's note and radiologist's read. The radiologist's interpretation added new, clinically important information in 1.0% (23/2264) of these studies. In 1.7% (38/2264) of the studies, it was determined that the radiologist missed the diagnosis or clinically important information that could affect treatment. The total amount of the professional fees charged for the radiologists' interpretations was $87,362. On average, the hospital charges for each occurrence in which the radiologist's read provided an additional diagnosis or clinically important information beyond the orthopaedist's note were $3798. The results of this study suggest that eliminating the

  13. Universal brain signature of proficient reading: Evidence from four contrasting languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckl, Jay G; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Molfese, Peter J; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Bick, Atira; Frost, Stephen J; Hancock, Roeland; Wu, Denise H; Mencl, William Einar; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Lee, Jun-Ren; Oliver, Myriam; Zevin, Jason D; Hoeft, Fumiko; Carreiras, Manuel; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Pugh, Kenneth R; Frost, Ram

    2015-12-15

    We propose and test a theoretical perspective in which a universal hallmark of successful literacy acquisition is the convergence of the speech and orthographic processing systems onto a common network of neural structures, regardless of how spoken words are represented orthographically in a writing system. During functional MRI, skilled adult readers of four distinct and highly contrasting languages, Spanish, English, Hebrew, and Chinese, performed an identical semantic categorization task to spoken and written words. Results from three complementary analytic approaches demonstrate limited language variation, with speech-print convergence emerging as a common brain signature of reading proficiency across the wide spectrum of selected languages, whether their writing system is alphabetic or logographic, whether it is opaque or transparent, and regardless of the phonological and morphological structure it represents.

  14. Effectiveness of an Interface for Strategic Reading on University Students: an Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Zarzosa Escobedo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A computer interface for training university students in reading comprehension of expository-argumentative texts is presented. A text is divided into several sections, for each of which several questions are presented; the reader must select an answer from among various choices and then a feedback screen is presented according to the answer. Two experiments were carried out to test the program’s effectiveness. The first one compared the performance of 50 students in two successive but equivalent lessons. In the second one, the performance of 18 students after four lessons was compared with that of 15 students after a single lesson. There were statistically significant differences in both experiments that support the training effectiveness, although with noticeable variability between participants. The scope and limitations of the program due to the number of lessons and the size of the population sample in the second experiment are discussed in relation to the outcomes.

  15. Do textbooks used in university reading education courses conform to the instructional recommendations of the national reading panel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesha Joshi, R; Binks, Emily; Graham, Lori; Ocker-Dean, Emily; Smith, Dennie L; Boulware-Gooden, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Two reasons may be responsible for the poor grasp of the linguistic concepts related to literacy acquisition by preservice and in-service teachers: a lack of attention given to such concepts by teacher educators (college faculty members) and a lack of relevant information provided in the textbooks used in college courses. In an earlier study, the authors found that many teacher educators involved in the training of preservice and in-service teachers were not well acquainted with these concepts. In this study, the authors examined the extent to which textbooks used in reading education courses contain the information about the five components of literacy instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension) recommended by the National Reading Panel. Such scrutiny shows that many textbooks do not adequately cover these five components and the related instructional procedures for teaching them. In addition to the paucity of information about teaching the five components, some textbooks present inaccurate information.

  16. Reclaiming the Universal: Postcolonial Readings of Selected Anglophone Poems by Filipino Poets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Neil C. Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After giving a summary of postcolonial theory’s understanding of universalism, the author of this article critically “re-functions” and re-contextualizes this concept within the history of postcolonial literatures, defining it as a textual “register” rather than just a theme. In this manner, he pursues the argument that the universalist trope can indeed be “postcolonially reclaimed”—a task that is carried out in his readings of a selection of well-known lyric texts written by some of the most important poets of the Philippines’ anglophone tradition. Crucial to this project is the recognition of the multiplicity of postcolonial modes of writing, most of which do not self-consciously traffic in the particularities of ethnopoetic “local-coloring.” Instead, they interpretively require—despite their seemingly self-evident accessibility and assimilability— a ruthlessly specifying, critical approach. This is an approach that seeks, first and foremost, to locate a text resolutely within the context of its production and intended consumption. Germane to this activity is the idea that the universal, once situated, is always specific. Suffice it to say that Philippine literature’s many (mostly lyric gestures toward “generality” and “abstraction” need to be seen in this historicizing light.

  17. Predictors of Early Termination in a University Counseling Training Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Schneider, Mercedes K.; Spengler, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the existence of counseling dropout research, there are limited predictive data for counseling in training clinics. Potential predictor variables were investigated in this archival study of 380 client files in a university counseling training clinic. Multinomial logistic regression, predictive discriminant analysis, and classification and…

  18. The Effects of Epistemic Beliefs in Science and Gender Difference on University Students' Science-Text Reading: An Eye-Tracking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Huang, Rui-Ting; Tsai, I-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to explore not only the effects of epistemic beliefs in science on science-text reading but also the gender differences in epistemic beliefs and the reading process. The interactions between gender and epistemic beliefs during reading were also explored. A total of 25 university students, 13 male and 12…

  19. University Students Use of Computers and Mobile Devices for Learning and Their Reading Speed on Different Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Bongeka

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at the investigation of mobile device and computer use at a higher learning institution. The goal was to determine the current use of computers and mobile devices for learning and the students' reading speed on different platforms. The research was contextualised in a sample of students at the University of South Africa.…

  20. Difficulties First-Year University Mathematics Students Have in Reading Their Mathematics Textbook. Technical Report. No. 2009-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mary D.; Selden, Annie; Selden, John

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the experiences and difficulties certain first-year university students displayed in reading new passages from their mathematics textbooks. We interviewed eleven precalculus and calculus students who were considered to be good at mathematics, as indicated by high ACT mathematics scores. These students were also …

  1. University Students with Reading Difficulties: Do Perceived Supports and Comorbid Difficulties Predict Well-being and GPA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack-Cutler, Holly L.; Parrila, Rauno K.; Torppa, Minna

    2016-01-01

    We examined the impact of the number of comorbid difficulties, social support, and community support on life satisfaction and academic achievement among 120 university students or recent graduates with self-reported reading difficulties. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived social support, perceived community support, the…

  2. Measurements of Radon Concentration in Several Wards of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo...

    OpenAIRE

    , Y. Halimi; , S. Kadiri; , G. Hodolli; , B. Xhafa; , A. Jonuzaj

    2016-01-01

    Understanding that what’s the level of environment pollution from radioactive pollutant in some wards of UCCK (University Clinical Center of Kosovo) in Prishtina are made measurements of α radiation which is the product of 222Rn and have been read doses of TLD to some staff workers in three wards of UCCK. All this is done to see the risk level of possible pollution. Concentration of radon 222Rn is measured with device CRM-510 portable instruments. During the measurements the apparatus has rec...

  3. Do family physicians retrieve synopses of clinical research previously read as email alerts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Granikov, Vera; Shulha, Michael; Bartlett, Gillian; Marlow, Bernard

    2011-11-30

    A synopsis of new clinical research highlights important aspects of one study in a brief structured format. When delivered as email alerts, synopses enable clinicians to become aware of new developments relevant for practice. Once read, a synopsis can become a known item of clinical information. In time-pressured situations, remembering a known item may facilitate information retrieval by the clinician. However, exactly how synopses first delivered as email alerts influence retrieval at some later time is not known. We examined searches for clinical information in which a synopsis previously read as an email alert was retrieved (defined as a dyad). Our study objectives were to (1) examine whether family physicians retrieved synopses they previously read as email alerts and then to (2) explore whether family physicians purposefully retrieved these synopses. We conducted a mixed-methods study in which a qualitative multiple case study explored the retrieval of email alerts within a prospective longitudinal cohort of practicing family physicians. Reading of research-based synopses was tracked in two contexts: (1) push, meaning to read on email and (2) pull, meaning to read after retrieval from one electronic knowledge resource. Dyads, defined as synopses first read as email alerts and subsequently retrieved in a search of a knowledge resource, were prospectively identified. Participants were interviewed about all of their dyads. Outcomes were the total number of dyads and their type. Over a period of 341 days, 194 unique synopses delivered to 41 participants resulted in 4937 synopsis readings. In all, 1205 synopses were retrieved over an average of 320 days. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 21 (1.7%) were dyads made by 17 family physicians. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 6 (0.5%) were known item type dyads. However, dyads also occurred serendipitously. In the single knowledge resource we studied, email alerts containing research-based synopses were rarely retrieved

  4. A Reading Attempt of the Urban Memory of Eskisehir Osmangazi University Meselik Campus via Cognitive Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Orkun

    2017-10-01

    University campuses have a small city view containing basic city functions such as work, accommodation, rest and transportation. They are spaces of social life that occupy large areas, have population density and different activities, change and grow with the cities they live in, and memorize the past accumulations. In this context, it is necessary for campuses to form and protect their own memories like cities. Campus memory is the ability of individuals to keep, maintain and - when necessary- reveal the experiences, sensations, comprehensions gathered from physical environment. "Cognitive mapping" is used to reveal the physical and emotional relationship that individuals make with the city and the individual-city interaction. Cognitive maps are created graphically using verbal and geometric items on paper by remembering these coded urban images. In this study, to determine the urban images belonging to Eskisehir Osmangazi University Meselik Campus, architecture students who have a short period experience of the campus were asked to note the areas they interact with the campus on the cognitive map. Campus memory items are identified by analysing the cognitive maps of the individuals who experienced the campus. In the direction of the obtained data, the campus area was re-read with five basic elements of Lynch: paths, districts, edges, nodes, and landmarks. As a result of these analyses, it is seen that religious structure, which is a large symbolic structure, located next to the main entrance in the settlement and health care facilities defined as landmarks are located in the memory of most of the individuals. Then, paths, nodes, districts, edges and educational buildings are listed respectively in cognitive maps.

  5. Characteristics of Patients Who Report Confusion After Reading Their Primary Care Clinic Notes Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Joseph; Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Mejilla, Roanne; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2016-01-01

    Patient access to online electronic medical records (EMRs) is increasing and may offer benefits to patients. However, the inherent complexity of medicine may cause confusion. We elucidate characteristics and health behaviors of patients who report confusion after reading their doctors' notes online. We analyzed data from 4,528 patients in Boston, MA, central Pennsylvania, and Seattle, WA, who were granted online access to their primary care doctors' clinic notes and who viewed at least one note during the 1-year intervention. Three percent of patients reported confusion after reading their visit notes. These patients were more likely to be at least 70 years of age (p education (p reading visit notes (relative risk [RR] 4.83; confidence interval [CI] 3.17, 7.36) compared to patients who were not confused. In adjusted analyses, they were less likely to report feeling more in control of their health (RR 0.42; CI 0.25, 0.71), remembering their care plan (RR 0.26; CI 0.17, 0.42), and understanding their medical conditions (RR 0.32; CI 0.19, 0.54) as a result of reading their doctors' notes compared to patients who were not confused. Patients who were confused by reading their doctors' notes were less likely to report benefits in health behaviors. Understanding this small subset of patients is a critical step in reducing gaps in provider-patient communication and in efforts to tailor educational approaches for patients.

  6. Reading fluency: implications for the assessment of children with reading disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Elizabeth B; Bloom, Juliana S; Hynd, George W

    2010-06-01

    The current investigation explored the diagnostic utility of reading fluency measures in the identification of children with reading disabilities. Participants were 50 children referred to a university-based clinic because of suspected reading problems and/or a prior diagnosis of dyslexia, where children completed a battery of standardized intellectual, reading achievement, and processing measures. Within this clinical sample, a group of children were identified that exhibited specific deficits in their reading fluency skills with concurrent deficits in rapid naming speed and reading comprehension. This group of children would not have been identified as having a reading disability according to assessment of single word reading skills alone, suggesting that it is essential to assess reading fluency in addition to word reading because failure to do so may result in the under-identification of children with reading disabilities.

  7. Guided Reading in First-Fourth Grade: Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffner, Jacqueline; Johnson, Kary; Torres-Elias, Annette; Dryden, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of collaborative efforts between a large metropolitan school district and the school of education at an area urban university. A reading clinic, in which university students conducted small guided reading group lessons with elementary students reading below grade level, was established through…

  8. Metacognitive Online Reading Strategies in Foreign Language Learning Context at University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – this research is aimed to identify the metacognitive online reading strategies employed by MRU students and assess the interrelation between online reading strategies and metacognitive awareness.Design/methodology/approach – the authors present and evaluate the findings obtained by using Online Survey of Reading Strategies (OSORS, the survey, which helped to identify MRU students’ metacognitive online reading strategies in a foreign language learning context. The methods applied in the research were the following ones: literature review and descriptive analysis of the obtained quantitative data. The quantitative research and descriptive analysis of the data received from the survey was applied. The target group of the study conducted at MRU consisted of 89 full-time students having different online reading experience. The sample was composed of students from five Bachelor study programmes studying in the academic year of 2012-2013. The instrument of the research (OSORS was composed of 38 items.Findings – the findings obtained through the survey revealed that readers work directly with the text to solve problems while reading online. However, a low score on any of the subscales of the inventory (i.e. Support strategies use indicates that there may be strategies in these parts that students might want to learn about and consider using them when reading online. By focusing students’ attention on the metacognitive reading strategies identified in the OSORS language, teachers could help students improve their online reading ability. Teachers should include strategy awareness as training component in their students’ online learning tasks.Research limitations/implications – the research sample is rather limited (89 participants.Practical implications – seeking to develop students’ online reading capacity, it is valuable for teachers to discover students’ preferences for online reading strategies and identify encountered

  9. Reading Habits of University ESL Students at Different Levels of English Proficiency and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Sheorey, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    Examines the degree to which the levels of English proficiency (high vs. low) and education (graduate vs. undergraduate) of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students were associated with differences in their reading behaviors. Finds that the subjects' level of education and English proficiency were associated with their reading behavior…

  10. Managing University Clinical Partnership: Learning from International Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen; Smith, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Dialogue between the leaders of academic clinical organisations in different countries has revealed that the core elements of the partnership between universities and health care systems are remarkably consistent across national boundaries. There is now an impetus to move beyond analysis of common challenges and towards strategies for success that…

  11. Author’s response: A universal approach to modeling visual word recognition and reading: not only possible, but also inevitable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ram

    2012-10-01

    I have argued that orthographic processing cannot be understood and modeled without considering the manner in which orthographic structure represents phonological, semantic, and morphological information in a given writing system. A reading theory, therefore, must be a theory of the interaction of the reader with his/her linguistic environment. This outlines a novel approach to studying and modeling visual word recognition, an approach that focuses on the common cognitive principles involved in processing printed words across different writing systems. These claims were challenged by several commentaries that contested the merits of my general theoretical agenda, the relevance of the evolution of writing systems, and the plausibility of finding commonalities in reading across orthographies. Other commentaries extended the scope of the debate by bringing into the discussion additional perspectives. My response addresses all these issues. By considering the constraints of neurobiology on modeling reading, developmental data, and a large scope of cross-linguistic evidence, I argue that front-end implementations of orthographic processing that do not stem from a comprehensive theory of the complex information conveyed by writing systems do not present a viable approach for understanding reading. The common principles by which writing systems have evolved to represent orthographic, phonological, and semantic information in a language reveal the critical distributional characteristics of orthographic structure that govern reading behavior. Models of reading should thus be learning models, primarily constrained by cross-linguistic developmental evidence that describes how the statistical properties of writing systems shape the characteristics of orthographic processing. When this approach is adopted, a universal model of reading is possible.

  12. Oral Language and Reading; Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference of the Department of Elementary Education at Indiana State University (3rd, Terre Haute, June 14-15, 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, David C., Ed.; Gibbs, Vanita M., Ed.

    This pamphlet is a collection of the speeches given at the Third Annual Reading Conference at Indiana State University, Terre Haute. The theme of the conference was "Oral Language and Reading." The contents include: "Official Program"; opening remarks, "They Led and Followed," by William G. McCarthy; opening address, "Strategies for Reading…

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation research on reading and dyslexia: a new clinical intervention technique for treating dyslexia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurits van den Noort

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, exist. The working mechanism behind TMS is a rapidly changing magnetic field that generates an electric current via electromagnetic induction. When the coil is placed on the scalp, the magnetic field generates a physiological reaction in the underlying neural tissue. The TMS-induced change in the participant′s behavior is used by researchers to investigate the causal relations between specific brain areas and cognitive functions such as language. A variant of TMS has been developed, which is called rapid-rate TMS (rTMS. In this review, three databases (Medline, Educational Resources Information Center, and Scopus were searched for rTMS studies on normal reading and dyslexia with a cut-off date of October 31, 2014. rTMS was found to be a valuable tool for investigating questions related to reading research, both on the word and the sentence level. Moreover, it can be successfully used in research on dyslexia. Recently, (high-frequency rTMS has been used as a "clinical" intervention technique for treating dyslexia and for improving reading performance by exciting underactive reading pathways in the brain. Finally, we end the paper with a discussion of future directions in the field of rTMS research and dyslexia, for instance, the promising prospect of combining TMS with simultaneous electroencephalographic imaging.

  14. RESEARCH INTO THE READING PROCESS OF OF THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY OF THE OLD VILNIUS UNIVERSITY: ASPECTS OF HISTORIOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Krakyte, Asta

    2006-01-01

    The article provides a general overview of the research into the reading process of the academic community of Vilnius University in 1579–1832 derived from significant research in librarianship andbook science. It presents sources and strategies to reveal the multifaceted relations existing between literature, the reader, priorities, the environment, results, etc. This article also analyzes works in humanities and social sciences with significantly reliable data related to particular aspects o...

  15. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Buçaj, Emine; Puca, Edmond; Namani, Sadie; Bajrami, Muharem; Krasniqi, Valbon; Berisha, Lindita; Jakupi, Xhevat; Halili, Bahrie; Kraja, Dhimiter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about pidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo.Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, cl...

  16. Burnout Among the Clinical Dental Students in the Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Wala Majid; Al-Ali, Muna H.; Duaibis, Ramzi B.; Oweis, Tamara; Badran, Darwish H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The study aimed to evaluate the level of burnout among the clinical dental students in two Jordanian universities. Methods A total of 307 students from the two schools were surveyed using Maslach Burnout Inventory survey. Scores for the inventory’s subscales were calculated and the mean values for the students’ groups were computed separately. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were carried out and the results were compared at 95% confidence level. Results The results showed that the dental students in both Jordanian universities suffered high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization compared to reported levels for dental students in other countries. The dental students of the University of Jordan demonstrated a significantly higher (p < 0.05) level of emotional exhaustion than their counterparts in the Jordan University of Science and Technology. Conclusions The findings indicated that dental students in the Jordanian universities presented considerable degrees of burnout manifested by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Studies targeting students health and psychology should be carried out to determine the causes of burnout among dental students. The curricula of the dental schools in the two universities should be accordingly improved to minimize burnout among the students. Keywords Burnout; Emotional exhaustion; Depersonalization; Personal accomplishment; Maslach Burnout Inventory PMID:22461870

  17. The Clinical and Classroom Utility of the Inventory of Reading Occupations: An Assessment Tool of Children ’s Reading Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Grajo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the initial clinical and classroom utility of the Inventory of Reading Occupations (IRO, a new tool to assess children’s reading participation. Method: The study used phenomenological qualitative and descriptive methods. The participants included 38 occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, classroom teachers, and parents who completed or reviewed responses of children on the IRO. To provide triangulation, 20 of the children who completed the IRO were interviewed. Data were thematically analyzed and then categorized using a central StrengthsWeaknesses-Opportunities-Threats premise. Results: The majority of the participants indicated favorable response to the clinical and classroom utility of the tool. Common themes were (a the IRO is a user-friendly and engaging assessment that allows students to reflect on their reading participation; (b the IRO is more suitable for children who engage in more structured reading; (c the IRO can be adapted for older children; and (d there is a need to identify whether the IRO is better as a screening or a full assessment tool. Conclusion: The study provided useful perspectives on how the tool can be further improved as a measure of the reading participation of school-aged children.

  18. RESEARCH INTO THE READING PROCESS OF OF THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY OF THE OLD VILNIUS UNIVERSITY: ASPECTS OF HISTORIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakyte, Asta

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a general overview of the research into the reading process of the academic community of Vilnius University in 1579–1832 derived from significant research in librarianship andbook science. It presents sources and strategies to reveal the multifaceted relations existing between literature, the reader, priorities, the environment, results, etc. This article also analyzes works in humanities and social sciences with significantly reliable data related to particular aspects of the issue.After investigating works of Lithuanian and Polish scientists M. Brensztejn, L. Piechnik, M. Birziska, L. Vladimirovas, P. Rabikauskas, D. Kuolys, etc., and comparing their deductions, it was observed that reading at Vilnius University in 1579–1832 was influenced by programs of sciences and official regulations of the Jesuit order no less than by local conditions. It is important to emphasize the remarkable influence of the characteristic classical model of education, applied at the University since 1579 and based on the learning of Latin, Greek and Hebrew language. Some changes were made to the local system of education since the middle of the 18th century due to the influence of the Piar order, but Jesuit authority directed the institution until 1832. Referred articles show that the process of education in Vilnius University was intended to promote a high level of maturity of the reader. During the process of learning new languages, students went through different stages of reading, improving their skills by interpretation and analysis. This was further cultivated in disputations, theatre performances and promoted by creating new texts, especially occasional publications. This process is reflected in numerous publications and manuscripts written by professors and students. Data accumulated in referred articles show that the usage of literature by academic community was influenced by books collated by University Library and traditional

  19. Reading as a Thinking Process; Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (5th, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, June 12-13, 1975).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, David C.; Gibbs, Vanita M.

    Thinking skills in children, effectively developed through reading, were emphasized at this reading conference. Three types of thinking skills linked to reading are: decoding symbols from the printed page, seeking factual meaning through recall; reading interpretively, understanding cause and effect reasoning or seeking the main idea of sentences;…

  20. Characteristics of specific reading disability in children from a neuropsychological clinic in Mexico City

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    Poblano Adrián

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This report describes the main clinical features associated with specific reading disability (RD in a group of 778 school-age children studied in a Neuropsychological Clinic in Mexico City. Material and Methods. The study was performed retrospectively, using data abstracted from clinical records of subjects seen in 1995-1996. Children were mainly from low and middle economic strata and aged between 6 to 12 years. The following data were collected: age, gender, diagnosis, school grade, food intake, maternal complications during pregnancy, perinatal and postnatal neurological risk factors, and neurological signs and handedness. Results. Subjects with RD had a mean age of 102.9 months, were predominantly male (male female ratio, 2:1. Among the study group, 49.1% of the children were diagnosed with RD of a visuo-sensory-motor type, and 75.1% were from early school years (1st to 3rd grades; 27.6% showed evidence of malnutrition. A previous history of language disorders (49.2%, and a high frequency of perinatal risk factors and neurological soft signs were also found. Conclusions. This study shows that variables such as gender, food intake, and genetic and neurological risk factors, were associated with reading disabilities in school children.

  1. English as a Foreign Language Learners' Major and Meta-Cognitive Reading Strategy Use at Al-Balqa Applied University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Snoubar, Tamador Khalaf

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative study aimed to investigate and compare the use of metacognitive reading Strategies among English as a foreign language students at Al-Balqa Applied University based on their academic field of study. The Survey of Reading Strategies (SORS) (Mokhtari & Sheory, 2002) was the instrument employed. This survey divides the…

  2. US detection and classification of hepatic disease: Comparison of quantitative algorithms with clinical readings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insana, M.F.; Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Wagner, R.F.; Bradford, M.; Russell, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    A method of quantitative digital analysis of US B-scans is used to differentiate between normal and diseased liver in vivo. The tissue signature is based on five measured parameters: four describe the tissue structure and scattering properties, the fifth is the US attenuation. The patient groups studied included 31 healthy subjects, 97 patients with chronic active hepatitis, 62 with Gaucher disease, and 10 with lymphomas. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to compare the diagnostic performance of the quantitative method with the clinical reading of trained observers. The quantitative method showed greater diagnostic capability for detecting and classifying diffuse and some focal disease

  3. A review of the current state of digital plate reading of cultures in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Novak, Susan M; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-01-01

    Digital plate reading (DPR) is increasingly being adopted as a means to facilitate the analysis and improve the quality and efficiency within the clinical microbiology laboratory. This review discusses the role of DPR in the context of total laboratory automation and explores some of the platforms currently available or in development for digital image capturing of microbial growth on media. The review focuses on the advantages and challenges of DPR. Peer-reviewed studies describing the utility and quality of these novel DPR systems are largely lacking, and professional guidelines for DPR implementation and quality management are needed. Further development and more widespread adoption of DPR is anticipated.

  4. Investigation of Technological University Students' Use of Metacognitive Reading Strategies in First and Second Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Yi-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    Reading, whether the reader's First language, L1 or Second language, L2, is a cognitive enterprise, and it can be treated as a result of the interaction among the reader, the text, and the context. Metacognitive strategies refer to the behaviours applied by learners to plan, arrange, and evaluate their learning. This study aimed to investigate…

  5. The Use of Metacognitive Reading Strategies among Students at International Burch University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becirovic, Senad; Brdarevic-Celjo, Amna; Sinanovic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    Being notably absent from many classrooms and largely unaware of by many language learners, metacognitive reading strategies have attracted a keen interest of scholars and have been extensively researched in very diverse contexts. Thus, the primary goal of this research is to determine the overall usage of different types of metacognitive reading…

  6. A Study of a Developmental Reading Class for Hispanic Males at a Texas University

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, Ivy Lee, II.

    2012-01-01

    Though developmental education has long been part of American post-secondary education, reliable evidence of its benefits, especially for ethnic minorities in reading, is lacking (Swail, Cabrera, Lee, & Williams, 2005). Developmental education has costs, however, in added tuition, time-to-completion, and discouragement (Bailey, 2009). Since…

  7. A Novel Web-based Approach for Visualization and Inspection of Reading Difficulties on University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejia, Carolina; Florian-Gaviria, Beatriz; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    reading difficulties and their characteristics, called PADA (acronym for the Spanish name Panel de Analíticas de Aprendizaje de Dislexia en Adultos), is presented. PADA is a web-based tool designed to facilitate the creation of descriptive visualizations required for a better understanding of students...

  8. Writing and Reading Multiplicity in the Uni-Verse: Engagements with Mathematics through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radakovic, Nenad; Jagger, Susan; Jao, Limin

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we explore the reading and writing of mathematical poetry from our experiences as mathematics teacher educators. First, we outline how our own engagement with mathematical poetry encouraged us to incorporate it into our teaching of pre-service teachers. We describe how our initial disappointment with the mathematical content of…

  9. Hacia una didáctica para la lectoescritura en el contexto universitario / Towards a didactics for reading and writing in the foreign language in the university context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Alberteris Galbán

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reading and writing in the university context need a coherent didactic direction that contributes to the students’ comprehensive education. The article offers some components for a didactics for reading and writing, based on the integration of the afore mentioned components of verbal activity, that share the base knowledge, taking into account the relations between comprehension and production stated as a constellation of interrelated processes. The methods used allowed the systematization of basic elements to structure the didactics. An operational model for reading and writing was also introduced. Its practical implementation evidenced higher levels in reading and writing performance of the students. Keywords: a, , , interrelated processes, foreign languages.

  10. Indications, imaging technique, and reading of cardiac computed tomography: survey of clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H.; Zimmermann, E.; Germershausen, C.; Hamm, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schlattmann, P. [University Hospital of Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Department of Medical Statistics, Computer Sciences and Documentation, Jena (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin, PO Box 10098 (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To obtain an overview of the current clinical practice of cardiac computed tomography (CT). A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to a total of 750 providers of cardiac CT in 57 countries. A total of 169 questionnaires from 38 countries were available for analysis (23%). Most CT systems used (94%, 207/221) were of the latest generation (64-row or dual-source CT). The most common indications for cardiac CT was exclusion of coronary artery disease (97%, 164/169). Most centres used beta blockade (91%, 151/166) and sublingual nitroglycerine (80%, 134/168). A median slice thickness of 0.625 mm with a 0.5-mm increment and an 18-cm reconstruction field of view was used. Interpretation was most often done using source images in orthogonal planes (92%, 155/169). Ninety percent of sites routinely evaluate extracardiac structures on a large (70%) or cardiac field of view (20%). Radiology sites were significantly more interested in jointly performing cardiac CT together with cardiology than cardiologists. The mean examination time was 18.6 {+-} 8.4 min, and reading took on average 28.7 {+-} 17.8 min. Cardiac CT has rapidly become established in clinical practice, and there is emerging consensus regarding indications, conduct of the acquisition, and reading. (orig.)

  11. Clinical Empathy and Narrative Competence: The Relevance of Reading Talmudic Legends as Literary Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Davidson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The “curative potential” in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve “narrative competence” in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The “narrative medicine” model of shared “close reading of literature and reflective writing” among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM, broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah’s death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including—especially—beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy.

  12. Clinical empathy and narrative competence: the relevance of reading talmudic legends as literary fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John H

    2015-04-01

    The "curative potential" in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve "narrative competence" in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The "narrative medicine" model of shared "close reading of literature and reflective writing" among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM), broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah's death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including-especially-beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy.

  13. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  14. Living Language through Creative Reading; Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (4th, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, June 13-14, 1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, David C., Ed.; Gibbs, Vanita M., Ed.

    These proceedings are published primarily for the purpose of helping teachers to improve their reading instruction. The contents include "Official Program"; "I Wish Children Literature" by Lee Bennett Hopkins, which discusses the importance of providing children with good reading materials; "Black English and Reading" by Ronald W. Bruton, which…

  15. University psychiatry in Italy: organisation and integration of university clinics and the National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Maria Furlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the Italian psychiatric system, community-based care has become increasingly important and widespread since the national reform of 1978. This report aims to provide an overview of the involvement of university medical schools in this process, considering their responsibility for teaching and training specialist practitioners and professionals. METHODS: The study was carried out between early 2010 and February 2011. An 18-items, self-administered, questionnaire was designed to investigate the number of faculty members that are responsible both for running a clinical ward and for providing community-based healthcare. RESULTS: Nine out of 53 faculty members (17% manage a Mental Health Department, 9 (17% manage a University Department, and 2 (3.8% manage both types of department. Less than half of the teachers have full responsibility (hospital and community; however the percentage reaches 73.2% if we include the hospital wards open to the community emergencies. The remaining 26.8% have no responsibility for community psychiatry. Moreover there were undoubtedly still too many universities with specialisation schools that are without an appropriate network of facilities enabling them to offer complex psychiatric training. DISCUSSION: As expected, there were several types of healthcare management that were not uniformly distributed throughout Italy and there were also marked differences between mental health care provision in the North, Centre, and South of Italy. The university involvement in clinical responsibility was great, but at the management level there was a lack of equality in terms of clinical care, which risks being reflected also on the institutional functions of teaching and research.

  16. University Clinic of Toxicology--historical note and present work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovska, C

    2013-01-01

    The University Clinic of Toxicology (UCT) in Skopje was founded as the Clinic for Toxicology and Emergency Internal Medicine on January 15th 1976. Today UCT has a modern building with office space of 1,300 m2 on 4 floors, 40 hospital beds and 72 employees including 18 doctors. UCT works in accordance with the public healthcare services in the Republic of Macedonia through the use of specialist/consultative and hospital healthcare for people over the age of 14 years. The Clinic also provides services in the field of emergency internal medicine, acute poisoning with medications, pesticides, corrosives, poisonous gases and mushrooms, heavy metals and other chemicals. The Clinic takes an active part in the detoxification programme for users of opiates and psychotropic substances, protocols for enteral and parenteral nutrition and guides for home treatment. Yearly there are more than 14,000 ambulance admissions, over 1,400 hospitalized patients, over 4,000 urgent EHO checks, more than 1,000 urgent upper endoscopies and over 700 other toxicological analyses and other interventions. The educational services and activities are realized through the chair for internal medicine. The Clinic offers undergraduate and graduate level education for medical students and dentists, for medical nurses, radiology technicians, speech therapists and physiotherapists. Over 300 papers and reports have been published to date by the medical staff at the UCT in the form of abstracts and integrated projects in the Republic of Macedonia and aboard. 8 doctorates have been successfully completed by employees from the Clinic as well as 4 master's theses and 1 in-depth project. UCT employees are the authors of some textbooks and monographs. UCT have undertaken some scientific projects. Employees from the Clinic of Toxicology are members taking an active part in many domestic and international associations.

  17. Developing a "clinical presentation" curriculum at the University of Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandin, H; Harasym, P; Eagle, C; Watanabe, M

    1995-03-01

    Currently, medical curricula are structured according to disciplines, body systems, or clinical problems. Beginning in 1988, the faculty of the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine (U of C) carefully evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each of these models in seeking to revise their school's curriculum. However, all three models fell short of a curricular structure based on current knowledge and principles of adult learning, clinical problem solving, community demands, and curriculum management. By 1991, the U of C had formulated a strategic plan for a revised curriculum structure based on the way patients present to physicians, and implementation of this plan has begun. In creating the new curriculum, 120 clinical presentations (e.g., "loss of consciousness/syncope") were defined and each was assigned to an individual or small group of faculty for development based on faculty expertise and interest. Terminal objectives (i.e., "what to do") were defined for each presentation to describe the appropriate clinical behaviors of a graduating physician. Experts developed schemes that outlined how they differentiated one cause (i.e., disease category) from another. The underlying enabling objectives (i.e., knowledge, skills, and attitudes) for reaching the terminal objectives for each clinical presentation were assigned as departmental responsibilities. A new administrative structure evolved in which there is a partnership between a centralized multidisciplinary curriculum committee and the departments. This new competency-based, clinical presentation curriculum is expected to significantly enhance students' development of clinical problem-solving skills and affirms the premise that prudent, continuous updating is essential for improving the quality of medical education.

  18. Problems of university-based scientists associated with clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, R D

    1979-05-01

    University faculty members who participate in clinical trials face a number of difficulties in connection with this association. Publication opportunities are often limited, and individual scholarship is difficult to express and evaluate within the context of a cooperative trial. Merit increases, promotion, and the award of tenure will usually require evidence of scholarly achievement outside the trial setting. For this reason, it seems inadvisable to recommend that a young investigator devote a major portion of his scholarly and research time to such an activity. A possible exception may be a full-time appointment for 1 to 2 years. Nonetheless, cooperative clinical trials are an important investigative tool and they should continue to be associated with academic centers. If appropriate administrative arrangements can be made, it should be possible to solve the academic problems of the young investigator associated with such trials.

  19. Integration of a framework with a learning management system for detection, assessment and assistance of university students with reading difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Mejía Corredor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg Dyslexia is a common learning disability in Spanish-speaking university students, and requires special attention from higher educational institutions in order to support affected individuals during their learning process. In previous studies, a framework to detect, assess and assist university students with reading difficulties related to dyslexia was developed. In this paper, the integration of this framework with a Learning Management System (LMS is presented. Two case studies were performed to test the functionality and the usability of this integration. The first case study was carried out with 20 students, while the second one with four teachers. The results show that both students and teachers were satisfied with the integration performed in Moodle.ce, among others.

  20. Reading the Urban Landscape: The Case of a Campus Tour at York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardekjian, Adrina; Classens, Michael; Sandberg, L. Anders

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a campus tour assignment in a first-year undergraduate environmental studies course at York University, Toronto, Canada. As a pedagogical tool, the assignment enables students to interrogate the dominant narratives of a university's immediate physical spaces and to apply broader theoretical and practical concepts to their…

  1. Clinical dosimetry with plastic scintillators - Almost energy independent, direct absorbed dose reading with high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quast, U; Fluehs, D [Department of Radiotherapy, Essen (Germany). Div. of Clinical Radiation Physics; Fluehs, D; Kolanoski, H [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    1996-08-01

    Clinical dosimetry is still far behind the goal to measure any spatial or temporal distribution of absorbed dose fast and precise without disturbing the physical situation by the dosimetry procedure. NE 102A plastic scintillators overcome this border. These tissue substituting dosemeter probes open a wide range of new clinical applications of dosimetry. This versatile new dosimetry system enables fast measurement of the absorbed dose to water in water also in regions with a steep dose gradient, close to interfaces, or in partly shielded regions. It allows direct reading dosimetry in the energy range of all clinically used external photon and electron beams, or around all branchytherapy sources. Thin detector arrays permit fast and high resolution measurements in quality assurance, such as in-vivo dosimetry or even afterloading dose monitoring. A main field of application is the dosimetric treatment planning, the individual optimization of brachytherapy applicators. Thus, plastic scintillator dosemeters cover optimally all difficult fields of clinical dosimetry. An overview about its characteristics and applications is given here. 20 refs, 1 fig.

  2. Clinical and microperimetric predictors of reading speed in low vision patients: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Giovanni; Virgili, Gianni; Giansanti, Fabrizio; Sato, Giovanni; Cappello, Ezio; Cruciani, Filippo; Varano, Monica; Menchini, Ugo

    2013-06-27

    To investigate the simultaneous association of several psychophysical measures with reading ability in patients with mild and moderate low vision attending rehabilitation services. Standard measurements of reading ability (Minnesota Reading [MNREAD] charts), visual acuity (Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] charts), contrast sensitivity (Pelli-Robson charts), reading contrast threshold (Reading Explorer [REX] charts), retinal sensitivity, and fixation stability and localization (Micro Perimeter 1 [MP1] fundus perimetry) were obtained in 160 low vision patients with better eye visual acuity ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution and affected by either age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy. All variables were moderately associated with reading performance measures (MNREAD reading speed and reading acuity and REX reading contrast threshold), as well as among each other. In a structural equation model, REX reading contrast threshold was highly associated with MNREAD reading speed (standardized coefficient, 0.63) and moderately associated with reading acuity (standardized coefficient, -0.30). REX test also mediated the effects of Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity (standardized coefficient, 0.44), MP1 fixation eccentricity (standardized coefficient, -0.19), and the mean retinal sensitivity (standardized coefficient, 0.23) on reading performance. The MP1 fixation stability was associated with both MNREAD reading acuity (standardized coefficient, -0.24) and MNREAD reading speed (standardized coefficient, 0.23), while ETDRS visual acuity only affected reading acuity (standardized coefficient, 0.44). Fixation instability and contrast sensitivity loss are key factors limiting reading performance of patients with mild or moderate low vision. REX charts directly assess the impact of text contrast on letter recognition and text navigation and may be a useful aid in reading rehabilitation.

  3. A new universal simplified adhesive: 6-month clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; Kose, Carlos; De Paula, Eloisa Andrade; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    Multimode adhesives, which can be used as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives, have been recently introduced without clinical data to back their use. To evaluate the 6-month clinical performance of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SU; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-nine patients participated in this study. Two hundred restorations were assigned to four groups: SU-TEm: etch-and-rinse + moist dentin; SU-TEd: etch-and-rinse + dry dentin; SU-SEet: selective enamel etching; and SU-SE: self-etch. The composite resin Filtek Supreme Ultra (3M ESPE) was placed incrementally. The restorations were evaluated at baseline and after 6 months using both the World Dental Federation (FDI) and the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Statistical analyses were performed with Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and McNemar test for significance in each pair (α = 0.05). Only four restorations (SU-SE: 3 and SU-TEm: 1) were lost after 6 months (p > 0.05 for either criteria). Marginal discoloration occurred in one restoration in the SU-SE group (p > 0.05 for either criteria). Only 2/200 restorations were scored as bravo for marginal adaptation using the USPHS criteria (one for SU-SE and one for SU-SEet, p > 0.05). However, when using the FDI criteria, the percentage of bravo scores for marginal adaptation at 6 months were 32%, 36%, 42%, and 46% for groups SU-TEm, SU-TEd, SU-SEet, and SU-SE, respectively (p > 0.05). The clinical behavior of the multimode adhesive does not depend on the bonding strategy at 6 months. The FDI evaluation criteria are more sensitive than the USPHS criteria. At 6 months, the clinical behavior of the new multimode adhesive Scotchbond Universal was found to be reliable when used in noncarious cervical lesions and may not depend on the bonding strategy employed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinical evidence of the role of the cerebellum in the suppression of overt articulatory movements during reading. A study of reading in children and adolescents treated for cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Khelifa-Gallois, N; Puget, S; Longaud, A; Laroussinie, F; Soria, C; Sainte-Rose, C; Dellatolas, G

    2015-04-01

    It has been suggested that the cerebellum is involved in reading acquisition and in particular in the progression from automatic grapheme-phoneme conversion to the internalization of speech required for silent reading. This idea is in line with clinical and neuroimaging data showing a cerebellar role in subvocal rehearsal for printed verbalizable material and with computational "internal models" of the cerebellum suggesting its role in inner speech (i.e. covert speech without mouthing the words). However, studies examining a possible cerebellar role in the suppression of articulatory movements during silent reading acquisition in children are lacking. Here, we report clinical evidence that the cerebellum plays a part in this transition. Reading performances were compared between a group of 17 paediatric patients treated for benign cerebellar tumours and a group of controls matched for age, gender, and parental socio-educational level. The patients scored significantly lower on all reading, but the most striking difference concerned silent reading, perfectly acquired by almost all controls, contrasting with 41 % of the patients who were unable to read any item silently. Silent reading was correlated with the Working Memory Index. The present findings converge with previous reports on an implication of the cerebellum in inner speech and in the automatization of reading. This cerebellar implication is probably not specific to reading, as it also seems to affect non-reading tasks such as counting.

  5. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  6. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group: The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    2931 alhawary@umich.edu Stephanie Daignault, MS, Biostatistician, Biostatistics Core University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center NI8D11...Consortium; The Cancer Institute of New Jersey/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; Robert Wood Johnson Medical School...University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; University of Wisconsin Carbone

  7. Enhancing clinical skills education: University of Virginia School of Medicine's Clerkship Clinical Skills Workshop Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Eugene C; Payne, Nancy J; Bradley, Elizabeth B; Maughan, Karen L; Heald, Evan B; Wang, Xin Qun

    2007-07-01

    In 1993, the University of Virginia School of Medicine began a clinical skills workshop program in an effort to improve the preparation of all clerkship students to participate in clinical care. This program involved the teaching of selected basic clinical skills by interested faculty to small groups of third-year medical students. Over the past 14 years, the number of workshops has increased from 11 to 31, and they now involve clerkship faculty from family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics. Workshops include a variety of common skills from the communication, physical examination, and clinical test and procedure domains such as pediatric phone triage, shoulder examination, ECG interpretation, and suturing. Workshop sessions allow students to practice skills on each other, with standardized patients, or with models, with the goal of improving competence and confidence in the performance of basic clinical skills. Students receive direct feedback from faculty on their skill performance. The style and content of these workshops are guided by an explicit set of educational criteria.A formal evaluation process ensures that faculty receive regular feedback from student evaluation comments so that adherence to workshop criteria is continuously reinforced. Student evaluations confirm that these workshops meet their skill-learning needs. Preliminary outcome measures suggest that workshop teaching can be linked to student assessment data and may improve students' skill performance. This program represents a work-in-progress toward the goal of providing a more comprehensive and developmental clinical skills curriculum in the school of medicine.

  8. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: Aarhus University Clinical Trial Candidate Database, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Mazin, Wiktor; Pedersen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Denmark is facing a reduction in clinical trial activity as the pharmaceutical industry has moved trials to low-cost emerging economies. Competitiveness in industry-sponsored clinical research depends on speed, quality, and cost. Because Denmark is widely recognized as a region that generates high quality data, an enhanced ability to attract future trials could be achieved if speed can be improved by taking advantage of the comprehensive national and regional registries. A "single point-of-entry" system has been established to support collaboration between hospitals and industry. When assisting industry in early-stage feasibility assessments, potential trial participants are identified by use of registries to shorten the clinical trial startup times. The Aarhus University Clinical Trial Candidate Database consists of encrypted data from the Danish National Registry of Patients allowing an immediate estimation of the number of patients with a specific discharge diagnosis in each hospital department or outpatient specialist clinic in the Central Denmark Region. The free access to health care, thorough monitoring of patients who are in contact with the health service, completeness of registration at the hospital level, and ability to link all databases are competitive advantages in an increasingly complex clinical trial environment.

  9. A new universal simplified adhesive: 18-month clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Kose, C; Mena-Serrano, A P; De Paula, E A; Tay, L Y; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the 18-month clinical performance of a multimode adhesive (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, SU, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-nine patients participated in this study. Two-hundred restorations were assigned to four groups: ERm, etch-and-rinse + moist dentin; ERd, etch-and-rinse + dry dentin; Set, selective enamel etching; and SE, self-etch. The composite resin, Filtek Supreme Ultra (3M ESPE), was placed incrementally. The restorations were evaluated at baseline, and at 18 months, using both the World Dental Federation (FDI) and the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Statistical analyses were performed using Friedman repeated-measures analysis of variance by rank and McNemar test for significance in each pair (α=0.05). Five restorations (SE: 3; Set: 1; and ERm: 1) were lost after 18 months (p>0.05 for either criteria). Marginal staining occurred in four and 10% of the restorations evaluated (p>0.05), respectively, for USPHS and FDI criteria. Nine restorations were scored as bravo for marginal adaptation using the USPHS criteria and 38%, 40%, 36%, and 44% for groups ERm, ERd, Set, and SE, respectively, when the FDI criteria were applied (p>0.05). However, when semiquantitative scores (or SQUACE) for marginal adaptation were used, SE resulted in a significantly greater number of restorations, with more than 30% of the total length of the interface showing marginal discrepancy (28%) in comparison with the other groups (8%, 6%, and 8%, respectively, for ERm, ERd, and Set). The clinical retention of the multimode adhesive at 18 months does not depend on the bonding strategy. The only differences between strategies were found for the parameter marginal adaptation, for which the FDI criteria were more sensitive than the USPHS criteria.

  10. Adoption of an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic: initial experience in facilitating clinician consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lepor, Herbert; Taneja, Samir S; Recht, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    The authors describe their initial experience in implementing an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic, including the frequency and nature of clinician consultations and the perceived impact on patient management by clinicians. A radiology reading room was established within an office-based urologic oncology clinic in proximity to the surgeon's work area. A radiologist was present in this reading room for a 3-hour shift each day. The frequency and nature of consultations during these shifts were recorded. Also, the clinic's staff completed a survey assessing perceptions of the impact of the integrated reading room on patient management. One hundred two consultations occurred during 57 included dates (average, 1.8 consultations per shift): 52% for review of external cases brought in by patients on discs, 43% for review of internal cases, and 5% for direct review by the radiologist of imaging with patients. The maximum number of consultations during a single shift was 8. All of the clinic's urologists indicated that >90% of consultations benefited patient care. The clinicians indicated tendencies to view consultations as affecting management in the majority of cases, to be more likely to seek consultation for outside imaging when the radiologist was on site, and to be less likely to repeat outside imaging when the radiologist was on site. The integrated reading room within the clinic has potential to improve the quality of care, for instance by facilitating increased review of outside imaging studies and thereby potentially reducing duplicate ordering and by enabling occasional direct image review with patients by radiologists. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Language Intervention Programme (KLISA PROGRAMME to Improve Reading Skill of Students with Learning Disability with Potential in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bungawali Abduh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reading is one of the fundamental skills across all subjects. A student with low competency in reading will experience difficulties in teaching and learning. The purpose of this research is to improve reading skills among student with learning disability in one secondary school in Bangi, Selangor. This action research had employed Reading Assessment Approach and descriptive analysis in data collection. Seven students with reading problem participated in this research. However, these students were having potential to be included in either Inclusive Program or Job Transition Program. Therefore, one reading program known as KLISA Program (Language Clinic Program was created and it has been implemented in classroom for 30 minutes during the first period every day. This 9-month program had employed phonics method and used a set of ‘Bacalah Anakku’ books and ABM Velcro in three phases. The reading assessment was conducted at the end of each phase to evaluate the students’ achievement in reading. The findings of this research proved that KLISA Program was effective for students’ improvement in reading. Hence, it is recommended that this program can be consistently implemented to overcome illiterate and reading disorder among primary and secondary school students. Kemahiran membaca adalah merentas semua matapelajaran. Kelemahan dalam kemahiran membaca akan menyebabkan kesulitan mengikuti pengajaran dan pembelajaran. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk meningkatkan kemahiran membaca di kalangan murid-murid bermasalah pembelajaran di sebuah sekolah menengah di Bangi, Selangor. Penelitian tindakan ini menggunakan pendekatan penilaian penaksiran bacaan dan analisis deskriptif untuk mengumpul data, Seramai 7 orang murid dalam sebuah kelas terlibat dalam kajian ini. Mereka terdiri dari murid bermasalah pembelajaran yang berpotensi untuk diserapkan di dalam Program Inklusif atau Transisi pekerjaan tetapi masih tidak boleh membaca. Satu program pemulihan

  12. Promoting reading skills or wasting time? Students’ perceived benefits of reading in an intermediary programme at the Vaal University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Scott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the substantial transformation of education in South Africa in the last 20 years, specifically to redress the past inequalities, the challenges are ongoing. These challenges include tertiary institutions having to accommodate a culturally and linguistically diverse group of students, often second-language (L2 English speakers, in an English lingua franca classroom. This study investigated the reading attitudes and habits of students in an intermediary programme of a tertiary institution and any perceived changes to these attitudes or habits, as well as their perceptions of the promotion of reading by the programme. On successful completion of the intermediary programme, students register for the compulsory first-year English distance learning course and are required to complete a placement test. Results for students who attended the intermediary programme were compared with those of students who did not attend the intermediary programme but registered directly for mainstream. The teaching of reading appeared invaluable at the tertiary level with the indication that students’ attitudes and behaviour changed and that they inter alia realised the academic value thereof, made decisions to take up reading as a hobby and discovered new genres. Keywords: Reading; Linguistically diverse

  13. A comparative study between clinical grading of anterior chamber flare and flare reading using the Kowa laser flare meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulou, Kallirroi; Del'Omo, Roberto; Morley, Anne M; Karagiannis, Dimitris; Bunce, Catey; Pavesio, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of standard clinical grading of aqueous flare in uveitis according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature consensus, and compare the results with the readings of the laser flare meter, Kowa 500. Two examiners clinically graded the flare in 110 eyes. The flare was then measured using the Kowa laser flare meter. Twenty-nine eyes were graded as anterior chamber flare +2; for 18 of these, the clinicians were in agreement, the rest differed by the order of one grade. The range of the laser flare meter for these eyes was 5.2-899.1 photons/ms. The median value was 41.4. Seventy-four eyes were graded with flare +1. Agreement was established in 51 of these eyes. Disagreement for the rest was again by the order of 1, and the flare meter range was 1.1-169.9 photons/ms, median value 18.4. For the clinical measure of flare 0, the clinicians disagreed on three out of five eyes. The flare meter readings ranged from 2.5 to 14.1 photons/ms, median value 9.9. Only two eyes were graded with flare +3 and there was one step disagreement on both of them. We found little evidence of association between the flare readings and intraocular pressure or age. Our findings suggest that clinical evaluation of aqueous flare is subjective. Compared with the Kowa laser flare meter's numeric readings, the discrepancies observed indicate that clinical grading is an approximate science. The laser flare meter provides an accurate, reproducible, non-invasive assessment of aqueous flare that can prove valuable in research and clinical decisions.

  14. Possible Reasons for Students' Ineffective Reading of Their First-Year University Mathematics Textbooks. Technical Report. No. 2011-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mary D.; Selden, Annie; Selden, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the observed behaviors and difficulties that eleven precalculus and calculus students exhibited in reading new passages from their mathematics textbooks. To gauge the effectiveness of these students' reading, we asked them to attempt straightforward mathematical tasks, based directly on what they had just read. These …

  15. Evaluating the Interpretations and Use of Curriculum-Based Measurement in Reading and Word Lists for Universal Screening in First and Second Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Christ, Theodore J.; Eckert, Tanya L.; White, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Universal screening in elementary schools often includes administering curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R); but in first grade, nonsense word fluency (NWF) and, to a lesser extent, word identification fluency (WIF) are used because of concerns that CBM-R is too difficult for emerging readers. This study used Kane's argument-based…

  16. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, clinical presentations, serological test, serum biochemistry and reatment were collected from hospital medical records. The diagnosis of brucellosis based on clinical and laboratory findings. Results: This descriptive study included 47 patients, who 33 of them (70.2% were males. The mean age was 37.9 ± 19.3 years. The route of transmission of the disease was known in 28 59.5% of them. Direct contact with livestock in 22 (46.8% and ingestion of dairy products in six cases (12.7% were reported as the transmission route. The majority of patients (27 patients, 57.4% were from rural area. The main presenting symptoms were atigue, fever and arthralgia. Osteoarticular manifestations were the common forms of localized disease. Regarding to the therapy, 45 (95.7% of patients were treated with streptomycin and doxycycline for the first three weeks. Conclusion: Human brucellosis is not a common in Kosovo but there is a potential risk. Osteoarticular symptoms were the most common presentation reasons. The most effective and preferred treatment regimen was Streptomycin plus Doxycycline for the first three weeks, and Doxycycline plus Rifampicin thereafter. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(4: 147-150

  17. Occupational Accidents among Clinical Staff of Tabriz University Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Sahebi; Rana Gholamzadeh nikjoo; Majid Khalili

    2015-01-01

    ​Background and Objectives : Occupational health and safety is one of the most important issues in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to explore the one –year prevalence of occupational accidents in Tabriz University hospitals. Materials and Methods : A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 patients of seven university hospitals using researcher made questionnaire. The hospitals were selected based on their specialty of the service. Then, one hospital was selected from each s...

  18. Physiotherapy clinical education at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Chetty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical education for physiotherapists forms a vital part of undergraduate programmes and equips students with competencies to practise autonomously as qualified health practitioners. However, disparities are evident in approaches to clinical education.Objective. To explore the perceptions of physiotherapy students, community-service physiotherapists and physiotherapy clinical supervisors regarding the clinical education framework at a tertiary institution in South Africa in order to understand preparedness of students for practice.Methods. A case study approach with two focus group discussions with students and interviews with community physiotherapists and clinical supervisors was employed. Data were analysed and categorised into key themes and sub-themes.Results. Five themes emerged from triangulation of data from the three groups: preparedness for professional practice, institutional barriers, curriculum disputes, personal factors and recommendations for physiotherapy clinical education. Students felt inadequately prepared owing to a perceived lack of exposure to certain aspects of physiotherapy, while community therapists believed that reflection on the undergraduate programme after qualifying contributed to their adequate preparation. Clinical supervisors supposed that students would benefit from actively engaging with teaching and learning opportunities, and clinical personnel collaboration was seen as key to facilitate a continuum in clinical education from classroom to healthcare setting.Conclusion. Participants reported that the existing curriculum structure may need to be revisited to address various issues, while holistic collaboration between students, supervisors and clinical personnel is imperative to create a cohesive learning environment.

  19. Clinical fMRI of language function in aphasic patients: Reading paradigm successful, while word generation paradigm fails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Maria; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Ragnehed, Mattias; Lundberg, Peter (Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden)), e-mail: maria.engstrom@liu.se; Karlsson, Marie; Crone, Marie (Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Logopedics, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden)); Antepohl, Wolfram (Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Rehabilitation, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2010-07-15

    Background: In fMRI examinations, it is very important to select appropriate paradigms assessing the brain function of interest. In addition, the patients' ability to perform the required cognitive tasks during fMRI must be taken into account. Purpose: To evaluate two language paradigms, word generation and sentence reading for their usefulness in examinations of aphasic patients and to make suggestions for improvements of clinical fMRI. Material and Methods: Five patients with aphasia after stroke or trauma sequelae were examined by fMRI. The patients' language ability was screened by neurolinguistic tests and elementary pre-fMRI language tests. Results: The sentence-reading paradigm succeeded to elicit adequate language-related activation in perilesional areas whereas the word generation paradigm failed. These findings were consistent with results on the behavioral tests in that all patients showed very poor performance in phonemic fluency, but scored well above mean at a reading comprehension task. Conclusion: The sentence-reading paradigm is appropriate to assess language function in this patient group, while the word-generation paradigm seems to be inadequate. In addition, it is crucial to use elementary pre-fMRI language tests to guide the fMRI paradigm decision.

  20. Clinical fMRI of language function in aphasic patients: Reading paradigm successful, while word generation paradigm fails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstroem, Maria; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Ragnehed, Mattias; Lundberg, Peter; Karlsson, Marie; Crone, Marie; Antepohl, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    Background: In fMRI examinations, it is very important to select appropriate paradigms assessing the brain function of interest. In addition, the patients' ability to perform the required cognitive tasks during fMRI must be taken into account. Purpose: To evaluate two language paradigms, word generation and sentence reading for their usefulness in examinations of aphasic patients and to make suggestions for improvements of clinical fMRI. Material and Methods: Five patients with aphasia after stroke or trauma sequelae were examined by fMRI. The patients' language ability was screened by neurolinguistic tests and elementary pre-fMRI language tests. Results: The sentence-reading paradigm succeeded to elicit adequate language-related activation in perilesional areas whereas the word generation paradigm failed. These findings were consistent with results on the behavioral tests in that all patients showed very poor performance in phonemic fluency, but scored well above mean at a reading comprehension task. Conclusion: The sentence-reading paradigm is appropriate to assess language function in this patient group, while the word-generation paradigm seems to be inadequate. In addition, it is crucial to use elementary pre-fMRI language tests to guide the fMRI paradigm decision.

  1. Clinical improvisation and the universe of musical idioms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2001-01-01

    (please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training and with the cr......(please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training...

  2. USING QUESTION GENERATING TECHNIQUE IN TEACHING READING COMPREHENSION FOR THE THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS AT ENGLISH STUDY PROGRAM OF MUHAMMADIYAH UNIVERSITY OF BENGKULU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washlurachim Safitri Safitri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to find out Using Question Generating Technique Toward Students Reading Comprehension At The Third Semester Students At English Study Program Of Muhammadiyah University Of Bengkulu. The design of this research was Quasi experimental research. The subject of this research is students at the third semester of English study program. They were A class  that consist of 20 students and D class that consist of 20 students. In collecting data, the researcher used some steps; firstly the students were given a pre-test before the researcher applied Question Generating Technique. Then, the researcher did the treatment for three meetings to the experimental class, after that the researcher did post test to both classes. The last, the researcher analyzed the result of reading test by using criteria for the assessment. The final step was the researcher discussed and concluded the data. The result of this research showed that the tobt was  4,880. Whereas, the degree of freedom of post-test is 68, means that the ttable was 2.021. Based on the scores gained, it shows that tobt is higher than ttable (9,911>4,880. There is a significant difference between the post-test mean of the experimental and control class. The result also showed that the students’ comprehension in reading was significantly. In conclusion, the Question Generating Technique had been successfully gave positive effect to the students’ reading comprehension particularly in reading subject in English study program of University Muhammadiyah of Bengkulu.  Key Words : Question Generating Technique, Reading comprehension,

  3. Clinical profile of patients with myasthenia gravis followed at the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mansueto Mourão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: to determine the clinical profile of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG; followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic of the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and to compare it with other Brazilian case series. Methods: sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from patients, and a systematic literature review performed, focusing on national studies on the clinical profile of MG patients. Results: sixty nine patients were enrolled in the study. Fifty five (91% subjects were female and the mean age (SD was 37.6 (±11.4 years. The mean disease duration was 14.1 years. Regarding treatment, prednisone was the most used strategy (64%, followed by the use of azathioprine (43%. There was no difference between thymectomized (42 and non-thymectomized (27 patients regarding disease severity and medication use. Conclusion: clinical and socio-demographic features of this MG sample from a University-based clinic resemble those reported in other Brazilian series and in the international literature.

  4. Third universal definition of myocardial infarction. Implications for clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzino, O.

    2013-01-01

    In general, the conceptual meaning of the term myocardial infarction has not changed, although have developed new sensitive diagnostic methods. In this way the clinical diagnosis is based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram's (ECG) changes and sensitive biochemical markers, as well as the information obtained from various imaging techniques

  5. Gambling and its clinical correlates in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Lust, Katherine; Christenson, Gary A; Redden, Sarah A; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2018-02-09

    This study sought to examine the prevalence of gambling disorder (GD) in a university sample and its associated physical and mental health correlates. A 156-item anonymous online survey was distributed via random email generation to a sample of 9449 university students. Current use of alcohol and drugs, psychological and physical status and academic performance were assessed, along with questionnaire-based measures of impulsivity and compulsivity. Positive screens for GD were based upon individuals meeting DSM-5 criteria. A total of 3421 participants (59.7% female) were included in the analysis. The overall prevalence of GD was 0.4%, while an additional 8.4% reported subsyndromal symptoms of GD. GD was significantly associated with past-year use of cocaine, heroin/opiate pain medications, sedatives, alcohol and tobacco. Those with GD were more likely to have generalized anxiety, PTSD and compulsive sexual behavior. Questionnaire-based measures revealed higher levels of both compulsivity and impulsivity associated with disordered gambling. Some level of gambling symptomatology is common in young adults and is associated with alcohol and drug use, as well as impulsive and compulsive behaviors. Clinicians should be aware of the presentation of problematic gambling and screen for it in primary care and mental health settings.

  6. Experience with the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services and Processes in a University Hospital in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Annemie; Claus, Barbara; Vandewoude, Koen; Petrovic, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the experience with the development of clinical pharmacy services in the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services in Belgian hospitals has not been evident because these activities were initially not structurally financed. The aim is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the clinical pharmacy development process, and the milestones that enhanced the progress. Furthermore, the organisation of clinical pharmacy in the Ghent University Hospital is explained, including back- and front-office activities, seamless pharmaceutical care and medication safety improvement. Some working methods, procedures and tools are explained for different clinical pharmacy services. In particular, the clinical pharmacy projects for geriatric patients as well as the preparation of clinical pharmacy services for the accreditation process are explained. We also reflect on the organisation model and the future development of clinical pharmacy, taking into consideration facilitators and potential barriers.

  7. Occupational Accidents among Clinical Staff of Tabriz University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sahebi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : Occupational health and safety is one of the most important issues in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to explore the one –year prevalence of occupational accidents in Tabriz University hospitals. Materials and Methods : A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 patients of seven university hospitals using researcher made questionnaire. The hospitals were selected based on their specialty of the service. Then, one hospital was selected from each specialty using random selection method. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were employed. The SPSS version 19 was used for data analysis. Results : The one-year prevalence of workplace accident was %21. Women were encountered in workplace accidents more than men (%31.1 vs. % 26.8. The youngest age group (20-30 years experienced the most workplace accidents (%41.5. Carelessness was the main cause of the workplace accidents (%49.3. Reporting rate of the occupational accidents was% 48.3 and the most common cause for not reporting was the fear of being recognized as a less competent individual. Sick leaves due to the severity of the accident was reported %23 (median: 5 days. Over %90 of the accident victims had experienced severe stress and job pressure within the previous year. In multiple regression models, the young staff (20-30 years with severe stress, job pressure and verbal violence victim had more chance of workplace accident.   Conclusion : In addition to the high prevalence of workplace accidents, intensity and consequences of workplace accidents should be considered as well. Providing appropriate methods including prevention of accidents and education of safety along with the assistance of technical staff, managers and attendants would be helpful.

  8. Clinical Engeneering Experience at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Fernando Ferreyra Ramírez

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the four-year experience of implementation of Clinical Engineering services at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina (HURNP/UEL). It was performed by the Electrical Engineering Department (DEEL), through a project involving lecturers and students from the Electrical and Civil Engineering Courses of the same university. The main objectives were the formation of human resources in the Clinical Engineering area and a positive contribution to the healthcare service...

  9. Reading Comprehension Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unal Ulker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The academic success of the university students greatly depends on the mastery of an academic reading skill. However, students as well as teachers, take the learning of this skill for granted, as they tend to presuppose that reading skill is acquired as a part of their secondary education. As a result, most first-year students employ non university strategies to read academic texts, which leads to a surface approach to reading and prevents students from a better understanding of the material. This paper will discuss the strategies that involve students in taking a deep approach to reading academic texts.

  10. [Universal ethical principles and their application in clinical drug trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Sergio Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Since 1931, and especially since the Nuremberg Code of 1947, an increasing number of declarations, regulations, norms, guidelines, laws, resolutions, and rules intended to create conditions for better protection of subjects participating in research studies have been published, although some have meant setbacks in the human rights of vulnerable populations. As such, violations of the dignity of experimental subjects in clinical trials continue. What researchers investigate and how the research is done, the quality and transparency of the data, and the analysis and the publication of results (of both raw and processed data) respond to the financial interests of the pharmaceutical companies, coming into permanent tension with bioethical principles and the needs of society. The active participation of civil society is necessary to make it so that pharmaceutical research, results and applications subordinate economic benefits to the protection of human rights.

  11. Development of a Clinical Pharmacology Graduate Program at the University of Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Robert A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The structure, components, and anticipated outcomes of a University of Kentucky doctoral program in pharmacology are described. The program is designed to develop pharmacy-trained specialists who are interested in rigorous, intensive clinical experience, state-of-the-art coursework, and integrated laboratory-based and clinical dissertation…

  12. Evaluation of radiological service of Dental Clinic, Uberlandia Federal University (MG-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, C.D.V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The management related problems and the quality of dental radiographs of the Radiographic Service of the Dental Clinic, Uberlandia Federal University (MG-Brazil) are evaluated. The results are based on the examinations of 404 dental files from patients atending the Dental Clinic in 1983. Frequency distribution, mean and percentages were computed for the variables studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. IMPACT OF CLINICAL-TRIALS ON THE ADOPTION OF NEW DRUGS WITHIN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIG, P; HAAIJER-RUSKAMP, FM; WESSELING, H

    1991-01-01

    To assess the influence that clinical trials may have on the introduction of new drugs into prescribing routines, the adoption of drugs has been studied in a university hospital in the Netherlands. A significant relation was found between the testing of semi-innovative drugs in clinical trials in

  14. [Achievements of an educational strategy promoting participation in the development of clinical aptitude and critical reading in cardiology residents, linked to appropriate use of research reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sánchez, Jesús Salvador; Leyva-González, Félix Arturo; Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    To search the reach of educative strategy promoting the participation, to estimate the development of clinical aptitude and critical reading attaching the appropriate use of clinic research in cardiology residents. Prospective study. The instrument of clinical aptitude was constructed with five cases and 170 items and the instrument of critical reading was developed with five summaries of articles of clinical research in cardiology by 120 items. The strategy was performed with activities one a week during six months by two hours per class, in the period: March and September, 2005. Reading guides were delivered to the participants a week before that included a clinical case and clinic research of cardiology. During the activities in class we were promoting the participation and discussion. Both measuring instruments were performed in the first (initial measuring) and final session (final measuring). Non parametric test were used because the variable of the subjects were not normal distribution and the scale was ordinal. The reliability coefficient in both instruments with the Kuder-Richardson was 0.90 and 0.85 respectively. After educative strategy was observed a significant advance in the global calcifications, such as in critical reading and in clinical aptitude (p = 0.001 and 0.5 respectively). Analyzing in an independent manner the components of critical reading we found significant advancement in the indicators interpretation and judgment. In clinical aptitude we found significant progress in the indicators: the suitable use of paraclinics resources, the appropriate use of therapeutics measurement and iatropatogenic decisions for omission. The educative strategy promoting the participation, permitted to get a change in the clinical aptitude and critical reading attaching the appropriate use of sources of investigation in cardiology residents.

  15. The widely used ATB FUNGUS 3 automated readings in China and its misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles: challenges for developing countries' clinical microbiology labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France) with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the most commonly used commercial antifungal susceptibility testing method in China. An in-depth analysis of data showed higher levels of resistance to azoles when ATB FUNGUS 3 strips were read automatically than when read visually. Based on this finding, the performance of ATB FUNGUS 3, read both visually and automatically, was evaluated by testing 218 isolates of five clinically important Candida species, using broth microdilution (BMD) following CLSI M27-A3 as the gold-standard. The overall essential agreement (EA) between ATB visual readings and BMD was 99.1%. In contrast, the ATB automated readings showed higher discrepancies with BMD, with overall EA of 86.2%, and specifically lower EA was observed for fluconazole (80.7%), voriconazole (77.5%), and itraconazole (73.4%), which was most likely due to the trailing effect of azoles. The major errors in azole drug susceptibilities by ATB automated readings is a concern in China that can result in misleading clinical antifungal drug selection and pseudo high rates of antifungal resistance. Therefore, the ATB visual reading is generally recommended. In the meantime, we propose a practical algorithm to be followed for ATB FUNGUS 3 antifungal susceptibility for Candida spp. before the improvement in the automated reading system.

  16. The widely used ATB FUNGUS 3 automated readings in China and its misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles: challenges for developing countries' clinical microbiology labs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the most commonly used commercial antifungal susceptibility testing method in China. An in-depth analysis of data showed higher levels of resistance to azoles when ATB FUNGUS 3 strips were read automatically than when read visually. Based on this finding, the performance of ATB FUNGUS 3, read both visually and automatically, was evaluated by testing 218 isolates of five clinically important Candida species, using broth microdilution (BMD following CLSI M27-A3 as the gold-standard. The overall essential agreement (EA between ATB visual readings and BMD was 99.1%. In contrast, the ATB automated readings showed higher discrepancies with BMD, with overall EA of 86.2%, and specifically lower EA was observed for fluconazole (80.7%, voriconazole (77.5%, and itraconazole (73.4%, which was most likely due to the trailing effect of azoles. The major errors in azole drug susceptibilities by ATB automated readings is a concern in China that can result in misleading clinical antifungal drug selection and pseudo high rates of antifungal resistance. Therefore, the ATB visual reading is generally recommended. In the meantime, we propose a practical algorithm to be followed for ATB FUNGUS 3 antifungal susceptibility for Candida spp. before the improvement in the automated reading system.

  17. Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  18. Effectiveness of music education for the improvement of reading skills and academic achievement in young poor readers: a pragmatic cluster-randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Brandão de Ávila, Clara Regina; Ploubidis, George B; Mari, Jair de Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Difficulties in word-level reading skills are prevalent in Brazilian schools and may deter children from gaining the knowledge obtained through reading and academic achievement. Music education has emerged as a potential method to improve reading skills because due to a common neurobiological substratum. To evaluate the effectiveness of music education for the improvement of reading skills and academic achievement among children (eight to 10 years of age) with reading difficulties. 235 children with reading difficulties in 10 schools participated in a five-month, randomized clinical trial in cluster (RCT) in an impoverished zone within the city of São Paulo to test the effects of music education intervention while assessing reading skills and academic achievement during the school year. Five schools were chosen randomly to incorporate music classes (n = 114), and five served as controls (n = 121). Two different methods of analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention: The standard method was intention-to-treat (ITT), and the other was the Complier Average Causal Effect (CACE) estimation method, which took compliance status into account. The ITT analyses were not very promising; only one marginal effect existed for the rate of correct real words read per minute. Indeed, considering ITT, improvements were observed in the secondary outcomes (slope of Portuguese = 0.21 [pmusic lessons as public policy.

  19. [Medical empiricism from one myth to another. A critical reading of Foucault's Birth of Clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Calan, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    The new history of the clinic, developed mainly after the publication of Othmar Keel's L'avènement de la médecine clinique moderne en Europe, 1750-1815 in 2001, invites the scholars to turn upside down the chronology adopted by Michel Foucault in his classic Birth of the Clinic. This paper investigates the philosophical consequences of this chronological displacement, showing that the medical empiricism of the clinic cannot have the characteristics attributed by Foucault. If the myth of the purity of such empiricism cannot be taken seriously anymore thanks to Foucault, is has been substituted by the myth of the creation of the clinic on the basis of enlightened empiricism. The clinic is, however, older than empiricism à la Condillac. It refers to an earlier medical empiricism developed in the 17th century which in its turn allowed for Condillac's philosophy. The clinic had in fact to choose between an elder medical empiricism and a new chemical empirism that appeared in the late 17th century. But the clinic was not a creation of the Enlightenment.

  20. The role of the national general medical journal: surveys of which journals UK clinicians read to inform their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Teresa H; Hanney, Stephen; Buxton, Martin J

    2008-12-01

    For biomedical research findings to contribute toward health gains they must reach clinicians. Academic journals have historically been considered important information sources. Birken and Parkin found seven journals to most consistently contain the best pediatric evidence and, of these seven, four were general medical journals. We surveyed clinicians in three UK medical specialties (psychiatry, surgery and pediatrics), asking which journals they read and which they considered important to inform their clinical practice. The readership of general medical journals, in comparison to specialty and sub-specialty journals, is widespread across the three UK medical specialties, although the importance of general medical journals varies widely. The BMJ is the most prominent general medical journal in terms of readership and importance but a dominant specialty or sub-specialty journal was usually more important for most groups. The Lancet is less widely read and less important, although more academics than non-academics consider it important. Overall, key general medical journals play an important role. Journal availability and cost, particularly in relation to membership for UK clinicians, and the position of academics and non-academics have to be considered in any analysis. Three of the four general medical journals containing the best pediatric evidence were found to be widely read by UK pediatricians and two UK-based general medical journals, the BMJ and The Lancet, were also considered important in our survey. Further investigation of the reasons for the importance of a journal and studies that would allow international comparisons would provide greater input to the discussion.

  1. [Systematic Readability Analysis of Medical Texts on Websites of German University Clinics for General and Abdominal Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, B Janghorban; Faron, A; Roth, K S; Grimminger, P P; Luers, J C

    2016-12-01

    Background: Besides the function as one of the main contact points, websites of hospitals serve as medical information portals. As medical information texts should be understood by any patients independent of the literacy skills and educational level, online texts should have an appropriate structure to ease understandability. Materials and Methods: Patient information texts on websites of clinics for general surgery at German university hospitals (n = 36) were systematically analysed. For 9 different surgical topics representative medical information texts were extracted from each website. Using common readability tools and 5 different readability indices the texts were analysed concerning their readability and structure. The analysis was furthermore stratified in relation to geographical regions in Germany. Results: For the definite analysis the texts of 196 internet websites could be used. On average the texts consisted of 25 sentences and 368 words. The reading analysis tools congruously showed that all texts showed a rather low readability demanding a high literacy level from the readers. Conclusion: Patient information texts on German university hospital websites are difficult to understand for most patients. To fulfill the ambition of informing the general population in an adequate way about medical issues, a revision of most medical texts on websites of German surgical hospitals is recommended. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Parent-child reading interactions among English and English as a second language speakers in an underserved pediatric clinic in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Kristyn M; Huang, Gary Y; Linskey, Katy R; Pirga, Jason; Bane-Terakubo, Teresa; Lee, Meta T

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare reading patterns between English-speaking and English as a Second Language (ESL) families in a health care setting in Hawai'i. A cross-sectional study was performed at an underserved pediatric primary care clinic in Hawai'i. Caregivers of patients between the ages of 6 months to 5 years were asked questions regarding demographics and parent-child reading interactions. Respondents were categorized into English-speaking or ESL groups based on primary language spoken at home. Pearson chi2 tests and Fisher exact tests were performed to compare demographic differences, reading frequency, and reading attitudes between groups. One-hundred three respondents completed the survey Fifty percent were ESL. All ESL respondents were of Asian-Pacific Islander (API) or mixed Asian ethnicity. All Caucasians in the study (n = 9) were in the English-speaking group. Between the English-speaking (n = 52) and ESL (n = 51) groups, there were no significant statistical differences in age or gender of the child, reading attitudes, or parent's educational status. Parents in the ESL group read to their children significantly fewer days per week than their English-speaking counterparts, had significantly fewer books in the home, and lived significantly fewer years in the United States. The findings suggest that API immigrant families share similar attitudes about reading as English-speaking families in Hawai'i but have significantly fewer books in their household and read significantly less frequently Physicians working with API populations should be aware that immigrant children may have fewer reading interactions and should counsel parents on the importance of reading daily.

  3. Empathy as a function of clinical exposure--reading emotion in the eyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Handford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence based largely on self-report data suggests that factors associated with medical education erode the critical human quality of empathy. These reports have caused serious concern among medical educators and clinicians and have led to changes in medical curricula around the world. This study aims to provide a more objective index of possible changes in empathy across the spectrum of clinical exposure, by using a behavioural test of empathic accuracy in addition to self-report questionnaires. Moreover, non-medical groups were used to control for maturation effects. METHODS: Three medical groups (N = 3×20 representing a spectrum of clinical exposure, and two non-medical groups (N = 2×20 matched for age, sex and educational achievements completed self-report measures of empathy, and tests of empathic accuracy and interoceptive sensitivity. RESULTS: Between-group differences in reported empathy related to maturation rather than clinical training/exposure. Conversely, analyses of the "eyes" test results specifically identified clinical practice, but not medical education, as the key influence on performance. The data from the interoception task did not support a link between visceral feedback and empathic processes. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice, but not medical education, impacts on empathy development and seems instrumental in maintaining empathetic skills against the general trend of declining empathic accuracy with age.

  4. [Clinical pharmacy practice education in master's course of Meijo University in affiliation with medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, Meijo University has developed a new program to train students in master's degree in the field of clinical practice. This new curriculum has three big pillars of educational goal: Problem-Based Learning (PBL), communication skill and clinical pharmacy practice training. Before exposing students to clinical training, they must learn first how to solve various patients' problems through PBL and enhance their communication skill. To provide a clinical environment, education and training, the Faculty of Pharmacy cooperated with the School of Medicine of Fujita Health University. Master's students together with other members of the healthcare team observe patient's disease state and most especially monitor pharmacotherapy. At first, students will be trained for a month at the pharmacy division and experience one week-nursing job. Next, they will be trained at the clinical divisions such as General Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Respiratory Medicine, Hematology, Chemotherapy, Gastroenterological Surgery, Psychiatry, and Emergency Unit. Students rotate three-month training on four clinical divisions during one year. The head physicians of the medical department hold concurrent post as professors and share responsibility with the pharmacy faculty in training the students. To have its venue where students, faculty and physicians conduct their discussion on clinical cases, a pharmacy satellite seminar class room was set up at Fujita Health University hospital. Through this, pharmacy students and faculty had more opportunities to exchange knowledge on medicine and pharmacy. Master's students are expected to acquire professionalism, ethical knowledge and pharmaceutical care skills through the clinical pharmacy practice program.

  5. Compare Clinical Competence and Job Satisfaction Among Nurses Working in Both University and Non-University Hospital in Bushehr 2015

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    Abdolrasoul Abbasi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are the biggest component of the health care system in the world and their job satisfaction and clinical competence affect performance and success of the organization. This study aimed to determine and compare the clinical competence and job satisfaction of nurses in both academic and non-academic hospitals in Bushehr in 2015. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 257 nurses were studied in two hospitals of Bushehr city selected by census method. Data was collected by using valid and reliable Nurse Clinical Competence and Job Satisfaction Inventory questionnaires. Data analyzed by using SPSS- 21, and descriptive statistics, t-test, and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient. Statistical significance was set at P< 0.05. Results: Findings showed that there were no significant diffrences between academic hospital nurses' job satisfaction with 126.96±29.34 and non-academic hospital with 128.31±23.26. Also, there were a significant diffrences between total score of nurses' clinical competence in academic hospital 62.18±18.09 and in non-academic hospital 67.78±17.64. There were a significant and direct association between the clinical competence and job satisfaction of nurses in both hospitals (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Although nurses clinical competence and job satisfaction in both hospitals were assessed at desirable level but both criteria were higher in non-university hospital nurses. It is nessessary that Nurse Manager’s of academic hospitals should pay attention to assessment and improvement of nurse clinical competence and job satisfaction

  6. The Anxiety Disorder Clinic for Children and Adolescents (TADCCA) at Aarhus University in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    for children with anxiety problems. The second case study is one of the total group of six families in which Erik was participating; as such it includes a summary of Erik's case in the context of the other five who participated. The group was conducted by a combination of a senior doctoral clinical...... psychologist and eight students. They were part of a training clinic, called The Anxiety Disorder Clinic for Children and Adolescents (TADCCA), in the Educational and Research Clinic of the Department of Psychology at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark. This article describes the background and context...

  7. Clinical Engeneering Experience at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina

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    Ernesto Fernando Ferreyra Ramírez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the four-year experience of implementation of Clinical Engineering services at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina (HURNP/UEL. It was performed by the Electrical Engineering Department (DEEL, through a project involving lecturers and students from the Electrical and Civil Engineering Courses of the same university. The main objectives were the formation of human resources in the Clinical Engineering area and a positive contribution to the healthcare services offered by the HURNP for the community in the surroundings of Londrina – Paraná State – Brazil.

  8. Nurse awareness of clinical research: a survey in a Japanese University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical research plays an important role in establishing new treatments and improving the quality of medical practice. Since the introduction of the concept of clinical research coordinators (CRC) in Japan, investigators and CRC work as a clinical research team that coordinates with other professionals in clinical trials leading to drug approval (registration trials). Although clinical nurses collaborate with clinical research teams, extended clinical research teams that include clinical nurses may contribute to the ethical and scientific pursuit of clinical research. Methods As knowledge of clinical research is essential for establishing an extended clinical research team, we used questionnaires to survey the knowledge of clinical nurses at Tokushima University Hospital. Five-point and two-point scales were used. Questions as for various experiences were also included and the relationship between awareness and experiences were analyzed. Results Among the 597 nurses at Tokushima University Hospital, 453 (75.9%) responded to the questionnaires. In Japan, registration trials are regulated by pharmaceutical affairs laws, whereas other types of investigator-initiated research (clinical research) are conducted based on ethical guidelines outlined by the ministries of Japan. Approximately 90% of respondents were aware of registration trials and clinical research, but less than 40% of the nurses were aware of their difference. In clinical research terminology, most respondents were aware of informed consent and related issues, but ≤50% were aware of other things, such as the Declaration of Helsinki, ethical guidelines, Good Clinical Practice, institutional review boards, and ethics committees. We found no specific tendency in the relationship between awareness and past experiences, such as nursing patients who were participating in registration trials and/or clinical research or taking a part in research involving patients as a nursing student or a nurse

  9. Consultation clinics for complementary and alternative medicine at Japanese university hospitals: An analysis at Tokushima University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGAWA, HIROAKI; TERAO, JUNJI; TAKEDA, EIJI; TAKAISHI, YOSHIHISA; KASHIWADA, YOSHIKI; KAWAZOE, KAZUYOSHI; FUSHITANI, SHUJI; TSUCHIYA, KOICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, AIKO; SATO, CHIHO; IRAHARA, MINORU

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report on a Consultation Clinic for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) which we established at Tokushima University Hospital in July of 2007 with the aim of providing person-to-person information on CAM, though not CAM therapy itself. In December of 2008, we received 55 applications for consultation, 37% concerning health foods, 37% Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo), and 26% various other topics. The consultants (nutritionists and pharmacists) communicated individually with 38 applicants; malignancies (26%) and cardiovascular disease (24%) were the main underlying concerns. To promote the quality of consultation, data was collected by means of focus group interviews concerning the perspective of the consultants. Safe and effective use of CAM requires a network of communication linking individuals, consultation teams, physicians, primary care institutions and university hospitals. To advance this goal, we plan to broaden the efforts described herein. Our findings indicate that the specific role of the consultation clinic in promoting the scientific use of CAM merits further study. PMID:22993564

  10. THE INCIDENCE OF CAESAREAN SECTIONS IN THE UNIVERSITY CLINICAL CENTER OF KOSOVO

    OpenAIRE

    Elshani, Brikene; Daci, Armond; Gashi, Sanije; Lulaj, Shefqet

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As in most countries of the world also at Kosovo the rate of Cesarean section from year to year is increasing. Aim: The main purpose of this paper was to present the incidence of births completed by Caesarean section at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics of University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Prishtin?. Material and methods: This study is retrospective, namely its made by collecting epidemiological data from patients? histories that completed birth by Caesarean section ...

  11. Psychology at Chinese universities and in Chinese society: with special reference to clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Guoan; Perrez, Meinrad; Han, Xiulan

    2011-01-01

    The following contribution gives a short introduction to Chinese psychology, history, psychological research and teaching institutions and student selection for universities. After a brief overview of the theoretical traditions and contemporary trends in general and experimental psychology it focuses in more detail on the recent developments in clinical and medical psychology. Research domains, academic training in clinical psychology and its applications in modern China are discussed with sp...

  12. The information sources and journals consulted or read by UK paediatricians to inform their clinical practice and those which they consider important: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Teresa H; Hanney, Steve; Buxton, Martin J

    2007-01-15

    Implementation of health research findings is important for medicine to be evidence-based. Previous studies have found variation in the information sources thought to be of greatest importance to clinicians but publication in peer-reviewed journals is the traditional route for dissemination of research findings. There is debate about whether the impact made on clinicians should be considered as part of the evaluation of research outputs. We aimed to determine first which information sources are generally most consulted by paediatricians to inform their clinical practice, and which sources they considered most important, and second, how many and which peer-reviewed journals they read. We inquired, by questionnaire survey, about the information sources and academic journals that UK medical paediatric specialists generally consulted, attended or read and considered important to their clinical practice. The same three information sources--professional meetings & conferences, peer-reviewed journals and medical colleagues--were, overall, the most consulted or attended and ranked the most important. No one information source was found to be of greatest importance to all groups of paediatricians. Journals were widely read by all groups, but the proportion ranking them first in importance as an information source ranged from 10% to 46%. The number of journals read varied between the groups, but Archives of Disease in Childhood and BMJ were the most read journals in all groups. Six out of the seven journals previously identified as containing best paediatric evidence are the most widely read overall by UK paediatricians, however, only the two most prominent are widely read by those based in the community. No one information source is dominant, therefore a variety of approaches to Continuing Professional Development and the dissemination of research findings to paediatricians should be used. Journals are an important information source. A small number of key ones can be

  13. [Educative strategy evaluation to improve critical reading skills on clinical research texts in second year gyneco-obstetrics residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza Lira, Sebastián; Arce Herrera, Rosa María; González González, Patricia

    2007-11-01

    The educative models and strategies to achieve a significant learning have a wide variety. The development of clinical aptitude for clinical research papers lecture has an important place to maintain the physician actualized and for resident formation. To evaluate the degree of development of the aptitude for the reading of clinical research articles in 2nd grade residents of the gynecology and obstetrics speciality alter an educative strategy. In 16 2nd year gynecology and obstetrics residents, a previously validated instrument was applied for the evaluation of critical lecture of clinical research articles in general medicine previous and after and educative strategy. Statistical analysis was with Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Also Wilcoxon test was used to assess the differences between baseline and final results. The median of age was 27 (24-31) years, gender 56.3% women and 43.8% men. A statistically significant increase in global score was observed after the educative strategy. After it only there was a significant increase in the indicator to interpret. After evaluating the domain degrees according to the indicator to interpret, in baseline evaluation it predominated the very low level and at the final evaluation the very low and low levels. In the indicator to judge at baseline the majority were in the very low level, and at the end in very low and low levels. According to the indicator to propose at baseline all were in the level expected by hazard, and at the end a minimal proportion was at very low level. These results traduce a discrete improvement in critical lecture process, which makes to consider the educative strategy that was used, since the objective to improve critical lecture capacity was not achieved.

  14. Managing out of hours clinical photography at the University Hospitals Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Simon; Kenny, Alice; Knights, Christina

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, Medical Illustration at University Hospitals Bristol (UHBristol) NHS Foundation Trust has seen a steady increase in photography requests, including the need for out of hours photography provision. This paper details how Medical Illustration at UHBristol decided to manage an out of hours clinical photography service.

  15. Transition from Clinical Manager to University Lecturer: A Self-Reflective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldland, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a case study exploring the author's use of reflective practice to facilitate the transition in role from a clinical manager with teaching responsibilities in a critical care unit to university lecturer. The similarities and differences in the roles with respect to learner characteristics, teaching contexts and effective teaching…

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  17. Comparing the organisational structure of the preoperative assessment clinic at eight university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edward, G. M.; Biervliet, J. D.; Hollmann, M. W.; Schlack, W. S.; Preckel, B.

    2008-01-01

    The preoperative assessment clinic (PAC) has been implemented in most major hospitals. However, there is no uniformity in the way PACs are organised. We compared the organisational structure of the PACs from all eight university hospitals in The Netherlands, looking at the following variables:

  18. Üniversite Öğrencilerinin Okuma Alışkanlığı: Ankara Üniversitesi Örneği / Reading Habit of University Students: The Model of Ankara University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Odabaş, Z. Canan Odabaş ve Coşkun Polat

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available [Turkish abstract]Okuma alışkanlığı, okuma eyleminin sürekli, düzenli ve eleştirel olarak sürdürülmesidir. Okuma alışkanlığının özünde sürdürülebilirlik yaklaşımı bulunmaktadır. Sürdürülebilir okuma alışkanlığı, bireyin yaşamının her döneminde okuma eylemini kalıcı ve düzenli olarak devam ettirmesini ifade eder. Türkiye’de okuma kültürünün gelişmiş ülke ortalamalarının oldukça altında olduğu bilinmektedir. Bu bakımdan çalışmanın temel amacı Türkiye’nin genel yapısında gözlemlenen bu olumsuz tablonun üniversite öğrencileri üzerine ne düzeyde yansıdığına ilişkin durum saptamasıdır. Çalışmada ilk olarak okuma alışkanlığı kavramsal olarak irdelenmekte, daha sonra Türkiye’de okuma alışkanlığının durumu ortaya konmakta ve son olarak da Ankara Üniversitesi lisans öğrencileri üzerinde yapılan anket uygulamasının sonuçları değerlendirilmektedir. Çıkan sonuçlar yüksek öğrenim boyunca öğrencilerin okuma becerisinde gelişme olduğunu, buna karşın yeterli okuma alışkanlığına sahip olmadıklarını göstermektedir. [English abstract] Reading habit is the realization of reading activity in a continuous, systematic and critical way. In the essence of this habit, the marking approach is sustainability. Sustainable reading habit is that an individual continues with his/her reading activity at every of his/her life’s phases, and in a permanent and proper form. It is known that, reading habit as a cultural attitude in Turkey is on the average lower than those being exercised in developed countries. This study aims at examining effects of this negative situation on university students. In the first part of the paper, conceptual analysis of reading habit is made and then, the intensity of the reading habit in Turkey is examined. Finally, the results of survey study conducted among Ankara University students are evaluated. Results reveal that

  19. The Development Of A Diagnostic Reading Test Of English For The Students Of Medical Faculty, Brawijaya University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Winarni

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a diagnostic test of multiple choice reading comprehension as an initial stage in developing teaching materials for medical students learning English. Sample texts were collected from all the departments in the faculty. Selection of relevant texts involved the participation of some subject lecturers. Sixty one items were developed from fifteen texts to be reduced to forty items after pilot testing. Face validity was improved. The main trial was carried out to twenty nine students and item analysis was carried out. The test showed low level of concurrent validity and the internal consistency showed a moderate level of reliability. The low level of concurrent validity was suspected to result from the test being too difficult for the testees as the item analysis had revealed.

  20. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

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    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  1. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

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    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  2. Comparing the organisational structure of the preoperative assessment clinic at eight university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, G M; Biervliet, J D; Hollmann, M W; Schlack, W S; Preckel, B

    2008-01-01

    The preoperative assessment clinic (PAC) has been implemented in most major hospitals. However, there is no uniformity in the way PACs are organised. We compared the organisational structure of the PACs from all eight university hospitals in The Netherlands, looking at the following variables: number of patients visiting the PAC, staffing of the PAC, opening hours, scheduling, and additional preoperative diagnostic testing. The number of patients seen yearly varies from 7.000 to 13.500. In all clinics, the preoperative assessment was performed by anaesthetists and residents. In five PACs, preoperative assessment was also performed by physician assistants or nurse practitioners. Opening hours varied. Consultations are by appointment, 'walk-in', or a combination of these two. In four clinics additional testing is performed at the PAC itself. This study shows that the organisational structure of the PAC at similar university hospitals varies greatly; this can have important implications when designing a benchmarking process.

  3. Evaluation of a cloud-based local-read paradigm for imaging evaluations in oncology clinical trials for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Kobayashi, Naomi; Bonnard, Eric; Charbonnier, Colette; Yamamichi, Junta; Mizobe, Hideaki; Kimura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Although tumor response evaluated with radiological imaging is frequently used as a primary endpoint in clinical trials, it is difficult to obtain precise results because of inter- and intra-observer differences. To evaluate usefulness of a cloud-based local-read paradigm implementing software solutions that standardize imaging evaluations among international investigator sites for clinical trials of lung cancer. Two studies were performed: KUMO I and KUMO I Extension. KUMO I was a pilot study aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of cloud implementation and identifying issues regarding variability of evaluations among sites. Chest CT scans at three time-points from baseline to progression, from 10 patients with lung cancer who were treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were evaluated independently by two oncologists (Japan) and one radiologist (France), through a cloud-based software solution. The KUMO I Extension was performed based on the results of KUMO I. KUMO I showed discordance rates of 40% for target lesion selection, 70% for overall response at the first time-point, and 60% for overall response at the second time-point. Since the main reason for the discordance was differences in the selection of target lesions, KUMO I Extension added a cloud-based quality control service to achieve a consensus on the selection of target lesions, resulting in an improved rate of agreement of response evaluations. The study shows the feasibility of imaging evaluations at investigator sites, based on cloud services for clinical studies involving multiple international sites. This system offers a step forward in standardizing evaluations of images among widely dispersed sites

  4. The Rise And Fall Of The Afterlife : The 1995 Read-Tuckwell Lectures at the University of Bristol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, Jan N.

    2002-01-01

    The afterlife is still very much alive in Western civilisation, even though the truth of its existence is no longer universally accepted. Surprisingly, however, heaven, hell and the immortal soul were all ideas which arrived relatively late in the ancient world. Originally Greece and Israel - the

  5. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

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    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  6. Memory Functioning in Children with Reading Disabilities and/or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Clinical Investigation of Their Working Memory and Long-term Memory Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Kibby, Michelle Y.; Cohen, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    We examined memory functioning in children with reading disabilities (RD), ADHD, and RD/ADHD using a clinic sample with a clinical instrument: the Children’s Memory Scale, enhancing its generalizability. Participants included 23 children with RD, 30 with ADHD, 30 with RD/ADHD, and 30 controls. Children with RD presented with reduced verbal short-term memory (STM) but intact visual STM, central executive (CE) and long-term memory (LTM) functioning. Their deficit in STM appeared specific to tas...

  7. Comparative Study of the Effect of Three Teaching Methods of Group, Personal (Face-to-Face, and Compact Disc on Correcting the Pronunciation and Reading of the Prayer in the Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabanali Khansanami

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emphasis is placed on the correction of reading the prayer as an important precept in Islamic culture, and it is essential to use an effective teaching method to promote the status of reading the prayers in youth. This study was conducted with the aim of comparing the effect of the methods of group teaching, personal (face-to-face teaching and using compact disc (CD on correcting the pronunciation and reading of the prayer in the students of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: This semi-experimental study was done on the students of the Faculty of Nursery and Midwifery of Qom University of Medical Sciences. The samples were randomly assigned into three groups, and the number of students in each group was 22. A checklist of reading mistakes was completed before the intervention, and then, teaching content was given to them in the form of group and face-to-face teaching and CD. In the following, reading mistakes of the students’ prayer were recorded one month after intervention. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, and Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon tests at a significance level of p0.05.Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the effect of teaching methods of group, personal, and CD was the same in correcting the students’ reading of the prayer. Therefore, it is suggested that considering the students’ interest and current circumstances, various methods could be used for correction of the students’ reading of the prayer.

  8. Cross-Language Transfer of Word Reading Accuracy and Word Reading Fluency in Spanish-English and Chinese-English Bilinguals: Script-Universal and Script-Specific Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarella, Adrian; Chen, Xi; Gottardo, Alexandra; Geva, Esther

    2015-01-01

    This study examined cross-language transfer of word reading accuracy and word reading fluency in Spanish-English and Chinese-English bilinguals. Participants included 51 Spanish-English and 64 Chinese-English bilinguals. Both groups of children completed parallel measures of phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, word reading accuracy,…

  9. Eighteen-month Clinical Study of Universal Adhesives in Noncarious Cervical Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, V C; Shibata, S; Stolf, S C; Chung, Y; Baratieri, L N; Heymann, H O; Walter, R

    To evaluate the clinical performance of Scotchbond Universal (3M Oral Care) and Prime & Bond Elect (Dentsply Sirona) in the restoration of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs). This was a randomized controlled clinical trial involving 63 subjects. Two hundred and three NCCLs were restored using Scotchbond Universal and Prime & Bond Elect using both an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch technique. Lesions were notch-shaped NCCLs, and the restorations were placed without any mechanical retention. Restorations were finished immediately after placement and scored with regard to retention, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, and secondary caries. Similar assessment of the restorations was performed 18 months after placement. Logistic regression was performed for each outcome separately with a compound symmetric variance-covariance structure assumed to consider a correlation of restorations within subjects. All analyses were conducted using SAS version 9.4 (SAS Inc). One hundred and fifty-eight teeth (77.8% of the restorations placed) in 46 subjects (73% of subjects enrolled) were available for the 18-month follow-up. A statistically significant difference was reached only for the comparison Scotchbond Universal/self-etch (SU_SE) and Prime & Bond Elect/etch-and-rinse (PBE_E&R) groups ( p=0.01), where a restoration with SU_SE was 66% less likely to maintain a score of Alpha for marginal discoloration than a restoration performed with PBE_E&R. Scotchbond Universal and Prime & Bond Elect presented acceptable clinical performance after 18 months of clinical service. However, Scotchbond Universal, when applied with a self-etch approach, did demonstrate a relatively high level of marginal discoloration when compared to the other groups.

  10. Reading faster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Nation

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the visual nature of the reading process as it relates to reading speed. It points out that there is a physical limit on normal reading speed and beyond this limit the reading process will be different from normal reading where almost every word is attended to. The article describes a range of activities for developing reading fluency, and suggests how the development of fluency can become part of a reading programme.

  11. Development of a Case-based Reading Curriculum and Its Effect on Resident Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messman, Anne M; Walker, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Textbook reading plays a foundational role in a resident's knowledge base. Many residency programs place residents on identical reading schedules, regardless of the clinical work or rotation the resident is doing. We sought to develop a reading curriculum that takes into account the clinical work a resident is doing so their reading curriculum corresponds with their clinical work. Preliminary data suggests an increased amount of resident reading and an increased interest in reading as a result of this change to their reading curriculum.

  12. Clinical nurses' attitudes towards research, management and organisational resources in a university hospital: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerjordet, Kristin; Lode, Kirsten; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses' interest in and motivation for research. An additional aim was to identify management and organisational resources in order to improve nurses' research capacity in practice. Clinical nurses find conducting research challenging, which accords with observations of the continuing research-practice gap. This descriptive cross-sectional survey sampled 364 clinical nurses from a university hospital on the west coast of Norway. The response rate was 61%. An increasingly positive attitude towards research emerged (40%), despite the fact that few were engaged in research-based activities. Clinical nurses emphasised that lack of designated time (60%), interest (31%) and knowledge (31%) constituted important research barriers, as did lack of research supervision and support (25%). Research supervision was one of the most significant needs to enhance clinical nurses' research skills, management and organisation of research activities (30%). Conscious efforts strategically built on clinical and academic collaborative networks are required to promote and sustain clinical nurses' research capacity. The findings of this survey should be useful in the building of clinical nurses' research capacity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

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    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  14. Universal Versus Targeted Screening for Lynch Syndrome: Comparing Ascertainment and Costs Based on Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Mujde Z; Fernandez, Luca P; Ng, Hank K; McKinnon, Wendy C; Heald, Brandie; Koliba, Christopher J; Greenblatt, Marc S

    2016-10-01

    Strategies to screen colorectal cancers (CRCs) for Lynch syndrome are evolving rapidly; the optimal strategy remains uncertain. We compared targeted versus universal screening of CRCs for Lynch syndrome. In 2010-2011, we employed targeted screening (age Lynch syndrome and estimated the 5-year costs of preventing CRC by colonoscopy screening, using a system dynamics model. Using targeted screening, 51/175 (29 %) cancers fit criteria and were tested by immunohistochemistry; 15/51 (29 %, or 8.6 % of all CRCs) showed suspicious loss of ≥1 mismatch repair protein. Germline mismatch repair gene mutations were found in 4/4 cases sequenced (11 suspected cases did not have germline testing). Using universal screening, 17/292 (5.8 %) screened cancers had abnormal immunohistochemistry suspicious for Lynch syndrome. Germline mismatch repair mutations were found in only 3/10 cases sequenced (7 suspected cases did not have germline testing). The mean cost to identify Lynch syndrome probands was ~$23,333/case for targeted screening and ~$175,916/case for universal screening at our institution. Estimated costs to identify and screen probands and relatives were: targeted, $9798/case and universal, $38,452/case. In real-world Lynch syndrome management, incomplete clinical follow-up was the major barrier to do genetic testing. Targeted screening costs 2- to 7.5-fold less than universal and rarely misses Lynch syndrome cases. Future changes in testing costs will likely change the optimal algorithm.

  15. Promoting fundamental clinical skills: a competency-based college approach at the University of Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Erika A; Maclaren, Carol F; Smith, Sherilyn; Mengert, Terry J; Maestas, Ramoncita R; Foy, Hugh M; Wenrich, Marjorie D; Ramsey, Paul G

    2005-05-01

    The focus on fundamental clinical skills in undergraduate medical education has declined over the last several decades. Dramatic growth in the number of faculty involved in teaching and increasing clinical and research commitments have contributed to depersonalization and declining individual attention to students. In contrast to the close teaching and mentoring relationship between faculty and students 50 years ago, today's medical students may interact with hundreds of faculty members without the benefit of a focused program of teaching and evaluating clinical skills to form the core of their four-year curriculum. Bedside teaching has also declined, which may negatively affect clinical skills development. In response to these and other concerns, the University of Washington School of Medicine has created an integrated developmental curriculum that emphasizes bedside teaching and role modeling, focuses on enhancing fundamental clinical skills and professionalism, and implements these goals via a new administrative structure, the College system, which consists of a core of clinical teachers who spend substantial time teaching and mentoring medical students. Each medical student is assigned a faculty mentor within a College for the duration of his or her medical school career. Mentors continuously teach and reflect with students on clinical skills development and professionalism and, during the second year, work intensively with them at the bedside. They also provide an ongoing personal faculty contact. Competency domains and benchmarks define skill areas in which deepening, progressive attention is focused throughout medical school. This educational model places primary focus on the student.

  16. [Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in childhood anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, Hildegard; Yang, Young-Im; Suhr-Dachs, Lydia; Walter, Daniel; Döpfner, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    Only few studies have examined whether the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) generalizes to clinical practice. This study examines the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for juvenile anxiety disorders under routine care conditions in a university-based psychiatric outpatient clinic. 92 children and adolescents with parent-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms and 61 children and adolescents with self-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms were treated with cognitive-behavioral interventions. Pre/post mean comparisons, effect sizes, and the clinical significance of changes in symptoms were examined. The effect size for reduction of anxiety symptoms was .81 for children whose parents had completed the rating scale and .79 for children who had filled in a self-rating scale. Effect sizes for reduction of comorbid symptoms varied between .37 and .84 for parent ratings and between .21 and .62 for self-ratings. The percentage of children and adolescents who achieved clinically significant improvements in anxiety symptoms was 55.1 % according to the parent ratings and 65.7 % according to the children's self-ratings. More than 50 % of parents and children reported clinically significant improvements in comorbid symptoms. Significant reductions in both anxiety and comorbid symptoms were demonstrated over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy of juvenile anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic. The effect sizes for anxiety symptoms were found to be comparable to the effect sizes reported in RCTs. Similarly, clinically significant improvements were as frequent as the rates of remission of anxiety symptoms reported in RCTs.

  17. The Correlation Between Students’Vocabulary Mastery and Their Interest in English Toward Reading Comprehension in descriptive Text at the Second Semester of Muhammadiyah University of Metro Academic Year 2014/2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Faliyanti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstarct -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vocabulary is one aspects  in reading comprehension. By having  a lot vocabulary, the students understand in reading comprehension. The interest in English also gives effect of students mastery in English. Before the students start to read they are must be interested in English first. Reading is one of skills in English that very essential for the students, because by reading the students can get information from the text. In this research the researcher focoses on reading comprehension in descriptive text. The problems formulation in this research are; (1 How far is the students score of ability in vocabulary mastery toward reading comprehension in descriptive text? (2 How far is the students score of ability in students interest in English toward reading comprehension in descriptive text? (3 How far is the correlation between students’ score of vocabulary mastery and students interest in English toward reading comprehension in descriptive text?. The objective of the research are; (1 To identify the students’ score in vocabulary mastery toward reading comprehension in descriptive text. (2 To identify the students’ score in students interest in English toward reading comprehension in descriptive text. (3 To find out how far the correlation between students’ score of vocabulary mastery and students interest in English toward reading compregension in descritive text. The research was conducted at the second semester of Muhammadiyah University Students in Academic Year 2014/2015. The population of this research was 127 students. The researcher used cluster ramdom sampling in taking sample. In collecting the data the researcher used test and questionnarie, namely vocabulary mastery and reading comprehension in descriptive text. In questionnarie used to students interest in English and in analyzing the data, the

  18. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  19. Effectiveness of music education for the improvement of reading skills and academic achievement in young poor readers: a pragmatic cluster-randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Cogo-Moreira

    Full Text Available Difficulties in word-level reading skills are prevalent in Brazilian schools and may deter children from gaining the knowledge obtained through reading and academic achievement. Music education has emerged as a potential method to improve reading skills because due to a common neurobiological substratum.To evaluate the effectiveness of music education for the improvement of reading skills and academic achievement among children (eight to 10 years of age with reading difficulties.235 children with reading difficulties in 10 schools participated in a five-month, randomized clinical trial in cluster (RCT in an impoverished zone within the city of São Paulo to test the effects of music education intervention while assessing reading skills and academic achievement during the school year. Five schools were chosen randomly to incorporate music classes (n = 114, and five served as controls (n = 121. Two different methods of analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention: The standard method was intention-to-treat (ITT, and the other was the Complier Average Causal Effect (CACE estimation method, which took compliance status into account.The ITT analyses were not very promising; only one marginal effect existed for the rate of correct real words read per minute. Indeed, considering ITT, improvements were observed in the secondary outcomes (slope of Portuguese = 0.21 [p<0.001] and slope of math = 0.25 [p<0.001]. As for CACE estimation (i.e., complier children versus non-complier children, more promising effects were observed in terms of the rate of correct words read per minute [β = 13.98, p<0.001] and phonological awareness [β = 19.72, p<0.001] as well as secondary outcomes (academic achievement in Portuguese [β = 0.77, p<0.0001] and math [β = 0.49, p<0.001] throughout the school year.The results may be seen as promising, but they are not, in themselves, enough to make music lessons as public

  20. Job Satisfaction in Basic and Clinical Faculty Members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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    Mehdi Saberi-Firoozi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Shiraz University of Medical Sciences as one of the oldest and largest universities of medicine in Iran with 50 years history has more than 450 faculty members and 5000 students. This study is an attempt to find out the level of job satisfaction among Shiraz University ofMedical Sciences’ faculty members.Methods: In midterm of 2003-2004, data on job satisfaction level among 404 faculty members from all schools of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were collected. The translation of Spector’s job satisfaction score was used including 34 questions in 9 items of job satisfaction and each one based on Likert’s Scale with score an of 1-5. A question related to overall job satisfaction of faculty members was added.Results: Of all faculties,, 252 responded to the questionnaire and 70.1% expressed satisfaction in response the added question. The mean scores of job satisfaction in items of coworkers, work nature, supervision, management methods, academic relations, promotion, salary and suitable benefits were3.771, 3.265, 2.557, 2.454, 2.395, and 2.376 out of 5 respectively (F=223.8, p=0.0001. In the promotion item, the satisfaction of female faculty was lower than male subjects. The level of job satisfaction was not different between clinical faculty members of Medical School with or without private activity. The results of linear regression analysis between the items of job satisfaction revealed that reimbursement and fringe benefits could predict the overall job satisfaction (r2=0.70, p<0.01.Conclusion: As a whole, the faculty members of the university were satisfied with their jobs, but a correction in reimbursement, benefits and promotion regulations especially in lower academic ranks is needed to improve the level of job satisfaction in this group.Key words: JOB SATISFACTION, FACULTY MEMBER, BASIC AND CLINICAL DEPARTMENTS, FULLTIME, PART-TIME

  1. Leer y escribir en la Universidad: propuestas de articulación con la escuela media Reading and writing at the University: articulated proposals with High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Nigro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El paso de los últimos años de la secundaria a la universidad suele ser muy arduo para el alumno, y perjudicial para nuestras sociedades, porque la deserción en los primeros años de la vida académica es alta en casi toda América Latina. A partir de diversas investigaciones de estudiosos del proceso cognitivo que implican la lectura y la escritura y, adhiriendo al movimiento internacional llamado "Writing across the curriculum" (Escribir a través del currículum, propongo algunas claves para mejorar la comprensión y la producción de textos en la universidad y en la escuela media. Esto es: formulo variadas propuestas para ambos niveles educativos sobre la base de mi propia experiencia como profesora de Teoría y Práctica de la Lengua 1 y de Producción Discursiva de los primeros y segundos años de la Facultad de Comunicación de la Universidad Austral y de la lectura de los textos de investigación que se abocan a la "alfabetización académica" y que consigno a lo largo de este artículo. El objetivo es tender un puente entre la universidad y la escuela media para que se articulen mejor ambas instituciones, en bien de los alumnos ingresantes (que ingresan.Passing from High School to the University is usually a hard step for students and harmful for our societies: we know it because desertion levels during the first years of University are very high in almost all Latin American countries. Based on several investigations made by studious of reading and writing cognitive processes and, agreeing with the International Movement "Writing across the curriculum", I propose some key tips to improve comprehension and writing production at High School and University. I give a variety of proposals for both educational levels, based on my own experience as a Teacher of Language Theory and Practice I and Discursive Production in the first and second years of studies at the Communication Faculty in Austral University ( Argentina . I also based my job

  2. Source of learning basic clinical skills by medical interns Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Meshkani Z

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective clinical teaching is a major objective in general practitioner’s education at medical schools. Purpose: To identify the sources of clinical skills learning that medical student experience Methods: In this cross sectional study, interns of Tehran medical university who spent at least 12 months of their internship answered a questionnaire on the sources of clinical skills training. Chi2 test was used to examine the association of source of learning and students,’ specification such as sex, score of pre –internship exam, and marital status. Results: All 250 interns who were eligible participated. Over all 46.60% interns learned their clinical skills from residents or clinical teachers, 29.61% observed others performing the procedures, 16.25 learned the skills from hospital staff or nurses, 7.54% practiced their knowledge when confronted to an emergency situation Conclusion: Our results warrant a more attentive approach to clinical skills (specially procedural skills training Key words: LEARNING RESOURCES

  3. The Widely Used ATB FUNGUS 3 Automated Readings in China and Its Misleading High MICs of Candida spp. to Azoles: Challenges for Developing Countries' Clinical Microbiology Labs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France) with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the m...

  4. Reading: Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Wennekers; Frank Huysmans; Jos de Haan

    2018-01-01

    Original title: Lees:Tijd The amount of time that Dutch people spend reading has been declining steadily since the 1950s. This decline in reading time contrasts starkly with the positive personal and social benefits that can be derived from reading, according to lots of research. The Reading:

  5. Reading Comics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Many adults, even librarians who willingly add comics to their collections, often dismiss the importance of comics. Compared to reading "real" books, reading comics appears to be a simple task and compared to reading no books, reading comics might be preferable. After all, comics do have words, but the plentiful pictures seem to carry most of the…

  6. Certifying a university ENT clinic using the ISO 9001:2000 international standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Matthias; Helbig, Silke; Kahla-Witzsch, Heike A; Kroll, Tobias; May, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Against statutory duties to introduce quality management systems, the increased importance of this subject has led to numerous activities in various public health institutions. Following the International Standardization Organization (ISO 9001:2000) prerequisites, Frankfurt Goethe University Hospital ENT clinic staff introduced a quality management system. This paper aims to investigate this process. Designing, planning and implementing the quality management system is described. Under the supervision of an executive quality management board, clinic quality goals were defined. Thereafter, several quality management teams performed an actual state analysis as well as developing and realising improvement proposals. Finally a quality management manual containing binding standards and working instructions concerning all patient care, research and teaching aspects was written. Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the clinic's quality management system conformed to current national and international standards while restructuring and reform improved procedural efficiency. The paper shows that mplementing the quality management system requires considerable effort but patients as well as staff profit considerably from the innovation. On the whole, the positive impact on structure and workflow in a specialist clinic predominates. Therefore, implementing a quality management system in all the clinic's wards and departments is recommended.

  7. The etiology and symptoms of endodontic cases treated in a university clinic in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlYahya, A. S.; Selirn, H. A.; Guile, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Endodontic patients treated at a University Dental Clinic over a two year period were studied. A total of 281 patients seen in a beginning endodontic course were analyzed to determine (1) the etiology of the pulpal disease presenting and (2) the signs and symptoms of pulpal disease. Results indicated that caries was the most prevalent reason for endodontic treatment. Most cases (40.6%) were asymptomatic. Lower molars were the most commonly affected and there was no significant difference in endodontic treatment distribution between males and females in the patient population studied. (author)

  8. A Virtual Mental Health Clinic for University Students: A Qualitative Study of End-User Service Needs and Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Amelia; Chan, Jade KY; Bennett, Kylie; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Help seeking for mental health problems among university students is low, and Internet-based interventions such as virtual clinics have the potential to provide private, streamlined, and high quality care to this vulnerable group. Objective The objective of this study was to conduct focus groups with university students to obtain input on potential functions and features of a university-specific virtual clinic for mental health. Methods Participants were 19 undergraduate students from an Australian university between 19 and 24 years of age. Focus group discussion was structured by questions that addressed the following topics: (1) the utility and acceptability of a virtual mental health clinic for students, and (2) potential features of a virtual mental health clinic. Results Participants viewed the concept of a virtual clinic for university students favorably, despite expressing concerns about privacy of personal information. Participants expressed a desire to connect with professionals through the virtual clinic, for the clinic to provide information tailored to issues faced by students, and for the clinic to enable peer-to-peer interaction. Conclusions Overall, results of the study suggest the potential for virtual clinics to play a positive role in providing students with access to mental health support. PMID:26543908

  9. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  10. Validation of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale for multicultural screening in Danish memory clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T Rune; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Gottrup, Hanne; Lützhøft, Jan H; Høgh, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2013-01-01

    The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) is a brief cognitive screening test that was developed to detect dementia in multicultural populations. The RUDAS has not previously been validated in multicultural populations outside of Australia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the RUDAS in a multicultural sample of patients referred to Danish memory clinics. Data were collected from 137 consecutive patients (34 with an immigrant background) in three Danish memory clinics. All patients were given the RUDAS as a supplement to the standard diagnostic workup. Diagnostic accuracy for the RUDAS [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.838] was similar to that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; AUC = 0.840). The cutoff score with the best balance of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy was multicultural patient populations. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Bacterial infections in horses: a retrospective study at the University Equine Clinic of Bern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaud, Y; Gerber, V; Rossano, A; Perreten, V

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial infections present a major challenge in equine medicine. Therapy should be based on bacteriological diagnosis to successfully minimize the increasing number of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The present study is a retrospective analysis of bacteriological results from purulent infections in horses admitted at the University Equine Clinic of Bern from 2004 to 2008. From 378 samples analyzed, 557 isolates were identified, of which Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus and coliforms were the most common. Special attention was paid to infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ST398 and a non-MRSA, multidrug-resistant S. aureus clone ST1 (BERN100). Screening of newly-admitted horses showed that 2.2 % were carriers of MRSA. Consequent hygiene measures taken at the Clinic helped to overcome a MRSA outbreak and decrease the number of MRSA infections.

  12. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanahan, Madeleine; Herrington, Anthony; Herrington, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst

  13. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Madeleine, E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.a [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Herrington, Anthony [Head, School of Regional, Remote and eLearning (RRE), Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Herrington, Jan [School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst

  14. Clinical education stressors in medical trainees in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHDIEH MOMAYYEZI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress is an important factor in the educational process. Teaching and learning are stressful processes. This stress can affect one’s ability and change his/her performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate stressors of clinical education from the perspective of medical students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted in Yazd University of Medical Science during year 2014-2015. The sample size was 170 medical students who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a questionnaire including four components: interpersonal relationship, educational environment, clinical experience and the unpleasant emotions. A significance level of 0.05 was considered for analysis. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-tests, using SPSS software, version 14. Results: The results showed that the highest domain score belonged to interpersonal relationship (3.33±0.3 followed by unpleasant emotions domain (3.3±0.3. The lowest domain score of clinical education stressors was educational environment (3.12±0.1. The results showed that the mean score of interpersonal relationship domain was more in women than in men (p<0.05. Conclusion: The relationship between teachers and students is an effective factor in all dimensions of clinical education stressors. So proper measures such as the promotion of scientific awareness of teachers and educational staff about factors that lead to stress and the best way to communicate with students should be taken to reduce the students’ stress.

  15. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, Atsumi; Narumoto, Jin; Yokota, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan. We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3) or an anxiety disorder (F4) in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history), treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models. From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356). The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.85). In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on patients with the factors identified in this study, and young psychiatrists should undergo further education to foster adherence.

  16. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu AM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anteneh Messele Birhanu,1 Fekadu Mazengia Alemu,2 Tesfaye Demeke Ashenafie,3 Shitaye Alemu Balcha,4 Berihun Assefa Dachew5 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, 2Department of Midwifery, 3Department of Nursing, 4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results: A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 11.7–19.2. Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0 and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92 were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other

  17. Reading Fluency Instruction for Students at Risk for Reading Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Jeremiah J.; Barefoot, Lexie C.; Avrit, Karen J.; Brown, Sasha A.; Black, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The important role of reading fluency in the comprehension and motivation of readers is well documented. Two reading rate intervention programs were compared in a cluster-randomized clinical trial of students who were considered at-risk for reading failure. One program focused instruction at the word level; the second program focused instruction…

  18. [Self perception of clinical competences declared by recently graduated physicians of the University of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán K, Teresa; Ercolano F, Mariely; Pérez A, Marcela; Fuentes F, Cristián

    2007-11-01

    The new curriculum of the University of Chile School of Medicine includes the evaluation not only of knowledge and skills, but also abilities and attitudes. To measure the self perceived level of basic clinical competences (BCC) declared by recently graduated physicians. A self evaluation survey was designed, based on the proposed objectives of the Faculty Curriculum Committee and on an instrument used in Spanish Universities. It contained 194 questions and the possible answers were: 1.1 know what it is and it has been explained to me; 2.1 have seen it done; 3.1 have done it before under supervision; 4. I would be capable to do it under any circumstance. It was applied confidentially to 50 of a total of 170 recently graduated physicians. Perception of BCC for the diagnosis of most common diseases was felt as satisfactory. History taking and physical examination were also considered as achieved skills. Deficiencies were found in practical aspects of nursing care, obstetric and gynecological abilities and reanimation procedures. Answers may be biased considering that the survey was a self assessment procedure. However, results provide sound orientation to detect strengths and weaknesses of delivered education. Achievement of BCC is proportional to clinical practice opportunities as a student.

  19. Feasibility of iFISH patterns in hematologic malignancies among Congolese patients at Kinshasa University clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Solange Nganga Nkanga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the feasibility of detecting Ph1 in leukemia patients in the Kinshasa University Clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, at KU Leuven, Belgium. Methods: Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples with chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia or acute leukocytes leukemia were obtained from 32 patients in Kinshasa University clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo and transferred to KU Leuven in Belgium for iFISH feasibility. Ph1 was detected by using a remote analysis of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH. Results: Out of the 32 patients involved in this study, 65.6% (n = 21 of the cases were successfully tested, of which 52.4% (n = 11 were iFISH positives for the variant t(9;22 (presence of Ph1 in chronic myeloid leukemia samples and 47.6% (n = 10 negatives in all subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, there was a female predominance in chronic myeloid leukemia samples Ph1-positives by iFISH, whereas no sexual influence was observed on acute subtypes of leukemia. Conclusions: iFISH analysis is feasible on samples obtained from remote sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, the optimization of the sample storage is necessary to further improve iFISH's performance. Keywords: iFISH, Ph1, Democratic Republic of Congo, Leukemia, Bone marrow, Blood

  20. The Relationship between Strategic Reading Instruction, Student Learning of L2-Based Reading Strategies and L2 Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkakoson, Songyut

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between strategic reading instruction, the process of learning second language-based reading strategies and English reading achievement for Thai university students of science and technology. In a course in reading general English texts for 16?weeks, 82 students were taught using a strategies-based approach…

  1. 英语专业学生阅读焦虑、阅读策略的效率研究——以江西农大南昌商学院为例%Efficiency Study on Reading Anxiety and Reading Strategy of English Major Students——Take Nanchang Business College of Jiangxi Agricultural University for Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文英

    2012-01-01

    利用英语阅读焦虑量表,英语阅读策略量表和阅读测试卷,对江西农业大学南昌商学院126名英语专来二年级学生进行测试,并就英语阅读策略、阅读焦虑和阅读成绩三者之间的相关性进行了调查和分析。结果表明:焦虑的高低与成绩的高低呈负相关关系,策略的高低与成绩的高低呈正相关关系。%Use English reading anxiety scale, English reading strategy scale and reading test roll, 126 English major sopho mores come from Nanchang Business College of Jiangxi Agricultural University were tested, According to the investigation and analysis the relationship between the English reading strategies, reading anxiety and reading scores. The results show that the level of anxiety and the level of achievement are negatively correlated, the level of policy and the level of achie vement are positively correlated.

  2. Implantation of a double reading process for radiological exams of the radiology service of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre using the IMPAX client system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, A.L.; Goulart, J.M.; Lucena, R.A.; Bacelar, A.; Pinto, A.L.A.

    2017-01-01

    A Quality Management System consists of several processes that qualify and quantify the performance of a service, minimizing the possibility of errors in the radiological diagnosis that may result in clinical consequences. One of these processes is the implantation of double reading, which consists in the evaluation of the report interpreted by a radiologist and the subsequent conference by another radiologist, through the analysis of archived PACS exams. The classification of the results of these analyzes was based on the recommendations of the American College of Radiology (ACR). Double reading is an extremely effective process for increasing the quality of the radiological report, in addition to contributing to the continuing education between the pairs

  3. Gender, mathematics, reading comprehension and science reasoning as predictors of science achievement among African-American students at a historical black college or university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Consuella Artiemese

    This study investigated predictors that influence the science achievement of African-American non-science majors in a Physical Science class. The population consisted of male and female college students enrolled in Physical Science courses at a historical black college or university (HBCU) located in the southeastern portion of the United States. A personal data information sheet was administered to 120 participants during the Fall of 2008. The personal data information sheet consisted of questions pertaining to the high school courses, students took in math, language arts and science. It also consisted of basic background information. Students also gave written consent for their midterm and final grades earned in Physical Science to be used in the study as part of the analyses. A t-Test including chi-square tests revealed that there was not a significant difference in the raw scores of African-American females and African American males on the American College Test. A significant difference was not observed between the females and males on the ACT math subtest, t (118) = -.78, p = .43; reading comprehension subtest, t (118) = -1.44, .15 or on the science reasoning subtest, t (118) = -1.46, p = .15. A significant difference was not found between the final grades of African American females and the final grades of African American males. Chi-square tests were conducted to determine goodness of fit, X2 = 6.11, df = 1, p = .191. Although the grades of females were higher than males, results were not significant. The correlation between math ACT and final grades were not significant, r = .131, N = 120, p = .155, reading comprehension ACT and final grades were not significant, r = .072, N = 120, p = .434 and science reasoning ACT and final grades were found not to be significant, r = .109, N = 120, p = .237. Being that the majority of students who participated in the study were from one state, had similar high school backgrounds, had similar majors and were similar in

  4. Revitalization of clinical skills training at the University of the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Jeggels

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Most educational institutions that offer health related qualifications make use of clinical skills laboratories. These spaces are generally used for the demonstration and assessment of clinical skills. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences related to the revitalization of skills training by introducing the skills lab method at the School of Nursing (SoN, University of the Western Cape (UWC. To accommodate the contextual changes as a result of the restructuring of the higher education landscape in 2003, the clinical skills training programme at UWC had to be reviewed. With a dramatic increase in the student numbers and a reduction in hospital beds, the skills lab method provided students with an opportunity to develop clinical skills prior to their placement in real service settings. The design phase centred on adopting a skills training methodology that articulates with the case-based approach used by the SoN. Kolb’s, experiential learning cycle provided the theoretical underpinning for the methodology. The planning phase was spent on the development of resources. Eight staff members were trained by our international higher education collaborators who also facilitated the training of clinical supervisors and simulated patients. The physical space had to be redesigned to accommodate audio visual and information technology to support the phases of the skills lab method. The implementation of the skills lab method was phased in from the first-year level. An interactive seminar held after the first year of implementation provided feedback from all the role players and was mostly positive. The results of introducing the skills lab method include: a move by students towards self-directed clinical skills development, clinical supervisors adopting the role of facilitators of learning and experiential clinical learning being based on, amongst others, the students’ engagement with simulated patients. Finally, the recommendations relate

  5. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamisawa A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atsumi Minamisawa,1 Jin Narumoto,1 Isao Yokota,2 Kenji Fukui1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Background: Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3 or an anxiety disorder (F4 in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression–Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history, treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models.Results: From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356. The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94–1.85.Conclusion: In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on

  6. Combining clinical practice and academic work in nursing: a qualitative study about perceived importance, facilitators and barriers regarding clinical academic careers for nurses in university hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, C.J. van; Goedhart, N.S.; Francke, A.L.; Vermeulen, H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurse aca- demics and other stakeholders regarding the importance, facilitators and barriers for nurses combining clinical and academic work in university hospitals. Background: Combining clinical practice and academic work

  7. Reading Habits of Undergraduates and their Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading is an indispensable tool of learning. Every course of study is accomplished partly through reading. Lecturers in the University usually have high expectations of a students‟ ability to cope with the demands of reading. However, reading as a practice and an art has tended to diminish. The general expectations of ...

  8. Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis of Germline Predisposition to Hematopoietic Malignancies: The University of Chicago Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami V. Desai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing use of clinical genomics to guide cancer treatment and management, there is a rise in the identification of germline cancer predisposition syndromes and a critical need for patients with germline findings to be referred for surveillance and care. The University of Chicago Hematopoietic Malignancies Cancer Risk Team has established a unique approach to patient care for individuals with hereditary hematologic malignancies through close communication and coordination between our pediatric and adult programs. Dedicated program members, including physicians, nurses, genetic counselors, and clinical research assistants, screen individuals for cancer predisposition at initial diagnosis through survivorship, in addition to testing individuals with an established family history of a cancer predisposition syndrome. Sample procurement, such as a skin biopsy at the time of bone marrow aspirate/biopsy in individuals with a positive screen, has facilitated timely identification of clinical germline findings or has served as a pipeline for translational research. Our integrated translational research program has led to the identification of novel syndromes in collaboration with other investigators, which have been incorporated iteratively into our clinical pipeline. Individuals are referred for clinical assessment based on personal and family history, identification of variants in susceptibility genes via molecular tumor testing, and during evaluation for matched related allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Upon referral, genetic counseling incorporates education with mindfulness of the psychosocial issues surrounding germline testing at different ages. The training and role of genetic counselors continues to grow, with the discovery of new predisposition syndromes, in the age of improved molecular diagnostics and new models for service delivery, such as telemedicine. With the identification of new syndromes that may predispose individuals

  9. Some Semi-Deep Thoughts about Deep Reading: Rejoinder to "Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development: The Neuroscience of the University Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheimer, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The author of this thought-provoking article joins an impressive cohort of current commentators and scholars united in their concern over the state of the art of reading. Mostly, they are concerned with the sustained, silent, generally solitary process of reading in which the reader is deeply focused on and immersed in the text. Their fear is that…

  10. Developing a universal reading comprehension intervention for mainstream primary schools within areas of social deprivation for children with and without language-learning impairment: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Ellis, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Some children in areas of social deprivation in Scotland have lower reading attainment than neighbouring children in less deprived areas, and some of these also have lower spoken language comprehension skills than expected by assessment norms. There is a need to develop effective reading comprehension interventions that fit easily into the school curriculum and can benefit all pupils. A feasibility study of reading comprehension strategies with existing evidence of efficacy was undertaken in three mainstream primary schools within an area of social deprivation in west central Scotland, to decide whether further investigation of this intervention was warranted. Aims were to measure comprehension of spoken language and reading via standardised assessments towards the beginning of the school year (T1) in mainstream primary school classrooms within an area of social deprivation; to have teachers introduce previously-validated text comprehension strategies, and to measure change in reading comprehension outcome measures towards the end of the year (T2). A pre- and post-intervention cohort design was used. Reading comprehension strategies were introduced to staff in participating schools and used throughout the school year as part of on-going reading instruction. Spoken language comprehension was measured by TROG-2 at T1, and reading progress by score changes from T1 to T2 on the WIAT-II(UK) -T reading comprehension scale. Forty-seven pupils in five classes in three primary schools took part: 38% had TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile. As a group, children made good reading comprehension progress, with a medium effect size of 0.46. Children with TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile had lower mean reading scores than others at T1 and T2, although with considerable overlap. However, TROG-2 did not make a unique contribution to reading progress: children below the 10(th) centile made as much progress as other children. The intervention was welcomed by schools, and the

  11. Multicultural Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltze, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Multicultural reading advocates believe in the power of literature to transform and to change people's lives. They take seriously the arguments that racism and prejudice can be lessened through multicultural reading, and also that children from undervalued societal groups who read books that depict people like themselves in a positive light will…

  12. Routine clinical heart examinations using SQUID magnetocardiography at University of Tsukuba Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, T.; Nakazawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Kato, Y.; Hattori, A.; Kimura, T.; Hoshi, T.; Ishizu, T.; Seo, Y.; Sato, A.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Nogami, A.; Watanabe, S.; Horigome, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Aonuma, K.

    2017-11-01

    A 64-channel Nb-based DC-SQUID magnetocardiography (MCG) system was installed at the University of Tsukuba Hospital (UTH) in March 2007 after obtaining Japanese pharmaceutical approval and insurance reimbursement approval. In the period between 2008 and 2016, the total number of patients was 10 085. The heart diseases diagnosed in fetuses as well as adults are mainly atrial arrhythmia, abnormal repolarization, ventricular arrhythmia, and fetal arrhythmia. In most cases of insufficient diagnostic accuracy with electrocardiography, SQUID MCG precisely revealed these heart diseases as an abnormal electrical current distribution. Based on success in routine examinations, SQUID MCG is now an indispensable clinical instrument with diagnostic software tuned up during routine use at UTH.

  13. A new universal simplified adhesive: 36-Month randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; de Paula, Eloisa Andrade; Hass, Viviane; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    It is still debatable which technique should be used with universal adhesives, either etch-and-rinse (wet or dry) or self-etch strategy (with or without selective enamel etching). To evaluate the 36-month clinical performance of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SU, 3M ESPE) in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-nine patients participated in this study. Two-hundred restorations were assigned to four groups: ERm: etch-and-rinse+moist dentin; ERd: etch-and-rinse+dry dentin; Set: selective enamel etching; and SE: self-etch. The same composite resin was inserted for all restorations in up to 3 increments. The restorations were evaluated at baseline and at 6-, 18-, and 36-months using both the FDI and the USPHS criteria. Statistical analyses were performed with Friedman repeated measures ANOVA by rank and McNemar test for significance in each pair (α=0.05). Eight restorations (ERm: 1; ERd: 1; Set: 1 and SE: 5) were lost after 36 months, but only significant for SE when compared with baseline (p=0.02 for either criteria). Marginal staining occurred in 6.8% of the restorations (groups ERm, ERd, and Set) and 17.5% of the restorations (group SE), with significant difference for each group when compared with baseline using the FDI criteria (puniversal adhesive was used, there were signs of degradation when the universal adhesive was applied in SE mode. The FDI criteria remain more sensitive than the USPHS criteria, especially for the criteria marginal staining and marginal adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical profile of hypertension at a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur C Onwuchekwa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Arthur C Onwuchekwa, Sunday ChinenyeDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, NigeriaBackground: Hypertension in Nigeria is a widespread problem of immense social and economic importance because of its high prevalence and the severity of its complications.Aim: To define the morbidity and mortality pattern of hypertension at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH.Method: Records of all patients admitted to the medical wards of the UPTH over a 5-year period with essential hypertension or any of its complications were retrieved from the ward and medical records and reviewed.Result: A total of 780 hypertensive patients were reviewed, constituting 28.2% of all ­medical admissions. Only 424 (15.2% had complete records and were analyzed. Record keeping was poor. There were 173 (41% males and 251 (59% females with a male to female ratio of 1:1.5. The ages ranged from 18 years to 100 years with a mean of 56.5 ± 16.2. Stroke was responsible for 169 (39.9% hypertensive complications. Heart failure occurred in 97 (22% cases while renal failure and encephalopathy accounted for 40 (9.4% and 7 (1.7% hypertensive complications respectively. There were 99 deaths out of which 51 (51.5% were due to stroke, 14 (14.12% were due to heart failure, and 12 (12.1% were due to renal failure.Conclusion: The contribution of systemic hypertension to the morbidity and mortality of adults at UPTH is quite significant.Keywords: clinical profile, hypertension, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital

  15. Perceptions of clients on awareness and the geographical location of a South African university sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rukshana; Van Der Heever, Mariana M; Damons, Anneleen

    2017-09-27

    The Campus Health Service at Stellenbosch University has a sub-division, a sexual health clinic, which provides sexual health services. The clients of the sexual health clinic consist of staff members and students. This article reports on the perceptions of clients that relate to awareness and the geographical location of the clinic. The Campus Health Service at Stellenbosch University's main campus. A descriptive qualitative approach was applied utilising in-depth interviews. A sample of n = 15 was drawn through purposive sampling and data saturation was achieved with the sample. The following themes emerged from the data: location of the clinic, awareness of sexual health services and marketing and advertising. The findings of the study revealed that accessibility of the clinic is influenced by the geographical location of the clinic and that marketing and awareness of services require attention.

  16. Privacy Issues in the Development of a Virtual Mental Health Clinic for University Students: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Amelia; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Farrer, Louise M; Reynolds, Julia; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need to develop online services for university students with the capacity to complement existing services and efficiently address student mental health problems. Previous research examining the development and acceptability of online interventions has revealed that issues such as privacy critically impact user willingness to engage with these services. To explore university student perspectives on privacy issues related to using an online mental health service within the context of the development of an online, university-based virtual mental health clinic. There were two stages of data collection. The first stage consisted of four 1.5-hour focus groups conducted with university students (n=19; 10 female, 9 male, mean age = 21.6 years) to determine their ideas about the virtual clinic including privacy issues. The second stage comprised three 1-hour prototype testing sessions conducted with university students (n=6; 3 male, 3 female, mean age = 21.2 years) using participatory design methods to develop and refine a service model for the virtual clinic and determine student views on privacy within this context. The students raised a number of issues related to privacy in relation to the development of the university virtual clinic. Major topics included the types of personal information they would be willing to provide (minimal information and optional mental health data), concern about potential access to their personal data by the university, the perceived stigma associated with registering for the service, and privacy and anonymity concerns related to online forums contained within the virtual clinic. Students would be more comfortable providing personal information and engaging with the virtual clinic if they trust the privacy and security of the service. Implications of this study include building the clinic in a flexible way to accommodate user preferences.

  17. The clinical pattern of diabetes Insipidus in a large university hospital in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir M I; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A M; Al Jurayyan, Rushaid N A; Al Gadi, Iman; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but serious endocrine disorder. Paediatric patients were evaluated for polyuria at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over a decade (2000-13). Relevant clinical examination and/or a triad of high serum osmolality, hypernatremia and low urine osmolality due to increased urine output confirmed the diagnosis. Water deprivation test was required in some cases with non-classic presentations. Appropriate brain imaging was performed whenever central diabetes insipidus (CDI) was suspected. Twenty-eight patients, 15 males (53.6%) and 13 females (46.4%), aged 0-17 years (mean: 6 years) were included. The calculated period prevalence was 7 in 10,000. In our cohort, 60.7% (17 of 28 patients) had CDI, 21.4% (6 of 28) were diagnosed with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and 17.9% (5 of 30) had psychogenic polydipsia. CDI was due to variable aetiology. Though CDI was the commonest, NDI was not a rare encounter in our community, possibly because of high consanguineous marriages. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Assessment of the Applications to University Hospital Urology Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Gucuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Provision of health care services to persons where it is needed required for the production of quality service in the organization of health services. The purpose of this study, determine the reason for admission and factors affecting admission and evaluate the current status for the patients admitted to a tertiary health care center. Materials and methods: The study was planned descriptive. Participants were determined among the patients were admitted to urology clinic between December 2011-March 2012 for any reason on a voluntary basis. Fourteen item questionnaire was completed by the physician. The survey asked the age, educational status, initial complaint, elapsed time from the beginning of complaints, whether was the previous treatment from another institution, reasons for choosing a university hospital polyclinics for participants. Results: A total of 337 participants attended, and their gender were 23.7% female, 76.3% male. 61.7% participants had received earlier medical attention because of complaints, 38.3% of had not received previously medical attention in any health institution and had to apply directly to the tertiary health care center. Apply directly to the university hospital outpatient clinic was significantly higher in men (p:0.11(table 1. Direct applications are increasing significantly in participant has higher education level. Compared to complexity of required investigations for patients had received and had not received earlier medical attention were no significant differences (p:0.134. Conclusion: For more effective use of health resources and results-oriented, training must be relevant to users of health care services to increase health literacy as well as a number of legal arrangements. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 165-168

  19. Evaluating laboratory key performance using quality indicators in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Chemistry Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mostafa M; Zaki, Adel; Hossam, Nermine; Aboul-Ela, Yasmin

    2014-12-01

    The performance of clinical laboratories plays a fundamental role in the quality and effectiveness of healthcare. To evaluate the laboratory performance in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Laboratories using key quality indicators and to compare the performance before and after an improvement plan based on ISO 15189 standards. The study was carried out on inpatient samples for a period of 7 months that was divided into three phases: phase I included data collection for evaluation of the existing process before improvement (March-May 2012); an intermediate phase, which included corrective, preventive action, quality initiative and steps for improvement (June 2012); and phase II, which included data collection for evaluation of the process after improvement (July 2012-September 2012). In terms of the preanalytical indicators, incomplete request forms in phase I showed that the total number of received requests were 31 944, with a percentage of defected request of 33.66%; whereas in phase II, there was a significant reduction in all defected request items (Plaboratories.

  20. Concordance Between Clinical Practice and Published Evidence: Findings From Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Harmeet K; Best, Al M; Sarrett, David C

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the concordance between clinical practice and published evidence by dental faculty and graduating students of the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry. A questionnaire previously developed by the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network with 12 clinical scenarios was administered to VCU faculty and graduating students. Responses were scored as either consistent or inconsistent with published evidence and then analyzed for differences between dental faculty, graduating students, and the national results. There were 43 dental faculty members with at least half-time student contact who responded to the survey. Faculty concordance ranged from 33% to 100%, and general practice faculty had the highest concordance (82%). Eighty-five of the graduating class of 98 responded to the survey, and student concordance ranged from 18% to 92% and averaged 67%. General practice faculty had higher concordance with published evidence than recently graduated dental students. Graduating students and dental faculty demonstrated higher concordance with evidence-based practice than practitioners in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. General practice dental faculty demonstrated adequate concordance, but students demonstrated only a medium-level concordance. Practitioners involved in teaching dental students are better able to keep up with evolving evidence and are better able to demonstrate evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Urological emergencies at the Dakar university teaching hospital: epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, B; Diao, B; Fall, P A; Diallo, Y; Sow, Y; Ondongo, A A M; Diagana, M; Ndoye, A K; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2008-11-01

    To present the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features of the urological emergencies in Senegal, West Africa. The authors conducted a 20 months retrospective study that analyzed the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features of all urological emergencies admitted to the urology department of the university teaching hospital Aristide-Le-Dantec (Dakar). There were 1237 urological emergencies. The mean age of the patients was 58.8 years (range one month-94 years). The sex ratio (M/F) was 20.32. These patients had an age equal to or higher than 60 years in 50.7% of the cases. The most frequent illness was urinary retention (53%) and genitor-urinary system infectious, which represented as a whole 16.4% of the cases. The gangrenes of male external genitalia (Fournier's gangrene) accounted for 4.1% of the cases and the priapism 1.3%. In emergency, 331 surgical operations were performed. The most performed procedures were the installation of a suprapubic catheter (59.8%) and debridement of a gangrene of male external genitalia (15.4%). The most frequent urological emergency in our country was the acute urinary retention. Some serious illness like gangrene of male external genitalia (Fournier's gangrene) and priapism are not rare there.

  2. Satisfaction With Medication Therapy Management Services at a University Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shiyun; Martin, Michelle T; Pierce, Andrea L; Zueger, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    A survey was issued to patients enrolled in the Medication Therapy Management Clinic (MTMC) at University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences (June 2011-January 2012) in order to assess satisfaction with pharmacy services provided by pharmacists. A 23-item survey was offered to 65 patients in the MTMC program before or after clinic visits. Since there is a paucity of data indicating the level of satisfaction with MTM services provided by pharmacists, this survey may contribute to the process of building a greater collaboration between the pharmacist and patient. Sixty-two of 65 patients completed the survey; satisfaction with MTMC pharmacists was demonstrated to be significantly positively correlated with overall satisfaction with the MTMC. Patient satisfaction is not significantly different according to age, gender, ethnicity, or number of disease states. Satisfaction with the pillbox service is not significantly different between younger and older patients. It was also noted that patients taking a greater number of medications had higher levels of satisfaction. Most patients indicated that they were satisfied with the MTMC pharmacists and services; further study linking patient satisfaction with MTM services to improved patient outcomes may allow our MTMC to serve as a model for other pharmacist-managed MTMCs serving similar patient populations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. First clinical and microbiological characterization of Clostridium difficile infection in a Croatian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anita; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Tonkic, Marija

    2014-12-01

    Clinical background and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the University Hospital Centre Split were investigated from January 2010 to December 2011. In total, 54 patients with first episode of CDI were consecutively included in the study based on the positive EIA test specific for A and B toxins. Demographic and clinical data were prospectively analyzed from medical records. CDI incidence rate was 0.6 per 10,000 patient-days. Thirty six cases (70.6%) were healthcare-associated, twelve cases (23.5%) were community-associated and three (5.9%) were indeterminate. Six patients (11.7%) had suffered one or more recurrences and 37 patients (72.5%) showed severe CDI. Prior therapy with third generation cephalosporin was significantly associated with severe CDI (Pdifficile strains were isolated and 50 of them were available for PCR-ribotyping. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes were identified. The most prevalent were PCR-ribotype 001 (27.8%) and 014/020 (24.1%). Twenty three strains were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. Among resistant strains, three (13.0%)--all PCR-ribotype 001--were multi-resistant. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was significantly higher in strains that caused infection after previous use of fluoroquinolones (P=0.04). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin

    2016-09-01

    In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5-8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia.

  5. Health and mood among HIV-positive outpatients attending an ART Clinic of a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dilar; Mendes, Aida; Abreu, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how individuals at different stages of infection with HIV perceive their health status and its association with mood states. With the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in 1996, the quality of life of people living with HIV has improved. However, the literature emphasises the negative effects of the disease on the mental health of individuals suffering from this condition and the high incidence of depression among infected individuals. Although people diagnosed and living with HIV are overwhelmed by emotions, we found that various emotional manifestations are understudied within this group of patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient unit of a University Hospital (antiretroviral therapy clinic), with a consecutive sample composed of 152 patients. Data were collected through a questionnaire used to assess the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, the Short Form (36) Health Survey, and the Profile of Mood States scale. The health status negatively affects the role at the emotional and mental health dimensions. The participants showing a worse health condition than in the previous year had higher levels of tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, fatigue/inertia and confusion/bewilderment. The stage of disease and the profile of mood state emerged as independent phenomena. The results of this study indicate that nurses worldwide should be aware of the emotional aspects (negative emotions strongly impact health) related to the subjective perception of a worsening health status, regardless of the stage of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Quality of Diabetes Care at Outpatient Clinic, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Al-Sinani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical care of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D patients at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, a countrywide tertiary referral center in Muscat, Oman.  Methods: We performed a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study using a total of 673 Omani T2D patients from the Diabetes and Family Medicine Clinics at SQUH. We collected patient data from June 2010 to February 2012 from the Hospital Information System (HIS. Patients had to be Omani, aged more than 18 years old, and have T2D with active follow-up and at least three visits within one year to be included in the study. Ninety-three percent of the patients (n=622 were on oral hypoglycemic drugs and/or insulin, and 70% were on statins. Patients’ anthropometric data, biochemical investigations, blood pressure, and duration of diabetes were recorded from the HIS.  Results: Using the recommended standards and guidelines of medical care in diabetes (American Diabetes Association and the American National Cholesterol Education Program III NCDP NIII standards, we observed that 22% of the patients achieved a HbA1C goal of 1.0; females >1.3mmol/L. Almost 60% of the patients had urinary microalbumin/creatinine ratio within the normal range.  Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of the care that T2D patients get at SQUH were lower than those reported in Europe and North America. However, it is similar to those reported in other countries in the Arabian Gulf.

  7. The incidence of caesarean sections in the university clinical center of kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshani, Brikene; Daci, Armond; Gashi, Sanije; Lulaj, Shefqet

    2012-12-01

    As in most countries of the world also at Kosovo the rate of Cesarean section from year to year is increasing. The main purpose of this paper was to present the incidence of births completed by Caesarean section at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics of University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Prishtinë. This study is retrospective, namely its made by collecting epidemiological data from patients' histories that completed birth by Caesarean section for the period 2000-2006 in this clinic. During this period, 14 maternal deaths were recorded during or after Caesarean section. Besides this, 14 lethal outcomes, the object of our study was 84 mothers which completed birth by Caesarean section and which are best used as a control group. The average age of mothers who died during or after Caesarean section was 32.1 years (SD ± 4.9). Youngest in this group was 24 years old and oldest 42 years. While the average age of mothers from the control group was 30.6 years (SD ± 5.9). Youngest was 19 and oldest 43 years, without significant difference. Most mothers included in the survey had more than one indication for Caesarean section. The most frequent indication was PIH syndrome with 33.7% and previous Caesarean section in 32.7%. Then with the participation of 12.2% were abruption of the placenta and disproportio feto pelvinea, 11.2% pelvinea and placenta praevia presentation, 10.2% parturiens while other indications were much rarer with less than 10% participation. Based on this we can conclude that the risk of the Caesarean section is high.

  8. Clinical profile and aetiology of optic neuritis in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia--5 years review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shatriah; Wan Hazabbah, Wan Hitam; Muhd-Nor, Nor-Idahriani; Daud, Jakiyah; Embong, Zunaina

    2012-04-01

    Although few studies concerning optic neuritis (ON) in Asian countries have been reported, there is no report about ON in Malaysia particularly within the Malay population. We aimed to determine the clinical manifestation, visual outcome and aetiology of ON in Malays, and discussed the literature of ON studies in other Asian populations. This was a retrospective study involving 31 consecutive patients (41 eyes) with ON treated at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia commencing from July 2005 till January 2010 with a period of follow-up ranging from 18-60 months. The clinical features, laboratory results, possible aetiology, and visual acuity after one year were analysed. Females were the predominant group. The age of the patients ranged between 3-55 years and peaked between 21-30 years old. 67.7% of the patients had unilateral involvement. Pain on ocular movement was observed in 31.7% of the affected eyes. 73.3% of 41 involved eyes showed visual acuity equal 6/60 or worse on presentation. Paracentral scotoma was the most common visual field defect noted. Optic disc papillitis proved more widespread compared to the retrobulbar type of ON. The aetiology was idiopathic in more than 50%, while the risk of multiple sclerosis was extremely low (3.2%) in our series. 66.0% demonstrating visual acuity improved to 6/12 or better at one year after the attack. 16.1% showed evidence of recurrence during follow-up. In conclusion, the clinical profile and aetiology of ON in Malay patients are comparable to other ON studies reported by other Asian countries.

  9. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, T.A.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Neder, H.D. [Instituto de Economia, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Araújo-Junqueira, L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); De-Souza, D.A. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica e Curso de Nutrição, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-12-17

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant.

  10. Clinical characteristics of lung abscess in children: 15-year experience at two university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Suk; Chun, Ji Hye; Lee, Kyung Suk; Rha, Yeong Ho; Choi, Sun Hee

    2015-12-01

    Information on the clinical features of lung abscess, which is uncommon in children, at hospitalizationis helpful to anticipate the disease course and management. There is no report concerning lung abscess in Korean children. We aimed to identify the clinical characteristics of pediatric lung abscess and compare the difference between primary and secondary abscess groups. The medical records of 11 lung abscess patients (7 males and 4 females) from March 1998 to August 2011 at two university hospitals were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical characteristics, symptoms, underlying disease, laboratory and radiologic findings, microbiological results, and treatments were examined. Six patients had underlying structural-related problems (e.g., skeletal anomalies). No immunologic or hematologic problem was recorded. The mean ages of the primary and secondary groups were 2.4 and 5.3 years, respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant. The mean length of hospital stay was similar in both groups (22.8 days vs. 21.4 days). Immunologic studies were performed in 3 patients; the results were within the normal range. Most patients had prominent leukocytosis. Seven and 4 patients had right and left lung abscess, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and antimycoplasma antibodies were detected in both groups. Two patients with primary lung abscess were administered antibiotics in the absence of other procedures, while 8 underwent interventional procedures, including 5 with secondary abscess. The most common symptoms were fever and cough. All patients in the primary group were younger than 3 years. Structural problems were dominant. Most patients required interventional procedures and antibiotics.

  11. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, T.A.S.; Neder, H.D.; Araújo-Junqueira, L.; De-Souza, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant

  12. Clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Akpan, N.A.; Essien, I.O.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is emerging as a major health challenge with the incidence and prevalence of the disease on the increase. It also contributes to overall morbidity and mortality with complications like cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and lower extremity amputation. There are few local studies on the clinical characteristics of the disease in our wet up and this study therefore set out to characterize the clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients in a health facility in Nigeria. It is a cross sectional, descriptive study carried out at the diabetes clinic of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and September 2008. Data obtained included age, sex, anthropometric indices, symptomatology, co-morbidities, complications and treatment of diabetes. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. A total of two hundred and seventy patients were studied (120 males, 150 females). About 89.2% were Type 2 DM patients and majority of the study subjects were overweight. Diabetic neuropathy was the commonest complication present in 38.8% of the subjects. Polyuria was the commonest symptom and hypertension the commonest comorbidity. Majority of the subjects were on oral hypolgycaemic agents for the management of their disease with the sulphonyureas and biguanides being the most common medication that was taken by them. A few of the patients were also taking herbal medication for treatment of their disease. Majority of the patients presenting in our facility have Type 2 diabetes, were hypertensive and overweight. Hypertension was the commonest co-morbidity and diabetic neuropathy the commonest complication. Adequate health education, subsidies on medications and proper funding of the health sector is necessary to stem the tide of the burden attributable to the disease. (author)

  13. Fragile X checklists: A meta-analysis and development of a simplified universal clinical checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubala, Toni Kasole; Lumaka, Aimé; Kanteng, Gray; Mutesa, Léon; Mukuku, Olivier; Wembonyama, Stanislas; Hagerman, Randi; Luboya, Oscar Numbi; Lukusa Tshilobo, Prosper

    2018-04-06

    has identified the highest risk features for patients with Fragile X syndrome that have been used to design a universal clinical checklist. © 2018 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Memory functioning in children with reading disabilities and/or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a clinical investigation of their working memory and long-term memory functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibby, Michelle Y; Cohen, Morris J

    2008-11-01

    We examined memory functioning in children with reading disabilities (RD), Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and RD/ADHD using a clinic sample with a clinical instrument: the Children's Memory Scale, enhancing its generalizability. Participants included 23 children with RD, 30 with ADHD, 30 with RD/ADHD, and 30 controls. Children with RD presented with reduced verbal short-term memory (STM) but intact visual STM, central executive (CE), and long-term memory (LTM) functioning. Their deficit in STM appeared specific to tasks requiring phonetic coding of material. Children with ADHD displayed intact CE and LTM functioning but reduced visual-spatial STM, especially when off stimulant medication. Children with RD/ADHD had deficits consistent with both disorders.

  15. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engeström, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136].

  16. The Influence of Translation on Reading Amount, Proficiency, and Speed in Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to examine the influence of a decrease in translation on the number of words read, reading comprehension, and reading rate in an extensive reading (ER) program. The participants were 70 first-year university students who experienced ER both in and outside the classroom for 15 weeks. The results of regression analyses confirmed…

  17. State University of New York, University of Stoney Brook, University and Clinical Practice Management Plan Space Leasing Practices. Report 96-S-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report assesses the propriety and economy of space leasing practices of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY-SB) for the period July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1996, specifically those related to a health center that includes five professional schools, a 536-bed teaching hospital, and a 350-bed veterans' home. Some of…

  18. Readings in risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glickman, Theodore S; Gough, Michael

    1990-01-01

    ... from Resources for the Future are distributed worldwide by The Johns Hopkins University Press. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Readings in risk I Theodore S. Glickman and Michael Gough, editors. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-915707-55-1 (alk. paper) 1. Technology-Risk assessment. 2. Health risk assessment....

  19. The need for reviewing log books in Birjand University of Medical Sciences clinical wards: Letter to Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Tahergorabi

    2017-08-01

    Furthermore, due to the pervasive use of electronic log books in recent years in medical universities across the country that are in line with developments and innovations in medical education, it is recommended that the log books at this university too, should be presented and evaluated electronically. Electronic log books with ongoing record of activities and clinical techniques based on educational objectives, in addition to learning consolidation, determine unavailable measures to achieve clinical objectives and, thus, cause regular monitoring and evaluation on the part of students.

  20. Depression and anxiety in patients on chronic hemodialysis in University Clinical Hospital Mostar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarić, Miro; Letica, Ivona; Petrov, Bozo; Tomić, Monika; Klarić, Branka; Letica, Ludvig; Francisković, Tanja

    2009-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are prevailing mental problem in patients on chronic hemodialysis and they have great influence on outcome of illness. Additionally, these disorders are rarely identified in that population of patients and they are insufficiently treated. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients on chronic hemodialysis in University Clinical Hospital Mostar and to examine the correlation between the demographic variables and the time spent on dialysis with depression and anxiety levels. The experimental group consisted of 56 patients on chronic hemodialysis in Mostar Clinical Hospital. The control group 1 consisted of 53 patients diagnosed with a chronic illness and treated for at least a year, while the control group 2 consisted of 51 persons who were not diagnosed with any chronic somatic or mental illness. Demographic data were collected using the constructed questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory-BDI was used to determine depression, while the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-STAI was used to determine anxiety. We recorded significantly higher prevalence of depression in patients on chronic dialysis (51.8%) than in patients with a chronic illness (41.5%) and persons without chronic illnesses (9.8%; p < 0.001). Trait anxiety level was significantly higher in hemodialysed patients compared to the other two groups (p = 0.006) but there were no significant differences in state anxiety level. The study has not shown any significant difference in the prevalence of depression and anxiety level regarding the differences in sex, gender and education level, apart from a higher level of state anxiety in patients with a lower education level (p = 0.032). These results indicate that patients on hemodialysis have a significantly higher level of depression and a higher level of trait anxiety compared to patients with chronic illnesses and especially compared to general population.

  1. Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miani, Celine; Marjanovic, Sonja; Jones, Molly Morgan; Marshall, Martin; Meikle, Samantha; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is seen to be central to improving the quality of healthcare and existing research suggests that absence of leadership is related to poor quality and safety performance. Leadership training might therefore provide an important means through which to promote quality improvement and, more widely, performance within the healthcare environment. This article presents an evaluation of the Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme, which combines leadership training and quality improvement initiatives with the placement of temporary external clinical champions in Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. We assessed impacts of the Programme on individual and organisational change, alongside core enablers and barriers for Programme success. Analyses drew on the principles of a theory-of-change-led realist evaluation, using logic modelling to specify the underlying causal mechanisms of the Programme. Data collection involved a stakeholder workshop, online questionnaires of programme participants, senior managers and support staff (n=114), and follow-up in-depth semi-structured interviews with a subsample of survey participants (n=15). We observed that the Programme had notable impacts at individual and organisational levels. Examples of individual impact included enhanced communication and negotiation skills or increased confidence as a result of multi-modal leadership training. At the organisational level, participants reported indications of behaviour change among staff, with evidence of spill-over effects to non-participants towards a greater focus on patient-centred care. Our findings suggest that there is potential for combined leadership training and quality improvement programmes to contribute to strengthening a culture of care quality in healthcare organisations. Our study provides useful insights into strategies seeking to achieve sustainable improvement in NHS organisations.

  2. Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miani, Celine; Marjanovic, Sonja; Jones, Molly Morgan; Marshall, Martin; Meikle, Samantha; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Leadership is seen to be central to improving the quality of healthcare and existing research suggests that absence of leadership is related to poor quality and safety performance. Leadership training might therefore provide an important means through which to promote quality improvement and, more widely, performance within the healthcare environment. This article presents an evaluation of the Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme, which combines leadership training and quality improvement initiatives with the placement of temporary external clinical champions in Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. We assessed impacts of the Programme on individual and organisational change, alongside core enablers and barriers for Programme success. Analyses drew on the principles of a theory-of-change-led realist evaluation, using logic modelling to specify the underlying causal mechanisms of the Programme. Data collection involved a stakeholder workshop, online questionnaires of programme participants, senior managers and support staff (n=114), and follow-up in-depth semi-structured interviews with a subsample of survey participants (n=15). We observed that the Programme had notable impacts at individual and organisational levels. Examples of individual impact included enhanced communication and negotiation skills or increased confidence as a result of multi-modal leadership training. At the organisational level, participants reported indications of behaviour change among staff, with evidence of spill-over effects to non-participants towards a greater focus on patient-centred care. Our findings suggest that there is potential for combined leadership training and quality improvement programmes to contribute to strengthening a culture of care quality in healthcare organisations. Our study provides useful insights into strategies seeking to achieve sustainable improvement in NHS organisations. PMID:28083304

  3. Clinical usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Galeano, Evelyn; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Len-Abad, Oscar; Pou-Clavé, Leonor; Sordé-Masip, Roger; Meije-Castillo, Yolanda; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Barba-Suñol, Pere; Monforte-Torres, Victor; Román-Broto, Antonio; Pahissa-Berga, Albert; Gavaldà-Santapau, Joan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of voriconazole (VOR) in a university hospital. A retrospective review was conducted on the clinical records of 52 patients treated with VOR and on whom TDM was performed. Steady-state trough plasma VOR concentration was measured at least 5 days after starting treatment. The therapeutic range of plasma VOR concentration was defined as 1-5.5μg/mL. The most frequent underlying conditions in the study population were lung transplant (48.1%) and hematological malignancies (26.9%). At the first TDM in each patient, VOR levels were outside the therapeutic range in 16 (30.7%) cases: 5.5μg/mL in 6 (11.5%). Eleven patients (21.2%) experienced severe muscle weakness and had considerable difficulty walking. All these patients were receiving concomitant treatment with corticosteroids. Age younger than 30 years (p=.005) and cystic fibrosis as the underlying disease (p=.04) were factors associated with low VOR levels. Almost all patients who had VOR concentrations >1μg/mL at the first TDM had a successful outcome (96%). Plasma VOR concentrations were outside the therapeutic range at the first TDM in 30% (16/52) of patients. Age younger than 30 years and cystic fibrosis were factors associated with low VOR levels. The potential interactions between corticosteroids and VOR should be highlighted, as they could be responsible for a high rate of muscle weakness observed in our patients. Prospective trials are needed to investigate VOR TDM and corticosteroid pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Combining clinical practice and academic work in nursing: A qualitative study about perceived importance, facilitators and barriers regarding clinical academic careers for nurses in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Goedhart, Nicole S; Francke, Anneke L; Vermeulen, Hester

    2017-12-01

    To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurse academics and other stakeholders regarding the importance, facilitators and barriers for nurses combining clinical and academic work in university hospitals. Combining clinical practice and academic work facilitates the use of research findings for high-quality patient care. However, nurse academics move away from the bedside because clinical academic careers for nurses have not yet been established in the Netherlands. This qualitative study was conducted in two Dutch university hospitals and their affiliated medical faculties and universities of applied sciences. Data were collected between May 2015 and August 2016. We used purposive sampling for 24 interviews. We asked 14 participants in two focus groups for their perceptions of importance, facilitators and barriers in nurses' combined clinical and academic work in education and research. We audiotaped, transcribed and thematically analysed the interviews and focus groups. Three themes related to perceived importance, facilitators and barriers: culture, leadership and infrastructure. These themes represent deficiencies in facilitating clinical academic careers for nurses. The current nursing culture emphasises direct patient care, which is perceived as an academic misfit. Leadership is lacking at all levels, resulting in the underuse of nurse academics and the absence of supporting structures for nurses who combine clinical and academic work. The present nursing culture appears to be the root cause of the dearth of academic positions and established clinical academic posts. A culture change would require a show of leadership that would promote and enable combined research, teaching and clinical practice and that would introduce clinical academic career pathways for nurses. Meanwhile, nurse academics should collaborate with established medical academics for whom combined roles are mainstream, and they should take advantage of their established infrastructure

  5. Development of a Case-based Reading Curriculum and Its Effect on Resident Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Messman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Textbook reading plays a foundational role in a resident’s knowledge base. Many residency programs place residents on identical reading schedules, regardless of the clinical work or rotation the resident is doing. We sought to develop a reading curriculum that takes into account the clinical work a resident is doing so their reading curriculum corresponds with their clinical work. Preliminary data suggests an increased amount of resident reading and an increased interest in reading as a result of this change to their reading curriculum.

  6. Clinical information system post-adoption evaluation at the georges pompidou university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Jean-Marc; Dart, Thierry; Dupuis, Isabelle; Leneveut, Laurence; Degoulet, Patrice

    2010-11-13

    The evaluation of a clinical information system (CIS) at different stages of deployment and routine use is a key factor to improve acceptability and use by health professionals. This paper examines on an expectation-confirmation model (ITPAM) the relationships between the determinants of success of a CIS in a cross-sectional survey performed at the Georges Pompidou University Hospital (HEGP). Results for the groups of physicians and nurses that replied to the survey (n=312) suggest that health professional satisfaction (overall R(2)=0.60) is determined by the quality of user support (r=.21, p=<0001), ease of use (r=.19, p=<0001), confirmation of expectations (r=.15, p=.0037), usefulness (r=.12, p=.0068), and compatibility (r=.10, p=.0206). The best predictor of physician satisfaction (R(2)=0.71) was compatibility (r=.21, p=.0072) whereas for nurses (R(2)=0.52) it was user support (r=.22, p=<0001) and ease of use (r=.22, p=.0001). Confirmation of expectations had an impact on post-adoption expectation and user's satisfaction, and confirms its importance for CIS evaluation studies.

  7. Perceptions of Ghanaian medical students completing a clinical elective at the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Nauzley C; Danso-Bamfo, Sandra; Moyer, Cheryl A; Danso, Kwabena A; Mäkiharju, Heather; Donkor, Peter; Johnson, Timothy R B; Kolars, Joseph C

    2014-07-01

    International medical electives typically represent a unidirectional flow of students from economically advantaged countries in the global "North" to resource-poor nations in the global "South." Little is known about the impact of bilateral exchanges on students from less affluent nations. Since 2007, students from the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) and medical schools in Ghana have engaged in a bilateral clinical exchange program. A 45-item online survey was distributed to all 73 Ghanaian medical students who had rotated at UMMS from 2008 to 2010 to assess perspectives on the value and impact of their participation. Incoming Ghanaian students outnumbered outgoing UMMS students 73 to 33 during the study period. Of eligible Ghanaian students, 70% (51/73) participated in the survey, with 40 of 51 providing valid data on at least 50% of questions. Ninety-seven percent (37/38) reported that the UMMS rotation was valuable to their medical training, 90% (35/39) reported changes in how they approach patient care, and 77% (24/31) reported feeling better equipped to serve patients in their home community. Eighty-five percent of students (28/33) felt more inclined to pursue training opportunities outside of their home country after their rotation at UMMS. More studies are needed to determine the feasibility of bidirectional exchanges as well as the short-term and long-term impact of rotations on students from underresourced settings and their hosts in more resource-rich environments.

  8. [Pediatric victims of traffic accidents admitted to a university hospital: epidemiological and clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitas, Juliana Pontes Pinto; Ribeiro, Lindioneza Adriano; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzes epidemiological and clinic characteristics of victims of traffic accidents. Data were obtained from medical records of children under 15 years of age (n = 1,123) admitted to a university hospital in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from 1999 to 2003. Mean age was eight years, 65.7% were boys, 76.6% were cyclists or pedestrians, 45.9% suffered head injuries, and 9% remained in hospital for more than two weeks. Fourteen (1.2%) died, 78.6% of these within 48 hours of hospitalization, and 85.7% with brain injuries. Among the passengers of motorcycles and larger vehicles, 58.8% were not using security devices properly at the time of the accident. Among the cyclists, 61% suffered isolated limb injuries. Meanwhile, pedestrians tended to suffer multiple lesions (57.5%) and be admitted to intensive care (7.1%), and represented 66.7% of the deaths. Epidemiological data on pediatric traffic victims can be useful for accident prevention programs.

  9. Reading Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Canadian Institute for Research in Behavioral and Social Sciences of Calgary was awarded a contract by the Provincial Government of Alberta to assess student skills and knowledge in reading and written composition. Here evaluation is defined and the use of standardized and criterion referenced tests for evaluating reading performance are…

  10. Effect of the PREPARE Website vs an Easy-to-Read Advance Directive on Advance Care Planning Documentation and Engagement Among Veterans: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudore, Rebecca L; Boscardin, John; Feuz, Mariko A; McMahan, Ryan D; Katen, Mary T; Barnes, Deborah E

    2017-08-01

    Documentation rates of patients' medical wishes are often low. It is unknown whether easy-to-use, patient-facing advance care planning (ACP) interventions can overcome barriers to planning in busy primary care settings. To compare the efficacy of an interactive, patient-centered ACP website (PREPARE) with an easy-to-read advance directive (AD) to increase planning documentation. This was a comparative effectiveness randomized clinical trial from April 2013 to July 2016 conducted at multiple primary care clinics at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. Inclusion criteria were age of a least 60 years; at least 2 chronic and/or serious conditions; and 2 or more primary care visits; and 2 or more additional clinic, hospital, or emergency room visits in the last year. Participants were randomized to review PREPARE plus an easy-to-read AD or the AD alone. There were no clinician and/or system-level interventions or education. Research staff were blinded for all follow-up measurements. The primary outcome was new ACP documentation (ie, legal forms and/or discussions) at 9 months. Secondary outcomes included patient-reported ACP engagement at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months using validated surveys of behavior change process measures (ie, 5-point knowledge, self-efficacy, readiness scales) and action measures (eg, surrogate designation, using a 0-25 scale). We used intention-to-treat, mixed-effects logistic and linear regression, controlling for time, health literacy, race/ethnicity, baseline ACP, and clustering by physician. The mean (SD) age of 414 participants was 71 (8) years, 38 (9%) were women, 83 (20%) had limited literacy, and 179 (43%) were nonwhite. No participant characteristic differed significantly among study arms at baseline. Retention at 6 months was 90%. Advance care planning documentation 6 months after enrollment was higher in the PREPARE arm vs the AD-alone arm (adjusted 35% vs 25%; odds ratio, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.03-2.51]; P = .04). PREPARE also resulted

  11. Psychosocial problems of pre-clinical students in the University of Ibadan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokhodion, F O

    2003-06-01

    Recent changes in the psychosocial environment of the university campus such as the steep rise in student numbers, the high cost of living standards and the increase in violence and cult activities has prompted the need to assess the impact of these changes on the students. A cross sectional study was carried out among pre-clinical medical students to identify their psychosocial problems. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information about socio-demographic variables including age, sex, sources of financial support, type of accommodation, smoking and drinking habits and use of recreational facilities. Causes of insecurity and depression among students were also recorded. The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12 was used to assess their mental health status. One hundred and seventy-six students responded to the enquiry, 94 males (53%) and 80 females (45%). One hundred and thirty-seven (79%) live on the campus while 37 (21%) live off campus. Only 9 of the students (5%) were smokers and 28 (16%) were drinkers. Monthly pocket money ranged from Naira 1,000 to Naira 25,000. Forty-one (23%) thought their pocket money was adequate, 92 (52%) thought it was fair and 39 (22%) thought it was inadequate. Causes of insecurity on the campus were cultism 34 (19%), lack of money 27 (15%), lack of textbooks 13 (7%) and stealing 10 (6%). Causes of depression include fear of failure of examinations, 62 (35%), lack of money, 48 (27%) and family problems 17 (10%). Mental health scores ranged from 1 to 10. Using a cut off point of 3 to delineate those with traits of poor mental health, 35 (21%) fell into the category 15 boys and 20 girls. Mean mental health score were higher for females, those living on campus, smokers and drinkers but this was not statistically significant. Fear of failure of examinations, cultism and lack of money are major concerns among medical students on the main university campus. Counselling services should be provided to assist students with

  12. How Reading Volume Affects both Reading Fluency and Reading Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. ALLINGTON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Long overlooked, reading volume is actually central to the development of reading proficiencies, especially in the development of fluent reading proficiency. Generally no one in schools monitors the actual volume of reading that children engage in. We know that the commonly used commercial core reading programs provide only material that requires about 15 minutes of reading activity daily. The remaining 75 minute of reading lessons is filled with many other activities such as completing workbook pages or responding to low-level literal questions about what has been read. Studies designed to enhance the volume of reading that children do during their reading lessons demonstrate one way to enhance reading development. Repeated readings have been widely used in fostering reading fluency but wide reading options seem to work faster and more broadly in developing reading proficiencies, including oral reading fluency.

  13. Empirical Correlates of Low Scores on MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in a Sample of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Tellegen, Auke; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the authors explored the meaning of low scores on the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Using responses of a sample of university students (N = 811), the authors examined whether low (T less than 39), within-normal-limits (T = 39-64), and high (T greater than 65) score levels on the RC scales are…

  14. [Development, problems and results of specialty-specific genetic counseling at the Neurology Clinic of the Karl Marx University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, H

    1987-11-01

    Genetic counselling for inherited neurological diseases has been established at the Clinic for Neurology of Karl Marx University. Comprehensive experiences have been got with the specific and sometimes markedly different problems and aims of counselling in Wilsons disease, X-linked recessive muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy and other neuromuscular disorders, Huntingtons chorea and hereditary ataxias.

  15. Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge and Attitude toward Registration Trials and Clinical Research: A Survey in a Japanese University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Ise

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical research plays a fundamental role in establishing new treatments. Clinical research coordinators are considered essential in clinical research, and medical professionals such as pharmacists often take on this role. Pharmacy students can be considered future candidates for this task. We used questionnaires to survey the knowledge of and attitudes toward registration trials and clinical research of pharmacy students at Tokushima University Hospital. All pharmacy students (103 to whom questionnaires were sent responded. Almost all respondents were aware of registration trials and clinical research. More than 90% were aware of the existence of clinical research coordinators, and about half (48.6% understood their role. In clinical research terminology, most respondents were aware of informed consent and related issues, but fewer than 20% were aware of more practical things. In total, 29.1% and 40.8% of the respondents were willing to carry out and coordinate research. These findings suggest that pharmacy students have basic knowledge of clinical research and that many students are willing to carry out and coordinate clinical research. More practical exposure to clinical research may help to strengthen their future contribution. Further studies may help to determine how to provide education on registration trials and clinical research to pharmacy students.

  16. Which Obstacles Prevent Us from Recruiting into Clinical Trials: A Survey about the Environment for Clinical Studies at a German University Hospital in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProspective clinical studies are the most important tool in modern medicine. The standard in good clinical practice in clinical trials has constantly improved leading to more sophisticated protocols. Moreover, translational questions are increasingly addressed in clinical trials. Such trials must follow elaborate rules and regulations. This is accompanied by a significant increase in documentation issues which require substantial manpower. Furthermore, university-based clinical centers are interested in increasing the amount of patients treated within clinical trials, and this number has evolved to be a key quality criterion. The present study was initiated to elucidate the obstacles that limit clinical scientists in screening and recruiting for clinical trials.MethodsA specific questionnaire with 28 questions was developed focusing on all aspects of clinical trial design as well as trial management. This included questions on organizational issues, medical topics as well as potential patients’ preferences and physician’s goals. The questionnaire was established to collect data anonymously on a web-based platform. The survey was conducted within the Klinikum rechts der Isar, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich; physicians of all levels (Department Chairs, attending physicians, residents, as well as study nurses, and other study-related staff were addressed. The answers were analyzed using the Survio analyzing tool (http://www.survio.com/de/.ResultsWe collected 42 complete sets of answers; in total 28 physicians, 11 study nurses, and 3 persons with positions in administration answered our survey. The study centers reported to participate in a range of 3–160 clinical trials with a recruitment rate of 1–80%. Main obstacles were determined: 31/42 (74% complained about limited human resources and 22/42 (52% reported to have a lack on technical resources, too. 30/42 (71% consented to the answer, that the documentation

  17. Promoting preschool reading

    OpenAIRE

    Istenič, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The thesis titled Promoting preschool reading consists of a theoretiral and an empirical part. In the theoretical part I wrote about reading, the importance of reading, types of reading, about reading motivation, promoting reading motivation, internal and external motivation, influence of reading motivation on the child's reading activity, reading and familial literacy, the role of adults in promotion reading literacy, reading to a child and promoting reading in pre-school years, where I ...

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  19. Evaluation of Dental Status of Adolescents at Kuwait University Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the dental status of adolescents initially presenting at Kuwait University Dental Clinic (KUDC). The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate (a) the prevalence of unrestored caries dentin among 12- to 16-year-old Kuwaiti residents, (b) the frequency of restorations extending into the inner half of the dentin, and (c) tooth loss pattern among this age group. Twelve- to 16-year-old patients who attended KUDC during the period January 2009 to December 2012 were included in this study. The total number of patients included in the study was 486; however, only 409 panoramic radiographs were available for evaluation. The Student t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. The prevalence of unrestored dentin caries among 12- to 16-year-old patients was 52%. The frequency of deep restorations extending into the inner half of the dentin was 33%. Tooth loss was found in 8.0% of the sampled population. The most common missing tooth was the mandibular first molar followed by the mandibular second premolar and the maxillary first molar. There were no statistical differences between Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti residents regardless of gender; however, males had a slightly higher DMFT. The DMFT and DMFS values in this study were higher than in other studies. Despite the tremendous effort by the Kuwaiti government to improve oral health, comprehensive preventive strategies, dental treatment and maintenance of oral health are still necessary and must be reinforced in this age group.

  20. Pediatric chronic patients at outpatient clinics: a study in a Latin American University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alveno, Renata A; Miranda, Caroline V; Passone, Caroline G; Waetge, Aurora R; Hojo, Elza S; Farhat, Sylvia C L; Odone-Filho, Vicente; Tannuri, Uenis; Carvalho, Werther B; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Silva, Clovis A

    2017-10-02

    To describe the characteristics of children and adolescentes with chronic diseases of outpatient clinics at a tertiary university hospital. A cross-sectional study was performed with 16,237 patients with chronic diseases followed-up in one year. The data were collected through the electronic system, according to the number of physician appointments in 23 pediatric specialties. Patients were divided in two groups: children (0-9 years) and adolescents (10-19 years). Early (10-14 years) and late (15-19 years) adolescent groups were also analyzed. Of the total sample, 56% were children and 46% were adolescents. The frequencies of following pediatric specialties were significantly higher in adolescents when compared with children: cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, nephrology/renal transplantation, neurology, nutrology, oncology, palliative and pain care, psychiatry, and rheumatology (p<0.05). The frequencies of emergency service visits (30% vs. 17%, p<0.001), hospitalizations (23% vs. 11%, p<0.001), intensive care unit admissions (6% vs. 2%, p<0.001), and deaths (1% vs. 0.6%, p=0.002) were significantly lower in adolescents than in children. However, the number of physician appointments (≥13) per patient was also higher in the adolescent group (5% vs. 6%, p=0.018). Further analysis comparison between early and late adolescents revealed that the first group had significantly more physician appointments (35% vs. 32%, p=0.025), and required more than two pediatric specialties (22% vs. 21%, p=0.047). Likewise, the frequencies of emergency service visits (19% vs. 14%, p<0.001) and hospitalizations (12% vs. 10%, p=0.035) were higher in early adolescents. This study evaluated a large population in a Latin American hospital and suggested that early adolescents with chronic diseases required many appointments, multiple specialties and hospital admissions. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of life Among Women who were Attending to Trakya University Hospital Menopause clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tokuç

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To asses the menopause symptoms and the impact of menopause and some socio-demographic variables and the hormon replacement therapy on quality of life among women who were attending to a menopause\tMatreial and METHOD: The study was a cross-sectional and descriptive study which was conducted on 299 women who were\tattending to Trakya University Hospital Menopause Clinic, between February –September 2005. After applying a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, Menopause Rating Scale (MRS, SF-36 Health Survey and Hospital\tAnxiety and Depression Scale were applied by trained interns respectively.\tRESULTS: The mean age of respondents was 52.07±6.12 r(36.0 – 76.0. The mean age of menopause was 45.8±5.1 (26.0 – 56.0. 18.9 % of women were still using HRT, 37.0% have used in the past and 44.1% of them have never used HRT. Women who were stil using HRT, who were stil working, who were educated more than 8 years and who have had no problems in the family have had significantly lower MRS scores and significantly higher SF-36 scores than the others. While MRS scores and SF-36 scores were increasing, the HAD scores were decreasing significantly.\tCONCLUSION: We could say that the menopause symptoms effected the women’s health and quality of life, negatively. But it was\tnot the only determinant of health perception and quality of life. The socio-economic, environmental and cultural factors and life style were also effective in menopause period like the other periods of life.

  2. [Clinical and epidemiological profile of tuberculosis in a university hospital in Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Alvaro; Köhnenkampf, Ruth; Navarrete, Pablo; García, Patricia; Balcells, M Elvira

    2012-07-01

    The incidence and epidemiological profile of tuberculosis (TB) has changed significantly in the recent years in Chile. To evaluate the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of TB cases diagnosed in the last decade at a university hospital in Santiago. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture registry of the microbiology laboratory was reviewed. Medical records of patients with a positive culture registered between 2000 and 2010 were retrieved and analyzed. Two hundred forty positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures were identified and the medical records of 158 of these patients were accessed for analysis. The median age was 53 years (range: 3 to 89), 55.1% were female and nearly 42% had extra-pulmonary TB. Among known risk factors, 32.9% of patients were older than 65 years, 4.4% were health care workers and 3.9% immigrants. Twenty eight percent (41/145) had some type of immunosuppression at diagnosis: 11.7% HIV infection and 16.6% were using immunosuppressive drugs. In this group, a previous tuberculin skin test was done in only 5 cases (12.2%). Adverse events related to TB treatment were reported in 21.3% of cases (17/80). No cases of fulminant hepatitis or death from this cause were identified. Four of 92 patients that had a complete follow up during treatment, died. Two of these patients were receiving steroids. Almost one third of TB cases occurred among immunosuppressed patients and 42% were extra-pulmonary forms. The prevention of TB reactivation in this group should be strengthened.

  3. Assessing nursing clinical skills competence through objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for open distance learning students in Open University Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranye, Nelson Ositadimma; Ahmad, Che'an; Ahmad, Nora; Bakar, Rosnida Abu

    2012-06-01

    The objective structured clinical skills examination (OSCE) has over the years emerged as a method of evaluating clinical skills in most medical and allied professions. Although its validity and objectivity has evoked so much debate in the literature, little has been written about its application in non-traditional education systems such as in distance learning. This study examined clinical skills competence among practising nursing students who were enrolled in a distance learning programme. The study examined the effect of work and years of nursing practice on nurses' clinical skills competence. This study used observational design whereby nursing students' clinical skills were observed and scored in five OSCE stations. Two instruments were used for the data collection - A self-administered questionnaire on the students' bio-demographic data, and a check list on the clinical skills which the examiners rated on a four point scale. The findings revealed that 14% of the nurses had level four competence, which indicated that they could perform the tasks correctly and complete. However, 12% failed the OSCE, even though they had more than 10 years experience in nursing and post basic qualifications. Inter-rater reliability was 0.92 for the five examiners. Factor analysis indicated that five participant factors accounted for 74.1% of the variations in clinical skills performance. An OSCE is a necessary assessment tool that should be continuously applied in nursing education, regardless of the mode of the education program, the student's years of experience or his/her clinical placement. This study validates the need for OSCE in both the design of tertiary nursing degree programs and the assessment of nurses' clinical competency level.

  4. Does clinical experience affect knowledge regarding hepatitis-B among male medical students at a private university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisar, N.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of male medical students about Hepatitis-B in their preclinical and clinical years and to investigate the self reported vaccination status of these students. In the year of 2007, 187 male students of Isra University Hyderabad Sindh Pakistan were selected by convenient sampling and surveyed with a self reported questionnaire comprising of questions regarding knowledge about hepatitis B. Data gathered was analyzed by SPSS V. 16. Knowledge between preclinical and clinical students were compared by Pearson's coefficient chi square test, p value < 0.005 was considered significant. Out of 187 students interviewed, 73 (39%) and 114 (61%) were from preclinical and clinical years respectively. Significant difference was found in clinical and preclinical students regarding basic knowledge about hepatitis B. and mode of transmission of disease (P= 0.004) and (P=< 0.001) respectively. Significant difference was found in the knowledge of both preclinical and clinical male medical students. (JPMA 59:808; 2009). (author)

  5. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Associated Clinical Features among Australian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Dianna

    2007-01-01

    The current study addressed the frequency of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms among university students and investigated the predictors of dysmorphic concern. Six hundred and nineteen Australian university students completed measures assessing BDD, dysmorphic concern, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, self-oriented and socially…

  6. Clinical and academic use of electronic and print books: the Health Sciences Library System e-book study at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folb, Barbara L; Wessel, Charles B; Czechowski, Leslie J

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) electronic book (e-book) study was to assess use, and factors affecting use, of e-books by all patron groups of an academic health sciences library serving both university and health system-affiliated patrons. A web-based survey was distributed to a random sample (n=5,292) of holders of library remote access passwords. A total of 871 completed and 108 partially completed surveys were received, for an approximate response rate of 16.5%-18.5%, with all user groups represented. Descriptive and chi-square analysis was done using SPSS 17. Library e-books were used by 55.4% of respondents. Use by role varied: 21.3% of faculty reported having assigned all or part of an e-book for class readings, while 86% of interns, residents, and fellows reported using an e-book to support clinical care. Respondents preferred print for textbooks and manuals and electronic format for research protocols, pharmaceutical, and reference books, but indicated high flexibility about format choice. They rated printing and saving e-book content as more important than annotation, highlighting, and bookmarking features. Respondents' willingness to use alternate formats, if convenient, suggests that libraries can selectively reduce title duplication between print and e-books and still support library user information needs, especially if publishers provide features that users want. Marketing and user education may increase use of e-book collections.

  7. Reading comprehension and reading related abilities in adolescents with reading disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelani, Karen; Sidhu, Robindra; Jain, Umesh; Tannock, Rosemary

    2004-11-01

    Reading comprehension is a very complex task that requires different cognitive processes and reading abilities over the life span. There are fewer studies of reading comprehension relative to investigations of word reading abilities. Reading comprehension difficulties, however, have been identified in two common and frequently overlapping childhood disorders: reading disability (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The nature of reading comprehension difficulties in these groups remains unclear. The performance of four groups of adolescents (RD, ADHD, comorbid ADHD and RD, and normal controls) was compared on reading comprehension tasks as well as on reading rate and accuracy tasks. Adolescents with RD showed difficulties across most reading tasks, although their comprehension scores were average. Adolescents with ADHD exhibited adequate single word reading abilities. Subtle difficulties were observed, however, on measures of text reading rate and accuracy as well as on silent reading comprehension, but scores remained in the average range. The comorbid group demonstrated similar difficulties to the RD group on word reading accuracy and on reading rate but experienced problems on only silent reading comprehension. Implications for reading interventions are outlined, as well as the clinical relevance for diagnosis.

  8. Reading Aloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 34 children's books that are excellent for reading aloud: some of them for inviting interaction, for laughing out loud, for prompting discussion, for living vicariously, for lingering over language, and for making curricular connections. (SR)

  9. Factors Enhancing Manpower Efficiency from the Viewpoint of Clinical and Non-clinical Faculty Members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Mehrabian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are various factors that affect manpower efficiency. Identification of the most important and influential factors on efficiency is quite essential. Analysis of factors affecting manpower efficiency from the viewpoint of clinical and non-clinical faculty members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: This descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional study was performed in October and November in 2011. The study sample consisted of 186 faculty members, including 128 clinical and 58 non-clinical. Instruments used to collect library data were questionnaire and field studies. Exploratory factor analysis with Varimax rotation was utilized to determine the factors influencing manpower efficiency as well as loading level of each of the variables. Results: Among clinical faculty members, 70.66% of changes in manpower efficiency, and among non-clinical faculty members, 79.57% of changes in manpower efficiency were explained by 9 and 8 factors, respectivelyConclusion: Staff empowerment and organizational culture were recognized as the most important factors enhancing manpower efficiency from the viewpoint of clinical and non-clinical faculty members, respectively.

  10. Demographic characteristics and clinical predictors of patients discharged from university hospital-affiliated pain clinic due to breach in narcotic use contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortty, Shushovan; Gupta, Deepak; Rustom, David; Berry, Hussein; Rai, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    The current retrospective study was completed with the aim to identify demographic characteristics and clinical predictors (if any) of the patients discharged from our pain clinic due to breach in narcotic use contract (BNUC). Retrospective patient charts' review and data audit. University hospital-affiliated pain clinic in the United States. All patient charts in our pain clinic for a 2-year period (2011-2012). The patients with BNUC were delineated from the patients who had not been discharged from our pain clinic. Pain characteristics, pain management, and substance abuse status were compared in each patient with BNUC between the time of admission and the time of discharge. The patients with BNUC discharges showed significant variability for the discharging factors among the pain physicians within a single pain clinic model with this variability being dependent on their years of experience and their proactive interventional pain management. The patients with BNUC in our pain clinic setting were primarily middle-aged, obese, unmarried males with nondocumented stable occupational history who were receiving only noninterventional pain management. Substance abuse, doctor shopping, and potential diversion were the top three documented reasons for BNUC discharges. In 2011-2012, our pain clinic discharged 1-in-16 patients due to breach in narcotic use contract.

  11. MCNP6 model of the University of Washington clinical neutron therapy system (CNTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Gregory B; Stewart, Robert D; Sandison, George A; Goorley, John T; Argento, David C; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-21

    A MCNP6 dosimetry model is presented for the Clinical Neutron Therapy System (CNTS) at the University of Washington. In the CNTS, fast neutrons are generated by a 50.5 MeV proton beam incident on a 10.5 mm thick Be target. The production, scattering and absorption of neutrons, photons, and other particles are explicitly tracked throughout the key components of the CNTS, including the target, primary collimator, flattening filter, monitor unit ionization chamber, and multi-leaf collimator. Simulations of the open field tissue maximum ratio (TMR), percentage depth dose profiles, and lateral dose profiles in a 40 cm × 40 cm × 40 cm water phantom are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements. For a nominal 10 × 10 field, the measured and calculated TMR values for depths of 1.5 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm (compared to the dose at 1.7 cm) are within 0.22%, 2.23%, 4.30%, and 6.27%, respectively. For the three field sizes studied, 2.8 cm × 2.8 cm, 10.4 cm × 10.3 cm, and 28.8 cm × 28.8 cm, a gamma test comparing the measured and simulated percent depth dose curves have pass rates of 96.4%, 100.0%, and 78.6% (depth from 1.5 to 15 cm), respectively, using a 3% or 3 mm agreement criterion. At a representative depth of 10 cm, simulated lateral dose profiles have in-field (⩾ 10% of central axis dose) pass rates of 89.7% (2.8 cm × 2.8 cm), 89.6% (10.4 cm × 10.3 cm), and 100.0% (28.8 cm × 28.8 cm) using a 3% and 3 mm criterion. The MCNP6 model of the CNTS meets the minimum requirements for use as a quality assurance tool for treatment planning and provides useful insights and information to aid in the advancement of fast neutron therapy.

  12. Medical Students’ Clinical Skills Do Not Match Their Teachers’ Expectations: Survey at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sičaja, Mario; Romić, Dominik; Prka, Željko

    2006-01-01

    Aim To evaluate self-assessed level of clinical skills of graduating medical students at Zagreb University School of Medicine and compare them with clinical skill levels expected by their teachers and those defined by a criterion standard. Method The study included all medical students (n = 252) graduating from the Zagreb University School of Medicine in the 2004-2005 academic year and faculty members (n = 129) teaching clinical skills. The participants completed anonymous questionnaire listing 99 clinical skills divided into nine groups. Students were asked to assess their clinical skills on a 0-5 scale, and faculty members were asked to assess the minimum necessary level of clinical skills expected from graduating medical students, using the same 0-5 scale. We compared the assessment scores of faculty members with students’ self-assessment scores. Participants were grouped according to their descriptive characteristics for further comparison. Results The response rate was 91% for students and 70% for faculty members. Students’ self-assessment scores in all nine groups of clinical skills ranged from 2.2 ± 0.8 to 3.8 ± 0.5 and were lower than those defined by the criterion standard (3.0-4.0) and those expected by teachers (from 3.1 ± 1.0 to 4.4 ± 0.5) (P<0.001 for all). Students who had additional clinical skills training had higher scores in all groups of skills, ranging from 2.6 ± 0.9 to 4.0 ± 0.5 (P<0.001 for all). Male students had higher scores than female students in emergency (P<0.001), neurology (P = 0.017), ear, nose, and throat (P = 0.002), urology (P = 0.003), and surgery skills (P = 0.002). Teachers’ expectations did not vary according to their sex, academic position, or specialty. Conclusion Students’ self-assessed level of clinical skills was lower than that expected by their teachers. Education during clinical rotations is not focused on acquiring clinical skills, and additional clinical

  13. Medical genetic issues in clinical of pediatric neurology practice:a history of pediatrics in Peking University First Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi-ru

    2006-02-18

    The Department of Pediatrics of Peking University First Hospital has a long term of outstanding history. It was established about 60 years ago. After the division of pediatric neurology (DPN) had been established in 1960s, it had been assigned to cover genetic disorders. During the recent 20 years, efforts have been put on three aspects: (1) Pediatric neurology clinical service and education; (2) research studies of childhood epilepsies and pediatric neurogenetic disorders; and (3) development of a strong DPN team to establish a comprehensive pediatric neurological program. In this paper, we reviewed the history of the pediatric neurology division in our department, our clinical and research work and achievements for neurogenetic diseases.

  14. [Clinical electro-ophthalmology at the Max Planck Institute of the Frankfurt University Ophthalmology Clinic 1970-1991].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R; Baier, M; Eckl, G; Raile, A

    1996-07-01

    The survey shows the frequency and distribution of diseases evaluated by electroophthalmological methods. Patients with retinal diseases (51.2%) and those with diseases of the optic nerve (21.8%) were examined most frequently. In a high percentage these investigations lead to a clinically useful assessment: described as confirmation or exclusion of a clinical diagnosis, as establishing a possible differential diagnosis or clearing up formerly unknown aspects of a disease. In cases of hereditary retinal disorders only 11% remained unclear, with presumed optic neuritis only 6%. The importance of electroophthalmological investigations is there ability to assess functional deficits in the visual system especially in somehow more rare retinal and centrally located disorders, functional deficits of unknown origins or in general diseases including the visual system.

  15. [Publication performances of university clinics for anesthesiology: Germany, Austria and Switzerland from 2001 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, G; Ausserer, J; Wenzel, V; Pehböck, D; Widmann, T; Lindner, K; Hamm, P; Paal, P

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the publication performance of university departments of anesthesiology in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The number of publications, original articles, impact factors and citations were evaluated. A search was performed in PubMed to identify publications related to anesthesiology from 2001 to 2010. All articles from anesthesiology journals listed in the fields of anesthesia/pain therapy, critical care and emergency medicine by the "journal citation report 2013" in Thomson Reuters ISI web of knowledge were included. Articles from non-anaesthesiology journals, where the stem of the word anesthesia (anes*, anaes*, anäst*, anast*) appears in the affiliation field of PubMed, were included as well. The time periods 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were compared. Articles were allocated to university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland via the affiliation field. A total of 45 university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland and 125,979 publications from 2,863 journals (65 anesthesiology journals, 2,798 non-anesthesiology journals) were analyzed. Of the publications 23 % could not be allocated to a given university department of anesthesiology. In the observation period the university department of anesthesiology in Berlin achieved most publications (n = 479) and impact points (1,384), whereas Vienna accumulated most original articles (n = 156). Austria had the most publications per million inhabitants in 2006-2010 (n=50) followed by Switzerland (n=49) and Germany (n=35). The number of publications during the observation period decreased in Germany (0.5 %), Austria (7 %) and Switzerland (8 %). Tables 2 and 4-8 of this article are available at Springer Link under Supplemental. The research performance varied among the university departments of anesthesiology in Germany, Austria and Switzerland whereby larger university departments, such as Berlin or Vienna published most. Publication output in Germany, Austria and

  16. Attitude of clinical faculty members in Shiraz Medical University towards private practice physicians' participation in ambulatory care education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatereh Mahori

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement of medical education is necessary for meeting health care demands. Participation of private practice physicians in ambulatory care training is an effective method for enhancing medical students' skills. Purpose This study was undertaken to determine clinical professors' views about participation of physicians with private office in ambulatory care training. Methods: Participants composed of 162 Shiraz Medical University faculty members from 12 disciplines. A questionnaire requesting faculty members' views on different aspects of ambulat01y care teaching and interaction of community-based organizations was distributed. Results: Of 120 (74.1% respondents, 64 (54.2% believed that clinical settings of medical university are appropriate for ambulatory care training. Private practice physicians believed more than academic physicians without private office that private offices have wider range of patients, more common cases, and better follow up chance; and is also a better setting for learning ambulatory care compared with medical university clinical centers. Overall, 32 (29.1% respondent’s found the participation of physicians with private practice on medical education positive. Key words medical education, ambulatory medicine, private practice

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer: the Georgetown University experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leonard N; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers fewer high-dose fractions of radiation which may be radiobiologically favorable to conventional low-dose fractions commonly used for prostate cancer radiotherapy. We report our early experience using SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Patients treated with SBRT from June 2008 to May 2010 at Georgetown University Hospital for localized prostate carcinoma, with or without the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), were included in this retrospective review of data that was prospectively collected in an institutional database. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35 Gy or 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Biochemical control was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the CTCAE v.3. Quality of life was assessed before and after treatment using the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUA) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaires. Late urinary symptom flare was defined as an AUA score ≥ 15 with an increase of ≥ 5 points above baseline six months after the completion of SBRT. One hundred patients (37 low-, 55 intermediate- and 8 high-risk according to the D’Amico classification) at a median age of 69 years (range, 48–90 years) received SBRT, with 11 patients receiving ADT. The median pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 6.2 ng/ml (range, 1.9-31.6 ng/ml) and the median follow-up was 2.3 years (range, 1.4-3.5 years). At 2 years, median PSA decreased to 0.49 ng/ml (range, 0.1-1.9 ng/ml). Benign PSA bounce occurred in 31% of patients. There was one biochemical failure in a high-risk patient, yielding a two-year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival of 99%. The 2-year actuarial incidence rates of GI and GU toxicity ≥ grade 2 were 1% and 31%, respectively. A median baseline AUA symptom score of 8 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p = 0.001), however returned to

  18. Redesign of a university hospital preanesthesia evaluation clinic using a queuing theory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, Maartje Elisabeth; Boer, Fredrik; Boucherie, Richardus J.; de Roode, Annemiek; van Kleef, Jack W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in patient length of stay (the duration of 1 clinic visit) as a result of the introduction of an electronic patient file system forced an anesthesia department to change its outpatient clinic organization. In this study, we sought to demonstrate how the involvement of essential

  19. CLINIC-LABORATORY DESIGN BASED ON FUNCTION AND PHILOSOPHY AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HANLEY, T.D.; STEER, M.D.

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES THE DESIGN OF A NEW CLINIC AND LABORATORY FOR SPEECH AND HEARING TO ACCOMMODATE THE THREE BASIC PROGRAMS OF--(1) CLINICAL TRAINING OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT MAJORS, (2) SERVICES MADE AVAILABLE TO THE SPEECH AND HEARING HANDICAPPED, AND (3) RESEARCH IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY, AUDIOLOGY, PSYCHO-ACOUSTICS, AND…

  20. Nurse-delivered universal point-of-care testing for HIV in an open-access returning traveller clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, R; Ashraf, A N; Yates, T A; Spriggs, K; Malinnag, M; Durward-Brown, E; Phillips, D; Mewse, E; Daniel, A; Armstrong, M; Kidd, I M; Waite, J; Wilks, P; Burns, F; Bailey, R; Brown, M

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV infection reduces morbidity and mortality associated with late presentation. Despite UK guidelines, the HIV testing rate has not increased. We have introduced universal HIV screening in an open-access returning traveller clinic. Data were prospectively recorded for all patients attending the open-access returning traveller clinic between August 2008 and December 2010. HIV testing was offered to all patients from May 2009; initially testing with laboratory samples (phase 1) and subsequently a point-of-care test (POCT) (phase 2). A total of 4965 patients attended the clinic; 1342 in phase 0, 792 in phase 1 and 2831 in phase 2. Testing rates for HIV increased significantly from 2% (38 of 1342) in phase 0 to 23.1% (183 of 792) in phase 1 and further increased to 44.5% (1261 of 2831) during phase 2 (P travelling to the Middle East and Europe were less likely to accept an HIV test with POCT. A nurse-delivered universal point-of-care HIV testing service has been successfully introduced and sustained in an acute medical clinic in a low-prevalence country. Caution is required in communicating reactive results in low-prevalence settings where there may be alternative diagnoses or a low population prevalence of HIV infection. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  1. Expansion of the consultation-liaison psychiatry paradigm at a university medical center: integration of diversified clinical and funding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hilty, Donald M; Klein, Sally C; Koike, Alan K; Servis, Mark E; Hales, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    The perspective of the contemporary Consultation-Liason Service (CLS) psychiatrist is increasingly one of consultant to medical and surgical colleagues in models other than inpatient medical and surgical units. Simultaneously, the need for a clinically and educationally robust inpatient CLS persists despite funding pressures. The University of California, Davis Medical Center Department of Psychiatry has made use of creative organizational and financial models to accomplish the inpatient CLS clinical and educational missions in a fiscally responsible manner. In addition, the department has in recent years expanded the delivery of psychiatry consultation-liaison clinical and educational services to other models of care delivery, broadening the role and influence of the CLS. Several of the initiatives described in this paper parallel an overall evolution of the practice of consultation-liaison psychiatry in response to managed care influences and other systems pressures. This consultation-liaison paradigm expansion with diversified sources of funding support facilitates the development of consultation-liaison psychiatry along additional clinical, administrative, research, and educational dimensions. Other university medical centers may consider adaptation of some of the initiatives described here to their institutions.

  2. [Skills lab training in veterinary medicine. Effective preparation for clinical work at the small animal clinic of the University for Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelskirchen, Simon; Ehlers, Jan; Kirk, Ansgar T; Tipold, Andrea; Dilly, Marc

    2017-09-20

    During five and a half years of studying veterinary medicine, students should in addition to theoretical knowledge acquire sufficient practical skills. Considering animal welfare and ethical aspects, opportunities for hands-on learning on living animals are limited because of the high annual number of students. The first German veterinary clinical-skills lab, established in 2013 at the University for Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation (TiHo), offers opportunities for all students to learn, train and repeat clinical skills on simulators and models as frequently as they would like, until they feel sufficiently confident to transfer these skills to living animals. This study describes the establishment of clinical-skills lab training within the students' practical education, using the example of the small-animal clinic of the TiHo. Two groups of students were compared: without skills lab training (control group K) and with skills lab training (intervention group I). At the end of both the training and a subsequent 10-week clinical rotation in different sections of the clinic, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was performed, testing the students' practical skills at 15 stations. An additional multiple-choice test was performed before and after the clinical rotation to evaluate the increased theoretical knowledge. Students of group I achieved significantly (p ≤ 0.05) better results in eight of the 15 tested skills. The multiple-choice test revealed a significant (p ≤ 0.05) gain of theoretical knowledge in both groups without any differences between the groups. Students displayed a high degree of acceptance of the skills lab training. Using simulators and models in veterinary education is an efficient teaching concept, and should be used continually and integrated in the curriculum.

  3. Validation of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale for Multicultural Screening in Danish Memory Clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Rune; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Gottrup, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) is a brief cognitive screening test that was developed to detect dementia in multicultural populations. The RUDAS has not previously been validated in multicultural populations outside of Australia. The aim of this study...

  4. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  5. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008?2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical...

  6. Reading Letters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    In our everyday life we constantly encounter a diversity of reading matters, including display types on traffic signage, printed text in novels, newspaper headlines, or our own writing on a computer screen. All these conditions place different demands on the typefaces applied. The book discusses...

  7. Reading Rembrandt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Reading Rembrandt: Beyond the Word-Image Opposition explores the potential for an interdisciplinary methodology between visual art and literature. In a series of close analyses of works by "Rembrandt" - works as we see them today, through all the ways of seeing and commenting that precede - and

  8. Reading While Listening on Mobile Devices: An Innovative Approach to Enhance Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochdi, Aicha; Eppard, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    This poster session will describe a study that took place at a university in the United Arab Emirates. The study included a reading app that was downloaded onto each student's individual mobile device. Students could read while listening to the stories. The primary goal of the study was to determine how, if at all, listening while reading in a…

  9. Anxiety and Academic Reading Performance among Malay ESL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd. Zin, Zuhana; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2010-01-01

    Research into the factors that contribute to reading performance decrement in L2 reading among ESL university students is still being extensively researched in the context of ELT. This is because successful academic performance is highly dependent on good reading ability. While it is widely accepted that poor reading performance is due to lack of…

  10. [Preconception counseling: evaluation of an outpatient clinic at a university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, S. de; Wouters, M.G.A.J.; Mom-Boertjens, J.; Bos, K.L.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of the outcomes from an outpatients' clinic for preconceptional counselling in the Netherlands and to assess its activities in terms of referrals, referral indications, supplementary investigations, treatment policy and a possible future pregnancy. DESIGN:

  11. Does Extensive Reading Promote Reading Speed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mu

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a wide range of learning benefits accruing from extensive reading. Not only is there improvement in reading, but also in a wide range of language uses and areas of language knowledge. However, few research studies have examined reading speed. The existing literature on reading speed focused on students' reading speed without…

  12. Achieving Educational Goals in Neurology Ward from the Viewpoint of Clinical Clerkship at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Razazian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In medical education, setting goals for clinical clerkship is the responsibility of educational groups. Taking the students' opinions into account, it is possible to study the efficacy of education in terms of learning and achieving educational goals. (1In periodontics and restorative departments of Shahed and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, it is reported that, achieving educational goals is not poss-ible (2. Also, some studies have reported the inadequacy of educational objectives in anesthesia clerkship from the viewpoint of medical students (3. In this descriptive-analytic study, 166 medical students of neurology wards at Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah during 2011- 2012 were selected via a survey to study the achievement rate of educational goals. We used a questionnaire to collect data. Reliability of the questionnaire (including content and face validity was obtained via consulting with ten faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.The mean age of the participants was 21.34 (±1.43 years. 60.5% of them were females. 3.6% were freshmen and 49.9% were sophomores. 79.5% knew the goals before the start of clinical clerkship and 76.5% took part in the justification session in which their responsibility and method of evaluation were presented. 78.3% of them received the emergency protocol of Neurology. Overall, the participants ranked the goal achievement as high (41.6%, well (45.2% and medium (23.3%. There was no statistically significantly association between achieving educational goals and age and clinical clerkship period. However, there was a statis¬tically significantly association between the increase rate of achieving educational goals and introducing the objectives at the beginning of clinical clerkship period (p=0.011, justification session at the beginning of clinical clerkship (p=0.019 being familiar with emergency protocols of Neurology (p=0.04 and the season (winter in comparison with fall and spring in

  13. Performance of Universal Adhesive in Primary Molars After Selective Removal of Carious Tissue: An 18-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Pires, Carine Weber; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; de Oliveira Rocha, Rachel

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the 18-month clinical performance of a universal adhesive, applied under different adhesion strategies, after selective carious tissue removal in primary molars. Forty-four subjects (five to 10 years old) contributed with 90 primary molars presenting moderately deep dentin carious lesions on occlusal or occluso-proximal surfaces, which were randomly assigned following either self-etch or etch-and-rinse protocol of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M ESPE). Resin composite was incrementally inserted for all restorations. Restorations were evaluated at one, six, 12, and 18 months using the modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Survival estimates for restorations' longevity were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis with shared frailty to assess the factors associated with failures (Padhesion strategy did not influence the restorations' longevity (P=0.06; 72.2 percent and 89.7 percent with etch-and-rinse and self-etch mode, respectively). Self-etch and etch-and-rinse strategies did not influence the clinical behavior of universal adhesive used in primary molars after selective carious tissue removal; although there was a tendency for better outcome of the self-etch strategy.

  14. The Georges Pompidou University Hospital Clinical Data Warehouse: A 8-years follow-up experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Zapletal, Eric; Avillach, Paul; Mamzer, Marie-France; Burgun, Anita; Degoulet, Patrice

    2017-06-01

    When developed jointly with clinical information systems, clinical data warehouses (CDWs) facilitate the reuse of healthcare data and leverage clinical research. To describe both data access and use for clinical research, epidemiology and health service research of the "Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou" (HEGP) CDW. The CDW has been developed since 2008 using an i2b2 platform. It was made available to health professionals and researchers in October 2010. Procedures to access data have been implemented and different access levels have been distinguished according to the nature of queries. As of July 2016, the CDW contained the consolidated data of over 860,000 patients followed since the opening of the HEGP hospital in July 2000. These data correspond to more than 122 million clinical item values, 124 million biological item values, and 3.7 million free text reports. The ethics committee of the hospital evaluates all CDW projects that generate secondary data marts. Characteristics of the 74 research projects validated between January 2011 and December 2015 are described. The use of HEGP CDWs is a key facilitator for clinical research studies. It required however important methodological and organizational support efforts from a biomedical informatics department. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. "If There Is a Job Description I Don't Think I've Read One": A Case Study of Programme Leadership in a UK Pre-1992 University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study of the role of programme leaders (PLs) in a pre-1992 university, based on interviews with PLs (7) and a survey of taught Masters students (54) in a single school. The study elicits PLs' activities, most of which might be categorised as managerial and administrative, with leadership required…

  16. Effects of Reading Strategy Instruction on Attitude toward Strategies and Performance in Reading Texts of Different Difficulty Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorkaee, Hossein Zabihi; Talebi, Seyed Hassan

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Reading Strategy Instruction (RSI) on reading performance and attitude toward reading strategies while reading texts of different difficulty levels. Fifty-five university students studying Political and Basic Sciences took part in this study. After homogenizing the participants, 24 students were in the…

  17. Pre-reading activities in EFL/ESL reading textbooks and Turkish preparatory school teachers' attitudes toward pre-reading activities

    OpenAIRE

    Jecksembieyva, Nurgaisha

    1993-01-01

    Ankara : Faculty of Humanities and Letters and the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 1993. Thesis (Master's) -- -Bilkent University, 1993. Includes bibliographical references leaves 35-40. The main focus of this study was to investigate pre-reading activities in EFL/ESL reading textbooks and to determine teachers' attitudes toward pre-reading activities. Fifteen reading textbooks for EFL/ESL students for different proficiency levels (beginning, interm...

  18. Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

  19. Epidemiological profile of patients seen in the pre-anesthetic assessment clinic of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Loureiro Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Assess the demographic and clinical characteristics of surgical patients seen in the Pre-anesthetic Assessment Clinic of the Hospital Universitário Gaffrée e Guinle (APA/HUGG, in order to assist in the pursuit for quality, effectiveness, and resource rationalization of hospital management. Method Cross-sectional descriptive study with 491 patients undergoing elective surgery, treated at APA/HUGG Clinic from March to December 2014. The following variables were assessed: sex, age, BMI, smoking status, associated diseases, classification of MET's and ASA, presence of decompensated disease, medical associated appointments interconsultation, specialty and surgical risk, history of prior anesthetic-surgical procedure, and complications. Results There was a predominance of female (64.8% and overweight patients (55.9%, aged 18-59 years. The prevalence of associated diseases was high (71.3%, with hypertension pressure prevailing (50.1%. Most patients had clinically compensated morbidity (96.3% and long-term use of medication (77.4%. Regarding the surgical characteristics, the most frequent specialty was general and medium risk surgeries. The analysis of the characteristics by age showed that the elderly have more associated diseases and long-term use of medication, in addition to predominance of ASA II-III. Conclusion The epidemiological profile of surgical patients seen at the APA/HUGG was female, age 18-59 years, overweight, with associated diseases, long-term use of medication, without clinical decompensation, ASA II and MET's ≥4. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of surgical patients is critical to schedule the perioperative care, allowing the improvement of quality and safety in anesthesia and surgery.

  20. Analysis of health services cost at the dental clinic of the San Marcos University.

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid Chumacero, Marco Tulio; Echeandía Arellano, Juana V.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: To establish the unitary services cost in Dentistry, To describe simplest way to determine the costs structure approximated for each dental service offered at the clinic. They it was compared with the welfare rates at the dental clinic of the UNMSM, the results were the following ones: 1. Diagnosis: in the four cost activities is higher compared with the official rates, demonstrating "minimum utilities" that goes up from 0,21 to s. 15.96. 2. Radiology: in th...

  1. Assessment of Clinical Stressful Factors Among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Raji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nursing students are exposed to clinical environmental stresses in addition to educational environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical stressful factors among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences in 2015.Materials and Methods: This study was a description-analytical study with 234 students of nursing and operation room up to two semesters for enrolled. Data was using a self-made researcher Questionnaire consisted of demographic information and clinical stressful factors. Data analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS-PC (v.20.Results: The findings showed that the main stressors in students of nursing and operation room were unpleasant emotions and least stressful areas were interpersonal communication in a clinical environment. The results showed that the average score of the field of education and humiliating experiences using Spearman correlation test (P=0/045 (r=0/16.Conclusion: Study showed, the mean stress is the moderate level. Stressful areas obtained in the four areas of personal communication, clinical practice stressful, unpleasant feelings and humiliating experience that fortunately, in many cases reform and change.

  2. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  3. Clinical and academic use of electronic and print books: the Health Sciences Library System e-book study at the University of Pittsburgh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Charles B; Czechowski, Leslie J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) electronic book (e-book) study was to assess use, and factors affecting use, of e-books by all patron groups of an academic health sciences library serving both university and health system–affiliated patrons. Methods: A web-based survey was distributed to a random sample (n = 5,292) of holders of library remote access passwords. A total of 871 completed and 108 partially completed surveys were received, for an approximate response rate of 16.5%–18.5%, with all user groups represented. Descriptive and chi-square analysis was done using SPSS 17. Results: Library e-books were used by 55.4% of respondents. Use by role varied: 21.3% of faculty reported having assigned all or part of an e-book for class readings, while 86% of interns, residents, and fellows reported using an e-book to support clinical care. Respondents preferred print for textbooks and manuals and electronic format for research protocols, pharmaceutical, and reference books, but indicated high flexibility about format choice. They rated printing and saving e-book content as more important than annotation, highlighting, and bookmarking features. Conclusions: Respondents' willingness to use alternate formats, if convenient, suggests that libraries can selectively reduce title duplication between print and e-books and still support library user information needs, especially if publishers provide features that users want. Marketing and user education may increase use of e-book collections. PMID:21753914

  4. Clinical analysis of oral carcinoma treated in the department of otolaryngology, Niigata University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Takahashi, Sugata; Tomita, Masahiko; Watanabe, Jun; Matsuyama, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-five sites of oral carcinoma (118 patients) treated in our department during 15 years (1991 to 2005) were clinically analyzed. Multiple carcinomas within the oral cavity arose in 17 sites. In our department, tongue and oral floor were common subsites, followed by buccal mucosa, gingiva, lip, and hard palate. The number of patients increased according to the elevation of clinical stage. Since the subsites and stage characteristics of our department might be due to patients' distribution among medical and dental clinics, correlation of information among medical and dental schools was considered important The significance of multiple malignancies in patients with oral carcinoma was confirmed since multiple malignancies within and outside of the oral cavity occurred at a high rate. The five-year survival rate was 73.8% in tongue carcinoma patients and 58.9% in oral floor carcinoma patients, and the prognosis of patients was fair with positive application of surgery. Since the prognosis of patients without surgery was poor, it is important to consider the treatment strategy for patients who reject surgery and to recommend that they visit a clinic before the tumor advances to an unresectable stage. (author)

  5. Redesign of a University Hospital Preanesthesia Evaluation Clinic Using a Queuing Theory Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, Maartje Elisabeth; de Boer, F.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; de Roode, A.; van Kleef, J.W.

    Background Changes in patient length of stay (the duration of one visit) as a result of the introduction of an electronic patient file system forced an anesthesia department to change their outpatient clinic organization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate how the involvement of essential

  6. Clinical experience of therapy with cyclotron neutrons at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.G.; Gerdes, A.J.; Berry, H.C.; Soronen, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    Proper clinical evaluation of fast neutron teletherapy of human cancers will be difficult and time-consuming and will require extension over many years. Fast neutron teletherapy may not have significant advantage over modern conventional supervoltage/megavoltage radiation therapy. A negative answer will be acceptable only if based on sound evidence. If fast neutron teletherapy has an advantage over modern conventional radiation therapy, the advantage may be small and tumor- and site-specific. Detection of a small advantage will require study of a large number of patients and this will be possible only in carefully planned cooperative clinical trials. The study of a large number of patients over a long period will require installation of dedicated neutron generators in research-oriented medical centers. Cooperative clinical trials must be preceded by careful definition of target tumors, normal tissue tolerances, reasonable doses and advantageous patterns of application. Any improvement in local tumor control attributed to fast neutron teletherapy might be dissipated by a concurrent increase in treatment-related sequelae. Much related physics and radiobiology remains to be done and must be supported concurrent with the clinical programs

  7. The clinical feature of HIV/AIDS at presentation at the Jos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each qualified patient had a comprehensive history taken with emphasis on the clinical symptoms and detailed physical examination performed by the researchers. The data collected were analyzed using a multipurpose computer programme, Epi-info 2000 version 1.1.3 (Atlanta GA, USA). Results: There were 86(43.0%) ...

  8. Treatment of the carcinoma of the vulva at the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology in Vienna (386 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, H.

    1980-01-01

    In the department of radiotherapy of the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Vienna the electroresection and electrocoagulation is practiced with good success in the treatment of carcinoma of the vulva. Of 386 treated cases with vulvar carcinoma, 234 (60,6%) were alive after five years. After surgical treatment the inguinal lymphonodes were irradiated (6000 rad). In comparison with the international statistic of the Annual Report of the results of treatment in gynaecological cancer (1979) the results obtained in Vienna are much better than the international average. (orig.) [de

  9. "La comprensión lectora en Inglés: problemas encontrados en las pruebas de acceso a la universidad" [Reading comprehension in English: problems found within the spanish university entrance examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Sánchez Ruiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El objetivo de esta investigación es analizar errores de lectura en inglés –cometidos por alumnos españoles de segundo de bachillerato en la prueba de acceso a la universidad- detectando los problemas de comprensión mediante la observación y el diálogo con el lector según se van produciendo (miscue analysis. Para llevar a cabo el experimento, se siguen los siguientes pasos: selección de la muestra, elección de las lecturas, previsión de problemas, análisis de errores, explicación de resultados, extracción de conclusiones y, por último, propuesta de mejoras en el hábito lector y comprobación de su eficacia. Este trabajo pretende aportar nuevas teorías sobre el proceso lector y aplicar un cambio en la concepción del mismo basado en la actitud de los lectores para obtener éxito. Igualmente, los datos registrados han permitido depurar estrategias que subsanen los problemas detectados; además, la demostración de su valía ofrece alternativas para mejorar la práctica docente en cuanto a comprensión lectora.ABSTRACT:The aim of the current study is to analyse reading mistakes in English made by Spanish students in their second year of Baccalaureate in the university entrance examination. For that, miscue analysis is applied, which consists in detecting comprehension problems while observing the readers’ behaviour and dialoguing with them as they make those mistakes. To carry out the present experiment, the following steps were taken: selection of the participants and the reading fragments, problem anticipation, analysis of the mistakes, explanation of the results, drawing conclusions and, finally, proposals for improvement and checking of their effectiveness. This paper seeks to find new theories about the reading process and to apply a change in its conception based on readers’ attitudes to be successful. The data registered during the process have led to polish strategies which can solve those problems

  10. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p dental care (p dental health. Perceived overall health (p Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Pilot Design and Implementation of an Innovative Mental Health and Wellness Clinic at a Historically Black College/University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica R; Pollio, David E; Hong, Barry A; Valencia, Celeste; Sorrell, Michael; North, Carol S

    2018-05-01

    A pilot mental health and wellness clinic was developed and implemented on the campus of Paul Quinn College, a small Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Dallas, TX, to address mental health disparities in an African-American student population. Additionally, a series of student engagement activities was developed and implemented to address stigma and enhance linkage to the clinic. The student engagement activities were well attended. In all, 14 students requested a total of 97 appointments during the spring 2016 semester, but attended only 41 appointments. Students sought treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders, most commonly major depressive disorder and adjustment disorder. A model based on this program could conceivably be extended to serve students more broadly in other HBCUs as well as in community colleges.

  12. Reading Comprehension Difficulties among French Students of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading Comprehension Difficulties among French Students of the University of Education, Winneba: ... The quality of work done depends so much on the level of understanding of the reading text by students. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  13. Determining nurses\\' clinical competence in hospitals of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences by self assessment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood mahreini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses’ self awareness of their own level of clinical competence is essential in maintaining high standards of care and identifying areas of educational need and professional development. Self-assessment is a method for measuring clinical competence, and encourages nurses to use reflective thinking and take an active part in the learning process. Although nurse competence may vary between hospitals, very few studies have been done on this subject. Methods: In this cross sectional study, we analyzed clinical competency of 190 registered nurses working in different hospitals in Bushehr by self assessment method. The instrument for data collection was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 73 items from seven categories which were devised from Benner's “from Novice to Expert” framework. The level of competence was assessed on a scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using the competencies was assessed on a Likert scale. Results: the nurses reported their overall level of competence as “good” (51-75. They felt more competent in the categories of “managing situations” and “helping role” (with maximum score of 79.54 and least competent in “teaching – coaching” and “ensuring quality” categories (with minimum score of 61.15. The frequency of practicing competencies had a positive correlation with the level of nursing clinical competence. Conclusion: The level of nursing competence and frequency of using competencies varied in different hospitals. Although the nurses reported their overall level of competence as good, we should be concerned about 24% of competencies which are not used by the nurses, especially in "teaching – coaching" and "ensuring quality" categories.

  14. [Is autonomy a universal value principle? The study of concrete clinical cases in perinatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmans-Cabiax, Chantal

    2007-09-01

    Certain perinatalogy situations make one confront cultural differences and, in particular, the relative importance of the value of female autonomy. This leads to the following question: should autonomy have as much weight everywhere as it is given in Western health ethics? The passionate, philosophical and historical work by J.B. Schneewind, The Invention of Autonomy: A History of Modern Moral Philosophy, is used to assist in the understanding of the important cultural evolutions which have interacted to support the idea of moral autonomy in the West. This return to our roots brings us, not to question moral autonomy through its claim to universality, but to dare to relativize the modalities according to cultural contexts. And especially to rehabilitate other values--for example caring for one another--prominent in other more community orientated societies in which the West can be inspired.

  15. Mini clinical evaluation exercise in undergraduate dermatovenereology education: an experience of University of Pamukkale, Medical Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeniz Ergin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX is being widely used in medical education and is a reliable and valid method for the assessment of residents’ competency in medical interviewing, physical examination, humanistic qualities/professionalism, clinical judgment, counseling skills, organization, and efficiency. In order to enhance formative evaluation methods in our faculty, we planned to apply the method to students on dermatovenereology training. Materials and Methods: The Mini-CEX was performed by residents to 42 medical students. At first, 5 residents were evaluated by a faculty member with Mini-CEX and were informed about their application-oriented evaluator roles. The students were informed prior to conducting the assessment. Standard Mini-CEX form was used for the assessment. The participants were rated in 7 competencies and each was rated using a 9-point Likert scale. At the end of each encounter, students and evaluators rated their satisfaction with Mini-CEX using a 9-point Likert scale. Student’s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. Student feedback was evaluated with “grounded theory”. Results: A total of 50 assessments, 44 in outpatient and 6 in inpatient clinic, were performed. Satisfaction with the Mini-CEX was rated by the evaluators and the students as 7,16 and 7,98, respectively. There was no significant difference between the evaluators in terms of student satisfaction. Average time spent on observing the encounter and in giving feedback was 16.5 and 6.5 minutes, respectively. There was no significant difference between assessors in terms of time spent observing and giving feedback. Average scores of assessed clinical competencies were between 4,28 and 8,14. The highest scores were reported on humanistic qualities/ professionalism whereas the lowest were reported on clinical judgment skills. Discussion: According to our data, we believe that Mini-CEX may be used as an

  16. Clinical experiences of undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stewart, Christopher J

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the number and range of clinical procedures completed by undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry in Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland, and to compare the number of procedures undertaken with the subsequent examination scores. The work comprised a retrospective audit of clinical logbooks for all of the undergraduate dental students in one cohort through their fourth and fifth clinical years between 2004 and 2006. Thirty-four quantitative logbooks were audited. Students had seen a total of 1,031 patients, and each student had completed a full course of dental treatment for an average of twenty-two children. Students completed means of 30.2 restorative procedures for children, fourteen in deciduous dentition (range six to twenty-eight), and seventeen in permanent dentition (range seven to twenty-eight). Continuity of education and care (measured through children having their treatment fully completed by the same student) was 72 percent. A moderate positive correlation between levels of clinical experience and exam score was identified. All students gained experience in management of child patients with students providing care for an average of thirty children and a minimum of nineteen.

  17. A New Approach for Education and Training of Medical Physicists in Cuba: From University to Clinical Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso-Laguardia, R.; Rivero Blanco, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: According to the international recommendations of IAEA and the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the education and training of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMP) should include three main academic and professional elements: a university level education, a postgraduate education specific in medical physics (MP) and a supervised clinical training. In Cuba, most of the medical physicists working in radiation oncology (RO) or nuclear medicine (NM) services have graduated from nuclear related programmes of the High Institute on Applied Technologies and Sciences (InSTEC), who further perform a postgraduate study in medical physics (MP), at the level of a so-called Diploma course or a Master in Sciences. Nevertheless, the third level of education, namely the supervised clinical training has not yet been established, due to the lack of official recognition of the profession of MP by the health authorities. A new approach for comprehensive training of CQMP is presented, where, by maintaining the three elements of education, the process is optimized so that a medical physicist is prepared with the highest level of theoretical and clinical training, in agreement with the current demand of the advanced technologies put in service in Cuban hospitals. (author

  18. Impact of the University of Colorado's Advanced Clinical Training and Service (ACTS) Program on dental students' clinical experience and cognitive skills, 1994-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rob; Call, Richard L; Maguire, Kerry; Berkey, Douglas B; Karshmer, Bernard A; Guyton, Brad; Tawara-Jones, Karen

    2010-04-01

    The University of Colorado Denver School of Dental Medicine has operated a community-based dental education program for all of its students since 1985. A database of student productivity has been maintained in a standardized format, capable of multiyear compilation, since 1994. This study utilizes twelve years of these data to profile the type and amount of clinical treatment that can be provided by a typical fourth-year dental student during a 100-day community-based training experience. Between 1994 and 2006, the school's 423 graduates provided a mean of 922 treatment procedures per student at a mean of 498 patient visits per student. During a typical four-week clinical affiliation, each student provided a mean of approximately twenty-seven restorations on permanent teeth, sixteen restorations on primary teeth, and twenty-four oral surgery procedures (extractions). Students also gained considerable experience in periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, and endodontics. Self-assessed competency ratings tended to increase after completing the program, as did willingness to treat underserved populations after graduation. About 16 percent of graduates reported planning to practice in the public sector after completing dental school. A community-based experience such as this appears to offer an opportunity to substantially augment dental students' clinical training experiences.

  19. Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines for newborns at a Copenhagen University Hospital - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Greisen, Gorm; Jacobsen, Robert Thorkild

    2007-01-01

    To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development.......To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development....

  20. Electronic health record in the internal medicine clinic of a Brazilian university hospital: Expectations and satisfaction of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the satisfaction and expectations of patients and physicians before and after the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. We conducted 389 interviews with patients and 151 with physicians before and after the implementation of a commercial EHR at the internal medicine clinic of Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Brazil. The physicians were identified by their connection to the outpatient clinic and categorized by their years since graduation: residents and preceptors (with 10 years or less of graduation) or assistants (with more than 10 years of graduation). The answers to the questionnaire given by the physicians were classified as favorable or against the use of EHR, before and after the implementation of this system in this clinic, receiving 1 or 0 points, respectively. The sum of these points generated a multiple regression score to determine which factors contribute to the acceptance of EHR by physicians. We also did a third survey, after the EHR was routinely established in the outpatient clinic. The degree of patient satisfaction was the same before and after implementation, with more than 90% positive evaluations. They noted the use of the computer during the consultation and valued such use. Resident (younger) physicians had more positive expectations than assistants (older physicians) before EHR implementation. This optimism was reduced after implementation. In the third evaluation the use of EHR was higher among resident physicians. Resident physicians perceived and valued the EHR more and used it more. In 28 of the 57 questions on performance of clinical tasks, resident physicians found it easier to use EHR than assistant physicians with significant differences (pclinical setting should be preceded by careful planning to improve physician's adherence to the use of EHR. Patients do not seem to notice much difference to the

  1. Evaluation of the iPad as a low vision aid for improving reading ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Shamim A; Sambhav, Kumar; Grover, Sandeep; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the iPad as a low vision aid in improving the reading ability of low vision patients (LVPs). In this study, 228 consecutive patients that came for their routine eye care examination at the University of Florida, Jacksonville eye clinic, were enrolled. Patients met inclusion criteria if they had best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/100 or worse in the best corrected eye and were willing to participate in the study. The patient's reading ability was assessed both with the patient's own spectacles and an iPad. Patients were encouraged to enlarge the reading material as well as change the contrast until they could read comfortably. The number of patients able to read the text comfortably was recorded. Out of the total 228 participants who qualified, 103 (45%) were male and 125 (55%) were female. Only 22% could read standard newsprint-sized text (N8) without the help of an iPad. With the help of an iPad, 94% participants with impaired vision were able to read standard newsprint-sized text (N8) or smaller text (PiPad, a new portable electronic media device, can be adapted by LVPs to improve their reading ability.

  2. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Schumacher

    Full Text Available Informed consent forms (ICFs for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies.We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics.Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials were significantly longer (P < .0001 and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003 than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11. At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011. The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12 or trial sponsor (P = .38.Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient's education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511.

  3. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Dar-Odeh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Najla Dar-Odeh1, Soukaina Ryalat1, Mohammad Shayyab1, Osama Abu-Hammad21Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Oral Medicine and Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Jordan; 2Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, JordanObjectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients.Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period.Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection.Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure.Keywords: dental records, documentation, prescriptions, local anesthesia

  4. Interactive tele-education applied to a distant clinical microbiology specialization university course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazzi, Denise B; Rossi, Flávia; Wen, Chao L

    2011-09-01

    The microbiology laboratory provides a strategic support for infectious disease diagnosis and also alerts the medical community about bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The microbiologists' training is a challenge in Brazil, a country with an extensive territory, a diverse population, and disparity of resource allocation. The aim of this study was to implement an interactive tele-educational course in clinical microbiology to reach distant laboratory workers and to improve their professional skills. The course scientific content was defined according to competences associated, distributed in 560 h, with laboratory practices (knowledge matrix-contextual education). The 11-module course structure comprised 70% distance learning, 22% on campus (integrated modules), and 8% monographs. The group included 7 physicians and 21 microbiologists from 20 different Brazilian cities. The time flexibility and location were the two main reasons for student participation, thus decreasing absences to the workplace, different from the traditional teaching methodologies. The group performance was measured by monthly evaluations, and 1 year postcourse, the researcher visited their workplace. There was significant improvement in microbiological practices performed before compared with after group participation. Therefore, 76.9% of laboratory practices were modified because of the knowledge acquired in the course. Students showed behavioral changes in relation to performance in infection control as well as on the dissemination of their knowledge. This specialization course using distance education did not compromise the quality. This educational methodology represents an alternative to teach clinical microbiology to laboratory workers from remote hospitals, as a nationwide continuing educational strategy.

  5. Slow Reading: Reading along "Lectio" Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, K. Jo-Ann; Badley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The medieval monastic movement preserved and developed reading practices--lectio--from ancient Greek pedagogy as a slow, mindful approach to reading for formation. This ancient way of reading, now better known as lectio divina, challenges the fast, pragmatic reading so characteristic of our time. We propose that the present moment may be ripe for…

  6. Histopathological Study of Hysterectomy Operations in A University Clinic in Tehran From 2005 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Khaniki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We intended to determine causes and histological pattern of hysterectomies in an Iranianpopulation.Materials and methods: Archived reports of pathology department of a university hospital dated March2005 to March 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Age, chief complaint, type of operation includingabdominal, vaginal and subtotal hysterectomy, the indication of the operation and the pathology of thespecimen were retrieved from the records.Results: The average rate of hysterectomy was 219 per year. The average age of the patients was49.6±11.3. About 40% of cases aged 45-54 years. The main chief compliant was abnormal uterinebleeding (62.2%. The leading preoperative indication for hysterectomy operations were uterineleiomyoma (24.8% and then abnormal uterine bleeding and abdominal/pelvic mass. The most frequentpathologic findings were leiomyoma (22.0% and adenomyosis (12.1%. In 11.8% of hysterectomyspecimens no pathologic lesion was found.Conclusion: The hysterectomy is rather common in Iran with age dependent pattern of indications andcorresponding pathologies.

  7. Pattern of clinical presentation of eclampsia at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinma, E D; Echendu, D A

    2012-01-01

    Eclampsia contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal mortalities globally. The objective of this study is to review the pattern of Eclampsia in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Nigeria. A retrospective study that reviewed records from labour ward and the Medical Records Department, of cases of Eclampsia managed at NAUTH over a ten year period 1st January-31st December, 2009. There were 57 cases of Eclampsia out of a total of 6,262 deliveries within the study period, giving a prevalence of 0.91%. The highest prevalence of 0.24% occurred in 2009. It was most common, 14 (30.4%), in the 25-29 year age group. The nulliparous women, 28 (61%) were more commonly affected. The prevalence was higher in the un-booked patients (89%), and antepartum Eclampsia was the commonest type (76%). Twenty one (45.7%) patients had three or more convulsions prior to the institution of therapy. Headache, oedema, and blurring of vision were the commonest symptoms, 74%, 71%, and 65% respectively. Eclampsia occurred mainly in un-booked and primigravid patients in this study. Early registration of pregnant women, especially primigravid, in health facilities for effective antenatal care and supervised hospital delivery will significantly reduce the prevalence and complications of Eclampsia.

  8. Developing reading literacy by reading badge

    OpenAIRE

    Rejc, Blanka

    2017-01-01

    Reading is a fundamental activity of our society and is present in all areas of a person’s life. Authors who deal with reading define reading with different definitions, some of them I also presented in my master’s degree thesis. The ways of reading, typology of readers and knowledge of different reading models are only some of the important theoretical facts that serve as a basis for the research and defining reading. Reading motivation is an important motivational factor, which encourages a...

  9. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  10. Overview of two years of clinical experience of chest tomo-synthesis at Sahlgrenska university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, Aa. A.; Vikgren, J.; Svalkvist, A.; Zachrisson, S.; Flinck, A.; Boijsen, M.; Kheddache, S.; Maansson, L. G.; Baath, M.

    2010-01-01

    Since December 2006, ∼ 3800 clinical chest tomo-synthesis examinations have been performed at our department at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital. A subset of the examinations has been included in studies of the detectability of pulmonary nodules, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Visibility studies, in which chest tomo-synthesis and CT have been compared side-by side, have been used to determine the depiction potential of chest tomo-synthesis. Comparisons with conventional chest radiography have been made. In the clinical setting, chest tomo-synthesis has mostly been used as an additional examination. The most frequent indication for chest tomo-synthesis has been suspicion of a nodule or tumour. In visibility studies, tomo-synthesis has depicted over 90% of the nodules seen on the CT scan. The corresponding figure for chest radiography has been <30%. In the detection studies, the lesion-level sensitivity has been ∼ 60% for tomo-synthesis and 20% for chest radiography. In one of the detection studies, an analysis of all false-positive nodules was performed. This analysis showed that all findings had morphological correlates on the CT examinations. The majority of the false-positive nodules were localised in the immediate sub-pleural region. In conclusion, chest tomo-synthesis is an improved chest radiography method, which can be used to optimise the use of CT resources, thereby reducing the radiation dose to the patient population. However, there are some limitations with chest tomo-synthesis. For example, patients undergoing tomo-synthesis have to be able to stand still and hold their breath firmly for 10 s. Also, chest tomo-synthesis has a limited depth resolution, which may explain why pathology in the sub-pleural region is more difficult to interpret and artefacts from medical devices may occur. (authors)

  11. Clinical and Biological Insights from the University of California San Francisco Prospective and Longitudinal Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Bryan S; Lehman, Zoe; Kidd, Sharon A; Ho, Melissa; Sun, Sara; Ramstein, Joris; Arger, Nicholas K; Nguyen, Christine P; Su, Robert; Gomez, Antonio; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Koth, Laura L

    2017-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by non-necrotizing granulomas in involved organs, most commonly the lung. Description of patient characteristics in the Western United States is limited. Furthermore, blood-based measures that relate to clinical sarcoidosis phenotypes are lacking. We present an analysis of a prospective, longitudinal sarcoidosis cohort at a Northern Californian academic medical center. We enrolled 126 sarcoidosis subjects and 64 healthy controls and recorded baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. We used regression models to identify factors independently associated with pulmonary physiology. We tested whether blood transcript levels at study entry could relate to longitudinal changes in pulmonary physiology. White, non-Hispanics composed ~70% of subjects. Hispanics and Blacks had a diagnostic biopsy at an age ~7 years younger than whites. Obstructive, but not restrictive, physiology characterized Scadding Stage IV patients. Subjects reporting use of immunosuppression had worse FEV1%p, FVC%p, and DLCO%p compared to subjects never treated, regardless of Scadding stage. We defined sarcoidosis disease activity by a drop in pulmonary function over 36 months and found that subjects meeting this definition had significant repression of blood gene transcripts related to T cell receptor signaling pathways, referred to as the "TCR factor." Obstructive pulmonary physiology defined Stage IV patients which were mostly white, non-Hispanics. Genes comprising the composite gene expression score, TCR factor, may represent a blood-derived measure of T-cell activity and an indirect measure of active sarcoidosis inflammation. Validation of this measure could translate into individualized treatment for sarcoidosis patients.

  12. Psychosocial problems of clinical students in the University of Ibadan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokhodion, F O; Gureje, O

    2003-03-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out among medical students in the University of Ibadan to identify their socio economic and psychological problems. Three hundred and sixteen students, 159 males and 157 females participated in the study. The questionnaire, which was self-administered, sought information about sources of financial support, type of accommodation, use of recreational facilities, smoking and drinking habits and sources of stress and insecurity on the campus. The GHQ-12 was used to assess their mental status. Ninety-four percent of students were sponsored by their parents. Average monthly income as pocket money ranged from N800-N15,000. Sixty-three (20%) reported that their pocket money was inadequate and 11 (3.5%) engage in business ventures to supplement their income. Two hundred and fifty-seven (81%) live on the campus, 11 (3.5%) were current smokers and 54 (18%) were current drinkers. Stealing and lack of money were the commonest causes of insecurity on the campus. Lack of money, fear of failure of examinations, family problems and broken relationships were reported as causes of depression among this study population. GHQ scores ranged from 1 to 9 using a cut-off point of 3 scores, 38 students (12.0%) were categorised as having traits of poor mental health. GHQ scores were not associated with age, sex, smoking or drinking status or students' assessment of the adequacy of their pocket money. However, living off campus and poor self-perception were associated with poor mental health (p < 0.01). Counseling services should be provided in the medical school to assist students to handle issues that constitute a source of stress in their psychosocial environment.

  13. Quality of clinical supervision as perceived by attending doctors in university and district teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busari, Jamiu O; Koot, Bart G

    2007-10-01

    Attending doctors (ADs) play important roles in the supervision of specialist registrars. Little is known, however, about how they perceive the quality of their supervision in different teaching settings. We decided to investigate whether there is any difference in how ADs perceive the quality of their supervision in university teaching hospital (UTH) and district teaching hospital (DTH) settings. We used a standardised questionnaire to investigate the quality of supervision as perceived by ADs. Fifteen items reflecting good teaching ability were measured on a 5-point Likert scale (1-5: never-always). We investigated for factors that influenced the perceived quality of supervision using Likert scale items (1-5: totally disagree-totally agree) and open-ended questionnaires. A total of 83 ADs (UTH: 51; DTH: 32) were eligible to participate in the survey. Of these, 43 (52%) returned the questionnaire (UTH: 25; DTH: 18). There was no difference in the overall mean of the 15 items between the UTH (3.67, standard deviation [SD] 0.35) and DTH (3.73, SD 0.31) ADs. Attending doctors in the DTH group rated themselves better at 'teaching technical skills' (mean 3.50, SD 0.70), compared with their UTH counterparts (mean 3.0, SD 0.76) (P = 0.03). Analysis of variance of the overall means revealed no significant difference between the different hospital settings. The results suggest that teaching hospital environments do not influence how ADs perceive the quality of their supervision. Lack of time for teaching was perceived as responsible for poor supervision. Other factors found to influence AD perceptions of good supervision included effective teaching skills, communication skills and provision of feedback.

  14. Clinical and Demographic Features of Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome Diagnosed in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Arslan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS is characterized by symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly, intracranial tumor or mass. This study aimed to explore and analyze 34 patients with PTCS according to age, sex, symptoms of the disorder, cranial magnetic resonance images findings, etiology, and treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 patients who were diagnosed as having PTCS and followed up between January 2011 and August 2016 by Dicle University Medical School Neurology Department were included in this study. PTCS was diagnosed in accordance with the modified Dandy criteria. Results: Thirty-four patients were identified as having PTCS. Twenty-one (91.2% had headache, 19 (55.9% had blurred vision, 6 (17.6% had diplopia, 2 (5.9% had vertigo, 1 (2.9% had tinnitus, and 1 (2.9% had numbness of the face. Twenty-seven patients were diagnosed as having idiopathic intracranial hypertension, 21 (61.8% had no etiologic factors. Six (17.6% patients were obese, one of whom had recently gained weight and another had polycystic ovary syndrome. Seven patients were thought to have secondary PTCS with the following etiologic factors: 2 (5.9% patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, 1 (2.9% had a history of all-trans retinoic acid intake due to a malignancy, 1 (2.9% had choroid plexus granuloma, 2 (5.9% had sinus venous thrombosis, and 1 (2.9% had Familial Meditteranian Fever. Conclusion: Although PTCS was described many years ago, its physiopathology and exact treatment procedures are not clearly understood. The most important target of its treatment is to prevent loss of vision and improve symptoms. With a better understanding of its pathophysiology, effective treatment protocols will be developed

  15. Now What? Think Fast: Using Healthcare Clinics as Universal Language to Maximize Learning for International Students in a Graduate Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Katila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available International students in Masters programs come to the US optimistic and willing to learn. Upon arrival and entrance into programs, they often encounter unexpected environments. Culture shock and language barriers may seem like obvious hurdles, but work ethic and scope of visual knowledge also pose unique challenges for both students and design educators. Although all students share new challenges in graduate school, international students face tougher impediments in studio environments where they express themselves both visually and verbally. Additionally, much of design uses humor, idioms, and visual clues only understood in English. So how do educators help international students build on what they already know? How do educators break barriers between domestic and international students so they may teach one another through a shared language? In fall 2015, my Conceptual Development and Implementation class was struggling to exchange ideas in the classroom. We moved through that struggle by developing a shared language around each student's experiences with healthcare clinics in their country of origin. Students explained what makes healthcare clinics reputable; how people access information in India, China, small towns and larger urban areas; and where people look for trustworthy information. This paper discusses how one educator used student experience of healthcare clinics to find a universal language to maximize learning for international students in design education.

  16. Clinical audit teaching in record-keeping for dental undergraduates at International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jun A; Chew, Jamie K Y; Ravindranath, Sneha; Pau, Allan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of clinical audit training on record-keeping behavior of dental students and students' perceptions of the clinical audit training. The training was delivered to Year 4 and Year 5 undergraduates at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It included a practical audit exercise on patient records. The results were presented by the undergraduates, and guidelines were framed from the recommendations proposed. Following this, an audit of Year 4 and Year 5 students' patient records before and after the audit training was carried out. A total of 100 records were audited against a predetermined set of criteria by two examiners. An email survey of the students was also conducted to explore their views of the audit training. Results showed statistically significant improvements in record-keeping following audit training. Responses to the email survey were analyzed qualitatively. Respondents reported that the audit training helped them to identify deficiencies in their record-keeping practice, increased their knowledge in record-keeping, and improved their record-keeping skills. Improvements in clinical audit teaching were also proposed.

  17. Case Study in Designing a Research Fundamentals Curriculum for Community Health Workers: A University - Community Clinic Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, Jill; Kalichman, Michael; Bell, Yvonne; Dagnino, Cynthia; Taras, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Community health workers are increasingly incorporated into research teams. Training them in research methodology and ethics, while relating these themes to a community’s characteristics, may help to better integrate these health promotion personnel into research teams. Approach and Strategies This pilot project involved the design and implementation of an interactive training course on research fundamentals for community health workers from clinics in a rural, predominately Latino setting. Curriculum development was guided by collaborative activities arising from a university - clinic partnership, a community member focus group, and the advice of community-based researchers. The resulting curriculum was interactive and stimulated dialogue between trainees and academic researchers. Discussion and Conclusions Collaboration between researchers and health agency professionals proved to be a practical method to develop curriculum for clinic staff. An interactive curriculum allowed trainees to incorporate community-specific themes into the discussion. This interaction educated course instructors from academia about the community as much as it educated course participants about research. The bidirectional engagement that occurs during the development and teaching of this course can potentially lead to research partnerships between community agencies and academia, better-informed members of the public, and research protocols that accommodate community characteristics. PMID:24121537

  18. Reading Multimodally: What is Afforded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, David; Voss, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Technological changes and the proliferation of digital devices have created new reading experiences for students. The rapid transition from print to digital texts is evident in the movement toward the adoption of an e-book standard, increasing sales of e-book readers and tablet devices, and projections that universities and public schools may use…

  19. Septic arthritis: a 12 years retrospective study in a rheumatological university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Septic arthritis is a disabling and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. The most important risk factors are joint prosthesis, pre-existing joint disease and immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of our study therefore was to revaluate all septic arthritis cases discharged from our Rheumatologic Unit in the last 12 years, to assess the risk factors, the clinical and laboratory characteristics, the causative microorganisms and its possible increase in frequency. Methods: The medical records of 42 consecutive patients with septic arthritis discharged from our Rheumatology Unit between January 1995 and December 2006 were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 23 to 90 and there isn’t gender predominance. Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on the finding of purulent material in the joint space and/or the isolation of a bacterial pathogen from joint fluid. Demographic data, risk factors, co-morbidity, clinical manifestations, time interval between symptoms onset and diagnosis, treatment and laboratory data including serum white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, synovial white blood cells and culture results were analysed. We considered these parameters in the whole population and in two different age groups (≤60, >60 and tried to determine if there was a change of microorganisms involved in septic arthritis during the years. Results: Of 42 patients, 47% were aged 60 and younger. Only 10 patients were admitted to our unit before 2001. A predisposing factor was recorded in 90,5% of cases: 15 patients had rheumatoid arthritis, 8 were diabetic, 6 had seronegative arthritis, 4 had a connective tissue disease, 8 patients had a prosthetic infection and 3 were subjected recently to arthrocentesis. We found that patients aged 60 and younger were more frequently affected by joint disease and had a synovial white blood cell count lower than patients

  20. Reading and Dyslexia in Different Orthographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunswick, Nicola, Ed.; McDougall, Sine, Ed.; de Mornay Davies, Paul, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a unique and accessible account of current research on reading and dyslexia in different orthographies. While most research has been conducted in English, this text presents cross-language comparisons to provide insights into universal aspects of reading development and developmental dyslexia in alphabetic and non-alphabetic…

  1. Clinical Benefit of Ablating Localized Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation: The Indiana University FIRM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M; Kalra, Vikas; Das, Mithilesh K; Jain, Rahul; Garlie, Jason B; Brewster, Jordan A; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2017-03-14

    Mounting evidence shows that localized sources maintain atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear in unselected "real-world" patients if sources drive persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LPeAF), or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF); if right atrial sites are important; and what the long-term success of source ablation is. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of rotors and focal sources in a large academic registry of consecutive patients undergoing source mapping for AF. One hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years, 79% men) with PAF (37%), PeAF (31%), or LPeAF (32%). Of these, 73 (43%) had undergone at least 1 prior ablation attempt (mean 1.9 ± 0.8; range: 1 to 4). Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) with an endocardial basket catheter was used in all cases. FIRM analysis revealed sources in the right atrium in 85% of patients (1.8 ± 1.3) and in the left atrium in 90% of patients (2.0 ± 1.3). FIRM ablation terminated AF to sinus rhythm or atrial flutter or tachycardia in 59% (PAF), 37% (PeAF), and 19% (LPeAF) of patients, with 15 of 67 terminations due to right atrial ablation. On follow-up, freedom from AF after a single FIRM procedure for the entire series was 95% (PAF), 83% (PeAF), and 82% (LPeAF) at 1 year and freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was 77% (PAF), 75% (PeAF), and 57% (LPeAF). In the Indiana University FIRM registry, FIRM-guided ablation produced high single-procedure success, mostly in patients with nonparoxysmal AF. Data from mapping, acute terminations, and outcomes strongly support the mechanistic role of biatrial rotors and focal sources in maintaining AF in diverse populations. Randomized trials of FIRM-guided ablation and mechanistic studies to determine how rotors form, progress, and regress are needed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ACUTE RENAL FAILURE IN THE NEWBORNS HOSPITALIZED AT THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, UNIVERSITY CLINICAL CENTRE TUZLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulić Evlijana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reasons for acute renal failure in hospitalized infants were sepsis, hypovolemia, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome, surgical interventions and congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and and main etiologies, and early outcome of neonatal acute renal failure. Materials and Methods: At Intensive Care Unit, Clinical Center Tuzla, from 15. 01. 2013 to 15. 01. 2015 in 21 newborn was diagnosed renal failure, based on the amount of excreted urine and serum creatinine. Results: The prevalence of renal failure was 6.84%, with a higher incidence of female. 33.3% of infants were term neonates. Oliguria was diagnosed in 71.4% of newborns. Sepsis was the most common predisposing factor for the development of renal failure, associated with high mortality. Other causes of renal failure were perinatal hypoxia, RDS, surgical interventions and congenital heart defects. There was a positive correlation between the gestational age of the newborn and serum creatinine. Discussion: Early prevention of risk factors with rapid diagnosis and effective treatment, can affect further outcome of acute renal failure in infants.

  3. Epidemiological observations in the AIDS clinic at the Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayan, S; Engelhard, D; Boger, S; Ganer, A; Morag, A; Shapiro, M; Sacks, T

    1989-06-01

    Of the first 395 attendees at the AIDS clinic in Jerusalem, 32% were homo/bisexuals, 4% i.v. drug abusers (IVDAs), 24% persons with minimal risk for AIDS and 38% were persons having no risk. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody rates were 7% for homosexuals, 29% for IVDAs, 1% for persons with minimal risk and 0% for persons at no risk. Israeli homosexuals had a significantly greater risk for HIV infection (9 of 35) if they had sexual contact with non-Israelis as compared with homosexuals who had contact with local partners only (0/91, P less than 0.001). The mean number of attendees per month increased by 431% during the 4 months following the first prime-time television program on AIDS. The largest mean increases occurred among persons at no risk (1 to 27.2), those with minimal risk (2.5 to 16.5), and among women (1.25 to 20.0). This report indicates that HIV infection among Israeli homosexuals has not yet reached U.S. proportions. It also shows that the TV program raised anxiety concerning AIDS among the general public, and probably encouraged the public to use HIV testing as part of a general health screening program.

  4. The knowledge and attitude about HIV/AIDS among Jordanian dental students: (Clinical versus pre clinical students at the University of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayyab Mohammad H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to address the suspected deficiency in the level of understanding of HIV/AIDS among clinical and pre clinical dental students at the University of Jordan. In this cross-sectional study, structured questionnaires were distributed to fifth year dental students (n = 121 and to third year dental students (n = 144 in the academic year 2008/2009. Findings Significantly higher percentage of fifth-year students compared to third-year students felt that the teaching they received on cross-infection precautions and barrier dentistry was adequate (P Significantly higher proportion of third-year students compared to fifth-year (39.2% vs. 26.3% thought that HIV patients should be referred to other centers or support groups for treatment (P = 0.04. Conclusions The level of knowledge of Jordanian dental students about HIV and AIDS was generally acceptable; there were inadequacies, however, in their understanding regarding some aspects of AIDS epidemic which demands that dental school curriculum needs some improvement.

  5. A Test of a Linear Programming Model as an Optimal Solution to the Problem of Combining Methods of Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Study reported here tested an application of the Linear Programming Model at the Reading Clinic of Drew University. Results, while not conclusive, indicate that this approach yields greater gains in speed scores than a traditional approach for this population. (Author)

  6. Building school-based reading practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    context of the academic subjects which they study at school, rather than in areas traditionally associated with learners' out-of-school interests ... the majority of the learners had not seen their parents reading a book ..... Harvard University Press.

  7. The role of the Oregon State University Endophyte Service Laboratory in diagnosing clinical cases of endophyte toxicoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A Morrie; Blythe, Linda L; Duringer, Jennifer M

    2014-07-30

    The Oregon State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agricultural Sciences instituted the Endophyte Service Laboratory to aid in diagnosing toxicity problems associated with cool-season grasses in livestock. The endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophalum) present in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) produces ergopeptine alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the molecule used to determine exposure and toxicity thresholds for the vasoconstrictive conditions "fescue foot" and "summer slump". Another vasoconstrictive syndrome, "ergotism," is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, and its primary toxin, ergotamine. "Ryegrass staggers" is a neurological condition that affects livestock consuming endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with high levels of lolitrem B. HPLC-fluorescent analytical methods for these mycotoxins are described and were used to determine threshold levels of toxicity for ergovaline and lolitrem B in cattle, sheep, horses, and camels. In addition, six clinical cases in cattle are presented to illustrate diagnosis of these three diseases.

  8. Building leadership among laboratory-based and clinical and translational researchers: the University of California, San Francisco experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wides, Cynthia; Mertz, Elizabeth; Lindstaedt, Bill; Brown, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    In 2005 the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) implemented the Scientific Leadership and Management (SLM) course, a 2-day leadership training program to assist laboratory-based postdoctoral scholars in their transition to independent researchers managing their own research programs. In 2011, the course was expanded to clinical and translational junior faculty and fellows. The course enrollment was increased from approximate 100 to 123 participants at the same time. Based on course evaluations, the number and percent of women participants appears to have increased over time from 40% (n = 33) in 2007 to 53% (n = 58) in 2011. Course evaluations also indicated that participants found the course to be relevant and valuable in their transition to academic leadership. This paper describes the background, structure, and content of the SLM and reports on participant evaluations of the course offerings from 2007 through 2011. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neurosurgery clinical registry data collection utilizing Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside and electronic health records at the University of Rochester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Christine A; Miranpuri, Amrendra S

    2015-12-01

    In a population health-driven health care system, data collection through the use of clinical registries is becoming imperative to continue to drive effective and efficient patient care. Clinical registries rely on a department's ability to collect high-quality and accurate data. Currently, however, data are collected manually with a high risk for error. The University of Rochester's Department of Neurosurgery in conjunction with the university's Clinical and Translational Science Institute has implemented the integrated use of the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) informatics framework with the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) databases.

  10. Surgent University : The Establishment and Evaluation of a National Online Clinical Teaching Repository for Surgical Trainees and Students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to develop a new teaching strategy for medical students while creating a national online repository system (Surgent University). Then, the potential of this e-learning modality to facilitate learning of clinical surgery was evaluated. Methods. An online repository and Internet-based interface was designed and hosted on the medical education Web site, www.surgent.ie. Participation was by medical students across 3 Irish universities. Student use of the repository was quantitatively assessed over an 8-week period. They were then invited to complete an anonymous survey assessing the effectiveness of the online repository. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with P < .05 considered significant. Results. Over the study period, the online repository received 6105 uploaded facts by 182 final-year medical students from 3 different universities. The repository Web pages were accessed 54 061 times with 4609 individual searches of the repository. Of the 60 participating students invited to provide survey-based feedback, there were 40 respondents, giving a 66.7% response rate. Of those surveyed, 70% (n = 28) rated the online repository as highly beneficial and 75% (n = 30) as highly relevant. Overall, 87.5% (n = 35) felt that it should be continued, and 70% (n = 28) felt that it should be expanded beyond surgery to include other hospital specialties. Those finding the program interface user-friendly were more likely to find it beneficial (P = .031) and relevant to their ongoing education (P = .002). Conclusions. A user-friendly interface allows for high levels of usage, whereas a "student-centered" structure ensures that the facts uploaded are beneficial and relevant to medical students\\' education.

  11. Oral health knowledge among pre-clinical students of International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Oral health is an important issue in public health with a great impact on individuals’ general health status. A good access to oral healthcare services and a good knowledge of it play a key role in the oral disease prevention. A better health attitude and practice require a better knowledge. The aims of this study was to evaluate the oral health knowledge among the International students branch (Kish of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-12.   Materials and Methods: 159 pre-clinical students in medicine (54 students, dentistry (69 students and pharmacy (36 students participated in this research. A standard questionnaire was used as the main tool of research to evaluate the attitude and knowledge of students about the oral health. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test.   Results: According to the results, dental students had the best level of knowledge and pharmacy students had a better knowledge level compared to the medical students. The results also showed a significant relationship between students’ oral health knowledge and their field and duration of study and the place of their secondary school (P0.05.   Conclusion: The results showed that the students at the International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences had a relatively good knowledge of oral health. Students’ knowledge level can be improved by providing students with educational materials, organized workshops and seminars.

  12. Antibiotic prescribing and resistance: knowledge level of medical students of clinical years of University Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque, Nor Iza A Rahman, Zainal Zulkifli, Salwani Ismail Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Abstract: The innovation of penicillin by Dr Alexander Fleming in 1928 and its use in clinical practice saved many lives, especially during the Second World War. Tuberculosis still carries a significant public health threat and has re-emerged over the past two decades, even in modern countries where tuberculosis was thought to be eliminated. The World Health Organization defines antimicrobial resistance as the resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was initially effective for treatment of infections caused by the microbe. Therefore, the findings of the current study will provide data to enable the design of a new educational program to better equip our students in confronting antimicrobial resistance. This study was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, which was undertaken in the Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. The study participants were students of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program (MBBS of Year III, IV, and V. A total of 142 out of 164 (86% medical students returned the questionnaire. Specifically, the year-wise breakdown of responses was 29% (41, 39% (55, and 32% (45 for Year III, IV, and V, respectively. Among the study respondents, 28% (40 were male, and the remaining 72% (102 were female. In all, 67% of the participants felt more confident in “making an accurate diagnosis of infection/sepsis.” The majority (88% of the study participants stated that they would like more training on antibiotic selection. This research has found that there is a gap between theoretical input and clinical practice; the students are demanding more educational intervention to face the threat of antimicrobial resistance. Keywords: antibiotic, prescribing, resistance, medical students, knowledge

  13. Systematic implementation of clinical risk management in a large university hospital: the impact of risk managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Brunner, Gernot; Tax, Christa; Falzberger, Gebhard; Smolle, Josef; Leitgeb, Karina; Kober, Brigitte; Kamolz, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    For health care systems in recent years, patient safety has increasingly become a priority issue. National and international strategies have been considered to attempt to overcome the most prominent hazards while patients are receiving health care. Thereby, clinical risk management (CRM) plays a dominant role in enabling the identification, analysis, and management of potential risks. CRM implementation into routine procedures within complex hospital organizations is challenging, as in the past, organizational change strategies using a top-down approach have often failed. Therefore, one of our main objectives was to educate a certain number of risk managers in facilitating CRM using a bottom-up approach. To achieve our primary purpose, five project strands were developed, and consequently followed, introducing CRM: corporate governance, risk management (RM) training, CRM process, information, and involvement. The core part of the CRM process involved the education of risk managers within each organizational unit. To account for the size of the existing organization, we assumed that a minimum of 1 % of the workforce had to be trained in RM to disseminate the continuous improvement of quality and safety. Following a roll-out plan, CRM was introduced in each unit and potential risks were identified. Alongside the changes in the corporate governance, a hospital-wide CRM process was introduced resulting in 158 trained risk managers correlating to 2.0 % of the total workforce. Currently, risk managers are present in every unit and have identified 360 operational risks. Among those, 176 risks were scored as strategic and clustered together into top risks. Effective meeting structures and opportunities to share information and knowledge were introduced. Thus far, 31 units have been externally audited in CRM. The CRM approach is unique with respect to its dimension; members of all health care professions were trained to be able to identify potential risks. A network of risk

  14. Rearing a reading habit

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the importance and ways of inculcating reading habit in children at the right age, describes the five reading phases in children along with interest and the material to satiate the need, explains how four deterministic factors affect the reading habit of children, enlists motivations that are behind the reading process with tips to improve reading habit of children.

  15. SHAPING OUR READING CLASSROOM ALIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Purjayanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reading Comprehension has been determined (by the Director of First Common Year Program to be one of the core subjects for the first year IPB students, either in semester one or two. With the objective of being able to read English texts effectively and efficiently, the teaching of reading for these undergraduate programs are basically confined to skills that can develop reading speed and improve students‘ comprehension and reasoning abilities. Thus, skills like finding both general and specific ideas, guessing unknown words, finding meanings from English-English dictionary, predicting, ad nfinding inferences are those need to be covered. Such kind of teaching, however, can sometimes become a demanding task when dealing with certain classroom conditions and with certain targets. It is, therefore, a challenge for all English teachers in my university to be able to carry out the task well so as to achieve the above teaching objectives. Meanwhile, students‘ evaluation reveals that 3 semesters ago, teachers obtained various scores in their teaching evaluation, ranging from 2 to 3.7 out of the 1-4 scale. This paper, accordingly, is written to find out the teaching method and strategies used by those obtaining relatively good scores (3.2 and above in order to disseminate them as better insights for the teaching of reading not only in my university but also other schools or colleges.

  16. Reading Strategies Used by Iranian EFL Learners While Reading Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Yousefian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this study was to explore the nature and frequency of the reading strategies used by the EFL learners while reading academic texts. Normally, students tend to read all the information provided in reading materials. This study explores whether learners use reading strategies to assist them in reading comprehension. There was a sample of 45 English language (EFL learners from Islamic Azad University, Falavarjan Branch. The instrument utilized in this study was a survey questionnaire with 30 items including 13 global reading strategies, 8 problem solving strategies and 9 support reading strategies. The survey was going to signify how much EFL learners use each of these strategies while reading academic texts. The findings indicated that the participants used global reading strategies more (44.5% than problem solving strategies (29.0% and support reading strategies (26.5%. The results of the present study will let the instructors improve the reading strategies which are not used by EFL learners frequently. It also helps learners to promote the ability of using reading strategies and utilize the strategies in an appropriate and effective way.

  17. Inter-observer variability of visual analysis of "stress"-only adenosine first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging in relation to clinical experience and reading criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, D. D.; Kuijpers, D.; Bodewes, R.; Kappert, P.; Kerkhof, M.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.

    To assess the inter-observer agreement of adenosine "stress"-only visual analysis of perfusion MR images in relation to experience and reading criteria. 106 adenosine perfusion MR examinations out of 350, 46 consecutive positive examinations and 60 randomly selected negative examinations were

  18. Reliability and Validity of Objective Structured Clinical Examination for Residents of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE is used for the evaluation of the clinical competence in medicine for which it is essential to measure validity and reliability. This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: A descriptive-correlation study was designed and the data of OSCE for obstetrics and gynecology were collected via learning behavior checklists in method stations and multiple choice questions in question stations. The data were analyzed through Pearson correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha, using SPSS software (version 16. To determine the criterion validity, correlation of OSCE scores with scores of resident promotion test, direct observation of procedural skills, and theoretical knowledge was determined; for reliability, however, Cronbach's alpha was used. Total sample consisted of 25 participants taking part in 14 stations. P value of less than 0.05 was considered as significant.Results: The mean OSCE scores was 22.66 (±6.85. Criterion validity of the stations with resident promotion theoretical test, first theoretical knowledge test, second theoretical knowledge, and direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS was 0.97, 0.74, 0.49, and 0.79, respectively. In question stations, criterion validity was 0.15, and total validity of OSCE was 0.77.Conclusion: Findings of the present study indicated acceptable validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology.

  19. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  20. Summer Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galison, P.; Greene, B.; Mishkin, A.; Thompson, N.

    2004-04-01

    "Send Me a Cable" This isan excerpt from the author Peter Galison's book titled Einstein's Clocks, Poincare's Maps: Empires of Time. Galison is a professor in the History of Science and of Physics at Harvard University. In the early days, astronomer-surveyors struggled with measuring longitude. The best way was to observe an astronomical event, such as an eclipse, note the time it occurred in two different places, and figure the time difference. This was done easily enough in Europe, but not from Europe to America. Galison's 2003 book chronicles the difficulty and ultimate success of Benjamin Gould and George Dean to lay a trans-Atlantic electrical telegraph cable to obtain a reliable measurement of time. "Dead Stars Tell Tales" is an excerpt from the book The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene, a professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University. Among other topics, the book describes astronomers' efforts to measure the deceleration of the universe using type Ia supernovae as "standard candles." Surprisingly, the measurements suggest that the expansion of the universe is not decelerating, but is actually accelerating. "Don't Roll Over, Rover" is an excerpt from Andrew Mishkin's book Sojourner: An Insider's View of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. Mishkin is a senior systems engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He coordinated the development of various robotic vehicles and their sub-systems for more that 15 years. His book chronicles his participation in the rover operations team during the exploration of Mars. "Fairway to Heaven" is an excerpt from Neal Thompson's book of the same name, which documents the events of the Apollo 14 lunar mission in 1971. On that mission Ed Mitchell, Stuart Roosa, and Alan Shepard carried out experiments using the first two-wheeled cart called a MET (modularized equipment transport). Featured in the reprint is a description of Alan Shepard's famous golfing expedition in the Fra Mauro crater.

  1. Recent diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to prenatally and perinatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and their implementation in the University Clinical Hospital Mostar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Vjekoslav; Martinović, Vlatka; Kvesić, Ante; Bukvić, Nado; Skitarelić, Nataša; Brekalo, Zdrinko; Ivanković, Krunoslav; Šetka, Violeta

    2015-03-01

    A shift of the diagnostics of urological malformations towards the fetal age by means of ultrasound, especially hydronephrosis which, apart from reflux, is the most frequent developmental urological disorder, opened many dilemmas and debates. In the course of more than three decades the application of this diagnostic approach to the problem of hydrone- phrosis became a routine clinical practice in all modern clinics. In this paper we present the problems related to this diagnostic method and its delayed application in the Mostar University Clinical Hospital. Along with the exposition of a general approach to the problem of hydronephrosis we briefly present our modest collection of cases which points to the most recent trend of a vigorous medical development in this region, despite unfavorable overall conditions which prevailed so far. The observation included 56 children with prenatal, perinatal and early age determination of pyelon dilatation by means of ultrasonic exploration who were treated surgically. Of this number 32 (57.14%) were male, and 24 (42.86%) female children. Of the observed patients 56 had unilateral and 6 had bilateral pyelon dilatation so that 62 kidneys in all were observed and treated. The dilatation was determined prenatally in 24 (38.7%) out of 62 kidneys observed in all, in 7 (11.29%) the disorder was observed perinatally and in remaining 31 cases (49.9%) it manifested during early childhood, school age, even at the age of pre-puberty. Of the children with prenatally and perinatally determined dilatation, in 14 (45.16%) out of 31 (100.0%) observed kidneys the ap radius of the dilated pyelon was between 10-15 mm, and in 17 (54.84%) more than 15 mm. Along with other examinations (MAG3 and DMSA) the patients were followed-up by ultrasonic exploration of the observed kidney for 6 to 30 (average 18) months after postnatal diagnosis; the ultrasonic exploration was repeated in intervals of 6 months. Within 12 months of birth surgical intervention

  2. Reflex reading epilepsy: effect of linguistic characteristics on spike frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Dima; Lassonde, Maryse; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Denault, Carole; Macoir, Joël; Rouleau, Isabelle; Béland, Renée

    2011-04-01

    Reading epilepsy is a rare reflex epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by reading. Several cases have been described in the literature, but the pathophysiological processes vary widely and remain unclear. We describe a 42-year-old male patient with reading epilepsy evaluated using clinical assessments and continuous video/EEG recordings. We administered verbal, nonverbal, and reading tasks to determine factors precipitating seizures. Linguistic characteristics of the words were manipulated. Results indicated that reading-induced seizures were significantly more numerous than those observed during verbal and nonverbal tasks. In reading tasks, spike frequency significantly increased with involvement of the phonological reading route. Spikes were recorded predominantly in left parasagittal regions. Future cerebral imaging studies will enable us to visualize the spatial localization and temporal course of reading-induced seizures and brain activity involved in reading. A better understanding of reading epilepsy is crucial for reading rehabilitation in these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness....

  4. Dialogic Reading Aloud to Promote Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George M.

    2016-01-01

    How can teachers motivate students to read extensively in a second language? One strategy is for teachers to read aloud to students to promote the joys of reading generally, to build students' language skills and to introduce students to specific authors, book series, genres, websites, etc. This article begins by discussing why teachers might want…

  5. Enhancing academic reading skills through extensive reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The current study explores the feasibility of an extensive reading programme in the context of a low-income country (Mozambique), as well as the influence of extensive reading on academic reading. The programme took over 4 months and was conducted among 30 students majoring in Journalism at the Eduardo ...

  6. A Call to Embrace Social Reading in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Social reading can broadly be described as the experience surrounding the reading of electronic books, more commonly known as eBooks. Utilising eTextbooks and social reading at a university offers some powerful potential to engage students and help them succeed in their studies. A broad overview of the current landscape and recent initiatives…

  7. Reading for Pleasure and Creativity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn E.; Kneipp, Lee B.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between reading for pleasure and creativity. University students (N = 225) completed measures of reading for pleasure and creativity (SCAB). The results indicated that reading for pleasure was significantly, positively correlated to creativity. Implications for the classroom are explored, including possible…

  8. Linguistic Proficiency and Strategies on Reading Performance in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-01-01

    General English (L2) proficiency and reading strategies are believed to be highly effective in successful reading performance. However, available studies rarely investigated the combined effects of these two variables on successful reading. To fill this gap, 78 university students were divided into four groups of different degrees of these two…

  9. Clinical characteristics of dental emergencies and prevalence of dental trauma at a university hospital emergency center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kyun; Choi, Yong-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of dental emergency patients who visited a university hospital emergency center and to evaluate the incidence of dental trauma. A retrospective chart review of patients with dental complaints and who visited the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) emergency center in Gyeonggi-do, Korea, from January 2009 to December 2009 was conducted. Information regarding age, gender, the time, day, and month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up was collected and analyzed. One thousand four hundred twenty-five patients with dental problems visited the SNUBH emergency center. Dental patients accounted for 1.47% of the total 96,708 patients at the emergency center. The male-to-female ratio was 1.68:1, with a considerably larger number of male patients (62.7%). The age distribution peak was at 0-9 years (27.5%), followed by patients in their forties (14.1%). The number of patients visiting the dental emergency center peaked in May (14.2%), on Sundays (22.4%), and between 2100 and 2400 h (20.8%). The patients' chief complaints were as follows: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The prevalence of dental trauma was 66%. The reasons for dental emergency visits included the following: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and TMD, with 66% of the patients requiring management of dental trauma. It is important that dentists make a prompt, accurate diagnosis and initiate effective treatment in case of dental emergencies, especially dental trauma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical split-mouth evaluation of partial ceramic crowns luted with a new, universal adhesive system/resin cement: results after 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Vanessa; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Federlin, Marianne; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    A new universal adhesive with corresponding luting composite was recently marketed which can be used both, in a self-etch or in an etch-and-rinse mode. In this study, the clinical performance of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) inserted with this adhesive and the corresponding luting material used in a self-etch or selective etch approach was compared with a self-adhesive universal luting material. Three PCCs were placed in a split-mouth design in 50 patients. Two PCCs were luted with a combination of a universal adhesive/resin cement (Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) with (SB+E)/without (SB-E) selective enamel etching. Another PCC was luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE). Forty-eight patients were evaluated clinically according to FDI criteria at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months. For statistical analyses, the chi-square test (α = 0.05) and Kaplan-Meier analysis were applied. Clinically, no statistically significant differences between groups were detected over time. Within groups, clinically significant increase for criterion "marginal staining" was detected for SB-E over 18 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly higher retention rates for SB+E (97.8 %) and SB-E (95.6 %) in comparison to RXU2 (75.6 %). The 18-month clinical performance of a new universal adhesive/composite combination showed no differences with respect to bonding strategy and may be recommended for luting PCCs. Longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm superiority of SB+E over SB-E. At 18 months, the new multi-mode adhesive, Scotchbond Universal, showed clinically reliable results when used for luting PCCs.

  11. Student travel health and the role of universities and health clinics in New Zealand to prevent imported infections: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neave, Penny E; Nair, Balakrishnan; Heywood, Anita E

    2017-05-01

    Tertiary students are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during overseas travel as they visit low-income countries, have low perceptions of risk and are unlikely to access travel health advice. Some will visit friends and relatives abroad, a group identified as disproportionately affected by imported infections. There is no national student travel health policy in NZ. This study aimed to explore travel health training of university-based health providers; academics' practices and perceptions of travel health; reasons for travel and countries visited by NZ university students, their travel health uptake and factors affecting decision making about this. A cross-sectional study consisting of surveys sent in 2014 to university clinics, senior academics and students. Surveys were completed by 251 respondents. Three of nine clinicians had only undertaken a short course in travel health. Competing resources and time constraints in health clinics were amongst the barriers to providing optimal services. Of the senior academics, only 14% were able to confirm their university collaborated with health clinics. Sixty seven percent of students were unaware that clinics provided travel health services and 19% had or intended to seek professional travel health advice. A national policy is warranted involving all stakeholders, utilizing innovative technologies to increase uptake of student travel health services. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Reading Journal as A Way to Improve Students’ Comprehension toward A Textbook Reading Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menik Winiharti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reading journal is one way to record students’ independent learning based on text they read. This study was conducted to find out the students’ level of reading comprehension through some notes written in the reading journal, the extent to which the activity of writing reading journals improved students’ reading comprehension, whether the students got benefit from reading journal. There were 104 respondents coming from four different departments in Bina Nusantara University were asked to read a text related to the subject they learned in a certain session. Then they were assigned to write a journal that records the things they had read. When this task was finished, the lecturer ran a quiz containing related questions to check whether they really understood the content of the text. Afterwards, students were to fill in a questionnaire regarding their opinion on the impact of the reading journal toward their reading comprehension. The findings indicate that more than half of the participants appear to understand the material well, and the task plays a certain role in improving students’ understanding. The most crucial thing is that most students think they get benefit by writing the reading journal.

  13. Reading Makes Cents Resource Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacie Ashby

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s economy, it is more crucial than ever to focus our educational efforts on increasing financial literacy. Many young people are unskilled in managing their personal finances, yet this critical life skill will greatly affect their future economic well-being. Reading Makes Cents, developed by Penn State University, is an excellent resource to address this need. A reviewed and recommended curriculum by National 4-H, this complete, easy to use curriculum targets youth in grades 3-5 with a combination of financial literacy and reading. The curriculum explores basic money concepts such as spending, saving, and sharing money. Lessons incorporate hands-on activities and children’s literature to reinforce lesson objectives. With evaluation questions and family activities included, Reading Makes Cents is a perfect guide for educators to easily pick up and teach.

  14. Perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Melaku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors of preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pharmacy clerkship students and preceptors during June 2014 and December 2015. A 52-item structured questionnaire was self-administered to 126 students and 23 preceptors. The responses are presented using descriptive statistics. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test the significance of differences between students and preceptors. The response rate was 89.4% for students and 95.6% for preceptors. Statistically significant differences were observed in the responses regarding two of the five communication skills that were examined, six of the 26 clinical skills, and five of the 21 parameters involving feedback. The mean scores of preceptors (2.6/3 and students (1.9/3 regarding instructors’ ability to answer questions were found to be significantly different (P= 0.01. Students and preceptors gave mean scores of 1.9 and 2.8, respectively, to a question regarding preceptors’ application of appropriate up-to-date knowledge to individual patients (P= 0.00. Significant differences were also noted between students and instructors regarding the degree to which preceptors encouraged students to evaluate their own performance (P= 0.01. Discrepancies were noted between students and preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors. Preceptors rated their teaching behaviors more highly than students did. Short-term training is warranted for preceptors to improve some aspects of their teaching skills.

  15. Seroprevalence and determinants of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at the university teaching hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Christiana; Makasa, Mpundu; Sitali, Lungowe; Michelo, Charles

    2017-01-05

    Toxoplasmosis is a neglected zoonotic disease which is prevalent among pregnant women especially in Africa. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence and determinants of the disease among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH). A cross-sectional study was employed where 411 pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at UTH were interviewed using closed ended questionnaires. Their blood was also tested for Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies using the OnSite Toxo IgG/IgM Combo Rapid test cassettes by CTK Biotech, Inc, USA. The overall seroprevalence of the infection (IgG) was 5.87%. There was no seropositive IgM result. Contact with cats showed 7.81 times the risk of contracting the infection in the pregnant women and being a farmer/being involved in construction work showed 15.5 times likelihood of contracting the infection. Socio-economic status of the pregnant women also presented an inverse relationship (showed association) with the infection graphically. However, though there were indications of association between contact with cats, employment type as well as socioeconomic status of the pregnant women with the infection, there was not enough evidence to suggest these factors as significant determining factors of Toxoplasma gondii infection in our study population. There is a low prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection among pregnant women in Lusaka, Zambia. Screening for the infection among pregnant women can be done once or twice during pregnancy to help protect both mother and child from the disease. Health promotion among women of child bearing age on the subject is of immense importance in order to help curb the situation. Further studies especially that of case-control and cohort studies should be carried out in the country in order to better ascertain the extent of the condition nationwide.

  16. The Interplay of Silent Reading, Reading-While-Listening and Listening-Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kohji; Stephens, Meredith; Kamata, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Leading scholars (Gilbert, 2009; Walter, 2008) have highlighted the importance of phonological processing in learning to read. Nevertheless, reading in Japan has traditionally been taught without adequate attention to the role of phonological processing. Accordingly, it was speculated that Japanese university students would demonstrate superior…

  17. Lectura y Vida: Revista Latinoamericana de Lectura (Reading and Life: Latin American Reading Magazine). 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lectura y Vida: Revista Latinoamericana de Lectura, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The four 1996 issues of the journal, written entirely in Spanish and intended for reading teachers, include articles on these topics: design of the school and classroom environment for reading; a university experiment in cooperative learning and learning strategies; use of portfolios for evaluation of student work; evaluation of reading…

  18. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluranti J. Obisesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32±11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p<0.0001. The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere.

  19. Determining the agent factors related with time management of responsible doctors and nurses in clinics at Ankara University hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuner, Ahmet Munir; Nilgun, Sarp; Cifteli, F Gulay

    2006-01-01

    This research has been planned and conducted as a descriptive scanning model field study in order to determine the agent factors related with time management of doctors and nurses in positions of responsibility at Ankara University hospitals. As data collection instruments; the "Personal Information Form" which has been developed to determine the socio-demographical characteristics of the research group, the questionnaire of "Determining the Time Management Attitudes and Behaviour of Managers, Time Management Opportunities of the Managers, Prodcutive Working Times of the Managers and the Factors Causing Them to Lose Time", developed by Erdem has been used. It has been determined that the time management attitudes and behaviour of doctors, nurses and nurse assistants responsible for clinics are all different. It was found that nurse assistants graduated from pre-undergraduate or high schools are the least conscious of time management. In particular, nurse assistants of 36 years old and over with 21 years of work experience and 11 years of management experience show little awareness of time management. The time losing factors of the research group were found to be unnecessary visitors, lack of materials and the excessive amount of time spent on obtaining the necessary equipment.

  20. Comparing comprehensive care and departmental clinical education models: students' perceptions at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mojdeh; Harrison, Janet; Langham, Sue; Scarbecz, Mark; Amini, Mehdi

    2015-02-01

    In summer 2012, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry transitioned from a departmental clinical education model to a comprehensive care/group leader model. The aim of this study was to investigate the perspectives of the fourth-year class of dental students who, because the transition took place during their training, had experienced treating patients under both educational models. To achieve this objective, a questionnaire was designed to assess the students' opinions on the efficiency of their effort, availability of specialty faculty, stress, collaboration with classmates, and availability of exposure to different practice styles and techniques under the two systems. The students were also given an opportunity to provide open-ended feedback on the shortcomings and advantages of the systems. The Class of 2013 had 81 students, 55 of whom participated in the survey for a response rate of 67.9%. The majority (86%) of the respondents preferred the comprehensive care model and reported feeling that, in it, they were able to accomplish more comprehensive dentistry with greater consistency of supervision from faculty in a more patient-centered environment than in the departmental model. However, 56 percent considered having the same group leader for two years a disadvantage and recommended rotation of at least one group leader every six months. The results of this survey can help this college and other dental schools that are seeking to optimize their educational model to best serve students' educational experience and the dental needs of their patient population.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis infection in a low-risk women attended in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norhayati Moktar; Nor Liyana Ismail; Phoy Cheng Chun; Mohamad Asyrab Sapie; Nor Farahin Abdul Kahar; Yusof Suboh; Noraina Abdul Rahim; Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail; Tengku Shahrul Anuar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of trichomoniasis among women attending the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre.Methods: A total of 139 high vaginal swabs were taken from the subjects and sent to the laboratory in Amies gel transport media. The specimens were examined for the presence of Trichomonas vaginalis using wet mount, Giemsa staining and cultured in Diamond’s medium. Sociodemographic characteristics and gynaecological complaints were obtained in private using structured questionnaire applied by one investigator.Results: The median age was 32 years, with an interquartile interval of 9.96. Most of the subjects were Malays(76.9%) and the remaining were Chinese(15.1%), Indians(2.2%)and other ethnic groups(5.8%). One hundred and thirty eight(99.3%) of the women were married and 98.6% had less than 6 children. More than half(75.5%) of the women’s last child birth was less than 6 years ago. Forty seven percent of them were involved in supporting administrative work and 64.7% of the women gave a history of previous or current vaginal discharge.Conclusions: The present study reported zero incidence rate of trichomoniasis. The low incidence rate was postulated due to all women who participated in this study were categorized into a low-risk group.

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis infection in a low-risk women attended in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norhayati Moktar; Nor Liyana Ismail; Phoy Cheng Chun; Mohamad Asyrab Sapie; Nor Farahin Abdul Kahar; Yusof Suboh; Noraina Abdul Rahim; Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail; Tengku Shahrul Anuar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of trichomoniasis among women attending the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: A total of 139 high vaginal swabs were taken from the subjects and sent to the laboratory in Amies gel transport media. The specimens were examined for the presence of Trichomonas vaginalis using wet mount, Giemsa staining and cultured in Diamond's medium. Sociodemographic characteristics and gynaecological complaints were obtained in private using structured questionnaire applied by one investigator. Results: The median age was 32 years, with an interquartile interval of 9.96. Most of the subjects were Malays (76.9%) and the remaining were Chinese (15.1%), Indians (2.2%) and other ethnic groups (5.8%). One hundred and thirty eight (99.3%) of the women were married and 98.6%had less than 6 children. More than half (75.5%) of the women's last child birth was less than 6 years ago. Forty seven percent of them were involved in supporting administrative work and 64.7% of the women gave a history of previous or current vaginal discharge. Conclusions: The present study reported zero incidence rate of trichomoniasis. The low incidence rate was postulated due to all women who participated in this study were categorized into a low-risk group.

  3. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obisesan, Oluranti J.; Olowe, Olugbenga A.; Taiwo, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC) is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API) 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32 ± 11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p < 0.0001). The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere. PMID:26064140

  4. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors among elderly patients in outpatient clinic of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A; Azidah, A K; Asrenee, A R; Rosediani, M

    2009-06-01

    Depression among elderly primary care patients is a serious problem with significant morbidity and mortality. This is a cross sectional study to determine the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among the elderly patients attending the outpatient clinic, Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. This study utilized Malay version Geriatric Depression Scale 14 (M-GDS 14) to screen for elderly depression among Malaysian population. It also looked into associated risk factors for elderly depression using sociodemographic, family dynamics, and medically related questionnaires. Out of 244 subjects, 34 or 13.9% were found to have depression. Three variables were found to be significantly associated with depression. Elderly patient with any illness that limits the patient's activity or mobility has more risk of developing depression (OR 2.68 CI 1.15 - 6.24). Elderly patients who were satisfied with their personal incomes (OR 0.29 CI 0.10 - 0.85), and who had children or son/daughter-in-law to take care of them when they are sick (OR 0.10 CI 0.01 - 0.83) have a lower chance of having depression. Screening the elderly for depression, would help in diagnosing the elderly depression better and offer them the treatment needed.

  5. Spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis diagnosed patients at Dilla University Referral Hospital and other private clinics, Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhin Gebrezgabiher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis strains exsisting in Gedeo zone and the surrounding areas of the Southern Ethiopia using spoligotyping. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out from February, 2012 to June, 2013 and 97 (76 sputum and 21 fine needle aspirate samples were taken from tuberculosis diagnosed patients at Dilla University Referral Hospital and other private clinics. Culturing, region of difference (RD9 deletion typing and spoligotyping techniques were employed to isolate M. tuberculosis strains. Results: Growth of mycobacteria was observed in 35.1% (34/97. Speciation of isolates showed that 91.2% (31/34 of the isolates were M. tuberculosis. Further characterization led to the identification of 23 different spoligotype patterns of M. tuberculosis of which 61% and 39% displayed unique and cluster patterns, respectively. The most dominant shared type was spoligotype international type 53. Of the 23 strains, 12 have not been registered in the international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4. Seventy one percent of the strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage. Conclusions: This study revealed the existence of both genetically diverse and clustered M. tuberculosis strains from tuberculosis patients in the area, suggesting reactivation of infection and recent transmission, respectively. Molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis should be done nationwide in order to set appropriate control measures.

  6. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENTS ADMITTED TO KARADENIZ TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY CHILD OUTPATIENT CLINIC WITH SUICIDE ATTEMPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim AKTEPE

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Assesment of sociodemographic and psychiatric characteristics of attempted suicide in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors and sociodemographic, psychiatric characteristics of adolescents and children who attempted suicide. Suicide attempters (range 7-15 years, fifty-eight cases who referred to Karadeniz Technical University, School of Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry outpatient clinic between January 2003 and January 2005 were analyzed retrospectively, in terms of sex, age, living residence, number of suicide attempts, educational achievement and level, psychiatric examinations, method of suicide, precipitating events, psychiatric evaluations of parents, socioeconomic status in our study. The majority of subjects were girls (89.7%. The commonest age group involved was 15-16 years (46.6%. Girls, aged 15-16 years, from middle-low socioeconomic status with low achievement at school, living in urban area were found to be risky group for suicide attempt. From the view of low tolerance to problems, insufficient coping abilites in youth; acquirement of problem solving capacity and aiding in familiar problems solutions may be efficient in prevention and treatment of suicide. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 444-454

  7. Reading: Focus for Enjoyment. Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (10th, Terre Haute, Indiana, June 12-13, 1980). Studies in Curriculum Development No. 1, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, David C., Comp.; Gibbs, Vanita M., Comp.

    Focusing on reading for enjoyment, the seven articles in this collection were drawn from the Tenth Annual Reading Conference held at Indiana State University. Topics discussed in the articles are: (1) reading aloud to students, (2) how to have fun while teaching vocabulary, (3) the enjoyment and affective dimensions of "EAS into Reading," (4)…

  8. Cats, Comics, and Knausgård: Promoting Student Reading at a U.K. Academic Library with a Leisure Reading Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Susan; Marsh, Dominic; Brown, Dean; Forbes, Shona

    2017-01-01

    This case study describes the creation of a leisure reading collection in the Clifford Whitworth library at the University of Salford. It briefly surveys existing literature on leisure reading collections and looks at the growing interest among U.K. academic libraries in recreational reading. It considers the reasons for promoting reading as a…

  9. Reviews Book: The Age of Wonder Equipment: Portoscope DVD: Around the World in 80 Images Book: Four Laws that Drive the Universe Book: Antimatter Equipment: Coffee Saver Starter Set Equipment: Graphite Levitation Kit Book: Critical Reading Video: Science Fiction-Science Fact Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND The Age of Wonder This book tells the stories of inspiring 19th-century scientists Antimatter A fast read that gives an intriguing tour of the antimatter world Science Fiction-Science Fact A video from a set of resources about the facts in science fiction WORTH A LOOK Portoscope Lightweight ×30 microscope that is easy on the purse Four Laws that Drive the Universe In just 124 pages Peter Atkins explains thermodynamics Coffee Saver Starter Kit A tool that can demonstrate the effect of reduced air pressure Graphite Levitation Kit Compact set that demonstrates diamagnetic behaviour Critical Reading A study guide on how to read scientific papers HANDLE WITH CARE Around the World in 80 Images Navigate through images from Envistat, country by country WEB WATCH This month's issue features real-time simulation program Krucible 2.0, which enables learners to run virtual experiments

  10. The Socio-Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of the Adult Epileptic Patients Applying to the Neurology Clinic of Erciyes University and the Relation of These Phenomena to Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesile Şenol

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The epidemiological characteristics of epilepsy vary from society to society. Epilepsy, whose prevalence is between 0.5-1.0%, is usually seen in early and late ages, at the both of ends of life, and more often in males, and in people who have low income and education. Besides ıts neuropsychologic effects, epilepsy is a disease which has psychological, socilogical aspects such as social isolation, low self-esteem and depression. Depression is seen more often in people with epilepsy than people who don’t have this disease. The percentage of depression for the whole life-time for people with epilepsy is 10-30%. Age at onset of epilepsy, seizure type, frequency, time and the type of treatment (mono-poly therapy affect the incidence and degree of depression. OBJECTIVES: To define the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of epilepsy cases, to determine the percentage of depressive disorders in epilepsy cases, to probe the characteristics of epileptic seizure and its relation to depression. METHODS: The study was conducted through a face-to-face survey of 102 adult epileptic patients who applied to the Erciyes University Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic between October 2004 and 2005. In order to gather the data, which was prepared by the researcher “A survey form for the epileptic individuals” and “The Turkish Version of Beck Depression Inventory”, whose accuracy and validity was checked by Hisli, was used. RESULTS: The average age for the cases is 34.3±12.6, the average age at seizure onset is 21.4±14.6 and in 66% of them the seizure started when they were under 25. Majority of the cases were male and lower than the minimum wage. Among the patients, 45.6% had generalized (tonic-clonic seizures, and 36% had been ≥1/month seizures and 32% seizure-free during the previous year. CONCLUSION: The average of depressive disorder was 29.4%. 15.7% of the cases were with major depression. Age at onset epilepsy, seizure type and

  11. Theme: Parents and Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jund, Suzanne, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This journal issue concentrates on the theme "Parents and Reading." It presents articles on sharing books with young children, using public relations in a reading program, guiding preschool learning, assessing language readiness, working with reading problems, and teaching reading readiness in Wisconsin kindergartens. Resources and a review of…

  12. Psychometric Research in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Frederick B.

    This review of psychometric research in reading analyzes the factors which seem related to reading comprehension skills. Experimental analysis of reading comprehension by L. E. Thorndike revealed two major components: knowledge of word meanings and verbal reasoning abilities. Subsequent analysis of experimental studies of reading comprehension…

  13. El andamiaje asistido en procesos de comprensión lectora en universitarios A estrutura assistida em processos de compressão leitora em universitários The Assistance Framework in Reading Comprehension Processes for University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Susana Martínez-Díaz

    2011-12-01

    estratégia qualitativa, empregou-se a técnica de entrevista de grupo focal, produção de análise de textos escritos. Em relação à sequência de compreensão leitora, desenhou e validou-se um instrumento para avaliar os processos metacognitivos utilizados pelos estudantes durante a leitura. Para avaliar a compreensão de textos científicos, recorreu-se à produção de uma síntese pessoal, afim de recriar o texto por meio da articulação das experiências, resultado de conhecimentos prévios, indagação em diversas fontes como artigos, pesquisas, textos entre outras. Os resultados do pré-teste evidenciam que os docentes não se preocuparam por intervir na forma como seus estudantes abordam os textos dos cursos. Os resultados do pós-teste evidenciam que realmente é possível melhorar a compreensão lectoescrita de textos científicos com a mediação do docente.This study looked at the reading comprehension processes of twenty (20 psychology students at a private university. Based on the results of that investigation, a program with a framework for assistance in reading comprehension at the level of scientific texts was designed and applied. A mixed method was used to develop the investigative process. A quasi-experimental control group, with a pre-test and a post-test, was designed for the quantitative strategy, while the focus group interview technique, coupled with the production and analysis of written texts, was applied as the qualitative strategy. With respect to the sequence of reading comprehension, a tool to evaluate the metacognitive processes students use when reading was designed and validated. Personal summaries were produced to assess the comprehension of scientific texts, the idea being to re-create the text by articulating experiences through drawing on previous knowledge and checking different sources such as articles, studies and texts, among others. The pre-test results show teachers have not been overly concerned about intervening in the

  14. The impact of an academic reading programme in the Bachelor of Education (intermediate and senior phase degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Livingston

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research regarding the academic reading load experienced by first year students at universities in South Africa indicated that students are woefully under-prepared to deal with this load as they have limited reading experiences and strategies. This led to the implementation of an academic reading programme at a university of technology. In order to measure the impact of this academic reading programme, a sequential explanatory mixed-method model was designed to determine if the reading programme had led to any significant gains in reading speed and reading comprehension. The results of the empirical study indicated that the academic reading programme improved reading speed whilst maintaining comprehension.

  15. Teachers' perceptions of strategy training in reading instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sallı, Ayşegül

    2002-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 2002. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2002. Includes bibliographical references leaves 93-97. Reading strategies are processes used by a learner to enhance reading and to overcome comprehension failures. In order to better help students overcome such difficulties, training in reading strategies is necessary. Only with the appropriate ...

  16. 501 reading comprehension questions

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This updated edition offers the most extensive and varied practice for all types of questions students might face on standardized and in-class tests. With this guide, students will learn to develop expert reading strategies, understand how to read faster and with greater comprehension, overcome reading anxiety, and increase appreciation of reading for pleasure. This book's step-by-step approach provides graduated coverage that moves from the basics to more advanced reading.

  17. A survey on viewpoints of nursing and midwifery students and their clinical instructors at Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences towards clinical education during 2009-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Salimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical environments play a vital role in nursing and midwifery students' learning. The present study investigates the viewpoints of clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences about clinical education status during 2009-2011. Methods: In this cross sectional research data were gathered using a researcher made questionnaire including five domains: educational plan, quality of clinical instructors function, role of clinical professionals in clinical education, educational facilities and space, clinical evaluation and professional satisfaction. The questionnaire was completed by clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students. Convenient sampling was accomplished. Face validity, content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was assessed and confirmed by test – retest method. Results: Majority of clinical instructors, nursing and midwifery students reported day and evening work shifts more appropriate. Majority of clinical instructors reported the clinical education status pleasant, but 79.8% nursing students and 64.2% midwifery students reported it moderate. Comparing the mean of clinical education status from the viewpoints of clinical instructors didn't show a significant difference in the domain of "the role of the others impressive in clinical education", but there was a significant difference between the nursing and midwifery students in their view points about the domain. Conclusion: Clinical competency is an essential component in providing high quality nursing care, thus the educational planners should continue to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical education. Boosting the clinical learning environment domains such as “successful instructors”, “professional values”, “professional relationship with the members of caring team” and “conflict management” could make the clinical experience attractive and assure students

  18. Reading with a simulated 60-channel implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available First generation retinal prostheses containing 50-60 electrodes are currently in clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the theoretical upper limit (best possible reading performance attainable with a state-of-the-art 60-channel retinal implant and to find the optimum viewing conditions for the task. Four normal volunteers performed full-page text reading tasks with a low resolution, 60-pixel viewing window that was stabilized in the central visual field. Two parameters were systematically varied: (1 spatial resolution (image magnification and (2 the orientation of the rectangular viewing window. Performance was measured in terms of reading accuracy (% of correctly read words and reading rates (words/min. Maximum reading performances were reached at spatial resolutions between 3.6 and 6 pixels/char. Performance declined outside this range for all subjects. In optimum viewing conditions (4.5 pixels/char, subjects achieved almost perfect reading accuracy and mean reading rates of 26 words/min for the vertical viewing window and of 34 words/min for the horizontal viewing window. These results suggest that, theoretically, some reading abilities can be restored with actual state-of-the-art retinal implant prototypes if image magnification is within an optimum range. Future retinal implants providing higher pixel resolutions, thus allowing for a wider visual span might allow faster reading rates.

  19. Writing-Reading Relationships: Effectiveness of Writing Activities As Pre-Reading Tasks to Enhance L2 Inferential Reading Comprehension

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    Thilina Indrajie Wickramaarachchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the interaction between reading and writing processes in general and more specifically the impact of pre-reading tasks incorporating writing tasks (referred to as “prw tasks” in helping the development of inferential reading comprehension. A sample of 70 first year ESL students of the University of Kelaniya were initially selected with one group (experimental group engaging in “prw tasks” while the other group (control group performing the tasks without a pre-reading component. The intervention was for 6 sessions (one hour in each session. At the end of each session, the performance of the two groups was measured and the test scores were analyzed using the data analysis package SPSS to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. The results indicated that the experimental group had significantly performed better than the control group which indicated the effectiveness of the prw tasks in improving reading comprehension.

  20. Experiences of the Nuclear Medicine Service at the University Hospital Surgical Clinic Dr. Salvador Allende 2013-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suárez Iznaga, Rodolfo; Pozo Almaguer, Armando del; Gil Valdés, Doris; Fleitas Anaya, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Service of the University Hospital Surgical Clinic D r. Salvador Allende , located in the municipality of Cerro, began the provision of scintigraphic services in May 2013. A retrospective descriptive and analytical study was carried out from May 2013 to December 2015 from the archived scintigraphic reports. The objective of the study was to present the results of the Nuclear Medicine Service during this period. The data were reflected in percentages, using tables and graphs. To determine the existence of a statistically significant relationship between the variables were used: Chi square test with a level of significance α = 0.05 being positive if p <0.05. Until December 2015, 798 cases had been reported, which included Bone scans (88.34%), renal (10.65%) and thyroid scans for follow-up of cancer patients (1%); (76.82%) and the female sex was the most attended with 446 (55.89%) patients, there were no statistically significant differences between the scintigraphic studies and the sex of the patients. There were statistically significant differences between the scintigraphic studies and the age of the patients. The most frequent diagnoses were: bone scintigraphy, metastasis in 86.52% of patients, renal cyst scintigraphy (48.78%) and dynamic scintigraphy of the kidneys with obstructive functional involvement (63.64%) It was recommended to create the necessary technical and human resources conditions to be able to introduce other scintigraphy studies in the Nuclear Medicine Service such as: breast scintigraphy and lymph node scans, high demand in the medical center. In addition, to use scientifically the criteria of approval of patients in the consultation of classification of the service, with the aim of achieving a better selection of the applicants for scintigraphic studies, which would favor a more rational and efficient use of these studies.

  1. [Hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals: social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, types, indications, surgical approaches, and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, I S; Sy, T; Diallo, B S; Diallo, Y; Mamy, M N; Diallo, M H; Bah, E M; Diallo, T S; Keita, N

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to calculate the frequency of hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals (Donka Hospital and Ignace Deen Hospital), describe the women's social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, and identify the key indications, the surgical techniques used, and the prognosis. This was a 2-year descriptive study, retrospective for the first year (May 2011-April 2012) and prospective for the second (May 2012-April 2013), of 333 consecutive hysterectomies performed in the obstetrics and gynecology departments of these two hospitals. Hysterectomy is one of the surgical procedures most commonly performed in these departments (following cesarean deliveries), with frequency of 4.4% interventions. The profile of the women undergoing this surgery was that of a woman aged younger than 49 years (61%), married (75.7%), multiparous (33%), of childbearing age (61%), and with no history of abdominal or pelvic surgery (79.6%). Nearly all hysterectomies were total (95%, compared with 5% subtotal; the approach was abdominal in 82.25% of procedures and vaginal in 17.75%. The most common indication for surgery was uterine fibroids (39.6%), followed by genital prolapse (22.2%), and obstetric emergencies (17.8%). The average duration of surgery was 96 minutes for abdominal and 55 minutes for vaginal hysterectomies. The principal intraoperative complication was hemorrhage (12.31%), and the main postoperative complication parietal suppuration (21.02%). The average length of hospital stay was 10.3 days for abdominal hysterectomies and 7.15 days for vaginal procedures. We recorded 14 deaths for a lethality rate of 4.2%; most of these deaths were associated with hemorrhagic shock during or after an obstetric hysterectomy (93%). Hysterectomy remains a common intervention in developing countries. Its indications are common during the pregnancy and postpartum period, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Improving obstetric coverage could reduce its

  2. Clinical and echocardiographic characteristics and outcomes in congestive heart failure at the Hospital of The State University of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malebranche, Rodolphe; Tabou Moyo, Christian; Morisset, Paul-Henry; Raphael, Nernst-Atwood; Wilentz, James Robert

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and epidemiologic profile of congestive heart failure at the principal free-care hospital in Haiti. Cardiovascular disease represents the most prevalent cause of admissions to the medical service of the University Hospital of the State of Haiti. No previous study has examined the demographics of congestive heart failure in urban Haiti. Two hundred forty-seven patients presented to the inpatient service between May 2011 and May 2013. Evaluation included history and physical, CBC, renal/metabolic profile, serum glucose, anti-HIV antibody, ECG, chest radiograph and echocardiogram. Treatment included angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, furosemide and spironolactone, carvedilol, digoxin and anticoagulation. Women (62.4%) outnumbered men; patients were relatively young (mean age 50.1) and from the lowest socio-economic levels of the population. Nearly all (98.8%) presented with NYHA III-IV status, with correspondingly high mortality (23.3%). Echocardiography showed 73% dilated cardiomyopathy; 83% showed moderate to severe LV systolic dysfunction (mean EF 36.5 +/- 15%) and 17% preserved LV systolic function. The three principal etiologies were dilated cardiomyopathy (29%) hypertensive cardiomyopathy (27%) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (20%). Ischemic cardiomyopathy was rare (3.4%). At 27 months follow-up, 76.7% of the patients were alive and well. Among those who died, mean survival time was 113 days. Readmission carried a poor prognosis. This congestive heart failure study from Haiti shows an unusually high proportion of young women, primarily due to peripartum cardiomyopathy. Ischemic cardiomyopathy is rare, as in Africa. Further study is warranted to address the particular problem of the high frequency of peripartum cardiomyopathy in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Features and Treatment Modes of Mandibular Fracture at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Tatsumi

    Full Text Available The number of elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma is rapidly increasing due to active lifestyles and longevity. Shimane prefecture has the fastest growing proportion of elderly individuals in Japan. The aim of this study was to reveal the distinctive features and treatment modes of mandibular fracture treatment mode in patients requiring hospitalization at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan.Patient age, sex, period between injury and first consultation, years since injury, cause of injury, fracture site, treatment, and duration of hospitalization were evaluated. Univariate Poisson regression, relative risk with 95% confidence interval based on the Wald test, Fisher's exact test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore associations among clinical and demographic variables.In total, 305 patients were diagnosed with and hospitalized for mandibular fracture from 1980 to 2010. Younger age increased the risk for mandibular fracture. Incidence was higher in males than females, particularly in the young, but the male to female ratio decreased with age. The period until first hospital consultation decreased progressively over the study period. Fall was a much more frequent cause in patients aged ≥60 than in those aged <60 years. Mandibular fracture with condyle, symphysis, and angle involvement were most common and were associated with sex, age, and treatment mode. Length of hospitalization has decreased since 1980.In our department, patients aged ≥60 years accounted for a greater proportion of mandibular fracture cases than in many previous studies, reflecting the greater proportion of elderly residents in Shimane prefecture.

  4. Tuberculosis among Healthcare Workers at Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand: Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchai, Juthamas; Liwsrisakun, Chalerm; Bumroongkit, Chaiwat; Euathrongchit, Juntima; Tajarernmuang, Pattraporn; Pothirat, Chaicharn

    2018-05-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) among healthcare workers (HCWs) highly affects morbidity and TB transmission in hospitals. A retrospective cohort study of TB among HCWs (HCW-TB) was conducted using a registered database from 2003 to 2016 at Chiang Mai University Hospital to determine clinical and microbiological characteristics and treatment outcomes of HCW-TB. A total of 76 patients comprising 54 nurses (71.1%), 12 physicians (15.8%), and 10 paramedics (13.2%) were diagnosed with TB disease. The men to women ratio was 25:51, with a mean age of 37.0±11.6 years, a median work duration of 12.0 years (5-20) and a body mass index of 19.4±2.5 kg/m 2 . Within the HCW-TB group, 28 (36.8%) worked in the Medical Department, 12 (15.8%) worked in the Outpatient Department/Emergency Room, and 9 (11.8%) worked in the Surgical Department. Pulmonary TB (PTB) was the most common manifestation of HCW-TB (92.1%). Sputum acid-fast stains were positive among 28 (40.0%) HCWs with PTB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures were positive in 26 (34.2%) patients. Drug susceptibility testing showed sensitivity to all first-line drugs (75.0%), resistance to any one first-line drug (20.8%), and multidrug-resistant TB comprised 4.2%. The end-of-treatment success rate was 100%. Therefore, TB control guidelines should be strictly implemented to prevent TB transmission in healthcare settings.

  5. Introducing computer-assisted training sessions in the clinical skills lab at the Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Somaya; Mishriky, Adel M; Youssef, Mirella

    2008-01-01

    The Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University clinical skills lab was established in 1981 as the first skills lab in Egypt to cope with innovation in medical education adopted since school inauguration in 1978. Students are trained using their peers or models. Training is done weekly, guided by checklists tested for validity and reliability and updated regularly. Students receive immediate feedback on their performance. Recently, the number of students has increased, leading to challenges in providing adequate supervision and training experiences. A project to design and implement a computer-assisted training (CAT) system seemed to be a plausible solution. To assess the quality of a newly developed CAT product, faculty and students' satisfaction with it, and its impact on the learning process. The project involved preparation of multimedia video-films with a web interface for links of different scientific materials. The project was implemented on second year students. A quality check was done to assess the product's scientific content, and technical quality using questionnaires filled by 84 faculty members (139 filled forms) and 175 students (924 filled forms). For assessment of impact, results of examinations after project implementation were compared with results of 2nd year students of previous 3 years. More faculty (96.3%) were satisfied with the product and considered its quality good to excellent, compared to 93.9% of students, p < 0.001. Most faculty (76.2%) have agreed on its suitability for self-learning, while most students considered the product would be suitable after modification. The percentage of students' failures was lower after project implementation, compared to previous 3 years, p < 0.05. CAT materials developed for training of second year students in skills lab proved to be of good scientific content and quality, and suitable for self-learning. Their use was associated with lower failure rates among students. A randomized trial is recommended

  6. Teacher Candidates' Experiences with Clinical Teaching in Reading Instruction: A Comparison between the Professional Development School Environment and the Non-Professional Development School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates experience a variety of school settings when enrolled in teacher education methods courses. Candidates report varied experiences when in public school classrooms. This dissertation investigated clinical experiences of teacher candidates when placed in two different environments for clinical teaching. The two environments were a…

  7. A study on task-analysis of clinical pathologists as medical consultants in Nihon University Hospital--a Japanese perspective by comparison with current status in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, K; Yanai, M; Hosokawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Hoshino, T; Arashima, Y; Hayashi, K; Murakami, J; Tsuchiya, T; Kawano, K

    2000-07-01

    To identify our role and the customers' satisfaction, the on-call consultation service records of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi Hospital (NUIH), were analyzed. Between 1995 and 1998, 1,789 consultation services were recorded, and approximately 40% were from physicians, and 50% were from medical technologists. During office hours, many physicians made contact with us at the office of clinical pathology, the clinical laboratory and other places in the hospital by various means. They asked us to interpret multidisciplinary laboratory data, and to provide the specific information that might affect clinical management. Medical technologists asked for clinical information of patients with extreme measured values and requested that we contact with physicians. In contrast, on weekends/holidays or after routine working hours, physicians sometimes requested non-automated laboratory tests such as peripheral blood smears/bone marrow smears or Gram stains. The major contents of our responses to medical technologists were concerned with blood banking and handling of instruments not to be operated in routine work. These results reconfirm that we are still required to have clinical competence for common laboratory procedures and to have the capability of interpretation of multidisciplinary laboratory data in the university hospital. Traditionally, most Japanese clinical pathologists have been focused their attention on bench work in research laboratories. However, the present study shows that the clinical pathologists need to bridge the real gap between laboratory technology and patient care. Our on-call service system can enhance the education of clinical pathologists, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but also patient care. In addition, in response to a need for customer access to this service with a shortage of clinical pathologists, a more effective method would be to set up a proactive systemic approach in

  8. Toward a Tripartite Model of L2 Reading Strategy Use, Motivations, and Learner Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Hiromori, Tomohito; Nakayama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The present study proposes a tripartite model of L2 reading strategy use, reading motivations, and general learner beliefs by examining the relationships among them in an L2 context. Reading strategy instruction was performed for 360 first-year university students enrolled in a reading-based course, in expectation of affecting their motivations…

  9. An analysis of reading profiles of first-year students at Potchefstroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis of reading profiles of first-year students at Potchefstroom University: a cross-sectional study and a case study. ... South African Journal of Education ... that these students experienced problems across all aspects of the reading process (i.e. vocabulary, fluency, reading comprehension, and reading strategy use).

  10. Activating the Need to Know in Reading Instruction: One Teacher Educator's Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Priscilla S.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines one teacher educator's teaching of reading methods at a university that was recognized for exemplary reading instruction. Data collected over the course of one semester indicated that she modeled the teaching of reading and served as a catalyst in activating preservice teachers' need to know about how to teach reading by…

  11. Reading Disabilities and PASS Reading Enhancement Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    Children experience difficulties in reading either because they fail to decode the words and thus are unable to comprehend the text or simply fail to comprehend the text even if they are able to decode the words and read them out. Failure in word decoding results from a failure in phonological coding of written information, whereas reading…

  12. To read or not to read

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There is a widely held belief that reading (story)books makes us smarter and helps promote success in life. Does scientific evidence support this notion? The three meta-analyses in this thesis comprise 146 studies between 1988 and 2010 (N=10,308 participants) that addressed the role of book reading

  13. The Role of Reading Skills on Reading Comprehension Ability of Turkish EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading is a part of our daily lives. It is performed both for pleasure and information. Reading skills are important for the individuals since they foster comprehension in reading. If the students do not have knowledge of reading skills, they cannot be expected to be successful readers. Thus, they cannot achieve the level of comprehension required to pass exams in their own departments. For this reason, reading skills should be taught in universities for the students to be able to cope with comprehension problems. This case study aims to find out whether or not reading skills has a role on the reading comprehension ability of Turkish EFL students. This study is both a qualitative and a quantitative study which lasted for a duration of 14 weeks. Two groups were selected (experimental and control among prep classes at Kahramanmaraş Sütçü Imam University. Both groups were administered a pre-test and questionnaire at the beginning of the study to find out if they were aware of reading skills. In addition, 10 students were chosen randomly for interview. During the study, reading skills were infused into the curriculum through designing lesson plans in accordance with the language content and topics for level C students, as determined by the Common European Language Framework. The lessons required the students to use reading skills before, during, and post reading. At the end of the study, the same questionnaire was re-administered. The students were given the post-test and then interviewed. The quantitative data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. The obtained data revealed that the students enhanced their comprehension ability provided that they were taught to use reading skills.

  14. Determinants of completion of advance directives: a cross-sectional comparison of 649 outpatients from private practices versus 2158 outpatients from a university clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirstinger, Jochen; Bleyer, Bernhard; Blum, Christian; Rechenmacher, Michael; Wiese, Christoph H; Gruber, Hans

    2017-12-21

    To compare outpatients from private practices and outpatients from a university clinic regarding the determinants of completion of advance directives (AD) in order to generalise results of studies from one setting to the other. Five determinants of completion of AD were studied: familiarity with AD, source of information about AD, prior experiences with own life-threatening diseases or family members in need of care and motives in favour and against completion of AD. Observational cross-sectional study. Private practices and a university clinic in Germany in 2012. 649 outpatients from private practices and 2158 outpatients from 10 departments of a university clinic. Completion of AD, familiarity with AD, sources of information about AD (consultation), prior experiences (with own life-threatening disease and family members in need of care), motives in favour of or against completion of AD, sociodemographic data. Determinants of completion of AD did not differ between outpatients from private practices versus university clinic outpatients. Prior experience with severe disease led to a significantly higher rate of completion of AD (33%/36% with vs 24%/24% without prior experience). Participants with completion of AD had more often received legal than medical consultation before completion, but participants without completion of AD are rather aiming for medical consultation. The motives in favour of or against completion of AD indicated inconsistent patterns. Determinants of completion of AD are comparable in outpatients from private practices and outpatients from a university clinic. Generalisations from university clinic samples towards a broader context thus seem to be legitimate. Only one-third of patients with prior experience with own life-threatening diseases or family members in need of care had completed an AD as expression of their autonomous volition. The participants' motives for or against completion of AD indicate that ADs are considered a kind of

  15. Assessment of Clinical Education in the Alborz University of Medical Sciences from Surgical Technology and Anesthesiology Students’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bahrami Babaheidary

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Because of surgical technology and anesthesiology students needs to acquire clinical skills along with theoretical training, providing suitable clinical environment seems to be critical to achieve essential in-depth experience in professional aspects.

  16. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: A study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University psychiatric clinic in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296. The evaluation was focused on patient- related factors (socio-demographic and illness related, psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance. Results. Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X either without comorbidity (46.2% or with comorbidity (24.7%, mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant, to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 ± 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%, married (69.3% and employed (55.9%. The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4 during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15 after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%, followed by fluoxetine (13.3% and maprotiline (11.7%. Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p < 0.01. The most prescribed antidepressant group was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI (47.8%, followed by tricyclic antidepresants (TCA (25.3% and new antidepressants - venlafaxine, tianeptine, mirtazapine, bupropion, trazodone (15.1%. Most of the drugs were prescribed in doses which are at the lower end of the recommended dose-range. Regarding severity of the actual depressive episode, TCA were prescribed for severe depression with psychotic features, while SSRI were choice for

  17. Managing disclosure of research misconduct by a graduate student to a university mental health professional during a clinical counseling session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Holly A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-01-01

    This case looks at the question of how to consider obligations of confidentiality by a mental health professional who works for an institution and learns that a student has been using a drug intended for an animal research project. Dr. Paul Appelbaum, MD, a psychiatrist at Columbia University, examines the issue of the limits of confidentiality. Nicholas Steneck, PhD, a scholar in research misconduct at the University of Michigan, explores the obligations to report research misconduct. Walter Limehouse, MD, an ethicist at the Medical University of South Carolina, considers the systems issues raised by this case and offers some suggestions that might change the institutional environment.

  18. Reading and analysis on management guidelines for hyperthyroidism published in 2011 by American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Zhaowei; Tan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists published 'Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists', and created 100 evidence-based recommendations. The guideline systematically introduced the diagnoses and therapies of hyperthyroidism, emphasizing the indications, contraindications, preparations, methodologies and follow-up strategies. The guideline also provided detailed management principles for hyperthyroidism in children and pregnancy, Graves' ophthalmopathy and some unusual causes of hyperthyroidism. (authors)

  19. Comparison of the clinical information provided by the FreeStyle Navigator continuous interstitial glucose monitor versus traditional blood glucose readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarraugh, Geoffrey V; Clarke, William L; Kovatchev, Boris P

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the analysis was to compare the clinical utility of data from traditional self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to that of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). A clinical study of the clinical accuracy of the FreeStyle Navigator CGM System (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA), which includes SMBG capabilities, was conducted by comparison to the YSI blood glucose analyzer (YSI Inc., Yellow Springs, OH) using 58 subjects with type 1 diabetes. The Continuous Glucose-Error Grid Analysis (CG-EGA) was used as the analytical tool. Using CG-EGA, the "clinically accurate," "benign errors," and "clinical errors" were 86.8%, 8.7%, and 4.5% for SMBG and 92.7%, 3.7%, and 3.6% for CGM, respectively. If blood glucose is viewed as a process in time, SMBG would provide accurate information about this process 86.8% of the time, whereas CGM would provide accurate information about this process 92.7% of the time (P glucose values than CGM, control of blood glucose involves a system in flux, and CGM provides more detailed insight into the dynamics of that system. In the normal and elevated glucose ranges, the additional information about the direction and rate of glucose change provided by the FreeStyle Navigator CGM System increases the ability to make correct clinical decisions when compared to episodic SMBG tests.

  20. The effects of work on the health of nurses who work in clinical surgery departments at university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rosângela Marion da; Zeitoune, Regina Célia Gollner; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo de; Prestes, Francine Cassol

    2016-08-08

    to analyze the effects of work on the health of nurses who work in clinical surgery departments at university hospitals in relation to physical, social and psychological suffering and pain. a quantitative transversal study was carried out between 2012 and 2013 in four institutions in a state located in the south of Brazil. We studied 65 nurses who responded to questions on their habits. We also obtained sociodemographical information on them as well as conducting an evaluation on work relational damage using an evaluation scale. Associations were checked through the use of the Chi-Sqaure and Fisher's exact test. Correlations were checked using the Spearmann test. we found that physical ailments persisted and that there were connections between social and psychological pain/suffering and variable physical activities as well as connections with accidents in the work place and the option to work shifts. We noted correlations between social and psychological pain/suffering. nurses had their health compromised due to their work in clinical surgery departments. analisar os efeitos do trabalho na saúde de enfermeiros que atuam em clínicas cirúrgicas de hospitais universitários, relacionando-os aos danos físicos, sociais e psicológicos. estudo quantitativo, transversal, realizado entre 2012 e 2013 em quatro instituições de um Estado da região sul do Brasil. A amostra foi composta por 65 enfermeiros que responderam questões sobre os hábitos de vida e dados sociodemográficos e a Escala de Avaliação de Danos Relacionados ao Trabalho. Associações foram verificadas pelo teste Qui-Quadrado e Exato de Fisher e as correlações pelo teste de Spearmann. prevaleceu o adoecimento físico, encontrando associação entre os fatores Danos Sociais e Psicológicos e as variáveis prática de atividade física, acidente de trabalho e opção pelo turno de trabalho. Evidenciou-se correlação entre Danos Sociais e Psicológicos. o trabalho realizado por enfermeiros que atuam

  1. Linguistic Proficiency and Strategies on Reading Performance in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Talebi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available General English (L2 proficiency and reading strategies are believed to be highly effective in successful reading performance. However, available studies rarely investigated the combined effects of these two variables on successful reading. To fill this gap, 78 university students were divided into four groups of different degrees of these two variables in L2 and given a reading test in English and an interview for assessing how much of the problems in L2 reading among the four groups were rooted in linguistic competence and/or strategic competence. Findings evinced that the high general proficiency level coupled with high awareness and use of reading strategies would result in best performance and that the pattern of answers to different components of reading question is different in different groups. It is concluded that both of the variables should be emphasized simultaneously for the best performance in reading comprehension.

  2. Guided Reading and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Allyson L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Guided Reading and student motivation to read across fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. The study defined literacy motivation as: (a) task value; (b) self-perceived competence; (c) students' perceptions of the Guided Reading format. Factor analysis and repeated measures ANOVAs were…

  3. Readability and Reading Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin D.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    This document discusses the measurement of reading ability and the readability of books by application of the Lexile framework. It begins by stating the importance of uniform measures. It then discusses the history of reading ability testing, based on the assumption that no researcher has been able to measure more than one kind of reading ability.…

  4. Reading and Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, John J.; Marchant, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between reading and empathy was explored. Controlling for GPA and gender, reading variables were hypothesized as related to empathy; the relationship was expected to differ for males and females. For the complete sample, affective components were related to GPA but not reading. Perspective taking was related to reading…

  5. Free Reading Is UTOPIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCrone, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    In high school students get tied up in extracurricular activities and have little time for pleasure reading. It is true that with rigorous academic schedules they have little time for pleasure reading. Thus began a conversation with a sophomore English teacher at the author's high school. As they were discussing the plight of free reading he was…

  6. Reading: United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rose-Marie

    1983-01-01

    An exploration of the increasingly important role of linguistics in literacy research and instruction reviews literature on reading comprehension, written language, orthography, metalinguistics, classroom language use, reading disabilities, native tongues, nonstandard dialects, bilingual education, adult literacy, and second-language reading. (86…

  7. Teaching Reading with Puppets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth

    The use of traditional stories in American Indian language programs connects students' reading to their lives and familiarizes learners with the rhythms of the oral language. Puppet performances are one way of connecting reading programs to the Native oral tradition. A high school reading lesson in a first-year Hupa language class uses many…

  8. Validity of the Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR): effort considered in a clinical sample of U.S. military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kriscinda A; Shepard, Polly H; Mariner, Jennifer; Mossbarger, Brad; Herman, Steven M

    2010-07-01

    The current study represents an examination of the construct validity of the Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR) among a sample of U.S. military veterans referred for outpatient neuropsychological evaluation that included a measure of negative response bias, namely, the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM). This retrospective data analysis examined the relationship between the WTAR and measures of current verbal general intellectual function and current cognitive skills. Findings showed that, among patients passing the TOMM (N = 98), WTAR scores were most highly correlated with current verbal IQ but also showed significant correlations with verbal memory and lesser, but still significant, correlations with measures of visual-spatial memory. Discriminant validity for the WTAR was also shown among the group passing the TOMM in the sense that the WTAR, which is designed to measure verbal premorbid general intellectual skill, was not as highly correlated with measures of learning and memory as was a measure of current verbal general intellectual skill. Whereas scores on most study measures did significantly differ between the groups that passed versus failed the TOMM (N = 26), scores on the WTAR did not, suggesting that the WTAR may remain robust even in the face of suboptimal effort.

  9. Uterine fibroids and urinary disorders: An analysis using the medical imaging of 72 cases in Kinshasa University Clinics from 1998 to 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndaye, B.; Ntandu, U.; Maswapi, K.; Djamba, O.; Kitenge, N.

    2010-01-01

    Cross sectional study of 672 cases with clinical analysis and medical imaging whose average age is 44,5 years. This analysis looked at 672 cases of women's diagnosed with fibroids 1 january 1998 to 1 january 2003 in the department of obstetrics gynecology in the oncology and radiology of the university clinics in Kinshasa. All cases with diagnosis, using the clinical and medical imaging (ultrasound and hysterosalpingography and or intravenous urography) had fibroids were reviewed to identify the consequences of these on the urinary tract. The most frequent clinical signs were menorrhagia (22%), the menometrorrhagia (21,1%) and pelvic heaviness (20%). Radiological signs seen on intravenous urography were compressing the bladder dome (34,7%), bilateral ureteral diversion (15,2%) with hydronephrosis upstream (15,2%)

  10. Effective Reading in a Foreign Language: An Experimental Reading Course in English for Overseas Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Describes experimental program at the Language Center of the University of Kent at Canterbury in which Belgian university students participated in a course designed to increase their English reading speed. Purpose of course was to decrease tendency to concentrate on every word. Results suggest the participating students made significant progress.…

  11. Developmental relations between reading comprehension and reading strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Muijselaar, M.M.L.; Swart, N.M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Jong, P.F. de

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary, and working memory were administered. A structural equation model was constructed to estimate the unique relations between reading strategies and reading comprehension, while controlling for reading...

  12. Qualitative analysis on the field training program for clinical school counselling―Interview survey on psychology department of the universities having post graduate field training program―

    OpenAIRE

    岡本, 淳子; 佐藤, 秀行; 金, 亜美; 水﨑, 光保

    2016-01-01

     In this study, we have interviewed 20 universities with psychology departments that have the postgraduate field training programs of clinical school counselling for more than a year to find out the currentsituation. The results of the study revealed that the field training programs are implementedthrough various channels, largely categorized into the following types: 1)counselling support to thelocal schools through the board of education; 2)counselling support to the individual students thr...

  13. Mobile app reading speed test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsnorth, Alec; Wolffsohn, James S

    2015-04-01

    To validate the accuracy and repeatability of a mobile app reading speed test compared with the traditional paper version. Twenty-one subjects wearing their full refractive correction glasses read 14 sentences of decreasing print size between 1.0 and -0.1 logMAR, each consisting of 14 words (Radner reading speed test) at 40 cm with a paper-based chart and twice on iPad charts. Time duration was recorded with a stop watch for the paper chart and on the App itself for the mobile chart allowing critical print size (CPS) and optimal reading speed (ORS) to be derived objectively. The ORS was higher for the mobile app charts (194±29 wpm; 195±25 wpm) compared with the paper chart (166±20 wpm; F=57.000, pmobile app charts (0.17±0.20 logMAR; 0.18±0.17 logMAR) compared with the paper chart (0.25±0.17 logMAR; F=5.406, p=0.009). The mobile app test had a mean difference repeatability of 0.30±22.5 wpm, r=0.917 for ORS, and a CPS of 0.0±0.2 logMAR, r=0.769. Repeatability of the app reading speed test is as good (ORS) or better (CPS) than previous studies on the paper test. While the results are not interchangeable with paper-based charts, mobile app tablet-based tests of reading speed are reliable and rapid to perform, with the potential to capture functional visual ability in research studies and clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Reading use in preschool

    OpenAIRE

    Laísa Cristina dos Santos Guilherme; Rodrigo Ferreira Daverni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Reading in preschool is a time of awakening the taste and pleasure in reading, it is also a source of reflection, discovery and learn to listen. It is then necessary that the contact with the reading start from pre-school, with a variety of texts and the teacher also has the habit of reading in their daily lives. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the benefits of daily reading in the classroom pre-school life of a student, which the characteristics of a player and teacher re...

  15. What oral text reading fluency can reveal about reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, N.J.; Groen, M.A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Text reading fluency – the ability to read quickly, accurately and with a natural intonation – has been proposed as a predictor of reading comprehension. In the current study, we examined the role of oral text reading fluency, defined as text reading rate and text reading prosody, as a contributor

  16. State of Clinical Education at Tehran University of Medical Sciences from the Viewpoint of Students of Nursing & Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Baraz Pardenjani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Clinical education is considered as the heart of medicine and health care due to the importance of training expert manpower. To achieve this goal, education quality should be promoted, this requiring its continuous evaluation. In this regard, application of appropriate educational strategies by competent clinical trainers or instructors leads to an improvement in the clinical education outcomes. This study was carried out to assess the learning method of clinical skills and its barriers from the viewpoint of students of midwifery. Materials & Methods : This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 140 employed BS midwives in Yazd Province who had a 6-month working experience using a questionnaire including demographic information and items on the common clinical skills grading, skills learning methods, and barriers to clinical learning. Having collected the questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The findings of the study revealed that the rate of clinical skills was at a good level for most of the subjects (56.5%, at an intermediate level for 30.7 %, and at a low level for 12.8% of the subjects. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant between subjects' level of clinical skills and age, department, and clinical experience. In studying the learning methods of clinical skills, 46.6% of learning was attributed to trainers, while 69.3% of the learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during education, and 68.6% were attributed to insufficient practical training. Conclusion : Although the graduates had an acceptable level of clinical skills, the need for improving clinical education and administering continuous education programs for controlling and warranting care quality was markedly obvious. As the subjects reported, learning was attributed to trainers, while learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during training, and insufficient practical

  17. Using Randomized Clinical Trials to Determine the Impact of Reading Intervention on Struggling Adolescent Readers: Reports of Research from Five Nationally Funded Striving Readers Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loadman, William; Sprague, Kim; Hamilton, Jennifer; Coffey, Deb; Faddis, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the U.S. Department of Education awarded eight Striving Readers grants to projects around the country. The goal of Striving Readers is to improve literacy skills and achievement for struggling readers in middle and high school and to increase the research base using randomized clinical research to address improvement in adolescent…

  18. Executive Functions Contribute Uniquely to Reading Competence in Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisa A.; Koriakin, Taylor; Lipkin, Paul; Boada, Richard; Frijters, Jan; Lovett, Maureen; Hill, Dina; Willcutt, Erik; Gottwald, Stephanie; Wolf, Maryanne; Bosson-Heenan, Joan; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Mahone, E. Mark

    2018-01-01

    Competent reading requires various skills beyond those for basic word reading (i.e., core language skills, rapid naming, phonological processing). Contributing “higher-level” or domain-general processes include information processing speed and executive functions (working memory, strategic problem solving, attentional switching). Research in this area has relied on largely Caucasian samples, with limited representation of children from racial or ethnic minority groups. This study examined contributions of executive skills to reading competence in 761 children of minority backgrounds. Hierarchical linear regressions examined unique contributions of executive functions (EF) to word reading, fluency, and comprehension. EF contributed uniquely to reading performance, over and above reading-related language skills; working memory contributed uniquely to all components of reading; while attentional switching, but not problem solving, contributed to isolated and contextual word reading and reading fluency. Problem solving uniquely predicted comprehension, suggesting that this skill may be especially important for reading comprehension in minority youth. Attentional switching may play a unique role in development of reading fluency in minority youth, perhaps as a result of the increased demand for switching between spoken versus written dialects. Findings have implications for educational and clinical practice with regard to reading instruction, remedial reading intervention, and assessment of individuals with reading difficulty. PMID:26755569

  19. Reading and Love: Encouraging Love of Reading at Home and School: Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Reading (6th, Mangilao, Guam, January 18, 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Eileen G., Ed.

    Representing the expertise of university education professors and public school teachers, the articles in these proceedings focus on encouraging reading and fostering lifelong reading habits. Titles of the papers and their authors are as follows: (1) "Television and Books: Friends or Foes" (Jeannetta H. Caplan); (2) "Encouraging the…

  20. Slower saccadic reading in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, Naz; Yu, Caroline Yizhu; Song, Jeehey; Shariati, Mohammad Ali; Binder, Steven; Beyer, Jill; Santini, Veronica; Poston, Kathleen; Liao, Yaping Joyce

    2018-01-01

    significantly correlated with age, duration of disease, and VFQ-25 scores. The presence of convergence insufficiency did not significantly correlate with reading time in PD patients, although on average there was slower reading time in those with convergence insufficiency by 8 s (p = 0.2613). We propose that a simple reading task using 120 single-digit numbers can be used as a screening tool in the clinical setting to assess functional ocular motor difficulties in Parkinson's disease that can have a profound impact on quality of life.

  1. Effectiveness of Short Message Service Text-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention Among University Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssener, Ulrika; Bendtsen, Marcus; Karlsson, Nadine; White, Ian R; McCambridge, Jim; Bendtsen, Preben

    2016-03-01

    Smoking is globally the most important preventable cause of ill health and death. Mobile telephone interventions and, in particular, short message service (SMS) text messaging, have the potential to overcome access barriers to traditional health services, not least among young people. To determine the effectiveness of a text-based smoking cessation intervention among young people. A single-blind, 2-arm, randomized clinical trial (Nicotine Exit [NEXit]) was conducted from October 23, 2014, to April 17, 2015; data analysis was performed from April 23, 2014, to May 22, 2015. Participants included daily or weekly smokers willing to set a quit date within 1 month of enrollment. The study used email to invite all college and university students throughout Sweden to participate. The NEXit core program is initiated with a 1- to 4-week motivational phase during which participants can choose to set a stop date. The intervention group then received 157 text messages based on components of effective smoking cessation interventions for 12 weeks. The control group received 1 text every 2 weeks thanking them for participating in the study, with delayed access to the intervention. The primary outcomes were self-reported prolonged abstinence (not having smoked >5 cigarettes over the past 8 weeks) and 4-week point prevalence of complete smoking cessation shortly after the completion of the intervention (approximately 4 months after the quit date). A total of 1590 participants, mainly between 21 and 30 years of age, were randomized into the study; 827 (573 [69.3%] women) were allocated to the intervention group and 763 (522 [68.4%] women) were included in the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 783 (94.7%) of the intervention group and 719 (94.2%) of the control group. At baseline, participants were smoking a median (range) of 63 (1-238) and 70 (2-280) cigarettes per week, respectively. Eight-week prolonged abstinence was reported by 203 participants (25.9%) in the

  2. Evaluation of the effect of early clinical exposure on professional attitude of dental students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aghili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Learning dentistry could have many tension and anxieties like encountering to a strange clinical environment. Early clinical exposure (ECE is supposed to control these stresses. ECE program is an increasingly widespread component of educational curriculum. This study aims to determine the effect of early clinical exposure on the attitude of dental students’ towards dental education and profession. Methods: An analytic study was performed on all 72 dental students studying basic science at Faculty of Dentistry of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences consisted of a short term course of introduction to clinical environment in academic year of 2011-2012. Every 12 students attended in an one day ECE course from 8 AM to 1 PM. Students ' attitude towards dental profession and education were assessed by a questionnaire included 25 items before and after the course .For data analysis descriptive paired-t-test was used. Results: All students completed the questionnaires. Students' attitude towards dental education and profession was evaluated. Mean score of students' attitude before and after exposure to clinical environment were 94.6 and 100.5 respectively .Significant differences were found in the students' attitude before and after the course (P=0.001 Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, we found a positive effect of early clinical exposure on attitudes of first and second year dental students. Demographic variations had an effect on the students' attitude .Therefore we suggest that early clinical exposure should be added to educational curriculum of dental students.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of 3M Petrifilms and University of Minnesota Bi-plates as potential on-farm tests for clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, J L; Keefe, G P; McKenna, S L B; Dohoo, I R; Poole, D E

    2009-05-01

    The objective was to determine test characteristics and compare 2 potential on-farm culture systems for clinical mastitis, the Minnesota Easy Culture System II Bi-plate and Petrifilm. The tests were evaluated using clinically positive mastitic milk samples (n = 282) to determine their ability to differentiate appropriate treatment groups; all cases that had gram-positive growth were considered treatment candidates (n = 161), whereas cases that grew gram-negative organisms only or yielded no bacterial growth were classified as no treatment (n = 121). For Petrifilm, both undiluted and 1:10 diluted milk samples were used. To create treatment categories, 2 types of Petrifilms were used, Aerobic Count (AC) and Coliform Count (CC). Both Bi-plates and Petrifilms were read after 24 h of incubation. Analysis was conducted at various colony count thresholds for the Petrifilm test system. The combination of Petrifilms that had the highest sensitivity classified a case as gram-negative if there were > or =20 colonies present on the CC. If there were 5 colonies present on the AC, a case would be classified as gram-positive. The Bi-plate had a sensitivity of 97.9% and a specificity of 68.6%. The Petrifilm test system had a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 70.1%. There was no significant difference in the sensitivities between the tests. All Bi-plates and Petrifilms were read by a laboratory technician and a group of masked readers with limited microbiology training. Kappa values for the masked readers were 0.75 for Bi-plates and 0.84 and 0.86 for AC and CC Petrifilms, respectively. The Bi-plate and Petrifilm were able to successfully categorize clinical cases of mastitis into 2 treatments based on their ability to detect the presence of a gram-positive organism. Neither method had the ability to determine if a sample was contaminated. The results of this study indicate that both tests were able to appropriately categorize cases, which could potentially result in a

  4. Evaluation of the iPad as a low vision aid for improving reading ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji SA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Shamim A Haji, Kumar Sambhav, Sandeep Grover, Kakarla V Chalam Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the iPad as a low vision aid in improving the reading ability of low vision patients (LVPs. Methods: In this study, 228 consecutive patients that came for their routine eye care examination at the University of Florida, Jacksonville eye clinic, were enrolled. Patients met inclusion criteria if they had best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA of 20/100 or worse in the best corrected eye and were willing to participate in the study. The patient’s reading ability was assessed both with the patient’s own spectacles and an iPad. Patients were encouraged to enlarge the reading material as well as change the contrast until they could read comfortably. The number of patients able to read the text comfortably was recorded. Results: Out of the total 228 participants who qualified, 103 (45% were male and 125 (55% were female. Only 22% could read standard newsprint-sized text (N8 without the help of an iPad. With the help of an iPad, 94% participants with impaired vision were able to read standard newsprint-sized text (N8 or smaller text (P<0.01. Conclusion: The iPad, a new portable electronic media device, can be adapted by LVPs to improve their reading ability. Keywords: low vision devices, low vision patient, LVP, iPad

  5. University clinic and private practice treatment outcomes in Class I extraction and nonextraction patients: A comparative study with the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislik, Barbara; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Katsadouris, Alexios; Eliades, Theodore

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes in university vs private practice settings with Class I patients using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. A parent sample of 580 Class I patients treated with and without extractions of 4 first premolars was subjected to discriminant analysis to identify a borderline spectrum of 66 patients regarding the extraction modality. Of these patients, 34 were treated in private orthodontic practices, and 32 were treated in a university graduate orthodontic clinic. The treatment outcomes were evaluated using the 8 variables of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. The total scores ranged from 10 to 47 (mean, 25.44; SD, 9.8) for the university group and from 14 to 45 (mean, 25.94; SD, 7.7) for the private practice group. The university group achieved better scores for the variables of buccolingual inclination (mean difference, 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59, 3.98; P = 0.01) and marginal ridges (mean difference, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.28, 2.36; P = 0.01), and the private practice group achieved a better score for the variable of root angulation (mean difference, -0.65; 95% CI, -1.26, -0.03; P = 0.04). However, no statistically intergroup differences were found between the total American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System scores (mean difference, -0.5; 95% CI, -3.82, 4.82; P = 0.82). Patients can receive similar quality of orthodontic treatment in a private practice and a university clinic. The orthodontists in the private practices were more successful in angulating the roots properly, whereas the orthodontic residents accomplished better torque control of the posterior segments and better marginal ridges. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcomes from the first mouth cancer awareness and clinical check-up day in the Dublin Dental University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2012-04-01

    To increase public awareness about mouth cancer, the Dublin Dental University Hospital (DDUH) hosted an awareness day and free mouth check-up in September 2010. The messages of information, self-examination and risk management, and the importance of early detection, were available to all attendees. The role of general dental and medical practitioners in examination of the mouth was stressed.

  7. Guest Comment: Universal Language Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne

    1979-01-01

    Explains that reading English among Scientists is almost universal, however, there are enormous problems with spoken English. Advocates the use of Esperanto as a viable alternative, and as a language requirement for graduate work. (GA)

  8. Assessing the New Literacies of Online Reading Comprehension: An Informative Interview with W. Ian O'Byrne, Lisa Zawilinski, J. Greg McVerry, and Donald J. Leu at the University of Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Kymes, Angel; Edwards, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The constantly changing nature of literacy, brought about by the Internet and other forms of information and communication technologies (ICTs), has pressed researchers and practitioners to seek new ways of addressing the complexities of reading comprehension and writing on and with the Internet. In this brief interview, members of the New…

  9. Physical and Clinical Comparison between a Screen-Film System and a Dual-Side Reading Mammography-Dedicated Computed Radiography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivetti, S.; Canossi, B.; Battista, R.; Vetruccio, E.; Torricelli, P.; Lanconelli, N.; Danielli, C.; Borasi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography systems, thanks to a physical performance better than conventional screen-film units, have the potential of reducing the dose to patients, without decreasing the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To achieve a physical and clinical comparison between two systems: a screen-film plate and a dual-side computed radiography system (CRM; FUJIFILM FCR 5000 MA). Material and Methods: A unique feature of the FCR 5000 MA system is that it has a clear support medium, allowing light emitted during the scanning process to be detected on the 'back' of the storage phosphor plate, considerably improving the system's efficiency. The system's physical performance was tested by means of a quantitative analysis, with calculation of the modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency, and contrast-detail analysis; subsequently, the results were compared with those achieved using a screen-film system (SFM; Eastmann Kodak MinR-MinR 2000). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was then performed on 120 paired clinical images obtained in a craniocaudal projection with the conventional SFM system under standard exposure conditions and also with the CRM system working with a dose reduced by 35% (average breast thickness: 4.3 cm; mean glandular dose: 1.45 mGy). CRM clinical images were interpreted both in hard copy and in soft copy. Results: The ROC analysis revealed that the performances of the two systems (SFM and CRM with reduced dose) were similar (P>0.05): the diagnostic accuracy of the two systems, when valued in terms of the area underneath the ROC curve, was found to be 0.74 for the SFM, 0.78 for the CRM (hard copy), and 0.79 for the CRM (soft copy). Conclusion: The outcome obtained from our experiments shows that the use of the dual-side CRM system is a very good alternative to the screen-film system

  10. Exploring the Relationship between Adolescent's Reading Skills, Reading Motivation and Reading Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeown, Sarah P.; Duncan, Lynne G.; Griffiths, Yvonne M.; Stothard, Sue E.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the extent to which adolescents' reading affect (reading motivation) and behaviour (reading habits) predict different components of reading (word reading, comprehension, summarisation and text reading speed) and also adds to the limited research examining group differences (gender, age, ability) in adolescents' reading…

  11. Screening for psychosocial problems in children attending the pediatric clinic at king Khalid university hospital (KKUH in Riyadh (KSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim H Al-Ayed

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed the feasibility of screening for behavioral problems of children in an outpatient setting. It is necessary to implement screening procedures for psycho-behavioral problems, and train pediatricians to screen children presenting at clinics.

  12. Strategic planning for clinical services: the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R W

    1986-09-01

    A formal, hospitalwide strategic-planning process provides structure for the pharmacy's plans for implementing clinical services. The state-supported clinical cancer and research center began a formal strategic-planning process in 1981. The institution's planning report, prepared every two years and covering three two-year periods, drives the institution's budget through the state's biennial budget process. The report focuses on each department's responsibilities, areas of service, and relationship to the mission of the institution. Through the long-range planning process, upper-level administrators learned that pharmacy was eager not only to provide high-volume drug distribution services but also to assume direct patient-care and research responsibilities. This prompted an organizational change for pharmacy from a hospital department to a clinical division. The division of pharmacy now consists of three professional departments (patient care, pharmacy research, and pharmacy academic programs) and an administrative support service area. Services offered by each of the three departments are discussed, along with specific initiatives planned for the years 1987-1993. Within the next few years, all managers will come from the ranks of clinical practitioners; nonpharmacists will oversee financial and human resource functions. The division encourages existing pharmacy staff members to enhance their clinical skills through staff development programs. Strategic planning serves the dual purposes of structuring plans for implementing clinical pharmacy services and communicating pharmacy's goals within the institution.

  13. Atopy patch tests in young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and controls: dose-response relationship, objective reading, reproducibility and clinical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygum, Anette; Mortz, Charlotte Gotthard; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2003-01-01

    The clinical interpretation and reproducibility of atopy patch tests was studied in 23 selected young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and 25 healthy controls using standard inhalant allergens. Non-invasive measurements were used for objective assessment of test reactions and the participants were retested after 6 weeks. Ten of 19 (53%) evaluable patients with atopic dermatitis had at least one positive atopy patch test. However, there was no clear clinical relevance of the atopy patch test results when related to patient history and distribution of dermatitis. Reproducible and dose-dependent results were obtained with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, grass and cat with a reproducibility rate of 0.69 to 0.81 in patients and 0.60-0.96 in controls. A unique finding was a significant positive correlation between a positive atopy patch test, allergen dose and increase in transepidermal water loss and erythema, while measurement of capacitance did not distinguish between positive and negative reactions. The results of the present study do not support the routine use of atopy patch tests in the evaluation of adult patients with atopic dermatitis.

  14. Reading in developmental prosopagnosia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Klargaard, Solja K; Petersen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    exposure durations (targeting the word superiority effect), and d) text reading. RESULTS: Participants with developmental prosopagnosia performed strikingly similar to controls across the four reading tasks. Formal analysis revealed a significant dissociation between word and face recognition......, that is, impaired reading in developmental prosopagnosia. METHOD: We tested 10 adults with developmental prosopagnosia and 20 matched controls. All participants completed the Cambridge Face Memory Test, the Cambridge Face Perception test and a Face recognition questionnaire used to quantify everyday face...... recognition experience. Reading was measured in four experimental tasks, testing different levels of letter, word, and text reading: (a) single word reading with words of varying length,(b) vocal response times in single letter and short word naming, (c) recognition of single letters and short words at brief...

  15. INTEREST AND READING MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamdu Alhamdu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between interest and reading motivation based on literature review. The concept of the interest portrayed as a psychological state that occurs during interaction between individual and specific topic, object or activity including process of willingness, increased attention, concentration and positive feeling to the topic, object or activity. Meanwhile reading motivation emphasized to mental readiness, willingness and refers to beliefs and perception of individual to engage in reading activity. Some researchers were identified factors that influenced reading motivation such as intrinsic and extrinsic factors, self-concept and value of reading, and interest. In general, the literature review described that have positive relationship between interest and reading motivation.

  16. Motivational reading on education, meaningful reading realisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Qafa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study I will present some ideas on today’s educational practice for motivation, the realization of the meaningful reading. There is a special place for the methodical ranking of the reading process, starting in school. Main requests of this reading, consist of the deep meaning of the subject, exploration of the idea, and other elements of the subject, implementation of the technique’s rules of the expressive reading, such as breathing, voice, diction, intonation, spelling, stoppages, logical emphasizes, emotional expressions, temper, timber, gesticulations, and mimic. There is also highlighted the fact that the used method comes from the pupils’ results and depends on the capability and level of the teacher, from the programming’s scale, the tools that are put into disposition, the age and the level of the pupils, and from the environment that the teacher creates during courses. At the end there are some practical guidelines for the realization of the expressive reading in the literature subject.

  17. Verbal and visuospatial working memory as predictors of children's reading ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V; Hasson, Ramzi M

    2014-08-01

    Children with reading difficulties often demonstrate weaknesses in working memory (WM). This research study explored the relation between two WM systems (verbal and visuospatial WM) and reading ability in a sample of school-aged children with a wide range of reading skills. Children (N = 157), ages 9-12, were administered measures of short-term memory, verbal WM, visuospatial WM, and reading measures (e.g., reading fluency and comprehension). Although results indicated that verbal WM was a stronger predictor in reading fluency and comprehension, visuospatial WM also significantly predicted reading skills, but provided more unique variance in reading comprehension than reading fluency. These findings suggest that visuospatial WM may play a significant role in higher level reading processes, particularly in reading comprehension, than previously thought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. on memory performance, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality in university students: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematolahi, Pouya; Mehrabani, Mitra; Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral rosemary on memory performance, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality in university students. In this double-blinded randomized controlled trial, the 68 participating students randomly received 500 mg rosemary and placebo twice daily for one month. Prospective and retrospective memory performance, depression, anxiety and sleep quality of the students were measured using Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory at baseline and after one month. The scores of all the scales and subscales except the sleep latency and sleep duration components of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory were significantly decreased in the rosemary group in comparison with the control group after one month. Rosemary as a traditional herb could be used to boost prospective and retrospective memory, reduce anxiety and depression, and improve sleep quality in university students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improve your reading

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Help your students discover the practical solution to their reading frustrations, with Improve Your Reading. Written by bestselling author and education advocate Ron Fry, this book avoids gimmicks and tricks in favor of proven strategies that will help your students better retain and comprehend what they've read in any textbook, in any course, at any academic level. Endlessly adaptable to each student's individual learning needs, the text focuses on fundamental skills students can carry beyond the classroom.

  20. Internet-based guided self-help for university students with anxiety, depression and stress: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Victor; McGrath, Patrick J; Wojtowicz, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Anxiety, depression and stress, often co-occurring, are the psychological problems for which university students most often seek help. Moreover there are many distressed students who cannot, or choose not to, access professional help. The present study evaluated the efficacy of an internet-based guided self-help program for moderate anxiety, depression and stress. The program was based on standard cognitive behavior therapy principles and included 5 core modules, some of which involved options for focusing on anxiety and/or depression and/or stress. Trained student coaches provided encouragement and advice about using the program via e-mail or brief weekly phone calls. Sixty-six distressed university students were randomly assigned to either Immediate Access or a 6-week Delayed Access condition. Sixty-one percent of Immediate Access participants completed all 5 core modules, and 80% of all participants completed the second assessment. On the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21, Immediate Access participants reported significantly greater reductions in depression (ηp(2)=. 07), anxiety (ηp(2)=. 08) and stress (ηp(2)=. 12) in comparison to participants waiting to do the program, and these improvements were maintained at a six month follow-up. The results suggest that the provision of individually-adaptable, internet-based, self-help programs can reduce psychological distress in university students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Student Time Usage during Fall Reading Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ken; Pschibul, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the time usage and levels of perceived stress, academic workload, and recreation time for 177 students at the University of Windsor before, during, and after Fall Reading Week (FRW). Over a three-week span (at various times of the day), students received a message to their smartphone to complete a 20-second survey…

  2. "Reading to Write" in East Asian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Leora

    2013-01-01

    A reading-writing initiative began in 2011-12 at the University of Toronto as a partnership between an East Asian Studies (EAS) department and an English Language Learning (ELL) Program. In this institution, students are expected to enter into scholarly discussions in their first year essays, yet many (both native English speakers and non-native…

  3. El enriquecimiento lexical en inglés desde la lectura libre y voluntaria de textos auténticos en las carreras técnicas universitarias / The enrichment of the English lexicon based on the free voluntary reading of authentic texts in university technical majorings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fabricio Molina García

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the enrichment of the English lexicon by students of university technical majoring. The starting point is the establishment of intertextual relationships from the free voluntary reading of authentic texts related to this area of knowledge to favor the development of vocabulary in English so as to enable the students to carry out academic, scientific and pre-professional tasks in the foreign language. From this perspective, a didactic strategy is offered to synthesize the phases and techniques to achieve this goal.

  4. Reading disorders and dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J

    2016-12-01

    We review current knowledge about the nature of reading development and disorders, distinguishing between the processes involved in learning to decode print, and the processes involved in reading comprehension. Children with decoding difficulties/dyslexia experience deficits in phoneme awareness, letter-sound knowledge and rapid automatized naming in the preschool years and beyond. These phonological/language difficulties appear to be proximal causes of the problems in learning to decode print in dyslexia. We review data from a prospective study of children at high risk of dyslexia to show that being at family risk of dyslexia is a primary risk factor for poor reading and children with persistent language difficulties at school entry are more likely to develop reading problems. Early oral language difficulties are strong predictors of later difficulties in reading comprehension. There are two distinct forms of reading disorder in children: dyslexia (a difficulty in learning to translate print into speech) and reading comprehension impairment. Both forms of reading problem appear to be predominantly caused by deficits in underlying oral language skills. Implications for screening and for the delivery of robust interventions for language and reading are discussed.

  5. "Teacher, I Can Read!" The Marvels of Early Intervention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jean C.; Hernandez, Leonor

    2011-01-01

    "Teacher, I can read!" exclaimed Saree, a fourth-quarter second grader who was placed in the lowest of reading groups at a southwest side elementary school in Chicago. This was her proud announcement after three weeks of intensive intervention with Ms. Gomez, a student teacher in her final semester at Chicago State University. "Ms.…

  6. How Reading Strategy Use and Personality Types Are Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Zahra; Ghyasi, Majid; Farsani, Mohammad Amini

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to uncover the reading strategies utilized by Iranian undergraduate English Foreign Language (EFL) learners and their relationship with personality types. To this end, 194 university EFL learners were asked to fill out the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to identify their personality types and answer a reading strategy…

  7. An Assessment of the Speed Reading Ability of Sandwich Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the concept and usefulness of rapid reading. It also reports a study in which the Faculty of Education, University of Lagos, Nigeria Sandwich students formed the subjects. Their pre-training reading speed and comprehension scores were determined through a pre-test, after which they were subjected to ...

  8. Reading and Vocabulary Recommendations for Spanish for Native Speakers Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Laura Gutierrez

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on the need for appropriate materials to address the needs of native speakers of Spanish who study Spanish in American universities and high schools. The most important factors influencing the selection of readings should include the practical nature of themes for reading and vocabulary development, level of difficulty, and variety in…

  9. Effectiveness of group cognitive–behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety disorders in community clinics: benchmarking against an efficacy trial at a university clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Arendt, Kristian Bech; Jørgensen, Lisbeth

    in Denmark (Arendt & Thastum, 2013). Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of evidence based, manualized group cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for children and adolescent with anxiety disorders, when delivered in an outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry or in a community based School Counselling...... Service in Denmark. Method: Psychologists and psychiatrists from three Child and Adolescent Psychiatry clinics and four community bases School Counselling Services are trained and supervised in a manualized group CBT treatment program (Cool Kids) for Childhood anxiety. Ninety-six children with anxiety...... disorders aged between 7 - 14 are expected to be included, equally divided between Psychiatric clinics (n = 48) and School Counselling services (n =48). The treatment consists of 10 2-hour group sessions with 5-6 children and their parents. Results are measured by independent diagnostic interviews...

  10. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce.

  11. Universal suprapubic approach for complete mesocolic excision and central vascular ligation using the da Vinci Xi® system: from cadaveric models to clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shen Ann; Noh, Gyoung Tae; Han, Jeong Hee; Cheong, Chinock; Stein, Hubert; Kerdok, Amy; Min, Byung Soh

    2017-12-01

    There has been little enthusiasm for performing robotic colectomy for colon cancer in recent years due to multiple factors, one being that the previous robotic systems such as the da Vinci Si ® (dVSi) were poorly designed for multi-quadrant surgery. The new da Vinci Xi ® (dVXi) system enables colectomy with central mesocolic excision to be performed easily in a single docking procedure. We developed a universal port placement strategy to allow right and left hemicolectomies to be performed via a suprapubic approach and a Pfannensteil extraction site. This proof of concept paper describes the development and subsequent clinical application of this setup. After extensive training on the dVXi system concepts in collaboration with clinical development engineers, we developed a port placement strategy which was tested and adapted after performing experimental surgery in three cadaveric models. Subsequently our port placement was used for two clinical cases of suprapubic right and left hemicolectomy. With some modifications of port placements after the initial cadaveric colectomies, we have developed a potentially universal suprapubic port placement strategy for robotic colectomy with complete mesocolic excision and central vascular ligation using the dVXi robotic system. This port placement strategy was applied successfully in our first two clinical cases. Based on our cadaveric laboratory as well as our initial clinical application, the suprapubic port placement strategy for the dVXi system with its improved features over the dVSi can feasibly perform right and left hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision and central vascular ligation. Further studies will be required to establish efficacy as well as safety profile of these procedures.

  12. Bone mineral density status and frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in 155 patients with psoriatic arthritis followed in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Noemi; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Vilaseca, Daniel Roig; Narváez, Javier; Carmona, Loreto; Nolla, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the bone mineral density (BMD) and the frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in a large group of Spanish patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). BMD was determined by DXA in all the patients who were willing to participate and had peripheral PsA regularly evaluated in a tertiary university hospital. All patients underwent a physical examination and general laboratory analysis. We gathered demographic and clinical variables related with BMD and risk of fractures. We also recorded the history of clinical low impact fractures. The population of reference to calculate T-score and Z-score came from a Spanish database. One hundred and fifty-five patients were included (64 postmenopausal women, 26 premenopausal women and 65 men). The clinical forms of PsA were: 46% oligoarticular and 54% polyarticular. Mean disease duration was 13.7±9.4 years and mean ESR was 21.8±13.9mm/h; 66% of patients had received glucocorticoid treatment. We found no differences in BMD status between the patients and the Spanish general population, neither in the whole series nor in each defined subgroup. Frequency of osteoporosis was 16%; it was higher in postmenopausal women (28%) than in men (9%) or premenopausal women (4%). Frequency of clinical fractures was 13%; it accounted specially in postmenopausal women. The magnitude of the problem of osteoporosis in PsA seems to be mild. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. A Preservice Training Module in Microcomputer Applications for Teaching Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    Declares the need to train teachers to use computers in reading and language arts and describes a training program used with undergraduate education majors at the State University of New York at Geneseo. (SRT)

  14. Developmental Relations Between Reading Comprehension and Reading Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijselaar, M.; Swart, N.M.; Steenbeek-Planting, E.G,.; Droop, M.; Verhoeven, L.; de Jong, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations between knowledge of reading strategies and reading comprehension in a longitudinal study of 312 Dutch children from the beginning of fourth grade to the end of fifth grade. Measures for reading comprehension, reading strategies, reading fluency, vocabulary,

  15. THE USE OF SCHEMATA IN READING COMPREHENSION: A CASE OF LEARNERS’ READING PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cucu Sutarsyah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Use of Schemata in Reading Comprehension: A Case of Learners’ Reading Problems. Schemata have an important role in the process of reading. It is almost impossible for a person to read without utilizing schemata. This study aimed to find learners’ reading problem in terms of using sche­mata.  A group of second year students of English Department of State University of Malang were in­volved in this study. As a case study, an interview, observation, and test were used to collect the data. The study reveals that the main reading problems were lack of background knowledge, over-reliance on background knowledge, and lack of background knowledge activation. In the process of reading, learn­ers’ background knowledge should be activated. Without optimal activation, the process of reading does not reach satisfactory results. It is also suggested that learners should not be over confident in get­ting the meaning from the text. Over-reliance on background knowledge might lead to misinterpretation.

  16. Reading and Reality. Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (14th, Terre Haute, Indiana, June 14, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Vanita M., Comp.; Waterman, David C., Comp.

    Intended for reading teachers, this pamphlet contains the presentations of the 14th annual reading conference at Indiana State University, beginning with opening remarks by David C. Waterman and welcoming comments by J. Stephen Hazlett. In the opening address, "What Good is Comprehension without Composition?" by Sharon and David Moore, the role of…

  17. Clinical Commentary by Barbara Segal, a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist Working in University College London Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This moving clinical account describes the psychotherapeutic work of a child psychotherapist undertaken in a hospital room with 13-year-old Maya, after the sudden onset of a terrifying and serious illness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, leaving her with paralysis and extreme weakness. The first session takes place almost three weeks after Maya's…

  18. [Tumors of the 4th ventricle and the craniospinal transitional zone. Review of patients of the Neurosurgical Clinic of the Department of Medicine of the Karl Marx University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebeling, H G; Fried, H; Goldhahn, W E; Skrzypczak, J; Brachmann, J; Eichler, I

    1983-01-01

    From a total of 1,028 infratentorial tumours operated on at the Neurosurgical Hospital of the Section Medicine of the Karl-Marx University Leipzig in the last 30 years, 167 tumours in the region of the 4th ventrical have been selected. Their statistical processing was carried out with respect to specific localisation, average age, kind of tumour, sex, clinical findings, duration of case history, application of instrumental diagnostic procedures and radicality of operation, success and failure. Some fundamental conclussions are drawn. A subdivision in detail will be contained in the following articles based on this material.

  19. Transplantation of the heart: An overview of 40 years' clinical and research experience at Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town: Part II. Laboratory research experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoulas, J

    2012-03-29

    Extensive experimental research on various aspects of heart transplantation was undertaken during the first 2 decades. An overview of this work is presented, and some still unpublished work has been included. Experimental laboratory investigation was an integral activity of the cardiac transplantation programme at the University of Cape Town over these years, and has remained so ever since. These studies provided invaluable fundamental information upon which future clinical work was based. It is therefore necessary to briefly mention and discuss this information, most of which has been published in detail by the various investigators concerned.

  20. THE IMPORTANCE OF ‘SIGNIFICANT OTHERS’ IN BRIDGING THE GAPS BETWEEN DIFFERENT READING CONTEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Karin Svensson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current research is an in-depth study of four pre-service teachers’ own experience of reading in various contexts and for different reasons. The aim is to analyse what has been significant regarding reading in a life history perspective by the use of narratives. A socio-cultural perspective on reading is used as analysis tool. The over-arching result from analysing pre-service teachers’ narratives is that reading is a relational process regardless of the context reading takes place in. The emerging themes allow a deeper understanding on critical aspects for developing reading in various contexts and at different levels. Significant others seem important in every reading practice, from new readers in primary school to pre-service teachers’ reading at university level. The narratives reveal a need for bridging the gaps that arise between the reading practices in the various contexts that students meet in school and university.