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Sample records for university participated methods

  1. The Economic Analysis of University Participation Rates

    Fallis, George

    2015-01-01

    Over the postwar period in most developed countries, the university participation rate has risen steadily to well over 30 percent, although there remain differences between countries. Students from lower income families have lower participation rates than those from higher income families. The article provides an economic analysis of these…

  2. Universal Image Steganalytic Method

    V. Banoci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we introduce a new universal steganalytic method in JPEG file format that is detecting well-known and also newly developed steganographic methods. The steganalytic model is trained by MHF-DZ steganographic algorithm previously designed by the same authors. The calibration technique with the Feature Based Steganalysis (FBS was employed in order to identify statistical changes caused by embedding a secret data into original image. The steganalyzer concept utilizes Support Vector Machine (SVM classification for training a model that is later used by the same steganalyzer in order to identify between a clean (cover and steganographic image. The aim of the paper was to analyze the variety in accuracy of detection results (ACR while detecting testing steganographic algorithms as F5, Outguess, Model Based Steganography without deblocking, JP Hide and Seek which represent the generally used steganographic tools. The comparison of four feature vectors with different lengths FBS (22, FBS (66 FBS(274 and FBS(285 shows promising results of proposed universal steganalytic method comparing to binary methods.

  3. Trade Union Participation in University Research Policies.

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    1984-01-01

    The recent development of Dutch research coordination agencies, the Science Shops, forms the context for a description of the relationship between university research and policy at Amsterdam University and the national trade union organization. Management tools such as project financing and other elements of this system are discussed. (MSE)

  4. University of Washington Participation in SAFARI-2000

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a summary, of the participation in the 6-week field study in southern Africa. During the field study there were flown 119.02 research hours (31 research flights). In these flights the researchers obtained many unique data sets for evaluating the effects of biomass burning and other sources of particles and gases on the climate of southern Africa, and obtained simultaneous measurements with NASA ER-2 and Terra overflights. They also analyzed portions of the large data sets acquired in SAFARI-2000. They attended several SAFARI-2000 workshops, national and international conferences to present SAFARI-2000 results.

  5. [Discussion paper on participation and participative methods in gerontology].

    Aner, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    The concept of "participation" and the demand for the use of "participative methods" in human, healthcare, nursing and gerontological research as well as the corresponding fields of practice are in great demand; however, the targets and organization of "participation" are not always sufficiently explicated. The working group on critical gerontology of the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics uses this phenomenon as an opportunity for positioning and develops a catalogue of criteria for reflection and assessment of participation of elderly people in science and practice, which can also be considered a stimulus for further discussions.

  6. Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program

    Y. Chen; A. Hechanova

    2007-07-25

    Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability.

  7. Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program

    Chen, Y.; Hechanova, A.

    2007-01-01

    Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability. In the six years of this program, we saw the evolution of the national transmutation concepts go from the use of accelerators to fast reactors. We also saw an emphasis on gas-cooled reactors for both high temperature heat and deep burn of nuclear fuel. At the local level, we saw a great birth at UNLV of two new academic programs Fall term of 2004 and the addition of 10 academic and research faculty. The Ph.D. program in Radiochemistry has turned into one of the nation's most visible and successful programs; and, the M.S. program in Materials and Nuclear Engineering initiated Nuclear Engineering academic opportunities which took a long time to come. Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability

  8. Sport participation of female university students | Nxumalo | South ...

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... The main reasons for non-participation were: 'no time' (68%), transport problems (8%) ... The university management should address the constraints to promote ...

  9. Attitudes of female university students towards participation in sports ...

    Attitudes of female university students towards participation in sports. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... linked to attitude but no studies to date have explored such links, particularly in respect of black undergraduate ...

  10. Trends in sport participation at South African universities | Burnett ...

    The participation figures of sixteen universities obtained through two questionnaires, six interviews and nineteen focus groups reveal high success rates in league competitions, ranging between 62.1 per ... Issues of inclusion and gender equality should be addressed, as the majority of sports uphold the ethos of masculinity.

  11. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  12. Impacting university physics students through participation in informal science

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Informal education programs organized by university physics departments are a popular means of reaching out to communities and satisfying grant requirements. The outcomes of these programs are often described in terms of broader impacts on the community. Comparatively little attention, however, has been paid to the influence of such programs on those students facilitating the informal science programs. Through Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC) at the University of Colorado Boulder, undergraduate and graduate physics students coach elementary and middle school children during an inquiry-based science afterschool program. As part of their participation in PISEC, university students complete preparation in pedagogy, communication and diversity, engage with children on a weekly basis and provide regular feedback about the program. We present findings that indicate these experiences improve the ability of university students to communicate in everyday language and positively influence their perspectives on teaching and learning.

  13. Bayesian Methods and Universal Darwinism

    Campbell, John

    2009-12-01

    Bayesian methods since the time of Laplace have been understood by their practitioners as closely aligned to the scientific method. Indeed a recent Champion of Bayesian methods, E. T. Jaynes, titled his textbook on the subject Probability Theory: the Logic of Science. Many philosophers of science including Karl Popper and Donald Campbell have interpreted the evolution of Science as a Darwinian process consisting of a `copy with selective retention' algorithm abstracted from Darwin's theory of Natural Selection. Arguments are presented for an isomorphism between Bayesian Methods and Darwinian processes. Universal Darwinism, as the term has been developed by Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett and Susan Blackmore, is the collection of scientific theories which explain the creation and evolution of their subject matter as due to the Operation of Darwinian processes. These subject matters span the fields of atomic physics, chemistry, biology and the social sciences. The principle of Maximum Entropy states that Systems will evolve to states of highest entropy subject to the constraints of scientific law. This principle may be inverted to provide illumination as to the nature of scientific law. Our best cosmological theories suggest the universe contained much less complexity during the period shortly after the Big Bang than it does at present. The scientific subject matter of atomic physics, chemistry, biology and the social sciences has been created since that time. An explanation is proposed for the existence of this subject matter as due to the evolution of constraints in the form of adaptations imposed on Maximum Entropy. It is argued these adaptations were discovered and instantiated through the Operations of a succession of Darwinian processes.

  14. Some observations in university participation in nuclear engineering research

    Eickhoff, K.G.; Hill, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A general discussion is presented on the kinds of problem which with suitable co-ordination would form appropriate topics for university research. R and D work can be done in-house, or with an industrial contractor, or with a university or polytechnic. The criteria are examined. Involvement by universities and polytechnics, and topics and location, are considered further. (U.K.)

  15. Establishment of an Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    Hechanova, A.E.; Cerefice, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) established an Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) University Participation Program in March 2001 to develop a world-class research program for accelerator-driven transmutation technology while building core competencies and facilities to promote the University's strategic growth goals. The goal of this program is to involve UNLV students in research on the cutting edge of science and engineering as an integrated part of the national program to develop this emerging technology. This program augments UNLV's research capabilities and infrastructure, while establishing national and international research collaborations with national laboratories, industrial partners, and other universities, increasing the UNL V research community's presence in the global scientific community. The UNL V Program is closely integrated into the national project led by Los Alamos and Argonne National Laboratories. The primary mechanism to insure this degree of integration is the teaming of national laboratory scientists with UNL V faculty and students on student research proposals. The Program was implemented under an aggressive schedule with faculty response that surpassed expectations. A total of 12 multi-tasked projects that involve 21 graduate students and 13 faculty members began under first year funding. Other major accomplishments include establishment of an administrative structure implementing all the components of the Program and establishment of a communications network between national laboratory project leaders and UNL V faculty. (authors)

  16. Production studies and documentary participants: a method

    Sanders, Willemien

    2016-01-01

    It was only after I finished my PhD thesis that I learned that my research related to production studies. Departing from the question of ethics in documentary filmmaking, I investigated both the perspective of filmmakers and participants on ethical issues in the documentary filmmaking practice,

  17. Students' Participation Styles in Two University Weight Training Classes.

    Bennett, Gregg

    2000-01-01

    Described the participation styles of college students enrolled in two basic weight training classes. Participation styles fell onto a continuum between slackin' and sweatin'. Observation and interview data indicated that there were four participation styles in the slackin' category and two in the sweatin' category. The transtheoretical model for…

  18. Depressive symptoms in elderly participants of an open university for elderly

    Samila Sathler Tavares Batistoni

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the prevalence of depressive disorders among the elderly is lower than among the younger population, the presence of significant symptoms of depression is common in this group. Studies report that participation in social, educational and leisure activities is related to fewer depressive symptoms in this population. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of depression among elderly participants of an Open University for the Third Age, in terms of the time studying. Methods: The study had a cross-sectional design and the participation of 95.2% (n=184 of total enrollers in the first half of 2010 on the activities of the Third Age Open University's School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities of the University of São Paulo. All participants answered a socio-demographic questionnaire and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15. Results: An association between studying time of over one semester at the University of the Third Age and a lower rate of depressive symptoms, was observed. Conclusion: Study time of over one semester was associated with less depressive symptoms, acting as a possible protective factor against depression.

  19. Maori University Graduates: Indigenous Participation in Higher Education

    Theodore, Reremoana; Tustin, Karen; Kiro, Cynthia; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Taylor, Nicola; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Hunter, Jackie; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand, are gaining university qualifications in greater numbers. This article describes the history of Maori university graduates, their current situation and the implications for indigenous futures. Section one provides a brief overview of historical policies and practices that, similar to those used on…

  20. Collaborative Design Method Holistic Participation (MHP)

    Proveniers, A.G.W.J.; Schmid, P.; Schmid-Pa'l, G.; Klucznik-Toro, A.; Csepe, A.; Kwiatkowska-Ciotucha, D.

    2009-01-01

    Almost by definition, innovative, sustainable, peaceful economics, technologies, derived services and products have to be developed in an interdisciplinary way: all kinds of bits and parts from less sustainable methods, technologies, services and products have to be reshuffled in new innovative,

  1. 40 CFR 262.107 - Under what circumstances will a university's participation in this environmental management...

    2010-07-01

    ... university's participation in this environmental management standard pilot be terminated? 262.107 Section 262... Environmental Management Standard § 262.107 Under what circumstances will a university's participation in this environmental management standard pilot be terminated? (a) EPA retains the right to terminate a University's...

  2. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    Martinec, Emil J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.

    2013-06-27

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  3. From Participation to Dropout: Quantitative Participation Patterns in Online University Courses

    Nistor, Nicolae; Neubauer, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The academic e-learning practice has to deal with various participation patterns and types of online learners with different support needs. The online instructors are challenged to recognize these and react accordingly. Among the participation patterns, special attention is requested by dropouts, which can perturbate online collaboration.…

  4. Wright St Univ Participation in AFRL University Engineering Design Challenge

    2014-12-23

    Methods Purpose: The purpose of this evaluation is to determine the strength of our selected epoxy when subject to shear loading in the Kevlar ...size and appropriate heat treatment. Method: Evolution one (1) tested the shear force of the epoxy on both a one square inch Kevlar patch and two...Parameters To Reflect Described Methods 3) Apply Epoxy to Kevlar Patch 4) Adhere Patch to Masonry Sample 5) Perform Prescribed Curing Method 6) Run

  5. The Method of Manufactured Universes for validating uncertainty quantification methods

    Stripling, H.F.; Adams, M.L.; McClarren, R.G.; Mallick, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Method of Manufactured Universes is presented as a validation framework for uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodologies and as a tool for exploring the effects of statistical and modeling assumptions embedded in these methods. The framework

  6. Getting the engine started: motivations for participation in a university outdoor recreation program

    Ryan L. Sharp; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the motivations of trip participants in the Georgia Outdoor Recreation Program at the University of Georgia during the fall semester of 2007, and to collect baseline data about their participation. Participants were asked to fill out a survey and return it to the trip leader at the conclusion of each trip. Participants'...

  7. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews

    Murphy, Susan A.; Boden, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs. PMID:25918485

  8. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews.

    Murphy, Susan A; Boden, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs.

  9. Understanding the Effect of Loneliness on Academic Participation and Success among International University Students

    Bek, Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of loneliness on academic participation and success among 213 students studying at Usak University. A total of 213 international students studying at Usak University, including 151 males and 62 females, were selected and participated in the research voluntarily. In the study, feelings of…

  10. Selection and Participation in Higher Education: University Selection in Support of Student Success and Diversity of Participation

    Palmer, Nigel; Bexley, Emmaline; James, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A range of imperatives underpin university selection practices. These include demonstrating merit based on prior academic achievement and supporting successful graduate outcomes in the professions and in broader fields of endeavour. They also include improving diversity of participation and equality of educational opportunity. Selection for…

  11. The Impact of Tuition Fees and Support on University Participation in the UK. CEE DP 126

    Dearden, Lorraine; Fitzsimons, Emla; Wyness, Gill

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how policy can affect university education is important for understanding how governments can promote human capital accumulation. This paper exploits historic changes to university funding policies in the UK to estimate the impact of tuition fees and maintenance grants on university participation. Previous work on this, which largely…

  12. Exercise Participation Motives and Engaging In Sports Activity among University of Ljubljana Students

    Cerar, Katja; Kondrič, Miran; Ochiana, Nicolae; Sindik, Joško

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The main aim of this study was to examine differences in sport participation motives, the frequency of engaging in sports activities according to gender, region and field of study, but also the association between the incidence of engaging in sports activity and the motivation for sports activity of students at the University of Ljubljana. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five thousand two hundred seventy-one students completed The Exercise Motivations Inventory (EMI-2), with additional questions about 12 socio-demographic parameters. RESULTS: The results reveal that most of the students are engaged in unorganized sports activities. Male students engage in sports activity more often than female students do. For male students, dominant participation motives are enjoyment, challenge, social recognition, affiliation, competition and strength but also endurance, for female students these are: stress and weight management, revitalisation, ill-health avoidance, positive health, appearance and nimbleness. Gender differences in participation motives are partly reflected also in differences according to the field of study. The correlations between the frequency of engaging in sports activity and the participation motives are mainly statistically significant. We did not find any significant differences in participation motives by region. CONCLUSION: In spite of these discouraging findings, increasing physical activity among students continues to be a national priority. PMID:29104693

  13. RECREATIONAL TENDENCIES AND THE FACTORS PREVENTING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS PARTICIPATING TO RECREATIONAL ACTIVITES ACCORDING TO GENDER

    Yaşar ÇORUH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study of university students according to gender; recreational activity participation trends and participation in these events in the factors which may impede the examination of population of the study, Agri Ibrahim Chechen University 2012 - 2013 academic year, students who are studying the sample group the Islamic Sciences Faculty, Faculty of Arts and Education at the Faculty of normal and used in teaching students selected by the random sampling method and volunteered to participate in the research consisted of 490 individuals . Working as a data collection tool "Leisure Barriers" scale is used. Working for the analysis of two independent sample t - test and ANOVA were applied, no significant differences found as a result of these practices in order to determine the source of the Duncan test was performed. The scale used in the study in three of the six factors of the variations observed according to the specified arguments, but this perspective more " time and lack of interest in" the focus has been understood that.

  14. Worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic and administrative staff at a South African university

    Thuli Ngonyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly it investigated the relationship between worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic staff and administrative staff at a South African university. Secondly it investigated if there is a statistically significant difference between worker participation levels of academic and non-academic staff. Most empirical work on worker participation has focused on workers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors of the economy, with limited focus on worker participation in the services sector. This study aims to address this gap through this exploratory study of the impact of worker participation on job satisfaction at a South African University.

  15. A Strategy to Increase the International Visibility and Participation of a State University

    Lucas, Stephen R.; Miles, Benton E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for expanding a university's international participation. An effort to correct international exchange imbalances evolved into a unique international program and partnership with Walt Disney World.

  16. Selected indicators of mental health in the elderly - the participants the University of the Third Age

    Martina Tomagová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the research study is to identify the selected indicators of mental health, such as meaning of life, experience of well-being, hope, and feelings of loneliness and depression in the elderly participating in the University of the Third Age, in relation to their age and gender. Design: A quantitative descriptive study. Methods: The selection of respondents was deliberate. The sample consisted of 147 seniors with a mean age of 67.4 (± 4.9 years enrolled at the University of the Third Age at Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University. Data were collected by means of self-assessment scales - the Life Meaningfulness Scale, Snyder´s Hope Scale, the Emotional Habitual Subjective Well-being Scale, the Loneliness Scale, and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results: Seniors considered their life meaningful, and expressed a high level of hope. Their emotions were predominately positive. We identified low levels of loneliness and found no indication of depressed mood. We identified significant differences between men and women in evaluation indicators of mental health only in the frequency of positive emotions. Conclusion: The study indicates the presence of salutogenic factors affecting the mental health of the sample of seniors in the process of active aging. The results could form the basis for implementing preventive strategies in clinical nursing practice.

  17. Gender Differences on Attitudes and Participation in an Extracurricular Gymnastics Course among Greek University Students

    Milosis, Dimitrios; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.; Siatras, Theophanis A.; Proios, Miltiadis; Proios, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were (a) to test the effectiveness of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict Greek university students' voluntary participation in an extracurricular gymnastics course, and (b) to evaluate gender differences. Two hundred sixty-three (127 female, 136 male) students participated in the study. Students' attitudes,…

  18. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  19. P ersonal Attributes as Determinants of Sport Participation among Undergraduates in Selected Nigerian Universities

    Yomi AWOSIKA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on personal attributes of undergraduates as determinants of sport participation in selected Nigerian universities which include age, gender and marital status. The instrument for the study is a self - developed, validated questionnaire. The subjects of the study are undergraduates in selected Nigerian universities. Analysis is the use of percentages and inferential statistics of chi square X 2 at 0.05 level of significance. The results derived from the study reveal that students’ personal attributes significantly determine their sport participation. Among other recommendations made is that it is highly imperative for university authorities to make frantic efforts to develop modalities capable of enco uraging students’ sport participation since most of them have sport potentials as evident in their post - primary school sport records. This will enable our universities groom healthy and academically sound graduates.

  20. Discussion paper on participation and participatory methods in gerontology.

    Aner, K

    2016-12-01

    The concept of "participation" and the use of "participatory methods" in human, healthcare, nursing, and gerontological research, as well as the corresponding fields of practice, represent an expanding field of interest. However, the objectives and organization of "participation" are not always sufficiently explicated. The Critical Gerontology Working Group of the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics presents a statement on this phenomenon, and proposes a catalogue of criteria for reflection upon and assessment of participation by older people in research and practice, which can also be considered a stimulus for further discussions.

  1. Benefits of EMU Participation : Estimates using the Synthetic Control Method

    Verstegen, Loes; van Groezen, Bas; Meijdam, Lex

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates quantitatively the benefits from participation in the Economic and Monetary Union for individual Euro area countries. Using the synthetic control method, we estimate how real GDP per capita would have developed for the EMU member states, if those countries had not joined the

  2. Public Participation: Methods Matter; A Response to Boaz et al.

    Paul Burton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The commentary on our paper from Boaz et al. is both welcome and pertinent, especially in its call for greater critical attention to be paid to some of the underlying principles of participation as well as to techniques and methods (1,2. In some respects our paper and subsequent research was designed to allow us to measure and better understand the impact of participating in a citizen’s jury on the jurors’ views and expressed preferences (1,3.

  3. Attitude of clinical faculty members in Shiraz Medical University towards private practice physicians' participation in ambulatory care education

    Khatereh Mahori

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement of medical education is necessary for meeting health care demands. Participation of private practice physicians in ambulatory care training is an effective method for enhancing medical students' skills. Purpose This study was undertaken to determine clinical professors' views about participation of physicians with private office in ambulatory care training. Methods: Participants composed of 162 Shiraz Medical University faculty members from 12 disciplines. A questionnaire requesting faculty members' views on different aspects of ambulat01y care teaching and interaction of community-based organizations was distributed. Results: Of 120 (74.1% respondents, 64 (54.2% believed that clinical settings of medical university are appropriate for ambulatory care training. Private practice physicians believed more than academic physicians without private office that private offices have wider range of patients, more common cases, and better follow up chance; and is also a better setting for learning ambulatory care compared with medical university clinical centers. Overall, 32 (29.1% respondent’s found the participation of physicians with private practice on medical education positive. Key words medical education, ambulatory medicine, private practice

  4. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  5. Participant Outcomes from Methods of Recruitment for Videogame Research.

    Ryan, Courtney; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Baranowski, Tom

    2018-02-01

    The most productive methods of recruitment for a videogame for health (G4H) trial are not known. Success or failure of recruitment methods has been reported for a variety of clinical trials, but few specifically for G4H trials. This study's goal was to recruit 444 overweight or obese (body mass index percentile between the 84.5th-99.4th percentiles) children between the ages of 10-12 years. The article reports the results of different methods of participant recruitment. Participants had to agree to three fasting blood samples (baseline, immediately after, and 2 months later); be willing to wear an accelerometer for 7 days at each assessment; read and speak English fluently (because the games were in English); have no history of any condition that would affect what he/she could eat or how much physical activity he/she could get; and have an eligible home computer purchased in the last 5 years with high-speed internet. Hardware criteria reflected the types of computers upon which Diab-Nano could be effectively played. Recruitment was conducted over a 35-month period and included electronic media, print advertising, community recruitment, and an internal volunteer list. Respondents were guided to a web-based screening questionnaire that asked for source of hearing about the study. Although diverse recruitment methods were used, slow recruitment resulted in obtaining only 45% of the recruitment goal (n = 199). Electronic media (e.g., radio, television, and internet), which reached millions of targeted parents, resulted in only 76 respondents, of whom 13 became participants; print media (e.g., magazine, newsletter/newspaper, and mail), which also reached large numbers of parents, resulted in 192 respondents, of whom 19 became participants; community recruitment (e.g., school, friend or family, doctors office, flyer, work, community program) resulted in 162 respondents, of whom 38 became participants; and the internal volunteer list resulted in 413 respondents, of

  6. Social anxiety and drinking game participation among university students: the moderating role of drinking to cope.

    Mulligan, Ellen J; George, Amanda M; Brown, Patricia M

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship of social anxiety with drinking game participation. Drinking games represent a popular form of drinking in university settings. Due to their structure, games may appeal to socially anxious drinkers, particularly among those seeking to fit in or cope with the social setting. To examine the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation among a university undergraduate sample and to investigate if drinking motives moderate this association. A total of 227 undergraduate students aged 18-24 years (73% female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year were included in the current investigation. Hierarchical regression examined the influences of social anxiety and drinking motives on frequency of drinking game participation, as well the interactions of social anxiety with drinking for coping motives and conformity motives. Social anxiety failed to emerge as a significant predictor of frequency of drinking game participation. However, drinking to cope moderated the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation. Socially anxious students who drank to cope were more likely to participate in drinking games on occasions when they consumed alcohol than those who did not endorse this drinking motive. Results demonstrated the influence of drinking to cope in the relationship of social anxiety with frequency of drinking game participation. Future work should examine the relationship with other indicators of drinking game activity. Intervention efforts addressing social anxiety and drinking should consider motives for drinking, as well as drinking patterns.

  7. The Method of Manufactured Universes for validating uncertainty quantification methods

    Stripling, H.F.

    2011-09-01

    The Method of Manufactured Universes is presented as a validation framework for uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodologies and as a tool for exploring the effects of statistical and modeling assumptions embedded in these methods. The framework calls for a manufactured reality from which experimental data are created (possibly with experimental error), an imperfect model (with uncertain inputs) from which simulation results are created (possibly with numerical error), the application of a system for quantifying uncertainties in model predictions, and an assessment of how accurately those uncertainties are quantified. The application presented in this paper manufactures a particle-transport universe, models it using diffusion theory with uncertain material parameters, and applies both Gaussian process and Bayesian MARS algorithms to make quantitative predictions about new experiments within the manufactured reality. The results of this preliminary study indicate that, even in a simple problem, the improper application of a specific UQ method or unrealized effects of a modeling assumption may produce inaccurate predictions. We conclude that the validation framework presented in this paper is a powerful and flexible tool for the investigation and understanding of UQ methodologies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modifying nodal pricing method considering market participants optimality and reliability

    A. R. Soofiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a method for nodal pricing and market clearing mechanism considering reliability of the system. The effects of components reliability on electricity price, market participants’ profit and system social welfare is considered. This paper considers reliability both for evaluation of market participant’s optimality as well as for fair pricing and market clearing mechanism. To achieve fair pricing, nodal price has been obtained through a two stage optimization problem and to achieve fair market clearing mechanism, comprehensive criteria has been introduced for optimality evaluation of market participant. Social welfare of the system and system efficiency are increased under proposed modified nodal pricing method.

  9. Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students.

    George, Amanda M; Zamboanga, Byron L

    2018-05-15

    Most drinking game (DG) research among university students has been conducted among USA college samples. The extent to which demographics and game type (e.g. team and sculling games) are linked to DG behaviours/consequences among non-USA students is not well understood. As such, the current study investigated characteristics of DG participation (and associated outcomes) among a sample of Australian university students. University students (N = 252; aged 18-24 years; 67% female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year completed an online survey. Measures included demographics, DG behaviours (lifetime, frequency and consumption) and gaming-specific consequences. Most of the students reported lifetime DG participation (85%). Among those who played a DG in the prior 6 months (69%), most had experienced a negative gaming-specific consequence. While team games were the most popular DG played, regression analysis demonstrated that participation in games which encouraged consumption (e.g. sculling) were associated with increased alcohol consumption during play. In addition to being older, playing DGs more frequently, and consuming more alcohol while playing, participation in both consumption and dice games (e.g. 7-11, doubles) predicted more negative gaming-specific consequences. DG participation is common among Australian university students, as it is in other parts of the world. The importance of game type is clear, particularly the risk of consumption games. Findings could help inform interventions to reduce participation in consumption games and identify students who might be especially at-risk for experiencing negative DG consequences. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. PUBLICATION OF SCIENTIFIC PERIODICALS AT UNIVERSITIES:NEW CHALLENGES, PARTICIPANTS TECHNOLOGY

    T. О. Kolesnykova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Publication of scientific periodicals in the Universities is very important and necessary element in the infrastructure of scientific communication. The aim of the article is: 1 providing a new model of publication system of the University scientific periodicals (on the example of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan – DNURT; 2 studying the peculiarities of the «Library publishing» model (Library Publishing and library as a new participant in the publication of world scientific periodicals of the University; 3 description of the developed software automation typesetting of scientific articles and their integration into international databases of scientific and technical information. Methodology. The scientists investigated: 1 the system of publication of scientific periodicals at DNURT; 2 integration system of electronic versions of periodicals and individual articles of scientists from DNURT into the world scientific databases; 3 publishing activity of the scientific and technical library of the University. Findings. The authors proved the need for the fast updates in each higher education institution of Ukrainian management system of scientific periodicals and the creation of the periodicals development concept. The conditions for the occurrence of positive changes in the publishing process in Universities were determined and named as a new participant in these processes – University library. The list of new tasks inherent in the scientific periodicals of the Universities was presented. The software product «Digital designer» was created as a new applied information technology solution to extend the functionality of the basic system information of the publication according to its editorial policy. Originality. The scientists studied the transformation process of the organizational structure of scientific periodicals publishing in the Universities of Ukraine and the world

  11. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  12. Promoting Participation Through the Universal Design of Built Environments: Making it Happen

    Valerie Watchorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental design is a determinant of social inclusion and people’s participation in life roles. Design that does not cater for a diverse range of ages, abilities and cultures restricts people’s access to, and use of, domestic or public premises. Universal design is an approach that acknowledges diversity of populations and encourages designers to create objects and places that are usable by the greatest majority of users. Although there are potential benefits to the widest application of universal design within society, such application is not mandatory within Australia. This paper presents findings from an Australian qualitative study that explored universal design as a means of facilitating greater environmental access for all. The views of experts working within the field of architecture and environmental access were explored regarding factors that restrict or facilitate application of universal design to the design of built environments. Study findings revealed a number of themes relating to factors that may restrain, ‘what’s holding us back?’ and factors that may facilitate application of universal design, ‘making it happen’. These findings have direct relevance to those involved in the planning and design of built environments, policy developers and educators. Keywords: Universal design, architecture, occupational therapy, built environments, barriers, facilitators, inter-professional education

  13. Can smartphones measure momentary quality of life and participation? A proof of concept using experience sampling surveys with university students.

    Liddle, Jacki; Wishink, Anna; Springfield, Liz; Gustafsson, Louise; Ireland, David; Silburn, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Understanding quality of life and participation is a key aspect of occupational therapy research. The use of smartphones to deliver experience-sampling surveys may provide an accessible way to monitor these outcomes. This study used smartphone-based experience sampling methods (ESM) to investigate factors influencing momentary quality of life (mQOL) of university students. A convenience sample of students at an Australian university participated. Using a custom smartphone application, ESM surveys were sent six to eight times, every second day, over a week. Participants indicated their mQOL, occupational participation, occupational enjoyment, social context and location via surveys and provided demographic and health information in a single self-report questionnaire. The relationship between mQOL and variables was analysed at the survey level using logistic regression. Forty students completed 391 surveys. Higher mQOL was significantly related to participation in productive occupations (z = 3.48; P = 0.001), moderate (z = 4.00; P sample, analysing at the individual level, and using ESM in conjunction with other methodologies is recommended. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  14. Efficacy of Carotid Artery Stenting by the Universal Protection Method.

    Goto, Shunsaku; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Kato, Kyozo; Izumi, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2018-04-18

    To avoid distal plaques embolization during carotid artery stenting, we developed Universal Protection Method that combined the use of a proximal common carotid artery balloon, an external carotid artery balloon, and a distal internal carotid artery filter, with continuous flow reversal to the femoral vein. Herein, we assessed the efficacy of the Universal Protection Method by comparing stenting outcomes before and after its introduction. We assessed outcomes for 115 cases before and 41 cases after the Universal Protection Method was adopted (non-Universal Protection Method and Universal Protection Method groups, respectively). We then compared procedure details, magnetic resonance imaging (within 48 hours after the procedure), intraprocedural complications, and postoperative stroke rates. Ischemic stroke was not observed in the Universal Protection Method group, but 1 major stroke and 2 minor strokes were observed in the non-Universal Protection Method group. High-intensity areas were seen in 6 (15.0%) and 49 (42.6%) cases in the Universal Protection Method and non-Universal Protection Method groups, respectively (P = .001). Contrastingly, intraprocedural complications were observed in 9 (22.5%) and 21 (18.3%) cases in the Universal Protection Method and non-Universal Protection Method groups, respectively. Among these intraprocedural complication cases, high-intensity areas were observed in 1 case (11.1%) in the Universal Protection Method group and in 15 cases (71.4%) in the non-Universal Protection Method group. Universal Protection Method is a safe technique that is applicable to all patients undergoing carotid artery stenting, irrespective of individual risk factors. Notably, the incidence rates of both distal embolization and unexpected intraprocedural complications are low. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Informal science participation positively affects the communication and pedagogical skills of university physics students

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah

    2013-04-01

    Many undergraduate and graduate physics students choose to participate in an informal science program at the University of Colorado Boulder (Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC)). They coach elementary and middle school students in inquiry-based physics activities during weekly, afterschool sessions. Observations from the afterschool sessions, field notes from the students, and pre/post surveys are collected. University students are also pre/post- videotaped explaining a textbook passage on a physics concept to an imagined audience for the Communications in Everyday Language assessment (CELA). We present findings from these data that indicate informal experiences improve the communication and pedagogical skills of the university student as well as positively influence their self-efficacy as scientific communicators and teachers.

  16. [Nationwide evaluation of German university teaching methods in neurology].

    Biesalski, A-S; Zupanic, M; Isenmann, S

    2015-06-01

    Germany is confronted with a lack of medical doctors and an increasing need for neurologists in particular. In order to recruit future doctors in neurology it is essential to attract young students when still at university. This article presents the first German national survey of medical students' acceptance of teaching methods in neurology. The participants evaluated teaching methods and examination formats and were asked about their preferences. The survey was based on a questionnaire distributed to 22 German medical schools and 1245 participating students. Interactive teaching methods, especially courses in practical examinations, clinical internships and bedside teaching were highly rated among the students. In contrast, multiple choice tests, as one of the most widespread examination methods, were poorly rated compared to practical and oral examinations. For most of the students it was not decisive, in which semester teaching of neurology took place, while the majority asked for additional and more intensive neurological education. The data give an overview of teaching of neurology in Germany and students' assessment of various approaches. The results should be utilized towards reorientation of future curricula that should aim at innovative and even more practically oriented teaching.

  17. The Academic Profession and University Governance Participation in Japan: Focusing on the Role of Kyoju-kai

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The dominant role of Kyoju-kai (the professoriate) in university governance in Japan is now facing a critical examination as part of university reforms in response to global competition. What are the determinants of the characteristics of participation in university governance by individual faculty members? In what way does the organizational…

  18. Universal programmable logic gate and routing method

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Vatan, Farrokh (Inventor); Akarvardar, Kerem (Inventor); Blalock, Benjamin (Inventor); Chen, Suheng (Inventor); Cristoloveanu, Sorin (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammad M. (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An universal and programmable logic gate based on G.sup.4-FET technology is disclosed, leading to the design of more efficient logic circuits. A new full adder design based on the G.sup.4-FET is also presented. The G.sup.4-FET can also function as a unique router device offering coplanar crossing of signal paths that are isolated and perpendicular to one another. This has the potential of overcoming major limitations in VLSI design where complex interconnection schemes have become increasingly problematic.

  19. RESEARCH NOTE A Universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for ...

    Navya

    success of the extracted gDNA to be submitted into post-PCR analysis. ... The application of the universal method for DNA extraction not restricted into routine ... On the other hand, the universal method has proven its feasibility to be utilized.

  20. Pittsburgh Public School District / Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Team Participation in the US First Competition

    Stroupe, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    FIRST, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, is an international program designed to encourage junior and senior high school students to participate in science and technology related activities. FIRST attempts to increase enthusiasm for technology by providing a competitive environment in which to demonstrate robotics technology designed for a particular set of tasks. Carnegie Mellon University provided student members of the project the opportunity to complete the design, construction, testing, and operation of a robot. Electrical, mechanical, and programming skills were stressed, with both adult and senior students acting as mentors for more junior members. Teamwork and integration was also stressed in order to provide students with a realistic feel for project-based work. Finally, an emphasis was placed on recruiting students with greater difficulty in entering technological fields: girls and ethnic minorities and students leaning toward humanities (especially art). Carnegie Mellon built a relationship with Taylor Allderdice High School that lasted four years. For four years, the success of the project increased each year. Each term, the students successfully designed and built a working robot that could fully participate in the competition. The enthusiasm of the students has been the cornerstone of the recruit of new students, keeping the project growing and vital. Carnegie Mellon's participation with Allderdice has been an overall great success.

  1. Evaluative Indices Assigned to Contraceptive Methods by University Undergraduates

    McDermott, Robert J.; Malo, Teri L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Daley, Ellen M.; Mayer, Alyssa B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preordinate attitudes and beliefs about contraception may influence acceptance or rejection of a particular method. Purpose: We examined the attitudes about contraception methods held by undergraduate students (N=792) at two large southeastern universities in the United States. Methods: Twelve methods were rated on 40 semantic…

  2. Participation in health impact assessment: objectives, methods and core values.

    Wright, John; Parry, Jayne; Mathers, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a multidisciplinary aid to decision-making that assesses the impact of policy on public health and on health inequalities. Its purpose is to assist decision-makers to maximize health gains and to reduce inequalities. The 1999 Gothenburg Consensus Paper (GCP) provides researchers with a rationale for establishing community participation as a core value of HIA. According to the GCP, participation in HIA empowers people within the decision-making process and redresses the democratic deficit between government and society. Participation in HIA generates a sense that health and decision-making is community-owned, and the personal experiences of citizens become integral to the formulation of policy. However, the participatory and empowering dimensions of HIA may prove difficult to operationalize. In this review of the participation strategies adopted in key applications of HIA in the United Kingdom, we found that HIA's aim of influencing decision-making creates tension between its participatory and knowledge-gathering dimensions. Accordingly, researchers have decreased the participatory dimension of HIA by reducing the importance attached to the community's experience of empowerment, ownership and democracy, while enlarging its knowledge-gathering dimension by giving pre-eminence to "expert" and "research-generated" evidence. Recent applications of HIA offer a serviceable rationale for participation as a means of information gathering and it is no longer tenable to uphold HIA as a means of empowering communities and advancing the aims of participatory democracy. PMID:15682250

  3. Association Between Exercise Participation and Quality of Sleep and Life Among University Students in Taiwan.

    Chang, Shih-Pei; Shih, Kuo-Sen; Chi, Chung-Pu; Chang, Chin-Ming; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional survey study examined exercise, sleep quality, and quality of life (QOL) in 1230 Taiwanese university students. Compared with women, men had higher body mass index (BMI) (22.3 ± 4.1 vs 20.7 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)), higher exercise frequency (2.6 ± 1.7 vs 2.0 ± 1.4 d/wk), better sleep quality (global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index 6.0 ± 2.8 vs 6.5 ± 2.7), better physical QOL (physical component summary 52.7 ± 6.2 vs 51.7 ± 6.6), and higher reporting of good self-perceived health (62.2% vs 43.3%) (P Students with better self-perceived health or satisfaction with exercise participation also had better quality of sleep and better QOL. © 2016 APJPH.

  4. Levels of physical activity, motivation and barriers to participation in university students.

    Sevil, Javier; Práxedes, Alba; Abarca-Sos, Alberto; Del Villar, Fernando; García-González, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory and trans-theoretical model applied to exercise, the aim of this study was to analyse the existing relationships between physical activity (PA) carried out by university students, perceived barriers to PA, motivation to PA and stages of change. 901 Spanish students took part in the study (408 men, 493 women; mean age 22.59±3.59), who completed the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-3), Scale of Barriers to PA, Stages of Change and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Short Form (IPAQ-SF). Noteworthy among the findings is the positive relationship between the more autonomous regulation forms, especially integrated regulation, and the moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) levels. However, barriers to participatrion are negatively related to PA levels and the more self-determined forms of motivation. Finally, students in action and maintenance stages, and those who comply with the recommendations on PA present higher values in the more self-determined motivation forms and lower values in barriers to participation in PA. The study shows the importance of addressing the analysis of variables associated with engagement in PA in the university population to develop healthy policies and intervention programmes that can establish a series of healthy and more active habits in the youth-adult stage. The appropriateness of promoting more self-determined motivation forms is highlighted, especially integrated regulation, to have an impact on higher levels of MVPA.

  5. Investigation of Factors That May Constrain Participation of Sportive and Non-Sportive Recreational Activities Among University Students

    Nurullah Emir Ekinci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze, which recreational sport or non- sport such as cultural/ art activities that university students prefer in their leisure time and underlying reasons that constrains participating in these activities with regard to different variables. Randomly chosen 339 students from The Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Sciences and Engineering at University of Dumlupiınar volunteered for the study. In this research as a data collection tool “Leisure Constraint Scale” was used. During the evaluation of the data in addition to descriptive statistical methods such as Percentage (% and frequency (f Independent Samples t-test and One way Anova were used. As a result it was found that 19.2% participants choose recreational sport activities in their leisure time. In addition, significant differences have emerged between participants’ gender and constrains to leisure in "lack of information", "lack of friends" and "time" sub-dimensions, between age and barriers to leisure in "time" sub-dimension, and between average monthly income levels and constrains to leisure in "individual psychology" and "facilities / services" sub dimensions (p <0.05. But no significant differences were found according to activities that they choose in their leisure time.

  6. Methods to study mindful awareness and participation in education

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Svinth, Lone; Petersen, Freja Filine

    For more than a decade, a variety of techniques have been introduced in Danish educational settings to bring mindful awareness into teachers’ and students’ lives in order to increase the mental, emotional and social health of the participants. In this workshop we present five studies that address...

  7. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS OF FEMALE STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE SPORT OLYMPIAD OF IRANIAN UNIVERSITIES: A CORRELATIONAL STUDY

    Dr. Hassan Bahrololoum

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at studying the relationship between happiness and emotional intelligence among female students participating in the 10th Sport Olympiad of Iranian universities held in Semnan province. To do this survey, 302 female students were randomly selected from the total population of female students participating in the 10th sport Olympiad of Iranian Universities. To collect data, the study used three standardized questionnaires: Oxford's Happiness Questionnaire; Brodberry's Emotional...

  8. Drinking game participation, gender performance and normalization of intoxication among Nigerian university students.

    Dumbili, Emeka; Williams, Clare

    2017-06-01

    Most research on drinking games (DGs) and the associated risks focuses on Western countries. In the Nigerian context, DGs activity has not attracted scholarly attention but growing media reports indicate that Nigerian youths play DGs, and that a number of gamers have died during or immediately after game-playing. Drawing on gender performance scripts, we explored the performance of gender through DGs practices and the factors that motivate DGs participation. Thirty-one in-depth interviews were conducted with male and female college students (aged 19-23 years) at a university in south-eastern Nigeria. The participants discussed the popularity of the DGs that students play on this campus, identifying the spaces where each game is played and the motivations for game-playing. Collective, contextual constructions of gender identities through 'Fastest-Drinker' DG were identified, and the participants also performed gender through 'Truth-or-Dare' and 'Endurance' DGs. Men dominated 'First-to-Finish' DGs, which are played at parties and bars, and consumed beer or stout, while women, who mainly played Truth-or-Dare games, drank spirits or sweetened alcoholic beverages. Boredom and fun seeking provoked game-playing among women while adherence to masculinity norms, which engendered the public performance of masculinity and gambling activities, motivated men to play DGs. To avoid 'collective shame', men's friendship groups provided support/care for inebriated game-playing members, but the immediacy of this support/care varied according to DGs type. DGs appear to normalize heavy drinking and the culture of intoxication on this campus. Measures to monitor alcohol sales outlets around campuses and interventions that target students' leisure spaces should be developed.

  9. Materials about participation of the Novorossiysky university professors in the Odessa charity organizations work in the ONU Scientific Library funds

    I. С. Грєбцова

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is devotted to the analysis of active participation of the Novorossiysky university professors in the Odessa charity organizations work, which is lighted up on the base of archive funds and materials of the published sources kept in the Scientific Library of the Odessa National University.

  10. External Stakeholders' Roles and Factors Influencing Their Participation in Developing Generic Skills for Students in Vietnamese Universities

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu

    2018-01-01

    External stakeholders have increasingly participated in instructional and training activities in higher education; however, their contribution has not yet been adequately documented, especially in non-Western university contexts. This article reports a study that examined external stakeholders' roles and factors influencing their participation in…

  11. Triangulation, Respondent Validation, and Democratic Participation in Mixed Methods Research

    Torrance, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years or so the "Field" of "Mixed Methods Research" (MMR) has increasingly been exerting itself as something separate, novel, and significant, with some advocates claiming paradigmatic status. Triangulation is an important component of mixed methods designs. Triangulation has its origins in attempts to validate research findings…

  12. Methods for evaluating educational programs: does Writing Center participation affect student achievement?

    Bredtmann, Julia; Crede, Carsten J; Otten, Sebastian

    2013-02-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the introduction of a Writing Center at a university, which aims at improving students' scientific writing abilities. In order to deal with the presumed limited utility of student feedback surveys for evaluating the effectiveness of educational programs, we use students' actual learning outcomes as our quality measure. Based on this objective measure, different statistical evaluation methods established in the labor market treatment literature are applied. We present and discuss the validity of these methods to evaluate educational programs and compare the results of these approaches to implications obtained using corresponding student surveys. Although almost all students reported the writing courses to be helpful, we find no significant effect of course participation on students' grades. This result highlights the need for institutions not to rely solely on student course evaluations for evidence-based policy decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Toward equity through participation in Modeling Instruction in introductory university physics

    Brewe, Eric; Sawtelle, Vashti; Kramer, Laird H.; O'Brien, George E.; Rodriguez, Idaykis; Pamelá, Priscilla

    2010-06-01

    We report the results of a five year evaluation of the reform of introductory calculus-based physics by implementation of Modeling Instruction (MI) at Florida International University (FIU), a Hispanic-serving institution. MI is described in the context of FIU’s overall effort to enhance student participation in physics and science broadly. Our analysis of MI from a “participationist” perspective on learning identifies aspects of MI including conceptually based instruction, culturally sensitive instruction, and cooperative group learning, which are consistent with research on supporting equitable learning and participation by students historically under-represented in physics (i.e., Black, Hispanic, women). This study uses markers of conceptual understanding as measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and odds of success as measured by the ratio of students completing introductory physics and earning a passing grade (i.e., C- or better) by students historically under-represented in physics to reflect equity and participation in introductory physics. FCI pre and post scores for students in MI are compared with lecture-format taught students. Modeling Instruction students outperform students taught in lecture-format classes on post instruction FCI (61.9% vs 47.9%, p<0.001 ), where these benefits are seen across both ethnic and gender comparisons. In addition, we report that the odds of success in MI are 6.73 times greater than in lecture instruction. Both odds of success and FCI scores within Modeling Instruction are further disaggregated by ethnicity and by gender to address the question of equity within the treatment. The results of this disaggregation indicate that although ethnically under-represented students enter with lower overall conceptual understanding scores, the gap is not widened during introductory physics but instead is maintained, and the odds of success for under-represented students is not different from majority students. Women

  14. Toward equity through participation in Modeling Instruction in introductory university physics

    Eric Brewe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a five year evaluation of the reform of introductory calculus-based physics by implementation of Modeling Instruction (MI at Florida International University (FIU, a Hispanic-serving institution. MI is described in the context of FIU’s overall effort to enhance student participation in physics and science broadly. Our analysis of MI from a “participationist” perspective on learning identifies aspects of MI including conceptually based instruction, culturally sensitive instruction, and cooperative group learning, which are consistent with research on supporting equitable learning and participation by students historically under-represented in physics (i.e., Black, Hispanic, women. This study uses markers of conceptual understanding as measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI and odds of success as measured by the ratio of students completing introductory physics and earning a passing grade (i.e., C− or better by students historically under-represented in physics to reflect equity and participation in introductory physics. FCI pre and post scores for students in MI are compared with lecture-format taught students. Modeling Instruction students outperform students taught in lecture-format classes on post instruction FCI (61.9% vs 47.9%, p<0.001, where these benefits are seen across both ethnic and gender comparisons. In addition, we report that the odds of success in MI are 6.73 times greater than in lecture instruction. Both odds of success and FCI scores within Modeling Instruction are further disaggregated by ethnicity and by gender to address the question of equity within the treatment. The results of this disaggregation indicate that although ethnically under-represented students enter with lower overall conceptual understanding scores, the gap is not widened during introductory physics but instead is maintained, and the odds of success for under-represented students is not different from majority students

  15. The power of the university in public administration. participation of national university of Colombia campus Manizales, in building public policy for the region

    Germán Albeiro Castaño Duque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to investigate the power of the University and its contribution to the public administration through participation in public policy. It examines what has been the role of academia in taking clear and decisive way finding solutions to the problems of communities and how extension programs have influenced the action of the state to lay the foundation of social development. The research methodology is approached from a casual type qualitative perspective, which aims to demonstrate the contribution and participation of the National University of Colombia Campus Manizales in the construction of public policies in its geographical influence area and the coordination with communities immersed in those territories. It is intended that this case study be as an input to generate parameters for the participation of universities in building public policies that contribute to addressing the needs and questions of citizens.

  16. Participant Interaction in Asynchronous Learning Environments: Evaluating Interaction Analysis Methods

    Blanchette, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to determine the extent to which three different objective analytical methods--sequence analysis, surface cohesion analysis, and lexical cohesion analysis--can most accurately identify specific characteristics of online interaction. Statistically significant differences were found in all points of…

  17. A Mixed Methods Study of Teach for America Teachers' Mathematical Beliefs, Knowledge, and Classroom Teaching Practices during a Reform-Based University Mathematics Methods Course

    Swars, Susan Lee

    2015-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the mathematical preparation of elementary teachers in a Teach for America (TFA) program, focal participants for whom there is scant extant research. Data collection occurred before and after a university mathematics methods course, with a particular focus on the participants' (n = 22) mathematical beliefs,…

  18. The Comparative Impacts of Social Justice Educational Methods on Political Participation, Civic Engagement, and Multicultural Activism

    Krings, Amy; Austic, Elizabeth A.; Gutiérrez, Lorraine M.; Dirksen, Kaleigh E.

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional, repeated measures, quasi-experimental study evaluates changes in college students' commitment toward, and confidence in, political participation, civic engagement, and multicultural activism. Our sample (n = 653) consisted of college students in a Midwestern university who participated in one of three social justice education…

  19. TRANSFORMATION OF INNOVATIVE AND METHODICAL ACTIVITY LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY

    О. О. Скаченко

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our article is the analysis of innovative and methodical activity of university libraries which develop as information centers today. The subject of research is methodical, publishing and innovative activity of Scientific Library of the Kiev national university of culture and arts. We observe process of introduction of technological innovations in library service that allows improving quality of the services provided to the reader by library. New actual projects are developed, cultural and educational and information services extend, work methods improve. Also, the structure of library is improved – there are new sectors. The main finding of the work consists in systematization of various aspects and the directions of innovative activity of library. The research findings have the practical value for library workers, teachers of university, students, library users, and also for anyone who is interested in library science.

  20. Participant dropout as a function of survey length in internet-mediated university studies: implications for study design and voluntary participation in psychological research.

    Hoerger, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Internet-mediated research has offered substantial advantages over traditional laboratory-based research in terms of efficiently and affordably allowing for the recruitment of large samples of participants for psychology studies. Core technical, ethical, and methodological issues have been addressed in recent years, but the important issue of participant dropout has received surprisingly little attention. Specifically, web-based psychology studies often involve undergraduates completing lengthy and time-consuming batteries of online personality questionnaires, but no known published studies to date have closely examined the natural course of participant dropout during attempted completion of these studies. The present investigation examined participant dropout among 1,963 undergraduates completing one of six web-based survey studies relatively representative of those conducted in university settings. Results indicated that 10% of participants could be expected to drop out of these studies nearly instantaneously, with an additional 2% dropping out per 100 survey items included in the study. For individual project investigators, these findings hold ramifications for study design considerations, such as conducting a priori power analyses. The present results also have broader ethical implications for understanding and improving voluntary participation in research involving human subjects. Nonetheless, the generalizability of these conclusions may be limited to studies involving similar design or survey content.

  1. Brief Discussions of a Draw of American Universal Education on Chinese Postgraduate Teaching Methods

    Li Zhengminqing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by International Friendships Inc.(IFI in Cincinnati, that is a Christian community organization, the authors participated in a universal education activity, called “History Museum”, organized by the local people in Kentucky State of U.S.A. In the activity, the authors grasped some characteristics of American universal education and reflected some problems of the professional foundation teaching of Chinese postgraduates, especially of Chinese engineering postgraduates. Based on the above thinking, some suggestions of the teaching methods for the professional foundation courses of Chinese postgraduates are proposed. Furthermore, the authors hope the proposed methods would be good for improving the postgraduate education in China.

  2. The California State University Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (CSU-LSAMP): A Collaborative, Comprehensive Approach to Broadening Participation in STEM.

    Hammersley, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program supports alliances of institutions in their efforts to broaden participation in STEM and diversify the STEM workforce. There are currently 42 LSAMP alliances across the nation. Formed in 1993, the California State University LSAMP program (CSU-LSAMP) is an alliance of all 23 campuses of the CSU system and serves over 3,000 students per year. The primary goals of CSU-LSAMP are to increase persistence and graduation rates for URM participants, increase the number of STEM degrees awarded by the CSU to URM students, and increase the number of CSU-LSAMP students who advance to STEM graduate study. CSU-LSAMP activities are focused on four objectives - academic support (e.g. supplemental instruction & peer mentoring), support at transition points (e.g. first time freshmen & transfer students), research experiences (including international research experiences), and professional development (e.g. conference presentations & graduate school preparation activities). Financial support is offered in the form of textbook assistance, research stipends, and travel awards. We maintain a structure that allows campuses to tailor their programs to meet the needs of their own student populations but that also ties the Alliance together with a set of common activities, goals and policies. External evaluation of the program shows that our approach has been highly successful and can provide useful lessons for other programs focused on broadening participation. Since 1994, the number of URM students enrolled in STEM disciplines at CSU campuses has more than doubled and the number of STEM degrees to URM students has almost tripled. Persistence and graduation rates for URM students who participate in CSU-LSAMP are almost twice those of URM non-participants and equal to those of non-URM students. Of the students who participated in the past 15 years, 42 percent either earned a post

  3. Ways to Promote the Classroom Participation of International Students by Understanding the Silence of Japanese University Students

    Kim, Soonhyang; Ates, Burcu; Grigsby, Yurimi; Kraker, Stefani; Micek, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored the role of silence and deciphered its meaning and usefulness as a teaching and learning strategy for Japanese students through a survey of Japanese university students in their home country. This study has revealed that participant responses were evenly divided among comfortable with silence, uncomfortable with silence, and…

  4. Sensation Seeking and Locus of Control in University Students in the Context of Regular Exercise Participation and Gender

    Tekin, Ali; Tekin, Gülcan; Çalisir, Melih

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the locus of control (LC) and sensation seeking (SS) levels of university female students according to regular exercise participation (REP) and gender (G). This descriptive study was initiated in 2016 and finished in 2017. A total of 623 students, 306 females and 317 males, from different academic departments…

  5. Peer Assessment of Oral Presentations: Effects of Student Gender, University Affiliation and Participation in the Development of Assessment Criteria

    Langan, Mark A.; Wheater, Philip C.; Shaw, Emma M.; Haines, Ben J.; Cullen, Rod W.; Boyle, Jennefer C.; Penney, David; Oldekop, Johan A.; Ashcroft, Carl; Lockey, Les; Preziosi, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Peer assessment provides a useful mechanism to develop many positive qualities in students studying in higher education (HE). Potential influences on peer-awarded marks include student qualities such as gender, HE background (e.g. university affiliation) and participation in the development of the assessment criteria. Many studies that have…

  6. Barriers to Participation in Learning Management Systems in Saudi Arabian Universities

    Abdullah Alenezi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify various barriers that have hindered the adoption of LMSs in Saudi Arabian universities. Learning management systems (LMSs have been adopted in many learning institutions because of their functionalities and applications to improve pedagogy. Universities have been encouraged to use LMSs to enhance the collaborative working environment among students and between the students and their instructors. This study was done by administering 150 questionnaires to students in three universities in Saudi Arabia. Findings from the study revealed that the main barriers to the use of LMSs were inadequate technical support by the universities, negative attitude toward technology, and inadequate training on the LMS platforms. Minor barriers identified include poor Internet access and networking, limited infrastructure to support the LMS, lack of hardware and software to run the LMS, and challenges in English language proficiency.

  7. APPLICATION OF FORMS AND METHODS OF COMMERCIALIZATION OF INNOVATIONS THROUGH THE INTERACTION OF UNIVERSITIES AND ENTERPRISES

    Svetlana E. Sitnikova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of formation of economy based on knowledge, a key condition for successful development is the effective integration of science, education and business. Currently, the commercialization of innovation becomes a necessary factor for sustainable development of universities, one of their main tools to increase its competitiveness in the market of educational services and products. The efficiency of the process of innovation commercialization is conditioned by the rational choice of forms and methods of implementing this process. The interaction of universities and enterprises in the innovative clusters provides benefits such as effective dissemination of information about the creation of innovations, the relevant areas of research, the granting of preferences to cluster participants. The creation of technoparks suggests the presence of a specially allocated site, which houses many new businesses, so that existing institutions can only be partners of the technopark. From the point of view of commercialization of University innovation, the cluster seems to be a more attractive method compared with the creation of technology parks, but its application is necessary to adjust the approach to conducting the state policy in the field of innovation management. The interaction of universities and enterprises via an intermediary – the chamber of commerce and industry – can be described as an obstacle to the commercialization of university innovations. On the contrary, technological innovation center protects the interests of universities, rather than enterprises, as it is created to facilitate the commercialization of university innovation. Direct interaction of universities and enterprises becomes possible with the help of methods of a single transaction, a regular cooperation and a contract for the supply of innovation. The choice of methods of commercialization of innovations should be made on the basis of existing university

  8. Prediction of Participation of Undergraduate University Students in a Music and Dance Master’s Degree Program

    Evangelos Bebetsos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the investigation of students’ attitudes and intention towards their possible participation in a graduate Music and Dance Distance Learning Master’s Degree Program. The sample consisted of consisted of 229 undergraduate University students, between the ages of 20 to 63 yrs. of age (M=34.24, SD=10.70. More specifically, 134 were students of the Hellenic Open University and 95 were students of the School of Physical Education and Sport Science, of the Democritus University of Thrace. The sample completed the version the “Planned Behavior Theory” questionnaire. Results revealed differences among students of both Universities, between experienced and less experienced ones, and also among age groups. On the contrary, no sex differences in any of the questionnaire’s factors were indicated. In conclusion, the findings of this research allow a better understanding of the distance education process, which explains the attitudes and intention(s of students’ participation, and the factors that might influence theirparticular participation.

  9. Burnout and occupational participation among dentists with teaching responsibilities in universities.

    Huri, Meral; Bağiş, Nilsun; Eren, Hakan; Başibüyük, Onur; Şahin, Sedef; Umaroğlu, Mutlu; Orhan, Kaan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of burnout and explore the relationships between burnout and occupational participation among dentists with teaching responsibilities. Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to evaluate occupational participation with questions on demographic information among 155 dentists with teaching responsibilities. Age, gender, years of experience, academic position were the factors affecting level of burnout and occupational participation. Occupational performance score was negatively correlated with emotional exhausment (r = -.731) and depersonalization (r = -.693) while positively correlated with personal accomplishment (r = .611). Occupational satisfaction scores were negatively correlated with emotional exhausment (r = -.631) and depersonalization (r = -.625) while positively correlated with personal accomplishment (r = .614). Occupational participation level can effect burnout among dentists with teaching responsibilities. Further studies with a larger sample are needed to investigate these preliminary results deeply.

  10. Participant Perceptions of an Online Discussion among University Students in Israel, Taiwan and the United States

    Zimmerman, Lynn W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether and how online discussions used in learning situations help to develop interactive intercultural communication. Undergraduate university students in the US, Taiwan, and Israel engaged in an online discussion about gender stereotypes. This study examines their perceptions of the interactions. There were 31 undergraduate…

  11. Leading, Managing and Participating in Inter-University Teaching Grant Collaborations

    Willcoxson, Lesley; Kavanagh, Marie; Cheung, Lily

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the leadership and management of multi-university collaborations funded by national teaching grants. The paper commences with a review of literature relating to stages of project development, key operational issues, impediments to collaboration and the leadership and management of teaching grant collaborations. Finally, we…

  12. Understanding Leadership Development through Athletic Participation at a Small Private University: A Qualitative Approach

    Phillips, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The financial and competitive challenges facing higher educational institutions have created a dire need for universities and colleges to evaluate the value of the different departments within their institutions. Athletic administrators in higher education are committed to providing adequate opportunities for students, coaches, and staff to…

  13. 11. Basic Practice Methods in University General Piano Classes

    Raducanu Cristina Andra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to present and analyse some practicing piano methods which are used during secondary piano lessons at the university. The final goal was to show the benefits of these practice strategies in the process of learning a new piano piece. Experience demonstrated that in order to keep students motivated, there is a need for them to know how to approach and study a new repertoire and to be sure that implementing these practice methods will help them gain the necessary skills which will enable them to fluently perform a musical piece.

  14. Influence of Participation, Facilitator Styles, and Metacognitive Reflection on Knowledge Building in Online University Courses

    Cacciamani, Stefano; Cesareni, Donatella; Martini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    of engagement in knowledge building activity is the socio-cognitive dynamic of epistemic agency, in which students exercise a higher level of agency for setting forth their ideas and negotiating fit with those of others rather than relying on their teacher. The purpose of this paper is to investigate...... the influence of (a) levels of participation, (b) facilitator styles and (c) metacognitive reflection on knowledge building in two blended, post-secondary education contexts. A study of a total of 67 undergraduate students suggest that high levels of participation, a supportive facilitator style, and ample...

  15. Career choices and global health engagement: 24-year follow-up of U.S. participants in the Indiana University-Moi University elective.

    Umoren, Rachel A; Gardner, Adrian; Stone, Geren S; Helphinstine, Jill; Machogu, Emily P; Huskins, Jordan C; Johnson, Cynthia S; Ayuo, Paul O; Mining, Simeon; Litzelman, Debra K

    2015-12-01

    Global health experiences evoke a profound awareness of cultural differences, inspire learners to prioritize professional values, and provide a lens for addressing global health care challenges. This study compares the long-term career and practice choices of participants in a 2-month Indiana University-Moi University, Kenya elective from 1989-2013 with those of a control group. Global health elective (GHE) participants and a random sample of alumni without GHE experience were surveyed on their clinical practice, public health and global health activities. Responses from 176 former participants were compared with a control group of 177 alumni. GHE participants were more likely than similar controls to provide care to underserved U.S. populations (p=0.037), spend time in global health, public health, and public policy activities (p=0.005) and be involved in global health advocacy (p=0.001). Using multivariable analysis, GHE participants were more likely to be generalists (p<0.05), report that healthcare costs influenced medical decision-making (p<0.05), and provide healthcare outside the U.S. for ≥1 week/year (p<0.001). Many years out of training, GHE participants were more likely to be generalists working with underserved populations, to be cost-conscious in their healthcare decision-making, and to be involved in global health, public health or public policy. With the primary care provider shortage and need for greater awareness among providers of healthcare costs, our study shows that that global health experiences may yield broader benefits to the U.S. medical system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Method for universal detection of two-photon polarization entanglement

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Horodecki, Paweł; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-03-01

    Detecting and quantifying quantum entanglement of a given unknown state poses problems that are fundamentally important for quantum information processing. Surprisingly, no direct (i.e., without quantum tomography) universal experimental implementation of a necessary and sufficient test of entanglement has been designed even for a general two-qubit state. Here we propose an experimental method for detecting a collective universal witness, which is a necessary and sufficient test of two-photon polarization entanglement. It allows us to detect entanglement for any two-qubit mixed state and to establish tight upper and lower bounds on its amount. A different element of this method is the sequential character of its main components, which allows us to obtain relatively complicated information about quantum correlations with the help of simple linear-optical elements. As such, this proposal realizes a universal two-qubit entanglement test within the present state of the art of quantum optics. We show the optimality of our setup with respect to the minimal number of measured quantities.

  17. Effects of Universal Child Care Participation on Pre-teen Skills and Risky Behaviors

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Simonsen, Marianne

    This paper uses a Danish panel data child survey merged with administrative records along with a pseudo-experiment that generates variation in the take-up of preschool across municipalities to investigate pre-teenage effects of child care participation at age three (either parental care, preschoo...

  18. Is "Being Green" a Determinant of Participation in University Sustainability Initiatives?

    Figueredo, Felita R.; Tsarenko, Yelena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to develop and test a model to explain students' willingness to participate in sustainability programs. Specifically, the authors aimed to determine those factors, apart from students' environmental orientation (self-perception of "being green"), that influence students' willingness to participate…

  19. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  20. A cross-sectional investigation of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and health-behavior participation in Australian university students.

    Lovell, Geoff P; Nash, Kim; Sharman, Rachael; Lane, Ben R

    2014-05-06

    Transitioning to university involves a major life change that can have implications for physical and mental health. This study had three objectives: first, assess the mental health and health-behavior participation of Australian university students; second, evaluate clustering of health behaviors; and third, examine how mental health relates to health behaviors. University students (n = 751) enrolled at an Australian regional university completed an online survey containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and a health-behavior questionnaire. Over one-third of students reported mild or higher mental illness symptoms and most reported engaging in multiple unhealthy behaviors. Furthermore, mental health was associated with unhealthy behaviors. For males, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast and poor sleep quality. For females, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast, inadequate vigorous physical activity, and short or long sleep hours. Stress symptoms in females were associated with healthy sleep hours, but poor sleep quality. Future research may consider whether an intervention targeting one or two key health behaviors has utility in improving participation in other health behaviors and mental health. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. INNOVATIVE METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY AT MODERN UNIVERSITIES

    A. Yu. Suslov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. As a discipline, History holds a specific place among disciplines of a humanitarian cycle of educational programs of higher education institutions regardless of university specialities. History plays an important role in the course of formation of a citizen and development of critical thinking of a personality as an element of a common culture. However, new federal standards require a drastic reduction of the classroom hours for studying a History course by students of non-humanitarian specialties, and, at the same time, enhancement of the contents of a discipline (its reorientation from History of Russia towards World History. Therefore, History programmes and courses demand up-to-date approaches, methods and didactic means to provide formation of holistic worldview of future experts.The aim of the article is to consider the features of innovative methods application in teaching history in high school taking into consideration modernization processes.Methodology and research methods. The research undertaken is based on activity and competence-based approaches. The methods of analysis and synthesis of the academic literature on the research topic were used; the methods of reflection and generalization of teaching activities of the Department of Humanitarian Disciplines of theKazanNationalResearchTechnologicalUniversity were applied as well.Results and scientific novelty. A modern view on historical education has been proposed as means of students’ systems thinking formation, designing the ideas about the world historical process among students, the mission ofRussia in this process, and evolution ofRussia as a part of the modern civilization. It is stated that History university course is designed not only to give the students strong subject knowledge, but also to create axiological orientations and abilities on the basis of the analysis of historical collisions, objective and subjective factors of society development. Moreover

  2. Broadening participation in Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Maryland Baltimore County

    Rous, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Over the past two decades, UMBC has undertaken a series of efforts to broaden participation in the natural sciences and mathematics, beginning with the establishment of the Meyerhoff program. Using as examples the multiple initiatives that followed, and with a focus on the challenge of increasing access and success of all students who enter as both freshmen and transfer students, I will describe a model of culture change that we have employed repeatedly to understand and guide our efforts in broadening participation. Particular attention will be paid to the concept of cultural capital, the role of innovators and the challenge of scaling small-scale innovations towards institutional change. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  3. Factors Affecting Consumer Participation In Online Shopping In Malaysia: The Case Of University Students

    Mohammed Shamsul Chowdhury; Nadiah Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Since lack of trust has remained one of the barriers to online shopping, this study is intended to explore the factors that affect the perceptions of trust for students’ intent to participate in online shopping. We used non-probability procedure to select respondents since we do not know how many students have access to the internet and are engaged in online shopping. Pearson correlation, multiple regression were used to test the hypotheses. The regression analysis in this study clearly suppo...

  4. Design and Realization of Multimedia-Examinations for large Numbers of Participants in University

    Norman Tschirner

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on Multimedia Examinations successfully accomplished in a physics lecture for engineering freshmen. The use of New Media enables us to create new types of questions, including Java-based applets or those requiring internet-based research. The new forms are presented in detail. Economically priced hardware solutions and user-friendly software for both teachers and students are realized in collaboration with Promethean Corporation. A first evaluation - which is very countenancing - is presented, our eAssessment finds general approval in the participants’ opinion.

  5. Participation of the Pennsylvania State University in the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network

    Lamb, D.; de Pena, R.G.

    1991-04-01

    The Meteorology Department of the Pennsylvania State University collected precipitation in central Pennsylvania for more than 14 years on behalf of the Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S). The MAP3S protocol, based on the sampling of precipitation from individual meteorological events over a long period of time, has allowed both for the development of a chemical climatology of precipitation in the eastern region of the United States and for a vastly improved understanding of the atmospheric processes responsible for wet acidic deposition. The precipitation chemistry data from the Penn State MAP3S site provide evidence of links to the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide and oxidant precursors. There is now little doubt that the free acidity in the precipitation of the region is due to the presence of unneutralized sulfate in the aqueous phase. In the absence of significant sources of this sulfur species and in view of supplemental enrichment studies, it is concluded that the sulfate enters cloud and rain water primarily through the aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide emitted into the air within the geographical region of deposition. Within the source region the local abundances of sulfur dioxide often exceed those of the oxidants, so the depositions of sulfate and free acidity tend to be modulated by the availability of the strong oxidants. As a consequence, the deposition of sulfate exhibits a very strong seasonal dependence and little response to changes in the emissions of sulfur dioxide

  6. Demonstrating the unit hydrograph and flow routing processes involving active student participation - a university lecture experiment

    Schulz, Karsten; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Klotz, Daniel; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph (UH) has been one of the most widely employed hydrological modelling techniques to predict rainfall-runoff behaviour of hydrological catchments, and is still used to this day. Its concept is based on the idea that a unit of effective precipitation per time unit (e.g. mm h-1) will always lead to a specific catchment response in runoff. Given its relevance, the UH is an important topic that is addressed in most (engineering) hydrology courses at all academic levels. While the principles of the UH seem to be simple and easy to understand, teaching experiences in the past suggest strong difficulties in students' perception of the UH theory and application. In order to facilitate a deeper understanding of the theory and application of the UH for students, we developed a simple and cheap lecture theatre experiment which involved active student participation. The seating of the students in the lecture theatre represented the hydrological catchment in its size and form. A set of plastic balls, prepared with a piece of magnetic strip to be tacked to any white/black board, each represented a unit amount of effective precipitation. The balls are evenly distributed over the lecture theatre and routed by some given rules down the catchment to the catchment outlet, where the resulting hydrograph is monitored and illustrated at the black/white board. The experiment allowed an illustration of the underlying principles of the UH, including stationarity, linearity, and superposition of the generated runoff and subsequent routing. In addition, some variations of the experimental setup extended the UH concept to demonstrate the impact of elevation, different runoff regimes, and non-uniform precipitation events on the resulting hydrograph. In summary, our own experience in the classroom, a first set of student exams, as well as student feedback and formal evaluation suggest that the integration of such an experiment deepened the learning experience by active

  7. Gambling participation and problems among employees at a university health center.

    Petry, Nancy M; Mallya, Sarita

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the frequency and intensity of gambling behaviors among employees at an academic health center. Employees were sent an anonymous questionnaire assessing demographic characteristics, participation in gambling activities, and gambling-related problems. Of the 904 respondents, 96% reported gambling in their lifetimes, with 69% gambling in the past year, 40% in the past two months, and 21% in the past week. The most common forms of gambling were lottery and scratch tickets, slot machines, card playing, sports betting, bingo, and track. Only 1.2% of the sample reported gambling on the internet. Using scores on the South Oaks Gambling Screen, 3.0% of the respondents were classified as Level 2 (or problem) gamblers, and an additional 1.8% were Level 3 (or pathological) gamblers. Compared to Level 1 (non-problem) gamblers, Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers were more likely to be male, single, and employed full-time, and to have lower income and education. About half of the Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers reported interest in an evaluation of their gambling behaviors and treatment interventions. These data suggest the need to screen for gambling problems in health care professionals and to provide gambling-specific treatments.

  8. [Communication, participation and leadership in the perception of the emotional climate in a university hospital in Andalusia, Spain].

    Danet, Alina; March, Joan Carles; Romera, Inmaculada García

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyze perceptions and opinions among health professionals in a university hospital in Andalusia, Spain, regarding the emotional climate, leadership style, quality of information, and internal communication. The study also aimed to collect health professionals' suggestions for improving these workplace characteristics. The study included 730 participants and used a quantitative and qualitative methodology. The results reflect a medium-to-low level of emotional climate, correlated with the leadership style and information and internal communication. Statistically significant differences appeared when comparing professional categories and hospital units. The health professionals provided a positive assessment of the administrators' work, although requiring more task-oriented, participative, and affiliative leadership skills.

  9. Evaluation Methods of the Academic Achievement of Students Ilam University of Medical Sciences

    Mirzaei AR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Academic achievement exams have long played an important role in education and so have been always judged, reviewed and restudied. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of different types of academic achievement exams (evaluation methods by faculty of Ilam University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, faculty members of Ilam University of Medical Sciences in the second semester of 2013-14 academic year (N=90 were studied by total counting. Data were gathered by a researcher made questionnaire by 29 questions that was assessing the application level of educational progress evaluation methods by faculty members. For data analysis, SPSS 16 software was used and descriptive and inferential statistics (Student T test and one-way ANOVA were performed. Findings: 76 of participants (93.8% placed a greater emphasis on the final exam. The most widely used methods for students' progress evaluation was multiple-choice questions (93.8% n=76, and low used assessment method was 360 degree evaluation (4.9% n=4. Comparing of mean scores of participants based on gender and academic degree, were not showed a significant differences, but comparison of the mean scores of participants based on faculty showed a significant difference (p<0.05. Conclusion: With respect to faculty member's emphasis on use and application of the final evaluation results and preferably less effort and common procedures, as well as less variety of evaluation methods of students' progress, paying attention to the new methods of educational achievement evaluation and implementation training courses for teachers is essential.

  10. Income Disparities in the Use of Health Screening Services Among University Students in Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study of 2479 Participants in a University.

    Lee, Su Hyun; Joh, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Soojin; Oh, Seung-Won; Lee, Cheol Min; Kwon, Hyuktae

    2016-05-01

    Public health insurance coverage for preventive care in young adults is incomplete in Korea. Few studies have focused on young adults' socioeconomic disparities in preventive care utilization. We aimed to explore household income disparities in the use of different types of health screening services among university students in Korea.This cross-sectional study used a web-based self-administered survey of students at a university in Korea from January to February 2013. To examine the associations between household income levels and health screening service use within the past 2 years, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression with adjustment for various covariables.Of 2479 participants, 45.5% reported using health screening services within 2 years (university-provided screening 32.9%, private sector screening 16.7%, and both 4.1%). Household income levels were not significantly associated with overall rates of health screening service use with a multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) in the lowest versus highest income group of 1.12 (0.87-1.45, Ptrend = 0.35). However, we found significantly different associations in specific types of utilized screening services by household income levels. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of university-provided health screening service use in the lowest versus highest income level was 1.74 (1.30-2.34; Ptrend income level was 0.45 (0.31-0.66; Ptrend income groups among university students in Korea, although overall rates of health screening service use were similar across income levels. Low-income students were more likely to use university-provided health screening services, and less likely to use private sector screening services. To ensure appropriate preventive care delivery for young adults and to address disparities in disadvantaged groups, the expansion of medical insurance coverage for preventive health care, establishment of a usual source of care, focusing on

  11. A Community-Based Obesity Prevention Program Decreased the Body Mass Index of University-Affiliated Participants

    Michelle L. Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a national health concern and the focus of many health promotion programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavioral impact of a 12-week obesity prevention program on a university campus. Participants were provided questionnaires with weights, heights, and body mass indices (BMIs determined at the pre-phase weigh-in and post-phase weigh-out. At the weigh-in, participants received pedometers and information about upcoming educational sessions to assist them with reaching their health behavior goals. A total of 247 (38.2% of 646 individuals (79.4% women completed the program. A mean weight loss of 1.8 kg caused a decrease in BMI from 29.3 at weigh-in to 28.7 at weigh-out (p = .002. Pre- and post-questionnaires indicated increases (p < 0.001 in physical activity; using pedometers; and intakes of fruits, vegetables, and water at the end of the program. The 6-month follow-up questionnaire (33.2% response rate indicated healthy habits were being maintained for fruit and vegetable consumption. Further intervention development to incorporate innovative strategies for promoting healthy behaviors among students and employees on university campuses could help decrease the prevalence of obesity.

  12. Outcomes of three universal eating disorder risk reduction programs by participants with higher and lower baseline shape and weight concern.

    Wilksch, Simon M; Paxton, Susan J; Byrne, Susan M; Austin, S Bryn; O'Shea, Anne; Wade, Tracey D

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if baseline shape and weight concern (SWC) moderated outcomes in Prevention Across the Spectrum, a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) of 3 school-based programs aimed at reducing eating disorder and obesity risk factors. N = 1,316 Grade 7 and 8 girls and boys (M age = 13.21 years) across three Australian states were randomly allocated to: Media Smart; Life Smart; Helping, Encouraging, Listening and Protecting Peers Initiative (HELPP) or control (usual school class). Moderation was explored by testing interaction effects for group (Media Smart; Life Smart; HELPP; Control) × moderator (SWC: higher-SWC; lower-SWC) × time (post-program; 6-month follow-up; 12-month follow-up), with baseline risk factor scores entered as covariates. Moderation effects were found for shape concern, weight concern, eating concern, regular eating (i.e., meal skipping), physical activity, body dissatisfaction, dieting, and perfectionism. Post-hoc testing found eating concern at post-program was the only variable where higher-SWC Media Smart participants experienced a reduction in risk relative to controls. Both higher-SWC Life Smart and HELPP participants reported an increase in eating concern relative to controls and both groups were skipping more meals than controls at 12-month follow-up. Amongst lower-SWC participants, Media Smart was the only group to experience a benefit relative to controls (physical activity). This study highlights the need for moderator analyses to become more routinely conducted in universal trials, to ensure that participants across baseline risk levels are benefiting and not harmed from program participation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:66-75). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Measuring recent research performance for Chinese universities using bibliometric methods

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-07-29

    This paper focuses on measuring the academic research performance of Chinese universities by using Scopus database from 2007 to 2010. We have provided meaningful indicators to measure the research performance of Chinese universities as compared to world class universities of the US and the European region. Using these indicators, we first measure the quantity and quality of the research outcomes of the universities and then examine the internationalization of research by using international collaborations, international citations and international impact metrics. Using all of this data, we finally present an overall score called research performance point to measure the comprehensive research strength of the universities for the selected subject categories. The comparison identifies the gap between Chinese universities and top-tier universities from selected regions across various subject areas. We find that Chinese universities are doing well in terms of publication volume but receive less citations from their published work. We also find that the Chinese universities have relative low percentage of publications at high impact venues, which may be the reason that they are not receiving more citations. Therefore, a careful selection of publication venues may help the Chinese universities to compete with world class universities and increase their research internationalization. © 2014 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.

  14. Student's Perceptions of Quality Learning in a Malaysian University--A Mixed Method Approach

    Choy, S. Chee; Yim, Joanne Sau-Ching; Tan, Poh Leong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine students' perceptions of quality learning using a mixed-methods approach in a Malaysian university, with an aim to fill existing knowledge gaps in the literature on relationships among relevant quality variables. The study also assesses the extent to which detailed results from a few participants can be…

  15. Impact of the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine's Boiler Vet Camp on participants' knowledge of veterinary medicine.

    Weisman, James L; Amass, Sandra F; Warren, Joshua D

    2011-04-01

    To assess whether Boiler Vet Camp, a 7-day residential summer camp for students entering eighth or ninth grade in the fall, would increase participants' understanding of career options in the veterinary profession, increase understanding of the science of veterinary medicine, or increase the number of students stating that they intended to apply to the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. Survey. 48 individuals attending the 2009 Boiler Vet Camp. Information on participant demographics was obtained from camp applications. A questionnaire was administered on the first and sixth days of camp, and results were analyzed to identify changes in responses over time. More campers correctly answered questions designed to evaluate knowledge of the veterinary profession and 10 of 12 questions designed to evaluate specific knowledge of the science of veterinary medicine on day 6, compared with day 1. Remarkable differences were not observed among gender or race-ethnicity groups for these questions. There was no significant difference between percentages of campers who stated that they would apply to Purdue before and after camp. Significantly more Caucasian campers stated they would apply to Purdue on both day 1 and day 6, compared with campers from under-represented minority groups. Results indicated that the Boiler Vet Camp accomplished 2 of its 3 planned objectives, suggesting that such camps can be successfully used to increase knowledge of the veterinary profession among middle school students. Reasons for the low percentage of participants from underrepresented minorities who indicated they would apply to the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine require further exploration.

  16. Exploring partners' perspectives on participation in heart failure home care: a mixed-method design.

    Näsström, Lena; Luttik, Marie Louise; Idvall, Ewa; Strömberg, Anna

    2017-05-01

    To describe the partners' perspectives on participation in the care for patients with heart failure receiving home care. Partners are often involved in care of patients with heart failure and have an important role in improving patients' well-being and self-care. Partners have described both negative and positive experiences of involvement, but knowledge of how partners of patients with heart failure view participation in care when the patient receives home care is lacking. A convergent parallel mixed-method design was used, including data from interviews and questionnaires. A purposeful sample of 15 partners was used. Data collection lasted between February 2010 - December 2011. Interviews were analysed with content analysis and data from questionnaires (participation, caregiving, health-related quality of life, depressive symptoms) were analysed statistically. Finally, results were merged, interpreted and labelled as comparable and convergent or as being inconsistent. Partners were satisfied with most aspects of participation, information and contact. Qualitative findings revealed four different aspects of participation: adapting to the caring needs and illness trajectory, coping with caregiving demands, interacting with healthcare providers and need for knowledge to comprehend the health situation. Results showed confirmatory results that were convergent and expanded knowledge that gave a broader understanding of partner participation in this context. The results revealed different levels of partner participation. Heart failure home care included good opportunities for both participation and contact during home visits, necessary to meet partners' ongoing need for information to comprehend the situation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  18. Evaluation of participant recruitment methods to a rare disease online registry.

    Johnson, Kimberly J; Mueller, Nancy L; Williams, Katherine; Gutmann, David H

    2014-07-01

    Internet communication advances provide new opportunities to assemble individuals with rare diseases to online patient registries from wide geographic areas for research. However, there is little published information on the efficacy of different recruitment methods. Here we describe recruitment patterns and the characteristics of individuals with the self-identified autosomal dominant genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) who participated in an online patient registry during the 1-year period from 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012. We employed four main mechanisms to alert potential participants to the registry: (1) Facebook and Google advertising, (2) government and academic websites, (3) patient advocacy groups, and (4) healthcare providers. Participants reported how they first heard about the registry through an online questionnaire. During the 1-year period, 880 individuals participated in the registry from all 50 U.S. States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 39 countries. Facebook and Google were reported as referral sources by the highest number of participants (n=550, 72% Facebook), followed by healthcare providers (n=74), and government and academic websites (n=71). The mean participant age was 29±18 years and most participants reported White race (73%) and female sex (62%) irrespective of reported referral source. Internet advertising, especially through Facebook, resulted in efficient enrollment of large numbers of individuals with NF1. Our study demonstrates the potential utility of this approach to assemble individuals with a rare disease from across the world for research studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Participant outcomes, perceptions, and experiences in the Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification Program, University of Manitoba: An exploratory study

    Friesen, Marcia R.

    Immigration, economic, and regulatory trends in Canada have challenged all professions to examine the processes by which immigrant professionals (international graduates) achieve professional licensure and meaningful employment in Canada. The Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification Program (IEEQ) at the University of Manitoba was developed as an alternate pathway to integrate international engineering graduates into the engineering profession in Manitoba. However, universities have the neither mandate nor the historical practice to facilitate licensure for immigrant professionals and, thus, the knowledge base for program development and delivery is predominantly experiential. This study was developed to address the void in the knowledge base and support the program's ongoing development by conducting a critical, exploratory, participant-oriented evaluation of the IEEQ Program for both formative and summative purposes. The research questions focussed on how the IEEQ participants perceived and described their experiences in the IEEQ Program, and how the participants' outcomes in the IEEQ Program compared to international engineering graduates pursuing other licensing pathways. The study was built on an interpretivist theoretical approach that supported a primarily qualitative methodology with selected quantitative elements. Data collection was grounded in focus group interviews, written questionnaires, student reports, and program records for data collection, with inductive data analysis for qualitative data and descriptive statistics for quantitative data. The findings yielded rich understandings of participants' experiences in the IEEQ Program, their outcomes relative to international engineering graduates (IEGs) pursuing other licensing pathways, and their perceptions of their own adaptation to the Canadian engineering profession. Specifically, the study suggests that foreign credentials recognition processes have tended to focus on the recognition and

  20. Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolution, Interactions

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Krasiński, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle

    2009-10-01

    As the structures in our Universe are mapped out on ever larger scales, and with increasing detail, the use of inhomogeneous models is becoming an essential tool for analyzing and understanding them. This book reviews a number of important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology. It shows how inhomogeneous models can be employed to study the evolution of structures such as galaxy clusters and galaxies with central black holes, and to account for cosmological observations like supernovae dimming, the cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations or the dependence of the Hubble parameter on redshift within classical general relativity. Whatever 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' turn out to be, inhomogeneities exist on many scales and need to be investigated with all appropriate methods. This book is of great value to all astrophysicists and researchers working in cosmology, from graduate students to academic researchers. - Presents inhomogeneous cosmological models, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with basic properties of these models - Shows how inhomogeneous models can be used to analyse cosmological observations such as supernovae, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations - Reviews important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology

  1. METHODICAL ASPECTS OF TEACHING EFFICIENCY IN SMART-UNIVERSITY

    Anzhelika V. Rychkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Instrumentation development disclosed in accordance with the basic principles of Smart-University. Suggest ways to improve the use of the Electronic Campus and grade-rating system (GRS. Scrum methodology approaches and their adaptation to build Smart-University

  2. Methodical principles of assessment of financial compensation for clinical trial volunteer participants

    V. Ye. Dobrova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the necessity to obtain the reliable results of a clinical trial and to distribute it to the general population of patients the problem of recruiting the adequate number of individuals to participate in the study as objects of observation in the group receiving the investigational medicinal product or as a member of the control group should to be solved. Aim of study. The aim of our study was to research and to justify practically the methodological approaches to determining financial compensation for participation of volunteers in the clinical trials and the appropriate methods of its calculation. Material and methods. For the purpose of determining the baseline factors for calculating the hourly compensation the survey of healthy volunteers and of expert professionals as well as the analysis of its results have been done. Questioning healthy volunteers regarding their attitudes towards inconvenience and discomfort during participation in clinical trials was held at the Ukrainian clinical research centers. Survey participants number was 99, they were healthy volunteers who took part in the first phase clinical trial or bioequivalence studies. The expert survey included questioning of the 193 professionals from Ukrainian clinical research centers, CRO, pharmaceutical manufacturers – research sponsors and collaborators State Expert Center Ministry of Health of Ukraine, who were involved in the planning, organization, implementation and evaluation of clinical trials as well as their regulatory control. Results of study. Using the method of pairwise comparisons and iterative refinement procedures the collective estimate of experts questionnaire results has been performed, by the results of which the nine indicators have been identified and the importance of each of them as units of discomfort have been established. Motivational factors of voluntary participation in clinical trials have been studied. Motivation system for

  3. Personnel of human anatomy department of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky as the participants of the Great Patriotic War

    Aleshkina O.Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides evidence on participation of assistants who worked at the Department of Human Anatomy of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky and took part in the Great Patriotic War.

  4. Local Stakeholder Perception on Community Participation in Marine Protected Area Management: A Q-Method Approach

    Megat Jamual Fawaeed, P. S.; Daim, M. S.

    2018-02-01

    Local stakeholder involvement in Marine Protected Area (MPA) management can bring to a successful MPA. Generally, participatory research in marine protected area management is exploring the relationship between marine protected area management approach adopted by the management agencies and the level of participation of local stakeholder whom reside within the marine protected areas. However, the scenario of local community participation in MPA management in Malaysia seems discouraging and does not align with the International Aichi Biodiversity Target 2020. In order to achieve the International Aichi Biodiversity Target 2020, this paper attempts to explore the methodology on participatory research towards the local stakeholder of Pulau Perhentian Marine Park (PPMP), Terengganu, Malaysia. A Q-methodology is used to investigate the perspective of local stakeholder who represents different stances on the issues, by having participants rank and sort a series of statements by comply quantitative and qualitative method in collecting the data. A structured questionnaire will be employed across this study by means of face-to-face interview. In total, 210 respondents from Kampung Pasir Hantu are randomly selected. Meanwhile, a workshop with the agency (Department of Marine Park) had been held to discuss about the issues faces on behalf of management that manage the PPMP. Using the Q-method, researcher acknowledged wise viewpoints, reflecting how different stakeholders’ perception and opinion about community participation with highlights the current level of community participation in MPA. Thus, this paper describes the phases involved in this study, methodology and analysis used in making a conclusion .

  5. The University of Minnesota Morris (UMM) STEP Program: an initiative to encourage the participation of Native Americans in the sciences

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM STEP program is to increase the number of graduates in STEM fields through innovative curricular, recruiting and mentoring strategies. A unique focus of the UMM STEP program is increasing the number of Native American science majors. The STEP program fosters a summer research environment where peer interaction and mentoring creates a web of support. To do so we will establish a supportive and fulfilling pipeline that: 1) Identifies Native American students and involves them in research while they are high school; 2) Mentors and prepares participants for university academics the summer before their freshman year; 3) Provides a complete tuition waiver, mentoring and a support network throughout their undergraduate career; and 4) Involves participants in an active and dynamic summer undergraduate research environment where under-represented individuals are in the majority. The third and fourth components of this pipeline are in very good shape. The Morris campus was originally established as an Indian School in 1887. When the federal government deeded the Indian school campus to the University of Minnesota a stipulation was that Native American students attend the college for free. At present, 196 Native Americans are enrolled at UMM (50 are STEM majors). The UMM STEP research experience provides the unique opportunity to interact with a scientific community that both breaks down a number of traditional barriers and aids in the maturation of these students as scientists. In Summer 2008, 4 students were involved in summer research and in 2009 seven Native American students participated. Early efforts of the UMM STEP program are encouraging. UMM Admissions staff used the UMM STEP program to recruit Native American students and the P.I. phoned “uncommitted admits”, visited reservations and hosted reservation student visits. The result was an increase in freshman Native American Science majors from 7 in Fall 2007, 15 in fall 2008 and 20 in fall

  6. What Else after Behavior Was Changed? the Effects of a University's Policy on Student Participation in Motorcycle Emission Tests

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    With an attempt to realize the effectiveness of a university's policy on motorcycle emission, this study compared its students' participation behavior, associated knowledge, and attitudes toward relevant environmental issues with those of three other universities without similar measures. The results of a survey on a total of 504 students revealed…

  7. The Relationship of Organizational Identity and Alumni Participation Interest among Online, Non-Traditional, Undergraduate Students at a Southeastern Private Religious University

    Hendrick, Mary Carol

    2017-01-01

    Colleges and universities depend heavily on alumni participation in the areas of financial contributions, positive advertising, and student recruitment. As higher education institutions increase the number of fully online programs, it is important to ensure that students feel a sense of connectedness to the university. The purpose of this study is…

  8. Measuring recent research performance for Chinese universities using bibliometric methods

    Zhu, Jia; Hassan, Saeed-Ul; Mirza, Hamid Turab; Xie, Qing

    2014-01-01

    from their published work. We also find that the Chinese universities have relative low percentage of publications at high impact venues, which may be the reason that they are not receiving more citations. Therefore, a careful selection of publication

  9. Participation of Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, in training of personnel for nuclear power

    Sterba, F.

    1983-01-01

    Graduates of application oriented fields of all mathematics and physics specializations of Solid state physics and Nuclear physics work successfully in nuclear power. In the mathematics fields great attention is devoted to optimization, control, process modeling, etc. The subject Solid state physics is subdivided into the following specializations: physics of metals, magnetic properties of the solid state and structural analysis. These specializations educate specialists with a good knowledge of the structure and properties of metal materials. Great attention is devoted to the causes and development of defects, materials creep and the radiation damage of crystal lattices. The nuclear physics specialization Applied nuclear physics deals with the use of nuclear methods in diverse fields and provides basic knowledge in nuclear power generation and the operation of nuclear reactors. The Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the Charles University in Prague also runs postgraduate study courses in nuclear physics measurement methods, solid state physics, etc. (E.S.)

  10. Factors that influence utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing at a selected university campus.

    Ndabarora, Eléazar; Mchunu, Gugu

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported that university students, who are mostly young people, rarely use existing HIV/AIDS preventive methods. Although studies have shown that young university students have a high degree of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and HIV modes of transmission, they are still not utilising the existing HIV prevention methods and still engage in risky sexual practices favourable to HIV. Some variables, such as awareness of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods, have been associated with utilisation of such methods. The study aimed to explore factors that influence use of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing in a selected campus, using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework. A quantitative research approach and an exploratory-descriptive design were used to describe perceived factors that influence utilisation by university students of HIV/AIDS prevention methods. A total of 335 students completed online and manual questionnaires. Study findings showed that the factors which influenced utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods were mainly determined by awareness of the existing university-based HIV/AIDS prevention strategies. Most utilised prevention methods were voluntary counselling and testing services and free condoms. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS score was also found to correlate with HIV risk index score. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS showed correlation with self-efficacy on condoms and their utilisation. Most HBM variables were not predictors of utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students. Intervention aiming to improve the utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students at the selected university should focus on removing identified barriers, promoting HIV/AIDS prevention services and providing appropriate resources to implement such programmes.

  11. Understanding How Participants Become Champions and Succeed in Adopting Healthy Lifestyles: A Storytelling of a Community Health and Nutrition Program at a Land-Grant University

    Keo, Phalla Duong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and understand the experiences of participants who become champions and succeed in adopting healthy lifestyles. The setting was a health and nutrition educational program at University of Minnesota Extension. The main research questions were: How do participants in the Community Health Education Program…

  12. A Study of Female Students' Perceptions of the Barriers to Participate in Physical and Sports Activities at Al-Hussein Bin Talal University

    Al-Tawel, Adnan M.; AlJa'afreh, Ibraheem A.

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the perceived barriers to participate in physical and sports activities among female university students as well as the potential differences of their perceptions of the barriers based on their academic discipline, academic year, and Grade Point Average (GPA) level. The participants in this study were 221 female students…

  13. My Experience as a Student Participant in the Institute for Geophysics/Huston-Tillotson University Geodiversity Project

    Putman, N.; Ellins, K.; Holt, J.; Olson, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    As a senior pre-service teacher at Huston-Tillotson University, a minority-serving institution in Texas, I found myself in need of a science course and reluctantly enrolled in "Special Topics in the Geosciences," a survey course taught by visiting scientists from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). I had no idea what the geosciences were about. On the first day of class we took a test and I began to feel a sense of foreboding, but after speaking with the instructors, I left filled with excitement. With my limited background in science, I knew that the class was going to be challenging and require a lot of studying. I took every opportunity offered in the class to learn more about the geosciences. If there was a field trip, I went. If there was an opportunity for me to speak to children about what I learned, I did. For example, I participated in the Explore UT open house event where, rather than being an observer as I had expected, I found myself explaining earthquake seismology to students, parents and visitors. The experience was pivotal. As I explained to a small group of 3rd graders how they could use computer applications to observe and understand seismic waves, I realized I wanted to be a science teacher and not an elementary level-teacher as I had planned. Since completing "Special Topics in the Geosciences," I've been an undergraduate research assistant at UTIG. Over the summer, I adapted approximately ten existing UTIG Earth Science learning activities into the 5-E instructional model for the fall 2006 professional development Earth Science Revolution Workshops for in- service teachers, and I developed a new lesson on tides for these workshops. I also participated in presenting both a workshop for minority-serving elementary teachers and a class for alternative certification teachers at HTU. In early September, I joined a group of scientists, engineers, and space-suited "astronauts" in the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater

  14. Analysis of transport of collimated radiation in a participating media using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Mishra, Subhash C.; Vernekar, Rohan Ranganath

    2012-01-01

    Application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) recently proposed by Asinari et al. [Asinari P, Mishra SC, Borchiellini R. A lattice Boltzmann formulation to the analysis of radiative heat transfer problems in a participating medium. Numer Heat Transfer B 2010; 57:126–146] is extended to the analysis of transport of collimated radiation in a planar participating medium. To deal with azimuthally symmetric radiation in planar medium, a new lattice structure for the LBM is used. The transport of the collimated component in the medium is analysed by two different, viz., flux splitting and direct approaches. For different angles of incidence of the collimated radiation, the LBM formulation is tested for the effects of the extinction coefficient, the anisotropy factor, and the boundary emissivities on heat flux and emissive power distributions. Results are compared with the benchmark results obtained using the finite volume method. Both the approaches in LBM provide accurate results. -- Highlights: ► Transport of collimated radiation in participating media is studied. ► Usage of Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended in this study. ► In LBM, flux splitting and direct approaches are proposed. ► Effects of various parameters are studied on heat flux and temperature profiles. ► In all cases, LBM provides correct results.

  15. Undergraduate psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods at an Irish university.

    Jabbar, F; Casey, P; Kelly, B D

    2016-11-01

    At University College Dublin, teaching in psychiatry includes clinical electives, lectures, small-group and problem-based teaching, consistent with international trends. To determine final-year psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods. We distributed questionnaires to all final-year medical students in two classes (2008 and 2009), after final psychiatry examination (before results) and all of them participated (n = 111). Students' interest in psychiatry as a career increased during psychiatry teaching. Students rated objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as the most useful element of teaching and examination. The most common learning style was "reflector"; the least common was "pragmatist". Two thirds believed teaching could be improved (increased patient contact) and 89 % reported that experience of psychiatry changed attitudes towards mental illness (increased understanding). Students' preference for OSCEs may reflect the closeness of OSCE as a form of learning to OSCE as a form of assessment: OSCEs both focus on specific clinical skills and help prepare for examinations. Future research could usefully examine the extent to which these findings are university-specific or instructor-dependent. Information on the consistency of various teaching, examination and modularisation methods would also be useful.

  16. Enhancing life prospects of socially vulnerable youth through sport participation: a mixed methods study

    2014-01-01

    Background Sport participation has been associated with improved life prospects such as academic performance and employability prospects. As such, promoting sport participation might be a way to increase life prospects, especially for socially vulnerable youth because they are less physically active than their peers. However, the evidence for the causal effect of sport participation on these outcomes is still limited and little is known about factors that play a role in this possible effect. The aim of this study is four-fold. First, the causal effect of sport participation on life prospects is studied and the underlying mechanisms of this relation are explored. Secondly, the life experiences of the youngsters in the sport context, that may contribute to skill development, are studied. Thirdly, social conditions for a positive effect are explored, as sport is likely to have a positive effect under specific conditions. Fourthly, this study aims to provide insights on the elements of successful partnerships between youth care organisations and local sport clubs. Methods and design This protocol reports on a mixed method study. An intervention that aims to increase the sport participation of socially vulnerable youth, between 12–23 years old, is implemented in three regions of a Rotterdam youth care organisation. The youngsters in the two control regions receive care-as-usual. The main outcome variables, collected via questionnaires, are the life prospect, sense of coherence and self-regulation skills of the youngsters after 6 and 18 months of follow-up. The Motivational Climate Scale is administered to explore the social conditions for a positive effect and interviews are conducted with sport coaches to explore their role in skill development. Interviews with the youngsters are conducted to gain insight on the life experiences that may lead to skill development. The elements of successful partnerships are collected during interviews with youth care professionals

  17. Enhancing Science Education Instruction: A Mixed-Methods Study on University and Middle School Collaborations

    Owen-Stone, Deborah S.

    The purpose of this concurrent mixed methods study was to examine the collaborative relationship between scientists and science teachers and to incorporate and advocate scientific literacy based on past and current educational theories such as inquiry based teaching. The scope of this study included archived student standardized test scores, semi-structured interviews, and a Likert scale survey to include open-ended comments. The methodology was based on the guiding research question: To what extent and in what ways does the collaboration and inquiry methodology, with GTF and PT teams, serve toward contributing to a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of this predicting relationship between student PASS scores, inquiry skills, and increased scientific literacy for GTF's, PT's, and students via an integrative mixed methods analysis? The data analysis considerations were derived from the qualitative data collected from the three GTF/PT teams by the use of recorded interviews and text answered survey comments. The quantitative data of archived student Palmetto Assessment of State Standards (PASS) scores on scientific literacy and inquiry tests and the Likert-scale portion of the survey were support data to the aforementioned qualitative data findings. Limitations of the study were (1) the population of only the GK-12 teachers and their students versus the inclusion of participants that did not experience the GK-12 Fellow partnerships within their classrooms, should they be considered as participants, (2) involved the researcher as a participant for two years of the program and objectivity remained through interpretation and well documented personal reflections and experiences to inform accuracy, and (3) cultural diversity contributed to the relationship formed between the research Fellow and science educator and communication and scientific language did form a barrier between the Fellow, educator, and student rapport within the classroom. This study

  18. Identifying barriers and facilitators to participation in pressure ulcer prevention in allied healthcare professionals: a mixed methods evaluation.

    Worsley, Peter R; Clarkson, Paul; Bader, Dan L; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the barriers and facilitators for allied health professional's participation in pressure ulcer prevention. Mixed method cohort study. Single centre study in an acute university hospital trust. Five physiotherapists and four occupational therapists were recruited from the hospital trust. Therapists had been working in the National Health Service (NHS) for a minimum of one year. Therapist views and experiences were collated using an audio recorded focus group. This recording was analysed using constant comparison analysis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of attitudes and knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention using questionnaires. Key themes surrounding barriers to participation in pressure ulcer prevention included resources (staffing and equipment), education and professional boundaries. Fewer facilitators were described, with new training opportunities and communication being highlighted. Results from the questionnaires showed the therapists had a positive attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention with a median score of 81% (range 50 to 83%). However, there were gaps in knowledge with a median score of 69% (range 50 to 77%). The therapist reported several barriers to pressure ulcer prevention and few facilitators. The primary barriers were resources, equipment and education. Attitudes and knowledge in AHPs were comparable to data previously reported from experienced nursing staff. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences and perceptions of students with disabilities concerning factors influencing participation in recreational sports at a university in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

    Wright, S.A.; Titus, S.

    2013-01-01

    South African universities share a common purpose to make sport and recreation accessible to students at higher education institutions, including students with disabilities.Therefore, integrating students with disabilities into the daily activities of any university institution is important as it may be beneficial for them to participate in recreational activities on campus. This study focuses on the experiences and perceptions of students with disabilities regarding recreational sport whilst...

  20. Enhancing life prospects of socially vulnerable youth through sport participation: a mixed methods study.

    Super, Sabina; Hermens, Niels; Verkooijen, Kirsten; Koelen, Maria

    2014-07-09

    Sport participation has been associated with improved life prospects such as academic performance and employability prospects. As such, promoting sport participation might be a way to increase life prospects, especially for socially vulnerable youth because they are less physically active than their peers. However, the evidence for the causal effect of sport participation on these outcomes is still limited and little is known about factors that play a role in this possible effect. The aim of this study is four-fold. First, the causal effect of sport participation on life prospects is studied and the underlying mechanisms of this relation are explored. Secondly, the life experiences of the youngsters in the sport context, that may contribute to skill development, are studied. Thirdly, social conditions for a positive effect are explored, as sport is likely to have a positive effect under specific conditions. Fourthly, this study aims to provide insights on the elements of successful partnerships between youth care organisations and local sport clubs. This protocol reports on a mixed method study. An intervention that aims to increase the sport participation of socially vulnerable youth, between 12-23 years old, is implemented in three regions of a Rotterdam youth care organisation. The youngsters in the two control regions receive care-as-usual. The main outcome variables, collected via questionnaires, are the life prospect, sense of coherence and self-regulation skills of the youngsters after 6 and 18 months of follow-up. The Motivational Climate Scale is administered to explore the social conditions for a positive effect and interviews are conducted with sport coaches to explore their role in skill development. Interviews with the youngsters are conducted to gain insight on the life experiences that may lead to skill development. The elements of successful partnerships are collected during interviews with youth care professionals, sport coaches and other

  1. The participative method of subject definition as used in the quantitative modelling of hospital laundry services.

    Hammer, K A; Janes, F R

    1995-01-01

    The objectives for developing the participative method of subject definition were to gain all the relevant information to a high level of fidelity in the earliest stages of the work and so be able to build a realistic model at reduced labour cost. In order to better integrate the two activities--information acquisition and mathematical modelling--a procedure was devised using the methods of interactive management to facilitate teamwork. This procedure provided the techniques to create suitable working relationships between the two groups, the informants and the modellers, so as to maximize their free and accurate intercommunication, both during the initial definition of the linen service and during the monitoring of the accuracy and reality of the draft models. The objectives of this project were met in that the final model was quickly validated and approved, at a low labour cost.

  2. Contraceptive Method Mix and Trend at the Jos University Teaching ...

    JUTH) North Central Nigeria over an 18-year period, 1985-2002. There were a total of 17,846 clients who used the various methods of contraception. Modern methods of contraception have been accepted in our facility including the permanent ...

  3. Participatory Bluetooth Sensing: A Method for Acquiring Spatio-Temporal Data about Participant Mobility and Interactions at Large Scale Events

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    for collecting spatio-temporal data about participant mobility and social interactions uses the capabilities of Bluetooth capable smartphones carried by participants. As a proof-of-concept we present a field study with deployment of the method in a large music festival with 130 000 participants where a small...

  4. Do Transmasculine Speakers Present with Gender-Related Voice Problems? Insights from a Participant-Centered Mixed-Methods Study

    Azul, David; Arnold, Aron; Neuschaefer-Rube, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are indications of gender-related voice problems in our transmasculine participants and to analyze how discrepancies between participant self-evaluations and researcher-led examinations can be best negotiated to ensure a participant-centered interpretation. Method: We conducted a…

  5. The Construction of Professional Identity and Pathways of Participation of Full Time Faculty Members in University Restructuring in Mexico

    Montero Hernandez, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the federal government required public state universities in Mexico to recruit full time faculty members with doctoral degrees and research productivity to increase the academic competitiveness of higher education. After two decades of the implementation of federal mandates, public state universities have not improved their…

  6. Factors influencing the contraceptive method choice: a university hospital experience

    Kahraman, Korhan; Göç, Göksu; Taşkın, Salih; Haznedar, Pınar; Karagözlü, Selen; Kale, Burak; Kurtipek, Zeynep; Özmen, Batuhan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the factors influencing behavior of women in choosing contraceptive methods. Material and Methods A total of 4022 women who were admitted to our clinic in a year, were the subjects in this current study for contraception choices. Relationship between the current contraceptive choice and the age, marital status, educational level, gravidity and induced abortions were evaluated. Results Current users of any contraceptive methods were found to make up thirty-three percent of the entire study population. The most preferred method of contraception was an intrauterine device (46.4%), followed by, condom (19.2%), coitus interruptus (16.4%), tubal sterilization (11%), oral contraceptives (5.7%) and lastly the “other methods” that consisted of depot injectables and implants (1.2%). Among other contraceptive methods, the condom was found to be used mostly by the younger age group (OR:0.956, 95% CI:0.936–0.976, p<0.001), while tubal sterilization was preferred mainly by the elderly population (p<0.001, OR:1.091, 95% CI:1.062–1.122). Women that have a higher educational level, were found to use OC (76.3%, OR:5.970, 95% CI:3.233–11.022), tubal sterilization (59.6%, OR:4.110, 95% CI:2.694–6.271) and other methods (62.5%, OR:3.279, 95% CI:1.033–10.402) more commonly than the low educational group (p<0.001). Conclusion These results demonstrated that the rates of both contraception utilization and the usage of more effective methods of contraception need to be increased by providing better family planning systems and counselling opportunities. PMID:24592017

  7. Teaching methods for increasing the participations of students: Innovative dynamics games Teaching methods for increasing the participations of students: Innovative dynamics games Teaching methods for increasing the participations of students: Innovative dynamics games

    Ester Oliveras

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper analyses new dynamics as teaching methodologies in the context of   the degrees adapted to the EHEA. The aim of this study is double: to assess whether there is greater involvement in seminars with these new dynamics and to test if learning also experienced changes. Design/methodology/approach: To experiment with the introduction of innovative dynamic games in an introductory course in accounting.  These new dynamics are applied during the academic year 2010-11 in the UPF. The design, implementation and evaluation of the methodology devised have followed three stages: 1 Game Design and adequate dynamic; 2 To test the games; 2 Implementation during the course. Findings: The results show that students value positively those dynamics improving their learning and creating greater involvement. Research limitations/implications: There are some contradictory results regarding the knowledge gained by the students. Another area to be explored relates to the skills that the teacher must have in order to manage this type of dynamics. Originality/value: In an introductory level of the Financial Accounting course the most common dynamics is solving exercises. Due to the nature of matter, these are closed so they not provoke discussion among students. However, you can use activities that allow greater participation, especially through dynamics or games. This paper shows that.Purpose: This paper analyses new dynamics as teaching methodologies in the context of   the degrees adapted to the EHEA. The aim of this study is double: to assess whether there is greater involvement in seminars with these new dynamics and to test if learning also experienced changes.Design/methodology/approach: To experiment with the introduction of innovative dynamic games in an introductory course in accounting.  These new dynamics are applied during the academic year 2010-11 in the UPF. The design, implementation and evaluation of the methodology devised

  8. Evaluation of Bias Correction Methods for "Worst-case" Selective Non-participation in NAEP

    McLaughlin, Don; Gallagher, Larry; Stancavage, Fran

    2004-01-01

    With the advent of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the context for NAEP participation is changing. Whereas in the past participation in NAEP has always been voluntary, participation is now mandatory for some grade and subjects among schools receiving Title I funds. While this will certainly raise school-level participation rates in the mandated…

  9. Examining the Role of Ideological and Political Education on University Students' Civic Perceptions and Civic Participation in Mainland China: Some Hints from Contemporary Citizenship Theory

    Zhang, Chong; Fagan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    A long existing compulsive curriculum of ideological and political education is employed by the Chinese government to promote citizenship education among Chinese university students. This article builds on the findings of a mixed-methods research that examined the role of ideological and political education on university students' civic…

  10. Motivational Determinants of Exergame Participation for Older People in Assisted Living Facilities: Mixed-Methods Study.

    Meekes, Wytske; Stanmore, Emma Kate

    2017-07-06

    Exergames (exercise-based videogames) for delivering strength and balance exercise for older people are growing in popularity with the emergence of new Kinect-based technologies; however, little is known about the factors affecting their uptake and usage by older people. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that may influence the motivation of older people to use exergames to improve their physical function and reduce fall risk. Mixed methods were employed in which 14 semistructured interviews were conducted with older people (n=12, aged 59-91 years) from 2 assisted living facilities in the North West of the United Kingdom. The older people participated in a 6-week trial of exergames along with one manager and one physiotherapist; 81 h of observation and Technology Acceptance Model questionnaires were conducted. The findings suggest that the participants were intrinsically motivated to participate in the exergames because of the enjoyment experienced when playing the exergames and perceived improvements in their physical and mental health and social confidence. The social interaction provided in this study was an important extrinsic motivator that increased the intrinsic motivation to adhere to the exergame program. The findings of this study suggest that exergames may be a promising tool for delivering falls prevention exercises and increasing adherence to exercise in older people. Understanding the motivation of older people to use exergames may assist in the process of implementation. ©Wytske Meekes, Emma Kate Stanmore. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 06.07.2017.

  11. The 'Antiretrovirals, Sexual Transmission Risk and Attitudes' (ASTRA study. Design, methods and participant characteristics.

    Andrew Speakman

    Full Text Available Life expectancy for people diagnosed with HIV has improved dramatically however the number of new infections in the UK remains high. Understanding patterns of sexual behaviour among people living with diagnosed HIV, and the factors associated with having condom-less sex, is important for informing HIV prevention strategies and clinical care. In addition, in view of the current interest in a policy of early antiretroviral treatment (ART for all people diagnosed with HIV in the UK, it is of particular importance to assess whether ART use is associated with increased levels of condom-less sex. In this context the ASTRA study was designed to investigate current sexual activity, and attitudes to HIV transmission risk, in a large unselected sample of HIV-infected patients under care in the UK. The study also gathered background information on demographic, socio-economic, lifestyle and disease-related characteristics, and physical and psychological symptoms, in order to identify other key factors impacting on HIV patients and the behaviours which underpin transmission. In this paper we describe the study rationale, design, methods, response rate and the demographic characteristics of the participants. People diagnosed with HIV infection attending 8 UK HIV out-patient clinics in 2011-2012 were invited to participate in the study. Those who agreed to participate completed a confidential, self-administered pen-and-paper questionnaire, and their latest CD4 count and viral load test results were recorded. During the study period, 5112 eligible patients were invited to take part in the study and 3258 completed questionnaires were obtained, representing a response rate of 64% of eligible patients. The study includes 2248 men who have sex with men (MSM, 373 heterosexual men and 637 women. Future results from ASTRA will be a key resource for understanding HIV transmission within the UK, targeting prevention efforts, and informing clinical care of individuals

  12. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    MOHAMMED BAQUR SAHIB A. AL-SHUHAIB

    gels, containing 7% glycerol, and 1×TBE buffer. The gels were run under 200 .... Inc. Germany, GeneaidTM DNA Isolation Kit, Geneaid. Biotech., New Taipei City, .... C. L. and Arsenos G. 2015 Comparison of eleven methods for genomic DNA ...

  13. Gender Issues in Older Adults' Participation in Learning: Viewpoints and Experiences of Learners in the University of the Third Age (U3A).

    Williamson, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of 41 female and 15 male older adults participating in Universities of the Third Age found the genders approach retirement differently. Women want to experience freedom and make up for lost opportunities; men prefer to "sit." However, men with active interests before retirement continued activity in the Third Age. (SK)

  14. Active Citizens, Good Citizens, and Insouciant Bystanders: The Educational Implications of Chinese University Students' Civic Participation via Social Networking

    Ke, Lin; Starkey, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This virtual ethnographic study explores how Chinese university students use social network sites (SNSs) to participate in civic activities. An ideal of "active" citizens is contrasted with good citizens (Crick) and insouciant bystanders. We find that students engage with the civic issues embedded in everyday life; their online civic…

  15. Actions and Achievements of Self-Regulated Learning in Personal Environments. Research on Students Participating in the Graduate Program in Preschool Education at the University of Granada

    Chaves-Barboza, Eduardo; Trujillo-Torres, Juan Manuel; López-Núñez, Juan Antonio; Sola-Martínez, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    This paper is intended to study the self-regulated learning (SRL) process in personal learning environments (PLEs) among students participating in the Graduate Program for Preschool Education at the University of Granada (Spain). The study is focused on self-regulatory actions carried out by students, and on their self-regulated learning…

  16. "Fort Valley State University Cooperative Developmental Energy Program: Broadening the Participation of Underrepresented Minorities in the Geosciences"

    Crumbly, I.; Hodges, J.; Kar, A.; Rashidi, L.

    2015-12-01

    According to the American Geological Institute's Status of Recent Geoscience Graduates, 2014, underrepresented minorities (URMs) make up only 7%, 5%, and 2% of graduates at the BS/BA, MA/MS, and Ph.D levels, respectively. Recruiting academically-talented URMs to major in the geosciences instead of majoring in other fields such as medicine, law, business, or engineering is a major undertaking. Numerous factors may contribute as to why few URMs choose geoscience careers. To address the underrepresentation of URMs in the geosciences 1992, the Cooperative Developmental Energy Program (CDEP) of Fort Valley State University (FVSU) and the College of Geosciences at the University of Oklahoma (OU) implemented a 3 + 2 dual degree program specifically in geology and geophysics. Since 1992, FVSU-CDEP has added the University of Texas at Austin (2004), Pennsylvania State University (2005), University of Arkansas (2010), and the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (2015) as partners to offer degrees in geology and geophysics. The dual degree programs consist of students majoring in chemistry or mathematics at FVSU for the first three years and transferring to one of the above partnering universities for years four and five to major in geology or geophysics. Upon completion of the program, students receive a BS degree in chemistry or mathematics from FVSU and a BS degree in geology or geophysics from a partnering university. CDEP has been responsible for recruiting 33 URMs who have earned BS degrees in geology or geophysics. Females constitute 50% of the graduates which is higher than the national average. Also, 56% of these graduates have earned the MS degree and 6% have earned the Ph.D. Currently, 60% of these graduates are employed with oil and gas companies; 20% work for academia; 12% work for governmental agencies; 6 % are professionals with environmental firms; and 2% of the graduate's employment is unknown.

  17. Levelling the Playing Fields in PAR: The Intricacies of Power, Privilege, and Participation in a University-Community-School Partnership

    Wood, Lesley; McAteer, Mary

    2017-01-01

    When academics, who occupy a traditional position of power and privilege, engage with community members whose thinking, attitudes, and responses have been shaped by ongoing sociohistorical oppression and disadvantage, democratic participation is not easy to attain. Yet, unless community members feel able to participate freely, the valuable local…

  18. Use of machine learning methods to classify Universities based on the income structure

    Terlyga, Alexandra; Balk, Igor

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we discuss use of machine learning methods such as self organizing maps, k-means and Ward’s clustering to perform classification of universities based on their income. This classification will allow us to quantitate classification of universities as teaching, research, entrepreneur, etc. which is important tool for government, corporations and general public alike in setting expectation and selecting universities to achieve different goals.

  19. Screening Internet forum participants for depression symptoms by assembling and enhancing multiple NLP methods.

    Karmen, Christian; Hsiung, Robert C; Wetter, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Depression is a disease that can dramatically lower quality of life. Symptoms of depression can range from temporary sadness to suicide. Embarrassment, shyness, and the stigma of depression are some of the factors preventing people from getting help for their problems. Contemporary social media technologies like Internet forums or micro-blogs give people the opportunity to talk about their feelings in a confidential anonymous environment. However, many participants in such networks may not recognize the severity of their depression and their need for professional help. Our approach is to develop a method that detects symptoms of depression in free text, such as posts in Internet forums, chat rooms and the like. This could help people appreciate the significance of their depression and realize they need to seek help. In this work Natural Language Processing methods are used to break the textual information into its grammatical units. Further analysis involves detection of depression symptoms and their frequency with the help of words known as indicators of depression and their synonyms. Finally, similar to common paper-based depression scales, e.g., the CES-D, that information is incorporated into a single depression score. In this evaluation study, our depressive mood detection system, DepreSD (Depression Symptom Detection), had an average precision of 0.84 (range 0.72-1.0 depending on the specific measure) and an average F measure of 0.79 (range 0.72-0.9). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. INTERDISCIPLINARITY IN PUBLIC SPACE PARTICIPATIVE PROJECTS: METHODS AND RESULTS IN PRACTICE AND TEACHING

    Pedro Brandão

    2015-06-01

    • In the development of design practice and studio teaching methods We shall see in this paper how interdisciplinary approaches correspond to new and complex urban transformations, focusing on the importance of actors’ interaction processes, combining professional and non-professional knowledge and theory-practice relations. Therefore, we aim at a deepening in public space area of knowledge under the growing complexity of urban life. We see it as a base for further development of collaborative projects and their implications on community empowerment and urban governance at local level. Motivations of this line of work are persistent in several ongoing research projects, aiming to: - Understand public space as a cohesion factor both in urban life and urban form - Manage processes and strategies as elements of urban transformation, - Stimulate the understanding of actors’ roles in urban design practices. - Favoring the questioning of emerging aspects of urban space production… The paper presents and analyses processes, methods and results from civic participation projects developed in the neighbourhood of Barò de Viver (Barcelona and in the District of Marvila (Lisbon. In the first case, a long process initiated in 2004 and partially completed in 2011, neighbours developed the projects "Memory Wall" and Ciutat d'Asuncion Promenade as part of identity construction in public space, in collaboration  with a team of facilitators from CrPolis group. In the second case, different participatory processes dated from 2001 and 2003 have resulted in the implementation of a specific identity urban brand and communication system with an ongoing project of "maps" construction according to the neighbours perception and representation systems. We may conclude that processes of urban governance require more active participation of citizens in projects regarding the improvement of quality of life. At the same time, the implementation of these processes requires a clear

  1. Efficient Use of Clickers: A Mixed-Method Inquiry with University Teachers

    George Cheung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of information technology and policies encouraging interactivities in teaching and learning, the use of students’ response system (SRS, commonly known as clickers, has experienced substantial growth in recent years. The reported effectiveness of SRS has varied. Based on the framework of technological-pedagogical-content knowledge (TPACK, the current study attempted to explore the disparity in efficiency of adopting SRS. A concurrent mixed method design was adopted to delineate factors conducive to efficient adoption of SRS through closed-ended survey responses and qualitative data. Participants were purposefully sampled from diverse academic disciplines and backgrounds. Seventeen teachers from various disciplines (i.e., tourism management, business, health sciences, applied sciences, engineering, and social sciences at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University formed a teacher focus group for the current study. In the facilitated focus group, issues relating to efficient use of clickers, participants explored questions on teachers’ knowledge on various technologies, knowledge relating to their subject matters, methods and processes of teaching, as well as how to integrate all knowledge into their teaching. The TPACK model was adopted to guide the discussions. Emergent themes from the discussions were extracted using NVivo 10 for Windows, and were categorized according to the framework of TPACK. The survey, implemented on an online survey platform, solicited participants on teachers’ knowledge and technology acceptance. The close-ended survey comprised 30 items based on the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK framework and 20 items based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT. Participating teachers concurred with the suggestion that use of clickers is instrumental in engaging students in learning and assessing formative students’ progress. Converging with the survey results

  2. Using the Health Belief Model to Explain Mothers' and Fathers' Intention to Participate in Universal Parenting Programs.

    Salari, Raziye; Filus, Ania

    2017-01-01

    Using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework, we studied factors related to parental intention to participate in parenting programs and examined the moderating effects of parent gender on these factors. Participants were a community sample of 290 mothers and 290 fathers of 5- to 10-year-old children. Parents completed a set of questionnaires assessing child emotional and behavioral difficulties and the HBM constructs concerning perceived program benefits and barriers, perceived child problem susceptibility and severity, and perceived self-efficacy. The hypothesized model was evaluated using structural equation modeling. The results showed that, for both mothers and fathers, perceived program benefits were associated with higher intention to participate in parenting programs. In addition, higher intention to participate was associated with lower perceived barriers only in the sample of mothers and with higher perceived self-efficacy only in the sample of fathers. No significant relations were found between intention to participate and perceived child problem susceptibility and severity. Mediation analyses indicated that, for both mothers and fathers, child emotional and behavioral problems had an indirect effect on parents' intention to participate by increasing the level of perceived benefits of the program. As a whole, the proposed model explained about 45 % of the variance in parental intention to participate. The current study suggests that mothers and fathers may be motivated by different factors when making their decision to participate in a parenting program. This finding can inform future parent engagement strategies intended to increase both mothers' and fathers' participation rates in parenting programs.

  3. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  4. Teaching Media and Methods in Marketing: European and North American Universities

    Vila, Natalia; Kuster, Ines

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to examine the most widely used teaching media and methods in university education. To achieve this objective, international research has been carried out among 135 marketing teachers from North American and European universities. The study shows that North American teachers use more traditional media and participatory methods…

  5. Using the Health Belief Model to Explain Mothers? and Fathers? Intention to Participate in Universal Parenting Programs

    Salari, Raziye; Filus, Ania

    2016-01-01

    Using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework, we studied factors related to parental intention to participate in parenting programs and examined the moderating effects of parent gender on these factors. Participants were a community sample of 290 mothers and 290 fathers of 5- to 10-year-old children. Parents completed a set of questionnaires assessing child emotional and behavioral difficulties and the HBM constructs concerning perceived program benefits and barriers, percei...

  6. The Implementation of Analytical Hierarchy Process Method for Outstanding Achievement Scholarship Reception Selection at Universal University of Batam

    Marfuah; Widiantoro, Suryo

    2017-12-01

    Universal University of Batam offers outstanding achievement scholarship to the current students to be each year of new academic year, seeing the large number of new Students who are interested to get it then the selection team should be able to filter and choose the eligible ones. The selection process starting with evaluation and judgement made by the experts. There were five criteria as the basic of selection and each had three alternatives that must be considered. Based on the policy of University the maximum number of recipients are five for each of six study programs. Those programs are art of music, dance, industrial engineering, environmental engineering, telecommunication engineering, and software engineering. The expert choice was subjective that AHP method was used to help in making decision consistently by doing pairwise comparison matrix process between criteria based on selected alternatives, by determining the priority order of criteria and alternatives used. The results of these calculations were used as supporting decision-making to determine the eligible students receiving scholarships based on alternatives of selected criteria determined by the final results of AHP method calculation with the priority criterion A (0.37%), C (0.23%), E (0.21%), D (0.14%) and B (0.06%), value of consistency ratio 0.05. Then the alternative priorities 1 (0.63), 2 (0.26) and 3 (0.11) the consistency ratio values 0.03, where each CR ≤ 0.1 or consistent weighting preference.

  7. Mindfulness in higher education: awareness and attention in university students increase during and after participation in a mindfulness curriculum course

    de Bruin, E.I.; Meppelink, R.; Bögels, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a mindfulness course in the curriculum of international students (n = 104) from 16 different countries at the University of Amsterdam. The curriculum consisted of seven weekly lectures, as well as studying scientific articles on mindfulness research and gaining

  8. Use of Participant-Generated Photographs versus Time Use Diaries as a Method of Qualitative Data Collection

    MaryEllen Thompson PhD, OTR/L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A small qualitative research study was chosen as a time efficient way to allow students to participate in and complete a research project during a 16-week long semester course. In the first year of the research contribution course, student researchers asked participants with diabetes to complete time use diaries as a part of their initial data collection. The time use diaries were found to be an ineffective way to collect data on self-management of diabetes and were not useful as a basis for subsequent interviews with the participants. A review of the literature suggested reasons for this lack of effectiveness; in particular, participants tend not to record frequently done daily activities. Further review of the literature pointed toward the use of participant-generated photography as an alternative. Subsequent participants were asked to take photographs of their daily self-management of their diabetes for initial data collection. These photographs provided a strong basis for subsequent interviews with the participants. A comparison of the data collected and the emergent themes from the two different methods of initial data collection demonstrated the improved ability to answer the original research question when using participant-generated photography as a basis for participant interviews. The student researchers found the use of participant-generated photographs to elicit interviews with participants in the context of a research contribution course to be effective and enjoyable.

  9. Global Competition and Learning Organizations: Goals and Motivations of Corporate Leaders and Employees Who Participate in Corporate/University Partnerships

    Zolfo, Elana; Mann, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine executive and employee attitudes regarding benefits and difficulties accruing to employees and their corporations who participate in on-site MBA programs for 11 corporate partners. Because so many corporations embrace partnerships with colleges to advance the knowledge base of their employees, it seems…

  10. Online Debating to Encourage Student Participation in Online Learning Environments: A Qualitative Case Study at a South African University

    Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl; Mostert, Markus

    2005-01-01

    The use of computer-mediated communication in higher education presents opportunities for students to be part of an online learning community irrespective of their geographical location. However, students do not always avail themselves of this opportunity and pedagogic strategies for encouraging participation are therefore constantly being…

  11. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  12. Effects of test method and participant musical training on preference ratings of stimuli with different reverberation times.

    Lawless, Martin S; Vigeant, Michelle C

    2017-10-01

    Selecting an appropriate listening test design for concert hall research depends on several factors, including listening test method and participant critical-listening experience. Although expert listeners afford more reliable data, their perceptions may not be broadly representative. The present paper contains two studies that examined the validity and reliability of the data obtained from two listening test methods, a successive and a comparative method, and two types of participants, musicians and non-musicians. Participants rated their overall preference of auralizations generated from eight concert hall conditions with a range of reverberation times (0.0-7.2 s). Study 1, with 34 participants, assessed the two methods. The comparative method yielded similar results and reliability as the successive method. Additionally, the comparative method was rated as less difficult and more preferable. For study 2, an additional 37 participants rated the stimuli using the comparative method only. An analysis of variance of the responses from both studies revealed that musicians are better than non-musicians at discerning their preferences across stimuli. This result was confirmed with a k-means clustering analysis on the entire dataset that revealed five preference groups. Four groups exhibited clear preferences to the stimuli, while the fifth group, predominantly comprising non-musicians, demonstrated no clear preference.

  13. Overview of Didactic Methodical Organization of University Teaching by Bologna Concept of Higher Education

    Nedim Čirić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reassessment of the existing didactic-methodological organization within the University lectures as well as the role of students and University lecturers is a result of the current process of higher education reforms. The advancement of pedagogical and didactic-methodological competences of university lecturers represents an imperative in reaching a high quality education. The results of this research may function as a starting point in the self-evaluation of University lecturers. The point of this work was to present didactic and methodical elements of contemporary university teaching, according to Bologna concept of higher education, and position of students. Taking into consideration the very definition and didactic methodological structure and legality of teaching, researches related to representation of individual didactic and methodical elements of contemporary university teaching are presented, which relate to forms of teaching, methods of teaching and application of teaching and technical aids. In the context of the current reform of the high education and considering the Bologna Declaration it could be concluded that contemporary university teaching is marked with cooperative interactive teaching in which the position of students and teachers is defined as partnership.

  14. Predictive models for suicidal thoughts and behaviors among Spanish University students: rationale and methods of the UNIVERSAL (University & mental health) project.

    Blasco, Maria Jesús; Castellví, Pere; Almenara, José; Lagares, Carolina; Roca, Miquel; Sesé, Albert; Piqueras, José Antonio; Soto-Sanz, Victoria; Rodríguez-Marín, Jesús; Echeburúa, Enrique; Gabilondo, Andrea; Cebrià, Ana Isabel; Miranda-Mendizábal, Andrea; Vilagut, Gemma; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Auerbach, Randy P; Kessler, Ronald C; Alonso, Jordi

    2016-05-04

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among young people. While suicide prevention is considered a research and intervention priority, longitudinal data is needed to identify risk and protective factors associate with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Here we describe the UNIVERSAL (University and Mental Health) project which aims are to: (1) test prevalence and 36-month incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors; and (2) identify relevant risk and protective factors associated with the incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among university students in Spain. An ongoing multicenter, observational, prospective cohort study of first year university students in 5 Spanish universities. Students will be assessed annually during a 36 month follow-up. The surveys will be administered through an online, secure web-based platform. A clinical reappraisal will be completed among a subsample of respondents. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be assess with the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI) and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Risk and protective factors will include: mental disorders, measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) and Screening Scales (CIDI-SC), and the Epi-Q Screening Survey (EPI-Q-SS), socio-demographic variables, self-perceived health status, health behaviors, well-being, substance use disorders, service use and treatment. The UNIVERSAL project is part of the International College Surveys initiative, which is a core project within the World Mental Health consortium. Lifetime and the 12-month prevalence will be calculated for suicide ideation, plans and attempts. Cumulative incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and mental disorders will be measured using the actuarial method. Risk and protective factors of suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models. The study will provide valid, innovative and useful data for developing

  15. NASA's Public Participation Universe: Why and How the U.S. Space Agency Is Democratizing Its Approaches to Innovation

    Kaminski, Amy; Buquo, Lynn; Roman, Monsi; Beck, Beth; Thaller, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes NASA's increasing effort to invite greater public participation in its techno scientific work through open innovation methodologies. First we examine why NASA has expanded its use of these approaches, noting the roles of an intertwined set of forcing functions including budget constraints, the availability of technological resources, and committed individuals. Next we outline the strategies the agency has invoked to engage the public in research, technology development, and other activities to advance and shape NASA's mission. As we show, promoting greater public involvement has entailed facilitating the NASA workforce's familiarity with open innovation approaches as well as developing projects and creating outreach strategies appropriate to the envisioned participant base. We then discuss the wide variety of outcomes NASA's open innovation initiatives have yielded in support of NASA research and development objectives as well as benefits to participants and others. We conclude with a discussion of the remaining barriers to the use of open innovation techniques as a standard practice and the strategies in work to overcome those barriers so the full potential of a democratized approach to innovation can be realized.

  16. A cost-effective method of achieving meaningful citizen participation in public roadway pipeline studies

    Buszynski, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Many proponents of gas pipeline studies using the public roadway for their facilities have trouble encouraging public participation. Problems resulting from a lack of public involvement are documented. A public participation process designed to gather meaningful public input is presented through a case study of a public roadway pipeline study in southern Ontario. Techniques are outlined to effectively stimulate public interest and document the public involvement process. Recommendations are made as to the transferability of this process to other jurisdictions.

  17. Training School Pupils in the Scientific Method: Student Participation in an International VLF Radio Experiment

    Denton, J. J.; Denton, M. H.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Harron, H.; Ulich, T.; Denton, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a school-university collaboration to involve students in the deployment, testing, and operation of a very low frequency (VLF) radio receiver as part of an international network of such experiments. A background to the collaboration is presented, along with a summary of planning and development, and the ultimate deployment of the…

  18. How Learning Designs, Teaching Methods and Activities Differ by Discipline in Australian Universities

    Cameron, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the learning designs, teaching methods and activities most commonly employed within the disciplines in six universities in Australia. The study sought to establish if there were significant differences between the disciplines in learning designs, teaching methods and teaching activities in the current Australian context, as…

  19. A National Assessment of Colleges and University School Health Education Methods Courses

    Fisher, Christine M.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Methods: Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods…

  20. How to Engage Occupational Physicians in Recruitment of Research Participants : A Mixed-Methods Study of Challenges and Opportunities

    Arends, Iris; Bultmann, Ute; Shaw, William S.; van Rhenen, Willem; Roelen, Corne; Nielsen, Karina; van der Klink, Jac J. L.

    Purpose To investigate barriers and facilitators for research participant recruitment by occupational physicians (OPs). Methods A mixed-methods approach was used. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with OPs to explore perceived barriers and facilitators for recruitment. Based on data of a

  1. How to engage occupational physicians in recruitment of research participants : A mixed-methods study of challenges and opportunities

    Arends, I; et al.,; Shaw, W.S.; Bültmann, U.; Rhenen, van W.; Roelen, C.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate barriers and facilitators for research participant recruitment by occupational physicians (OPs). Methods A mixed-methods approach was used. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with OPs to explore perceived barriers and facilitators for recruitment. Based on data of a

  2. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    Lorena M Salto

    Full Text Available An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS and undergraduate (UG student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical

  3. The Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Agriculture (BEEA) Study: Rationale, Design, Methods, and Participant Characteristics.

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Lynch, Charles F; Andreotti, Gabriella; Thomas, Kent W; Sandler, Dale P; Savage, Sharon A; Alavanja, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural exposures including pesticides, endotoxin, and allergens have been associated with risk of various cancers and other chronic diseases, although the biological mechanisms underlying these associations are generally unclear. To facilitate future molecular epidemiologic investigations, in 2010 the study of Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Agriculture (BEEA) was initiated within the Agricultural Health Study, a large prospective cohort in Iowa and North Carolina. Here the design and methodology of BEEA are described and preliminary frequencies for participant characteristics and current agricultural exposures are reported. At least 1,600 male farmers over 50 years of age will be enrolled in the BEEA study. During a home visit, participants are asked to complete a detailed interview about recent agricultural exposures and provide samples of blood, urine, and (since 2013) house dust. As of mid-September 2014, in total, 1,233 participants have enrolled. Most of these participants (83%) were still farming at the time of interview. Among those still farming, the most commonly reported crops were corn (81%) and soybeans (74%), and the most frequently noted animals were beef cattle (35%) and hogs (13%). There were 861 (70%) participants who reported occupational pesticide use in the 12 months prior to interview; among these participants, the most frequently noted herbicides were glyphosate (83%) and 2,4-D (72%), and most commonly reported insecticides were malathion (21%), cyfluthrin (13%), and permethrin (12%). Molecular epidemiologic investigations within BEEA have the potential to yield important new insights into the biological mechanisms through which these or other agricultural exposures influence disease risk.

  4. Students’ Satisfaction with the Group Work Method and its Performance Evaluation: A survey in an Italian University

    Massimo Zedda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group Work Learning Method is a cooperative learning technique that has positive effects in learning: students’ active participation can increase both cognitive and social skills. Our work involved three cohorts of students of different years attending the same course at the University of Torino, Department of Psychology. The contents of the course were the same in all years, students were asked to form self-selected groups to find creative solutions to two cases regarding violent behavior in workplace. Satisfaction concerning this activity and the method to evaluate the performance of the activity were investigated. Findings confirm overall students’ satisfaction related to group work learning method. This satisfaction improves the scores in course and teacher skills satisfaction. About the evaluation, findings shown that students agreed teacher’s and peers’ evaluation of the performance.

  5. The Effectiveness of Fraud Prevention and Detection Methods at Universities in Indonesia

    Zamzami, Faiz; Nusa, Nabella Duta; Timur, Rudi Prasetya

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of corruption have taken place in several universities in Indonesia. To prevent and handle the cases, internal auditors play pivotal roles in detecting and preventing fraud. Therefore, effective methods to detect and prevent fraud are needed. The methods are expected to set the appropriate measures to detect and prevent fraud effectively. This research proposed a question how the internal auditors perceive the effectiveness of fraud detection and prevention methods. The research ai...

  6. Leveraging social and digital media for participant recruitment: A review of methods from the Bayley Short Form Formative Study

    Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Mathew, Sunitha

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Social media is increasingly being used in research, including recruitment. Methods For the Bayley Short Form Formative Study, which was conducted under the the National Children’s Study, traditional methods of recruitment proved to be ineffective. Therefore, digital media were identified as potential channels for recruitment. Results Results included successful recruitment of over 1800 infant and toddler participants to the Study. Conclusions This paper outlines the methods, res...

  7. A continuous exchange factor method for radiative exchange in enclosures with participating media

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; Chung, B.T.F.; Litkouhi, B.

    1987-01-01

    A continuous exchange factor method for analysis of radiative exchange in enclosures is developed. In this method two types of exchange functions are defined, direct exchange function and total exchange function. Certain integral equations relating total exchange functions to direct exchange functions are developed. These integral equations are solved using Gaussian quadrature integration method. The results obtained based on the present approach are found to be more accurate than those of the zonal method

  8. Differences in participation based on self-esteem in power and manual wheelchair users on a university campus: a pilot study.

    Rice, Ian M; Wong, Alex W K; Salentine, Benjamin A; Rice, Laura A

    2015-03-01

    To examine the relationship of self-esteem and wheelchair type with participation of young adult manual and power wheelchair users with diverse physical disabilities. Cross-sectional survey study. Large University Campus. A convenience sample of college students (N = 39) with self-reported physical disabilities who are full time wheelchair users (>40 per week) and are two or more years post illness or injury. Not applicable. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used to measure self-esteem, and the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to measure participation. Self-esteem correlated highly with cognitive independence (CI) (r = 0.58), mobility (r = 0.67) and social integration (SI) (r = 0.52). Use of manual wheelchair was significantly related to higher levels of CI and mobility while longer use of any wheelchair (power or manual) was significantly associated with higher levels of mobility and SI. In addition higher self-esteem independently predicted a significant proportion of the variance in CI, mobility and SI, while type of wheelchair predicted a significant proportion of the variance in CI (p self-esteem was found to be the strongest predictor of participation in a population of young adults with mobility limitations. Better understanding of the factors influencing participation may help to facilitate new interventions to minimize the disparities between persons with disabilities and their able bodied peers. Implication for Rehabilitation A total of 46.8% of wheelchair users report the desire for increased community participant but face significant barriers. The type of wheelchair has been identified as having a large impact on participation. This study found self-esteem to be the strongest predictor of participation, which is notable because self-esteem is a characteristic that is potentially modifiable with treatment.

  9. A Comparison of Internet-Based Participant Recruitment Methods: Engaging the Hidden Population of Cannabis Users in Research

    Elizabeth Clare Temple

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a growing number of researchers are embracing Internet-based data collection methods, the adoption of Internet-based recruitment methods has been relatively slow. This may be because little is known regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of Internet-based participant recruitment, nor how these different recruitment strategies impact on the data collected. These issues are addressed in this article with reference to a study comparing the effectiveness of three Internet-based strategies in recruiting cannabis users for an online study. Consideration of the recruitment data leads us to recommend that researchers use multipronged Internet-based recruitment campaigns with appropriately detailed recruitment messages tailored to the population of interest and located carefully to ensure they reach the intended audience. Further, we suggest that building rapport directly with potential participants, or utilising derived rapport and implicit endorsements, is an important aspect of successful Internet-based participant recruitment strategies.

  10. Protein space: a natural method for realizing the nature of protein universe.

    Yu, Chenglong; Deng, Mo; Cheng, Shiu-Yuen; Yau, Shek-Chung; He, Rong L; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2013-02-07

    Current methods cannot tell us what the nature of the protein universe is concretely. They are based on different models of amino acid substitution and multiple sequence alignment which is an NP-hard problem and requires manual intervention. Protein structural analysis also gives a direction for mapping the protein universe. Unfortunately, now only a minuscule fraction of proteins' 3-dimensional structures are known. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree representations are not unique for any existing tree construction methods. Here we develop a novel method to realize the nature of protein universe. We show the protein universe can be realized as a protein space in 60-dimensional Euclidean space using a distance based on a normalized distribution of amino acids. Every protein is in one-to-one correspondence with a point in protein space, where proteins with similar properties stay close together. Thus the distance between two points in protein space represents the biological distance of the corresponding two proteins. We also propose a natural graphical representation for inferring phylogenies. The representation is natural and unique based on the biological distances of proteins in protein space. This will solve the fundamental question of how proteins are distributed in the protein universe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recruiting Black Americans in a Large Cohort Study: The Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) Design, Methods and Participant Characteristics

    Herring, R. Patti; Butler, Terry; Hall, Sonja; Montgomery, Susanne B.; Fraser, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of the prospective Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) was to examine the relationship between diet and risk of breast, prostate and colon cancers in Black and White participants. This paper describes the study design, recruitment methods, response rates, and characteristics of Blacks in the AHS-2, thus providing insights about effective strategies to recruit Blacks to participate in research studies. Design We designed a church-based recruitment model and trained local recruiters who used various strategies to recruit participants in their churches. Participants completed a 50-page self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaire. Participants Participants are Black Seventh-day Adventists, aged 30–109 years, and members of 1,209 Black churches throughout the United States and Canada. Results Approximately 48,328 Blacks from an estimated target group of over 90,000 signed up for the study and 25,087 completed the questionnaire, comprising about 26% of the larger 97,000 AHS-2-member cohort. Participants were diverse in age, geographic location, education, and income. Seventy percent were female with a median age of 59 years. Conclusion In spite of many recruitment challenges and barriers, we successfully recruited a large cohort whose data should provide some answers as to why Blacks have poorer health outcomes than several other ethnic groups, and help explain existing health disparities. PMID:21305834

  12. Survey nonresponse among ethnic minorities in a national health survey - a mixed-method study of participation, barriers, and potentials

    Ahlmark, Nanna; Algren, Maria Holst; Holmberg, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    , to alienation generated by the questions' focus on disease and cultural assumptions, or mistrust regarding anonymity. Ethnic minorities seem particularly affected by such barriers. To increase survey participation, questions could be sensitized to reflect multicultural traditions, and the impact of sender......Objectives. The participation rate in the Danish National Health Survey (DNHS) 2010 was significantly lower among ethnic minorities than ethnic Danes. The purpose was to characterize nonresponse among ethnic minorities in DNHS, analyze variations in item nonresponse, and investigate barriers...... and incentives to participation. Design. This was a mixed-method study. Logistic regression was used to analyze nonresponse using data from DNHS (N = 177,639 and chi-square tests in item nonresponse analyses. We explored barriers and incentives regarding participation through focus groups and cognitive...

  13. Requirements for Participative Management as a Source of Sustainable Competitive Advantage and Tipical Management Method

    Muscalu Emanoil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic context in the recent years has undergone major changes in modern methods and techniques used in management. The current competitive environment is characterized by permanent turbulences influencing firstly the managerial act itself. Out of the many methods and techniques applied so far, some turn out to be less adaptable to the current economic and social context.

  14. Allocation of Transaction Cost to Market Participants Using an Analytical Method in Deregulated Market

    Jeyasankari, S.; Jeslin Drusila Nesamalar, J.; Charles Raja, S.; Venkatesh, P.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission cost allocation is one of the major challenges in transmission open access faced by the electric power sector. The purpose of this work is to provide an analytical method for allocating transmission transaction cost in deregulated market. This research work provides a usage based transaction cost allocation method based on line-flow impact factor (LIF) which relates the power flow in each line with respect to transacted power for the given transaction. This method provides the impact of line flows without running iterative power flow solution and is well suited for real time applications. The proposed method is compared with the Newton-Raphson (NR) method of cost allocation on sample six bus and practical Indian utility 69 bus systems by considering multilateral transaction.

  15. Users in the Driver's Seat: A New Approach to Classifying Teaching Methods in a University Repository

    Neumann, Susanne; Oberhuemer, Petra; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Neumann, S., Oberhuemer, P., & Koper, R. (2009). Users in the Driver's Seat: A New Approach to Classifying Teaching Methods in a University Repository. In U. Cress, V. Dimitrova & M. Specht (Eds.), Learning in the Synergy of Multiple Disciplines. Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on

  16. Collection evaluation in University libraries (II. Methods based on collection use

    Àngels Massísimo i Sánchez de Boado

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This is our second paper devoted to the collection evaluation in the university libraries. Seven methods are described, based on collection use. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as their usefulness for a range of library types

  17. A Multi-Objective Method to Align Human Resource Allocation with University Strategy

    Bouillard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Universities are currently under considerable pressure to reach their stakeholders' expectations. Management tools that use strategic plans, key performance indicators and quality assurance methods are increasingly deployed. This paper aims to demonstrate how resource allocation can be aligned with institutional strategic plans with a very simple…

  18. Nuclear analytical methods in teaching and research at the university of Illinois

    Landsberger, S.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the nuclear analytical methods opportunities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are given. Undergraduate and graduate level teaching and research are highlighted. The TRIGA reactor and neutron activation analysis facilities are described in the context of this role within an inter-disciplinary environment. (author)

  19. The black-body radiation inversion problem, its instability and a new universal function set method

    Ye, JiPing; Ji, FengMin; Wen, Tao; Dai, Xian-Xi; Dai, Ji-Xin; Evenson, William E.

    2006-01-01

    The black-body radiation inversion (BRI) problem is ill-posed and requires special techniques to achieve stable solutions. In this Letter, the universal function set method (UFS), is developed in BRI. An improved unique existence theorem is proposed. Asymptotic behavior control (ABC) is introduced. A numerical example shows that practical calculations are possible with UFS

  20. Understanding University Students' Thoughts and Practices about Digital Citizenship: A Mixed Methods Study

    Kara, Nuri

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate university students' thoughts and practices concerning digital citizenship. An explanatory mixed methods design was used, and it involved collecting qualitative data after a quantitative phase in order to follow up on the quantitative data in more depth. In the first quantitative phase of the study, a…

  1. Developing digital technologies for university mathematics by applying participatory design methods

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our research efforts to develop digital technologies for undergraduate university mathematics. We employ participatory design methods in order to involve teachers and students in the design of such technologies. The results of the first round of our design are included...

  2. An Introduction of Finite Element Method in the Engineering Teaching at the University of Camaguey.

    Napoles, Elsa; Blanco, Ramon; Jimenez, Rafael; Mc.Pherson, Yoanka

    This paper illuminates experiences related to introducing finite element methods (FEM) in mechanical and civil engineering courses at the University of Camaguey in Cuba and provides discussion on using FEM in postgraduate courses for industry engineers. Background information on the introduction of FEM in engineering teaching is focused on…

  3. THE USEFULNESS OF USER TESTING METHODS IN IDENTIFYING PROBLEMS ON UNIVERSITY WEBSITES

    Layla Hasan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the usefulness of three user testing methods (observation, and using both quantitative and qualitative data from a post-test questionnaire in terms of their ability or inability to find specific usability problems on university websites. The results showed that observation was the best method, compared to the other two, in identifying large numbers of major and minor usability problems on university websites. The results also showed that employing qualitative data from a post-test questionnaire was a useful complementary method since this identified additional usability problems that were not identified by the observation method. However, the results showed that the quantitative data from the post-test questionnaire were inaccurate and ineffective in terms of identifying usability problems on such websites.

  4. The Forecasting of Labour Force Participation and the Unemployment Rate in Poland and Turkey Using Fuzzy Time Series Methods

    Yolcu Ufuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy time series methods based on the fuzzy set theory proposed by Zadeh (1965 was first introduced by Song and Chissom (1993. Since fuzzy time series methods do not have the assumptions that traditional time series do and have effective forecasting performance, the interest on fuzzy time series approaches is increasing rapidly. Fuzzy time series methods have been used in almost all areas, such as environmental science, economy and finance. The concepts of labour force participation and unemployment have great importance in terms of both the economy and sociology of countries. For this reason there are many studies on their forecasting. In this study, we aim to forecast the labour force participation and unemployment rate in Poland and Turkey using different fuzzy time series methods.

  5. Leveraging social and digital media for participant recruitment: A review of methods from the Bayley Short Form Formative Study.

    Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Mathew, Sunitha

    2017-06-01

    Social media is increasingly being used in research, including recruitment. For the Bayley Short Form Formative Study, which was conducted under the the National Children's Study, traditional methods of recruitment proved to be ineffective. Therefore, digital media were identified as potential channels for recruitment. Results included successful recruitment of over 1800 infant and toddler participants to the Study. This paper outlines the methods, results, and future research opportunities.

  6. A Method for Recruiting Participants from Isolated Islands of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) for Survey Research

    Moosa, Sheena; Koopman-Boyden, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Representing isolated small island communities through social survey research continues to be challenging. We examine a locally developed method to reach and recruit older people (65+ years) for a survey on well-being in the small island developing state of Maldives. The use of messengers to recruit participants is examined in the context of these…

  7. Universal DNA-based methods for assessing the diet of grazing livestock and wildlife from feces.

    Pegard, Anthony; Miquel, Christian; Valentini, Alice; Coissac, Eric; Bouvier, Frédéric; François, Dominique; Taberlet, Pierre; Engel, Erwan; Pompanon, François

    2009-07-08

    Because of the demand for controlling livestock diets, two methods that characterize the DNA of plants present in feces were developed. After DNA extraction from fecal samples, a short fragment of the chloroplastic trnL intron was amplified by PCR using a universal primer pair for plants. The first method generates a signature that is the electrophoretic migration pattern of the PCR product. The second method consists of sequencing several hundred DNA fragments from the PCR product through pyrosequencing. These methods were validated with a blind analysis of feces from concentrate- and pasture-fed lambs. The signature method allowed differentiation of the two diets and confirmed the presence of concentrate in one of them. The pyrosequencing method allowed the identification of up to 25 taxa in a diet. These methods are complementary to the chemical methods already used. They could be applied to the control of diets and the study of food preferences.

  8. Reasons for non-participation in a parental program concerning underage drinking: a mixed-method study

    Eriksson Charli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol consumption among adolescents is a serious public health concern. Research has shown that prevention programs targeting parents can help prevent underage drinking. The problem is that parental participation in these kinds of interventions is generally low. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine non-participation in a parental support program aiming to prevent underage alcohol drinking. The Health Belief Model has been used as a tool for the analysis. Methods To understand non-participation in a parental program a quasi-experimental mixed-method design was used. The participants in the study were invited to participate in a parental program targeting parents with children in school years 7-9. A questionnaire was sent home to the parents before the program started. Two follow-up surveys were also carried out. The inclusion criteria for the study were that the parents had answered the questionnaire in school year 7 and either of the questionnaires in the two subsequent school years (n = 455. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine reasons for non-participation. The final follow-up questionnaire included an opened-ended question about reasons for non-participation. A qualitative content analysis was carried out and the two largest categories were included in the third model of the multinomial logistic regression analysis. Results Educational level was the most important socio-demographic factor for predicting non-participation. Parents with a lower level of education were less likely to participate than those who were more educated. Factors associated with adolescents and alcohol did not seem to be of significant importance. Instead, program-related factors predicted non-participation, e.g. parents who did not perceive any need for the intervention and who did not attend the information meeting were more likely to be non-participants. Practical issues, like time demands, also seemed to

  9. Depressão e envelhecimento: estudo nos participantes do Programa Universidade Aberta à Terceira Idade Depression and aging: study comprising participants of the "Senior Citizens Open University"

    Valéria Moura Moreira Leite

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: identificar a presença de depressão em idosos que freqüentaram o Programa Universidade Aberta à Terceira Idade, da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, considerando variáveis demográficas e socioeconômicas. MÉTODOS: estudo epidemiológico, descritivo e de corte transversal. Foi realizado um censo com os 358 idosos sendo 312 mulheres e 46 homens (>60 anos, utilizando o questionário "Brasil Old Age Schedule" (BOAS, do qual foi selecionada a seção de saúde mental, quanto à depressão, verificando a freqüência das variáveis solidão, tristeza, pouca disposição, pessimismo em relação ao futuro, irritação, auto-acusação, idéias suicidas, dor de cabeça, insatisfação, distúrbios do sono e do apetite. RESULTADOS: foi encontrado um percentual importante de depressão (24,02% na população estudada, cuja maioria está classificada em depressão menor, entre a faixa etária de 70-79 anos, do sexo feminino e separados. Foi observada associação significante entre baixa escolaridade e depressão. Os casos de depressão apresentam relevante relação com as variáveis preocupação, dor de cabeça, pouca disposição, irritação, tristeza e insatisfação. CONCLUSÕES: a presença de depressão na população estudada aponta para a importância do planejamento, por parte do Programa, de ações direcionadas à saúde de seus participantes, em particular, os transtornos mentais relativos à depressão.OBJECTIVES: to identify depression in the elderly enrolled at the Senior Citizens Open University, a program of the Federal University of Pernambuco, considering demographic, social and economic variables. METHODS: epidemiological, descriptive, cross sectional cohort study. A census comprising 358 elderly subjects being 312 women and 46 men (>60 yr through the Brasil Old Age Schedule (BOAS was completed from which the section related to mental health was selected focusing on depression variables such as loneliness, sadness

  10. Recruiting black Americans in a large cohort study: the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) design, methods and participant characteristics.

    Herring, R Patti; Butler, Terry; Hall, Sonja; Montgomery, Susanne B; Fraser, Gary E

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the prospective Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) was to examine the relationship between diet and risk of breast, prostate and colon cancers in Black and White participants. This paper describes the study design, recruitment methods, response rates, and characteristics of Blacks in the AHS-2, thus providing insights about effective strategies to recruit Blacks to participate in research studies. We designed a church-based recruitment model and trained local recruiters who used various strategies to recruit participants in their churches. Participants completed a 50-page self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaire. Participants are Black Seventh-day Adventists, aged 30-109 years, and members of 1,209 Black churches throughout the United States and Canada. Approximately 48,328 Blacks from an estimated target group of over 90,000 signed up for the study and 25,087 completed the questionnaire, comprising about 26% of the larger 97,000 AHS-2-member cohort. Participants were diverse in age, geographic location, education, and income. Seventy percent were female with a median age of 59 years. In spite of many recruitment challenges and barriers, we successfully recruited a large cohort whose data should provide some answers as to why Blacks have poorer health outcomes than several other ethnic groups, and help explain existing health disparities.

  11. The facilitators and barriers to nurses' participation in continuing education programs: a mixed method explanatory sequential study.

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2014-11-30

    Since several factors affect nurses' participation in Continuing Education, and that nurses' Continuing Education affects patients' and community health status, it is essential to know facilitators and barriers of participation in Continuing Education programs and plan accordingly. This mixed approach study aimed to investigate the facilitators and barriers of nurses' participation, to explore nurses' perception of the most common facilitators and barriers. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design with follow up explanations variant were used, and it involved collecting quantitative data (361 nurses) first and then explaining the quantitative results with in-depth interviews during a qualitative study. The results showed that the mean score of facilitators to nurses' participation in Continuing Education was significantly higher than the mean score of barriers (61.99 ± 10.85 versus 51.17 ± 12.83; pEducation was related to "Update my knowledge". By reviewing the handwritings in qualitative phase, two main levels of updating information and professional skills were extracted as the most common facilitators and lack of support as the most common barrier to nurses' participation in continuing education program. According to important role Continuing Education on professional skills, nurse managers should facilitate the nurse' participation in the Continues Education.

  12. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    Bavykin, Sergei [Darien, IL

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  13. Farmers' participation in knowledge circulation and the promotion of agroecological methods in South India

    Arora, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of widespread agrarian distress in rural India, finding ways to secure livelihood sustainability of small farmers have become urgent concerns. Agroecological methods (AEMs) are considered by some to be effective in solving structural problems with farmers' production processes

  14. Optimizing primary care research participation: a comparison of three recruitment methods in data-sharing studies.

    Lord, Paul A; Willis, Thomas A; Carder, Paul; West, Robert M; Foy, Robbie

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of representative samples in primary care research is essential to ensure high-quality, generalizable results. This is particularly important for research using routinely recorded patient data to examine the delivery of care. Yet little is known about how different recruitment strategies influence the characteristics of the practices included in research. We describe three approaches for recruiting practices to data-sharing studies, examining differences in recruitment levels and practice representativeness. We examined three studies that included varying populations of practices from West Yorkshire, UK. All used anonymized patient data to explore aspects of clinical practice. Recruitment strategies were 'opt-in', 'mixed opt-in and opt-out' and 'opt-out'. We compared aggregated practice data between recruited and not-recruited practices for practice list size, deprivation, chronic disease management, patient experience and rates of unplanned hospital admission. The opt-out strategy had the highest recruitment (80%), followed by mixed (70%) and opt-in (58%). Practices opting-in were larger (median 7153 versus 4722 patients, P = 0.03) than practices that declined to opt-in. Practices recruited by mixed approach were larger (median 7091 versus 5857 patients, P = 0.04) and had differences in the clinical quality measure (58.4% versus 53.9% of diabetic patients with HbA1c ≤ 59 mmol/mol, P Researchers should, with appropriate ethical safeguards, consider opt-out recruitment of practices for studies involving anonymized patient data sharing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. EVALUATION OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BY RATIO ANALYSIS METHOD

    Ferda BÜLÜÇ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the financial performances of public university hospitals in Turkey; make contribution to the related literature in accordance with the findings and develop recommendations for the decision makers. Within the scope of the study, financial statements of revolving fund of the 43 public university hospitals for the years of 2013, 2014 and 2015 were obtained from the Ministry of Finance General Directorate of Public Accounts. Financial statements were evaluated by ratio analysis method. After analysing, it has been reached that the burden of debt of the hospitals were high,  they have been experiencing the problem of paying short term debts, stock turnover rates and turnover rates were low and the incomes of the hospitals can not cover their expenses. It is recomended that hospitals should use resources more efficiently and decision makers should consider education and research activities in budget allocation to university hospitals.

  16. Sexual and Gender Minority Adolescents' Views On HIV Research Participation and Parental Permission: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Mustanski, Brian; Coventry, Ryan; Macapagal, Kathryn; Arbeit, Miriam R; Fisher, Celia B

    2017-06-01

    Sexual and gender minority adolescents are underrepresented in HIV research, partly because institutional review boards (IRBs) are reluctant to waive parental permission requirements for these studies. Understanding teenagers' perspectives on parental permission and the risks and benefits of participating in HIV research is critical to informing evidence-based IRB decisions. Data from 74 sexual and gender minority adolescents aged 14-17 who participated in an online focus group in 2015 were used to examine perspectives on the risks and benefits of participation in a hypothetical HIV surveillance study and the need for parental permission and adequate protections. Data were analyzed thematically; mixed methods analyses examined whether concerns about parental permission differed by whether teenagers were out to their parents. Most adolescents, especially those who were not out to their parents, would be unwilling to participate in an HIV study if parental permission were required. Perceived benefits of participation included overcoming barriers to HIV testing and contributing to the health of sexual and gender minority youth. Few risks of participation were identified. Adolescents suggested steps that researchers could take to facilitate informed decision making about research participation and ensure minors' safety in the absence of parental permission; these included incorporating multimedia presentations into the consent process and explaining researchers' motivations for conducting the study. Respondents believed that the benefits of HIV surveillance research outweighed the risks. Requiring parental permission may exclude many sexual and gender minority teenagers from taking part in HIV research, especially if they are not out. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  17. Participant Assisted Data Collection Methods in the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-13

    Mullen, Nasim A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Jina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    From November 2011 to March 2013, air quality was measured over 6-day periods in 324 residences across California using a mail-out strategy. All interactions with study participants, from recruitment, to data collection, to communication of results, were conducted with remote communication methods including conventional mail, electronic mail, telephone and text messaging. Potential participants were reached primarily by sharing study information with community groups and organizations that directed interested individuals to complete an online screening survey. Pollutant concentrations were measured with sampling equipment that was mailed to participants' homes with deployment instructions. Residence and household characteristics and activity data were collected via two phone surveys and an activity log. A comparison of responses to survey questions completed online versus over the phone indicated that a substantial fraction of participants (roughly 20%) required a researcher's assistance to respond to basic questions about appliance characteristics. Using the printed instructions and telephone assistance from researchers, roughly 90% of participants successfully deployed and returned sampling materials accurately and on schedule. The mail-out strategy employed in this study was found to be a cost-effective means for collecting residential air quality data.

  18. How to engage occupational physicians in recruitment of research participants: a mixed-methods study of challenges and opportunities.

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; Shaw, William S; van Rhenen, Willem; Roelen, Corné; Nielsen, Karina; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2014-03-01

    To investigate barriers and facilitators for research participant recruitment by occupational physicians (OPs). A mixed-methods approach was used. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with OPs to explore perceived barriers and facilitators for recruitment. Based on data of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (cluster-RCT), univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate associations between OPs' personal and work characteristics and the number of recruited participants for the cluster-RCT per OP. Perceived barriers and facilitators for recruitment were categorised into: study characteristics (e.g. concise inclusion criteria); study population characteristics; OP's attention; OP's workload; context (e.g. working at different locations); and OP's characteristics (e.g. motivated to help). Important facilitators were encouragement by colleagues and reminders by information technology tools. Multivariate analyses showed that the number of OPs within the clinical unit who recruited participants was positively associated with the number of recruited participants per OP [rate ratio of 1.43, 95 % confidence interval 1.24-1.64]. When mobilising OPs for participant recruitment, researchers need to engage entire clinical units rather than approach OPs on an individual basis. OPs consider regular communication, especially face-to-face contact and information technology tools serving as reminders, as helpful.

  19. Community sensitization and decision-making for trial participation: a mixed-methods study from The Gambia.

    Dierickx, Susan; O'Neill, Sarah; Gryseels, Charlotte; Immaculate Anyango, Edna; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Okebe, Joseph; Mwesigwa, Julia; Jaiteh, Fatou; Gerrets, René; Ravinetto, Raffaella; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Peeters Grietens, Koen

    2017-08-16

    Ensuring individual free and informed decision-making for research participation is challenging. It is thought that preliminarily informing communities through 'community sensitization' procedures may improve individual decision-making. This study set out to assess the relevance of community sensitization for individual decision-making in research participation in rural Gambia. This anthropological mixed-methods study triangulated qualitative methods and quantitative survey methods in the context of an observational study and a clinical trial on malaria carried out by the Medical Research Council Unit Gambia. Although 38.7% of the respondents were present during sensitization sessions, 91.1% of the respondents were inclined to participate in the trial when surveyed after the sensitization and prior to the informed consent process. This difference can be explained by the informal transmission of information within the community after the community sensitization, expectations such as the benefits of participation based on previous research experiences, and the positive reputation of the research institute. Commonly mentioned barriers to participation were blood sampling and the potential disapproval of the household head. Community sensitization is effective in providing first-hand, reliable information to communities as the information is cascaded to those who could not attend the sessions. However, further research is needed to assess how the informal spread of information further shapes people's expectations, how the process engages with existing social relations and hierarchies (e.g. local political power structures; permissions of heads of households) and how this influences or changes individual consent. © 2017 The Authors Developing World Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas.

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    This article provides an example of the application of social network analysis method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people's behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The article draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way in which social network analysis can be used as a tool to display participation and nonparticipation in community development and health promotion activities, to help identify capacities and assets, mobilize resources, and finally to evaluate the achievements. The article concludes that identification of interpersonal ties among people who know one another well as well as more tenuous relationships in networks can be used by community development workers to foster greater cohesion and cooperation within an area.

  1. Exchange factor method: an alternative zonal formulation for analysis of radiating enclosures containing participating media

    Larsen, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The exchange factor method (EFM) is introduced and compared to the zone method (ZM). In both the EFM and ZM the region of interest is discretized into volume and surface elements, each considered to be isothermal, which are small enough to give the required resolution. A suitable set of state variables for the system is composed of the surface element radiosities and the gas element emissive powers. The EFM defines exchange factors as dimensionless total-exchange areas for radiant interchange between volume and surface elements by all possible absorption/re-emission paths, but excluding wall reflections. In the EFM, the exchange factors replace the direct-exchange areas of the ZM and are used to write energy balances for each area and volume element in the system. As in the ZM, the radiant energy balance equations result in a set of algebraic equations linear in the system state variables. The distinguishing feature of the EFM is that exchange factors may be measurable quantities. Relationships between the EFM exchange factors and the ZM direct-exchange areas are presented. EFM conservation and reciprocity laws, analogous to those of the ZM, are also included. Temperature and heat flux distributions, predicted using the EFM, for two- and three-dimensional enclosures containing absorbing/emitting, isotropically scattering, and conducting media are included. An application of the EFM is proposed which calls for the measurement of exchange factors in a scale model of the enclosure to be analyzed. The measurement of these factors in an enclosure containing an isotropically scattering medium is discussed. The effects of isotropic scattering and absorption/re-emission processes are shown to be indistinguishable in their contribution to exchange factor paths

  2. College Graduation Rates for Minority Students in a Selective Technical University: Will Participation in a Summer Bridge Program Contribute to Success?

    Murphy, Terrence E; Gaughan, Monica; Hume, Robert; Moore, S Gordon

    2010-03-01

    There are many approaches to solving the problem of underrepresentation of some racial and ethnic groups and women in scientific and technical disciplines. Here, the authors evaluate the association of a summer bridge program with the graduation rate of underrepresented minority (URM) students at a selective technical university. They demonstrate that this 5-week program prior to the fall of the 1st year contains elements reported as vital for successful student retention. Using multivariable survival analysis, they show that for URM students entering as fall-semester freshmen, relative to their nonparticipating peers, participation in this accelerated summer bridge program is associated with higher likelihood of graduation. The longitudinal panel data include more than 2,200 URM students.

  3. Difficulties experienced in setting and achieving goals by participants of a falls prevention programme: a mixed-methods evaluation.

    Haas, Romi; Mason, Wendy; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of participants of a falls prevention programme to set and achieve goals. The study used a prospective longitudinal design and a mixed-methods approach to data collection. Study participants were (1) 220 older adults participating in a 15-week combined exercise and education falls prevention programme and (2) 9 practitioners (3 home-care nurses, 5 community workers, and an exercise physiologist) involved in delivering the programme. Data from goal-setting forms were analyzed, and descriptive statistics were used to determine the number of appropriate goals set and achieved. Data were analyzed according to programme setting (home- or group-based) and whether or not participants were classified as being from a Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) background in the Australian context. Semi-structured interviews with programme practitioners were thematically analyzed. A total of 144 respondents (n=75 CALD group, n=41 non-CALD group, n=6 CALD home, n=22 non-CALD home) set 178 goals. Only 101 (57%) goals could be evaluated according to achievement, because participants set goals that focused on health state instead of behaviour, set goals not relevant to falls prevention, used inappropriate constructs to measure goal achievement, and either did not review their goals or dropped out of the programme before goal review. Of these 101 goals, 64 were achieved. Practitioners described their own difficulties in understanding the process of setting health behaviour goals along with communication, cultural, and logistic difficulties. Both CALD and non-CALD participants and those participating in both group- and home-based programmes experienced difficulty in setting and achieving goals to facilitate behaviour change for falls prevention. Data suggest that home-based participants had more difficulty in setting goals than their group-based counterparts and, to a lesser extent, that CALD participants experienced more difficulty in setting goals than

  4. Analysis of combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in presence of participating medium by the development of hybrid method

    Mahapatra, S.K.; Dandapat, B.K.; Sarkar, A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study addresses the mathematical modeling aspects of coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer in the presence of absorbing, emitting and isotropic scattering gray medium within two-dimensional square enclosure. A blended method where the concepts of modified differential approximation employed by combining discrete ordinate method and spherical harmonics method, has been developed for modeling the radiative transport equation. The gray participating medium is bounded by isothermal walls of two-dimensional enclosure which are considered to be opaque, diffuse and gray. The effect of various influencing parameters i.e., radiation-conduction parameter, surface emissivity, single scattering albedo and optical thickness has been illustrated. The adaptability of the present method has also been addressed

  5. Identifying Mental Health Elements among Technical University Students Using Fuzzy Delphi Method

    Pua, P. K.; Lai, C. S.; Lee, M. F.

    2017-08-01

    Mental health is a part of our daily life that is often experienced. As a student, mental health issue often encounters a variety of difficult challenges at the higher education institution. A student with good mental health can handle and cope the normal stress of life, capable work productivity, enhance academic performance and able to make contribute to the community. However, rapidly transformation and changing of society have been impacted on students’ mental health, and it will be deteriorated and negatively impact on students if it absence of preventive controlled. This study aimed to identify the element of mental health among the technical university students. A total of 11 experts were selected to analyze the fuzziness consensus of experts. All collected data was analyzed by using the fuzzy Delphi method and the result shows that there are 4 elements of 8 elements that fulfill the requirement consensus of experts, which threshold value is equal and less than 0.2, the percentage of the expert group is more than 75%. The four elements were depression, anxiety, stress, and fear are often experienced by technical university students. In conclusion, precocious actions have to be taken by university and counseling center, parents and non-government organization in order to mitigate the mental health problem faced by students to improve the quality lifestyle students at the university.

  6. Advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media

    Coelho, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Many methods are available for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media. Among these, the discrete ordinates method (DOM) and the finite volume method (FVM) are among the most widely used ones. They provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational requirements, and they are relatively easy to integrate in CFD codes. This paper surveys recent advances on these numerical methods. Developments concerning the grid structure (e.g., new formulations for axisymmetrical geometries, body-fitted structured and unstructured meshes, embedded boundaries, multi-block grids, local grid refinement), the spatial discretization scheme, and the angular discretization scheme are described. Progress related to the solution accuracy, solution algorithm, alternative formulations, such as the modified DOM and FVM, even-parity formulation, discrete-ordinates interpolation method and method of lines, and parallelization strategies is addressed. The application to non-gray media, variable refractive index media, and transient problems is also reviewed. - Highlights: • We survey recent advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods. • Developments in spatial and angular discretization schemes are described. • Progress in solution algorithms and parallelization methods is reviewed. • Advances in the transient solution of the radiative transfer equation are appraised. • Non-gray media and variable refractive index media are briefly addressed

  7. New Methods of Evaluation for Postgraduate Training in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Revered editor evaluation of medical students in specialized medical fields has great importance in determining the necessary competence to learning clinical environments and necessary ability for functioning in the real environment (1. New specialized medical evaluation focuses on ways that confirm the clinical competence assistant that can point to the students’ experience booklet (log book; assay exams; Multiple Choice Question (MCQ; Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE; observation with check list or rating scale; self-assessment and assessment by peers rating scale general; Portfolio; Direct Observation of Procedure Skill (DOPS; Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX; 360-degree comprehensive assessment of Clinical Skills based on Records assistants (CSR; Objective Structural Practical Examination (OSPE (2. This descriptive-analytical study was performed to evaluate the use of modern methods of evaluation among eleven postgraduate departments in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data collection tool was a checklist that was prepared by researchers and was completed by clinical group managers. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 software, Chi-square test and analysis of variance. In total of 11 studied groups, 106 full-time board faculty members, 14 co-education, 221 residents were working. The most modern methods to evaluate in %100 of groups were OSCE and MCQ, DOPS in %80 of groups, and Mini-CEX and CSR in% 27 of groups. Assay exams were used in infectious and pathology groups as the use of other modern methods of evaluation was not observed in all groups. Statistically, the most important reasons for the lack of significant new methods of evaluation were: internal decision of the department (P=0.002, unfamiliarity of team members with modern methods of evaluation (P=0.06, and the adequacy of other methods of evaluation according to the decision of the department (P<0.001. Other cited reasons such as lack of

  8. Integrating medical, assistive, and universal design products and technologies: Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM).

    Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne; Bauer, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    ISO26000 provides guidance on effective organizational performance that recognizes social responsibility (including rights of persons with disabilities (PWD)), engages stakeholders, and contributes to sustainable development [1]. Millennium Development Goals 2010 state: while progress has been made, insufficient dedication to sustainable development, and inequalities to the most vulnerable people require attention [2]. World Report on Disability 2011 recommendations includes improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation that empower PWD [3]. The Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM), Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC) and Matching Person and Technology (MPT) provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve rehabilitation interventions [4-6]. The ATSM and ATDC support universal design (UD) principles and provision of universal technology. The MPT assures interventions are effective and satisfactory to end-users [7]. The ICF conceptual framework and common language are used throughout [8]. Research findings on healthcare needs are translated. ATSM applications in support of these findings are presented. National initiatives demonstrate the need and value of the ATSM as an evidence-based, user-centric, interdisciplinary method to improve individual and organizational performance for rehabilitation [including AT] services. Two Disability & Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology articles demonstrate ATSM and ATDC use to strengthen rehabilitation services and integrate Universal Design principles for socially responsible behavior.

  9. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate

    Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  10. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    Abel B Minyoo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey. Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere.

  11. The self-organizing fractal theory as a universal discovery method: the phenomenon of life

    Kurakin Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A universal discovery method potentially applicable to all disciplines studying organizational phenomena has been developed. This method takes advantage of a new form of global symmetry, namely, scale-invariance of self-organizational dynamics of energy/matter at all levels of organizational hierarchy, from elementary particles through cells and organisms to the Universe as a whole. The method is based on an alternative conceptualization of physical reality postulating that the energy/matter comprising the Universe is far from equilibrium, that it exists as a flow, and that it develops via self-organization in accordance with the empirical laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. It is postulated that the energy/matter flowing through and comprising the Universe evolves as a multiscale, self-similar structure-process, i.e., as a self-organizing fractal. This means that certain organizational structures and processes are scale-invariant and are reproduced at all levels of the organizational hierarchy. Being a form of symmetry, scale-invariance naturally lends itself to a new discovery method that allows for the deduction of missing information by comparing scale-invariant organizational patterns across different levels of the organizational hierarchy. An application of the new discovery method to life sciences reveals that moving electrons represent a keystone physical force (flux that powers, animates, informs, and binds all living structures-processes into a planetary-wide, multiscale system of electron flow/circulation, and that all living organisms and their larger-scale organizations emerge to function as electron transport networks that are supported by and, at the same time, support the flow of electrons down the Earth's redox gradient maintained along the core-mantle-crust-ocean-atmosphere axis of the planet. The presented findings lead to a radically new perspective on the nature and origin of life, suggesting that living matter

  12. The self-organizing fractal theory as a universal discovery method: the phenomenon of life.

    Kurakin, Alexei

    2011-03-29

    A universal discovery method potentially applicable to all disciplines studying organizational phenomena has been developed. This method takes advantage of a new form of global symmetry, namely, scale-invariance of self-organizational dynamics of energy/matter at all levels of organizational hierarchy, from elementary particles through cells and organisms to the Universe as a whole. The method is based on an alternative conceptualization of physical reality postulating that the energy/matter comprising the Universe is far from equilibrium, that it exists as a flow, and that it develops via self-organization in accordance with the empirical laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. It is postulated that the energy/matter flowing through and comprising the Universe evolves as a multiscale, self-similar structure-process, i.e., as a self-organizing fractal. This means that certain organizational structures and processes are scale-invariant and are reproduced at all levels of the organizational hierarchy. Being a form of symmetry, scale-invariance naturally lends itself to a new discovery method that allows for the deduction of missing information by comparing scale-invariant organizational patterns across different levels of the organizational hierarchy.An application of the new discovery method to life sciences reveals that moving electrons represent a keystone physical force (flux) that powers, animates, informs, and binds all living structures-processes into a planetary-wide, multiscale system of electron flow/circulation, and that all living organisms and their larger-scale organizations emerge to function as electron transport networks that are supported by and, at the same time, support the flow of electrons down the Earth's redox gradient maintained along the core-mantle-crust-ocean-atmosphere axis of the planet. The presented findings lead to a radically new perspective on the nature and origin of life, suggesting that living matter is an organizational state

  13. Developing an Assessment Method of Active Aging: University of Jyvaskyla Active Aging Scale.

    Rantanen, Taina; Portegijs, Erja; Kokko, Katja; Rantakokko, Merja; Törmäkangas, Timo; Saajanaho, Milla

    2018-01-01

    To develop an assessment method of active aging for research on older people. A multiphase process that included drafting by an expert panel, a pilot study for item analysis and scale validity, a feedback study with focus groups and questionnaire respondents, and a test-retest study. Altogether 235 people aged 60 to 94 years provided responses and/or feedback. We developed a 17-item University of Jyvaskyla Active Aging Scale with four aspects in each item (goals, ability, opportunity, and activity; range 0-272). The psychometric and item properties are good and the scale assesses a unidimensional latent construct of active aging. Our scale assesses older people's striving for well-being through activities pertaining to their goals, abilities, and opportunities. The University of Jyvaskyla Active Aging Scale provides a quantifiable measure of active aging that may be used in postal questionnaires or interviews in research and practice.

  14. Universal Method for Creating Hierarchical Wrinkles on Thin-Film Surfaces.

    Jung, Woo-Bin; Cho, Kyeong Min; Lee, Won-Kyu; Odom, Teri W; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2018-01-10

    One of the most interesting topics in physical science and materials science is the creation of complex wrinkled structures on thin-film surfaces because of their several advantages of high surface area, localized strain, and stress tolerance. In this study, a significant step was taken toward solving limitations imposed by the fabrication of previous artificial wrinkles. A universal method for preparing hierarchical three-dimensional wrinkle structures of thin films on a multiple scale (e.g., nanometers to micrometers) by sequential wrinkling with different skin layers was developed. Notably, this method was not limited to specific materials, and it was applicable to fabricating hierarchical wrinkles on all of the thin-film surfaces tested thus far, including those of metals, two-dimensional and one-dimensional materials, and polymers. The hierarchical wrinkles with multiscale structures were prepared by sequential wrinkling, in which a sacrificial layer was used as the additional skin layer between sequences. For example, a hierarchical MoS 2 wrinkle exhibited highly enhanced catalytic behavior because of the superaerophobicity and effective surface area, which are related to topological effects. As the developed method can be adopted to a majority of thin films, it is thought to be a universal method for enhancing the physical properties of various materials.

  15. Evaluación de metodologías participativas: una experiencia en el ámbito universitario = Evaluation of participative methodologies: an experience in the university area

    Mª Rocio Rodríguez-Casado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES ha favorecido cambios a nivel metodológico en el ámbito universitario, fomentando el uso de metodologías de carácter participativo que transforman los procesos de enseñanza–aprendizaje en el que se encuentra implicado tanto el profesorado como el alumnado. En este trabajo analizamos la percepción del alumnado acerca de las metodologías participativas en las aulas universitarias, así como su evaluación acerca de las metodologías implementadas en durante el curso 2014/2015 en las Enseñanzas Prácticas y de Desarrollo de la asignatura “Estrategias Educativas para la Animación Sociocultural y el Desarrollo Comunitario” (4º curso del Doble Grado en Educación Social y Trabajo Social de la Universidad Pablo de Olavide, de Sevilla. Entre los resultados obtenidos se destaca la conciencia del alumnado en relación a los beneficios de la aplicación de metodologías participativas en las asignaturas, así como las exigencias de responsabilidad y compromiso que requiere en el alumnado y el profesorado. Asimismo, se resalta una percepción positiva sobre los recursos utilizados en la experiencia desarrollada para fomentar una metodología participativa. Como conclusión, observamos que las evaluaciones de las metodologías docentes se conforman como procesos de retroalimentación que persiguen la mejora de las prácticas docentes y, por ende, el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del alumnado.Abstract: European Higher Education Area has favoured methodological changes at the University level, encouraging the use of participatory methodologies that transformed the processes of teaching - learning in which is involved both teachers and students. In this work, we analyze the perception of the student it brings over of the participative methodologies in the university classrooms, as well as his evaluation brings over of the methodologies implemented during the course 2014/2015 in the

  16. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  17. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method.

    Salimi, Negin; Rezaei, Jafar

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what has been neglected is the other side of the coin-the inputs. The main aim of this study is to incorporate both the inputs and outputs of these projects into a more meaningful measure called efficiency. A ratio of the weighted sum of outputs over the weighted sum of inputs identifies the efficiency of a Ph.D. The weights of the inputs and outputs can be identified using a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method. Data on inputs and outputs are collected from 51 Ph.D. candidates who graduated from Eindhoven University of Technology. The weights are identified using a new MCDM method called Best Worst Method (BWM). Because there may be differences in the opinion of Ph.D. candidates and supervisors on weighing the inputs and outputs, data for BWM are collected from both groups. It is interesting to see that there are differences in the level of efficiency from the two perspectives, because of the weight differences. Moreover, a comparison between the efficiency scores of these projects and their success scores reveals differences that may have significant implications. A sensitivity analysis divulges the most contributing inputs and outputs.

  18. A Case Study of Academic Writing Development Through Principled Versus Standard Clt Method at Binus University

    Almodad Biduk Asmani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research project is to investigate how far the academic writing skills of Binus University students can be developed through two conflicting CLT methods: standard and principled. The research project is expected to result in computer-animated format which can be used as one of the main tools in teaching and learning grammar at Binus University. The research project uses the qualitative approach, and thus uses verbal data. The research project involves two subject groups (experimental and control. The experimental group will receive the treatment of grammar learning by using the Principled CLT approach, while the control group receives the standard CLT approach. Survey is then conducted to the two groups so as to find out their comments on the two teaching methods. From the results of the questionnaires, it is found that Principled CLT method is favored for its knowledge and accuracy factors, while the Standard CLT is preferred for its fun and independence factors.   

  19. Theory of music and method of "Harmony" in J.Cepler's book "Harmony of Universe"

    Smirnov, V. A.

    In the Cepler's book "Harmony of Universe" edited in 1619 the theory of music as a science of that time is presented. Also the investigation of proportion corresponding to musical between orbital parameters of planets is presented. J.Cepler used comparison of musical proportion for investigation movement of celestial bodies. So that Cepler's third law was formulated as following: "Proportion between periods rotation of any two planets is one and a half of proportion average distans of this planets exactly". The Cepler's method of "Harmony" lead to explanation of existence anti-entropyc processes which are widely spreaded in nature. [Johannes Kepler. Weltharmonik. Munchen-Berlin 1939 ].

  20. UV-treatment in dermatology. Equipment and methods in Norwegian university hospitals

    Christensen, T.; Johnsen, B.; Johnsson, M.; Nordal, E.; Thune, P.; Kjeldstad, B.; Reitan, J.B.

    1994-12-01

    The use of phototherapy and the phototherapy-equipment were studied in five Norwegian university hospitals. The indications and the methods used were relatively similar, as well as the equipment used for dosimetry. The spectra and irradiance from the phototherapy lamps were measured and the variations in these parameters were evaluated. It is discussed whether there is a need for closer control and standardization of these parameters. The UVA-irradiance that could be experienced by the persons employed in the departments was found to be lower than the recommended limits. 12 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  1. How Are University Gyms Used by Staff and Students? A Mixed-Method Study Exploring Gym Use, Motivation, and Communication in Three UK Gyms

    Frances Rapport

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined university gym use by staff and students using mixed methods: participant observation and an e-survey. Research in three UK universities entailed 16 observation sessions and an e-survey that reached 3396 students and staff. The research focused on gym use, the gym environment, the presentation of the self, and social interaction within gym spaces. The gyms were found to have a difficult role to play in providing functionality for some, while helping others to be active and minimize feelings of isolation and lack of control. This led to these gyms developing spaces of exercise rather than therapeutic spaces, and divisions in use of space, with some areas rarely used and often highly gendered, resulting in contested meanings produced within Healthy University discourses and physical activities.

  2. The influence of participation in extracurricular activities to the employability of Industrial Engineering graduates of one Private University in the Philippines

    Charlene Joy E. Chua

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Filipinos have been regarding education as the leading avenue of success. Having the system patterned from the American Education structure, education in the country provides basic learning needs and a foundation on which successive learning can be based on. Aside from traditional learning inside the classroom, extracurricular activities (ECAs are also provided for students, which basically have the same goal as that of courses in a curriculum. These activities however, let the students have experiences not included in formal education. Moreover, ECAs are being promoted in some college institutions considering that it benefits students in ways that would prepare them for their future. Certain companies focus on investing on leadership development of their employees to make them globally competitive. This paper focused on determining the degree or extent of influence of ECAs to the employability of the University of Santo Tomas (UST Industrial Engineering graduates of Batches 2013, 2014, and 2015. A survey was administered to 43 sampled graduates. Logistic regression was used in determining the influence of participation in ECAs to the employability of the graduates. Correlational analysis showed that there exists a significant relationship between and among independent variables of number of jobs, number of initial interview, level of participation and soft skills developed through ECAs. Meanwhile, Paired Sample Means Test exhibited that at 95% level of significance, there exists no relationship between the soft skills possessed by the graduates and as expected by the company with which they are employed. Recommendations were provided to enhance the activities offered in UST towards increasing employability rate of graduate students.

  3. Knowledge and attitudes of the third year medical students in a university about sexually transmitted diseases and prevention methods

    Bünyamin Akça

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The passage from childhood to adulthood is the period when health habits and sexual behaviors start to form. Thus, the topics of sexual health and reproductive health should be approached with priority during this period. The objective of the study is to evaluate the knowledge and behavior of students of the medical faculty with respect to sexually transmitted diseases and prevention methods.Methods: The questionnaire that contains 23 headings created by the researchers after relevant literature reviews was administered to the third-semester students of the Izmir Katip Celebi University Medical Faculty in face-to-face interviews after obtaining their verbal consent. The study data was analyzed using the SPSS 20.0 demo software bundle. Conditions in which the p-value was under 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant.Results: The mean age of the students that participated in the study (n=104 was 21.88 ± 1.9 years of age, 51% (n=53 of the students were female, and 49.0% (n=51 were male. Among the students, 93% stated that they had received education about preventing pregnancy. Two of the  most well-known prevention methods by the participants were condoms in 99.0% (n=103 and oral contraceptives in 95.2% (n=99. The rate of correct answers given about all of the risk factors for sexually transmitted diseases (sex workers, polygamy, homosexuality, being sexually active, substance addiction was 22.1% (n=23.Conclusion: Identifying the level of knowledge in the youth about STDs in early periods, determining the services they require, cooperating with related institutions to review the adequacy of information online, and educating youth about STDs are important in preventing these diseases and also in the treatment of existing diseases before they lead to more problems.

  4. Standardization of Tc-99 by two methods and participation at the CCRI(II)-K2. Tc-99 comparison.

    Sahagia, M; Antohe, A; Ioan, R; Luca, A; Ivan, C

    2014-05-01

    The work accomplished within the participation at the 2012 key comparison of Tc-99 is presented. The solution was standardized for the first time in IFIN-HH by two methods: LSC-TDCR and 4π(PC)β-γ efficiency tracer. The methods are described and the results are compared. For the LSC-TDCR method, the program TDCR07c, written and provided by P. Cassette, was used for processing the measurement data. The results are 2.1% higher than when applying the TDCR06b program; the higher value, calculated with the software TDCR07c, was used for reporting the final result in the comparison. The tracer used for the 4π(PC)β-γ efficiency tracer method was a standard (60)Co solution. The sources were prepared from the mixture (60)Co+(99)Tc solution and a general extrapolation curve, type: N(βTc-99)/(M)(Tc-99)=f [1-ε(Co-60)], was drawn. This value was not used for the final result of the comparison. The difference between the values of activity concentration obtained by the two methods was within the limit of the combined standard uncertainty of the difference of these two results. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A national assessment of colleges and university school health education methods courses.

    Fisher, Christine M; Price, James H; Telljohann, Susan K; Dake, Joseph A

    2015-04-01

    Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods instructors at school health preparation programs were surveyed. A total of 138 completed surveys (61%) were returned. The topics taught in school health education methods courses emphasized the most included aligning objectives, instruction, and assessment (79%); development of lesson plans (73%); teaching methods that engage learners (72%); and application of the National Health Education Standards and performance indicators (69%). The content taught and how the instructors assessed their students differed statistically by 1 or more of the following: whether they had a health education degree, had experience teaching in the public schools, and if their program was accredited. This study provides information regarding what school health methods instructors across the United States are teaching in their classes. Using this information as a baseline can serve as a guide for preservice faculty teaching a school health methods course. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  6. Exploring the development of science self-efficacy in preservice elementary school teachers participating in a science education methods course

    Gunning, Amanda M.

    The demands of society's increasing dependence on science and technology call for our students to have a solid foundation in science education, starting in the earliest grades. However, elementary school teachers often lack the necessary experiences to deliver that education. This qualitative study seeks to explore the development of six preservice elementary teachers in a semester-long science methods course. The course consisted of many components; one in particular was a microteaching experience, which emerged as especially significant. The participants' experiences throughout the semester were studied primarily through the lens of self-efficacy, but were also examined considering learning theories and mental models. It was found that two participants in particular were self-directed learners and were able to construct for themselves a self-selected cognitive apprenticeship. Other findings include the significance of a microteaching experience on development of self-efficacy in science teaching and the role mental models may or may not play in development of self-efficacy in the science methods course. This study has implications both for preservice elementary education in science and in general.

  7. [Knowledge of university students in Szeged, Hungary about reliable contraceptive methods and sexually transmitted diseases].

    Devosa, Iván; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Vanya, Melinda; Szili, Károly; Fáyné Dombi, Alice; Barabás, Katalin

    2016-04-03

    Promiscuity and lack of use of reliable contraceptive methods increase the probability of sexually transmitted diseases and the risk of unwanted pregnancies, which are quite common among university students. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge of university students about reliable contraceptive methods and sexually transmitted diseases, and to assess the effectiveness of the sexual health education in secondary schools, with specific focus on the education held by peers. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire survey was carried out in a randomized sample of students at the University of Szeged (n = 472, 298 women and 174 men, average age 21 years) between 2009 and 2011. 62.1% of the respondents declared that reproductive health education lessons in high schools held by peers were reliable and authentic source of information, 12.3% considered as a less reliable source, and 25.6% defined the school health education as irrelevant source. Among those, who considered the health education held by peers as a reliable source, there were significantly more females (69.3% vs. 46.6%, p = 0.001), significantly fewer lived in cities (83.6% vs. 94.8%, p = 0.025), and significantly more responders knew that Candida infection can be transmitted through sexual intercourse (79.5% versus 63.9%, p = 0.02) as compared to those who did not consider health education held by peers as a reliable source. The majority of respondents obtained knowledge about sexual issues from the mass media. Young people who considered health educating programs reliable were significantly better informed about Candida disease.

  8. Methods of Thrust Allocation in a DP Simulation System of Maritime University of Szczecin

    Zalewski Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vessels conducting dynamic positioning (DP operations are usually equipped with thruster configurations that enable generation of resultant force and moment in any direction. These configurations are deliberately redundant in order to reduce the consequences of thruster failures and increase the safety. On such vessels a thrust allocation system must be used to distribute the control actions determined by the DP controller among the thrusters. The optimal allocation of thrusters′ settings in DP systems is a problem that can be solved by several convex optimization methods depending on criteria and constraints used. The paper presents linear programming (LP and quadratic programming (QP methods adopted in DP control model which is being developed in Maritime University of Szczecin for ship simulation purposes.

  9. Universal trench design method for a high-voltage SOI trench LDMOS

    Hu Xiarong; Zhang Bo; Luo Xiaorong; Li Zhaoji

    2012-01-01

    The design method for a high-voltage SOl trench LDMOS for various trench permittivities,widths and depths is introduced.A universal method for efficient design is presented for the first time,taking the trade-off between breakdown voltage (BV) and specific on-resistance (Rs,on) into account.The high-k (relative permittivity)dielectric is suitable to fill a shallow and wide trench while the low-k dielectric is suitable to fill a deep and narrow trench.An SOI LDMOS with a vacuum trench in the drift region is also discussed.Simulation results show that the high FOM BV2/Rs,on can be achieved with a trench filled with the low-k dielectric due to its shortened cell-pitch.

  10. Community participation in mosquito breeding site control: an interdisciplinary mixed methods study in Curaçao.

    Elsinga, Jelte; van der Veen, Henry T; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Dijkstra, Arie; Grobusch, Martin P; Tami, Adriana; Bailey, Ajay

    2017-09-19

    As the arboviral diseases dengue, chikungunya and Zika emerge in the Americas, so does the need for sustainable vector control policies. To successfully achieve mosquito control, joint efforts of both communities and governments are essential. This study investigates this important, but by-and-large neglected topic. In June and July 2015, a cross-sectional mixed methods study applying a survey questionnaire (response rate of 82.5%; n = 339), in-depth interviews (n = 20) and focus group discussions (n = 7; 50 participants) was performed in Curaçao. The study was designed based on an integrated theoretical framework of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Participants showed a good knowledge of, and a high-level performance of mosquito breeding site control (MBSC) practices. Personal protection against mosquitoes (e.g. topical repellents) was perceived as relatively less effective thus practiced to lower extent compared to MBSC practices (i.e. larval source management). A lower intention to perform MBSC was independently associated with: (i) satisfaction on governmental MBSC (P = 0.012); (ii) barriers to perform MBSC practices, i.e. 'Government doesn't control other breeding sites' (P = 0.005), 'Don't know how to control breeding sites' (P = 0.041), and 'a mosquito does not transmit dengue' (P = 0.016), (iii) attitudes towards MBSC (P = 0.001) and self-efficacy (person's perceived ability to act) to perform MBSC (P = 0.002). Mixed-methods evidence highlights three possible ways of improving community participation in MBSC. First, it highlights the need for ongoing media coverage, targeting (i) communities' perceptions on transmission routes of dengue and chikungunya, and (ii) presence of car tires in yards. Secondly, it shows that promotion of governmental activities in MBSC can enhance MBSC of communities, if people develop a sense of responsibility to perform MBSC at their own properties. Thirdly, this study describes

  11. SuBSENSE: a universal change detection method with local adaptive sensitivity.

    St-Charles, Pierre-Luc; Bilodeau, Guillaume-Alexandre; Bergevin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Foreground/background segmentation via change detection in video sequences is often used as a stepping stone in high-level analytics and applications. Despite the wide variety of methods that have been proposed for this problem, none has been able to fully address the complex nature of dynamic scenes in real surveillance tasks. In this paper, we present a universal pixel-level segmentation method that relies on spatiotemporal binary features as well as color information to detect changes. This allows camouflaged foreground objects to be detected more easily while most illumination variations are ignored. Besides, instead of using manually set, frame-wide constants to dictate model sensitivity and adaptation speed, we use pixel-level feedback loops to dynamically adjust our method's internal parameters without user intervention. These adjustments are based on the continuous monitoring of model fidelity and local segmentation noise levels. This new approach enables us to outperform all 32 previously tested state-of-the-art methods on the 2012 and 2014 versions of the ChangeDetection.net dataset in terms of overall F-Measure. The use of local binary image descriptors for pixel-level modeling also facilitates high-speed parallel implementations: our own version, which used no low-level or architecture-specific instruction, reached real-time processing speed on a midlevel desktop CPU. A complete C++ implementation based on OpenCV is available online.

  12. RECONSTRUCTING THE INITIAL DENSITY FIELD OF THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: METHODS AND TESTS WITH MOCK CATALOGS

    Wang Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang Xiaohu; Van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Our research objective in this paper is to reconstruct an initial linear density field, which follows the multivariate Gaussian distribution with variances given by the linear power spectrum of the current cold dark matter model and evolves through gravitational instabilities to the present-day density field in the local universe. For this purpose, we develop a Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to obtain the linear density field from a posterior probability function that consists of two components: a prior of a Gaussian density field with a given linear spectrum and a likelihood term that is given by the current density field. The present-day density field can be reconstructed from galaxy groups using the method developed in Wang et al. Using a realistic mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, obtained by populating dark matter halos in the Millennium simulation (MS) with galaxies, we show that our method can effectively and accurately recover both the amplitudes and phases of the initial, linear density field. To examine the accuracy of our method, we use N-body simulations to evolve these reconstructed initial conditions to the present day. The resimulated density field thus obtained accurately matches the original density field of the MS in the density range 0.3∼ –1 , much smaller than the translinear scale, which corresponds to a wavenumber of ∼0.15 h Mpc –1

  13. Flexner 2.0—Longitudinal Study of Student Participation in a Campus-Wide General Pathology Course for Graduate Students at The University of Arizona

    Margaret M. Briehl PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty members from the Department of Pathology at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson have offered a 4-credit course on enhanced general pathology for graduate students since 1996. The course is titled, “Mechanisms of Human Disease.” Between 1997 and 2016, 270 graduate students completed Mechanisms of Human Disease. The students came from 21 programs of study. Analysis of Variance, using course grade as the dependent and degree, program, gender, and year (1997-2016 as independent variables, indicated that there was no significant difference in final grade (F = 0.112; P = .8856 as a function of degree (doctorate: mean = 89.60, standard deviation = 5.75; master’s: mean = 89.34, standard deviation = 6.00; certificate program: mean = 88.64, standard deviation = 8.25, specific type of degree program (F = 2.066, P = .1316; life sciences: mean = 89.95, standard deviation = 6.40; pharmaceutical sciences: mean = 90.71, standard deviation = 4.57; physical sciences: mean = 87.79, standard deviation = 5.17, or as a function of gender (F = 2.96, P = .0865; males: mean = 88.09, standard deviation = 8.36; females: mean = 89.58, standard deviation = 5.82. Students in the physical and life sciences performed equally well. Mechanisms of Human Disease is a popular course that provides students enrolled in a variety of graduate programs with a medical school-based course on mechanisms of diseases. The addition of 2 new medically oriented Master of Science degree programs has nearly tripled enrollment. This graduate level course also potentially expands the interdisciplinary diversity of participants in our interprofessional education and collaborative practice exercises.

  14. Corrected entropy of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in tunneling method

    Zhu, Tao; Ren, Ji-Rong; Li, Ming-Fan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the thermodynamic quantities of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe by using the tunneling formalism beyond semiclassical approximation developed by Banerjee and Majhi [25]. For this we first calculate the corrected Hawking-like temperature on apparent horizon by considering both scalar particle and fermion tunneling. With this corrected Hawking-like temperature, the explicit expressions of the corrected entropy of apparent horizon for various gravity theories including Einstein gravity, Gauss-Bonnet gravity, Lovelock gravity, f(R) gravity and scalar-tensor gravity, are computed. Our results show that the corrected entropy formula for different gravity theories can be written into a general expression (4.39) of a same form. It is also shown that this expression is also valid for black holes. This might imply that the expression for the corrected entropy derived from tunneling method is independent of gravity theory, spacetime and dimension of the spacetime. Moreover, it is concluded that the basic thermodynamical property that the corrected entropy on apparent horizon is a state function is satisfied by the FRW universe

  15. Fun, influence and competence—a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students’ participation in physical education

    Eirik Abildsnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA, and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1 to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance (“Sports enjoyment” or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons (“Motion enjoyment”, and 2 to explore the students’ experiences with PE programs. Methods In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82% comprising 141 (78% girls and 40 (22% boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%, Design, Arts and Crafts (27% or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49% were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Results Students attending “Motion enjoyment” accrued less steps/day compared to the “Sports enjoyment” group (6661 (5514, 7808 vs.9167 (7945, 10390 steps/day and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5 vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9 hours/day. Compared to those attending “Sports enjoyment”, a higher number of students attending “Motion enjoyment” reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.28, 12.78, and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95. The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the

  16. Islam’s Universality and the Risale-i Nur’s Method of Interpreting the Qur’an’s Universality

    Resid Haylamaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Religion came together with the first man as a way of life, making it impossible to separate them. For to do so is opposed to the innate nature of things and gives rise to numerous complications for both the individual and society. As is shown by the purpose of the universe’s creation looking to man and everything being centered on him, and the things told him by the book of the universe being supported by the scriptures, which are all essentially the same differing only in secondary matters, and instructors being sent to expound both ‘books’ and to hasten to man’s assistance - as is shown by these, in consequence of God’s mercy, every age He has called men to a religion-centered way of life, and He continues to do so. It is clear that Islam tried to throw light on in a general sort of way, is a universal message addressing all peoples and all ages. The subjects and general principles it comprises are sufficiently extensive to demonstrate this aspect of it. For it is universal not only in its primary source, the Qur’an, but also in Hadiths, which are based on revelation, and in the general principles derived from these two sources. The Risale-i Nur, one of the most important interpretations of Islam in modern times, lays considerable emphasis on Islam’s universality, stressing particularly that contrarily to what is supposed. Just as the universe is sufficiently comprehensive to satisfy everyone, so the universal message possesses the same breadth and vitality and may address all minds and satisfy them; contrarily to other speech, it neglects nothing. Thus, this paper tried to describe the Risale-I Nur’s Method of Interpreting the Qur’an on Islamic Universality.

  17. A Universal Method for Fishing Target Proteins from Mixtures of Biomolecules using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    Zhou, X.; Sun, Q; Kini, R; Sivaraman, J

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging tasks in biology include the identification of (1) the orphan receptor for a ligand, (2) the ligand for an orphan receptor protein, and (3) the target protein(s) for a given drug or a lead compound that are critical for the pharmacological or side effects. At present, several approaches are available, including cell- or animal-based assays, affinity labeling, solid-phase binding assays, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most of these techniques are not easy to apply when the target protein is unknown and the compound is not amenable to labeling, chemical modification, or immobilization. Here we demonstrate a new universal method for fishing orphan target proteins from a complex mixture of biomolecules using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tracking tool. We took snake venom, a crude mixture of several hundred proteins/peptides, as a model to demonstrate our proposed ITC method in tracking the isolation and purification of two distinct target proteins, a major component and a minor component. Identities of fished out target proteins were confirmed by amino acid sequencing and inhibition assays. This method has the potential to make a significant advancement in the area of identifying orphan target proteins and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and characterization.

  18. Desalination Processes Evaluation at Common Platform: A Universal Performance Ratio (UPR) Method

    Wakil Shahzad, Muhammad

    2018-01-31

    The inevitable escalation in economic development have serious implications on energy and environment nexus. The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) predicted that the Non Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD) countries will lead with 71% rise in energy demand in contrast with only 18% in developed countries from 2012-2040. In Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, about 40% of primary energy is consumed for cogeneration based power and desalination plants. The cogeneration based plants are struggling with unfair primary fuel cost apportionment to electricity and desalination. Also, the desalination processes performance evaluated based on derived energy, providing misleading selection of processes. There is a need of (i) appropriate primary fuel cost appointment method for multi-purposed plants and (ii) desalination processes performance evaluation method based on primary energy. As a solution, we proposed exergetic analysis for primary fuel percentage apportionment to all components in the cycle according to the quality of working fluid utilized. The proposed method showed that the gas turbine was under charged by 40%, steam turbine was overcharged by 71% and desalination was overcharged by 350% by conventional energetic apportionment methods. We also proposed a new and most suitable desalination processes performance evaluation method based on primary energy, called universal performance ratio (UPR). Since UPR is based on primary energy, it can be used to evaluate any kind of desalination processes, thermally driven, pressure driven & humidification-dehumidification etc. on common platform. We showed that all desalination processes are operating only at 10-13% of thermodynamic limit (TL) of UPR. For future sustainability, desalination must achieve 25-30% of TL and it is only possible either by hybridization of different processes or by innovative membrane materials.

  19. Intergenerational continuity and discontinuity in Mexican-origin youths' participation in organized activities: insights from mixed-methods.

    Simpkins, Sandra D; Vest, Andrea E; Price, Chara D

    2011-12-01

    Motivation theories suggest that parents are an integral support for adolescents' participation in organized activities. Despite the importance of parents, the field knows very little about how parents' own experiences in activities influence the participation of their adolescent children. The goals of this study were to examine (a) the patterns of intergenerational continuity and discontinuity in parents' activity participation during adolescence and their adolescents' activity participation, and (b) the processes underlying each of these patterns within Mexican-origin families. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through three in-depth interviews conducted with 31 seventh-grade adolescents and their parents at three time points over a year. The quantitative data suggested there was modest intergenerational continuity in activity participation. There were three distinct patterns: nine families were continuous participants, seven families were continuous nonparticipants, and 15 families were discontinuous, where the parent did not participate but the youth did participate in activities. The continuous participant families included families in which parents valued how organized activities contributed to their own lives and actively encouraged their adolescents' participation. The continuous nonparticipant families reported less knowledge and experience with activities along with numerous barriers to participation. There were three central reasons for the change in the discontinuous families. For a third of these families, parents felt strongly about providing a different childhood for their adolescents than what they experienced. The intergenerational discontinuity in participation was also likely to be sparked by someone else in the family or an external influence (i.e., friends, schools).

  20. Focal Plant Observations as a Standardised Method for Pollinator Monitoring: Opportunities and Limitations for Mass Participation Citizen Science.

    Helen E Roy

    Full Text Available Recently there has been increasing focus on monitoring pollinating insects, due to concerns about their declines, and interest in the role of volunteers in monitoring pollinators, particularly bumblebees, via citizen science.The Big Bumblebee Discovery was a one-year citizen science project run by a partnership of EDF Energy, the British Science Association and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology which sought to assess the influence of the landscape at multiple scales on the diversity and abundance of bumblebees. Timed counts of bumblebees (Bombus spp.; identified to six colour groups visiting focal plants of lavender (Lavendula spp. were carried out by about 13 000 primary school children (7-11 years old from over 4000 schools across the UK. 3948 reports were received totalling 26 868 bumblebees. We found that while the wider landscape type had no significant effect on reported bumblebee abundance, the local proximity to flowers had a significant effect (fewer bumblebees where other flowers were reported to be >5m away from the focal plant. However, the rate of mis-identifcation, revealed by photographs uploaded by participants and a photo-based quiz, was high.Our citizen science results support recent research on the importance of local flocal resources on pollinator abundance. Timed counts of insects visiting a lure plant is potentially an effective approach for standardised pollinator monitoring, engaging a large number of participants with a simple protocol. However, the relatively high rate of mis-identifications (compared to reports from previous pollinator citizen science projects highlights the importance of investing in resources to train volunteers. Also, to be a scientifically valid method for enquiry, citizen science data needs to be sufficiently high quality, so receiving supporting evidence (such as photographs would allow this to be tested and for records to be verified.

  1. Fun, influence and competence-a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students' participation in physical education.

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Rohde, Gudrun; Berntsen, Sveinung; Stea, Tonje H

    2017-03-10

    Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA), and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE) than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance ("Sports enjoyment") or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons ("Motion enjoyment"), and 2) to explore the students' experiences with PE programs. In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82%) comprising 141 (78%) girls and 40 (22%) boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%), Design, Arts and Crafts (27%) or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49%) were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys) were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Students attending "Motion enjoyment" accrued less steps/day compared to the "Sports enjoyment" group (6661 (5514, 7808) vs.9167 (7945, 10390) steps/day) and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5) vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9) hours/day). Compared to those attending "Sports enjoyment", a higher number of students attending "Motion enjoyment" reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.28, 12.78), and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95)). The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the importance of having competent and engaging teachers

  2. iPBS: a universal method for DNA fingerprinting and retrotransposon isolation.

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Antonius, Kristiina; Smýkal, Petr; Schulman, Alan H

    2010-11-01

    Molecular markers are essential in plant and animal breeding and biodiversity applications, in human forensics, and for map-based cloning of genes. The long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are well suited as molecular markers. As dispersed and ubiquitous transposable elements, their "copy and paste" life cycle of replicative transposition leads to new genome insertions without excision of the original element. Both the overall structure of retrotransposons and the domains responsible for the various phases of their replication are highly conserved in all eukaryotes. Nevertheless, up to a year has been required to develop a retrotransposon marker system in a new species, involving cloning and sequencing steps as well as the development of custom primers. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method useful both as a marker system in its own right and for the rapid isolation of retrotransposon termini and full-length elements, making it ideal for "orphan crops" and other species with underdeveloped marker systems. The method, iPBS amplification, is based on the virtually universal presence of a tRNA complement as a reverse transcriptase primer binding site (PBS) in LTR retrotransposons. The method differs from earlier retrotransposon isolation methods because it is applicable not only to endogenous retroviruses and retroviruses, but also to both Gypsy and Copia LTR retrotransposons, as well as to non-autonomous LARD and TRIM elements, throughout the plant kingdom and to animals. Furthermore, the inter-PBS amplification technique as such has proved to be a powerful DNA fingerprinting technology without the need for prior sequence knowledge.

  3. Reconstructing the Initial Density Field of the Local Universe: Methods and Tests with Mock Catalogs

    Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang, Xiaohu; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2013-07-01

    Our research objective in this paper is to reconstruct an initial linear density field, which follows the multivariate Gaussian distribution with variances given by the linear power spectrum of the current cold dark matter model and evolves through gravitational instabilities to the present-day density field in the local universe. For this purpose, we develop a Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to obtain the linear density field from a posterior probability function that consists of two components: a prior of a Gaussian density field with a given linear spectrum and a likelihood term that is given by the current density field. The present-day density field can be reconstructed from galaxy groups using the method developed in Wang et al. Using a realistic mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, obtained by populating dark matter halos in the Millennium simulation (MS) with galaxies, we show that our method can effectively and accurately recover both the amplitudes and phases of the initial, linear density field. To examine the accuracy of our method, we use N-body simulations to evolve these reconstructed initial conditions to the present day. The resimulated density field thus obtained accurately matches the original density field of the MS in the density range 0.3 \\lesssim \\rho /\\bar{\\rho } \\lesssim 20 without any significant bias. In particular, the Fourier phases of the resimulated density fields are tightly correlated with those of the original simulation down to a scale corresponding to a wavenumber of ~1 h Mpc-1, much smaller than the translinear scale, which corresponds to a wavenumber of ~0.15 h Mpc-1.

  4. UNIVERSAL METHODS OF INFORMATIZATION OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENTOF THE EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION

    Н А Заславская

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with issues related to the development of the external educational institution, which is due to the improvement of quality of its interaction with the target audience. Improving the quality of interaction between educational organization with the target audience is ensured through the use of different types of marketing communications. In view of the development of modern information and communications technology area of information marketing communications is a priority. In addition to the classical definition of marketing communications, we introduce the definition of informatization of educational marketing communications organizations.To form an individual package the most effective for a particular educational organization of marketing communications is necessary not only to eliminate the differences existing strategic objectives of the educational organization and identify the desired long-term effect of the use of marketing tools. We consider a set of universal methods of marketing communication of information, which provide a steady positive development of the educational organization. Among these methods are: infographic summary of the educational organization, the cube -transformer like inforgraphic resume educational organization with a QR-code cards, parents’ meetings in the form of webinars, click “Share” on the website of an educational organization, registration of educational institution official group in the social network. Increasing the efficiency of interaction with the target audience improves its loyalty to a particular educational institution.

  5. [The strategic research areas of a University Hospital: proposal of a quali-quantitative method.

    Iezzi, Elisa; Ardissino, Diego; Ferrari, Carlo; Vitale, Marco; Caminiti, Caterina

    2018-02-01

    This work aimed to objectively identify the main research areas at the University Hospital of Parma. To this end, a multidisciplinary working group, comprising clinicians, researchers, and hospital management, was formed to develop a shared quali-quantitative method. Easily retrievable performance indicators were selected from the literature (concerning bibliometric data and grant acquisition), and a scoring system developed to assign weights to each indicator. Subsequently, Research Team Leaders were identified from the hospital's "Research Plan", a document produced every three years which contains information on the main research themes carried out at each Department, involved staff and available resources, provided by health care professionals themselves. The selected performance indicators were measured for each Team Leader, and scores assigned, thus creating a ranking list. Through the analyses of the research themes of top Team Leaders, the Working Group identified the following five strategic research areas: (a) personalized treatment in oncology and hematology; (b) chronicization mechanisms in immunomediate diseases; (c) old and new risk factors for cardiovascular diseases; (d) nutritional disorders, metabolic and chronic-degenerative diseases; (e) molecular diagnostic and predictive markers. We have developed an objective method to identify a hospital's main research areas. Its application can guide resource allocation and can offer ways to value the work of professionals involved in research.

  6. Development of radio acoustic sounding method in Kharkov National University of Radio Electronics

    Proshkin, Y G; Kartashov, V M; Babkin, S I

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of the role of Kharkov National University of Radio Electronics in developing the atmosphere radio acoustic sounding (RAS) method within the period from 1968 to 2008 was carried out. As a part of the investigation program six experimental models of the sounding radio equipment were developed and manufactured. The atmosphere sounding methods were developed for measuring the base meteorological values. For the first time in the world practice, relevant comparative measurements of air temperature, wind velocity and direction were performed on a short base (about 150 m) using the centimetre RAS equipment and standard sensors of a high (300 m) meteorological mast. The RAS equipment was used for the purpose of meteorological support to investigations in the field of the atmosphere physics and applied problems. All instrumental, atmosphere and social factors, affecting operation the RAS systems, were generalized. It is shown that compact and mobile systems for remote monitoring of the atmospheric boundary layer with possible prompt obtaining of relevant information about base meteorological values in large volumes can be based on the RAS equipment

  7. Sales Education beyond the classroom: Building participative learning experiences in Sales Management through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers

    José Luis Ruizalba Robledo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The overarching goal of working through the CMGSMethod (Case Method with GuestSpeakers in Sales Management courses is toprovide Marketing students with practical knowledge about how a sales managercan deal with a wide variety of possible professional scenarios. Even when thecase method itself is an excellent way to equip students for their prospectiveemployment, the potential of this method can be enhanced with innovativepedagogical tools. Firstly, eight sales managers were invited to the SalesManagement Course as guest speakers. Students were required to prepare forthese sessions, gathering information about the speaker’s sector andidentifying areas of special interest. Each speaker shared their hands-onexperience and offered an overview of their field in a workshop, whileanswering the students’ questions. These sessions increased the interaction ofstudents with sales professionals, who presented their insights into a careerin sales management. The learning experiences built through these workshopswere narrated by the students in the course blog. Secondly, students were askedto present a scientific paper with the aim of bridging the gap between highereducation and cutting-edge research. This article portrays the reasoning behindthe course as well as the different steps followed during the process. Thecourse finished with encouraging results, suggesting the desirability ofincorporating PL (participative learning experiences into any marketingcourse.

  8. THE SERVICES QUALITY LEVEL ASSESSESMENT IN THE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY WITH SERVQUAL METHOD APPLYING

    STASIAK-BETLEJEWSKA, Renata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary universities services quality level concerns mainly the education efficiency evaluation that results from the learning outcomes realization and innovative features of the teaching programs that differ universities offers. Technical universities attention is focused on ministerial requirements fulfillment which are strictly concentrated on the students skills obtaining in the relation to the employers’ market. The university services quality analysis ignores common expectations of students and candidates for students related to the technical or functional quality, such as university facilities and administrative workers empathy. The aim of this study is to identify the expectations of both students and candidates for studies at technical universities, what allows to identify university services quality level and areas needs improvement in terms of not only the educational services but also technical university facilities. Results show significant importance of the all examined service quality aspects in the context of expectations of candidates and students’ perception. Research findings allow not only to identify the technical university services quality, but also to support the university development within the scientific research process assistance.

  9. “Nothing Better or Worse than Being Black, Gay, and in the Band”: A Qualitative Examination of Gay Undergraduates Participating in Historically Black College or University Marching Bands

    Carter, Bruce Allen

    2013-01-01

    This collective case study examined the experiences of four African American gay band students attending historically Black colleges or universities (HCBUs) in the southern United States. This study explored influences that shaped the participants' identities as they negotiated numerous complex sociocultural discourses pervasive and challenging to…

  10. Evaluating the Resilience of the Bottom-up Method used to Detect and Benchmark the Smartness of University Campuses

    Giovannella, Carlo; Andone, Diana; Dascalu, Mihai; Popescu, Elvira; Rehm, Matthias; Mealha, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    A new method to perform a bottom-up extraction and benchmark of the perceived multilevel smartness of complex ecosystems has been recently described and applied to territories and learning ecosystems like university campuses and schools. In this paper we study the resilience of our method

  11. 2 CFR 801.332 - What methods must I use to pass requirements down to participants at lower tiers with whom I...

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What methods must I use to pass requirements down to participants at lower tiers with whom I intend to do business? 801.332 Section 801.332 Grants... NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Responsibilities of Participants Regarding Transactions § 801.332 What...

  12. Training of trainers in active learning methods at the Princess Nourah Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Ikonen, Anne Leena; Eklund Karlsson, Leena; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    (from SDU to Princess Nourah University - PNU) in Bachelor level education in 2013-17. The SDU BSc in Public Health curriculum was adjusted into a BSc in Health Education and Promotion and BSc in Epidemiology Programmes to fit into the Saudi context and culture and education needs. Training the PNU......Abstract title: Training of trainers in active learning methods at the Princess Nourah Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Students’ learning outcome of teaching activity/course presented: University of Southern Denmark (SDU) conducted a cross-cultural knowledge transfer project...

  13. A universal meteorological method to identify potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils

    Středová Hana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The climate of Central Europe, mainly winter seasons with no snow cover at lower altitudes and a spring drought as well, might cause erosion events on heavy-textured soils. The aim of this paper is to define a universal method to identify the potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils. The categorization of potential wind erosion risk due to meteorological conditions is based on: (i an evaluation of the number of freeze-thaw episodes forming bare soil surfaces during the cold period of year; and (ii, an evaluation of the number of days with wet soil surfaces during the cold period of year. In the period 2001–2012 (from November to March, episodes with temperature changes from positive to negative and vice versa (thaw-freeze and freeze-thaw cycles and the effects of wet soil surfaces in connection with aggregate disintegration, are identified. The data are spatially interpolated by GIS tools for areas in the Czech Republic with heavy-textured soils. Blending critical categories is used to locate potential risks. The level of risk is divided into six classes. Those areas identified as potentially most vulnerable are the same localities where the highest number of erosive episodes on heavy-textured soils was documented.

  14. A basis of common approach to the development of universal steganalysis methods for digital images

    Alla А. Kobozeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new common approach to the organization of steganalysis in digital images is developed. New features of formal parameters defining the image are identified, theoretically grounded and practically tested. For the first time characteristics of mutual disposition of the left and right singular vectors corresponding to the largest singular value of the matrix (block of matrix of an image and the vector composed of the singular values obtained as a result of normal singular decomposition of the matrix (block matrix are obtained. It is shown that for the majority of the blocks of the original image (regardless of the storage format — lossy, lossless the angle between the left (right singular vector and the vector composed of singular numbers is determined by the angle between the n-optimal vector and the standard space basis of the corresponding dimension. It is shown that the discovered feature is violated for the mentioned formal parameters in the disturbed image. This is an indicator of integrity violation, particularly steganotransformation, and it can be used to develop new universal steganalysis methods and algorithms. Their efficiency does not depend on the specifics of steganoalgorithm used for insertion of additional information.

  15. Self-Perceived Participation and Autonomy at 1-Year Post Stroke: A Part of the Stroke Arm Longitudinal Study at the University of Gothenburg (SALGOT Study).

    Törnbom, Karin; Hadartz, Kristin; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-04-01

    Identifying factors predicting the long-term outcome of participation and autonomy after stroke is essential for developing individualized rehabilitation interventions. The aim was to describe self-assessed participation and autonomy and to explore factors associated with the same at 1 year post stroke. Participants consisted of 79 persons (mean age = 67) with a first-time stroke at the 1-year follow-up. To investigate perceived participation and autonomy at 1 year, a self-assessment questionnaire, the Impact on Participation and Autonomy-English version (IPA-E) was used. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed using age, gender, stroke severity, and functional dependency at discharge as potential contributors to the perceived level of participation and autonomy. A high percentage (70%-88%) evaluated their functions as fair to very good within all domains of the IPA-E at 1 year post stroke. However, around a fifth experienced their Family role as poor to very poor. Participants' functional dependency at discharge significantly influenced the outcome for the domains of Family role (odds ratio [OR] = 5.66, P Autonomy indoors (OR = 3.44, P autonomy at 1 year post stroke. The results also indicate that supporting indoor autonomy and social relations of persons with stroke during the acute rehabilitation is important to enhance participation and autonomy at 1 year post stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can Web 2.0 Enhance Community Participation in an Institutional Repository? The Case of PocketKnowledge at Teachers College, Columbia University

    Cocciolo, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This project investigates if a Web 2.0 approach to designing an institutional repository can positively impact community participation. To study this, two institutional repositories (one Web 2.0, the other not) are used within the same institution. Results indicate that the use of a Web 2.0 approach significantly enhances community participation.…

  17. A Universal Ts-VI Triangle Method for the Continuous Retrieval of Evaporative Fraction From MODIS Products

    Zhu, Wenbin; Jia, Shaofeng; Lv, Aifeng

    2017-10-01

    The triangle method based on the spatial relationship between remotely sensed land surface temperature (Ts) and vegetation index (VI) has been widely used for the estimates of evaporative fraction (EF). In the present study, a universal triangle method was proposed by transforming the Ts-VI feature space from a regional scale to a pixel scale. The retrieval of EF is only related to the boundary conditions at pixel scale, regardless of the Ts-VI configuration over the spatial domain. The boundary conditions of each pixel are composed of the theoretical dry edge determined by the surface energy balance principle and the wet edge determined by the average air temperature of open water. The universal triangle method was validated using the EF observations collected by the Energy Balance Bowen Ratio systems in the Southern Great Plains of the United States of America (USA). Two parameterization schemes of EF were used to demonstrate their applicability with Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products over the whole year 2004. The results of this study show that the accuracy produced by both of these two parameterization schemes is comparable to that produced by the traditional triangle method, although the universal triangle method seems specifically suited to the parameterization scheme proposed in our previous research. The independence of the universal triangle method from the Ts-VI feature space makes it possible to conduct a continuous monitoring of evapotranspiration and soil moisture. That is just the ability the traditional triangle method does not possess.

  18. An International Study of the Ability and Cost-Effectiveness of Advertising Methods to Facilitate Study Participant Self-Enrolment Into a Pilot Pharmacovigilance Study During Early Pregnancy

    Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Stephens, Sally; Thomas, Simon Hugh Lynton; Jamry-Dziurla, Anna; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Zetstra - van der Woude, Priscilla; Laursen, Maja; Hliva, Valerie; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Bourke, Alison; Dreyer, Nancy A; Blackburn, Stella CF

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the fetal effects of maternal medication use in pregnancy is often inadequate and current pregnancy pharmacovigilance (PV) surveillance methods have important limitations. Patient self-reporting may be able to mitigate some of these limitations, providing an adequately sized study sample can be recruited. OBJECTIVE: To compare the ability and cost-effectiveness of several direct-to-participant advertising methods for the recruitment of pregnant participants into a stu...

  19. Universal field matching in craniospinal irradiation by a background-dose gradient-optimized method.

    Traneus, Erik; Bizzocchi, Nicola; Fellin, Francesco; Rombi, Barbara; Farace, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The gradient-optimized methods are overcoming the traditional feathering methods to plan field junctions in craniospinal irradiation. In this note, a new gradient-optimized technique, based on the use of a background dose, is described. Treatment planning was performed by RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) on the CT scans of a pediatric patient. Both proton (by pencil beam scanning) and photon (by volumetric modulated arc therapy) treatments were planned with three isocenters. An 'in silico' ideal background dose was created first to cover the upper-spinal target and to produce a perfect dose gradient along the upper and lower junction regions. Using it as background, the cranial and the lower-spinal beams were planned by inverse optimization to obtain dose coverage of their relevant targets and of the junction volumes. Finally, the upper-spinal beam was inversely planned after removal of the background dose and with the previously optimized beams switched on. In both proton and photon plans, the optimized cranial and the lower-spinal beams produced a perfect linear gradient in the junction regions, complementary to that produced by the optimized upper-spinal beam. The final dose distributions showed a homogeneous coverage of the targets. Our simple technique allowed to obtain high-quality gradients in the junction region. Such technique universally works for photons as well as protons and could be applicable to the TPSs that allow to manage a background dose. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Engineering Education at a New Public University in Brazil: First Students' Contact with Engineering Methods

    Romero, Jesus Franklin A.; Leite, Patricia; Mantovani, Gerson L.; Lanfredi, Alexandre J. C.; Martins-Filho, Luiz S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of an introductory discipline to the engineering curricula at the Brazilian Federal University of ABC (UFABC). The university offers a common basic curriculum that must be accomplished by every student and can be followed by professionalising courses. The discipline "Introduction to Engineering"…

  1. What's for Sale at Canadian Universities? A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Promotional Strategies

    Pizarro Milian, Roger

    2017-01-01

    The current fiscal environment has driven Canadian universities to become more entrepreneurial, seeking out and competing over new sources of funding. Despite such intensifying competition, little effort has been made to document the promotional tactics that Canadian universities are using to render themselves appealing to external audiences. This…

  2. Using perceptual mapping methods to understand gender differences in perceived barriers and benefits of clinical research participation in urban minority HIV+ patients.

    Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Wolak, Caitlin; Greener, Judith; Tedaldi, Ellen; Nanavati, Aasit; Ruppert, Katey; Gordon, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Minority participation in HIV clinical trials research is critical to understanding the impact of medications or behavioral interventions, but little is known about gender differences in perceptions of participation. We surveyed 50 minority HIV+ patients from an urban clinic to assess perceived risks/benefits of clinical trial research participation and used innovative marketing methods to analyze results. Perceptual mapping and vector message-modeling, a method that creates 3-D models representing how groups conceptualize elements, were used to assess how male and female participants could be motivated to participate. Results showed men farther away from participation and more concerned with HIV disclosure and experimentation than women. Men expressed distrust of the medical system, doubted HIV's origin, and knew less about research implementation. Women were closer to participation in both behavior and medical trials and perceived medication issues as more significant, including fear of losing medication stability, medications not working, being in the placebo group, and experiencing side effects. Vector modeling shows that messages would need to focus on different aspects of clinical research for men and women and that interventions aimed at minority HIV+ patients to encourage clinical trial participation would need to be targeted to their unique perceptions. Understanding gender perceptions of HIV clinical research has significant implications for targeting messages to increase minority participation.

  3. Activity-Based Costing (ABC and Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing (TDABC: Applicable Methods for University Libraries?

    Kate-Riin Kont

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This article provides an overview of how university libraries research and adapt new cost accounting models, such as “activity-based costing” (ABC and “time-driven activity-based costing” (TDABC, focusing on the strengths and weaknesses of both methods to determine which of these two is suitable for application in university libraries.Methods – This paper reviews and summarizes the literature on cost accounting and costing practices of university libraries. A brief overview of the history of cost accounting, costing, and time and motion studies in libraries is also provided. The ABC and the TDABC method, designed as a revised and easier version of the ABC by Kaplan and Anderson (Kaplan & Anderson 2004 at the beginning of the 21st century, as well as the adoption and adaptation of these methods by university libraries are described, and their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their suitability for university libraries, are analyzed. Results – Cost accounting and costing studies in libraries have a long history, the first of these dating back to 1877. The development of cost accounting and time and motion studies can be seen as a natural evolution of techniques which were created to solve management problems. The ABC method is the best-known management accounting innovation of the last 20 years, and is already widely used in university libraries around the world. However, setting up an ABC system can be very costly, and the system needs to be regularly updated, which further increases its costs. The TDABC system can not only be implemented more quickly (and thus more cheaply, but also can be updated more easily than the traditional ABC, which makes the TDABC the more suitable method for university libraries.Conclusion – Both methods are suitable for university libraries. However, the ABC method can only be implemented in collaboration with an accounting department. The TDABC method can be tested and implemented by

  4. USE OF METRIC METHODS OF RESEARCH IN THE LIBRARY OF VINNYTSIA STATE PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY NAMED AFTER MYKHAILO KOTSIUBYNSKY

    В. С. Білоус

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Subject. Theme. The aim of the work. The level of development of science and technology is crucial to the progress of society. The need to increase the presence of science in the global scientific information space, increase its influence in the world. The use of metric methods of research in the library of a higher school. Methods. The use of scientific methods of analysis, synthesis, analogy, comparison, forecasting allowed us to examine the results of implementation of innovative communications initiatives in the library of the university Results. Current and future activities of the library of the higher school in integration of scientific publications to international information space are highlighted. The practical implementation of these activities are discussed on the example of the libraries of Vinnitsa State M. Kotsiubynskyi Pedagogical University. Scientific novelty. The role of the university library in the process of increasing the representation of the Ukrainian science in the world of scholarly communication. The proposed strategy, the implementation of which should characterize a modern librarian as a «role model» for the community of the university in the implementation of electronic models of scientific communication. Conclusions. Innovative transformations in the content, forms and methods of library activities, using metric measurements affect the improvement of scientific activities of the institution, give significant social results. Introduction to the practice of library activities certain areas will prevent the «dissipation» of documentary scientific information resources of the university, will contribute to their consolidating, will increase the importance of scientific publications and the authority of the Ukrainian science in General. The article reflects the innovative activities of libraries inVinnytsiaMykhailoKotsiubynskyiStatePedagogicalUniversity, development of library service in using research work of the

  5. A universal method to assess the potential of phosphorus loss from soil to aquatic ecosystems.

    Pöthig, Rosemarie; Behrendt, Horst; Opitz, Dieter; Furrer, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    Phosphorus loss from terrestrial to the aquatic ecosystems contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. To maintain the world's vital freshwater ecosystems, the reduction of eutrophication is crucial. This needs the prevention of overfertilization of agricultural soils with phosphorus. However, the methods of risk assessment for the P loss potential from soils lack uniformity and are difficult for routine analysis. Therefore, the efficient detection of areas with a high risk of P loss requires a simple and universal soil test method that is cost effective and applicable in both industrialized and developing countries. Soils from areas which varied highly in land use and soil type were investigated regarding the degree of P saturation (DPS) as well as the equilibrium P concentration (EPC(0)) and water-soluble P (WSP) as indicators for the potential of P loss. The parameters DPS and EPC(0) were determined from P sorption isotherms. Our investigation of more than 400 soil samples revealed coherent relationships between DPS and EPC(0) as well as WSP. The complex parameter DPS, characterizing the actual P status of soil, is accessible from a simple standard measurement of WSP based on the equation [Formula: see text]. The parameter WSP in this equation is a function of remaining phosphorous sorption capacity/total accumulated phosphorous (SP/TP). This quotient is independent of soil type due to the mutual compensation of the factors SP and TP. Thus, the relationship between DPS and WSP is also independent of soil type. The degree of P saturation, which reflects the actual state of P fertilization of soil, can be calculated from the easily accessible parameter WSP. Due to the independence from soil type and land use, the relation is valid for all soils. Values of WSP, which exceed 5 mg P/kg soil, signalize a P saturation between 70% and 80% and thus a high risk of P loss from soil. These results reveal a new approach of risk assessment for P loss from soils to

  6. Statistical methods for the time-to-event analysis of individual participant data from multiple epidemiological studies

    Thompson, Simon; Kaptoge, Stephen; White, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Meta-analysis of individual participant time-to-event data from multiple prospective epidemiological studies enables detailed investigation of exposure-risk relationships, but involves a number of analytical challenges....

  7. Diagnostic Criteria for Problematic Internet Use among U.S. University Students: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation

    Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Snyder, Susan M.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical studies have identified increasing rates of problematic Internet use worldwide and a host of related negative consequences. However, researchers disagree as to whether problematic Internet use is a subtype of behavioral addiction. Thus, there are not yet widely accepted and validated diagnostic criteria for problematic Internet use. To address this gap, we used mixed-methods to examine the extent to which signs and symptoms of problematic Internet use mirror DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder, gambling disorder, and Internet gaming disorder. A total of 27 university students, who self-identified as intensive Internet users and who reported Internet-use-associated health and/or psychosocial problems were recruited. Students completed two measures that assess problematic Internet use (Young’s Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring their experiences with problematic Internet use. Results of standardized measures and focus group discussions indicated substantial overlap between students’ experiences of problematic Internet use and the signs and symptoms reflected in the DSM-5 criteria for substance use disorder, gambling disorder, and Internet gaming disorder. These signs and symptoms included: a) use Internet longer than intended, b) preoccupation with the Internet, c) withdrawal symptoms when unable to access the Internet, d) unsuccessful attempts to stop or reduce Internet use, e) craving, f) loss of interest in hobbies or activities other than the Internet, g) excessive Internet use despite the knowledge of related problems, g) use of the Internet to escape or relieve a negative mood, and h) lying about Internet use. Tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, and recurrent Internet use in hazardous situations were uniquely manifested in the context of problematic Internet use. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:26751569

  8. Diagnostic Criteria for Problematic Internet Use among U.S. University Students: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation.

    Wen Li

    Full Text Available Empirical studies have identified increasing rates of problematic Internet use worldwide and a host of related negative consequences. However, researchers disagree as to whether problematic Internet use is a subtype of behavioral addiction. Thus, there are not yet widely accepted and validated diagnostic criteria for problematic Internet use. To address this gap, we used mixed-methods to examine the extent to which signs and symptoms of problematic Internet use mirror DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder, gambling disorder, and Internet gaming disorder. A total of 27 university students, who self-identified as intensive Internet users and who reported Internet-use-associated health and/or psychosocial problems were recruited. Students completed two measures that assess problematic Internet use (Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale and participated in focus groups exploring their experiences with problematic Internet use. Results of standardized measures and focus group discussions indicated substantial overlap between students' experiences of problematic Internet use and the signs and symptoms reflected in the DSM-5 criteria for substance use disorder, gambling disorder, and Internet gaming disorder. These signs and symptoms included: a use Internet longer than intended, b preoccupation with the Internet, c withdrawal symptoms when unable to access the Internet, d unsuccessful attempts to stop or reduce Internet use, e craving, f loss of interest in hobbies or activities other than the Internet, g excessive Internet use despite the knowledge of related problems, g use of the Internet to escape or relieve a negative mood, and h lying about Internet use. Tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, and recurrent Internet use in hazardous situations were uniquely manifested in the context of problematic Internet use. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  9. Using Satellite Classes to Optimise Access to and Participation in First-Year Business Management: A Case at an Open and Distance-Learning University in South Africa

    Swanepoel, Elana; De Beer, Andreas; Muller, Helene

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of satellite classes as a component of blended learning, to enhance student performance of the Business Management I and Management I students at an open and distance-learning university. We discuss the evolution of distance education, the interactivities promoted by open and distance learning and the concept of blended…

  10. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  11. Faculty-Exchange Programs Promoting Change: Motivations, Experiences, and Influence of Participants in the Carnegie Mellon University-Portugal Faculty Exchange Program

    Patrício, Maria Teresa; Santos, Patrícia; Loureiro, Paulo Maia; Horta, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    The international mobility of faculty is increasing worldwide. Although studies have considered the experiences of academics abroad, less is known about faculty-exchange programs with policy objectives. This study helps to fill this gap by analyzing a nationwide structured faculty exchange program established by Carnegie Mellon University and…

  12. To Speak or Not to Speak in the New Taiwanese University: Class Participation and Identity Construction in Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Graduate Classrooms

    Lin, Shumin

    2018-01-01

    In order to internationalize higher education, universities across Asia have engaged in aggressive recruitment of international students and increased provision of English-medium instruction (EMI). While many studies have examined Asian international students' intercultural interactions during class discussions in Western/English-speaking…

  13. Collaboration in nuclear engineering education between France and the United States: Participation of French students at Texas A ampersand M University

    Peddicord, K.L.; Durand, J.L.; Gousty, Y.; Jeneveau, A.; Erdman, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Universities in the United States have had a long tradition of accepting students from other countries to pursue graduate degrees. This has particularly been the case in the fields of engineering and science. This trend has grown to the point that in several graduate engineering fields, the percentage of foreign nationals outnumbers US enrollees. Historically, most foreign students studying in the US universities have been from developing countries. Usually these students apply and are accepted on a case-by-case basis. For a number of reasons, less emphasis has been placed on programs with western Europe. In this paper, a program of collaboration is described in which the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Texas A ampersand M University has entered into memoranda of agreement with two institutions in France. The two universities are the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (INPG) in Grenoble and the Ecole Polytechnique Feminine (EPF) in Sceaux. The purpose of the program is to enable students in nuclear engineering to simultaneously complete requirements for the diploma and the MS degree

  14. Characteristics of internet addiction/pathological internet use in U.S. university students: a qualitative-method investigation.

    Li, Wen; O'Brien, Jennifer E; Snyder, Susan M; Howard, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students' self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7), and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3). Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants' lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research.

  15. Characteristics of internet addiction/pathological internet use in U.S. university students: a qualitative-method investigation.

    Wen Li

    Full Text Available Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students' self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7, and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3. Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants' lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research.

  16. Universal Algorithm for Online Trading Based on the Method of Calibration

    V'yugin, Vladimir; Trunov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We present a universal algorithm for online trading in Stock Market which performs asymptotically at least as good as any stationary trading strategy that computes the investment at each step using a fixed function of the side information that belongs to a given RKHS (Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space). Using a universal kernel, we extend this result for any continuous stationary strategy. In this learning process, a trader rationally chooses his gambles using predictions made by a randomized ...

  17. Implementation of the Harvard Case Method through a Plan-Do-Check-Act Framework in a University Course

    Shieh, Ruey S.; Lyu, Jr Jung; Cheng, Yun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Harvard Business School began to promote the Harvard case method (HCM) within the Asian region. Because of differences in classroom culture between Asian and Western countries, Asian participants' reaction to the HCM implementation is of interest. This study explores how the western initiated method was implemented in one of the Asian…

  18. Usability Assessment of International Office Website of Diponegoro University With Scenario Based Usability Evaluation Method and Wammi Method

    Ratna Purwaningsih; Ikhsan Yenifi

    2015-01-01

    Website development needs to pay attention to usability aspect which consist of four factors: efficiency, effectiveness, satisfactions and error rate. The website of International Office of Diponegoro University provides academic information for Indonesian students and foreign students. The website still has some problem, especially on searching certain information. This research aims to evaluate the design of the existing website and measures the usability. A well-designed website will help ...

  19. Understanding Black Male Student Athletes' Experiences at a Historically Black College/University: A Mixed Methods Approach

    Cooper, Joseph N.; Hall, Jori

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how a mixed methods approach was employed to acquire a better understanding of Black male student athletes' experiences at a historically Black college/university in the southeastern United States. A concurrent triangulation design was incorporated to allow different data sources to be collected and…

  20. Interrogating the Lesson Plan in a Pre-Service Methods Course: Evidence from a University in Kenya

    Simwa, Kefa L.; Modiba, Maropeng

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on research that examined how the content of a History methods course, taught in a university in Kenya, influenced student teachers' lesson planning and pedagogical skills. A lecture on a lesson plan, micro-teaching lesson plan documents and presentations were examined to determine student teachers' preparedness for teaching the…

  1. Structures and Relationships between the Business Executive and Information Technology Executive at the University: A Mixed Methods Study

    Hollman, Angela K.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses an explanatory mixed methods methodology to attempt to determine the reporting relationships between business and IT executives within the university. The study also explores IT and business executives thoughts on these relationships. Supporting research from organizational studies and business-IT alignment is combined in order to…

  2. Cooling the Campus: Experiences from a Pilot Study to Reduce Electricity Use at Tufts University, USA, Using Social Marketing Methods

    Marcell, Kristin; Agyeman, Julian; Rappaport, Ann

    2004-01-01

    A community-based social marketing (CBSM) campaign to reduce student electricity use and greenhouse gas emissions was undertaken at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Social marketing methods follow a commercial marketing model and involve market research into the planning, pricing, communication, distribution, and evaluation of methods…

  3. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people’s behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community...

  4. Development of a Behavior Change Intervention to Improve Sexual Health Service Use Among University Undergraduate Students: Mixed Methods Study Protocol.

    Cassidy, Christine; Steenbeek, Audrey; Langille, Donald; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Curran, Janet

    2017-11-02

    University students are at risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections and suffering other negative health outcomes. Sexual health services offer preventive and treatment interventions that aim to reduce these infections and associated health consequences. However, university students often delay or avoid seeking sexual health services. An in-depth understanding of the factors that influence student use of sexual health services is needed to underpin effective sexual health interventions. In this study, we aim to design a behavior change intervention to address university undergraduate students' use of sexual health services at two universities in Nova Scotia, Canada. This mixed methods study consists of three phases that follow a systematic approach to intervention design outlined in the Behaviour Change Wheel. In Phase 1, we examine patterns of sexual health service use among university students in Nova Scotia, Canada, using an existing dataset. In Phase 2, we identify the perceived barriers and enablers to students' use of sexual health services. This will include focus groups with university undergraduate students, health care providers, and university administrators using a semistructured guide, informed by the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour Model and Theoretical Domains Framework. In Phase 3, we identify behavior change techniques and intervention components to develop a theory-based intervention to improve students' use of sexual health services. This study will be completed in March 2018. Results from each phase and the finalized intervention design will be reported in 2018. Previous intervention research to improve university students' use of sexual health services lacks a theoretical assessment of barriers. This study will employ a mixed methods research design to examine university students' use of sexual health service and apply behavior change theory to design a theory- and evidence-based sexual health service intervention. Our

  5. Influence of application method on surface free-energy and bond strength of universal adhesive systems to enamel.

    Imai, Arisa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Sai, Keiichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Nojiri, Kie; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of different adhesive application methods and etching modes on enamel bond effectiveness of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) testing and surface free-energy (SFE) measurements. The adhesives Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond were used. Prepared bovine enamel specimens were divided into four groups, based on type of adhesive, and subjected to the following surface treatments: (i) total-etch mode with active application; (ii) total-etch mode with inactive application; (iii) self-etch mode with active application; and (iv) self-etch mode with inactive application. Bonded specimens were subjected to SBS testing. The SFE of the enamel surfaces with adhesive was measured after rinsing with acetone and water. The SBS values in total-etch mode were significantly higher than those in self-etch mode. In total-etch mode, significantly lower SBS values were observed with active application compared with inactive application; in contrast, in self-etch mode there were no significant differences in SBS between active and inactive applications. A reduction in total SFE was observed for active application compared with inactive application. The interaction between etching mode and application method was statistically significant, and the application method significantly affected enamel bond strength in total-etch mode. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Ambivalent participation

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom......' continued participation. I show how negotiating the risks of participation may simultaneously satisfy the desire for knowledge and curb erotic desires....

  7. The University of Minnesota Morris - N.S.F. REU Program: Twenty years of encouraging women to participate in the Geological Sciences

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM - REU program is to nurture the development of women in the geological sciences. Women are historically under-represented in the geological sciences. This program introduces undergraduate women to research project design and independent data collection and analysis designed to increase student’s scientific skills, introduce them to new fields of study, and to develop academic/professional confidence. In so doing, the program tries to encourage students to continue their education at the graduate level and/or to pursue a career in the Geosciences. The program was first proposed in 1988 and was run during the summers of 1989, '90, '91, '94, '95, '97, ’99, 2000, 05, 07, and 09 (in 1996 and 1998 a similar program was run at Gustavus Adolphus College). The focus of the program is field and laboratory research to determine the origin and history of glacial deposits in west-central Minnesota and the late Paleozoic Glacial deposits of the Parana Basin, Brazil. Much of the success of the program can be attributed to developing student “ownership” of their individual projects, their particular REU group, and the UMM-REU program overall. Research projects are selected and designed by the participants. Frequently considered are: research subject, location of field area and geologic techniques employed. Both project ownership and team building is encouraged by participant led weekly visits to field areas and frequent group discussions of research problems, successes and major gaffes. Additional team building activities include: 1) living in the same on-campus apartments and Brazilian B&B, 2) organized social activities, 3) international travel and working with Brazilian (women) students, 4) readings and discussions on "women in geology”, 5) shared strategies and concerns for career choices and; 6) participation in the "Friends of UMM-REU" conference (an "informal" presentation of results). Finally, an emphasis is placed on the utilization of the

  8. Universal method for opnimal design main structural assemblies of steel structures stationary conveyor with hanging ribbon

    Boslovyak P.V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The technique and the detailed algorithm for optimal design of steel structures hospitaltion of the conveyor with hang-ing ribbon. Developed a universal objective function together with the system-limited-subject to limits of main components of steel structures of stationary conveyor with hanging ribbon.

  9. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method

    Salimi, N.; Rezaei, J.

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what

  10. Improving Assessment Methods in University Science Education with Negotiated Self- and Peer-Assessment

    Poon, Wai-Yin; McNaught, Carmel; Lam, Paul; Kwan, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether, in the Hong Kong context, self- and peer-assessment promote students' self-reflection and enable students to understand their own strengths and weaknesses better. A three-stage assessment strategy was employed in three Science courses at The Chinese University of Hong Kong: (1) students developing…

  11. Food-Related Environmental Beliefs and Behaviours among University Undergraduates: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Campbell-Arvai, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to document the food-related environmental beliefs and behaviours of undergraduate university students. More specifically, this research was focussed on determining if environmental sustainability is a consideration in students' food choices, identifying the specific choices and behaviours adopted to reduce…

  12. Targeted Facebook Advertising is a Novel and Effective Method of Recruiting Participants into a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness Study.

    Subasinghe, Asvini K; Nguyen, Margaret; Wark, John D; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-07-22

    Targeted advertising using social networking sites (SNS) as a recruitment strategy in health research is in its infancy. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of targeted Facebook advertisements to increase recruitment of unvaccinated women into a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness study. Between September 2011 and November 2013, females aged 18 to 25 years, residing in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertisements relating to general women's health. From November 2013 to June 2015, targeted advertising campaigns were implemented to specifically recruit women who had not received the HPV vaccine. Consenting participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire and those who had ever had sexual intercourse were asked to provide a self-collected vaginal swab. The HPV vaccination status of participants was confirmed from the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR). The campaign comprised 10 advertisements shown between September 2011 and June 2015 which generated 55,381,637 impressions, yielding 23,714 clicks, at an overall cost of AUD $22,078.85. A total of 919 participants were recruited. A greater proportion of unvaccinated women (50.4%, 131/260) were recruited into the study following targeted advertising, compared with those recruited (19.3%, 127/659) prior to showing the modified advertisement (Padvertising is a rapid and cost-effective way of recruiting young unvaccinated women into a HPV vaccine effectiveness study.

  13. Absorption and scattering coefficients estimation in two-dimensional participating media using the generalized maximum entropy and Levenberg-Marquardt methods

    Berrocal T, Mariella J.; Roberty, Nilson C.; Silva Neto, Antonio J.; Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ

    2002-01-01

    The solution of inverse problems in participating media where there is emission, absorption and dispersion of the radiation possesses several applications in engineering and medicine. The objective of this work is to estimative the coefficients of absorption and dispersion in two-dimensional heterogeneous participating media, using in independent form the Generalized Maximum Entropy and Levenberg Marquardt methods. Both methods are based on the solution of the direct problem that is modeled by the Boltzmann equation in cartesian geometry. Some cases testes are presented. (author)

  14. Characteristics of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use in U.S. University Students: A Qualitative-Method Investigation

    Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Snyder, Susan M.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as intensive Internet users, spent more than 25 hours/week on the Internet for non-school or non-work-related activities and who reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. Students completed two IA/PIU measures (Young’s Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and participated in focus groups exploring the natural history of their Internet use; preferred online activities; emotional, interpersonal, and situational triggers for intensive Internet use; and health and/or psychosocial consequences of their Internet overuse. Students’ self-reports of Internet overuse problems were consistent with results of standardized measures. Students first accessed the Internet at an average age of 9 (SD = 2.7), and first had a problem with Internet overuse at an average age of 16 (SD = 4.3). Sadness and depression, boredom, and stress were common triggers of intensive Internet use. Social media use was nearly universal and pervasive in participants’ lives. Sleep deprivation, academic under-achievement, failure to exercise and to engage in face-to-face social activities, negative affective states, and decreased ability to concentrate were frequently reported consequences of intensive Internet use/Internet overuse. IA/PIU may be an underappreciated problem among U.S. university students and warrants additional research. PMID:25647224

  15. Using Geospatial Research Methods to Examine Resource Accessibility and Availability as it Relates to Community Participation of Individuals with Serious Mental Illnesses.

    Townley, Greg; Brusilovskiy, Eugene; Snethen, Gretchen; Salzer, Mark S

    2018-03-01

    Greater community participation among individuals with serious mental illnesses is associated with better psychosocial and health outcomes. Typically, studies examining community participation have utilized self-report measures and been conducted in limited settings. The introduction of methodological advances to examining community participation of individuals with serious mental illnesses has the potential to advance the science of community mental health research and invigorate the work of community psychologists in this area. This study employed an innovative geospatial approach to examine the relationship between community participation and resource accessibility (i.e., proximity) and availability (i.e., concentration) among 294 individuals utilizing community mental health services throughout the United States. Findings suggest small but significant associations between community participation and the accessibility and availability of resources needed for participation. Furthermore, findings demonstrate the importance of car access for individuals residing in both urban and non-urban settings. The methods and results presented in this study have implications for community mental health research and services and provide an illustration of ways that geospatial methodologies can be used to investigate environmental factors that impact community inclusion and participation of individuals with serious mental illnesses. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  16. Proposal and field practice of a 'hiyarihatto' activity method for promotion of statements of participants for nuclear power plant organization

    Aoyagi, Saizo; Fujino, Hidenori; Ishii, Hirotake; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Sakuda, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Sugiman, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    In a 'hiyarihatto' activity, workers report and discuss incident cases related to their work. Such an activity is particularly effective for cultivating participants' attitudes about safety. Nevertheless, a conventional face-to-face hiyarihatto activity includes features that are inappropriate for conduct in a nuclear power plant organization. For example, workers at nuclear power plants are geographically distributed and busy. Therefore, they have great difficulty in participating in a face-to-face hiyarihatto activity. Furthermore, workers' hesitation in discussing problems inhibits the continuation of their active participation. This study is conducted to propose a hiyarihatto activity with an asynchronous and distributed computer-mediated communication (CMC) for a nuclear power plant organization, with the demonstration of its effectiveness through field practice. The proposed method also involves the introduction of special participants who follow action guidelines for the promotion of the continuation of the activity. The method was used in an actual nuclear power plant organization. Results showed that the method is effective under some conditions, such as during periods without facility inspection. Special participants promoted the activity in some cases. Moreover, other factors affecting the activity and some improvements were identified. (author)

  17. Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: A mixed-methods study (Innovative Practice).

    Hall, Jodi; Mitchell, Gary; Webber, Catherine; Johnson, Karen

    2016-04-11

    Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Barriers to treatment and control of hypertension among hypertensive participants: A community based cross-sectional mixed method study in municipalities of Kathmandu, Nepal

    Surya Devkota

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Despite the established evidence on benefits of controlling raised blood pressure and development of several guidelines on detection and management of hypertension, people often have untreated or uncontrolled hypertension. In this context, we undertook this study to identify the barriers existing in hypertension treatment and control in the municipalities of Kathmandu district in Nepal. Methods: This was a community based, cross-sectional mixed method study conducted in the municipalities of Kathmandu district in Nepal between January and July 2015. Among 587 randomly selected participants, the aware hypertensive participants were further assessed for the treatment and control of hypertension. For qualitative component, 20 participants having uncontrolled hypertension took part in two focused group discussions and two cardiac physicians participated in in-depth interviews.Results: Out of 587 participants screened, 191 (32.5% were identified as hypertensive. Among 191 hypertensive participants, 118 (61.8% were aware of their problem. Of the 118 aware hypertensive participants, 93 (78.8% were taking medicines, and among those treated, 46 (49.6% had controlled hypertension. Proportions of participants taking anti-hypertensive medications varied significantly with age groups, ethnicity, occupation and income. Hypertension control was significantly associated with use of combination therapy, adherence to medication, follow-up care, counseling by healthcare providers and waiting time in hospital. Being worried that the medicine needs to be taken life-long, perceived side effects of drugs, non-adherence to medication, lost to follow-up, inadequate counseling from physician, and lack of national guidelines for hypertension treatment were the most commonly cited barriers for treatment and control of hypertension in qualitative component of the research.Conclusion: Large proportion of the hypertensive population has the untreated and

  19. Music Theory and the Harmony Method in J. Kepler's Work " The harmony of the Universe"

    Smirnov, V. A.

    In Kepler's book The Harmony of the Universe, edited in 1619, the theory of music as a science of that time is presented. Also the investigation of the correspondence between musical proportion and orbital parameters of the planets is presented. Kepler's book The Harmony of the Universe is a work that discloses the basic physical regularities of the developing Universe, which so far had not been definitively formulated. To explain the development process, Kepler introduced the concept of a "productive force" or "forming force" that directs the development of natural phenomena with the principles of world harmony, described by him. In addition to the four known natural interactions is a fifth one, that had never been studied fully. In this way we can explain the development of natural phenomena as alive and nonalive. Arising from the "productive force" that directs the flow of processes with the laws of harmony is an explanation of the existence of "anti-entropy" processes, a contradiction to the second law of thermodynamics, but playing a fundamental part in nature. The "golden section" apparatus defines space and time frames of process flow. The contents of the book give a notion about the way or "program" of development. Which basic law of nature is hiden in the contents of book is yet to be resolved (Kepler, 1939).

  20. Feature selection and data sampling methods for learning reputation dimensions: The University of Amsterdam at RepLab 2014

    Gârbacea, C.; Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on our participation in the reputation dimension task of the CLEF RepLab 2014 evaluation initiative, i.e., to classify social media updates into eight predefined categories. We address the task by using corpus-based methods to extract textual features from the labeled training data to

  1. From spectator to participant

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Kofoed, Jens

    The book collects experiences and methods for citizens’ participation in order to strengthen the local Agenda 21 process. 5 different types of methods is presented: Methods of analyses and evaluation, methods of dialogue, methods for action, methods for networking, and finely methods for involving...... local institutions. In the opening part the book deals with fundamental themes in participation processes such as planning of changes and changes and conflicts....

  2. An International Study of the Ability and Cost-Effectiveness of Advertising Methods to Facilitate Study Participant Self-Enrolment Into a Pilot Pharmacovigilance Study During Early Pregnancy.

    Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Stephens, Sally; Thomas, Simon Hugh Lynton; Jamry-Dziurla, Anna; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla; Laursen, Maja; Hliva, Valerie; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Bourke, Alison; Dreyer, Nancy A; Blackburn, Stella Cf

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fetal effects of maternal medication use in pregnancy is often inadequate and current pregnancy pharmacovigilance (PV) surveillance methods have important limitations. Patient self-reporting may be able to mitigate some of these limitations, providing an adequately sized study sample can be recruited. To compare the ability and cost-effectiveness of several direct-to-participant advertising methods for the recruitment of pregnant participants into a study of self-reported gestational exposures and pregnancy outcomes. The Pharmacoepidemiological Research on Outcomes of Therapeutics by a European Consortium (PROTECT) pregnancy study is a non-interventional, prospective pilot study of self-reported medication use and obstetric outcomes provided by a cohort of pregnant women that was conducted in Denmark, the Netherlands, Poland, and the United Kingdom. Direct-to-participant advertisements were provided via websites, emails, leaflets, television, and social media platforms. Over a 70-week recruitment period direct-to-participant advertisements engaged 43,234 individuals with the study website or telephone system; 4.78% (2065/43,234) of which were successfully enrolled and provided study data. Of these 90.4% (1867/2065) were recruited via paid advertising methods, 23.0% (475/2065) of whom were in the first trimester of pregnancy. The overall costs per active recruited participant were lowest for email (€23.24) and website (€24.41) advertisements and highest for leaflet (€83.14) and television (€100.89). Website adverts were substantially superior in their ability to recruit participants during their first trimester of pregnancy (317/668, 47.5%) in comparison with other advertising methods (Padvertisement methods used and in their ability to recruit participants in early pregnancy. Recruitment of a pregnant cohort using direct-to-participant advertisement methods is feasible, but the total costs incurred are not insubstantial. Future research is

  3. 2 CFR 801.437 - What method do I use to communicate to a participant the requirements described in the OMB...

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What method do I use to communicate to a participant the requirements described in the OMB guidance at 2 CFR 180.435? 801.437 Section 801.437 Grants... NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Responsibilities of Federal Agency Officials Regarding Transactions § 801...

  4. Extra-curricular methods for improving the quality of the staff training in the university of civil engineering (psychological content

    Magera Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High technologies in architecture and construction change the world around. Professional trainings for the creators of the artificial environment (engineers and architects have an effect on people’s life but practically they don’t take into account the human nature of the final user and his own psychological features. In this article there are presented the results of the psychological services in the University of civil engineering from 2006 to 2017 as extra-curricular methods for the general competences formation and development. There are also described the methods of works and their specifics, some difficulties and perspectives. There are explained the reasons for psychological service at the university of civil engineering. There are also taken into account the global risks and dangers affecting the study content of civil engineering.

  5. Characteristics of neutron irradiation facility and dose estimation method for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University research reactor institute

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Kanda, K.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron irradiation characteristics of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KIJRRI) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), is described. The present method of dose measurement and its evaluation at the KURRI, is explained. Especially, the special feature and noticeable matters were expounded for the BNCT with craniotomy, which has been applied at present only in Japan. (author)

  6. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequen...

  7. Sales Education beyond the Classroom: Building Participative Learning Experiences in Sales Management through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers)

    Ruizalba Robledo, José Luis; Almenta López, Estefanía; Vallespín Arán, María

    2014-01-01

    The overarching goal of working through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers) in Sales Management courses is to provide Business and marketing learners with practical knowledge about how a sales manager can deal with a wide variety of possible professional scenarios. Even when the case method itself is an excellent way to equip…

  8. Assessment of a multimedia-based prospective method to support public deliberations on health technology design: participant survey findings and qualitative insights.

    Lehoux, P; Jimenez-Pernett, J; Miller, F A; Williams-Jones, B

    2016-10-26

    Using a combination of videos and online short stories, we conducted four face-to-face deliberative workshops in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) with members of the public who later joined additional participants in an online forum to discuss the social and ethical implications of prospective technologies. This paper presents the participants' appraisal of our intervention and provides novel qualitative insights into the use of videos and online tools in public deliberations. We applied a mixed-method study design. A self-administered survey contained open- and close-ended items using a 5-level Likert-like scale. Absolute frequencies and proportions for the close-ended items were compiled. Qualitative data included field notes, the transcripts of the workshops and the participants' contributions to the online forum. The qualitative data were used to flesh out the survey data describing the participants' appraisal of: 1) the multimedia components of our intervention; 2) its deliberative face-to-face and online processes; and 3) its perceived effects. Thirty-eight participants contributed to the workshops and 57 to the online forum. A total of 46 participants filled-in the survey, for a response rate of 73 % (46/63). The videos helped 96 % of the participants to understand the fictional technologies and the online scenarios helped 98 % to reflect about the issues raised. Up to 81 % considered the arguments of the other participants to be well thought-out. Nearly all participants felt comfortable sharing their ideas in both the face-to-face (89 %) and online environments (93 %), but 88 % preferred the face-to-face workshop. As a result of the intervention, 85 % reflected more about the pros and cons of technology and 94 % learned more about the way technologies may transform society. This study confirms the methodological feasibility of a deliberative intervention whose originality lies in its use of videos and online scenarios. To increase deliberative depth and foster a

  9. Field Trip as an Effective Method of Teaching Apiculture/Beekeeping among University Students

    Ja’afar-Furo, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various methods of teaching beekeeping in the very few institutions of higher learning that offer such courses have been studied. This survey attempted to review the numerous methods of instructions applied in achieving better learning outcomes on apiculture in tertiary institutions. Secondary information were mainly used to source for data for the survey. However, interview schedules were conducted to solicit for primary data from the students on their perception on best methodology for learning the subject. Descriptive statistics and percentage score were used to analyse the involvement of institutions in instructing learners, and capture learners’ perception on most preferred teaching methods of the course, respectively. Although findings indicated that a classroom lectures method, a combination of lecture and demonstration methods, field trip method, laboratory method, project methods, among others, existed as pedagogies used for ensuring that learners have had thorough understanding of the subject matter, majority of learners opted for the field trip method of teaching apiculture as the most preferred way of stimulating students toward enhanced learning outcomes. Based on the findings of the study, it’s concluded that a combination of field trip and lecture methods of instruction is the most effective way of teaching beekeeping in tertiary schools. Therefore, institutions and organisations of public and private origins that intend to improve on the knowledge of apiculture among youths and all, should capture field trip and lecture methods in their curricula of learning as the most preferred way of instruction.

  10. Pinvox Method to Enhance Self-Study in Blended Learning: Experiences at University of Bucharest

    Enrique Canessa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results on the first large-scale trial implementation of the new Pinvox algorithm carried out at the Department of Distance Learning (DL of the University of Bucharest to encourage hundreds of Bachelor and Master DL students to perform their self-study. Pinvox is an open source tool that helps to ensure "on-line attendance” and to induce “student's attention��� through the identification of different, randomly selected, brief audio PINs embedded automatically in videos or audio files assigned to each student. We argue that checking how students watched a video lecture has many advantages in the formative assessment work.

  11. Unfolding Participation

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  12. Long-Term Reserve Expansion of Power Systems With High Wind Power Penetration Using Universal Generating Function Methods

    DING, YI; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2010-01-01

    from long term planning point of view utilizing universal generating function (UGF) methods. The reliability models of wind farms and conventional generators are represented as the correspondin UGFs and the special operators for these UGFs are defined to evaluate the customer and the system...... reliabilities. The effect of transmission network on customer reliabilities is also considered in the system UGF. The power output models of wind turbine generators in a wind farm considering wind speed correlation and un-correlation are developed, respectively. A reliability-based reserve expansion method...

  13. Evaluating the Resilience of the Bottom-up Method used to Detect and Benchmark the Smartness of University Campuses

    Giovannella, Carlo; Andone, Diana; Dascalu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    A new method to perform a bottom-up extraction and benchmark of the perceived multilevel smartness of complex ecosystems has been recently described and applied to territories and learning ecosystems like university campuses and schools. In this paper we study the resilience of our method...... by comparing and integrating the data collected in several European Campuses during two different academic years, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The overall results are: a) a more adequate and robust definition of the orthogonal multidimensional space of representation of the smartness, and b) the definition...

  14. Evaluation of social media channel preference for student engagement improvement in universities using entropy and TOPSIS method

    Meyliana Meyliana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze students’ social media preference in order to improve student engagement with university by examining social media implementation quality in terms of information and service quality. Design/methodology/approach: Research methodology is started with the hierarchy creation of student engagement with university which then translated into questionnaire. This questionnaire was distributed to 58 universities in Jakarta (Indonesia’s capital. The questionnaire result was analyzed with entropy and TOPSIS method. Findings: In social media implementation quality, information quality is more important than service quality because in social media, a good information quality is really relevant with the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the information. On the other hand regarding service quality, the system availability will help students in their interaction process with university, on top of the service’s efficiency and fulfillment. This directly impacts the cooperation between students, active learning process, and students’ expectation. The social medias students preferred to improve student engagement with universities respectively are LINE, Facebook, Twitter, Wiki, Blog, Instagram, YouTube, Path, LinkedIn, and Podcast. Research limitations/implications: Social media’s role is not only to create student engagement in the learning process, but also other aspects included by Chickering & Gamson (1987. Practical implications: The Social CRM channel shift from electronic into social media shows that social media holds an important role for university since it eases up the communication between university and the students. The good social media management has been an issue that needs to be solved by university by creating a unit or delegate a person that can manage the social media correctly and quickly so the students feel that they get the good service they want. Originality/value: The other researches focus on observing

  15. A new method to extract dental pulp DNA: application to universal detection of bacteria.

    Lam Tran-Hung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental pulp is used for PCR-based detection of DNA derived from host and bacteremic microorganims. Current protocols require odontology expertise for proper recovery of the dental pulp. Dental pulp specimen exposed to laboratory environment yields contaminants detected using universal 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new protocol by encasing decontaminated tooth into sterile resin, extracting DNA into the dental pulp chamber itself and decontaminating PCR reagents by filtration and double restriction enzyme digestion. Application to 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria in 144 teeth collected in 86 healthy people yielded a unique sequence in only 14 teeth (9.7% from 12 individuals (14%. Each individual yielded a unique 16S rDNA sequence in 1-2 teeth per individual. Negative controls remained negative. Bacterial identifications were all confirmed by amplification and sequencing of specific rpoB sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The new protocol prevented laboratory contamination of the dental pulp. It allowed the detection of bacteria responsible for dental pulp colonization from blood and periodontal tissue. Only 10% such samples contained 16S rDNA. It provides a new tool for the retrospective diagnostic of bacteremia by allowing the universal detection of bacterial DNA in animal and human, contemporary or ancient tooth. It could be further applied to identification of host DNA in forensic medicine and anthropology.

  16. A universal laboratory method for determining physical parameters of radon migration in dry granulated porous media.

    Ye, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Feng; Dai, Xin-Tao; Ding, De-Xin

    2017-10-01

    The particle size and heaped methods of exhalation media have important effects on physical parameters, such as the free radon production rate, porosity, permeability, and radon diffusion coefficient. However, existing methods for determining those parameters are too complex, and time-consuming. In this study, a novel, systematic determining method was proposed based on nuclide decay, radon diffusion migration theory, and the mass conservation law, and an associated experimental device was designed and manufactured. The parameters of uranium ore heap and sandy soil of radon diffusion coefficient (D), free radon production rate (α), media permeability (k), and porosity (ε) were obtained. At the same time, the practicality of the novel determining method was improved over other methods, with the results showing that accuracy was within the acceptable range of experimental error. This novel method will be of significance for the study of radon migration and exhalation in granulated porous media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Determination of minimal concentrations of biocorrosion inhibitors by a bioluminescence method in relation to bacteria, participating in biocorrosion].

    Efremenko, E N; Azizov, R E; Makhlis, T A; Abbasov, V M; Varfolomeev, S D

    2005-01-01

    By using a bioluminescence ATP assay, we have determined the minimal concentrations of some biocorrosion inhibitors (Katon, Khazar, VFIKS-82, Nitro-1, Kaspii-2, and Kaspii-4) suppressing most common microbial corrosion agents: Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The cell titers determined by the bioluminescence method, including not only dividing cells but also their dormant living counterparts, are two- to sixfold greater than the values determined microbiologically. It is shown that the bioluminescence method can be applied to determination of cell titers in samples of oil-field waters in the presence of iron ions (up to 260 mM) and iron sulfide (to 186 mg/l) and in the absence or presence of biocidal corrosion inhibitors.

  18. Targeted Facebook Advertising is a Novel and Effective Method of Recruiting Participants into a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness Study

    Subasinghe, Asvini K; Nguyen, Margaret; Wark, John D; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted advertising using social networking sites (SNS) as a recruitment strategy in health research is in its infancy. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of targeted Facebook advertisements to increase recruitment of unvaccinated women into a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness study. Methods Between September 2011 and November 2013, females aged 18 to 25 years, residing in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertiseme...

  19. A universal gamma-gamma method for simultaneous determination of rock and ore properties

    Charbucinski, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of heavy element content, density, borehole diameter and grain size is described, which is based on investigation of the changes in spectrum shape. By analysing these changes in a quantitative manner, information regarding the physical parameters of the medium can be obtained. The results of laboratory tests of the method are presented. (author)

  20. Applying the Balanced Scorecard Strategic Evaluation Method to a University Athletic Department

    THANOS KRIEMADIS, ANDREAS KOTSOVOS & PANAYIOTIS ALEXOPOULOS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Balanced Scorecard (BSC has been extensively used in manufacturing organisations, service organisations, non-profit organisations, and governmental organizations with outstanding results (Kaplan and Norton, 2001b. Performance measures are at the core of the BSC system.However, financial measurement alone does not reflect the organisational mission of governmental and non-profit organisations; rather the mission of government or non-profitorganisation should be placed at top of the BSC in measuring whether such an organisation has been successful. Hence, the greatest difference between businesses and nonprofit organisations lies in the achievement of the mission.The purpose of this article is to present the evaluation of the performance of a University Athletic Department using the balanced scorecard strategic approach which includes four dimensions such as: (a the customer dimension, (b the financial dimension,(c the learning and growth dimension and (d the internal business process dimension.

  1. Understanding gendered aspects of migration aspiration and motives of university students by multivariate statistical methods

    Đula Borozan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the application of multivariate analysis of variance and logistic regression in measuring, explaining and evaluating (i gender differences in expressing migration aspirations, and (ii a gender effect on migration motivation of university students in Croatia. The results supported the thesis that migration is a complex gendering process that assumes subjective assessment of the whole set of interrelated motives. According to logistic regression, gender is a significant predictor of migration aspirations among the selected demographic and socio-economic variables. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that gender and migration aspirations in interaction matter when it comes to migration motives, particularly related to the perceived importance of social networks. Females, and especially those who aspire to migrate, assessed these motives as more important than males.

  2. Sandwich nucleic acid hybridization: a method with a universally usable labeled probe for various specific tests

    Wolf, H.; Leser, U.; Haus, M.; Gu, S.Y.; Pathmanathan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of recombinant m13 phages as hybridization probes offers a considerable advantage over the commonly used recombinant plasmids as the preparation of the DNA probe is very simple and it can easily be labeled directly, e.g. with isotopes with long half-life like 125 I and used for hybridization. However, as the application of nucleic acid hybridization for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes becomes almost unavoidable, the logistic problems of keeping numerous individually labeled hybridization probes increase considerably and may reach prohibitory levels in less well-equipped laboratories. In a new sandwich technique, the first step involves hybridization with an unlabeled recombinant m13 DNA carrying an insert of the desired specificity. In a second step a universally usable labeled probe directed against the m13 part of the recombinant phage DNA is applied. This reduces considerably the problem of preparing and keeping multiple labeled probes in stock. (Auth.)

  3. Fine tuning the teaching methods used for second year university mathematics

    Lim, L. L.; Thiel, D. V.; Searles, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    Second year mathematics is a compulsory course for all students enrolled in engineering and mathematics programmes at the university, and it is taken by approximately 120 students each year. The pass rate of the course had been below expectations in the past years. In order to improve the predicament, quizzes which provided a mark incentive were introduced in 2009 as a pilot study. The pass rate was improved compared to the previous year. Hence, quizzes were added to the course assessment in 2010. This article compares and reports the outcome to the 2009 and 2010 quizzes based on the students' feedback and results at the end of the course. From the data of the surveys, students welcomed the regular quizzes, although the pass rate still did not meet the expectation.

  4. Utilization and discontinuation of contraceptive methods: the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH experience

    Njoku CO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception has an important role to play in reducing the high rate of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Objective: The objective is to determine the prevalence rate, methods and reasons for discontinuation of contraceptive methods at UCTH, Calabar. Method: This was a retrospective study of all clients that utilised different forms of contraceptives at UCTH, Calabar from 1st January, 2009 to 31st December, 2013. Results: A total of 5,381 clients used various methods of contraception while 13,492 live births were recorded giving the prevalence rate of 39.9% of total live birth. Common methods were intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD 1,745(32.8% and injectable contraceptives 1,268(23.8%. Most clients 1,876(35.2% were graduates while 81(1.5% had no formal education. A total of 535(10.1% clients discontinued different family planning method commonly due to desire for pregnancy and side effects. IUCD had the highest discontinuation rate. Conclusion: The study revealed low prevalence rate of contraceptive use which was more among teenagers and illiterate women. The main reasons for discontinuation of different methods were desire for pregnancy, side effects and menopause. Creating more contraceptive awareness, improvement in contraceptive counselling and female education will help to improve contraceptive utilisation rate and reduce discontinuation rate.

  5. Least-squares calibration method based on a universal phase and height mapping formula in Fourier transform profilometry

    Wen, Yongfu; Cheng, Haobo; Gao, Ya; Zhang, Huijing; Feng, Yunpeng; Pan, Baozhu

    2011-01-01

    In Fourier transform profilometry (FTP), we perform a strict theoretical analysis of the phase–height mapping relationship and give a universal calculation formula in which the constraints on the experimental setup are removed. In that case, the projector and camera can be located arbitrarily to get better information on fringes, which makes the system easy to manipulate and improves the speed of measurement. As the relationship between the phase and height distribution depends on system parameters (such as the relative position of the projector and camera) which are difficult to obtain, we propose a least-squares calibration approach for FTP, which can avoid measuring the system parameters directly. Both the simulation and experimental results prove that the 3D shape of the tested objects can be reconstructed exactly by using the calculation formula and calibration method, and that the system has better universality

  6. Neck Flexor and Extensor Muscle Endurance in Subclinical Neck Pain: Intrarater Reliability, Standard Error of Measurement, Minimal Detectable Change, and Comparison With Asymptomatic Participants in a University Student Population.

    Lourenço, Ana S; Lameiras, Carina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess intrarater reliability and to calculate the standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC) for deep neck flexor and neck extensor muscle endurance tests, and compare the results between individuals with and without subclinical neck pain. Participants were students of the University of Aveiro reporting subclinical neck pain and asymptomatic participants matched for sex and age to the neck pain group. Data on endurance capacity of the deep neck flexors and neck extensors were collected by a blinded assessor using the deep neck flexor endurance test and the extensor endurance test, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), SEM, and MDC were calculated for measurements taken within a session by the same assessor. Differences between groups for endurance capacity were investigated using a Mann-Whitney U test. The deep neck flexor endurance test (ICC = 0.71; SEM = 6.91 seconds; MDC = 19.15 seconds) and neck extensor endurance test (ICC = 0.73; SEM = 9.84 minutes; MDC = 2.34 minutes) are reliable. No significant differences were found between participants with and without neck pain for both tests of muscle endurance (P > .05). The endurance capacity of the deep neck flexors and neck extensors can be reliably measured in participants with subclinical neck pain. However, the wide SEM and MDC might limit the sensitivity of these tests. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Optimal systems of means and methods and universal algorithm of decontamination of radio nuclide's contaminated soils

    Kutlakhmedov, Y.; Zezina, N.; Micheev, A.; Jouve, A.; Perepelyatnikov, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper represents our data of comparative analysis of efficacy of different countermeasures in decontamination of soils in Ukraine in total and in case study Milyachi. On this base it was created of optimal algorithm of strategy of decontamination of soils which is based on method of usage turf harvester for unploughed soils and method of phytodesactivation for ploughed soils of Ukraine after Chernobyl accident

  8. The gravitational-optical methods for examination of the hypothesis about galaxies and antigalaxies in the Universe

    Gribov, I. A.; Trigger, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    The optical-gravitational methods for distinction between photons and antiphotons (galaxies, emitting photons and antigalaxies, emitting antiphotons) in the proposed hypothesis of totally gravitationally neutral (TGN)-Universe are considered. These methods are based on the extension of the earlier proposed the gravitationally neutral Universe concept, including now gravitational neutrality of vacuum. This concept contains (i) enlarged unbroken baryon-like, charge, parity and time and full ±M gr gravitational symmetries between all massive elementary particles-antiparticles, including (ia) ordinary matter (OM)-ordinary antimatter (OAM), (ib) dark matter (DM)-dark antimatter (DAM) and (ii) the resulting gravitational repulsion between equally presented (OM+DM)-galactic and (OAM+DAM)-antigalactic clusters, what spatially isolates and preserves their mutual annihilations in the large-scale TGN-Universe. It is assumed the gravitational balance not only between positive and negative gravitational masses of elementary particles and antiparticles, but also between all massless fields of the quantum field theory (QFT), including the opposite gravitational properties of photons and antiphotons, etc, realizing the totally gravitationally neutral vacuum in the QFT. These photons and antiphotons could be distinguishable optically-gravitationally, if one can observe a massive, deviating OM-star or a deviating (OM+DM)-galaxy from our galactic group, moving fast enough on the heavenly sphere, crossing the line directed to spatially separated far-remote galactic clusters (with the visible OM-markers, emitting photons) or antigalactic cluster (with the visible OAM-markers, emitting antiphotons). The deviations and gravitational microlensing with temporarily increased or decreased brightness of their OM and OAM rays will be opposite, indicating the galaxies and antigalaxies in the Universe.

  9. Development of self-awareness after severe traumatic brain injury through participation in occupation-based rehabilitation: mixed-methods analysis of a case series.

    Doig, Emmah; Kuipers, Pim; Prescott, Sarah; Cornwell, Petrea; Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We examined participation in goal planning and development of self-awareness for people with impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury. METHOD. We performed a mixed-methods study of 8 participants recently discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. Self-awareness was measured using discrepancy between self and significant other ratings on the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI-4) at four time points. We calculated effect size to evaluate the change in MPAI-4 discrepancy over time. RESULTS. Seven participants identified their own goals. We found a large reduction in mean MPAI-4 discrepancy (M = 8.57, SD = 6.59, N = 7, d = 1.08) in the first 6 wk and a further small reduction (M = 5.33, SD = 9.09, N = 6, d = 0.45) in the second 6 wk of intervention. Case data indicated that 7 participants demonstrated some growth in self-awareness. CONCLUSION. Engagement in occupation-based, goal-directed rehabilitation appeared to foster awareness of injury-related changes to varying extents. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. Authoring Participation

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear...

  11. Towards a unified study of extreme events using universality concepts and transdisciplinary analysis methods

    Balasis, George; Donner, Reik V.; Donges, Jonathan F.; Radebach, Alexander; Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of many complex systems is characterized by the same universal principles. In particular, systems which are otherwise quite different in nature show striking similarities in their behavior near tipping points (bifurcations, phase transitions, sudden regime shifts) and associated extreme events. Such critical phenomena are frequently found in diverse fields such as climate, seismology, or financial markets. Notably, the observed similarities include a high degree of organization, persistent behavior, and accelerated energy release, which are common to (among others) phenomena related to geomagnetic variability of the terrestrial magnetosphere (intense magnetic storms), seismic activity (electromagnetic emissions prior to earthquakes), solar-terrestrial physics (solar flares), neurophysiology (epileptic seizures), and socioeconomic systems (stock market crashes). It is an open question whether the spatial and temporal complexity associated with extreme events arises from the system's structural organization (geometry) or from the chaotic behavior inherent to the nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of these phenomena. On the one hand, the presence of scaling laws associated with earthquakes and geomagnetic disturbances suggests understanding these events as generalized phase transitions similar to nucleation and critical phenomena in thermal and magnetic systems. On the other hand, because of the structural organization of the systems (e.g., as complex networks) the associated spatial geometry and/or topology of interactions plays a fundamental role in the emergence of extreme events. Here, a few aspects of the interplay between geometry and dynamics (critical phase transitions) that could result in the emergence of extreme events, which is an open problem, will be discussed.

  12. Establishment of hybridized focus measure functions as a universal method for autofocusing

    Shah, Mohammad Imran; Mishra, Smriti; Rout, Chittaranjan

    2017-12-01

    Exact focusing is essential for any automatic image capturing system. Performances of focus measure functions (FMFs) used for autofocusing are sensitive to image contents and imaging systems. Therefore, identification of universal FMF assumes a lot of significance. Eight FMFs were hybridized in pairs of two and implemented simultaneously on a single stack to calculate the hybrid focus measure. In total, 28 hybrid FMFs (HFMFs) and eight FMFs were implemented on stacks of images from three different imaging modalities. Performance of FMFs was found to the best at 50% region sampling. Accuracy, focus error, and false maxima were calculated to evaluate the performance of each FMF. Nineteen HFMFs provided >90% accuracy. Image distortion (noise, contrast, saturation, illumination, etc.) was performed to evaluate robustness of HFMFs. Hybrid of tenengrad variance and steerable filter-based (VGRnSFB) FMFs was identified as the most robust and accurate function with an accuracy of ≥90% and a relatively lower focus error and false maxima rate. Sharpness of focus curve of VGRnSFB along with eight individual FMFs was also computed to determine the efficacy of HFMF for the optimization process. VGRnSFB HFMF may be implemented for automated capturing of an image for any imaging system.

  13. The experimental learning method for environmental education (Tamet in students from the National University of Central Perú

    Rosa Haydeé Zárate Quiñones

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in order to apply the experimental method of learning for Sustainable Development in students of the Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Sciences of the National University of Central Peru. For its development we worked with a sample of 1062 students and a quasi-experimental design was used. Were employed different methods of mathematical theoretical, empirical and statistical level that allowed data collection, analysis and interpretation of results. A test of knowledge in Environmental Education for Sustainable Development to students, a questionnaire of perception and opinion, as well as a questionnaire of teacher training was applied. The experimental method used allowed the development of knowledge, habits and environmental values for sustainable development in students, contributing to the protection and conservation of the environment.

  14. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF

    Jing Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Results Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %, never married (83.5 %, unemployed (94.2 %, and without a bank account (66.0 %. Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure, and depression (57.3 %. Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48

  15. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. Objectives (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Methods Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Results Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was

  16. The DESARC method: An effective approach for university-industry cooperation

    Aksit, Mehmet; Tekinerdogan, B.; Sözer, Hasan; Safi, Hakan Faruk; Ayas, Meryem

    Achieving excellence in software development techniques is an important issue for the organizations that develop advanced software-intensive products. Within this context, software excellence is defined as the adoption of advanced software techniques and methods to cope with the complexity and the

  17. Greening a Chemistry Teaching Methods Course at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Hj Ismail, Zurida; Mohamed, Norita

    2011-01-01

    Green chemistry is the design, development and implementation of chemical products and processes to reduce or eliminate the use of sub-stances hazardous to human health and the environment. This article reports on the integration of green chemistry and sustainable development concepts (SDCs) into an existing teaching methods course for chemistry…

  18. Signature Pedagogies and Legal Education in Universities: Epistemological and Pedagogical Concerns with Langdellian Case Method

    Hyland, Aine; Kilcommins, Shane

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of Lee S. Shulman's concept of "signature pedagogies" as it relates to legal education. In law, the signature pedagogy identified by Shulman is the Langdellian case method. Though the concept of signature pedagogies provides an excellent infrastructure for the exchange of teaching ideas, Shulman has a tendency to…

  19. Study on behaviors and performances of universal N-glycopeptide enrichment methods.

    Xue, Yu; Xie, Juanjuan; Fang, Pan; Yao, Jun; Yan, Guoquan; Shen, Huali; Yang, Pengyuan

    2018-04-16

    Glycosylation is a crucial process in protein biosynthesis. However, the analysis of glycopeptides through MS remains challenging due to the microheterogeneity and macroheterogeneity of the glycoprotein. Selective enrichment of glycopeptides from complex samples prior to MS analysis is essential for successful glycoproteome research. In this work, we systematically investigated the behaviors and performances of boronic acid chemistry, ZIC-HILIC, and PGC of glycopeptide enrichment to promote understanding of these methods. We also optimized boronic acid chemistry and ZIC-HILIC enrichment methods and applied them to enrich glycopeptides from mouse liver. The intact N-glycopeptides were interpreted using the in-house analysis software pGlyco 2.0. We found that boronic acid chemistry in this study preferred to capture glycopeptides with high mannose glycans, ZIC-HILIC enriched most N-glycopeptides and did not show significant preference during enrichment and PGC was not suitable for separating glycopeptides with a long amino acid sequence. We performed a detailed study on the behaviors and performances of boronic acid chemistry, ZIC-HILIC, and PGC enrichment methods and provide a better understanding of enrichment methods for further glycoproteomics research.

  20. Implementing a Flipped Classroom Approach in a University Numerical Methods Mathematics Course

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a "flipped classroom" approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an…

  1. Generalization of opinions for forms and methods of teaching used od lower stages of universities

    Rudolf Šrámek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Competent persons show, that more than 90% of teachers of Czech elementary schools and secondary schools until and since of 90-s of last century used and still use stereotype forms and methods of teaching; these procedures, which are little autonomic, formative and social. Procedures of sharing know- ledge to students and underestimating of deducing of knowledge with students.

  2. Generative Knowledge Interviewing: A Method for Knowledge Transfer and Talent Management at the University of Michigan

    Peet, Melissa R.; Walsh, Katherine; Sober, Robin; Rawak, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Experts and leaders within most fields possess knowledge that is largely tacit and unconscious in nature. The leaders of most organizations do not "know what they know" and cannot share their knowledge with others. The loss of this essential knowledge is of major concern to organizations. This study tested an innovative method of tacit…

  3. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    Snyder, Susan M.; Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) family connectedness, (2) family conflict/family disconnection, and (3) family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area. PMID:26658077

  4. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation.

    Susan M Snyder

    Full Text Available This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1 family connectedness, (2 family conflict/family disconnection, and (3 family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area.

  5. Participation of HIV prevention programs among men who have sex with men in two cities of China—a mixed method study

    Ma Wei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various HIV prevention programs targeting men who have sex with men (MSM are operating in China, whether and how these programs are being utilized is unclear. This study explores participation of HIV prevention programs and influencing factors among MSM in two cities in China. Methods This is a mixed-method study conducted in Beijing and Chongqing. A qualitative study consisting of in-depth interviews with 54 MSM, 11 key informants, and 8 focus group discussions, a cross-sectional survey using respondent-driven sampling among 998 MSM were conducted in 2009 and 2010 respectively to elicit information on MSM’s perception and utilization of HIV prevention programs. Qualitative findings were integrated with quantitative multivariate factors to explain the quantitative findings. Results Fifty-six percent of MSM in Chongqing and 75.1% in Beijing ever participated in at least one type of HIV prevention program (P=0.001. Factors related to participation in HIV prevention programs included age, ethnicity, income, HIV risk perception, living with boyfriend, living in urban area, size of MSM social network, having talked about HIV status with partners, and knowing someone who is HIV positive. Reasons why MSM did not participate in HIV prevention programs included logistical concerns like limited time for participation and distance to services; program content and delivery issues such as perceived low quality services and distrust of providers; and, cultural issues like HIV-related stigma and low risk perception. Conclusions The study shows that there is much room for improvement in reaching MSM in China. HIV prevention programs targeting MSM in China may need to be more comprehensive and incorporate the cultural, logistic and HIV-related needs of the population in order to effectively reach and affect this population’s risk for HIV.

  6. Improving communication when seeking informed consent: a randomised controlled study of a computer-based method for providing information to prospective clinical trial participants.

    Karunaratne, Asuntha S; Korenman, Stanley G; Thomas, Samantha L; Myles, Paul S; Komesaroff, Paul A

    2010-04-05

    To assess the efficacy, with respect to participant understanding of information, of a computer-based approach to communication about complex, technical issues that commonly arise when seeking informed consent for clinical research trials. An open, randomised controlled study of 60 patients with diabetes mellitus, aged 27-70 years, recruited between August 2006 and October 2007 from the Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Alfred Hospital and Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne. Participants were asked to read information about a mock study via a computer-based presentation (n = 30) or a conventional paper-based information statement (n = 30). The computer-based presentation contained visual aids, including diagrams, video, hyperlinks and quiz pages. Understanding of information as assessed by quantitative and qualitative means. Assessment scores used to measure level of understanding were significantly higher in the group that completed the computer-based task than the group that completed the paper-based task (82% v 73%; P = 0.005). More participants in the group that completed the computer-based task expressed interest in taking part in the mock study (23 v 17 participants; P = 0.01). Most participants from both groups preferred the idea of a computer-based presentation to the paper-based statement (21 in the computer-based task group, 18 in the paper-based task group). A computer-based method of providing information may help overcome existing deficiencies in communication about clinical research, and may reduce costs and improve efficiency in recruiting participants for clinical trials.

  7. Beyond statistical methods: teaching critical thinking to first-year university students

    David, Irene; Brown, Jennifer Ann

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a major change in the way we teach our first-year statistics course. We have redesigned this course with emphasis on teaching critical thinking. We recognized that most of the students take the course for general knowledge and support of other majors, and very few are planning to major in statistics. We identified the essential aspects of a first-year statistics course, given this student mix, focusing on a simple question, 'Given this is the last chance you have to teach statistics, what are the essential skills students need?' We have moved from thinking about statistics skills needed for a statistician to skills needed to participate in today's society. We have changed the way we deliver the course with less emphasis on lectures and more on alternative resources including on-line tutorials, Excel, computer-based skills testing, web-based learning materials and smaller group activities such as study groups and example classes. Feedback from students shows that they are very receptive and enthusiastic.

  8. Health Attitudes and Suicidal Ideation among University Students

    Ashrafioun, Lisham; Bonar, Erin; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether positive health attitudes are associated with suicidal ideation among university students after accounting for other health risk factors linked to suicidal ideation. Participants: Participants were 690 undergraduates from a large midwestern university during fall semester 2011. Methods:…

  9. Universal exergy analysis method and its application%泛(火用)分析方法及其应用

    蒋爱华; 梅炽; 时章明

    2011-01-01

    为分析和评价原材料、能源、资金、劳动力等不同类别的要素资源在生产过程中的综合利用情况,提出泛(火用)概念和泛(火用)分析方法,建立系统的泛(火用)分析和评价模型,定义泛(火用)利用系数和可持续发展指数等量化指标.利用泛(火用)分析方法和模型对SKS炼铅系统和太阳能光伏发电系统进行分析和评价.研究结果表明:SKS炼铅系统等冶金生产系统的泛(火用)利用系数很低,可持续发展性较差,节能措施应以降低这类生产系统的不可再生资源特别是不可再生能源的消耗为主;太阳能光伏系统的町持续发展性能优越,其节能工作应以降低太阳能电池的制造成本和设备安装成本为主.%To analyze the situation of comprehensive utilization of different kinds of resources such as material, energy,funds, labor force, the concept of uinversal exergy was defined and the universal exergy analysis method was put forward,some models for analysis and evaluation of universal exergy of systems were established, and some quantitative indicators such as utilization coefficient of universal exergy and sustainable development index were defined.Universal exergy analysis method and the models were used to evaluate a SKS lead smelting system and one of solar photovoltaic power generation systems.The results show that both the coefficient of utilization of universal exergy and the sustainable development index of metallurgical production systems like the SKS lead smelting system are lower, the energy-saving measures for such systems should be focused on reducing the consumption of unrenewable resources, especially unrenewable energy, and that solar photovoltaic power generation systems are very well in sustainable development, and the focus of the energy saving work is on reducing cost in manufacturing solar photovoltaic cells and the installation cost of the solar photovoltaic power systems.

  10. Computer-aided head film analysis: the University of California San Francisco method.

    Baumrind, S; Miller, D M

    1980-07-01

    Computer technology is already assuming an important role in the management of orthodontic practices. The next 10 years are likely to see expansion in computer usage into the areas of diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment-record keeping. In the areas of diagnosis and treatment planning, one of the first problems to be attacked will be the automation of head film analysis. The problems of constructing computer-aided systems for this purpose are considered herein in the light of the authors' 10 years of experience in developing a similar system for research purposes. The need for building in methods for automatic detection and correction of gross errors is discussed and the authors' method for doing so is presented. The construction of a rudimentary machine-readable data base for research and clinical purposes is described.

  11. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-08-10

    Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was less cost effective in later endpoints

  12. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  13. Determining nurses\\' clinical competence in hospitals of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences by self assessment method

    Masood mahreini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses’ self awareness of their own level of clinical competence is essential in maintaining high standards of care and identifying areas of educational need and professional development. Self-assessment is a method for measuring clinical competence, and encourages nurses to use reflective thinking and take an active part in the learning process. Although nurse competence may vary between hospitals, very few studies have been done on this subject. Methods: In this cross sectional study, we analyzed clinical competency of 190 registered nurses working in different hospitals in Bushehr by self assessment method. The instrument for data collection was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 73 items from seven categories which were devised from Benner's “from Novice to Expert” framework. The level of competence was assessed on a scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using the competencies was assessed on a Likert scale. Results: the nurses reported their overall level of competence as “good” (51-75. They felt more competent in the categories of “managing situations” and “helping role” (with maximum score of 79.54 and least competent in “teaching – coaching” and “ensuring quality” categories (with minimum score of 61.15. The frequency of practicing competencies had a positive correlation with the level of nursing clinical competence. Conclusion: The level of nursing competence and frequency of using competencies varied in different hospitals. Although the nurses reported their overall level of competence as good, we should be concerned about 24% of competencies which are not used by the nurses, especially in "teaching – coaching" and "ensuring quality" categories.

  14. Participation, Care and Support

    Prof. dr. Jean Pierre Wilken

    2017-01-01

    The research group Participation, Care and Support is part of the Research Centre for Social Innovation of Utrecht University for Applied Sciences. This is a transdisciplinary research centre, doing practice based research focused on relevant social issues, connecting different fields like social

  15. In Their Own Words: The Significance of Participant Perceptions in Assessing Entomology Citizen Science Learning Outcomes Using a Mixed Methods Approach.

    Lynch, Louise I; Dauer, Jenny M; Babchuk, Wayne A; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Golick, Doug

    2018-02-06

    A mixed methods study was used to transcend the traditional pre-, post-test approach of citizen science evaluative research by integrating adults' test scores with their perceptions. We assessed how contributory entomology citizen science affects participants' science self-efficacy, self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Pre- and post-test score analyses from citizen scientists ( n = 28) and a control group ( n = 72) were coupled with interviews ( n = 11) about science experiences and entomological interactions during participation. Considering quantitative data alone, no statistically significant changes were evident in adults following participation in citizen science when compared to the control group. Citizen scientists' pre-test scores were significantly higher than the control group for self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Interview data reveal a notable discrepancy between measured and perceived changes. In general, citizen scientists had an existing, long-term affinity for the natural world and perceived increases in their science self-efficacy, self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Perceived influences may act independently of test scores. Scale instruments may not show impacts with variances in individual's prior knowledge and experiences. The value of mixed methods on citizen science program evaluation is discussed.

  16. Introducing Problem-Solving Method in the Business School of a Brazilian University

    Lilian A. P. Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article has as the primary objective discussing the cultural roadblocks faced as part of the process of introducing a new method in a traditional educational institution, as well as showing the preliminary results of that effort, besides proposing some ideas of breaking the resistances. It also emphasizes the difficult to break the institutional mental model of producing only academic theoretical works as a way of achieving goals, no matter the quality of new knowledge and expertise created. The first results showed that 30% of the professors are "risking" themselves on the new method. The students involved – almost 400 – seem to be a little more confident, choosing the new rather than the "traditional". It appears that they foresee much more opportunities than the professors do. The preliminary results show that some new steps are required. If the resistances are deeply understood, they maybe can be diminished and broken. Another important point to be emphasized is that being in strict contact with the market would help them to develop their classes, enriching with updated and local examples.

  17. Universal method for protein bioconjugation with nanocellulose scaffolds for increased cell adhesion.

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Sämfors, Sanna; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is an emerging biomaterial since it is biocompatible, integrates well with host tissue and can be biosynthesized in desired architecture. However, being a hydrogel, it exhibits low affinity for cell attachment, which is crucial for the cellular fate process. To increase cell attachment, the surface of BNC scaffolds was modified with two proteins, fibronectin and collagen type I, using an effective bioconjugation method applying 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium (CDAP) tetrafluoroborate as the intermediate catalytic agent. The effect of CDAP treatment on cell adhesion to the BNC surface is shown for human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the mouse mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2. In both cases, the surface modification increased the number of cells attached to the surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells indicated more healthy and viable cells. CDAP activation of bacterial nanocellulose is shown to be a convenient method to conjugate extracellular proteins to the scaffold surfaces. CDAP treatment can be performed in a short period of time in an aqueous environment under heterogeneous and mild conditions preserving the nanofibrillar network of cellulose. © 2013.

  18. Implementing a flipped classroom approach in a university numerical methods mathematics course

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a 'flipped classroom' approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an examination of the attitudes of the 2014 cohort to the approach in general as well as analysing their use of the videos. Based on these responses, the instructor makes a number of changes (for example, the use of 'cloze' summary notes and the introduction of an extra, optional tutorial class) before repeating the 'flipped classroom' approach the following year. The attitudes to the approach and the video usage of the 2015 cohort are then compared with the 2014 cohort and further changes that could be implemented for the next cohort are suggested.

  19. Survey nonresponse among ethnic minorities in a national health survey--a mixed-method study of participation, barriers, and potentials.

    Ahlmark, Nanna; Algren, Maria Holst; Holmberg, Teresa; Norredam, Marie Louise; Nielsen, Signe Smith; Blom, Astrid Benedikte; Bo, Anne; Juel, Knud

    2015-01-01

    The participation rate in the Danish National Health Survey (DNHS) 2010 was significantly lower among ethnic minorities than ethnic Danes. The purpose was to characterize nonresponse among ethnic minorities in DNHS, analyze variations in item nonresponse, and investigate barriers and incentives to participation. This was a mixed-method study. Logistic regression was used to analyze nonresponse using data from DNHS (N = 177,639 and chi-square tests in item nonresponse analyses. We explored barriers and incentives regarding participation through focus groups and cognitive interviews. Informants included immigrants and their descendants of both sexes, with and without higher education. The highest nonresponse rate was for non-Western descendants (80.0%) and immigrants 25 (72.3%) with basic education. Immigrants and descendants had higher odds ratios (OR = 3.07 and OR = 3.35, respectively) for nonresponse than ethnic Danes when adjusted for sex, age, marital status, and education. Non-Western immigrants had higher item nonresponse in several question categories. Barriers to non-participation related to the content, language, format, and layout of both the questionnaire and the cover letter. The sender and setting in which to receive the questionnaire also influenced answering incentives. We observed differences in barriers and incentives between immigrants and descendants. Nonresponse appears related to linguistic and/or educational limitations, to alienation generated by the questions' focus on disease and cultural assumptions, or mistrust regarding anonymity. Ethnic minorities seem particularly affected by such barriers. To increase survey participation, questions could be sensitized to reflect multicultural traditions, and the impact of sender and setting considered.

  20. A valence-universal coupled-cluster single- and double-excitations method for atoms: Pt. 3

    Jankowski, K.; Malinowski, P.

    1994-01-01

    To better understand the problems met when solving the equations of VU-CC approaches in the presence of intruder states, we are concerned with the following aspects of the solvability problem for sets of non-linear equations: the existence and properties of multiple solutions and the attainability of these solutions by means of various numerical methods. Our study is concentrated on the equations obtained for Be within the framework of the recently formulated atomically oriented form of the valence-universal coupled-cluster theory accounting for one- and two-electron excitations (VU-CCSD/R) and based on the complete model space (2s 2 , 2p 2 ). Six pairs of multiple solutions representing four 1 S states are found and discussed. Three of these solutions provide amplitudes describing the 2p 2 1 S state for which the intruder state problem has been considered as extremely serious. Several known numerical methods have been applied to solve the same set of non-linear equations for the two-valence cluster amplitudes. It is shown that these methods perform quite differently in the presence of intruder states, which seems to indicate that the intruder state problem for VU-CC methods is partly caused by the commonly used methods of solving the non-linear equations. (author)

  1. Working towards consensus on methods used to elicit participant-reported safety data in uncomplicated malaria clinical drug studies: a Delphi technique study.

    Mandimika, Nyaradzo; Barnes, Karen I; Chandler, Clare I R; Pace, Cheryl; Allen, Elizabeth N

    2017-01-28

    Eliciting adverse event (AE) and non-study medication data reports from clinical research participants is integral to evaluating drug safety. However, using different methods to question participants yields inconsistent results, compromising the interpretation, comparison and pooling of data across studies. This is particularly important given the widespread use of anti-malarials in vulnerable populations, and their increasing use in healthy, but at-risk individuals, as preventive treatment or to reduce malaria transmission. Experienced and knowledgeable anti-malarial drug clinical researchers were invited to participate in a Delphi technique study, to facilitate consensus on what are considered optimal (relevant, important and feasible) methods, tools, and approaches for detecting participant-reported AE and non-study medication data in uncomplicated malaria treatment studies. Of 72 invited, 25, 16 and 10 panellists responded to the first, second and third rounds of the Delphi, respectively. Overall, 68% (68/100) of all questioning items presented for rating achieved consensus. When asking general questions about health, panellists agreed on the utility of a question/concept about any change in health, taking care to ensure that such questions/concepts do not imply causality. Eighty-nine percent (39/44) of specific signs and symptoms questions were rated as optimal. For non-study medications, a general question and most structured questioning items were considered an optimal approach. The use of mobile phones, patient diaries, rating scales as well as openly engaging with participants to discuss concerns were also considered optimal complementary data-elicitation tools. This study succeeded in reaching consensus within a section of the anti-malarial drug clinical research community about using a general question concept, and structured questions for eliciting data about AEs and non-study medication reports. The concepts and items considered in this Delphi to be

  2. University Learning Systems for Participative Courses.

    Billingham, Carol J.; Harper, William W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the instructional development of a course for advanced finance students on the use of data files and/or databases for solving complex finance problems. Areas covered include course goals and the design. The course class schedule and sample learning assessment assignments are provided. (JD)

  3. Comparisons in the Organisation, Methods, and Results of the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (Spain) and The Open University of The United Kingdom.

    James, Arthur

    The organization, methods, and outcomes of the distance education systems at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED) in Spain and The Open University of the United Kingdom are compared. The following topics are covered: higher education in Spain, UNED's ideology, student characteristics in both universities, organization,…

  4. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  5. Plans of Implementation and Methods for Increasing Student Enrollment in the Earth Systems Science Course at Elizabeth City State University

    Porter, W.

    2001-12-01

    This presentation reviews the experience of Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in offering the Earth Systems Science (ESS) online course sponsored the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) and how it relates to our plans to offer the course in the Spring Semester of 2002. The course was offered for the first time at ECSU during the Fall semester 2000. Eight students were enrolled in the course, which may not be considered a large number; however, we felt the administration of the course was successful because of the staff's learning experience. The small number is also a reflection of the nature of ECSU's primary recruitment region of northeastern North Carolina; this area is extremely rural with a smaller population, lower economic development, and fewer cultural amenities than most regions of the state. Our approach to this project is for a long-term effective offering of a course that is much needed, especially in this area of the state. The ultimate goal is to develop ESS as our online offering of courses in the Geoscience Department curriculum as to recruit students who might not have the opportunity to take college-level courses because of daytime work commitments and/or inaccessibility to a local college or university. A major component of ESS is its focus on problem-based learning built upon the life experiences of participating students. Having learned from the previous offering of the course, the following are objectives related to the Spring Semester 2002: 1. To get ESS to become a part of the Geoscience curriculum so that it will be listed on the schedule of classes for the Spring Semester 2002 and each succeeding semester; 2. To aggressively reach out to the public school teachers, especially in the recruitment region of ECSU in northeastern North Carolina, by using effective recruitment strategies; 3. To have an active and continuous communication with prospective students prior to and immediately after the enrollment, as well as being

  6. An efficient method to find potentially universal population genetic markers, applied to metazoans

    Chenuil Anne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the impressive growth of sequence databases, the limited availability of nuclear markers that are sufficiently polymorphic for population genetics and phylogeography and applicable across various phyla restricts many potential studies, particularly in non-model organisms. Numerous introns have invariant positions among kingdoms, providing a potential source for such markers. Unfortunately, most of the few known EPIC (Exon Primed Intron Crossing loci are restricted to vertebrates or belong to multigenic families. Results In order to develop markers with broad applicability, we designed a bioinformatic approach aimed at avoiding multigenic families while identifying intron positions conserved across metazoan phyla. We developed a program facilitating the identification of EPIC loci which allowed slight variation in intron position. From the Homolens databases we selected 29 gene families which contained 52 promising introns for which we designed 93 primer pairs. PCR tests were performed on several ascidians, echinoderms, bivalves and cnidarians. On average, 24 different introns per genus were amplified in bilaterians. Remarkably, five of the introns successfully amplified in all of the metazoan genera tested (a dozen genera, including cnidarians. The influence of several factors on amplification success was investigated. Success rate was not related to the phylogenetic relatedness of a taxon to the groups that most influenced primer design, showing that these EPIC markers are extremely conserved in animals. Conclusions Our new method now makes it possible to (i rapidly isolate a set of EPIC markers for any phylum, even outside the animal kingdom, and thus, (ii compare genetic diversity at potentially homologous polymorphic loci between divergent taxa.

  7. Application of numerical methods, derivatives theory and Monte Carlo simulation in evaluating BM&F BOVESPA's POP (Protected and Participative Investment

    Giuliano Carrozza Uzêda Iorio de Souza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a practical case in which two of the most efficient numerical procedures developed for derivative analysis are applied to evaluate the POP (Investment Protection with Participation, a structured operation created by São Paulo Stock Exchange - BM&FBOVESPA. The first procedure solves the differential equation through the use of implicit finite differences method. Due to its characteristics, the approach makes it possible to run sensitivity analysis as well as price estimation. In the second, the problem is solved by Monte Carlo simulation, which facilitates the identification of the probability related to the exercise of the embedded options.

  8. A Universal Method for Species Identification of Mammals Utilizing Next Generation Sequencing for the Analysis of DNA Mixtures

    Tillmar, Andreas O.; Dell'Amico, Barbara; Welander, Jenny; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Species identification can be interesting in a wide range of areas, for example, in forensic applications, food monitoring and in archeology. The vast majority of existing DNA typing methods developed for species determination, mainly focuses on a single species source. There are, however, many instances where all species from mixed sources need to be determined, even when the species in minority constitutes less than 1 % of the sample. The introduction of next generation sequencing opens new possibilities for such challenging samples. In this study we present a universal deep sequencing method using 454 GS Junior sequencing of a target on the mitochondrial gene 16S rRNA. The method was designed through phylogenetic analyses of DNA reference sequences from more than 300 mammal species. Experiments were performed on artificial species-species mixture samples in order to verify the method’s robustness and its ability to detect all species within a mixture. The method was also tested on samples from authentic forensic casework. The results showed to be promising, discriminating over 99.9 % of mammal species and the ability to detect multiple donors within a mixture and also to detect minor components as low as 1 % of a mixed sample. PMID:24358309

  9. Implementing music therapy on an adolescent inpatient unit: a mixed-methods evaluation of acceptability, experience of participation and perceived impact.

    Patterson, Sue; Duhig, Michael; Darbyshire, Chris; Counsel, Robin; Higgins, Niall; Williams, Ian

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to assess the feasibility of delivering a music therapy program on adolescent psychiatric wards. We undertook a mixed-methods evaluation of a pilot program. Various active and receptive techniques were employed in group music therapy sessions delivered as part of a structured clinical program. Data collected in interviews with participants and staff and feedback questionnaires were thematically and descriptively analysed and triangulated. Data from 62 questionnaires returned by 43 patients who took part in 16 music therapy sessions, and seven staff, evidenced strong support for music therapy. Patients typically reported experiencing sessions as relaxing, comforting, uplifting, and empowering; >90% would participate by choice and use music therapeutically in the future. Staff endorsed music therapy as valuable therapeutically, reporting that patients engaged enthusiastically and identified sessions as improving their own moods and ward milieu. Integration of music therapy in inpatient treatment of adolescents is feasible and acceptable, and is valued by staff and patients as a complement to 'talking therapies'. Participation is enjoyed and associated with outcomes including improvement in mood, expression of feelings and social engagement consistent with recovery. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. Developing a service user informed intervention to improve participation and ability to perform daily activities in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a mixed-methods study protocol.

    Hackett, Katie L; Newton, Julia L; Deane, Katherine H O; Rapley, Tim; Deary, Vincent; Kolehmainen, Niina; Lendrem, Dennis; Ng, Wan-Fai

    2014-08-21

    A significant proportion of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) is functionally impaired and experience difficulties participating in various aspects of everyday life. There is currently no evidence of efficacy for non-pharmacological interventions aimed specifically at supporting the patients with PSS to improve their participation and ability to perform daily activities. This paper describes a research protocol for a mixed-methods study to develop an intervention to improve these outcomes. The protocol follows the Medical Research Council framework for complex interventions. We will use group concept mapping with the patients, adults who live with them and healthcare professionals to identify factors which prevent people with PSS from participating in daily life and performing daily activities. The factors will be prioritised by participants for importance and feasibility and will inform an intervention to be delivered within a National Health Service (NHS) setting. Evidence-based intervention techniques will be identified for the prioritised factors and combined into a deliverable intervention package. Key stakeholders will comment on the intervention content and mode of delivery through focus groups, and the data will be used to refine the intervention. The acceptability and feasibility of the refined intervention will be evaluated in a future study. The study has been approved by an NHS Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference: 13/NI/0190. The findings of this study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and through presentation at national and international conferences. UKCRN Study ID: 15939. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Analog model of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in Bose-Einstein condensates: Application of the classical field method

    Jain, Piyush; Weinfurtner, Silke; Visser, Matt; Gardiner, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Analog models of gravity have been motivated by the possibility of investigating phenomena not readily accessible in their cosmological counterparts. In this paper, we investigate the analog of cosmological particle creation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe by numerically simulating a Bose-Einstein condensate with a time-dependent scattering length. In particular, we focus on a two-dimensional homogeneous condensate using the classical field method via the truncated Wigner approximation. We show that for various forms of the scaling function the particle production is consistent with the underlying theory in the long wavelength limit. In this context, we further discuss the implications of modified dispersion relations that arise from the microscopic theory of a weakly interacting Bose gas

  12. Teaching Power Electronics with a Design-Oriented and Project-Based Learning Method at the Technical University of Denmark

    Zhang, Zhe; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a fast developing technology within the electrical engineering field. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from DesignOriented Project Based Learning of switch-mode power supply design within a power electronics course at the Technical University of Denmark...... (DTU). Project-based learning (PBL) is known to be a motivating and problem-centered teaching method that not only places students at the core of the teaching and learning activities but also gives students the ability to transfer their acquired scientific knowledge into industrial practices. Students...... are asked to choose a specification from different power converter applications such as a fuel cell power conditioning converter, a light-emitting diode (LED) driver or a battery charger. Based upon their choice, the students select topology, design magnetic components, calculate input/output filters...

  13. Introducing Research Methods to Undergraduate Majors Through an On-Campus Observatory with The University of Toledo's Ritter Observatory

    Richardson, Noel; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Ritter Observing Team

    2017-01-01

    With a 1-m telescope on the University of Toledo (OH) main campus, we have initiated a grad student-undergraduate partnership to help teach the undergraduates observational methods and introduce them to research through peer mentorship. For the last 3 years, we have trained up to 21 undergraduates (primarily physics/astronomy majors) in a given academic semester, ranging from freshman to seniors. Various projects are currently being conducted by undergraduate students with guidance from graduate student mentors, including constructing three-color images, observations of transiting exoplanets, and determination of binary star orbits from echelle spectra. This academic year we initiated a large group research project to help students learn about the databases, journal repositories, and online observing tools astronomers use for day-to-day research. We discuss early inclusion in observational astronomy and research of these students and the impact it has on departmental retention, undergraduate involvement, and academic success.

  14. In Their Own Words: The Significance of Participant Perceptions in Assessing Entomology Citizen Science Learning Outcomes Using a Mixed Methods Approach

    Lynch, Louise I.; Dauer, Jenny M.; Babchuk, Wayne A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany

    2018-01-01

    A mixed methods study was used to transcend the traditional pre-, post-test approach of citizen science evaluative research by integrating adults’ test scores with their perceptions. We assessed how contributory entomology citizen science affects participants’ science self-efficacy, self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Pre- and post-test score analyses from citizen scientists (n = 28) and a control group (n = 72) were coupled with interviews (n = 11) about science experiences and entomological interactions during participation. Considering quantitative data alone, no statistically significant changes were evident in adults following participation in citizen science when compared to the control group. Citizen scientists’ pre-test scores were significantly higher than the control group for self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Interview data reveal a notable discrepancy between measured and perceived changes. In general, citizen scientists had an existing, long-term affinity for the natural world and perceived increases in their science self-efficacy, self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects. Perceived influences may act independently of test scores. Scale instruments may not show impacts with variances in individual’s prior knowledge and experiences. The value of mixed methods on citizen science program evaluation is discussed. PMID:29415522

  15. Politicising participation

    Calderon, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of local communities in public space planning and design processes is widely promoted as an essential element of landscape architecture and urban design practice. Despite this, there has been little theorisation of this topic within these fields. Furthermore, the implementation of ideals and principles commonly found in theory are far from becoming mainstream practice, indicating a significant gap between the theory and practice of participation. This thesis aims to contri...

  16. CORALINA: a universal method for the generation of gRNA libraries for CRISPR-based screening.

    Köferle, Anna; Worf, Karolina; Breunig, Christopher; Baumann, Valentin; Herrero, Javier; Wiesbeck, Maximilian; Hutter, Lukas H; Götz, Magdalena; Fuchs, Christiane; Beck, Stephan; Stricker, Stefan H

    2016-11-14

    The bacterial CRISPR system is fast becoming the most popular genetic and epigenetic engineering tool due to its universal applicability and adaptability. The desire to deploy CRISPR-based methods in a large variety of species and contexts has created an urgent need for the development of easy, time- and cost-effective methods enabling large-scale screening approaches. Here we describe CORALINA (comprehensive gRNA library generation through controlled nuclease activity), a method for the generation of comprehensive gRNA libraries for CRISPR-based screens. CORALINA gRNA libraries can be derived from any source of DNA without the need of complex oligonucleotide synthesis. We show the utility of CORALINA for human and mouse genomic DNA, its reproducibility in covering the most relevant genomic features including regulatory, coding and non-coding sequences and confirm the functionality of CORALINA generated gRNAs. The simplicity and cost-effectiveness make CORALINA suitable for any experimental system. The unprecedented sequence complexities obtainable with CORALINA libraries are a necessary pre-requisite for less biased large scale genomic and epigenomic screens.

  17. Claiming Participation

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    The article discuss the conflicts, potentials and possible alliances of do-it-yourself (DIY) urbanism when it takes the form of spontaneous place appropriations, when it is performed as participatory urban design and when it is integrated strategically in planning. DIY urbanism and experimentation...... with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  18. 'I've got to get something out of it. And so do they': experiences of people with aphasia and university students participating in a communication partner training programme for healthcare professionals.

    Cameron, Ashley; Hudson, Kyla; Finch, Emma; Fleming, Jennifer; Lethlean, Jennifer; McPhail, Steven

    2018-06-05

    Communication partner training (CPT) has been used to support communication partners to interact successfully with people with aphasia (PWA). Through successful CPT interaction PWA's accessibility to healthcare is notably improved. The present study sought to build on prior studies by investigating the experiences of individuals with aphasia and healthcare providers to ascertain what they deemed to be beneficial from CPT and what could be refined or improved, dependent on the setting and skill set of those participating. To gain an understanding of the experiences of PWA involved in the provision of CPT to health professional (HP) students. Also to investigate the experiences of HP students who participated in the CPT programme. Eight PWA and 77 HP students who had completed a CPT programme participated in a focus group/semi-structured interview (PWA) and feedback session (HP students) moderated by two speech-language pathologists (SLPs). These sessions were recorded (audio and video), transcribed verbatim, including non-verbal communication, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Overall, the study sought to understand experiences of the training. Both the PWA and HP students reported positive experiences of CPT. PWA discussed their perception that CPT improved HPs and HP students' understanding and interactions conversing with them and emphasized the need for training and education for all health related professions. HP students enjoyed the opportunity to experience interacting with PWA, without being 'assessed' and felt it consolidated their learning based on lecture content. Inclusive and accessible healthcare is paramount to ensure the engagement of patients and providers. Based on the experiences and feedback of the participants in this current study, CPT offers a salient and practical training method with potential to improve practice. Participants perceived CPT to be beneficial and validated the need for the training to support PWA accessing

  19. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-05-11

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequences for the restriction endonuclease Sapl, an enzyme that cleaves outside of its recognition sequence. The intermediate molecule containing the mutagenic cassette is then digested with Sapl, thereby removing most of the mutagenic cassette, leaving only a three base cohesive overhang that is ligated to generate the final insertion or substitution mutation. A general method for constructing blunt-end target molecules suitable for this approach is also described. Because the mutagenic cassette is excised during this procedure and alters the target only by introducing the desired mutation, the same cassette can be used to introduce a particular codon at all target sites. Each cassette can deposit two different codons, depending on the orientation in which it is inserted into the target molecule. Therefore, a series of eleven cassettes is sufficient to insert all possible amino acids at any constructed target site. Thus codon cassettes are 'off-the-shelf' reagents, and this methodology should be a particularly useful and inexpensive approach for subjecting multiple different positions in a protein sequence to saturation mutagenesis.

  20. Universal method for effusive-flow characterization target ion source/vapor transport systems for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)

    Alton, G.D.; Bilheux, J.-C.; Liu, Y.; Cole, J. A.; Williams, C.

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the use of accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for exploring reactions important in understanding the structure of the nucleus and nuclear astrophysical phenomena has motivated the construction of facilities dedicated to their production and acceleration. Many facilities utilize the isotope-separator-on-line (ISOL) method in which species of interest are generated within a solid or liquid target matrix. Experimentally useful RIBs are often difficult to generate by this technique because of the times required for diffusion from the interior of the target material, and to effusively transport the species of interest to the ion source following diffusion release in relation to its lifetime. Therefore, these delay times must be minimized. We have developed an experimental method that can be used to determine effusive-flow times of arbitrary geometry target/vapor transport systems. The technique utilizes a fast valve to measure effusive-flow times as short as 0.1 ms for any chemically active or inactive species through any target system, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. In this report, we provide a theoretical basis for effusive flow through arbitrary geometry vapor transport systems, describe a universal experimental apparatus for measuring effusive-flow times, and provide time spectra for noble gases through prototype RIB target/vapor-transport systems

  1. A SWOT Analysis of the Integration of E-Learning at a University in Uganda and a University in Tanzania

    Zhu, Chang; Justice Mugenyi, Kintu

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) to integrating e-learning perceived by academic staff at a university in Uganda and a university in Tanzania. Mixed-methods research was used in which a main qualitative study was complemented by a quantitative method. The sample participants were academic staff…

  2. Improving Students' Participation in Active Learning Methods: Group Discussions, Presentations and Demonstrations: A Case of Madda Walabu University Second Year Tourism Management Students of 2014

    Tesfaye, Sewnet; Berhanu, Kassegn

    2015-01-01

    Education is a means by which people develop and acquire knowledge, skills, values and attitudes. It paves the way for development and plays a vital role (serves as a catalyst) in bringing socio-cultural, economical, technological, political and environmental advancements. The general objective of this study was to improve Second Year Tourism…

  3. Definition of intercultural competence (IC) in undergraduate students at a private university in the USA: A mixed-methods study.

    Gierke, Lioba; Binder, Nadine; Heckmann, Mark; Odağ, Özen; Leiser, Anne; Kedzior, Karina Karolina

    2018-01-01

    Intercultural competence (IC) is an important skill to be gained from higher education. However, it remains unclear what IC means to students and what factors might influence their definitions of IC. The aim of the current study was to qualitatively assess how students at one higher education institution in the USA define IC and to quantitatively test for relationships among IC components and various demographic characteristics, including intercultural experience and study context. A further aim was to descriptively compare the IC definitions from the US sample with the definitions obtained from another sample of university students in Germany. A purposive sample of n = 93 undergraduate, second semester students at Dickinson College, USA, participated in the study by completing an online questionnaire. The qualitative data were content-analyzed to define the dimensions of IC. The quantitative data were cluster-analyzed to assess the multivariate relationships among the IC components and the demographic characteristics of the sample. The most important dimensions of IC were Knowledge, External Outcomes (interaction, communication), and Attitudes (respect, tolerance) according to the US sample. The most frequently chosen dimensions of IC differed between both samples: Knowledge was chosen by the sample in the USA while External Outcomes was chosen by the sample in Germany. Relative to the US sample, significantly more students chose Attitudes, External Outcomes, and Intrapersonal Skills in the sample in Germany. The relationships among IC components and demographic characteristics were only weak in the US sample. A person with IC was rated as Open-minded and Respectful by students who lived predominantly in the USA or Tolerant and Curious by those who lived outside the USA for at least six months. The current results suggest that students residing in two countries (USA or Germany) define IC using similar dimensions. However, IC definitions may depend on the

  4. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    Medved, E.

    1998-01-01

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  5. Use of electromagnetic induction methods to monitor remediation at the University of Connecticut landfill: 2004–2011

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐lapse geophysical surveys using frequency‐domain electromagnetics (FDEM) can indirectly measure time‐varying hydrologic parameters such as fluid saturation or solute concentration. Monitoring of these processes provides insight into aquifer properties and the effectiveness of constructed controls (such as leachate interceptor trenches), as well as aquifer responses to natural or induced stresses. At the University of Connecticut landfill, noninvasive, electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods were used to monitor changes in subsurface electrical conductivity that were related to the landfill‐closure activities. After the landfill was closed, EMI methods were used to monitor changes in water saturation and water quality. As part of a long‐term monitoring plan to observe changes associated with closure, redevelopment, and remediation of the former landfill, EMI data were collected to supplement information from groundwater samples collected in wells to the south and north of the landfill. In comparison to single‐point measurements that could have been collected by conventional installation of additional monitoring wells, the EMI methods provided increased spatial coverage, and were less invasive and therefore less destructive to the wetland north of the landfill. To monitor effects of closure activities on the subsurface conductivity, EMI measurements were collected from 2004 to 2011 along discrete transects north and south of the landfill prior to, during, and after the landfill closure. In general, the results indicated an overall decline in subsurface electrical conductivity with time and with distance from the former landfill. This decline in electrical conductivity indicated that the closure and remediation efforts reduced the amount of leachate that originated from the landfill and that entered the drainages to the north and south of the landfill.

  6. Teaching of foundations of radiochemistry on chemical faculty of Moscow State University after M.V. Lomonosov. Methodical ensuring of the subject

    Luk'yanov, V.B.; Berdonosov, S.S.; Fedoseev, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    The peculiarities of the lecture course on radiochemistry principles in the Moscow State University after M.V. Lomonosov are considered. The methodical provision of the lectures including the curriculum, methodical aids, tasks for self-control and for lecture control, as well as, summary questionary forms, is discussed. 3 refs

  7. Considering New Paths for Success: An Examination of the Research and Methods on Urban School-University Partnerships Post-No Child Left Behind

    Flynn, Joseph E.; Hunt, Rebecca D.; Johnson, Laura Ruth; Wickman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines urban school-university partnership research after No Child Left Behind. Central to the review is an analysis in the trend of research methods utilized across studies. It was found that many studies are single-case studies or anecdotal. There are few quantitative, sustained qualitative, or mixed-methods studies represented in…

  8. Characteristics of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use in U.S. University Students: A Qualitative-Method Investigation

    Li, Wen; O?Brien, Jennifer E.; Snyder, Susan M.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have identified high rates and severe consequences of Internet Addiction/Pathological Internet Use (IA/PIU) in university students. However, most research concerning IA/PIU in U.S. university students has been conducted within a quantitative research paradigm, and frequently fails to contextualize the problem of IA/PIU. To address this gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study using the focus group approach and examined 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as inten...

  9. Privacy preserving probabilistic record linkage (P3RL): a novel method for linking existing health-related data and maintaining participant confidentiality.

    Schmidlin, Kurt; Clough-Gorr, Kerri M; Spoerri, Adrian

    2015-05-30

    preserve privacy of persons in the study. Privacy Preserving Probabilistic Record linkage expands record linkage facilities in settings where a unique identifier is unavailable and/or regulations restrict access to the non-unique person identifiable information needed to link existing health-related data sets. Automated pre-processing and encryption fully protect sensitive information ensuring participant confidentiality. This method is suitable not just for epidemiological research but also for any setting with similar challenges.

  10. Application of scl - pbl method to increase quality learning of industrial statistics course in department of industrial engineering pancasila university

    Darmawan, M.; Hidayah, N. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, there has been a change of new paradigm in the learning model in college, ie from Teacher Centered Learning (TCL) model to Student Centered Learing (SCL). It is generally assumed that the SCL model is better than the TCL model. The Courses of 2nd Industrial Statistics in the Department Industrial Engineering Pancasila University is the subject that belongs to the Basic Engineering group. So far, the applied learning model refers more to the TCL model, and field facts show that the learning outcomes are less satisfactory. Of the three consecutive semesters, ie even semester 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016 obtained grade average is equal to 56.0; 61.1, and 60.5. In the even semester of 2016/2017, Classroom Action Research (CAR) is conducted for this course through the implementation of SCL model with Problem Based Learning (PBL) methods. The hypothesis proposed is that the SCL-PBL model will be able to improve the final grade of the course. The results shows that the average grade of the course can be increased to 73.27. This value was then tested using the ANOVA and the test results concluded that the average grade was significantly different from the average grade value in the previous three semesters.

  11. Institutional participative strategic planning method for community higher education institution (HEI Planejamento estratégico participativo em uma instituição de ensino superior (IES comunitária

    Marcus Vinicius Anátocles Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a method for the participation of university managers and stakeholders in the validation of the questions and strategy choice during the Strategic Planning process in a Community HEI. It proposes a tool for participations that considers an evolutionary and systemic vision in the proposition. It preserves the HEI community characteristics. The use of interviews, meetings, seminars and works with the community members envolved through working g roups and committees, is a way to legitimate the results and to achieve a integrated strategic planning.Este artigo propõe uma metodologia de participação da comunidade de gestores universitários e stakeholders para validação das questões e determinação das estratégias no processo de Planejamento Estratégico em IES comunitária. Propõe ainda um mecanismo de participação que considera uma visão sistêmica e evolutiva na proposição, estruturação e no processo de operacionalização do planejamento estratégico, preservando as características das comunidades das IES. A utilização de entrevistas, reuniões, seminários e trabalhos com membros das comunidades envolvidas através de grupos de trabalho e comitês, servem como forma de legitimação dos resultados e para realizar um pensamento estratégico integrado.

  12. Mapping eParticipation

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    The emerging research area of eParticipation can be characterized as the study of technology-facilitated citizen participation in (democratic) deliberation and decision-making. Using conventional literature study techniques, we identify 105 articles that are considered to be highly relevant to e......Participation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging socio-technical research area and use this schema to map the research contributions identified. This allows us make an initial sketch of the scientific character of the area and its central concerns, theories......, and methods. We extend the analysis to define four central research challenges for the field: understanding technology and participation; the strategic challenge; the design challenge; and the evaluation challenge. This article thus contributes to a developing account of eParticipation, which will help future...

  13. Evaluation of Pharmacists' Participation in Post-Admission Ward ...

    Objective: The study evaluates pharmacist's perception of and participation in post-admission ward rounds, at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Method: All the 60 pharmacists covering various units of pharmaceutical services were administered a forty-two element structured questionnaire. Fifty (83.3%) ...

  14. Methods University Health System Can Use to Expand Medicaid Coverage to Uninsured Poor Parents with Medicaid Eligible Children: Policy Analysis

    McMahon, III, Robert T

    2006-01-01

    ... and the continuing reduction in local employer-sponsored insurance. The cost for providing health care to this population has fallen to Bexar County residents through local taxes in support of the county hospital, University Health System...

  15. Acceptance, Tolerance, Participation

    1993-01-01

    The problem of radioactive waste management from an ethical and societal viewpoint was treated in this seminar, which had participants from universities (social, theological, philosophical and science institutes), waste management industry, and regulatory and controlling authorities. After initial reviews on repository technology, policies and schedules, knowledge gaps, and ethical aspects on decision making under uncertainty, four subjects were treated in lectures and discussions: Democratic collective responsibility, Handling threats in democratic decision making, Waste management - a technological operation with a social dimension, Acceptance and legitimity. Lectures with comments and discussions are collected in this report

  16. Effects of Participation in a STEM Camp on STEM Attitudes and Anticipated Career Choices of Middle School Girls: A Mixed Methods Study

    Kager, Elisabeth

    Middle school is a critical time for the development of girls' attitudes toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Existing research has indicated declining positive attitudes toward these fields among girls throughout adolescence. This study investigated how, to what extent, and for whom participation in a summer STEM Camp at a Midwestern college in the United States affected the STEM attitudes and career aspirations of 23 female participants, ages 10-14 years. Using a concurrent triangulation design, the researcher collected pre- and post-questionnaire data (N = 20), interviewed participants (N = 9), read journal entries (N = 22), and wrote field notes. The researcher adapted the Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scales (FSAS) to measure five of the original nine attitude scales concerning STEM: Male Domain, Confidence, Usefulness, Success, and Motivation. In addition to these standardized, Likert-type scale questions, the questionnaire included demographic items to gauge participants' anticipated career choices and the level of STEM motivation (e.g., extracurricular activities and guardians' STEM involvement). The interview questions elicited information about the participants' Camp experiences and the Camp's influence on participants' attitudes and career aspirations. The journal prompts provoked participants to think about their perceptions of, and relationship with, science and mathematics as well as how supportive their parents and peers had been regarding these two fields. Participants' incoming STEM attitudes were positive. Accordingly, there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-scores of attitudes toward STEM. Nevertheless, qualitative results showed that the Camp did strengthen participants' positive attitudes through enthusiastic instructors, STEM-motivated peers, and hands-on activities that allowed for creative freedom. Participating in the STEM Camp challenged participants' prior career aspirations by

  17. The Quality Assessment of the Services Offered to the Students of the College of Education at King Saud University Using (SERVQUAL) Method

    Alhabeeb, Abdurrahman Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is measuring the level of quality service offered to students at the college of education at King Saud University, specifically the gap between students' perceptions and expectations of the quality of the offered service. The descriptive analytical approach has been applied in the study using SERVQUAL method to collect data…

  18. An Evaluation of Two Different Methods of Assessing Independent Investigations in an Operational Pre-University Level Examination in Biology in England.

    Brown, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Explored aspects of assessment of extended investigation ("project") practiced in the operational examinations of The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES) for the perspective of construct validity. Samples of the 1993 (n=333) and 1996 (n=259) biology test results reveal two methods of assessing the project. (MAK)

  19. A Comparative Study of Two Methods of Instruction in a University Animal Biology Course: Audio-Tutorial with Conventional Lecture-Laboratory.

    Rowsey, Robert Ellis

    In this comparative study of instructional methods involving university students, pre- and posttest data were collected from achievement and attitude instruments as well as from opinion questionnaires. The major findings included: (1) students taught via audio-tutorial instruction demonstrated significantly greater achievement gain; (2) the number…

  20. Practices of Citizenship Rights among Minority Students at Chinese Universities

    Zhao, Zhenzhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how Chinese minority students participate and defend citizenship rights on a university campus against the backdrop of ongoing social changes. Three rights are focused on: freedom of religion, freedom of association, and freedom to use an ethnic language. The data were collected at three universities. Research methods involved…

  1. Implementing Web 2.0 Design Patterns in an Institutional Repository May Increase Community Participation. A Review of: Cocciolo, A. (2010. Can Web 2.0 enhance community participation in an institutional repository? The case of PocketKnowledge at Teachers College, Columbia University. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36(4, 304–312. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2010.05.004

    Yvonne Hultman Özek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate whether Web 2.0 can enhance participation in institutional repositories (IRs and whether its widespread use can lead to success in this context. Another purpose was to emphasize how an IR with a Web 2.0 approach can connect individuals in their creative and intellectual outputs, no matter what form of shared material is contributed.Design – Comparative study.Setting –Two IRs at Teachers College, Columbia University, which is a graduate and professional school of education in New York City.Subjects – Students, faculty, and staff using the PocketKnowledge and CPC IRs.Methods – Cocciolo compared two different IRs called PocketKnowledge and Community Program Collections (CPC. PocketKnowledge had the following Web 2.0 design patterns: users control their own data; users should be trusted; flexible tags are preferred over hierarchical taxonomies; the attitude should be playful; software gets better the more people use it. The PocketKnowledge IR design patterns were compared with the traditional design of the CPC IR. The CRC IR organized information based on taxonomy (e.g., programs and departments, lack of user control of their own content, and centrality of authority.Data were collected during a 22-month period. The PocketKnowledge IR was studied from September 2006 to July 2008, compiling information on both contributions and contributors. Contributions made by library staff to aid availability in archival collections were excluded from the data sets, because the study was focused on community participation in the learning environment. The CPC was studied between November 2004 and July 2006. Data collected included the contributions made to the system and information on the role of the contributor (e.g., student, faculty, or staff.Main Results – Participation was much greater in the Web 2.0 system (PocketKnowledge than in the non-Web 2.0 system (CPC. Involvement in the latter, the CPC, was noted primarily for

  2. A survey on lifestyle and attitudes on fruit and vegetable consumption and participation in physical activity in a sample of secondary school and university students from Palermo, Western Sicily

    Enza Sidoti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Fruit and vegetable (F&V consumption, and physical activity (PA, are thought to be some of the most important protective factors that can improve long-term health quality of life. Many epidemiological studies indicate, in fact, that F&V consumption and PA are health-promoting and are correlated with the beneficial effects and positive outcomes such as preventing some chronic diseases. Evidence, however, indicates that large proportions of adolescents are not consuming the minimum servings of F&V as recommended by experts and a high percentage of them have sedentary habits.

    Objective and method: The purpose of this research was to investigate knowledge and behaviors in a sample of secondary school, (250, and university students, (200, referred to F&V consumption and PA. The instrument used for the survey was a questionnaire containing 19 items with multiple choice answers. Data were codified, descriptive analysis and ÷2 tests were computed through Openstat and Statistica software.

    Results: Only 24,2% of the individuals identified welfare as including healthy eating, and this attitude seemed to be associated with the students’ families educational level. Educational level was also positively associated with the awareness of the importance of a healthy diet for well-being and with PA practice. The percentage of students having knowledge of the expert recommendations on PA and eating guidelines about F&V consumption was about one third of the entire population. Students who met the expert recommendation for daily servings of fruit and vegetables were 27,8%, while only 17,8% practiced regular PA. The principal source of information was university/school, (48,0% and 57,0%.

    Conclusions: Healthy dietary and PA habits are far from the optimal in our sample of students. Because of the importance for the prevention of many diseases and long term health

  3. Barriers to uptake among high-risk individuals declining participation in lung cancer screening: a mixed methods analysis of the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial.

    Ali, Noor; Lifford, Kate J; Carter, Ben; McRonald, Fiona; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Baldwin, David R; Weller, David; Hansell, David M; Duffy, Stephen W; Field, John K; Brain, Kate

    2015-07-14

    The current study aimed to identify the barriers to participation among high-risk individuals in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot trial. The UKLS pilot trial is a randomised controlled trial of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening that has recruited high-risk people using a population approach in the Cambridge and Liverpool areas. High-risk individuals aged 50-75 years were invited to participate in UKLS. Individuals were excluded if a LDCT scan was performed within the last year, if they were unable to provide consent, or if LDCT screening was unable to be carried out due to coexisting comorbidities. Statistical associations between individual characteristics and UKLS uptake were examined using multivariable regression modelling. In those who completed a non-participation questionnaire (NPQ), thematic analysis of free-text data was undertaken to identify reasons for not taking part, with subsequent exploratory linkage of key themes to risk factors for non-uptake. Comparative data were available from 4061 high-risk individuals who consented to participate in the trial and 2756 who declined participation. Of those declining participation, 748 (27.1%) completed a NPQ. Factors associated with non-uptake included: female gender (OR=0.64, pemotional barriers. Smokers were more likely to report emotional barriers to participation. A profile of risk factors for non-participation in lung screening has emerged, with underlying reasons largely relating to practical and emotional barriers. Strategies for engaging high-risk, hard-to-reach groups are critical for the equitable uptake of a potential future lung cancer screening programme. The UKLS trial was registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Register under the reference 78513845. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF)

    Sun, Jing; Patel, Falguni; Kirzner, Rachel; Newton-Famous, Nijah; Owens, Constance; Welles, Seth L.; Chilton, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support inte...

  5. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-re...

  6. Relationship between Religious Orientation (Internal-External) With Methods of Overcoming Stress in Students of Islamic Azad University of Abhar

    Jafari, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between religious orientation (internal-external) and the ways of coping stress (problem-based and emotion-based) in the students of IAU (Islamic Azad University), Abhar Branch. Religion with internal origin is comprehensive and has well-organized principles. However, religion with external origin is a device…

  7. Educational-Methodical Projects for Students' Intellectual Competences Formation: The Imperative Goal of the Educational Process of the University

    Kutuev, Ruslan A.; Kudyasheva, Albina N.; Buldakova, Natalya V.; Aleksandrova, Natalia S.; Vasilenko, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the tendencies of the modern information society which produces and consumes intelligence, knowledge and competences as the main educational product of labor market. These trends fundamentally alter the methodological basis of the educational process of the University, subjecting it to imperative goals: the…

  8. Methods of Psychological and Pedagogical Accompaniment of First-Year Students in Process of Adapting to Learning at University

    Maralova, Tatyana P.; Filipenkova, Olesya G.; Galitskikh, Elena O.; Shulga, Tatiana I.; Sidyacheva, Natalya V.; Ovsyanik, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is conditioned by the complexity of students' adaptation to learning at University due to the change of social environment, an alarming feelings about the precise self-determination, lack of knowledge in opportunities for self-expression in art, science, sport and public life. The purpose of the paper is to identify…

  9. Visual Thinking Routines: A Mixed Methods Approach Applied to Student Teachers at the American University in Dubai

    Gholam, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Visual thinking routines are principles based on several theories, approaches, and strategies. Such routines promote thinking skills, call for collaboration and sharing of ideas, and above all, make thinking and learning visible. Visual thinking routines were implemented in the teaching methodology graduate course at the American University in…

  10. Teaching Power Electronics with a Design-Oriented, Project-Based Learning Method at the Technical University of Denmark

    Zhang, Zhe; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a fast-developing technology within the electrical engineering field. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying design-oriented project-based learning to switch-mode power supply design in a power electronics course at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Project-based learning (PBL) is known…

  11. Open University

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  12. Research in organizational participation and cooperation

    Jeppesen, Hans Jeppe; Jønsson, Thomas; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses some different perspectives on organizational participation and presents conducted and ongoing research projects by the research unit SPARK at Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus.......This article discusses some different perspectives on organizational participation and presents conducted and ongoing research projects by the research unit SPARK at Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus....

  13. Parental perceptions surrounding polio and self-reported non-participation in polio supplementary immunization activities in Karachi, Pakistan: a mixed methods study.

    Khowaja, Asif Raza; Khan, Sher Ali; Nizam, Naveeda; Omer, Saad Bin; Zaidi, Anita

    2012-11-01

    To assess parent's knowledge and perceptions surrounding polio and polio vaccination, self-reported participation in polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) targeting children aged questionnaire was administered to assess parental knowledge of polio and participation in polio SIAs conducted in September and October 2011. Additionally, 30 parents of Pashtun ethnicity (a high-risk group) who refused to vaccinate their children were interviewed in depth to determine why. Descriptive and bivariate analyses by ethnic and socioeconomic group were performed for quantitative data; thematic analysis was conducted for qualitative interviews with Pashtun parents. Of 1017 parents surveyed, 412 (41%) had never heard of polio; 132 (13%) did not participate in one SIA and 157 (15.4%) did not participate in either SIA. Among non-participants, 34 (21.6%) reported not having been contacted by a vaccinator; 116 (73.9%) reported having refused to participate, and 7 (4.5%) reported that the child was absent from home when the vaccinator visited. Refusals clustered in low-income Pashtun (43/441; 9.8%) and high-income families of any ethnic background (71/153; 46.4%). Low-income Pashtuns were more likely to not have participated in polio SIAs than low-income non-Pashtuns (odds ratio, OR: 7.1; 95% confidence interval, CI: 3.47-14.5). Reasons commonly cited among Pashtuns for refusing vaccination included fear of sterility; lack of faith in the polio vaccine; scepticism about the vaccination programme, and fear that the vaccine might contain religiously forbidden ingredients. In Karachi, interruption of polio transmission requires integrated and participatory community interventions targeting high-risk populations.

  14. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF).

    Sun, Jing; Patel, Falguni; Kirzner, Rachel; Newton-Famous, Nijah; Owens, Constance; Welles, Seth L; Chilton, Mariana

    2016-07-16

    Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full) and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %), never married (83.5 %), unemployed (94.2 %), and without a bank account (66.0 %). Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure), and depression (57.3 %). Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48.5 % of the fathers of the youngest child spent

  15. The problems of female students at Jimma University, Ethiopia, with ...

    Background: Education is perhaps the single essential measure to ensure a full participation of women in development. Women's participation in all fields of the world has become significant. Objective: This study was conducted to identify gender related problems of female students in Jimma University (JU). Methods: This ...

  16. Catch crops as universal and effective method for reducing nitrogen leaching loss in spring cereal production: A meta-analysis.

    Valkama, Elena; Lemola, Riitta; Känkänen, Hannu; Turtola, Eila

    2016-04-01

    and red clovers) did not diminish the risk for N leaching. Otherwise, the effect on N leaching and its risk were consistent across the studies conducted in different countries on clay and coarse-textured mineral soils with different ploughing times, N fertilization rates (50-160 kg/ ha), and amounts of annual precipitation (480-1040 mm). Non-legume catch crops reduced grain yield by 3% with no changes in grain N content. In contrast, legumes and mixed catch crops increased both grain yield and grain N content by 6%. In spring cereal production, undersown non-legume catch crops are deemed a universal and effective method for reducing N leaching loss across the various soils, management practices and weather conditions in the Nordic countries. The environmental benefits of using non-legume catch crops appear considerable compared to the adverse reduction in grain yields, amounting to only a few percent. Catch crops are advisable for fields at high risk for N leaching (e.g., sandy soils or soils and crops requiring high N fertilization).

  17. The Participation Banking As A Distinctive Method And The Its Growing In The Turkish Finance Market-Period: 2007-2013

    Ferhat Sayım

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Financial systems and companies has become the most important reason in the weakness of world economic system. The formation and development process of the financial structure also constitutes the infrastructure of the world economic system. The path of the financial system and development has led to discuss with the financial crisis in 2008-2011. One of the argument topic in order to reduce problems caused by the conventional banking system is alternative financing systems. In Turkey, the corporations based on profit share system which are named participation based banking attention, if the alternative banking systems are considered. These banks which settle on different principles in the risk distribution of the portfolio acquired are analyzed more nowadays. Participation based banks are placed in almost every regulation related to banking terms and get their legal infrastructure more stable in the banking legislation of Turkey.This study is a 2007-2013 part of research series. We try to find out the place and the importance of participation based banking with the various sub-headings especially in Turkey. We examine the comparative review 2007-2013 data of participation banks which Total Assets, Equity Net Profit, Collected Turkish Currency and Foreign Currency Funds and Bank Loan Funds, figures for the four participation banks in Turkey. We are comparing the total figures with deposit banks for the same period.One of our primary aim in this essay, to study in the framework of the alternatives of the financial companies and options. These options could be stated as a vibrant and viable well established choice as a non-western model- different from the classical western interest based leading banking system in the globe. Moreover, that participation banking systems’ grow and increase with its resourceful bulk of transactions and shares within the financial market. In addition, we intended to delineate the basic functioning structures, rules

  18. Applications of hybrid and digital computation methods in aerospace-related sciences and engineering. [problem solving methods at the University of Houston

    Huang, C. J.; Motard, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The computing equipment in the engineering systems simulation laboratory of the Houston University Cullen College of Engineering is described and its advantages are summarized. The application of computer techniques in aerospace-related research psychology and in chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, and mechanical engineering is described in abstracts of 84 individual projects and in reprints of published reports. Research supports programs in acoustics, energy technology, systems engineering, and environment management as well as aerospace engineering.

  19. Culture-Based Methods and Molecular Tools for Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Detection in a Belgian University Hospital

    Montesinos, I.; Argudín, M. A.; Hites, M.; Ahajjam, F.; Dodémont, M.; Dagyaran, C.; Bakkali, M.; Etienne, I.; Jacobs, F.; Knoop, C.; Patteet, S.; Lagrou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing worldwide problem with major clinical implications. Surveillance is warranted to guide clinicians to provide optimal treatment to patients. To investigate azole resistance in clinical Aspergillus isolates in our institution, a Belgian university hospital, we conducted a laboratory-based surveillance between June 2015 and October 2016. Two different approaches were used: a prospective culture-based surveillance using VIPcheck on unselected...

  20. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: a mixed method study on what patients experience as a suitable stage to participate

    Bisseling, Else M.; Schellekens, Melanie P. J.; Jansen, Ellen T. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Prins, Judith B.; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is associated with high levels of psychological distress. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has proven to be effective in reducing distress in cancer patients. In several studies, patients who are currently undergoing somatic anticancer treatment are excluded from participating

  1. As Public Relationship Application Countinability of Participated Art Projects via Distance Education Method: A Case of "Women's Are Meeting with Literature Project"

    Taskaya, Merih

    2013-01-01

    Observations of artistic activities' transformative influence in social sphere by social scientists have played an essential role in the rise of "participative art" works worldwide. Within the scope of the public relations practices performed by municipal administrations particularly in order to promote the cultural development of…

  2. What Motivates Low-Qualified Employees to Participate in Training and Development? A Mixed-Method Study on their Learning Intentions

    Kyndt, Eva; Govaerts, Natalie; Claes, Trees; De La Marche, Jens; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    The current research starts from the observation that low-qualified employees hold a vulnerable position on the labour market. It has been argued that learning and development can decrease this vulnerability; unfortunately research has shown that low-qualified employees participate considerably less in learning activities in comparison with…

  3. Book review: Social Research: Issues, Methods and Process, 3rd edition, by Tim May, Open University Press, 2001, ISBN 0335206123

    Jones, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The great strength of this book by Tim May ("Social Research: Issues, Methods and Process", 3rd edition ) is its successful negotiation (perhaps navigation) of the relationships between theory and method in (social) research.

  4. Servicemembers and veterans with major traumatic limb loss from Vietnam war and OIF/OEF conflicts: survey methods, participants, and summary findings.

    Reiber, Gayle E; McFarland, Lynne V; Hubbard, Sharon; Maynard, Charles; Blough, David K; Gambel, Jeffrey M; Smith, Douglas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss from combat theaters is one of the highest priorities of the Department of Veteran Affairs. We achieved a 62% response rate in our Survey for Prosthetic Use from 298 Vietnam war veterans and 283 servicemembers/veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) who sustained major traumatic limb loss. Participants reported their combat injuries; health status; quality of life; and prosthetic device use, function, rejection, and satisfaction. Despite the serious injuries experienced, health status was rated excellent, very good, or good by 70.7% of Vietnam war and 85.5% of OIF/OEF survey participants. However, many health issues persist for Vietnam war and OIF/OEF survey participants (respectively): phantom limb pain (72.2%/76.0%), chronic back pain (36.2%/42.1%), residual-limb pain (48.3%/62.9%), prosthesis-related skin problems (51.0%/58.0%), hearing loss (47.0%/47.0%), traumatic brain injury (3.4%/33.9%), depression (24.5%/24.0%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (37.6%/58.7%). Prosthetic devices are currently used by 78.2% of Vietnam war and 90.5% of OIF/OEF survey participants to improve function and mobility. On average, the annual rate for prosthetic device receipt is 10.7-fold higher for OIF/OEF than for Vietnam war survey participants. Findings from this cross-conflict survey identify many strengths in prosthetic rehabilitation for those with limb loss and several areas for future attention.

  5. An advanced revised universal slope method for low cycle fatigue evaluation of elbow piping subjected to in-plane cyclic bending displacement

    Urabe, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    In order to rationalize the low cycle fatigue evaluation of elbow piping subjected to in-plane cyclic bending displacement, an advanced revised universal slope method is proposed. In the proposed method, the coefficient of the first term of the fatigue life equation which resembles Manson's equation is expressed by parameters of the multi-axial degree, the tensile strength and the fracture strength. Also, the coefficient of the second term is expressed by the multi-axial degree, the fracture ductility and the minimum fracture ductility under the maximum multi-axial degree. Here equivalent strain range is used for the fatigue life estimation. The previously carried out pipe elbow test data were reanalyzed using the proposed method. As the result, the experimentally obtained fatigue lives had considerably good coincidences with the predicted fatigue lives by the proposed method. Application of the proposed method is also discussed. (author)

  6. A partial economic evaluation of blended learning in teaching health research methods: a three-university collaboration in South Africa, Sweden, and Uganda

    Minna Kumpu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novel research training approaches are needed in global health, particularly in sub-Saharan African universities, to support strengthening of health systems and services. Blended learning (BL, combining face-to-face teaching with computer-based technologies, is also an accessible and flexible education method for teaching global health and related topics. When organised as inter-institutional collaboration, BL also has potential for sharing teaching resources. However, there is insufficient data on the costs of BL in higher education. Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the total provider costs of BL in teaching health research methods in a three-university collaboration. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed on a BL course on randomised controlled trials, which was led by Stellenbosch University (SU in South Africa and joined by Swedish and Ugandan universities. For all three universities, the costs of the BL course were evaluated using activity-based costing with an ingredients approach. For SU, the costs of the same course delivered with a classroom learning (CL approach were also estimated. The learning outcomes of both approaches were explored using course grades as an intermediate outcome measure. Results: In this contextually bound pilot evaluation, BL had substantially higher costs than the traditional CL approach in South Africa, even when average per-site or per-student costs were considered. Staff costs were the major cost driver in both approaches, but total staff costs were three times higher for the BL course at SU. This implies that inter-institutional BL can be more time consuming, for example, due to use of new technologies. Explorative findings indicated that there was little difference in students’ learning outcomes. Conclusions: The total provider costs of the inter-institutional BL course were higher than the CL course at SU. Long-term economic evaluations of BL with societal perspective are

  7. A partial economic evaluation of blended learning in teaching health research methods: a three-university collaboration in South Africa, Sweden, and Uganda.

    Kumpu, Minna; Atkins, Salla; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Nkonki, Lungiswa

    2016-01-01

    Novel research training approaches are needed in global health, particularly in sub-Saharan African universities, to support strengthening of health systems and services. Blended learning (BL), combining face-to-face teaching with computer-based technologies, is also an accessible and flexible education method for teaching global health and related topics. When organised as inter-institutional collaboration, BL also has potential for sharing teaching resources. However, there is insufficient data on the costs of BL in higher education. Our goal was to evaluate the total provider costs of BL in teaching health research methods in a three-university collaboration. A retrospective evaluation was performed on a BL course on randomised controlled trials, which was led by Stellenbosch University (SU) in South Africa and joined by Swedish and Ugandan universities. For all three universities, the costs of the BL course were evaluated using activity-based costing with an ingredients approach. For SU, the costs of the same course delivered with a classroom learning (CL) approach were also estimated. The learning outcomes of both approaches were explored using course grades as an intermediate outcome measure. In this contextually bound pilot evaluation, BL had substantially higher costs than the traditional CL approach in South Africa, even when average per-site or per-student costs were considered. Staff costs were the major cost driver in both approaches, but total staff costs were three times higher for the BL course at SU. This implies that inter-institutional BL can be more time consuming, for example, due to use of new technologies. Explorative findings indicated that there was little difference in students' learning outcomes. The total provider costs of the inter-institutional BL course were higher than the CL course at SU. Long-term economic evaluations of BL with societal perspective are warranted before conclusions on full costs and consequences of BL in teaching

  8. Contribution of developing advanced engineering methods in interdisciplinary studying the piston rings from 1.6 spark ignited Ford engine at Technical University of Cluj-Napoca

    -Aurel Cherecheş, Ioan; -Ioana Borzan, Adela; -Laurean Băldean, Doru

    2017-10-01

    Study of construction and wearing process in the case of piston-rings and other significant components from internal combustion engines leads at any time to creative and useful optimizing ideas, both in designing and manufacturing phases. Main objective of the present paper is to realize an interdisciplinary research using advanced methods in piston-rings evaluation of a common vehicle on the streets which is Ford Focus FYDD. Specific objectives are a theoretical study of the idea for advanced analysis method in piston-rings evaluation and an applied research developed in at Technical University from Cluj-Napoca with the motor vehicle caught in the repairing process.

  9. Development of psychotherapy as a method of mental disorders treatment at the Jagiellonian University and in Kraków before World War I.

    Dembińska, Edyta; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the origins of Polish psychotherapy with a special focus on psychotherapy development in Krakow and at the Jagiellonian University. The history of Krakow psychotherapy starts with the foundation of the Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic of the Jagiellonian University in 1905. Doctors working in the Department of psychotherapy developed their skills through contacts with the Zurich University Psychiatric Clinic Burgholzli. At the same time psychotherapy, and psychoanalysis in particular, were raising more and more interest in Poland. The most dynamic development of psychoanalysis reflected in the number of scientific publications, occurs in the years leading to the outbreak of War World I. This article presents brief portraits of the first Polish psychoanalysts ( Ludwik Jekels, Herman Nunberg, Ludwika Karpińska, Stefan Borowiecki, Jan Nelken, Kraol de Beaurain). Many of them worked in Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic of the Jagiellonian University. Their scientific achievements and contribution to the development of the international psychoanalytic movement are described, as well as relationships with leading psychoanalysts of this period (Freud, Jung). With the outbreak of World War I the research on and treatment of war neurosis was initiated in the Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic. Professor Piltz, the director of the clinic, together with his assistants (Borowiecki, de Beuarain, Artwiński) devised a unique in European psychiatry and highly efficient method of post-traumatic disorders treatment, in which psychotherapy was of key importance.

  10. Computing Cost Price for Cataract Surgery by Activity Based Costing (ABC Method at Hazrat-E-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2014

    Masuod Ferdosi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital managers need to have accurate information about actual costs to make efficient and effective decisions. In activity based costing method, first, activities are recognized and then direct and indirect costs are computed based on allocation methods. The aim of this study was to compute the cost price for cataract surgery by Activity Based Costing (ABC method at Hazrat-e-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross- sectional study for computing the costs of cataract surgery by activity based costing technique in Hazrat-e-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2014. Data were collected through interview and direct observation and analyzed by Excel software. Results: According to the results of this study, total cost in cataract surgery was 8,368,978 Rials. Personnel cost included 62.2% (5,213,574 Rials of total cost of cataract surgery that is the highest share of surgery costs. The cost of consumables was 7.57% (1,992,852 Rials of surgery costs. Conclusion: Based on the results, there was different between cost price of the services and public Tariff which appears as hazards or financial crises to the hospital. Therefore, it is recommended to use the right methods to compute the costs relating to Activity Based Costing. Cost price of cataract surgery can be reduced by strategies such as decreasing the cost of consumables.

  11. Avaliação da participação de pequeno número de estudantes universitários em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo Evaluation of the limited participation by university students in a smoking cessation program

    Wilson Paloschi Spiandorello

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a participação de pequeno número de estudantes da Universidade de Caxias do Sul em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo. MÉTODOS: Delineamento transversal e comparativo entre alunos que se inscreveram em um programa de tratamento do tabagismo e alunos que não se inscreveram. RESULTADOS: De 108 alunos não inscritos, 102 não mostraram intenção de parar de fumar (94,4%, intervalo de confiança de 95% de 88,29% a 97,93%. As comparações entre inscritos e não inscritos mostraram diferenças estatísticas, respectivamente: nas idades 35 e 23 anos, p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the limited participation by university students in a smoking cessation program. METHODS: A cross-sectional, comparative study was conducted at the University of Caxias do Sul, located in Caxias do Sul, Brazil, involving students who enrolled in a smoking cessation program, together with those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 108 student who did not enroll in the program, 102 (94.4% stated that they had no intention to quit smoking (95% confidence interval: 88.29-97.93%. Comparisons between the enrolled and nonenrolled students revealed the following statistical differences: in mean age (35 vs. 23 years, p < 0.01; mean duration of the smoking habit (19.42 vs. 7.36 years, p < 0.01; considering oneself addicted (100% vs. 58.5%, p = 0.047; believing oneself able to stop smoking at any time (7.1% vs. 22.6%, p = 0.02; having no knowledge of any reasons to quit smoking (37.5% vs. 12%, p = 0.03; having suffered discrimination (42.9% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: Among the university students evaluated, there was a phase, classified as precontemplative or contemplative, during which they were refractory to smoking cessation. Although all of the students were aware of the diseases caused by smoking, 41.5% did not consider themselves addicted. The concept of substance dependence does not apply to these students. It would seem more appropriate to define nicotine

  12. Evaluation of three instructional methods of teaching for undergraduate medical students, at King Saud university, Saudi Arabia

    Eiad A Al-Faris

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: This empirical study suggests some advantages for the PBL method and the modified PBL over the lecture method. Larger studies are needed to confirm our results of this important issue as the modified PBL is an affordable option for schools that can not meet the staff and space requirements of the PBL curriculum.

  13. University and Student Segmentation: Multilevel Latent-Class Analysis of Students' Attitudes towards Research Methods and Statistics

    Mutz, Rudiger; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is often claimed that psychology students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics affect course enrolment, persistence, achievement, and course climate. However, the inter-institutional variability has been widely neglected in the research on students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics, but it is important…

  14. Business Oriented Technological System Analysis (BOTSA) at Eindhoven University of Technology : an innovative learning method to foster entrepreneurship

    Wijnker, M.A.S.G.; van Kasteren, H.; Romijn, H.A.; Taufik, T.; Prabasari, I.; Rineksane, I.A.; Yana, R.; Widowati, R.; Putra Rosyidi, S.A.; Riyadi, S.; Harsanto, P.

    BOTSA is an innovative teaching method for students with technical background in the field of sustainable energy technologies and an interest in entrepreneurship. Two core features of this method, namely the connection between a technological analysis and a business case as well as the involvement

  15. Postsecondary Education--Participation and Dropping out: Differences across University, College and Other Types of Postsecondary Institutions. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 070

    Shaienks, Danielle; Gluszynski, Tomasz; Bayard, Justin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to capture and profile postsecondary education dropouts from three different types of postsecondary education--university, college and other types of institutions. It compares them with graduates from these three types of institutions. The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey…

  16. Evaluation of Safety and Security by Using the Fuzzy Logic Methods in Islamic Azad University, Branch of Lahijan

    Hedyeh Rastkar Komachali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Safety assumes a critical part in the utilization of spots. Various spots can create issues in respect to people’s impression of safety. A few parameters influence the view of security and various scientists have dug into these parameters. In any case, large portions of these parameters are quantitative and hard to break down utilizing ordinary expository strategies. This paper at first recognizes the parameters that influence safety by utilizing a survey. These parameters incorporate the components of light, crowdedness, and scene. A short time later, these parameters are measured in three places inside the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan branch. An assessment of the security of these spots in view of the fluffy rationale framework takes after. Finally, we watched that after effects of the fluffy rationale examination demonstrated generous concurrence with the survey discoveries.

  17. FACTORS THAT AFFECT TRANSPORT MODE PREFERENCE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MALAYSIA BY LOGIT METHOD

    ALI AHMED MOHAMMED

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to examine the perceptions and preferences of students on choosing the type of transportation for their travels in university campus. This study focused on providing personal transport users road transport alternatives as a countermeasure aimed at shifting car users to other modes of transportation. Overall 456 questionnaires were conducted to develop a choice of transportation mode preferences. Consequently, Logit model and SPSS were used to identify the factors that affect the determination of the choice of transportation mode. Results indicated that by reducing travel time by 70% the amount of private cars users will be reduced by 84%, while reduction the travel cost was found to be highly improving the public modes of utilization. This study revealed positive aspects is needed to shift travellers from private modes to public. The positive aspect contributes to travel time and travel cost reduction, hence improving the services, whereby contributing to sustainability.

  18. How to characterize the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions? A method of analysis in an uncertain universe

    Amant, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    For ADEME (the French Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maitrise de l'Energie), Carbone 4, a consulting firm, has developed several tools that apply a methodology for assessing the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This methodology is based on two criteria: the 'full cost per ton of avoided CO 2 equivalent' and the 'potential of avoided emissions'. It is original in that it compares measurements in quite different socioeconomic contexts and thus yields elements that are useful for making choices in an uncertain universe, as shall be increasingly necessary. This methodology brings to light the key factors determining a measure's efficiency and thus identifies the conditions for its success or failure. It is a precious tool for decision-making

  19. Packaging Glass with a Hierarchically Nanostructured Surface: A Universal Method to Achieve Self-Cleaning Omnidirectional Solar Cells

    Lin, Chin An

    2015-12-01

    Fused-silica packaging glass fabricated with a hierarchical structure by integrating small (ultrathin nanorods) and large (honeycomb nanowalls) structures was demonstrated with exceptional light-harvesting solar performance, which is attributed to the subwavelength feature of the nanorods and an efficient scattering ability of the honeycomb nanowalls. Si solar cells covered with the hierarchically structured packaging glass exhibit enhanced conversion efficiency by 5.2% at normal incidence, and the enhancement went up to 46% at the incident angle of 60°. The hierarchical structured packaging glass shows excellent self-cleaning characteristics: 98.8% of the efficiency is maintained after 6 weeks of outdoor exposure, indicating that the nanostructured surface effectively repels polluting dust/particles. The presented self-cleaning omnidirectional light-harvesting design using the hierarchical structured packaging glass is a potential universal scheme for practical solar applications.

  20. Gender Differences in Osteoporosis Health Beliefs and Knowledge and Their Relation to Vigorous Physical Activity in University Students

    Gammage, Kimberley L.; Gasparotto, Jennifer; Mack, Diane E.; Klentrou, Panagiota

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this cross-sectional investigation was to examine (1) gender differences in osteoporosis-related knowledge and beliefs and (2) if these beliefs could predict vigorous physical activity behavior in university students. Participants: Male (n = 176) and female (n = 351) university students participated in the study. Methods:…

  1. Monitoring Hydration Status Pre- and Post-Training among University Athletes Using Urine Color and Weight Loss Indicators

    Webb, Marquitta C.; Salandy, Sinead T.; Beckford, Safiya E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hydration status pre- and post-training among university athletes using urine color and weight loss as indicators. Participants: Participants were 52 university athletes training for campus games in a developing country. Methods: Pre- and post-training urine specimens were compared with a standard urine color scale.…

  2. Status of research methods used in the dissertations of graduates from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Assistantship, MD, Board and MSc for the years 1996-2006

    Abbas Doulani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available   The present study seeks to examine the status of research methods employed in dissertations submitted by graduates of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The study also examined the impact factors. Using content analysis, the research methods were divided into four groups: historical, descriptive, empirical and literature review. The distributions for each method were calculated on the basis of gender, graduate level, citations, time frame and fields of study. Samples were chosen randomly from among the dissertations available at faculty libraries at TUMS. 390 dissertations were selected. Findings demonstrated that gender did not influence the choice of research method. With exception of Nursing faculty, graduate level proved to be an prominent factor when choosing research method. All types of citations (books, journals, online and non-printed sources were identified as another significant factor impacting pushing towards any given research method. With exception of Hygiene and Food Faculty, the time factor affected the research method selection process as well. Finally, given their different research characteristics, the field of studies investigated also contributed to both the scope and direction of research methods chosen.

  3. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  4. Protocol for a mixed-methods longitudinal study to identify factors influencing return to work in the over 50s participating in the UK Work Programme: Supporting Older People into Employment (SOPIE).

    Brown, Judith; Neary, Joanne; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Thomson, Hilary; McQuaid, Ronald W; Leyland, Alastair H; Frank, John; Jeavons, Luke; de Pellette, Paul; Kiran, Sibel; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2015-12-16

    Increasing employment among older workers is a policy priority given the increase in life expectancy and the drop in labour force participation after the age of 50. Reasons for this drop are complex but include poor health, age discrimination, inadequate skills/qualifications and caring roles; however, limited evidence exists on how best to support this group back to work. The Work Programme is the UK Government's flagship policy to facilitate return to work (RTW) among those at risk of long-term unemployment. 'Supporting Older People Into Employment' (SOPIE) is a mixed-methods longitudinal study involving a collaboration between academics and a major Work Programme provider (Ingeus). The study will investigate the relationship between health, worklessness and the RTW process for the over 50s. There are three main study components. Embedded fieldwork will document the data routinely collected by Ingeus and the key interventions/activities delivered. The quantitative study investigates approximately 14,000 individuals (aged 16-64 years, with 20% aged over 50) who entered the Ingeus Work Programme (referred to as 'clients') in a 16-month period in Scotland and were followed up for 2 years. Employment outcomes (including progression towards work) and how they differ by client characteristics (including health), intervention components received and external factors will be investigated. The qualitative component will explore the experiences of clients and Ingeus staff, to better understand the interactions between health and (un)employment, Work Programme delivery, and how employment services can be better tailored to the needs of the over 50s. Ethical approval was received from the University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee (application number 400140186). Results will be disseminated through journal articles, national and international conferences. Findings will inform current and future welfare-to-work and job retention initiatives to

  5. The differential impact of academic self-regulatory methods on academic achievement among university students with and without learning disabilities.

    Ruban, Lilia M; McCoach, D Betsy; McGuire, Joan M; Reis, Sally M

    2003-01-01

    Although research on academic self-regulation has proliferated in recent years, no studies have investigated the question of whether the perceived usefulness and the use of standard self-regulated learning strategies and compensation strategies provide a differential prediction of academic achievement for university students with and without learning disabilities (LD). We developed and tested a model explaining interrelationships among self-regulatory variables and grade point average (GPA) using structural equation modeling and multiple group analysis for students with LD (n = 53) and without LD (n = 421). Data were gathered using a new instrument, the Learning Strategies and Study Skills survey. The results of this study indicate that students with LD differed significantly from students without LD in the relationships between their motivation for and use of standard self-regulated learning strategies and compensation strategies, which in turn provided a differential explanation of academic achievement for students with and without LD. These paths of influence and idiosyncrasies of academic self-regulation among students with LD were interpreted in terms of social cognitive theory, metacognitive theory, and research conducted in the LD field.

  6. Universal Natural Shapes: From Unifying Shape Description to Simple Methods for Shape Analysis and Boundary Value Problems

    Gielis, Johan; Caratelli, Diego; Fougerolle, Yohan; Ricci, Paolo Emilio; Tavkelidze, Ilia; Gerats, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Gielis curves and surfaces can describe a wide range of natural shapes and they have been used in various studies in biology and physics as descriptive tool. This has stimulated the generalization of widely used computational methods. Here we show that proper normalization of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm allows for efficient and robust reconstruction of Gielis curves, including self-intersecting and asymmetric curves, without increasing the overall complexity of the algorithm. Then, we show how complex curves of k-type can be constructed and how solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the Laplace equation on these complex domains can be derived using a semi-Fourier method. In all three methods, descriptive and computational power and efficiency is obtained in a surprisingly simple way. PMID:23028417

  7. Regionally Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Solving the Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell System Submitted to Iowa State University

    Guthrey, Pierson Tyler

    The relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system (RVM) models the behavior of collisionless plasma, where electrons and ions interact via the electromagnetic fields they generate. In the RVM system, electrons could accelerate to significant fractions of the speed of light. An idea that is actively being pursued by several research groups around the globe is to accelerate electrons to relativistic speeds by hitting a plasma with an intense laser beam. As the laser beam passes through the plasma it creates plasma wakes, much like a ship passing through water, which can trap electrons and push them to relativistic speeds. Such setups are known as laser wakefield accelerators, and have the potential to yield particle accelerators that are significantly smaller than those currently in use. Ultimately, the goal of such research is to harness the resulting electron beams to generate electromagnetic waves that can be used in medical imaging applications. High-order accurate numerical discretizations of kinetic Vlasov plasma models are very effective at yielding low-noise plasma simulations, but are computationally expensive to solve because of the high dimensionality. In addition to the general difficulties inherent to numerically simulating Vlasov models, the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system has unique challenges not present in the non-relativistic case. One such issue is that operator splitting of the phase gradient leads to potential instabilities, thus we require an alternative to operator splitting of the phase. The goal of the current work is to develop a new class of high-order accurate numerical methods for solving kinetic Vlasov models of plasma. The main discretization in configuration space is handled via a high-order finite element method called the discontinuous Galerkin method (DG). One difficulty is that standard explicit time-stepping methods for DG suffer from time-step restrictions that are significantly worse than what a simple Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL

  8. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  9. Older adolescents’ views regarding participation in Facebook research

    Moreno, Megan A; Grant, Alison; Kacvinsky, Lauren; Moreno, Peter; Fleming, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Facebook continues to grow in popularity among adolescents as well as adolescent researchers. Guidance on conducting this research with appropriate attention to privacy and ethics is scarce. To inform such research efforts, the purpose of this study was to determine older adolescents’ responses after learning that they were participants in a research study that involved identification of participants using Facebook. Methods Public Facebook profiles of older adolescents age 18 to 19 years from a large state university were examined. Profile owners were then interviewed. During the interview participants were informed that they were identified by examining publicly available Facebook profiles. Participants were asked to discuss their views on this research method. Results A total of 132 participants completed the interview (70% response rate), the average age was 18.4 years (SD=0.5) and our sample included 64 males (48.5%). Participant responses included: endorsement (19.7%), fine (36.4%), neutral (28.8%), uneasy (9.1%) and concerned (6.1%). Among participants who were uneasy or concerned, the majority voiced confusion regarding their current profile security settings (p=0.00). Conclusion The majority of adolescent participants viewed the use of Facebook for research positively. These findings are consistent with the approach taken by many US courts. Researchers may consider these findings when developing research protocols involving Facebook. PMID:23084164

  10. MBA Students' Quality Improvement: The Correlation Analysis of Students' Personal Traits and Attitudes towards Teaching Methods at a Chinese University

    Kong, Rui; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhong, Wanxing; Zhou, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    MBA education has become the fastest growing segment of education in China in recent years and a segment that can now be considered indispensable. However, how best to teach it has long been a source of debate. One of the key issues is how to match student traits with teaching methods. While engaged as teachers of marketing management, the authors…

  11. Listening as a Method of Learning a Foreign Language at the Non-Language Faculty of the University

    Kondrateva, Irina G.; Safina, Minnisa S.; Valeev, Agzam A.

    2016-01-01

    Learning a foreign language is becoming an increasingly important with Russia's integration into the world community. In this regard, increased requirements for the educational process and the development of new innovative teaching methods meet the requirements of the time. One of the important aspects of learning a foreign language is listening…

  12. The load of short telomeres, estimated by a new method, Universal STELA, correlates with number of senescent cells

    Bendix, Laila; Horn, Peer Bendix; Jensen, Uffe Birk

    2010-01-01

    history of the cell, superimposed by a more stochastic mechanism, suddenly causing a significant shortening of a single telomere. Previously, studies that have tried to explore the role of critically shortened telomeres have been hampered by methodological problems. With the method presented here...

  13. General questions of methods of teaching fractal geometry to university students in conditions of fundamentalization of education

    Виктор Семенович Корнилов

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In article methodical aspects, components of fundamental training of students of physical and mathematical specialties of higher educational institutions of fractal geometry are discussed. The attention to use in the course of such training of means of informatization is paid.

  14. Exploration of different methods to assess dietary acrylamide exposure in pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa)

    Brantsaeter, A.L.; Haugen, M.; Mul, de A.; Bjellaas, T.; Becher, G.; Klaveren, van J.D.; Alexander, J.; Meltzer, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed dietary exposure to acrylamide in 119 pregnant Norwegian women. The aim of the study was to explore three different methods for estimation of long-term intake of acrylamide and whether it is possible by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to identify pregnant women with high exposure to

  15. An International Study of the Ability and Cost-Effectiveness of Advertising Methods to Facilitate Study Participant Self-Enrolment Into a Pilot Pharmacovigilance Study During Early Pregnancy

    Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Stephens, Sally; Thomas, Simon Hugh Lynton; Jamry-Dziurla, Anna; Jong-van den Berg, de Lolkje; Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla; Laursen, Maja; Hliva, Valerie; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Bourke, Alison; Dreyer, Nancy A; Blackburn, Stella Cf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the fetal effects of maternal medication use in pregnancy is often inadequate and current pregnancy pharmacovigilance (PV) surveillance methods have important limitations. Patient self-reporting may be able to mitigate some of these limitations, providing an adequately sized

  16. Using community participation to assess acceptability of "Contra Caries", a theory-based, promotora-led oral health education program for rural Latino parents: a mixed methods study.

    Hoeft, Kristin S; Rios, Sarah M; Pantoja Guzman, Estela; Barker, Judith C

    2015-09-03

    Latino children experience more prevalent and severe tooth decay than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black children. Few theory-based, evaluated and culturally appropriate interventions target parents of this vulnerable population. To fill this gap, the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program, a theory-based, promotora-led education program for low-income, Spanish-speaking parents of children aged 1-5 years, was developed. This article describes qualitative findings of the acceptability of curriculum content and activities, presents the process of refinement of the curriculum through engaging the target population and promotoras, and presents results from the evaluation assessing the acceptability of the curriculum once implemented. Focus groups were conducted with low-income Spanish-speaking parents of children 1-5 years living in a city in an agricultural area of California. Interviews were digitally recorded, translated and transcribed, checked for accuracy and the resulting data was thematically coded and analyzed using a social constructionist approach. The Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program was then implemented with a separate but similar sample, and after completing the program, participants were administered surveys asking about acceptability and favorite activities of the education program. Data were entered into a database, checked for accuracy, open-ended questions were categorized, and responses to close-ended questions counted. Twelve focus groups were conducted (N = 51), 105 parents attended the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program, and 83 parents filled out surveys. Complete attendance and retention was high (89% and 90%, respectively). This study found that their children's oral health is a high priority. Parents were not only interested in, but actually attended classes focused on increasing their knowledge and skills with respect to early childhood oral health. The Contra Caries content and format was perceived as

  17. Effects of practices and teaching methods on different measures of the educational output: the case of Spanish universities

    Pedro José PÉREZ VÁZQUEZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the relationships between the educational resources applied in higher education and two types of measures of educational output: average grade obtained by students and the contribution of studies to the development of diverse professional competencies. The relationships are modelled using multi-level production function equations, with the corresponding output measure as the dependent variable. The explanatory variables are the prevalence of various teaching/learning modes and a set of variables that control for the behaviour of students during their studies and for their personal attributes. Estimates, using data from European project Reflex, show significant relationships between the teaching and learning methods used and the alternative measures of educational output considered. The results show that attending lectures has the greatest impact on average grades; nonetheless, more proactive learning methods such as problem-based learning, internships and work provision, and practical knowledge are most influential for the development of professional competencies.

  18. Methods and Teaching Strategies Used by Teacher Education Faculty Members in one State University in the Philippines

    Amado C. Ramos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutions of higher learning across the nation are responding to political, economic, social and technological pressures to be more responsive to students' needs and more concerned about how well students are prepared to assume future societal roles. This study aimed to determine the methods and teaching strategies used by the PSU – CTE faculty members of Bayambang Campus, Bayambang, Pangasinan during the first semester of the school year 2013-2014. The descriptivecorrelational method of research was employed in this study where it involved the collection of pertinent data in order to answer questions concerning the current status of the subject of the study. Majority of the faculty members are females, they are master’s degree holders, have a permanent position with an academic rank of instructor, and most of the faculty members are graduate of SUCs. They also have high attitude toward teaching; generally, the faculty members perceived themselves to be often in using teaching approaches and teaching methods; and sometimes in using teaching techniques/styles, instructional support activities, and non-formal activities; and no significant relationships exist between the faculty members’ profile variables and their level of pedagogical approaches in teaching approaches, teaching methods, teaching techniques/styles, non-formal activities and instructional support activities. Teachers should be encouraged to pursue/finish higher education, likewise they should be motivated to conduct research studies like action researches as part of their functions, particularly along their area of specialization. Teachers should be encouraged to explore and view other effective teaching strategies and find more ways to entice other students challenge themselves to create their own strategies to use in the field and to become more global in perspective. The use computer technology can be an effective teaching strategy, especially when students are given

  19. How do Millennial Engineering and Technology Students Experience Learning Through Traditional Teaching Methods Employed in the University Setting?

    Howard, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document and analyze how Millennial engineering and technology students experience learning in large lecture classrooms. To help achieve this purpose, perceptions Millennials have toward traditional teaching methods employed in large lecture classes were analyzed and discussed. Additionally, this study documented how Millennials experienced technology within large lecture classrooms. A learning model depicting how Millennials experience learning within the larg...

  20. Older adolescents' views regarding participation in Facebook research.

    Moreno, Megan A; Grant, Alison; Kacvinsky, Lauren; Moreno, Peter; Fleming, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Facebook continues to grow in popularity among adolescents as well as adolescent researchers. Guidance on conducting research using Facebook with appropriate attention to privacy and ethics is scarce. To inform such research efforts, the purpose of this study was to determine older adolescents' responses after learning that they were participants in a research study that involved identification of participants using Facebook. Public Facebook profiles of older adolescents aged 18-19 years from a large state university were examined. Profile owners were then interviewed. During the interview, participants were informed that they were identified by examining publicly available Facebook profiles. Participants were asked to discuss their views on this research method. A total of 132 participants completed the interview (70% response rate); the average age was 18.4 years (SD = .5); and our sample included 64 male participants (48.5%). Participant responses included endorsement (19.7%), fine (36.4%), neutral (28.8%), uneasy (9.1%), and concerned (6.1%). Among participants who were uneasy or concerned, the majority voiced confusion regarding their current profile security settings (p = .00). The majority of adolescent participants viewed the use of Facebook for research positively. These findings are consistent with the approach taken by many U.S. courts. Researchers may consider these findings when developing research protocols involving Facebook. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Personalizing and Contextualizing Multimedia Case Methods in University-based Teacher Education: An Important Modification for Promoting Technological Design in School Science

    Bencze, Larry; Hewitt, Jim; Pedretti, Erminia

    2009-01-01

    Results of various studies suggest that multimedia ‘case methods’ (activities associated with case documentaries) have many benefits in university-based teacher education contexts. They can, for example, help to ‘bridge the gap’ between perspectives and practices held by academic teacher educators and those held by student-teachers - who may adhere to perspectives and practices commonly supported in schools. On the other hand, some studies, along with theoretical arguments, suggest that there are limits to the effectiveness of multimedia case methods - because, for example, they can never fully represent realities of teaching and learning in schools. Furthermore, often missing from multimedia case methods is the student-teacher in the role of teacher. To address these concerns, we modified an existing multimedia case method by associating it with a special practice teaching situation in a school context. Qualitative data analyzed using constant comparative methods suggest that student-teachers engaged in this modified multimedia case method developed relatively deep commitments to encouraging students to conduct technology design projects - a non-traditional practice in school science. Factors that appeared to influence development of this motivation included student-teachers’ pre-instructional perspectives about science and the personalization and contextualization inherent to the modified multimedia case method.

  2. Ethics Education In The University

    Nguyen K. Q. Trung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Accounting faculty of universities in Vietnam takes an important role in the training of human resources for the society in the field of accounting auditing and taxation. All professors and lecturers who teaching in those faculties have participated in editing and changing the accounting curricular in order to meet the needs of the market labor and requirements of new internationally professional standards. The integration of professional ethics into the curriculum has raised the concern of many universities not only in Vietnam but also in the world. This paper presents the study on teaching and learning of professional ethics at Faculty of Accounting and Auditing of Banking University of HCMC. The results of the study do highlight some recommendations for improving the contents of courses used for the teaching and learning accounting effectively. The research is presented in this paper as follows a short literature review and then the methodology of interviewing the professors in accounting fields who have the best experiences in education of accounting. Also students who are studying accounting course will be interviewed. In addition to content Analysis research methods and a case study approach are used to investigate the whether it is necessary for teaching and learning of Professional Ethics in accounting at Banking University of HCMC. The paper aims to answer the following questions i Should ethics be taught in accounting classes at universities ii How professional ethics has been taught and learned as a separate course or integration into different accounting and auditing courses

  3. Factors determining community participation in afforestation projects ...

    USER

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... 2School of Environment and Natural Resources Management, South Eastern University College ..... Development: Case Studies in Runia and Central Asia. ... Participation of Local Women's Associations in Rural Community.

  4. European Antibiotic Awareness Day, 2008 - the first Europe-wide public information campaign on prudent antibiotic use: methods and survey of activities in participating countries.

    Earnshaw, S; Monnet, D L; Duncan, B; O'Toole, J; Ekdahl, K; Goossens, H

    2009-07-30

    Antibiotic resistance is a major European and global public health problem and is, for a large part, driven by misuse of antibiotics. Hence, reducing unnecessary antibiotic use, particularly for the treatment of certain respiratory tract infections where they are not needed, is a public health priority. The success of national awareness campaigns to educate the public and primary care prescribers about appropriate antibiotic use in Belgium and France stimulated a European initiative coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), and named European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD), to take place each year on 18 November. Specific campaign materials, including key messages, logos, slogans and a media toolkit, were developed and made available for use in European countries. The focus of the first EAAD campaign was about not taking antibiotics for viral infections such as colds and flu. A post-campaign survey was conducted in January 2009. Thirty-two European countries participated in the first EAAD, producing information materials and implementing activities to mark EAAD. Media coverage peaked on 18 and 19 November. At EU level, EAAD was launched at a scientific meeting in the European Parliament, Strasbourg. The event received EU political engagement through support from the EU Commissioner for Health, the Slovenian and French EU Presidencies, and Members of the European Parliament. Critical factors that led to the success of the first EAAD were good cooperation and process for building the campaign, strong political and stakeholder support and development of campaign materials based on scientific evidence. Countries indicated wide support for another EAAD in 2009. For this purpose, ECDC is developing several TV spots as well as a second set of EAAD campaign materials targeting primary care prescribers.

  5. How characterization and clearance process is planned to be optimized by combining MARSSIM methods with parametric statistics in decommissioning of Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm

    Jiselmark, J.

    2017-01-01

    There are different standards for the characterization and clearance process used globally in the radiological industry. All of them have advantages and disadvantages. This paper is describing a decommissioning project which is combining two methods in order to use the advantages of both and minimizing the disadvantages. In Sweden there have been a standard since several years to use a method based on parametric Bayesian statistics for the characterization and clearance process. This method has great advantages close to the clearance limits due to few measurements per m"2, an ability to add extra measurements if needed and an ability to reshape area units without restarting the clearance process. Since the method is based on units with a normal or LOG-normal distribution of the contamination there can be several units far from the clearance limits. The American MARSSIM method use non parametric statistics instead of parametric. In comparison to the Bayesian methods this results in the disadvantage of less accuracy close to the clearance limits but also in the great advantage with few units far from the clearance limits. In the characterizing and clearance process of old radiological facilities at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm the MARSSIM method is combined with the Bayesian statistics method to minimize the amount of measurements and by that the cost for clearance. By using Bayesian statistics close to the clearance limits, more areas will be approved for clearance and the risk of having to redo the survey is minimized. By using MARSSIM methods in the area with an assumed contamination below 25 % of the clearance limits, the areas are not needed to be divided into units with normal or LOG-normal distributed activity. Bigger areas can be handled as units which result in fewer measurements and a faster process. (authors)

  6. Participation in CEN TC 335 TC343 Chemical Test Methods. Final report; Deelname CEN TC 335 TC343 Chemical Testmethods. Eindrapportage

    Bakker, F.P. [ECN Engineering en Services, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    An overview is given of the work that has been done on the standardization of methods for the characterization of biofuels and solid recovered fuels (SRF). For biofuels a complete set of prestandards is available, conversion of pre-standards to standards is in good progress. The development of a standard biocarbon content method based on the {sup 14}C isotope measurement is in good progress. This standard could be an important tool for carbon dioxide trading purposes. CEN is the European Commission for Standardization, TC 335 is the Technical Committee 335 on Solid Biofuels, and TC 343 is the Technical Committee on Solid Recovered Fuels. [Dutch] In de periode september 2005 tot december 2006 zijn Europese standaarden voor de karakterisering van biobrandstoffen beschikbaar gekomen. Voor een aantal parameters is nader onderzoek vereist en deels gaande. Dankzij de ervaring die in Nederland is opgedaan met Nationale Technische Afspraken (NTA's) voor vaste biobrandstoffen heeft onze bijdrage aan de Europese normering de invoering daarvan zeker bespoedigd. De 14C groendeel bepaling begint terrein te winnen en zal in de nabije toekomst ook bij verdere implementatie van het Kyoto protocol een rol gaan spelen. CEN is de European Commission for Standardization, TC 335 is de Technical Committee 335 over Solid Biofuels, en TC 343 is de Technical Committee over Solid Recovered Fuels.

  7. COMPUTER TESTING AS A METHOD FOR ESTIMATION OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS OF STUDENTS ON BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Petushok N. E.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Assessment of students' knowledge is one of the key tasks of any educational system. The aim of the study is to identify the significance of testing in a multipurpose system of means of assessing students' knowledge. Material and methods. Statistic analysis of the relationship of the results of computer testing, the examination score and the average annual score. Results. A positive correlation was revealed between all pairs of the compared indicators. For students of the Faculty of General Medicine high strength of relationship was noted for the average annual score ↔ examination score and testing ↔ examination score. For students of the Medical Faculty for International Students, the tendencies of interdependence of the indicators are similar, the strength of relationship is less pronounced. Conclusions. Computer testing should be used in complex with other tools of assessment of academic achievements.

  8. Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program

    2018-01-01

    goals. The first goal was to integrate upper level undergraduate students from Hampton University into the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer...upper level undergraduate Biology and Biochemistry Majors from Hampton University to work throughout the summer participating in prostate cancer...Dominican Republic summer 2017 Marissa Willis HU-GU Fellow Summer 2016 (Notario lab) Biology Major Hampton University, class of 2018, Math and

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    Coley, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In this book the use of inhomogeneous models in cosmology, both in modelling structure formation and interpreting cosmological observations, is discussed. The authors concentrate on exact solutions, and particularly the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) and Szekeres models (the important topic of averaging is not discussed). The book serves to demonstrate that inhomogeneous metrics can generate realistic models of cosmic structure formation and nonlinear evolution and shows that general relativity has a lot more to offer to cosmology than just the standard spatially homogeneous FLRW model. I would recommend this book to people working in theoretical cosmology. In the introduction (and in the concluding chapter and throughout the book) a reasonable discussion of the potential problems with the standard FLRW cosmology is presented, and a list of examples illustrating the limitations of standard FLRW cosmology are discussed (including potential problems with perturbation methods). In particular, the authors argue that the assumptions of isotropy and spatial homogeneity (and consequently the Copernican principle) must be properly challenged and revisited. Indeed, it is possible for `good old general relativity' to be used to explain cosmological observations without introducing speculative elements. In part I of the book the necessary background is presented (readers need a background in general relativity theory at an advanced undergraduate or graduate level). There is a good (and easy to read) review of the exact spherically symmetric dust Lemaitre-Tolman model (LT) (often denoted the LTB model) and the Lemaitre and Szekeres models. Light propogation (i.e. null geodesics, for both central and off-center observers) in exact inhomogeneous (LT) models is reviewed. In part II a number of applications of exact inhomogeneous models are presented (taken mainly from the authors' own work). In chapter 4, the evolution of exact inhomogeneous models (primarily the LT model, but also the

  10. Observing participating observation

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  11. Observing participating observation

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  12. Anadolu University, Open Education Faculty, Turkish Language and Literature Department Graduated Students' Views towards Pedagogical Formation Training Certificate, Special Teaching Methods Courses and Turkish Language and Literature Education from: Sample of Turkey

    Bulut, Mesut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out Anadolu University Open Education Faculty Turkish Language and Literature graduated students' views towards Pedagogical Formation Training certificate and their opinions about special teaching methods. This study has been done in one of the universities of East Karadeniz in Turkey in which the 20 Turkish…

  13. A Comparative Study on The Perception of Forest Landscape Using LIST Method Between University Students of Japan and Indonesia

    Prita Indah Pratiwi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest is not only assessed for timber production, but also for public interests. It is not easy to measure the multiple functions and existence values that forests represent to local residents. The purposes of this research were to classify landscape image aspects of students using LIST (Landscape Image Sketching Technique, to know students' attributes influencing perception, and to formulate the differences of forest landscape characters. The research was conducted in three stages: landscape image survey, landscape image analysis, and forest landscape interpretation. LIST method was applied to classify landscape image aspects. Chi-square test was applied to examine the significant differences between students of Japan and Indonesia to perceive forest landscape, while cluster analysis was applied to characterize forest landscape. The results showed that 10 prominent components were detected in both countries. The only attribute influencing perception for Indonesian students was gender. Japanese students categorized forest type into needle leaf, broadleaf, and unknown forest type, while Indonesian students classified forest type into broadleaf and unknown forest type. The results of this study might be useful as a guidance for forest landscape design in Japan and Indonesia.Keywords: chi-square test, cluster analysis, forest, LIST, perception 

  14. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation by the worker. Indirect participation involves employee representation, while direct participation relates to individual involvement in management’s decision-making processes. In the Framework Dir...

  15. Landscape and participation: construction of a PhD research problem and an analysis method. Towards the comparative analysis of participatory processes of landscape management projects design on a local scale in the Walloon region (Belgium)

    Droeven, Emilie

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary reflection to the definition of a PhD research problem on the concepts of participation, landscape and project, led the student to be interested in the participatory processes of landscape management projects design, and in the inhabitants landscapes representations. The method includes the comparative analysis of local processes of projects design, and the direct observation of two Walloon landscape management projects design (investigation conducted with stakeholders implied i...

  16. Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities

    Gündüz, Nevin; Keskin, Muzaffer Toprak; Erdugan, Fuat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities. While the study's universe consists of all 11th graders studying at High school, the sample includes 32 of the 11th grade students who participated in arrow shooting activities in…

  17. Case-Based Web Learning Versus Face-to-Face Learning: A Mixed-Method Study on University Nursing Students.

    Chan, Aileen Wai-Kiu; Chair, Sek-Ying; Sit, Janet Wing-Hung; Wong, Eliza Mi-Ling; Lee, Diana Tze-Fun; Fung, Olivia Wai-Man

    2016-03-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) is an effective educational method for improving the learning and clinical reasoning skills of students. Advances in e-learning technology have supported the development of the Web-based CBL approach to teaching as an alternative or supplement to the traditional classroom approach. This study aims to examine the CBL experience of Hong Kong students using both traditional classroom and Web-based approaches in undergraduate nursing education. This experience is examined in terms of the perceived self-learning ability, clinical reasoning ability, and satisfaction in learning of these students. A mixture of quantitative and qualitative approaches was adopted. All Year-3 undergraduate nursing students were recruited. CBL was conducted using the traditional classroom approach in Semester 1, and the Web-based approach was conducted in Semester 2. Student evaluations were collected at the end of each semester using a self-report questionnaire. In-depth, focus-group interviews were conducted at the end of Semester 2. One hundred twenty-two students returned their questionnaires. No difference between the face-to-face and Web-based approaches was found in terms of self-learning ability (p = .947), clinical reasoning ability (p = .721), and satisfaction (p = .083). Focus group interview findings complemented survey findings and revealed five themes that reflected the CBL learning experience of Hong Kong students. These themes were (a) the structure of CBL, (b) the learning environment of Web-based CBL, (c) critical thinking and problem solving, (d) cultural influence on CBL learning experience, and (e) student-centered and teacher-centered learning. The Web-based CBL approach was comparable but not superior to the traditional classroom CBL approach. The Web-based CBL experience of these students sheds light on the impact of Chinese culture on student learning behavior and preferences.

  18. The use of real time ultrasound scanning as a teaching method of anatomy in an undergraduate sonography and medical imaging degree in an Australian university

    Bowman, A.; Lawson, C.; McKillup, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Real-time ultrasound scanning is increasing in popularity as a teaching tool for human anatomy because it is non-invasive, offers real-time 3-D anatomy and is cheaper than dissections. Aim: To assess real-time ultrasound scanning as a teaching method of human anatomy, and to determine what teaching methods medical imaging and sonography students consider effective for understanding human anatomy. Method: Surveys were distributed to two consecutive cohorts of first year medical imaging and medical sonography students at CQUniversity. Participation was voluntary. Comparisons among teaching methods were made using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Real-time ultrasound scanning was the most preferred method of delivery for anatomy classes overall especially compared to computer programs, videos, 3-D radiological images and dissection. Specifically, students indicated that ultrasound scanning was the preferred method to encourage learning from experience (F 7,231  = 2.942, p = 0.006), to develop team skills (F 7,231  = 4.550, p < 0.006), to follow complex instructions (F 7,231  = 4.656 p < 0.001) and to appreciate anatomical variation (F 7,231  = 2.067, p = 0.048). Dissection was the least favoured teaching method. Conclusion: Real-time ultrasound scanning is a useful tool for teaching anatomy, and animal dissections are a poor substitute for the use of human cadavers. - Highlights: • Real-time ultrasound scanning is a valid teaching tool for human anatomy. • Real-time ultrasound is preferred by students compared to other teaching methods. • Dissection is the least favoured method to learn anatomy. • Ultrasound encourages learning from experience and develops team skills.

  19. List of Participants

    Aulakh Charanjit S, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali. Awasthi R L, Harish-Chandra ... Chakravarty Girish Kumar, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad. Chatterjee Ayan, Central University of ... Majumdar Parthasarathi, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananada. University, Kolkata. Mangang ...

  20. Participation in online continuing education.

    Farrell, Barbara; Ward, Natalie; Jennings, Brad; Jones, Caitlin; Jorgenson, Derek; Gubbels-Smith, Ashley; Dolovich, Lisa; Kennie, Natalie

    2016-02-01

    The ADAPT (ADapting pharmacists' skills and Approaches to maximize Patients' drug Therapy effectiveness) e-learning programme requires weekly participation in module activities and facilitated discussion to support skill uptake. In this study, we sought to describe the extent and pattern of, satisfaction with and factors affecting participation in the initial programme offering and reasons for withdrawal. Mixed methods - convergent parallel approach. Participation was examined in qualitative data from discussion boards, assignments and action plans. Learner estimations of time commitment and action plan submission rates were calculated. Surveys (Likert scale and open-ended questions) included mid-point and final, exit and participation surveys. Eleven of 86 learners withdrew, most due to time constraints (eight completed an exit survey; seven said they would take ADAPT again). Thirty-five of 75 remaining learners completed a participation survey. Although 50-60% of the remaining 75 learners actively continued participating, only 15/35 respondents felt satisfied with their own participation. Learners spent 3-5 h/week (average) on module activities. Factors challenging participation included difficulty with technology, managing time and group work. Factors facilitating participation included willingness to learn (content of high interest) and supportive work environment. Being informed of programme time scheduling in advance was identified as a way to enhance participation. This study determined extent of learner participation in an online pharmacist continuing education programme and identified factors influencing participation. Interactions between learners and the online interface, content and with other learners are important considerations for designing online education programmes. Recommendations for programme changes were incorporated following this evaluation to facilitate participation. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.