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Sample records for university hospital costs

  1. Activity-based costing and its application in a Turkish university hospital.

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    Yereli, Ayşe Necef

    2009-03-01

    Resource management in hospitals is of increasing importance in today's global economy. Traditional accounting systems have become inadequate for managing hospital resources and accurately determining service costs. Conversely, the activity-based costing approach to hospital accounting is an effective cost management model that determines costs and evaluates financial performance across departments. Obtaining costs that are more accurate can enable hospitals to analyze and interpret costing decisions and make more accurate budgeting decisions. Traditional and activity-based costing approaches were compared using a cost analysis of gall bladder surgeries in the general surgery department of one university hospital in Manisa, Turkey. Copyright (c) AORN, Inc, 2009.

  2. Outpatient admissions and hospital costs of Syrian refugees in a Turkish university hospital.

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    Tahirbegolli, Bernard; Çavdar, Sabanur; Çetinkaya Sümer, Esin; Akdeniz, Sıdıka I; Vehid, Suphi

    2016-07-01

    To examine the most frequent admitted polyclinics, diagnoses, and the costs of Syrian refugee patient in a Turkish university hospital in the metropolitan city of Istanbul, Western part of Turkey.  Research methodology consist of analyzing outpatient admissions to the Hospital Polyclinics of Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey from January-June 2014. We carried out diagnosis groups as classified in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Australian Modification, and analyzed the hospital cost of first admission through records based in the hospital information system.  Median age of 251 Syrian refugee patients is 19 years, inter quartile rate 7-34 years. Patients aged 65 and older compared with those until 18 years and 19 to 64 years aged groups have made statistically significant (p less than 0.001) less hospital admissions. The Most frequented clinic was the emergency clinic. On June there have been significantly (p less than 0.001) more admissions compared with other months. The most common diagnoses were diseases of the respiratory system. The costs of per admission was estimated nearly 48 US Dollar/per patient and the total amount of hospital admissions was 12,031.93 US Dollar.  On the specified dates, the clinics were mostly frequented from Syrian refugees until 18 years group. The most common presenting symptoms are respiratory diseases and most frequented clinic is emergency.

  3. Costs of the Patients Hospitalized with Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a University Hospital

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    Fatma Yıldırım

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, although a preventable and treatable disease continues to be a major health problem. Acute exacerbations of COPD is a major cause of hospitalization of patients and it constitutes a significant portion of COPD-related health care costs. In this study, we aimed to determine the cost of patients hospitalized with acute exacerbations of COPD in a university hospital. Methods: Data of the patients that were hospitalized due to COPD exacerbation between 1 September 2013-1 September 2014 in Hospital of Gazi University Medical Faculty were retrospectively analyzed. Cost data were gathered from data processing department. Costs were identified for drugs, laboratory tests, bed costs and other materials. Results: A total of 790 patients were hospitalized during twelve months. Among these patients 181 (23.0% patients had COPD and 99 (12.5% were hospitalized due to acute exacerbation of COPD. Of these 99 patients 77 (77.8% were male and 22 (22.2% were female. Forty-nine (49.5% patients were hospitalized from the emergency department, 50 (50.5% patients were from the outpatient clinic. The median age was 70 (64-77 years old and median length of hospital stay was 8 (6-13 days. Ninety-one (91.9% of them were discharged from the service. Eight (8.1% patients were transfered to the intensive care unit (ICU due to respiratory failure, and 7 of these patients (7.4% hospitalized back to the service after treatment at ICU, 2 (2.1% patients died. The median cost per patient was 1.064 (726-1.866 Turkish Lira (TL. Drug costs accounted the largest portion (36.0% of the median cost, followed by bed cost (26.0%. Two (2.1% of patients died in hospital. Although the number of patients without antibiotic usage is less (17.2% vs 82.8%; the median cost per patient in the antibiotic using group was higher than that were without antibiotic using (median 643 vs 1.162 TL p=0.001. Presence of a comorbidity, hypoxemia

  4. Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections in a Turkish university hospital

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    Yalcin Ata

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies associated nosocomial infections with increased hospital costs due to extra days in hospital, staff time, extra investigations and drug treatment. The cost of antibiotic treatment for these infections represents a significant part of hospital expenditure. This prospective observational study was designed to determine the daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections per infected adult patient in Akdeniz University Hospital. Methods All adult patients admitted to the ICUs between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2003 who had only one nosocomial infection during their stay were included in the study. Infection sites and pathogens, antimicrobial treatment of patient and it's cost were recorded. Daily antibiotic costs were calculated per infected patient. Results Among the 8460 study patients, 817 (16.6% developed 1407 episodes of nosocomial infection. Two hundred thirty three (2.7% presented with only one nosocomial infection. Mean daily antibiotic cost was $89.64. Daily antibiotic cost was $99.02 for pneumonia, $94.32 for bloodstream infection, $94.31 for surgical site infection, $52.37 for urinary tract infection, and $162.35 for the other infections per patient. The treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was the most expensive infection treated. Piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin were the most prescribed antibiotics, and meropenem was the most expensive drug for treatment of the nosocomial infections in the ICU. Conclusions Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections is an important part of extra costs that should be reduced providing rational antibiotic usage in hospitals.

  5. Cost awareness among doctors in an Irish university-affiliated teaching hospital

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    William H.C. Tiong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in USA and Canada have found that physicians and physicians in training have a limited understanding of medical care costs. In this study, we set out to survey all grades of doctors in the surgical department, emergency department, and anaesthetic department in a university-affiliated, Irish teaching hospital. Open-ended questionnaires on cost of 25 routinely used items in the hospital were sent to each department. The aims of the study were to assess the present knowledge of cost among the various grades of doctors, and to evaluate the level of professional experience on cost awareness and their confidence in their estimates. We had an overall response rate of 56.8% with 68.5% of doctors admitted to have estimated more than 90% of their responses. Ninety three percent of doctors have no confidence in their estimates on cost of listed items. We found that the lack of cost awareness was universal among doctors of all grades (P = 0.236. The doctors in our study population showed a high level of inaccuracy on their estimates of cost of routinely used items with 84% of the items overestimated. Our results were discouraging and demonstrated that considerable educational activity will be necessary if doctors are to be more cost effective in meeting the national health care budget.

  6. Hospital staffing and hospital costs.

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    Andrew, R R

    1976-08-07

    A comparative study of costs per bed per day in teaching hospitals affiliated with Monash University compared with large non-teaching metropolitan hospitals (1964 to 1974) shows they are much higher in teaching hospitals. There is no evidence that this is due to the additional costs arising from the clinical schools. Research in the teaching hospitals and the accompanying high professional standards and demands on services are major factors accounting for the difference. Over the decade studied, the resident staff have increased by 77% and other salaried staff by 24%. The index of expenditure for the three teaching hospitals in the decade has increased by 386%.

  7. Cost analysis of facial injury treatment in two university hospitals in Malaysia: a prospective study

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    Saperi BS

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bin Sulong Saperi,1 Roszalina Ramli,2 Zafar Ahmed,1 Amrizal Muhd Nur,1 Mohd Ismail Ibrahim,3 Muhd Fazlynizam Rashdi,2 Rifqah Nordin,2 Normastura Abd Rahman,4 Azizah Yusoff,4 Abd Jabar Nazimi,2 Roselinda Abdul Rahman,4 Noorhayati Abdul Razak,4 Norlen Mohamed 5 1International Centre for Casemix and Clinical Coding, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, 3Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, 4School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, 5Malaysian Institute of Road Safety Research, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Objective: Facial injury (FI may occur in isolation or in association with injuries to other parts of the body (facial and other injury [FOI]. The objective of this study was to determine the direct treatment costs incurred during the management of facial trauma. Materials and methods: A prospective cohort study on treatment cost for FIs and FOIs due to road-traffic crashes in two university hospitals in Malaysia was conducted from July 2010 to June 2011. The patients were recruited from emergency departments and reviewed after 6 months from the date of initial treatment. Direct cost analysis, comparison of cost and length of hospital stay, and Injury Severity Score (ISS were performed. Results: A total of 190 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 83 (43.7% had FI only, and 107 (56.3% had FOI. The mean ISS was 5.4. The mean length of stay and costs for patients with FI only were 5.8 days with a total cost of US$1,261.96, whereas patients with FOI were admitted for 7.8 days with a total cost of US$1,716.47. Costs doubled if the treatment was performed under general anesthesia compared to local anesthesia. Conclusion: Treatment of FI and FOI imposes a financial burden on the health care system in Malaysia. Keywords: facial

  8. Treatment cost of patients with maxillofacial fractures at the University Hospital in Mostar 2002-2006.

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    Jurić, Mario; Novakovic, Josip; Carapina, Mirela; Kneiević, Ervin

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the costs structure of medical treatment for the patients with maxillofacial fractures, to perform a treatment cost evaluation, describe the factors which considerably influence the costs and discover the ways of achieving financial savings in treated patients. The study group consisted of patients with maxillofacial fractures who were admitted and treated at the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery of the University Hospital Mostar in the period from January 2002 until December 2006. Data for the study were collected from the patients' databases, case histories and data obtained on the basis of individual payments for the treatment that was collected by Finance Department of the University Hospital of Mostar Most patients in this study were men (83%), of average age 34 +/- 19 years. Zygomatic bone fracture was the commonest injury. Open surgical procedure was performed in 84.7% of treated cases. The costs for the open procedure were considerably higher than conservative treatment. Medication cost made up a total of 37.9% and cost of hospital accommodation 27.3% out of total hospital charge. Cost reduction in treated patients with maxillofacial fractures should be achieved through protocols of urgent treatment of maxillofacial trauma patients immediately after sustaining an injury and with earlier discharge of the patients when postoperative complications are not expected.

  9. Computing Cost Price for Cataract Surgery by Activity Based Costing (ABC Method at Hazrat-E-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2014

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    Masuod Ferdosi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital managers need to have accurate information about actual costs to make efficient and effective decisions. In activity based costing method, first, activities are recognized and then direct and indirect costs are computed based on allocation methods. The aim of this study was to compute the cost price for cataract surgery by Activity Based Costing (ABC method at Hazrat-e-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross- sectional study for computing the costs of cataract surgery by activity based costing technique in Hazrat-e-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2014. Data were collected through interview and direct observation and analyzed by Excel software. Results: According to the results of this study, total cost in cataract surgery was 8,368,978 Rials. Personnel cost included 62.2% (5,213,574 Rials of total cost of cataract surgery that is the highest share of surgery costs. The cost of consumables was 7.57% (1,992,852 Rials of surgery costs. Conclusion: Based on the results, there was different between cost price of the services and public Tariff which appears as hazards or financial crises to the hospital. Therefore, it is recommended to use the right methods to compute the costs relating to Activity Based Costing. Cost price of cataract surgery can be reduced by strategies such as decreasing the cost of consumables.

  10. Comparison of Patient Costs in Internal Medicine and Anaesthesiology Intensive Care Units in a Tertiary University Hospital.

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    Kara, İskender; Yıldırım, Fatma; Başak, Dilek Yumuş; Küçük, Hamit; Türkoğlu, Melda; Aygencel, Gülbin; Katı, İsmail; Karabıyık, Lale

    2015-06-01

    The allocation of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to health is limited, therefore it has made a need for professional management of health business. Hospital managers as well as employees are required to have sufficient knowledge about the hospital costs. Hospital facilities like intensive care units that require specialization and advanced technology have an important part in costs. For this purpose, cost analysis studies should be done in the general health business and special units separately. In this study we aimed to compare the costs of anaesthesiology and internal medicine intensive care units (ICU) roughly. After approval of this study by Gazi University Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, the costs of 855 patients that were hospitalized, examined and treated for at least 24 hours in internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs between January 2012-August 2013 (20 months period) were taken and analyzed from chief staff of the Department of Information Technology, Gazi University Hospital. At the end of the study, we observed clear differences between internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs arising from transactions and patient characteristics of units. We stated that these differences should be considered by Social Security Institution (SSI) for the reimbursement of the services. Further, we revealed that SSI payments do not meet the intensive care expenditure.

  11. Teleradiology from the provider's perspective-cost analysis for a mid-size university hospital.

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    Rosenberg, Christian; Kroos, Kristin; Rosenberg, Britta; Hosten, Norbert; Flessa, Steffen

    2013-08-01

    Real costs of teleradiology services have not been systematically calculated. Pricing policies are not evidence-based. This study aims to prove the feasibility of performing an original cost analysis for teleradiology services and show break-even points to perform cost-effective practice. Based on the teleradiology services provided by the Greifswald University Hospital in northeastern Germany, a detailed process analysis and an activity-based costing model revealed costs per service unit according to eight examination categories. The Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the cost amplitude and identify pricing thresholds. Twenty-two sub-processes and four staff categories were identified. The average working time for one unit was 55 (x-ray) to 72 min (whole-body CT). Personnel costs were dominant (up to 68 %), representing lower limit costs. The Monte Carlo method showed the cost distribution per category according to the deficiency risk. Avoiding deficient pricing by a likelihood of 90 % increased the cost of a cranial CT almost twofold as compared with the lower limit cost. Original cost analysis is possible when providing teleradiology services with complex statutory requirements in place. Methodology and results provide useful data to help enhance efficiency in hospital management as well as implement realistic reimbursement fees. • Analysis of original costs of teleradiology is possible for a providing hospital • Results discriminate pricing thresholds and lower limit costs to perform cost-effective practice • The study methods represent a managing tool to enhance efficiency in providing facilities • The data are useful to help represent telemedicine services in regular medical fee schedules.

  12. Hospital costs fell as numbers of LVADs were increasing: experiences from Oslo University Hospital

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    Mishra Vinod

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study was undertaken to examine total hospital costs per patient of a consecutive implantation series of two 3rd generation Left Ventricle Assist Devices (LVAD. Further we analyzed if increased clinical experience would reduce total hospital costs and the gap between costs and the diagnosis related grouped (DRG-reimbursement. Method Cost data of 20 LVAD implantations (VentrAssist™ from 2005-2009 (period 1 were analyzed together with costs from nine patients using another LVAD (HeartWare™ from 2009-June 2011 (period 2. For each patient, total costs were calculated for three phases - the pre-LVAD implantation phase, the LVAD implantation phase and the post LVAD implant phase. Patient specific costs were obtained prospectively from patient records and included personnel resources, medication, blood products, blood chemistry and microbiology, imaging and procedure costs including operating room costs. Overhead costs were registered retrospectively and allocated to the specific patient by predefined allocation keys. Finally, patient specific costs and overhead costs were aggregated into total hospital costs for each patient. All costs were calculated in 2011-prices. We used regression analyses to analyze cost variations over time and between the different devices. Results The average total hospital cost per patient for the pre-LVAD, LVAD and post-LVAD for period 1 was $ 585, 513 (range 132, 640- 1 247, 299, and the corresponding DRG- reimbursement (2009 was $ 143, 192 . The mean LOS was 54 days (range 12- 127. For period 2 the total hospital cost per patient was $ 413, 185 (range 314, 540- 622, 664 and the corresponding DRG- reimbursement (2010 was $ 136, 963. The mean LOS was 49 days (range 31- 93. The estimates from the regression analysis showed that the total hospital costs, excluding device costs, per patient were falling as the number of treated patients increased. The estimate from the trend variable was -14

  13. Sepsis in a university hospital: a prospective study for the cost analysis of patients' hospitalization.

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    Barreto, Maynara Fernanda Carvalho; Dellaroza, Mara Solange Gomes; Kerbauy, Gilselena; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the cost of hospitalization of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted or diagnosed in the Urgent and Emergency sector at a university hospital and followed until the clinical outcome. An epidemiological, prospective, observational study conducted in a public hospital in southern Brazil for the period of one year (August 2013 to August 2014). Sepsis notification forms, medical records and data of the cost sector were used for the collection of clinical and epidemiological data. The sample comprised 95 patients, resulting in a total high cost of hospitalization (R$ 3,692,421.00), and an average of R$ 38,867.60 per patient. Over half of the total value of the treatment of sepsis (R$ 2,215,773.50) was assigned to patients who progressed to death (59.0%). The higher costs were related to discharge, diagnosis of severe sepsis, the pulmonary focus of infection and the age group of up to 59 years. The high cost of the treatment of sepsis justifies investments in training actions and institution of protocols that can direct preventive actions, and optimize diagnosis and treatment in infected and septic patients. Estimar o custo da internação de pacientes com sepse grave ou choque séptico admitidos ou diagnosticados no setor de Urgências e Emergências de um hospital universitário e seguidos até o desfecho clínico. Estudo epidemiológico, prospectivo e observacional, realizado em um hospital público do sul do Brasil, no período de 1 ano (agosto de 2013 a agosto de 2014). A coleta dos dados clínico-epidemiológicos utilizou fichas de notificação de sepse, prontuários e dados do setor de custos. Foi realizada análise de tendência central, dispersão e quartis dos custos das internações. Amostra composta por 95 pacientes que totalizaram elevado custo da internação (R$ 3.692.421,00), com média de R$ 38.867,60 por paciente. Mais da metade do valor total do tratamento da sepse (R$ 2.215.773,50) destinou-se a pacientes que evoluíram a

  14. [Therapy costs of adult patients admitting to emergency unit of a university hospital with asthma acute attack].

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    Serinken, Mustafa; Dursunoğlu, Neşe; Cimrin, Arif H

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, hospital costs of patients who admitted to the emergency department with asthma attack and several variables that could effect this cost were analyzed and data were collected in order to reduce economical burden of that disease was aimed. Between September 2005 and February 2007 patients with acute asthma attack, admitted to Pamukkale University Hospital Emergency Department were retrospectively evaluated. Totally 108 patients who met the inclusion criteria admitted to the emergency department with asthma acute attack. Of those 97 were women (89.8%). Forty mild, 51 moderate, 15 severe and 2 life-threatening attacks were detected. Severe and life-threatening attacks were more frequent in patients graduated from primary school compared with the other groups. Mean therapy costs of the patients who were hospitalized and treated in the emergency department were 836.60 +/- 324.30 TL (Turkish Lira) and 170.66 +/- 86.71 TL respectively. Treatment procedures consisted of 45.8% of and 38.5% hospital costs for patients treated in the emergency department and for patients hospitalized respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the comparison of costs according to the attack severity (p= 0.0001). Education level of the patients had a significant effect on hospital costs (p= 0.025). Comorbidities were found a significant increasing factor of treatment costs (p= 0.017). There were no effects of sex, age, medical insurance or duration of asthma disease on the hospital costs. The relation between low-education level, living in the rural area and admissions with severe attacks of asthma to emergency department show the importance of treatment success with patient compliance. Positive and negative factors effecting disease control should be detected by evaluating larger populations to reduce economical burden of asthma.

  15. [Cost of assisted reproduction technology in a public hospital].

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    Navarro Espigares, José Luis; Martínez Navarro, Luis; Castilla Alcalá, José Antonio; Hernández Torres, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    Most studies on the costs of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) identify the total cost of the procedure with the direct cost, without considering important items such as overhead or intermediate costs. The objective of this study was to determine the cost per ART procedure in a public hospital in 2003 and to compare the results with those in the same hospital in 1998. Data from the Human Reproduction Unit of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital in Granada (Spain) from 1998 and 2003 were analyzed. Since the total costs of the unit were known, the cost of the distinct ART procedures performed in the hospital was calculated by means of a methodology for cost distribution. Between 1998 and 2003, the activity and costs of the Human Reproduction Unit analyzed evolved differently. Analysis of activity showed that some techniques, such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, were consolidated while others, such as stimulation without assisted reproduction or intracervical insemination were abandoned. In all procedures, unit costs per cycle and per delivery decreased in the period analyzed. Important changes took place in the structure of costs of ART in the Human Reproduction Unit of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital between 1998 and 2003. Some techniques were discontinued, while others gained importance. Technological advances and structural innovations, together with a "learning effect," modified the structure of ART-related costs.

  16. Cost analysis of facial injury treatment in two university hospitals in Malaysia: a prospective study

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    Saperi, Bin Sulong; Ramli, Roszalina; Ahmed, Zafar; Muhd Nur, Amrizal; Ibrahim, Mohd Ismail; Rashdi, Muhd Fazlynizam; Nordin, Rifqah; Rahman, Normastura Abd; Yusoff, Azizah; Nazimi, Abd Jabar; Abdul Rahman, Roselinda; Abdul Razak, Noorhayati; Mohamed, Norlen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Facial injury (FI) may occur in isolation or in association with injuries to other parts of the body (facial and other injury [FOI]). The objective of this study was to determine the direct treatment costs incurred during the management of facial trauma. Materials and methods A prospective cohort study on treatment cost for FIs and FOIs due to road-traffic crashes in two university hospitals in Malaysia was conducted from July 2010 to June 2011. The patients were recruited from emergency departments and reviewed after 6 months from the date of initial treatment. Direct cost analysis, comparison of cost and length of hospital stay, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were performed. Results A total of 190 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 83 (43.7%) had FI only, and 107 (56.3%) had FOI. The mean ISS was 5.4. The mean length of stay and costs for patients with FI only were 5.8 days with a total cost of US$1,261.96, whereas patients with FOI were admitted for 7.8 days with a total cost of US$1,716.47. Costs doubled if the treatment was performed under general anesthesia compared to local anesthesia. Conclusion Treatment of FI and FOI imposes a financial burden on the health care system in Malaysia. PMID:28223831

  17. [Evolution of reimbursement of high-cost anticancer drugs: Financial impact within a university hospital].

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    Baudouin, Amandine; Fargier, Emilie; Cerruti, Ariane; Dubromel, Amélie; Vantard, Nicolas; Ranchon, Florence; Schwiertz, Vérane; Salles, Gilles; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Thomas, Luc; Bérard, Frédéric; Nancey, Stéphane; Freyer, Gilles; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Rioufol, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    In the context of health expenses control, reimbursement of high-cost medicines with a 'minor' or 'nonexistent' improvement in actual health benefit evaluated by the Haute Autorité de santé is revised by the decree of March 24, 2016 related to the procedure and terms of registration of high-cost pharmaceutical drugs. This study aims to set up the economic impact of this measure. A six months retrospective study was conducted within a French university hospital from July 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. For each injectable high-cost anticancer drug prescribed to a patient with cancer, the therapeutic indication, its status in relation to the marketing authorization and the associated improvement in actual health benefit were examined. The total costs of these treatments, the cost per type of indication and, in the case of marketing authorization indications, the cost per improvement in actual health benefit were evaluated considering that all drugs affected by the decree would be struck off. Over six months, 4416 high-cost injectable anticancer drugs were prescribed for a total cost of 4.2 million euros. The costs of drugs with a minor or nonexistent improvement in actual benefit and which comparator is not onerous amount 557,564 euros. The reform of modalities of inscription on the list of onerous drugs represents a significant additional cost for health institutions (1.1 million euros for our hospital) and raises the question of the accessibility to these treatments for cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of hospital data warehouse for cost analysis of DPC based on medical costs.

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    Muranaga, F; Kumamoto, I; Uto, Y

    2007-01-01

    To develop a data warehouse system for cost analysis, based on the categories of the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system, in which medical costs were estimated by DPC category and factors influencing the balance between costs and fees. We developed a data warehouse system for cost analysis using data from the hospital central data warehouse system. The balance data of patients who were discharged from Kagoshima University Hospital from April 2003 to March 2005 were determined in terms of medical procedure, cost per day and patient admission in order to conduct a drill-down analysis. To evaluate this system, we analyzed cash flow by DPC category of patients who were categorized as having malignant tumors and whose DPC category was reevaluated in 2004. The percentages of medical expenses were highest in patients with acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and particularly in patients with malignant tumors of the liver and intrahepatic bile duct. Imaging tests degraded the percentages of medical expenses in Kagoshima University Hospital. These results suggested that cost analysis by patient is important for hospital administration in the inclusive evaluation system using a case-mix index such as DPC.

  19. Mortality Rates of Traumatic Traffic Accident Patients at the University Hospital

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    Atilla Senih MAYDA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to estimate hospitalization and mortality rates in patients admitted to the University Hospital due to traffic accidents, and to determine the mean cost of the applicants in the hospital due to traffic accident. In this retrospective study data were obtained from the records of a university research and practice hospital. There were 802 patients admitted to emergency and other outpatient clinics of the University Hospital because of traffic accidents throughout the year 2012. Out of these patients, 166 (20.7% were hospitalized, and the annual mortality rate was 0.87%. The total cost was 322,545.2 euro and 402.2 euro per patient. Road traffic accident detection reports covered only the numbers of fatal injuries and injuries that happened at the scene of accidents. Determination of the number of the dead and wounded with overall mortality rate would be supposed to reveal the magnitude of public health problem caused by traffic accidents.

  20. Determinants of the direct cost of heart failure hospitalization in a public tertiary hospital.

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    Parissis, John; Athanasakis, Kostas; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Mareti, Christina; Bistola, Vasiliki; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Kyriopoulos, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Lekakis, John

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the first reason for hospital admission in the elderly and represents a major financial burden, the greatest part of which results from hospitalization costs. We sought to analyze current HF hospitalization-related expenditure and identify predictors of cost in a public tertiary hospital in Europe. We performed a retrospective chart review of 197 consecutive patients, aged 56±16years, 80% male, with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 30±10%, hospitalized for HF in a major university hospital in Athens, Greece. The survey involved the number of hospitalization days, laboratory investigations and medical therapies. Patients who were hospitalized in CCU/ICU or underwent interventional procedures or device implantations were excluded from analysis. Costs were estimated based on the Greek healthcare system perspective in 2013. Patients were hospitalized for a median of 7 days with a total direct cost of €3198±3260/patient. The largest part of the expenses (79%) was attributed to hospitalization (ward), while laboratory investigations and medical treatment accounted for 17% and 4%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, pre-admission New York Heart Association NYHA class (p=0.001), serum creatinine (p=0.003) and NT-proBNP (p=0.004) were significant independent predictors of hospitalization cost. Direct cost of HF hospitalization is high particularly in patients with more severe symptoms, profound neurohormonal activation and renal dysfunction. Strategies to lower hospitalization rates are warranted in the current setting of financial constraints faced by many European countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Screening for malnutrition among hospitalized patients in a Colombian University Hospital].

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    Cruz, Viviana; Bernal, Laura; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ruiz, Álvaro J

    2017-04-01

    On admission, 30 to 50% of hospitalized patients have some degree of malnutrition, which is associated with longer length of stay, higher rates of complications, mortality and greater costs. To determine the frequency of screening for risk of malnutrition in medical records and assess the usefulness of the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). In a cross-sectional study, we searched for malnutrition screening in medical records, and we applied the MST tool to hospitalized patients at the Internal Medicine Wards of San Ignacio University Hospital. Of 295 patients included, none had been screened for malnutrition since hospital admission. Sixty one percent were at nutritional risk, with a higher prevalence among patients with HIV (85.7%), cancer (77.5%) and pneumonia. A positive MST result was associated with a 3.2 days increase in length of hospital stay (p = 0.024). The prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized patients is high, but its screening is inadequate and it is underdiagnosed. The MST tool is simple, fast, low-cost, and has a good diagnostic performance.

  2. Social and hospital costs of patients admitted to a university hospital in Brazil due to motorcycle crashes.

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    Dos Anjos, Katia Campos; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Mattar, Rames

    2017-08-18

    This study aimed to investigate the social and hospital costs of patients treated at a public hospital who were motorcycle crash victims. This prospective study was on 68 motorcycle riders (drivers or passengers), who were followed up from hospital admission to 6 months after the crash. A questionnaire covering quantitative and qualitative questions was administered. Motorcycle crash victims were responsible for 12% of the institution's hospital admissions; 54.4% were young (18-28 years of age); 92.6% were the drivers; 91.2% were male; and 50% used their motorcycles as daily means of transportation. Six months afterward, 94.1% needed help from someone; 83.8% had changed their family dynamics; and 73.5% had not returned to their professional activities. Among the injuries, 94.7% had some type of fracture, of which 53.5% were exposed fractures; 35.3% presented temporary sequelae; and 32.4% presented permanent sequelae. They used the surgical center 2.53 times on average, with a mean hospital stay of 18 days. The per capita hospital cost of these victims' treatment was US$17,481.50. The social and hospital costs were high, relative to the characteristics of a public institution. Temporary or permanent disability caused changes to family dynamics, as shown by the high numbers of patients who were still away from their professional activities more than 6 months afterward.

  3. A simulation model of hospital management based on cost accounting analysis according to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    Since a little before 2000, hospital cost accounting has been increasingly performed at Japanese national university hospitals. At Kumamoto University Hospital, for instance, departmental costs have been analyzed since 2000. And, since 2003, the cost balance has been obtained according to certain diseases for the preparation of Diagnosis-Related Groups and Prospective Payment System. On the basis of these experiences, we have constructed a simulation model of hospital management. This program has worked correctly at repeated trials and with satisfactory speed. Although there has been room for improvement of detailed accounts and cost accounting engine, the basic model has proved satisfactory. We have constructed a hospital management model based on the financial data of an existing hospital. We will later improve this program from the viewpoint of construction and using more various data of hospital management. A prospective outlook may be obtained for the practical application of this hospital management model.

  4. Chronic Hepatitis C-Related Cirrhosis Hospitalization Cost Analysis in Bulgaria

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    Maria Dimitrova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveHCV infection is a leading cause of chronic liver disease with long-term complications—extensive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The objective of this study is to perform cost analysis of therapy of patients with chronic HCV-related cirrhosis hospitalized in the University Hospital “Queen Joanna-ISUL” for 3-year period (2012–2014.MethodsIt is a prospective, real life observational study of 297 patients with chronic HCV infection and cirrhosis monitored in the University Hospital “Queen Joanna-ISUL” for 3-year period. Data on demographic, clinical characteristics, and health-care resources utilization (hospitalizations, highly specialized interventions, and pharmacotherapy were collected. Micro-costing approach was applied to evaluate the total direct medical costs. The points of view are that of the National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF, hospital and the patients. Collected cost data are from the NHIF and hospitals tariffs, patients, and from the positive dug list for medicines prices. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared test, Kruskal–Wallis, and Friedman tests were used for statistical processing.Results76% of patients were male. 93% were diagnosed in grade Child-Pugh A and B. 97% reported complications, and almost all developed esophageal varices. During the 3 years observational period, patients did not change the critical clinical values for Child-Pugh status and therefore the group was considered as homogenous. 847 hospitalizations were recorded for 3 years period with average length of stay 17 days. The mortality rate of 6.90% was extremely high. The total direct medical costs for the observed cohort of patients for 3-year period accounted for 1,290,533 BGN (€659,839 with an average cost per patient 4,577 BGN (€2,340. Statistically significant correlation was observed between the total cost per patient from the different payers’ perspective and the Child-Pugh cirrhosis score

  5. The effect on patient loyalty of service quality, patient visit experience and perceived switching costs: lessons from one Taiwan university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Ling; Huang, Jun-Ying; Howng, Shen-Long

    2011-02-01

    The reimbursement system changed from fee-for-service to fixed prospective payments in Taiwan, the effect on the physician-patient's relationship is worth being studied. We examined the relationship between patient visit experience, cost perceptions and the two important aspects of quality of care, curing and interpersonal performance, and patients' loyalty to the hospital physicians. A total of 404 patients from an acute care hospital in Taiwan, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (KMUH), were investigated using a self-administered mailing survey. All measures including patient loyalty (PL), curing service quality (CSQ), interpersonal service quality (ISQ), visit experience (VE) and perceived switching costs (PSC), were adapted and modified from existing scales. Our results showed that the physician's CSQ and ISQ positively affected patients' loyalty to KMUH. The interaction between the main effects of service quality, patients' VE and three types of switching visit costs, yielded additional insights into the importance of service quality for patient retention. The CSQ of physicians becomes a more important determinant of loyalty than ISQ as patients' VE increases. The importance of CSQ and ISQ increases in relation to PL as the perceived procedural and relational costs of changing care providers increases. Neither CSQ nor ISQ has a reduced relationship with PL as the perceived financial costs of switching hospitals increase. Our study indicates that the impact of CSQ and ISQ on loyalty varies according to the perceived visit costs of changing hospitals and the patients' VE.

  6. Cost analysis of hospitalized Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD

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    Hübner, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: -associated diarrhea (CDAD causes heavy financial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. As with all hospital-acquired infections, prolonged hospital stays are the main cost driver. Previous cost studies only include hospital billing data and compare the length of stay in contrast to non-infected patients. To date, a survey of actual cost has not yet been conducted.Method: A retrospective analysis of data for patients with nosocomial CDAD was carried out over a 1-year period at the University Hospital of Greifswald. Based on identification of CDAD related treatment processes, cost of hygienic measures, antibiotics and laboratory as well as revenue losses due to bed blockage and increased length of stay were calculated.Results: 19 patients were included in the analysis. On average, a CDAD patient causes additional costs of € 5,262.96. Revenue losses due to extended length of stay take the highest proportion with € 2,555.59 per case, followed by loss in revenue due to bed blockage during isolation with € 2,413.08 per case. Overall, these opportunity costs accounted for 94.41% of total costs. In contrast, costs for hygienic measures (€ 253.98, pharmaceuticals (€ 22.88 and laboratory (€ 17.44 are quite low.Conclusion: CDAD results in significant additional costs for the hospital. This survey of actual costs confirms previous study results.

  7. Custeio ABC no ambiente hospitalar: um estudo nos hospitais universitários e de ensino brasileiros ABC costing in hospital environment: a study in brazilian university hospitals

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    Gilberto José Miranda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O Custeio Baseado em Atividades tem se mostrado como uma alternativa promissora para fazer frente à complexidade que caracteriza os custos hospitalares. Nos últimos dez anos, somente na Plataforma Lattes, foram encontrados mais de uma centena de estudos dessa natureza. Este trabalho tem como objetivo, conhecer, empiricamente, a utilização do Custeio ABC nos hospitais universitários e de ensino brasileiros e comparar os resultados, conforme as possibilidades, com as pesquisas realizadas nas maiores empresas brasileiras pelos autores: Khoury (1999, Beuren e Roedel (2002 e Azevedo, Santos e Pamplona (2004. Dos 115 questionários enviados aos hospitais universitários, 34 foram respondidos. O estudo levou a conclusões importantes, como: Os sistemas de custos atuais dos hospitais têm poucas condições de fornecer informações úteis à gestão; o Custeio ABC é bastante conhecido no ambiente, mas o número de usuários ainda é relativamente pequeno: apenas 15% da amostra; mas existe expectativa por parte de 44% dos hospitais com relação ao uso futuro da abordagem. As principais causas apresentadas para a não-utilização do Sistema ABC foram: (a o sistema utilizado atende às necessidades da organização e (b o Custeio Baseado em Atividades é muito complexo.The Cost Based Activity has been a promising alternative to deal with the complexity that characterizes hospital costs. In the last ten years, only in the Plataforma Lattes, more than a hundred studies of this nature had been found. This work aims to find out, empirically, the use of ABC Costing in Brazilian university hospitals and to compare the results, according to the possibilities, with the researches that have been made in the biggest Brazilian companies by the authors: Khoury (1999, Beuren and Roedel (2002 and Azevedo, Santos and Pamplona (2004. A hundred and fifteen questionnaires were sent to the university hospitals, 34 had been answered. The study relates important

  8. Costs of hospital malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Lori Jane; Bernier, Paule; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Allard, Johane; Duerksen, Donald; Gramlich, Leah; Laporte, Manon; Keller, Heather H

    2017-10-01

    Hospital malnutrition has been established as a critical, prevalent, and costly problem in many countries. Many cost studies are limited due to study population or cost data used. The aims of this study were to determine: the relationship between malnutrition and hospital costs; the influence of confounders on, and the drivers (medical or surgical patients or degree of malnutrition) of the relationship; and whether hospital reported cost data provide similar information to administrative data. To our knowledge, the last two goals have not been studied elsewhere. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on data from the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force prospective cohort study combined with administrative data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Subjective Global Assessment was used to assess the relationship between nutritional status and length of stay and hospital costs, controlling for health and demographic characteristics, for 956 patients admitted to medical and surgical wards in 18 hospitals across Canada. After controlling for patient and hospital characteristics, moderately malnourished patients' (34% of surveyed patients) hospital stays were 18% (p = 0.014) longer on average than well-nourished patients. Medical stays increased by 23% (p = 0.014), and surgical stays by 32% (p = 0.015). Costs were, on average, between 31% and 34% (p-values < 0.05) higher than for well-nourished patients with similar characteristics. Severely malnourished patients (11% of surveyed patients) stayed 34% (p = 0.000) longer and had 38% (p = 0.003) higher total costs than well-nourished patients. They stayed 53% (p = 0.001) longer in medical beds and had 55% (p = 0.003) higher medical costs, on average. Trends were similar no matter the type of costing data used. Over 40% of patients were found to be malnourished (1/3 moderately and 1/10 severely). Malnourished patients had longer hospital stays and as a result cost more than well

  9. Comparing systems for costing hospital treatments. The case of stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jytte; Skjoldborg, Ulla Slothuus

    2004-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the basic properties in the systems most commonly considered for costing treatments in the Danish hospitals. The differences between the traditional charge system, the DRG system and the ABC system are analysed, and difficulties encountered in comparing these systems are discussed. A sample of patients diagnosed with stable angina pectoris (SAP) at Odense University Hospital was used to compare the three systems when costing an entire treatment path, costing single hospitalisations and studying the effects of length of stay. Furthermore, it is illustrated that the main idea behind each system is reflected in how the systems over- or underestimate costs. Implications when managing the hospitals, particularly reimbursement, are discussed.

  10. Cost Analysis of Universal Screening vs. Risk Factor-Based Screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

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    Virginia R Roth

    Full Text Available The literature remains conflicted regarding the most effective way to screen for MRSA. This study was designed to assess costs associated with universal versus risk factor-based screening for the reduction of nosocomial MRSA transmission.The study was conducted at The Ottawa Hospital, a large multi-centre tertiary care facility with approximately 47,000 admissions annually. From January 2006-December 2007, patients underwent risk factor-based screening for MRSA on admission. From January 2008 to August 2009 universal MRSA screening was implemented. A comparison of costs incurred during risk factor-based screening and universal screening was conducted. The model incorporated probabilities relating to the likelihood of being tested and the results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR testing with associated effects in terms of MRSA bacteremia and true positive and negative test results. Inputted costs included laboratory testing, contact precautions and infection control, private room costs, housekeeping, and length of hospital stay. Deterministic sensitivity analyses were conducted.The risk factor-based MRSA screening program screened approximately 30% of admitted patients and cost the hospital over $780 000 annually. The universal screening program screened approximately 83% of admitted patients and cost over $1.94 million dollars, representing an excess cost of $1.16 million per year. The estimated additional cost per patient screened was $17.76.This analysis demonstrated that a universal MRSA screening program was costly from a hospital perspective and was previously known to not be clinically effective at reducing MRSA transmission. These results may be useful to inform future model-based economic analyses of MRSA interventions.

  11. Marginal Hospital Cost of Surgery-related Hospital-acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, William D; Limcangco, Rhona; Owens, Pamela L; Steiner, Claudia A

    2016-09-01

    Patients who develop hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are more likely to die, have longer hospital stays, and are at greater risk of infections. Patients undergoing surgery are prone to developing pressure ulcers (PUs). To estimate the hospital marginal cost of a HAPU for adults patients who were hospitalized for major surgeries, adjusted for patient characteristics, comorbidities, procedures, and hospital characteristics. Data are from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases and the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System for 2011 and 2012. PU information was obtained using retrospective structured record review from trained MPMS data abstractors. Costs are derived using HCUP hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Marginal cost estimates were made using Extended Estimating Equations. We estimated the marginal cost at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of the cost distribution using Simultaneous Quantile Regression. We find that 3.5% of major surgical patients developed HAPUs and that the HAPUs added ∼$8200 to the cost of a surgical stay after adjusting for comorbidities, patient characteristics, procedures, and hospital characteristics. This is an ∼44% addition to the cost of a major surgical stay but less than half of the unadjusted cost difference. In addition, we find that for high-cost stays (75th percentile) HAPUs added ∼$12,100, whereas for low-cost stays (25th percentile) HAPUs added ∼$3900. This paper suggests that HAPUs add ∼44% to the cost of major surgical hospital stays, but the amount varies depending on the total cost of the visit.

  12. Adherence to hospital drug formularies and cost of drugs in hospitals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plet, H. T.; Hallas, J.; Kjeldsen, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate adherence rates to hospital drug formularies (HDFs) and cost of drugs in hospitals. METHODS: Data on drugs used during 2010 were analyzed for ten hospitals (two hospitals from each of the five regions), constituting 30 % of hospitals and 45 % of hospital beds in Denmark....... Drug use data from individual hospitals were retrieved from the hospital pharmacies. Adherence to the HDFs was analyzed for selected substances characterised by extensive use both in primary and secondary sectors (ATC codes A10, B03, C03, C07, C08, C09, C10, J01, N02, N05 and R03). Within each group......, we also identified the drugs constituting 90 % of the volume (= DU90%) and the adherence to the HDF in this segment (Index of Adherence). RESULTS: Substances used by hospitals varied between 598 and 1,093. The proportion of used substances that were on the HDF varied between 14 % and 44 %. University...

  13. Cost of influenza hospitalization at a tertiary care children's hospital and its impact on the cost-benefit analysis of the recommendation for universal influenza immunization in children age 6 to 23 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer L; Katz, Ben Z

    2005-12-01

    To calculate the costs of influenza hospitalization at a tertiary care children's hospital as the basis of a cost-benefit analysis of the new influenza vaccine recommendation for children age 6 to 23 months. We reviewed the medical records of all patients admitted to Children's Memorial Hospital (CMH) in 2002 diagnosed with influenza. Total hospital costs were obtained from the Business Development Office. Thirty-five charts were analyzed. Both of the 2 patients requiring mechanical ventilation and 4 of 6 patients admitted to the intensive care unit had high-risk underlying medical conditions. Nine children were age 6 to 23 months; 4 of these 9 had no preexisting medical conditions. Had all 18 high-risk children over age 6 months been protected from influenza, approximately $350,000 in hospital charges could have been saved. Preventing the additional 4 hospitalizations in the otherwise low-risk children age 6 to 23 months for whom vaccine is currently recommended would have cost approximately $281,000 ($46/child) more than the hospital charges saved. When all children age 6 to 23 months are considered, influenza vaccination is less costly than other prophylactic measures. Addition of indirect costs, deaths, outpatient costs, and the cost of secondary cases would favor the cost:benefit ratio for influenza vaccination of all children age 6 to 23 months.

  14. Coste de las técnicas de reproducción asistida en un hospital público Cost of assisted reproduction technology in a public hospital

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    José Luis Navarro Espigares

    2006-10-01

    . Methods: Data from the Human Reproduction Unit of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital in Granada (Spain from 1998 and 2003 were analyzed. Since the total costs of the unit were known, the cost of the distinct ART procedures performed in the hospital was calculated by means of a methodology for cost distribution. Results: Between 1998 and 2003, the activity and costs of the Human Reproduction Unit analyzed evolved differently. Analysis of activity showed that some techniques, such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, were consolidated while others, such as stimulation without assisted reproduction or intracervical insemination were abandoned. In all procedures, unit costs per cycle and per delivery decreased in the period analyzed. Conclusions: Important changes took place in the structure of costs of ART in the Human Reproduction Unit of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital between 1998 and 2003. Some techniques were discontinued, while others gained importance. Technological advances and structural innovations, together with a «learning effect», modified the structure of ART-related costs.

  15. Strategic management for university hospitals

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    Martha Isabel Riaño-Casallas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are several approaches and schools that support strategic management processes. University hospitals require the implementation of a strategic approach to their management, since they are a particular type of organization with the triple mission of providing health care, education and research. Objective: To propose a strategic profile for a university hospital. Materials and methods: The theoretical framework of strategic management was analyzed and some particular components of hospital management were studied; based on these criteria, the strategic management process in three high complexity hospitals of Bogotá, D.C. was examined and a profile of both the objectives and the functional strategies for the hospital was proposed. Results: The main strategic thinking schools are presented; the processes and components of strategic management are described, and a strategic management profile for a university hospital is proposed. Conclusion: The strategic orientation of management for an institution with the characteristics of a university hospital facilitates achieving organizational objectives.

  16. Clinical factors and comorbidities affecting the cost of hospital-treated COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sami Deniz,1 Aysun Şengül,2 Yusuf Aydemir,3 Jülide Çeldir Emre,4 Mustafa Hikmet Özhan5 1Clinics of Chest Diseases, Dr Suat Seren Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Education and Research Hospital, İzmir, 2Clinics of Chest Diseases, Kocaeli Derince Research and Education Hospital, Kocaeli, 3Department of Chest Diseases, Sakarya University Faculty of Medicine, Sakarya, 4Clinics of Chest Diseases, Turgutlu State Hospital, Manisa, 5Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Ege University İzmir, Turkey Purpose: We aimed to assess the effects of comorbidities on COPD costs and to investigate the relationship between comorbidities and clinical variables.Patients and methods: All patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of COPD exacerbation between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014, at all state hospitals of Aydin province, a city located in the western part of Turkey, were included in this study. The costs examined in the study pertained to medications, laboratory tests, hospital stays, and other treatment-related factors, such as consumption of materials, doctor visits, and consultation fees.Results: A total of 3,095 patients with 5,237 exacerbations (mean age, 71.9±10.5 years; 2,434 males and 661 females were evaluated. For 880 of the patients (28.9%, or 3,852 of the exacerbations (73.1%, at least one comorbid disease was recorded. The mean cost of each exacerbation was $808.5±1,586, including $325.1±879.9 (40.7% for hospital stays, $223.1±1,300.9 (27.6% for medications, $46.3±49.6 (0.9% for laboratory expenditures, and $214±1,068 (26.5% for other treatment-related factors, such as consumption of materials, doctor visits, and consultation fees. The cost of each exacerbation was $1,014.9 in patients with at least one comorbidity, whereas it was $233.6 in patients without comorbidity (P<0.001. Age >65 years, female gender, hospitalization in an intensive care unit, invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, and a

  17. Impact of structural and economic factors on hospitalization costs, inpatient mortality, and treatment type of traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Tarun; Moos, Rudolf M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bopp, Matthias; Senn, Oliver; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ciritsis, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of structural and potentially economic factors determining cost, treatment type, and inpatient mortality of traumatic hip fractures are important health policy issues. We showed that insurance status and treatment in university hospitals were significantly associated with treatment type (i.e., primary hip replacement), cost, and lower inpatient mortality respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the structural level of hospital care and patient insurance type on treatment, hospitalization cost, and inpatient mortality in cases with traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland. The Swiss national medical statistic 2011-2012 was screened for adults with hip fracture as primary diagnosis. Gender, age, insurance type, year of discharge, hospital infrastructure level, length-of-stay, case weight, reason for discharge, and all coded diagnoses and procedures were extracted. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression with treatment by primary hip replacement as well as inpatient mortality as dependent variables were performed. We obtained 24,678 inpatient case records from the medical statistic. Hospitalization costs were calculated from a second dataset, the Swiss national cost statistic (7528 cases with hip fractures, discharged in 2012). Average inpatient costs per case were the highest for discharges from university hospitals (US$21,471, SD US$17,015) and the lowest in basic coverage hospitals (US$18,291, SD US$12,635). Controlling for other variables, higher costs for hip fracture treatment at university hospitals were significant in multivariate regression (p < 0.001). University hospitals had a lower inpatient mortality rate than full and basic care providers (2.8% vs. both 4.0%); results confirmed in our multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio (OR) 1.434, 95% CI 1.127-1.824 and OR 1.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.139-1.870 for full and basic coverage hospitals vs. university hospitals

  18. The impact of HMO and hospital competition on hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mustafa Z; Rivers, Patrick A; Fottler, Myron D

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the impact of HMO penetration and competition on health system performance, as measured by hospital cost per adjusted admissions. The study population consisted of acute-care hospitals in the United States. The findings of this study suggest that there is no relationship between HMO competition and hospital cost per adjusted admission. Governmental efforts to stimulate competition in the hospital market, if focused on promoting HMOs, are not likely to produce cost-containing results quickly.

  19. Cost-identification analysis of total laryngectomy: an itemized approach to hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedhia, Raj C; Smith, Kenneth J; Weissfeld, Joel L; Saul, Melissa I; Lee, Steve C; Myers, Eugene N; Johnson, Jonas T

    2011-02-01

    To understand the contribution of intraoperative and postoperative hospital costs to total hospital costs, examine the costs associated with specific hospital services in the postoperative period, and recognize the impact of patient factors on hospital costs. Case series with chart review. Large tertiary care teaching hospital system. Using the Pittsburgh Head and Neck Organ-Specific Database, 119 patients were identified as having total laryngectomy with bilateral selective neck dissection and primary closure from 1999 to 2009. Cost data were obtained for 112 patients. Costs include fixed and variable costs, adjusted to 2010 US dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Mean total hospital costs were $29,563 (range, $10,915 to $120,345). Operating room costs averaged 24% of total hospital costs, whereas room charges, respiratory therapy, laboratory, pharmacy, and radiology accounted for 38%, 14%, 8%, 7%, and 3%, respectively. Median length of stay was 9 days (range, 6-43), and median Charlson comorbidity index score was 8 (2-16). Patients with ≥1 day in the intensive care unit had significantly higher hospital costs ($46,831 vs $24,601, P cost differences with stratification based on previous radiation therapy ($27,598 vs $29,915 with no prior radiation, P = .62) or hospital readmission within 30 days ($29,483 vs $29,609 without readmission, P = .97). This is one of few studies in surgery and the first in otolaryngology to analyze hospital costs for a relatively standardized procedure. Further work will include cost analysis from multiple centers with investigation of global cost drivers.

  20. Costs of hospitalization in preterm infants: impact of antenatal steroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Fabiola Meneguel Ogata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To estimate the costs of hospitalization in premature infants exposed or not to antenatal corticosteroids (ACS. METHOD: Retrospective cohort analysis of premature infants with gestational age of 26-32 weeks without congenital malformations, born between January of 2006 and December of 2009 in a tertiary, public university hospital. Maternal and neonatal demographic data, neonatal morbidities, and hospital inpatient services during the hospitalization were collected. The costs were analyzed using the microcosting technique. RESULTS: Of 220 patients that met the inclusion criteria, 211 (96% charts were reviewed: 170 newborns received at least one dose of antenatal corticosteroid and 41 did not receive the antenatal medication. There was a 14-37% reduction of the different cost components in infants exposed to ACS when the entire population was analyzed, without statistical significance. Regarding premature infants who were discharged alive, there was a 24-47% reduction of the components of the hospital services costs for the ACS group, with a significant decrease in the length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. In very-low birth weight infants, considering only the survivors, ACS promoted a 30-50% reduction of all elements of the costs, with a 36% decrease in the total cost (p = 0.008. The survivors with gestational age <30 weeks showed a decrease in the total cost of 38% (p = 0.008 and a 49% reduction of NICU length of stay (p = 0.011. CONCLUSION: ACS reduces the costs of hospitalization of premature infants who are discharged alive, especially those with very low birth weight and <30 weeks of gestational age.

  1. Costs of hospitalization in preterm infants: impact of antenatal steroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Joice Fabiola Meneguel; Fonseca, Marcelo Cunio Machado; Miyoshi, Milton Harumi; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco de; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the costs of hospitalization in premature infants exposed or not to antenatal corticosteroids (ACS). Retrospective cohort analysis of premature infants with gestational age of 26-32 weeks without congenital malformations, born between January of 2006 and December of 2009 in a tertiary, public university hospital. Maternal and neonatal demographic data, neonatal morbidities, and hospital inpatient services during the hospitalization were collected. The costs were analyzed using the microcosting technique. Of 220 patients that met the inclusion criteria, 211 (96%) charts were reviewed: 170 newborns received at least one dose of antenatal corticosteroid and 41 did not receive the antenatal medication. There was a 14-37% reduction of the different cost components in infants exposed to ACS when the entire population was analyzed, without statistical significance. Regarding premature infants who were discharged alive, there was a 24-47% reduction of the components of the hospital services costs for the ACS group, with a significant decrease in the length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In very-low birth weight infants, considering only the survivors, ACS promoted a 30-50% reduction of all elements of the costs, with a 36% decrease in the total cost (p=0.008). The survivors with gestational age <30 weeks showed a decrease in the total cost of 38% (p=0.008) and a 49% reduction of NICU length of stay (p=0.011). ACS reduces the costs of hospitalization of premature infants who are discharged alive, especially those with very low birth weight and <30 weeks of gestational age. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Unit cost of healthcare services at 200-bed public hospitals in Myanmar: what plays an important role of hospital budgeting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Thet Mon; Saw, Yu Mon; Khaing, Moe; Win, Ei Mon; Cho, Su Myat; Kariya, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Eiko; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-19

    Cost information is important for efficient allocation of healthcare expenditure, estimating future budget allocation, and setting user fees to start new financing systems. Myanmar is in political transition, and trying to achieve universal health coverage by 2030. This study assessed the unit cost of healthcare services at two public hospitals in the country from the provider perspective. The study also analyzed the cost structure of the hospitals to allocate and manage the budgets appropriately. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at 200-bed Magway Teaching Hospital (MTH) and Pyinmanar General Hospital (PMN GH), in Myanmar, for the financial year 2015-2016. The step-down costing method was applied to calculate unit cost per inpatient day and per outpatient visit. The costs were calculated by using Microsoft Excel 2010. The unit costs per inpatient day varied largely from unit to unit in both hospitals. At PMN GH, unit cost per inpatient day was 28,374 Kyats (27.60 USD) for pediatric unit and 1,961,806 Kyats (1908.37 USD) for ear, nose, and throat unit. At MTH, the unit costs per inpatient day were 19,704 Kyats (19.17 USD) for medicine unit and 168,835 Kyats (164.24 USD) for eye unit. The unit cost of outpatient visit was 14,882 Kyats (14.48 USD) at PMN GH, while 23,059 Kyats (22.43 USD) at MTH. Regarding cost structure, medicines and medical supplies was the largest component at MTH, and the equipment was the largest component at PMN GH. The surgery unit of MTH and the eye unit of PMN GH consumed most of the total cost of the hospitals. The unit costs were influenced by the utilization of hospital services by the patients, the efficiency of available resources, type of medical services provided, and medical practice of the physicians. The cost structures variation was also found between MTH and PMN GH. The findings provided the basic information regarding the healthcare cost of public hospitals which can apply the efficient utilization of the

  3. Costs of a Hospital-Based, Ready-To-Use Syringe Delivery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Vand, S; Lisby, M

    2017-01-01

    %) and at €20,905 (an increase of 228%) for the endoscopy department. The ready-to-use delivery program imposed an additional cost of €11.32 per day surgery operation and €2.41 per endoscopy procedure. Conclusion: This ready-to-use programme increased the cost of the medical handling process. This incremental......Objective: The risk of errors in the medication administration process is high. Applications of pre lled syringes may improve patient safety but could be more costly. The objective of this study was to assess the additional costs of a ready-to-use syringe delivery programme in comparison...... with a conventional delivery programme at day surgery and endoscopy departments at a large university hospital. Methods: The cost analysis used the hospital perspective and developed an “activity-based costing” model to assess the costs of medicine- handling activities. The model was calibrated with six-month data...

  4. The effect of chain membership on hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, T J

    1997-06-01

    To compare the cost structures of hospitals in multihospital systems and independently owned hospitals. The American Hospital Association's Annual Survey from 1990 for data on hospital costs and attributes. Area characteristics came from the Area Resource File, and the Medicare case-mix index came from the Health Care Financing Administration. Data on wages are from the Bureau of the Census' State and Metropolitan Area Data Book. The Guide to Hospital Performance from HCIA, Inc. provided data on quality of care. Separate cost functions were estimated for chain and independent hospitals. Hybrid translog cost functions included measures of outputs, input prices, and hospital and area characteristics. The estimation method accounted for the simultaneous determination of costs and chain membership, and for any nonrandom selection of hospitals into chains. Several economic cost measures were calculated to compare the cost structures of the two types of hospitals. Data from all sources were merged at the hospital level to form the study sample. Hospitals in multihospital systems were less costly than independently owned hospitals. Among independent hospitals, for-profits had the highest costs. There were no statistically significant differences in costs by ownership among chain members. Economies of scale were enjoyed in both types of hospitals only at high volumes of output, while economies of scope occurred at all volumes for chain hospitals, but only at low and medium volumes for independent hospitals. This study provides support for the idea that growth of the multihospital system sector can provide a market solution to the problem of constraining costs. It does not, however, support the property rights theory that proprietary hospitals are more efficient than nonprofit hospitals.

  5. Duration of hospital stay following orthognathic surgery at the jordan university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarab, Fadi; Omar, Esam; Bhayat, Ahmed; Mansuri, Samir; Ahmed, Sami

    2012-09-01

    Major oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures have been routinely performed on an inpatient basis in order to manage both, the recovery from anesthesia and any unpredictable morbidity that may be associated with the surgery. The use of inpatient beds is extremely expensive and if the surgical procedures could be done on an outpatient setting, it would reduce the costs and the need for inpatient care. The aim was to determine the length of hospital stay (LHS) and the factors which influence the LHS following orthognathic surgery at the Jordan University Hospital over 5 years (2005-2009). This was a retrospective record review of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery at Jordan University Hospital between 2005 and 2009. The variables were recorded on a data capture form which was adapted and developed from previous studies. Descriptive and analytical statistical methods were used to correlate these variables to the LHS. Ninety two patients were included in the study and 74% of them were females. The mean age was 23.7 years and the mean LHS was 4 days. The complexity of the procedure, length of operation time, intensive care unit (ICU) stay and year of operation were significantly correlated with a positive LHS (P LHS over the progressing years and this could be due to an increase in experience and knowledge of the operators and an improvement in the hospital facilities.

  6. Influence of superstition on the date of hospital discharge and medical cost in Japan: retrospective and descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, K; Fukui, T; Endoh, A; Rahman, M; Maekawa, M

    To determine the influence of superstition about Taian (a lucky day)-Butsumetsu (an unlucky day) on decision to leave hospital. To estimate the costs of the effect of this superstition. Retrospective and descriptive study. University hospital in Kyoto, Japan. Patients who were discharged alive from Kyoto University Hospital from 1 April 1992 to 31 March 1995. Mean number, age, and hospital stay of patients discharged on each day of six day cycle. The mean number, age, and hospital stay of discharged patients were highest on Taian and lowest on Butsumetsu (25.8 v 19.3 patients/day, P=0.0001; 43.9 v 41.4 years, P=0.0001; and 43.1 v 33.3 days, P=0.0001 respectively). The effect of this difference on the hospital's costs was estimated to be 7.4 million yen (¿31 000). The superstition influenced the decision to leave hospital, contributing to higher medical care costs in Japan. Although hospital stays need to be kept as short as possible to minimise costs, doctors should not ignore the possible psychological effects on patients' health caused by dismissing the superstition.

  7. [Hospital costs estimation by micro and gross-costing approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerre, P; Hayes, N; Bertaux, A-C

    2018-03-01

    Cost analysis has become increasingly commonplace in healthcare facilities in recent years. Regardless of the aim, the first consideration for a hospital costing process is to determine the point of view, or perspective, to adopt. Should the cost figures reflect the healthcare facility's point of view or enlighten perspectives for the public health insurance system? Another consideration is in regard to the method to adopt, as there are several. The two most widely used methods to determine the costs of hospital treatments in France are the micro-costing method and the gross-costing method. The aims of this work are: (1) to describe each of these methods (e.g. data collection, assignment of monetary value to resource consumption) with their advantages and shortcomings as they relate to the difficulties encountered with their implementation in hospitals; (2) to present a review of the literature comparing the two methods and their possible combination; and (3) to propose ways to address the questions that need to be asked before compiling resource consumption data and assigning monetary value to hospital costs. A final diagram summarizes methodologies to be preferred according to the evaluation strategy and the impact on patient care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Indirect costs of teaching in Canadian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, T A; Willan, A R; Cox, M A; Green, A

    1991-01-01

    We sought to determine whether there are indirect costs of teaching in Canadian hospitals. To examine cost differences between teaching and nonteaching hospitals we estimated two cost functions: cost per case and cost per patient-day (dependent variables). The independent variables were number of beds, occupancy rate, teaching ratio (number of residents and interns per 100 beds), province, urbanicity (the population density of the county in which the hospital was situated) and wage index. Within each hospital we categorized a random sample of patient discharges according to case mix and severity of illness using age and standard diagnosis and procedure codes. Teaching ratio and case severity were each highly correlated positively with the dependent variables. The other variables that led to higher costs in teaching hospitals were wage rates and number of beds. Our regression model could serve as the basis of a reimbursement system, adjusted for severity and teaching status, particularly in provinces moving toward introducing case-weighting mechanisms into their payment model. Even if teaching hospitals were paid more than nonteaching hospitals because of the difference in the severity of illness there should be an additional allowance to cover the indirect costs of teaching. PMID:1898870

  9. Differences in hospital casemix, and the relationship between casemix and hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, N; Milne, R; Gray, A; Raftery, J

    1995-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between hospital costs and casemix, and after adjustment for casemix differences, between cost and institutional size, number of specialties, occupancy and teaching status. A retrospective analysis of all admissions to nine acute-care NHS hospitals in the Oxford region during the 1991-1992 financial year was undertaken. All episodes were assigned to a diagnosis-related group (DRG) and a cost weight assigned accordingly. Costs per finished consultant episode, before and after adjustment for casemix differences, were analysed at the hospital and specialty level. Casemix differences were significant, and accounted for approximately 77 per cent of the difference in costs between providers. Costs per casemix-adjusted episode were not significantly associated with differences in hospital size, scope, occupancy levels or teaching status, but sample size was insufficient to investigate these relationships adequately. Specialty costs were poorly correlated with specialty casemix. This was probably due to poor apportionment of specialty costs in hospital accounting returns. Casemix differences need to be taken into account when comparing providers for the purposes of contracting, as unadjusted unit costs may be misleading. Although the methods used may currently be applied to most NHS hospitals, widespread use would be greatly facilitated by the development of indigenous cost weights and better routine hospital data coding and collection.

  10. [Relating costs to activities in hospitals. Use of internal cost accounting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavem, K

    1995-01-10

    During the last few years hospital cost accounting has become widespread in many countries, in parallel with increasing cost pressure, greater competition and new financing schemes. Cost accounting has been used in the manufacturing industry for many years. Costs can be related to activities and production, e.g. by the costing of procedures, episodes of care and other internally defined cost objectives. Norwegian hospitals have lagged behind in the adoption of cost accounting. They ought to act quickly if they want to be prepared for possible changes in health care financing. The benefits can be considerable to a hospital operating in a rapidly changing health care environment.

  11. [Cost of hospitalization by the Activity Based Costing method in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamdja, T; Balaka, A; Tchandana, M; Agbétra, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost of hospitalization per day in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar. This prospective study took place during the month of July 2011 in the newborn unit. The activity-based costing method was used to analyze costs. During the study period, 52 newborns were hospitalized for a total of 590 days. The cost of the human resources during that month was 9,907,832 FCFA (US $ 19,815.66), the cost of depreciation of fixed assets was estimated at 571,952 FCFA (US $ 1143.90), and supplies at 112,084 FCFA (US $ 224.17). External services cost 386,753 FCFA (US $ 773.51) and support services 6,917,380.65 FCFA (US $ 13,834.7613). The monthly expenses incurred for the hospitalization of newborns totaled 17,896,002 FCFA (US $ 35,792), for a cost per patient per day of 30,332.20 FCFA (US $ 60.66) and an average cost of hospitalization 334,153.88 FCFA (US $ 668,31). This study is the first of its kind in Senegal and neighboring countries. By applying the ABC approach, we can obtain a more detailed and precise estimate of the cost of activities and services. Process improvements and corrective actions should make it possible to identify cost drivers, such as time.

  12. The cost of hospitalization in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R D; Larson, L R; Roth, J M; Becker, R V; Mummert, L L

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographics, resource use, and costs associated with hospitalization of Crohn's disease patients. All patients hospitalized at our institution from 7/1/96 to 6/30/97 with a primary diagnosis of "Crohn's Disease" were analyzed using a computerized database. Data are presented "per hospitalization." A total of 175 hospitalizations (147 patients) were identified. Mean patient age was 36.5 yr; 61% were female; 82% Caucasian. Payer mix was most commonly contracted (57%), commercial (21%), or Medicare (13%). 57% of hospitalizations had a primary surgical procedure; the remainder were medical. Average length of stay was 8.7 days (surgical, 9.6 days; medical, 7.5 days). The average cost of hospitalization, excluding physician fees, was $12,528 (surgical, $14,409; medical, $10,020), whereas average charges were $35,378 (surgical, $46,354; medical, $20,744), including physician fees, which averaged $7,249 (surgical, $11,217; medical, $1,959). Mean reimbursements were $21,968 (surgical, $28,946; medical, $12,666) with average weighted reimbursement rates of 60.17% of hospital charges, 69.57% of physician fees. The distribution of costs across subcategories was: Surgery (39.6%), Pharmacy (18.6%), Laboratory (3.8%), Radiology (2.1%), Pathology (0.8%), Endoscopy (0.3%), and Other Hospital Costs (34.9%). Of the hospitalizations, 87% included treatment with steroids, 23% with immunomodulators, and 14% with aminosalicylates; 27% included the administration of total parenteral nutrition, which accounted for 63% of the total pharmacy costs. Surgery accounts for the majority of hospitalizations, nearly 40% of their total costs, and 75% of overall charges and reimbursements. Therapy that decreases the number of surgical hospitalizations should substantially reduce inpatient Crohn's disease costs, as well as overall costs.

  13. Proprietary hospitals in cost containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D A

    1985-08-23

    Any effort to control the rise in health care costs must start with analyzing the causes, which are really quite simple. Most cost control efforts fail because they do not address the causes. The causes are large subsidies in several forms that send a false message that health care is free and should be used abundantly, and expansive reimbursement programs that reward inefficient providers with higher payments. This combination of demand stimulation and cost-plus reimbursement produced the world's most expensive health care delivery system and strident calls for reform. A long overdue change in public policy took effect October 1, 1983, when Medicare payments moved from cost-plus reimbursement to fixed, prospectively determined prices. Because it addressed one of the causes of medical inflation, this change has been effective in slowing the rise in Medicare expenditures. Sponsorship of a hospital is not a determinant of its cost-effectiveness. There are examples of efficient and inefficient hospitals in both the voluntary and the investor-owned or taxpaying hospitals. The determining factor is the will of management to keep costs under control.

  14. Viral infections, prevalence and costs: A5-year, hospital based, retrospective observational study in shiraz, iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabayan, B.; Zamiri, N.; Chohedry, A.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from viral infections attend to health care centers. Data gathered from viral infections is limited to specific cases such as AIDS, viral hepatitis and Influenza. There is a significant lack of reliable documentation about other viral infections. In this study the prevalence and related costs of viral infections in hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were reviewed. In this cross-sectional study the data were extracted from files of 1319 patients with viral infection admitted in two university hospitals during a five year period (1999-2004). The frequencies of different viral infections along with their demographic data were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 29.24 with the range of 90 years. Hospitalization days were 8636 in 40 different wards in two hospitals. US$ 30.84 was the daily mean cost for each admitted patient. Viral meningitis was most frequent (14.2%) and 8.4% of patients died during hospitalization. This study confirms the necessity of expanding management programs for viral infections especially hepatitis B in youths in Iran. Unspecified viral infections cost much more than specified viral diseases. Viral infection costs can be reduced by finding more sensitive and specific diagnostic methods. (author)

  15. A managerial accounting analysis of hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, W G

    1976-01-01

    Variance analysis, an accounting technique, is applied to an eight-component model of hospital costs to determine the contribution each component makes to cost increases. The method is illustrated by application to data on total costs from 1950 to 1973 for all U.S. nongovernmental not-for-profit short-term general hospitals. The costs of a single hospital are analyzed and compared to the group costs. The potential uses and limitations of the method as a planning and research tool are discussed.

  16. Severe Maternal Morbidity and Hospital Cost among Hospitalized Deliveries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han-Yang; Chauhan, Suneet P; Blackwell, Sean C

    2018-05-03

     The objective of this study was to estimate the contemporary national rate of severe maternal morbidity (SMM) and its associated hospital cost during delivery hospitalization.  We conducted a retrospective study identifying all delivery hospitalizations in the United States between 2011 and 2012. We used data from the National (Nationwide) Inpatient sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. The delivery hospitalizations with SMM were identified by having at least one of the 25 previously established list of diagnosis and procedure codes. Aggregate and mean hospital costs were estimated. A generalized linear regression model was used to examine the association between SMM and hospital costs.  Of 7,438,946 delivery hospitalizations identified, the rate of SMM was 154 per 10,000 delivery hospitalizations. Without any SMM, the mean hospital cost was $4,300 and with any SMM, the mean hospital cost was $11,000. After adjustment, comparing to those without any SMM, the mean cost of delivery hospitalizations with any SMM was 2.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.1-2.2) times higher, and this ratio increases from 1.7-fold in those with only one SMM to 10.3-fold in those with five or more concurrent SMM.  The hospital cost with any SMM was 2.1 times higher than those without any SMM. Our findings highlight the need to identify interventions and guide research efforts to mitigate the rate of SMM and its economic burden. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  18. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  19. [Relationship between cost systems and hospital expenditure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cornejo, Beatriz; Pérez-Méndez, José A

    To analyze the relationship between the degree of development of hospital cost systems (CS) implemented by the regional health services (RHS) and the variation in unit cost of hospitals in Spanish National Health Service (NHS) between 2010 and 2013 and to identify other explanatory factors of this variation. A database of NHS hospitals was constructed from exclusively public sources. Using a multilevel regression model, explaining factors of the variation in unit cost (cost per weighted unit of activity [WAU]) of a sample of 170 hospitals were analyzed. The variables representative of the degree of development of CS are associated in a negative and significant way with the variation of the cost per WAU. It is observed that if a high-level development CS is used the cost variation per WAU would be reduced by close to 3.2%. There is also a negative and significant relationship between the variation in the cost per WAU and the variations in the percentage of high technology and the hospital occupancy rate. On the other hand, the variations in the average cost of personnel and in the number of workers per 100 beds are associated in a positive and significant way with the variation of the cost per WAU. In the period analysed, during which the main health expenditure adjustment was made, the control in hospital unit cost is associated not only with spending cuts but also with aspects related to their management, such as the implementation of more developed CS. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of warfarin discharge education program on hospital readmission and treatment costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Luigi; Lee, Seung-Mi; Doherty, Nancy; Suh, David; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Sun-Hong; Choi, Yong Chan; Suh, Dong-Churl

    2018-03-31

    Background Although warfarin is highly effective, management of patients prescribed warfarin is complex due to its narrow therapeutic window. Objective To evaluate the impact of a formal warfarin discharge education program (WDEP) on hospital readmission and treatment costs in patients who received warfarin therapy. Setting Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset in Somerville, New Jersey, USA. Method In this interventional cohort study, patients were assigned to either the WDEP group or the usual care group. The effects of the WDEP on readmission within 90 days after discharge were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. Factors influencing treatment cost were identified using generalized linear model with log-link function and gamma distribution. Main outcome measure Hospital readmission within 90 days and treatment costs associated with hospital readmission. Results Among 692 eligible patients, 203 in each group were matched using propensity scores and there were no statistically significant differences in the patient baseline characteristics between two groups. The risk of all-cause readmission within 90 days was significantly lower in the WDEP group compared to the usual care group (relative risk = 0.46, 95% CI 0.28-0.76). The treatment costs associated with hospital readmission in the WDEP group were 19% lower than those in the usual care group after adjusting for the study variables. Conclusion A formal, individualized WDEP provided by pharmacists resulted in significant reduction of readmission and treatment costs. The economic burden of treatment costs associated with warfarin can be controlled if well-organized warfarin education is provided to patients who received warfarin therapy.

  1. Gestão de custos aplicada a hospitais universitários públicos: a experiência do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da USP Cost management applied to public university hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Grespan Bonacim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta a experiência de implantação da metodologia de custos baseada em atividades (ABC do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, por meio de um estudo de caso, num período de cinco anos. As características dos hospitais universitários de alta tecnologia, tais como atividades docente-assistenciais e serviços básicos de saúde, fazem com que seus custos sejam mais elevados do que os de hospitais não universitários. Na sua trajetória institucional, o HCFMRP-USP não possuía uma metodologia consistente de mensuração e avaliação dos custos de sua atividade assistencial. No entanto, dificuldades de financiamento de suas atividades, associadas a uma completa reestruturação em seu modelo de atendimento vinculado ao Sistema Único de Saúde, impulsionaram a adoção do mapeamento de custos por atividades, para demonstrar, de forma adequada, como pode ser mensurado o impacto do ensino nos custos assistenciais, visto que a agenda democrática nacional tem reivindicado transparência, accountability e, fundamentalmente, eficiência na gestão dos recursos públicosThis paper presents the experience of implementing the methodology of cost-based activities (ABC at The Ribeirão Preto Medical School Clinics Hospital of the University of São Paulo (HCFMRP-USP, through a case study over a period of five years. Characteristics of high technology university hospitals, such as teaching and assistance, make their costs higher than those of non-university hospitals. In its institutional history, HCFMRP-USP lacked a consistent methodology for measuring and assessing the costs of its assistance activities. However, difficulties in financing these activities, associated with a complete restructuring in the hospital's healthcare model linked to the National Health System, have furthered the adoption of cost mapping, in order to assess adequately the impact of teaching activities

  2. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  3. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2015-05-17

    Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran.‎ This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS.‎ The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department.

  4. Cost evaluation of therapeutic drug monitoring of gentamicin at a teaching hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim MI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM makes use of serum drug concentrations as an adjunct to decision-making. Preliminary data in our hospital showed that approximately one-fifth of all drugs monitored by TDM service were gentamicin. Objective: In this study, we evaluated the costs associated with providing the service in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from medical records of patients admitted to the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia over a 5-year period. These patients were diagnosed with bronchopneumonia and were on gentamicin as part of their treatment. Five hospitalisation costs were calculated; (i cost of laboratory and clinical investigations, (ii cost associated with each gentamicin dose, (iii fixed and operating costs of TDM service, (iv cost of providing medical care, and (v cost of hospital stay during gentamicin treatment. Results: There were 1920 patients admitted with bronchopneumonia of which 67 (3.5% had TDM service for gentamicin. Seventy-three percent (49/67 patients were eligible for final analysis. The duration of gentamicin therapy ranged from 3 to 15 days. The cost of providing one gentamicin assay was MYR25, and the average cost of TDM service for each patient was MYR104. The average total hospitalisation cost during gentamicin treatment for each patient was MYR442 (1EUR approx. MYR4.02. Conclusion: Based on the hospital perspective, in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin, the provision of TDM service contributes to less than 25% of the total cost of hospitalization.

  5. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry.

  6. Combined PACS and intranet information system in a University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, D.; Pfluger, T.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Hahn, K.; Koenig, A.; Endres, S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The Department of Radiology at the University Hospital Innenstadt Munich provides all clinical departments of a large university hospital with several radiology units at different locations. During the last four years all units have been fully digitalized with a stepwise installation of a PACS. The PACS also processes images from the Nuclear Medicine Department. Methods: As image modalities, archive systems and review workstations, we use devices from multiple vendors, which are integrated into a consistent system using the DICOM standard. The hospital has developed its own RIS and an intranet information system, which provides access to all reports and images from radiology for all clinical departments inside the hospital. Additionally, other clinical information such as laboratory results or ECG examinations are available through the system. Results: After one year of operation, the system succeeded in the clinical routine work as the primary source for radiological reports and images as well as for laboratory values. Conclusion: The advantages of digitalization were, besides reduction of film cost, especially optimizations of work flow with access to digital images from every where at any time. (orig.) [de

  7. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Acharya

    Full Text Available Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs.A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study.The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%, clothes (9.8% and transport (7.3%. For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007, employed house head (p = 0.011, monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees (p = 0.014, private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001, C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001, longer duration (>5days of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001, longer distance (>15km from house to hospital (p = 0.0001 and longer travel time (>240 minutes from house to hospital (p = 0.007 showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs.Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  8. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan; Adhikari, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  9. Smart information system for gachon university gil hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Kyun; Jung, Eun Young; Jeong, Byung Hui; Moon, Byung Chan; Kang, Hyung Wook; Tchah, Hann; Han, Gi Seong; Cheng, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    In this research, the hospital information system of Gachon University Gil hospital is introduced and a future strategy for hospital information systems is proposed. This research introduces the development conditions of hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital, information about the development of the enterprise resource planning (ERP), a medical service process improvement system, and the personal health record (PHR) system. The medical service process and work efficiency were improved through the medical service process improvement system, which is the most common hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital and which includes an emergency medical service system, an online evaluation system and a round support system. Gachon University Gil hospital developed medical service improvement systems to increase work efficiency of medical team and optimized the systems to prove the availability of high-quality medical services for patients and their families. The PHR-based personalized health care solution is under development and will provide higher quality medical service for more patients in the future.

  10. Cost effects of hospital mergers in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Helda; Mateus, Céu

    2014-12-01

    The Portuguese hospital sector has been restructured by wide-ranging hospital mergers, following a conviction among policy makers that bigger hospitals lead to lower average costs. Since the effects of mergers have not been systematically evaluated, the purpose of this article is to contribute to this area of knowledge by assessing potential economies of scale to explore and compare these results with realized cost savings after mergers. Considering the period 2003-2009, we estimate the translog cost function to examine economies of scale in the years preceding restructuring. Additionally, we use the difference-in-differences approach to evaluate hospital centres (HC) that occurred between 2004 and 2007, comparing the years after and before mergers. Our findings suggest that economies of scale are present in the pre-merger configuration with an optimum hospital size of around 230 beds. However, the mergers between two or more hospitals led to statistically significant post-merger cost increases, of about 8 %. This result indicates that some HC become too large to explore economies of scale and suggests the difficulty of achieving efficiencies through combining operations and service specialization.

  11. Controlling for quality in the hospital cost function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Stefos, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the cost and quality of hospital care from the perspective of applied microeconomics. It addresses both theoretical and practical complexities entailed in incorporating hospital quality into the estimation of hospital cost functions. That literature is extended with an empirical analysis that examines the use of 15 Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) as measures of hospital quality. A total operating cost function is estimated on 2,848 observations from five states drawn from the period 2001 to 2007. In general, findings indicate that the PSIs are successful in capturing variation in hospital cost due to adverse patient safety events. Measures that rely on the aggregate number of adverse events summed over PSIs are found to be superior to risk-adjusted rates for individual PSIs. The marginal cost of an adverse event is estimated to be $22,413. The results contribute to a growing business case for inpatient safety in hospital services.

  12. Clinical response and hospital costs associated with the empirical use of vancomycin and linezolid for hospital-acquired pneumonia in a Chinese tertiary care hospital: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanlin Song,1,* Yicheng Yang,2,* Wendong Chen,3,4 Wei Liu,2 Kai Wang,2 Xuehai Li,5 Ke Wang,2 Manny Papadimitropoulos,3,6 William Montgomery7 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Shanghai Branch, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Division of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 4Normin Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5VitalStrategic Research Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 6Global Health Outcomes Research, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 7Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia *These authors contributed equally to this work Aims: To evaluate clinical outcomes and allocation of hospital costs associated with empirical use of vancomycin or linezolid for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP in the People's Republic of China. Methods: Hospital episodes including HAP treated by vancomycin or linezolid between 2008 and 2012 in a Chinese tertiary care hospital were retrospectively identified from hospital administrative databases. Propensity score methods created best-matched pairs for the antibiotics. The matched pairs were used for adjusted comparisons on clinical response and allocation of hospital costs. Multiple regression analyses adjusting residual imbalance after matching were performed to confirm adjusted comparisons. Results: Sixty matched pairs were created. Adjusted comparisons between vancomycin and linezolid showed similar clinical response rates (clinical cure: 30.0% versus 31.7%, respectively; P=0.847; treatment failure: 55.0% versus 45.0%, respectively; P=0.289 but a significantly lower in-hospital mortality rate for vancomycin (3.3% versus 18.3%, respectively; P=0.013. After further adjusting for the imbalanced variables between matched treatment groups, the risks of treatment failure associated with the two antibiotics were comparable (odds ratio: 1.139; P=0.308 and there was

  13. The cost of universal health care in India: a model based estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Pinto, Andrew D; Sharma, Atul; Bharaj, Gursimer; Kumar, Vishal; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    As high out-of-pocket healthcare expenses pose heavy financial burden on the families, Government of India is considering a variety of financing and delivery options to universalize health care services. Hence, an estimate of the cost of delivering universal health care services is needed. We developed a model to estimate recurrent and annual costs for providing health services through a mix of public and private providers in Chandigarh located in northern India. Necessary health services required to deliver good quality care were defined by the Indian Public Health Standards. National Sample Survey data was utilized to estimate disease burden. In addition, morbidity and treatment data was collected from two secondary and two tertiary care hospitals. The unit cost of treatment was estimated from the published literature. For diseases where data on treatment cost was not available, we collected data on standard treatment protocols and cost of care from local health providers. We estimate that the cost of universal health care delivery through the existing mix of public and private health institutions would be INR 1713 (USD 38, 95%CI USD 18-73) per person per annum in India. This cost would be 24% higher, if branded drugs are used. Extrapolation of these costs to entire country indicates that Indian government needs to spend 3.8% (2.1%-6.8%) of the GDP for universalizing health care services. The cost of universal health care delivered through a combination of public and private providers is estimated to be INR 1713 per capita per year in India. Important issues such as delivery strategy for ensuring quality, reducing inequities in access, and managing the growth of health care demand need be explored.

  14. Cost of capital to the hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, F A; Valvona, J; Hassan, M; Morrisey, M A

    1988-03-01

    This paper provides estimates of the cost of equity and debt capital to for-profit and non-profit hospitals in the U.S. for the years 1972-83. The cost of equity is estimated using, alternatively, the Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory. We find that the cost of equity capital, using either model, substantially exceeded anticipated inflation. The cost of debt capital was much lower. Accounting for the corporate tax shield on debt and capital paybacks by cost-based insurers lowered the net cost of capital to hospitals.

  15. Cost variation in diabetes care delivered in English hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels

    2009-01-01

    the hospital fixed effect and adjust for hospital characteristics such as number of patients treated, factor prices and number of specialties involved in diabetes care. We rank hospitals by their adjusted fixed effect, which measures the extent to which their costs vary from the average after controlling......Background: Many diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, where care is costly and where there may be scope to improve efficiency. Aims: We analyse the costs and characteristics of diabetic patients admitted to English hospitals and aim to assess what proportions of cost variation are explained...... by patient and hospital characteristics. Methods: We apply a multilevel approach recognising that patients are clustered in hospitals. We first analyse the relationship between patient costs and their characteristics, such as HRG, age, gender, diagnostic markers and socio-economic status. We derive...

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of neonatal hearing screening program in china: should universal screening be prioritized?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Li-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal hearing screening (NHS has been routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries, whereas such a screening program is still at the pilot or preliminary stage as regards its nationwide implementation in developing countries. To provide significant evidence for health policy making in China, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of NHS program implementation in case of eight provinces of China. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was conducted and all neonates annually born from 2007 to 2009 in eight provinces of China were simulated in this model. The model parameters were estimated from the established databases in the general hospitals or maternal and child health hospitals of these eight provinces, supplemented from the published literature. The model estimated changes in program implementation costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for universal screening compared to targeted screening in eight provinces. Results and discussion A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed to determine uncertainty in health effect estimates and cost-effectiveness ratios using a probabilistic modeling technique. Targeted strategy trended to be cost-effective in Guangxi, Jiangxi, Henan, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Hebei, Shandong, and Beijing from the level of 9%, 9%, 8%, 4%, 3%, 7%, 5%, and 2%, respectively; while universal strategy trended to be cost-effective in those provinces from the level of 70%, 70%, 48%, 10%, 8%, 28%, 15%, 4%, respectively. This study showed although there was a huge disparity in the implementation of the NHS program in the surveyed provinces, both universal strategy and targeted strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developed provinces, while neither of the screening strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developing provinces. This

  17. FPs lower hospital readmission rates and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Veerappa K; Culpepper, Larry; Phillips, Robert L; Rankin, Jennifer; Xierali, Imam; Finnegan, Sean; Jack, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Hospital readmission after discharge is often a costly failing of the U.S. health care system to adequately manage patients who are ill. Increasing the numbers of family physicians (FPs) is associated with significant reductions in hospital readmissions and substantial cost savings.

  18. Analysis of hospital logistics and costs of the Clinical Engineering Sector in a Philanthropic Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Artur de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals are considered complex organizations mainly due to the high cost of the health care structure employed for care. Reducing operating costs is a challenge for hospital managers. Particularly in the clinical engineering sector, adequate hospital logistics can reduce costs. In this context, the aim of the research was to analyze the activities of hospital logistics of the Clinical Engineering department at a charity hospital, focusing on cost reduction. The paper presents a case study in a large charity hospital located in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, MG. The analysis focuses on the activities of hospital logistics at this hospital clinical engineering sector. The work in this sector is concentrated in the realization and implementation of equipment maintenance, to the detriment of efforts to reduce costs and increase safety for all streams managed by the sector. It was also found that there are risks of increased costs with inadequate routines: (i acquisition of new and large equipment; (ii maintenance and release schedule for use; and (iii the theft of equipment.

  19. Processes of early stroke care and hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Marie Louise; Ehlers, Lars H; Hundborg, Heidi H; Ingeman, Annette; Johnsen, Søren P

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between processes of early stroke care and hospital costs remains unclear. We therefore examined the association in a population based cohort study. We identified 5909 stroke patients who were admitted to stroke units in a Danish county between 2005 and 2010.The examined recommended processes of care included early admission to a stroke unit, early initiation of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, early computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) scan, early physiotherapy and occupational therapy, early assessment of nutritional risk, constipation risk and of swallowing function, early mobilization,early catheterization, and early thromboembolism prophylaxis.Hospital costs were assessed for each patient based on the number of days spent in different in-hospital facilities using local hospital charges. The mean costs of hospitalization were $23 352 (standard deviation 27 827). The relationship between receiving more relevant processes of early stroke care and lower hospital costs followed a dose–response relationship. The adjusted costs were $24 566 (95% confidence interval 19 364–29 769) lower for patients who received 75–100% of the relevant processes of care compared with patients receiving 0–24%. All processes of care were associated with potential cost savings, except for early catheterization and early thromboembolism prophylaxis. Early care in agreement with key guidelines recommendations for the management of patients with stroke may be associated with hospital savings.

  20. Impact of comorbidities on hospitalization costs following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkel, Lucas E; Fox, Edward J; Black, Kevin P; Davis, Charles; Andersen, Lucille; Hollenbeak, Christopher S

    2012-01-04

    Hip fractures are common in the elderly, and patients with hip fractures frequently have comorbid illnesses. Little is known about the relationship between comorbid illness and hospital costs or length of stay following the treatment of hip fracture in the United States. We hypothesized that specific individual comorbid illnesses and multiple comorbid illnesses would be directly related to the hospitalization costs and the length of stay for older patients following hip fracture. With use of discharge data from the 2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 32,440 patients who were fifty-five years or older with an isolated, closed hip fracture were identified. Using generalized linear models, we estimated the impact of comorbidities on hospitalization costs and length of stay, controlling for patient, hospital, and procedure characteristics. Hypertension, deficiency anemias, and fluid and electrolyte disorders were the most common comorbidities. The patients had a mean of three comorbidities. Only 4.9% of patients presented without comorbidities. The average estimated cost in our reference patient was $13,805. The comorbidity with the largest increased hospitalization cost was weight loss or malnutrition, followed by pulmonary circulation disorders. Most other comorbidities significantly increased the cost of hospitalization. Compared with internal fixation of the hip fracture, hip arthroplasty increased hospitalization costs significantly. Comorbidities significantly affect the cost of hospitalization and length of stay following hip fracture in older Americans, even while controlling for other variables.

  1. Development of a Practical Costing Method for Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Pengyu; Toyabe, Shin-ichi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2006-01-01

    To realize an effective cost control, a practical and accurate cost accounting system is indispensable in hospitals. In traditional cost accounting systems, the volume-based costing (VBC) is the most popular cost accounting method. In this method, the indirect costs are allocated to each cost object (services or units of a hospital) using a single indicator named a cost driver (e.g., Labor hours, revenues or the number of patients). However, this method often results in rough and inaccurate r...

  2. Hospital costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisman, Leander R; Tan, Siok Swan; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Koudstaal, Peter J; Redekop, William K

    2015-06-02

    There have been no ischemic stroke costing studies since major improvements were implemented in stroke care. We therefore determined hospital resource use and costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands for 2012. We conducted a retrospective cost analysis using individual patient data from a national diagnosis-related group registry. We analyzed 4 subgroups: inpatient ischemic stroke, inpatient TIA, outpatient ischemic stroke, and outpatient TIA. Costs of carotid endarterectomy and costs of an extra follow-up visit were also estimated. Unit costs were based on reference prices from the Dutch Healthcare Insurance Board and tariffs provided by the Dutch Healthcare Authority. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between hospital costs and various patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 35,903 ischemic stroke and 21,653 TIA patients were included. Inpatient costs were €5,328 ($6,845) for ischemic stroke and €2,470 ($3,173) for TIA. Outpatient costs were €495 ($636) for ischemic stroke and €587 ($754) for TIA. Costs of carotid endarterectomy were €6,836 ($8,783). Costs of inpatient days were the largest contributor to hospital costs. Age, hospital type, and region were strongly associated with hospital costs. Hospital costs are higher for inpatients and ischemic strokes compared with outpatients and TIAs, with length of stay (LOS) the most important contributor. LOS and hospital costs have substantially declined over the last 10 years, possibly due to improved hospital stroke care and efficient integrated stroke services. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. The cost of universal health care in India: a model based estimate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: As high out-of-pocket healthcare expenses pose heavy financial burden on the families, Government of India is considering a variety of financing and delivery options to universalize health care services. Hence, an estimate of the cost of delivering universal health care services is needed. METHODS: We developed a model to estimate recurrent and annual costs for providing health services through a mix of public and private providers in Chandigarh located in northern India. Necessary health services required to deliver good quality care were defined by the Indian Public Health Standards. National Sample Survey data was utilized to estimate disease burden. In addition, morbidity and treatment data was collected from two secondary and two tertiary care hospitals. The unit cost of treatment was estimated from the published literature. For diseases where data on treatment cost was not available, we collected data on standard treatment protocols and cost of care from local health providers. RESULTS: We estimate that the cost of universal health care delivery through the existing mix of public and private health institutions would be INR 1713 (USD 38, 95%CI USD 18-73 per person per annum in India. This cost would be 24% higher, if branded drugs are used. Extrapolation of these costs to entire country indicates that Indian government needs to spend 3.8% (2.1%-6.8% of the GDP for universalizing health care services. CONCLUSION: The cost of universal health care delivered through a combination of public and private providers is estimated to be INR 1713 per capita per year in India. Important issues such as delivery strategy for ensuring quality, reducing inequities in access, and managing the growth of health care demand need be explored.

  4. Specialty and full-service hospitals: a comparative cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-10-01

    To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998-2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors.

  5. Maternal Mortality in Ribat University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal death is a tragedy that leaves an enormous negative impact on the family. The objectives of the study were to determine the rate and causes of maternal mortality in Ribat University Hospital Methods: This was a descriptive, hospital-based study conducted in Ribat University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan ...

  6. Applying Activity Based Costing (ABC) Method to Calculate Cost Price in Hospital and Remedy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, A; Dabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is one of the new methods began appearing as a costing methodology in the 1990's. It calculates cost price by determining the usage of resources. In this study, ABC method was used for calculating cost price of remedial services in hospitals. To apply ABC method, Shahid Faghihi Hospital was selected. First, hospital units were divided into three main departments: administrative, diagnostic, and hospitalized. Second, activity centers were defined by the activity analysis method. Third, costs of administrative activity centers were allocated into diagnostic and operational departments based on the cost driver. Finally, with regard to the usage of cost objectives from services of activity centers, the cost price of medical services was calculated. The cost price from ABC method significantly differs from tariff method. In addition, high amount of indirect costs in the hospital indicates that capacities of resources are not used properly. Cost price of remedial services with tariff method is not properly calculated when compared with ABC method. ABC calculates cost price by applying suitable mechanisms but tariff method is based on the fixed price. In addition, ABC represents useful information about the amount and combination of cost price services.

  7. [Does the hospital cost of care differ for inflammatory bowel disease patients with or without gastrointestinal infections? A case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Köhler, F; Kräplin, T; Hartmann, M; Lerch, M M; Stallmach, A

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal Infections have been implicated as possible causes of exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or risk factors for severe flares in general. The introduction of the G-DRG reimbursement system has greatly increased the pressure to provide cost effective treatment in German hospitals. Few studies have compared the costs of treating IBD patients with or without gastrointestinal infections and none of them have specifically considered the German reimbursement situation. We performed a single center case-control retrospective chart review from 2002 to 2011 of inpatients with IBD (Department of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena) with an exacerbation of their disease. The presence of gastrointestinal infections (Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, adeno-, rota-, norovirus and Clostridium difficile) was assessed in all inpatients with Cohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD patients with gastrointestinal infections (n = 79) were matched for age to IBD patients who were negative for gastrointestinal pathogens (n = 158). Patient level costing (PLC) was used to express the total cost of hospital care for each patient; PLC comprised a weighted daily bed cost plus cost of all medical services provided (e. g., endoscopy, microbiology, pathology) calculated according to an activity-based costing approach. All costs were discounted to 2012 values. Gastrointestinal infections in IBD patients were not associated with an increase in mortality (0%); however, they were associated with 2.3-fold higher total hospital charges (6499.10 € vs. 2817.00 €; p = 0.001) and increased length of stay in hospital (14.5 vs. 9.4 days; p costs, especially in UC. Inpatient hospital costs differ significantly for IBD patients with and without gastrointestinal infections, especially in ulcerative colitis, when care was provided in a single university hospital. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Regional cost differences of hospital supply in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauterbach, Karl W.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The intended adoption of a global reimbursement system for inpatient care in Germany envisions identical payments for identical treatments at different hospitals. This may lead to losses in some hospitals and may cause problems for the supply with health care facilities in the long run if there a important regional cost differences. Cost and performance data of 1112 hospitals in Germany have been analysed for regional differences in 2001: As regional categorizations we used official classification schemes based on centrality. The investigation does not support the postulation of additional payments for selected regions in Germany accounting for level cost-differences between hospitals. Confounding influence factors like ownership and hospital size seem to be more important. We recommend further investigations to evaluate regional cost-differences on the level of medical wards and using more risk-adjusted data. The examination of the individual case is necessary.

  9. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  10. Incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the focus of infection and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative microorganism in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the causative focus and classified by the antibiotic sensitivity of the microorganism.Patients admitted to Hospital del Mar in Barcelona from 2005 to 2012 were included. We analyzed the total hospital costs of patients with nosocomial bacteremia caused by microorganisms with a high prevalence and, often, with multidrug-resistance. A control group was defined by selecting patients without bacteremia in the same diagnosis-related group.Our hospital has a cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to estimate per-patient costs. A logistic regression was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia (propensity score) and was used for propensity-score matching adjustment. This propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients with bacteremia with differentiation of the causative focus and antibiotic sensitivity.The mean incremental cost was estimated at &OV0556;15,526. The lowest incremental cost corresponded to bacteremia caused by multidrug-sensitive urinary infection (&OV0556;6786) and the highest to primary or unknown sources of bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (&OV0556;29,186).This is one of the first analyses to include all episodes of bacteremia produced during hospital stays in a single study. The study included accurate information about the focus and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative organism and actual hospital costs. It provides information that could be useful to improve, establish, and prioritize prevention strategies for nosocomial infections.

  11. Neighborhood walkability and hospital treatment costs: A first assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Davey, Rachel; Cochrane, Tom; Learnihan, Vincent; Hanigan, Ivan C; Bagheri, Nasser

    2017-06-01

    Health system expenditure is a global concern, with hospital cost a major component. Built environment has been found to affect physical activity and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was a first assessment of the relationship between neighborhood walkability and hospital treatment costs. For 88 neighborhoods in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), 2011-2013, a total of 30,690 public hospital admissions for the treatment of four diagnostic groups (cancers, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, circulatory diseases and respiratory diseases) were extracted from the ACT admitted patient care database and analyzed in relation to the Walk Score® index as a measure of walkability. Hospital cost was calculated according to the cost weight of the diagnosis related group assigned to each admission. Linear regressions were used to analyze the associations of walkability with hospital cost per person, admissions per person and cost per admission at the neighborhood level. An inverse association with neighborhood walkability was found for cost per person and admissions per person, but not cost per admission. After adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomic status, a 20-unit increase in walkability was associated with 12.1% (95% CI: 7.1-17.0%) lower cost and 12.5% (8.1-17.0%) fewer admissions. These associations did not vary by neighborhood socioeconomic status. This exploratory analysis suggests the potential for improved population health and reduced hospital cost with greater neighborhood walkability. Further research should replicate the analysis with data from other urban settings, and focus on the behavioral mechanisms underlying the inverse walkability-hospital cost association. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accounting for the relationship between per diem cost and LOS when estimating hospitalization costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, K Jack; Stolar, Marilyn; Hu, Ming-yi; Alvarez, Piedad; Wang, Yamei; Getsios, Denis; Williams, Gregory C

    2012-12-01

    Hospitalization costs in clinical trials are typically derived by multiplying the length of stay (LOS) by an average per-diem (PD) cost from external sources. This assumes that PD costs are independent of LOS. Resource utilization in early days of the stay is usually more intense, however, and thus, the PD cost for a short hospitalization may be higher than for longer stays. The shape of this relationship is unlikely to be linear, as PD costs would be expected to gradually plateau. This paper describes how to model the relationship between PD cost and LOS using flexible statistical modelling techniques. An example based on a clinical study of clevidipine for the treatment of peri-operative hypertension during hospitalizations for cardiac surgery is used to illustrate how inferences about cost-savings associated with good blood pressure (BP) control during the stay can be affected by the approach used to derive hospitalization costs.Data on the cost and LOS of hospitalizations for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) from the Massachusetts Acute Hospital Case Mix Database (the MA Case Mix Database) were analyzed to link LOS to PD cost, factoring in complications that may have occurred during the hospitalization or post-discharge. The shape of the relationship between LOS and PD costs in the MA Case Mix was explored graphically in a regression framework. A series of statistical models including those based on simple logarithmic transformation of LOS to more flexible models using LOcally wEighted Scatterplot Smoothing (LOESS) techniques were considered. A final model was selected, using simplicity and parsimony as guiding principles in addition traditional fit statistics (like Akaike's Information Criterion, or AIC). This mapping was applied in ECLIPSE to predict an LOS-specific PD cost, and then a total cost of hospitalization. These were then compared for patients who had good vs. poor peri-operative blood-pressure control. The MA Case Mix dataset included data

  13. Accounting for the relationship between per diem cost and LOS when estimating hospitalization costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalization costs in clinical trials are typically derived by multiplying the length of stay (LOS by an average per-diem (PD cost from external sources. This assumes that PD costs are independent of LOS. Resource utilization in early days of the stay is usually more intense, however, and thus, the PD cost for a short hospitalization may be higher than for longer stays. The shape of this relationship is unlikely to be linear, as PD costs would be expected to gradually plateau. This paper describes how to model the relationship between PD cost and LOS using flexible statistical modelling techniques. Methods An example based on a clinical study of clevidipine for the treatment of peri-operative hypertension during hospitalizations for cardiac surgery is used to illustrate how inferences about cost-savings associated with good blood pressure (BP control during the stay can be affected by the approach used to derive hospitalization costs. Data on the cost and LOS of hospitalizations for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG from the Massachusetts Acute Hospital Case Mix Database (the MA Case Mix Database were analyzed to link LOS to PD cost, factoring in complications that may have occurred during the hospitalization or post-discharge. The shape of the relationship between LOS and PD costs in the MA Case Mix was explored graphically in a regression framework. A series of statistical models including those based on simple logarithmic transformation of LOS to more flexible models using LOcally wEighted Scatterplot Smoothing (LOESS techniques were considered. A final model was selected, using simplicity and parsimony as guiding principles in addition traditional fit statistics (like Akaike’s Information Criterion, or AIC. This mapping was applied in ECLIPSE to predict an LOS-specific PD cost, and then a total cost of hospitalization. These were then compared for patients who had good vs. poor peri-operative blood

  14. The costs of acute readmissions to a different hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Kongstad, Line Planck

    2017-01-01

    Treatment costs are found to vary substantially and systematically within DRGs. Several factors have been shown to contribute to the variation in costs within DRGs. We argue that readmissions might also explain part of the observed variation in costs. A substantial number of all readmissions occu....... If teaching hospitals are not compensated for the additional costs of treating different-hospital readmission patients, they might be unfairly funded under a DRG-based payment scheme.......Treatment costs are found to vary substantially and systematically within DRGs. Several factors have been shown to contribute to the variation in costs within DRGs. We argue that readmissions might also explain part of the observed variation in costs. A substantial number of all readmissions occur...... to a different hospital. The change in hospital indicates that a progression of the illness has occurred since the initial hospitalisation. As a result, different-hospital readmissions might be more costly compared to same-hospital admissions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to analyse differences...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of improving pediatric hospital care in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Edward I; Gomez, Ivonne; Nuñez, Oscar; Wong, Yudy

    2011-11-01

    To determine the costs and cost-effectiveness of an intervention to improve quality of care for children with diarrhea or pneumonia in 14 hospitals in Nicaragua, based on expenditure data and impact measures. Hospital length of stay (LOS) and deaths were abstracted from a random sample of 1294 clinical records completed at seven of the 14 participating hospitals before the intervention (2003) and 1505 records completed after two years of intervention implementation ("post-intervention"; 2006). Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were derived from outcome data. Hospitalization costs were calculated based on hospital and Ministry of Health records and private sector data. Intervention costs came from project accounting records. Decision-tree analysis was used to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness. Average LOS decreased from 3.87 and 4.23 days pre-intervention to 3.55 and 3.94 days post-intervention for diarrhea (P = 0.078) and pneumonia (P = 0.055), respectively. Case fatalities decreased from 45/10 000 and 34/10 000 pre-intervention to 30/10 000 and 27/10 000 post-intervention for diarrhea (P = 0.062) and pneumonia (P = 0.37), respectively. Average total hospitalization and antibiotic costs for both diagnoses were US$ 451 (95% credibility interval [CI]: US$ 419-US$ 482) pre-intervention and US$ 437 (95% CI: US$ 402-US$ 464) post-intervention. The intervention was cost-saving in terms of DALYs (95% CI: -US$ 522- US$ 32 per DALY averted) and cost US$ 21 per hospital day averted (95% CI: -US$ 45- US$ 204). After two years of intervention implementation, LOS and deaths for diarrhea decreased, along with LOS for pneumonia, with no increase in hospitalization costs. If these changes were entirely attributable to the intervention, it would be cost-saving.

  16. Primary kidney disease and post-renal transplantation hospitalization costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoddousi, K; Ramezani, M K; Assari, S; Lankarani, M M; Amini, M; Khedmat, H; Hollisaaz, M T

    2007-05-01

    This study sought to assess posttransplantation hospitalizations costs in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects to see whether diabetes mellitus (DM) as a primary cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) increased posttransplantation hospitalization costs. From 2000 to 2005, the hospitalization costs of 387 consecutive rehospitalizations of kidney recipients were retrospectively compared for two groups: patients with ESRD due to DM (n=71) and those with ESRD of non-DM etiologies (n=316). The hospitalization costs included the costs of hotel, medications, surgical procedures, paraclinical tests, imaging tests, health personnel time, special services (ie, patient transportation by ambulance), and miscellaneous costs. Societal perspective was used with costs expressed in PPP$ purchase power parity dollars (PPP$) estimated to be equal to 272 Iranian rials. Compared with the non-DM group, DM patients experienced significantly higher median costs both in total (1262 vs 870 PPP$, P=.001) and in cost components related to hotel (384 vs 215 PPP$, P=.001), health personnel time (235 vs 115 PPP$, P<.001), paraclinical tests (177 vs 149 PPP$, P=.012), and special services (100 vs 74 PPP$, P=.041). The mean of age was higher (P<.001), and the transplantation hospitalization time interval was also shorter in the DM group (median: 2.7 vs 12, P=.025). Considering DM as a leading cause of ESRD and its increasing prevalence in some countries, the association between hospitalization costs of posttransplant patients and DM may be of great economic importance to many transplantation centers.

  17. Costs of day hospital and community residential chemical dependency treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Zavala, Silvana K; Parthasarathy, Sujaya; Witbrodt, Jane

    2008-03-01

    Patient placement criteria developed by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) have identified a need for low-intensity residential treatment as an alternative to day hospital for patients with higher levels of severity. A recent clinical trial found similar outcomes at social model residential treatment and clinically-oriented day hospital programs, but did not report on costs. This paper addresses whether the similar outcomes in the recent trial were delivered with comparable costs, overall and within gender and ethnicity stratum. This paper reports on clients not at environmental risk who participated in a randomized trial conducted in three metropolitan areas served by a large pre-paid health plan. Cost data were collected using the Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (DATCAP). Costs per episode were calculated by multiplying DATCAP-derived program-specific costs by each client's length of stay. Differences in length of stay, and in per-episode costs, were compared between residential and day hospital subjects. Lengths of stay at residential treatment were significantly longer than at day hospital, in the sample overall and in disaggregated analyses. This difference was especially marked among non-Whites. The average cost per week was USD 575 per week at day hospital, versus USD 370 per week at the residential programs. However, because of the longer stays in residential, per-episode costs were significantly higher in the sample overall and among non-Whites (and marginally higher for men). These cost results must be considered in light of the null findings comparing outcomes between subjects randomized to residential versus day hospital programs. The longer stays in the sample overall and for non-White clients at residential programs came at higher costs but did not lead to better rates of abstinence. The short stays in day hospital among non-Whites call into question the attractiveness of day hospital for minority clients. Outcomes and costs

  18. Use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the Unit of Pain Management of the Alcorcón Foundation University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Isabel Martínez Tapia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is a non-pharmacological therapy (TNF used to alleviate pain and is among the current available treatments offered by the Units of Pain Management (Unidades del Dolor in Spanish Hospitals. The goal of this study was to identify the characteristics of portable electro-stimulator use, and its costs in the Unit of Pain Management of the Alcorcón Foundation University Hospital (Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out between January, 1999, and October, 2010, in the Unit of Pain Management of the Alcorcón Foundation University Hospital. The information on TENS delivery forms and its supplies was collected, and the characteristics of use and the associated costs were calculated. It was observed that the longest period of time used was less than a year. The cost of delivery for the portable equipment was 148 050 euros and the average annual cost for the use of TENS by a patient was 854 euros. From the information gathered, it can be concluded that the use of electro-analgesia is a valid option in terms of expenses for long periods of use, thereby allowing a reduction in costs and decreasing the use of other healthcare treatments.

  19. Experience with an end-of-life practice at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M L; Frank, R R

    1997-01-01

    To describe a 10-yr experience with an end-of-life practice in a hospital. A nonexperimental, prospective, descriptive design was used to record variables from a convenience sample of patients transferred to the Comprehensive Supportive Care Team. Detroit Receiving Hospital is an urban, university-affiliated, Level I trauma/emergency hospital. Patients who are not expected to survive hospitalization, and for whom a decision has been made to focus care on palliative interventions, are candidates for care by this practice. None. Patient demographics, including the following information: age, gender; diagnoses; illness severity; mortality rate; and disposition. Measures of resource utilization included: referral sources; Therapeutic intervention Scoring System values; bed costs; and length of hospital stay. Satisfactory patient/family care with a measurable reeducation in the use of resources can be achieved in the hospital setting. A hands-on approach to the care of dying patients by this specialty, palliative care service has provided patients, families, and clinicians with the type of support needed for satisfactory end-of-life care. A summary of our experience may be useful to others.

  20. Cost-benefit of infection control interventions targeting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, L; Avni, T; Rubinovitch, B; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) incur significant costs. We aimed to examine the cost and cost-benefit of infection control interventions against MRSA and to examine factors affecting economic estimates. We performed a systematic review of studies assessing infection control interventions aimed at preventing spread of MRSA in hospitals and reporting intervention costs, savings, cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness. We searched PubMed and references of included studies with no language restrictions up to January 2012. We used the Quality of Health Economic Studies tool to assess study quality. We report cost and savings per month in 2011 US$. We calculated the median save/cost ratio and the save-cost difference with interquartile range (IQR) range. We examined the effects of MRSA endemicity, intervention duration and hospital size on results. Thirty-six studies published between 1987 and 2011 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifteen of the 18 studies reporting both costs and savings reported a save/cost ratio >1. The median save/cost ratio across all 18 studies was 7.16 (IQR 1.37-16). The median cost across all studies reporting intervention costs (n = 31) was 8648 (IQR 2025-19 170) US$ per month; median savings were 38 751 (IQR 14 206-75 842) US$ per month (23 studies). Higher save/cost ratios were observed in the intermediate to high endemicity setting compared with the low endemicity setting, in hospitals with 6 months. Infection control intervention to reduce spread of MRSA in acute-care hospitals showed a favourable cost/benefit ratio. This was true also for high MRSA endemicity settings. Unresolved economic issues include rapid screening using molecular techniques and universal versus targeted screening. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  1. Controlling costs without compromising quality: paying hospitals for total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Jones, Barbara L; Meimban, Roger J; Pine, Gregory J

    2010-10-01

    Unit costs of health services are substantially higher in the United States than in any other developed country in the world, without a correspondingly healthier population. An alternative payment structure, especially for high volume, high cost episodes of care (eg, total knee replacement), is needed to reward high quality care and reduce costs. The National Inpatient Sample of administrative claims data was used to measure risk-adjusted mortality, postoperative length-of-stay, costs of routine care, adverse outcome rates, and excess costs of adverse outcomes for total knee replacements performed between 2002 and 2005. Empirically identified inefficient and ineffective hospitals were then removed to create a reference group of high-performance hospitals. Predictive models for outcomes and costs were recalibrated to the reference hospitals and used to compute risk-adjusted outcomes and costs for all hospitals. Per case predicted costs were computed and compared with observed costs. Of the 688 hospitals with acceptable data, 62 failed to meet effectiveness criteria and 210 were identified as inefficient. The remaining 416 high-performance hospitals had 13.4% fewer risk-adjusted adverse outcomes (4.56%-3.95%; P costs ($12,773-$11,512; P costs. A payment system based on the demonstrated performance of effective, efficient hospitals can produce sizable cost savings without jeopardizing quality. In this study, 96% of total excess hospital costs resulted from higher routine costs at inefficient hospitals, whereas only 4% was associated with ineffective care.

  2. Estimating the cost of healthcare delivery in three hospitals in southern ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboagye, A Q Q; Degboe, A N K; Obuobi, A A D

    2010-09-01

    The cost burden (called full cost) of providing health services at a referral, a district and a mission hospital in Ghana were determined. Standard cost-finding and cost analysis tools recommended by World Health Organization are used to analyse 2002 and 2003 hospital data. Full cost centre costs were computed by taking into account cash and non-cash expenses and allocating overhead costs to intermediate and final patient care centres. The full costs of running the mission hospital in 2002 and 2003 were US$600,295 and US$758,647 respectively; for the district hospital, the respective costs were US$496,240 and US$487,537; and for the referral hospital, the respective costs were US$1,160,535 and US$1,394,321. Of these, overhead costs ranged between 20% and 42%, while salaries made up between 45% and 60%. Based on healthcare utilization data, in 2003 the estimated cost per outpatient attendance was US$ 2.25 at the mission hospital, US$ 4.51 at the district hospital and US$8.5 at the referral hospital; inpatient day costs were US$ 6.05, US$ 9.95 and US$18.8 at the respective hospitals. User fees charged at service delivery points were generally below cost. However, some service delivery points have the potential to recover their costs. Salaries are the major cost component of the three hospitals. Overhead costs constitute an important part of hospital costs and must be noted in efforts to recover costs. Cost structures are different at different types of hospitals. Unit costs at service delivery points can be estimated and projected into the future.

  3. Exploring differences in inpatient drug purchasing cost between two pediatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydert, Per; Poole, Robert

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the hospital cost of purchasing drugs at two children's hospitals is explored with respect to high-cost drugs and drug classes and discussed with regard to differences in hospital setting, drug price, or number of treatments. The purchasing costs of drugs at the two hospitals were retrieved and analyzed. All information was connected to the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical code and compared in a Microsoft Access database. The 6-month drug purchasing costs at Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital (ALCH), Stockholm, Sweden, and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LPCH), Palo Alto, California, are similar and result in a cost per patient day of US $149 and US $136, respectively. The hospital setting and choice of drug products are factors that influence the drug cost in product-specific ways. Several problems are highlighted when only drug costs are compared between hospitals. For example, the comparison does not take into account the amount of waste, risk of adverse drug events, local dosing strategies, disease prevalence, and national drug-pricing models. The difference in cost per inpatient day at ALCH may indicate that cost could be redistributed in Sweden to support pediatric pharmacy services. Also, when introducing new therapies seen at the comparison hospital, it may be possible to extrapolate the estimated increase in cost.

  4. The cost of the district hospital: a case study in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, A J; Kapalamula, J; Chisimbi, S

    1993-01-01

    Described in an analysis of the cost to the Ministry of Health of providing district health services in Malawi, with particular emphasis on the district hospital. District resource allocation patterns were assessed by carefully disaggregating district costs by level of care and hospital department. A strikingly low proportion of district recurrent costs was absorbed by salaries and wages (27-39%, depending on the district) and a surprisingly high proportion by medical supplies (24-37%). The most expensive cost centre in the hospital was the pharmacy. A total of 27-39% of total recurrent costs were spent outside the hospital and 61-73% on hospital services. The secondary care services absorbed 40-58% of district recurrent costs. Unit costs by hospital department varied considerably by district, with one hospital being consistently the most expensive and another the cheapest. A total of 3-10 new outpatients could be treated for the average cost of 1 inpatient-day, while 34-55 could be treated for the average cost of 1 inpatient. The efficiency of hospital operations, the scope for redistributing resources districtwide, and the costing methodology are discussed.

  5. Managerial innovation in the hospital: an analysis of the diffusion of hospital cost-accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counte, M A; Glandon, G L

    1988-01-01

    Currently much interest is focused on the uses of cost-accounting systems within the hospital industry. Proponents frequently contend that such systems will help hospitals successfully adapt to new methods of financial reimbursement because they are essential to a number of major management functions, including competitive bidding, cost management, pricing, and profitability assessment. This article reports the results of a study conducted to examine the extent to which hospitals in a major market are actually beginning to use standard cost-accounting systems and identify factors that either aid or hinder the diffusion of these methods. Chief financial officers from 94 hospitals (83 percent response rate) participated in the study during the summer of 1986 where less than half of the hospitals (43 percent) had recently purchased a cost-accounting system. Detailed information about the interface of cost-accounting systems with other application systems and their specific management uses is reported.

  6. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Eva; Cots, Francesc; Sala, Maria; Comas, Mercè; Belvis, Francesc; Riu, Marta; Salvadó, Margarita; Grau, Santiago; Horcajada, Juan P; Montero, Maria Milagro; Castells, Xavier

    2012-05-23

    We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  7. Using business process redesign to reduce wait times at a university hospital in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkhuizen, Sylvia G.; Burger, Matthe P. M.; Jonkers, Rene E.; Limburg, Martien; Klazinga, Niek; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Business process redesign (BPR) has been applied to implement more customer-focused and cost-effective care. In 2002, two pilot projects to improve patient care processes for two specific patient groups were conducted at the Academic Medical Center, a 1,000-bed university hospital in

  8. HMO market penetration and hospital cost inflation in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    1991-11-20

    OBJECTIVE--Health maintenance organizations (HMOs) have stimulated price competition in California hospital markets since 1983, when the state legislature eliminated barriers to selective contracting by conventional health insurance plans. This study measures the impact of HMO-induced price competition on the rate of inflation in average cost per admission for 298 private, non-HMO hospitals between 1982 and 1988. DATA--HMO market penetration was calculated using discharge abstract data on insurance coverage, ZIP code of residence, and hospital of choice for 3.35 million patients in 1983 and 3.41 million patients in 1988. Data on hospital characteristics were obtained from the American Hospital Association and other sources. -HMO coverage grew from an average of 8.3% of all admissions in local hospital markets in 1983 to 17.0% of all admissions in 1988. The average rate of growth in costs per admission between 1982 and 1988 was 9.4% lower in markets with relatively high HMO penetration compared with markets with relatively low HMO penetration (95% confidence interval, 5.2 to 13.8). Cost savings for these 298 hospitals are estimated at $1.04 billion for 1988. CONCLUSION--Price competition between HMOs and conventional health insurers can significantly reduce hospital cost inflation if legislative barriers to selective contracting are removed. The impact of competition in California was modest, however, when evaluated in terms of the 74.5% average rate of California hospital cost inflation during these years.

  9. Hospital keeps cool and cuts its costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Russ

    2013-09-01

    Energy usage--particularly electricity--in hospitals is a hot topic, and the sector is under increasing pressure to reduce load and carbon emissions. The cost of 'going green' can, however, be high, and many hospitals shy away from more costly energy-efficient solutions, instead selecting cheaper options to suit the short term. One Hampshire healthcare facility, however, bucked the trend when selecting new chilled water plant, thanks to the advice and expertise of chartered consulting engineers, Henderson Green. Examining whether other hospitals should follow suit, managing director, Russ Pitman, explains 'why considering the bigger picture perspective does pay off'.

  10. Distribution of variable vs fixed costs of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R R; Frutos, P W; Ciavarella, G G; Gussow, L M; Mensah, E K; Kampe, L M; Straus, H E; Joseph, G; Rydman, R J

    1999-02-17

    Most strategies proposed to control the rising cost of health care are aimed at reducing medical resource consumption rates. These approaches may be limited in effectiveness because of the relatively low variable cost of medical care. Variable costs (for medication and supplies) are saved if a facility does not provide a service while fixed costs (for salaried labor, buildings, and equipment) are not saved over the short term when a health care facility reduces service. To determine the relative variable and fixed costs of inpatient and outpatient care for a large urban public teaching hospital. Cost analysis. A large urban public teaching hospital. All expenditures for the institution during 1993 and for each service were categorized as either variable or fixed. Fixed costs included capital expenditures, employee salaries and benefits, building maintenance, and utilities. Variable costs included health care worker supplies, patient care supplies, diagnostic and therapeutic supplies, and medications. In 1993, the hospital had nearly 114000 emergency department visits, 40000 hospital admissions, 240000 inpatient days, and more than 500000 outpatient clinic visits. The total budget for 1993 was $429.2 million, of which $360.3 million (84%) was fixed and $68.8 million (16%) was variable. Overall, 31.5% of total costs were for support expenses such as utilities, employee benefits, and housekeeping salaries, and 52.4% included direct costs of salary for service center personnel who provide services to individual patients. The majority of cost in providing hospital service is related to buildings, equipment, salaried labor, and overhead, which are fixed over the short term. The high fixed costs emphasize the importance of adjusting fixed costs to patient consumption to maintain efficiency.

  11. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain. All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros. In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively. Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  12. Estimating the cost of healthcare delivery in three hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The cost burden (called full cost) of providing health services at a referral, a district and a mission hospital in Ghana were determined. Methods: Standard cost-finding and cost analysis tools recommended by World Health Organization are used to analyse 2002 and 2003 hospital data. Full cost centre costs were ...

  13. A cost management model for hospital food and nutrition in a public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neriz, Liliana; Núñez, Alicia; Ramis, Francisco

    2014-11-13

    In Chile, the use of costing systems in the public sector is limited. The Ministry of Health requires hospitals to manage themselves with the aim of decentralizing health care services and increasing their quality. However, self-management with a lack of accounting information is almost impossible. On the other hand, nutrition department costs have barely been studied before, and there are no studies specifically for activity based costing (ABC) systems. ABC focuses on the process and traces health care activities to gain a more accurate measurement of the object costs and the financial performance of an organization. This paper uses ABC in a nutrition unit of a public hospital of high complexity to determine costs associated with the different meals for inpatients. The paper also provides an activity based management (ABM) analysis for this unit. The results show positive effects on the reduction of costs for the nutrition department after implementing ABC/ABM. Therefore, there are opportunities to improve the profitability of the area and the results could also be replicated to other areas in the hospital. ABC shed light on the amount of nutritionist time devoted to completing paperwork, and as a result, system changes were introduced to reduce this burden and allow them to focus on more relevant activities. Additional efficiencies were achieved through the elimination of non-value adding activities and automation of reports. ABC reduced the cost of the nutrition department and could produce similar results in other areas of the hospital. This is a practical application of a financial management tool, ABC, which would be useful for hospital managers to reduce costs and improve the management of the unit. This paper takes ABC and examines its use in an area, which has had little exposure to the benefits of this tool.

  14. The utilization of activity-based cost accounting in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Dennis; Forget, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare costs are being examined on all fronts. Healthcare accounts for 11% of the gross national product and will continue to rise as the "babyboomers" reach retirement age. While ascertaining costs is important, most research shows that costing methods have not been implemented in hospitals. This study is concerned with the use of costing methods; particularly activity-based cost accounting. A mail survey of CFOs was undertaken to determine the type of cost accounting method they use. In addition, they were asked whether they were aware of activity-based cost accounting and whether they had implemented it or were planning to implement it. Only 71.8% were aware of it and only 4.7% had implemented it. In addition, only 52% of all hospitals report using any cost accounting systems. Education needs to ensure that all healthcare executives are cognizant of activity-based accounting and its importance in determining costs. Only by determining costs can hospitals strive to contain them.

  15. Processes of early stroke care and hospital costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Marie Louise; Ehlers, Lars H; Hundborg, Heidi H

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relationship between processes of early stroke care and hospital costs remains unclear. Aims: We therefore examined the association in a population-based cohort study. Methods: We identified 5909 stroke patients who were admitted to stroke units in a Danish county between 2005...... of hospitalization were $23352 (standard deviation 27827). The relationship between receiving more relevant processes of early stroke care and lower hospital costs followed a dose-response relationship. The adjusted costs were $24566 (95% confidence interval 19364-29769) lower for patients who received 75......-100% of the relevant processes of care compared with patients receiving 0-24%. All processes of care were associated with potential cost savings, except for early catheterization and early thromboembolism prophylaxis. Conclusions: Early care in agreement with key guidelines recommendations for the management...

  16. Acute intoxications in two university hospitals in Burkina Faso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute intoxications in two university hospitals in Burkina Faso. ... admitted to the emergency services of the two sole University Hospitals of Ouagadougou from July 1, ... followed by chemicals, animals' toxins, food, alcohol and addictive drugs.

  17. Payment schemes and cost efficiency: evidence from Swiss public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at analysing the impact of prospective payment schemes on cost efficiency of acute care hospitals in Switzerland. We study a panel of 121 public hospitals subject to one of four payment schemes. While several hospitals are still reimbursed on a per diem basis for the treatment of patients, most face flat per-case rates-or mixed schemes, which combine both elements of reimbursement. Thus, unlike previous studies, we are able to simultaneously analyse and isolate the cost-efficiency effects of different payment schemes. By means of stochastic frontier analysis, we first estimate a hospital cost frontier. Using the two-stage approach proposed by Battese and Coelli (Empir Econ 20:325-332, 1995), we then analyse the impact of these payment schemes on the cost efficiency of hospitals. Controlling for hospital characteristics, local market conditions in the 26 Swiss states (cantons), and a time trend, we show that, compared to per diem, hospitals which are reimbursed by flat payment schemes perform better in terms of cost efficiency. Our results suggest that mixed schemes create incentives for cost containment as well, although to a lesser extent. In addition, our findings indicate that cost-efficient hospitals are primarily located in cantons with competitive markets, as measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman index in inpatient care. Furthermore, our econometric model shows that we obtain biased estimates from frontier analysis if we do not account for heteroscedasticity in the inefficiency term.

  18. Perception of activity based costing in Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Zaman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the perception of activity based costing (ABC in Australian universities. Using a questionnaire survey, data was collected from twenty-six finance directors and/or chief financial officers in Australian universities. The perception of ABC implementation in Australian universities depends on many variables including the understanding of ABC, consideration of ABC as a strategic cost management system, the role of ABC in reduction of expenses, consideration of ABC as a valuable tool to enhance overhead cost allocation, and consideration of ABC as an effective strategic cost management system designed to incorporate the university’s critical input, output, and process variables resulting in value creation. The result of regression analysis provides significant and positive association between the decision to implement ABC in Australian universities and both the treatment of ABC as a strategic cost management system and the degree of both senior management and internal champion support. The findings indicate substantial differences in the allocation of the overhead costs between ABC and traditional costing systems. The result also reveals that many Australian universities using the ABC method receive benefits in improving cost reduction and better resource allocation with revenue surplus. Furthermore, the study develops a generic model of cost pools and drivers of ABC implementation in Australian universities.

  19. Occupational Accidents among Clinical Staff of Tabriz University Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Sahebi; Rana Gholamzadeh nikjoo; Majid Khalili

    2015-01-01

    ​Background and Objectives : Occupational health and safety is one of the most important issues in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to explore the one –year prevalence of occupational accidents in Tabriz University hospitals. Materials and Methods : A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 patients of seven university hospitals using researcher made questionnaire. The hospitals were selected based on their specialty of the service. Then, one hospital was selected from each s...

  20. [Profitability of a day hospital: analysis of activity, cost and effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando Ortiz, Lili; Hinojosa Mena-Bernal, Carmen; González Sarmiento, Enrique; González Guilabert, Isabel; Arana Ruiz, Jorge; Muñoz Moreno, M Fe

    2012-01-01

    Day hospitals are an alternative to conventional hospital care. We analyzed the functioning and profitability of the day hospital of Hospital Clínico de Valladolid, Spain, in 2009. Profitability is expressed as the provision of identical health coverage at a lower cost than that generated by conventional hospital care and with adequate quality indicators. We performed a retrospective, observational and descriptive study of the information obtained on each patient attended in the day hospital from January 1 to December 31, 2009. We studied four quality indicators: cancellation of meetings, the rate of transfusion reactions, the out-patient rate and the satisfaction index. The estimated savings for each process was calculated as the difference in the average cost of hospitalization minus the average cost of the process in the day hospital. The most frequent diseases were systemic and connective tissue diseases, accounting for 25.4% of the processes treated; of these, 17.1% corresponded to rheumatoid arthritis. Patient satisfaction was 93%. Meetings cancellations and the rate of transfusion reactions were 0%. The out-patient rate was 26%. Day hospital costs were 8.6% of conventional hospital costs, with savings of 78,390.69 euros. The day hospital is cost effective due to savings compared with conventional hospitalization and has a satisfactory quality index. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Hospital Nursing Workforce Costs, Wages, Occupational Mix,and Resource Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to better understand how hospitals use different types of RNs, LPNs, and nurse aides in proprietary (for-profit), nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals and to estimate the wages, cost, and intensity of nursing care using a national data set. This is a cross-sectional observational study of 3,129 acute care hospitals in all 50 states and District of Columbia using data from the 2008 Occupational Mix Survey administered by the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing skill mix, hours, and labor costs were combined with other CMS hospital descriptive data, including type of hospital ownership, urban or rural location, hospital beds, and case-mix index. RN labor costs make up 25.5% of all hospital expenditures annually, and all nursing labor costs represent 30.1%, which is nearly a quarter trillion dollars ($216.7 billion) per year for inpatient nursing care. On average, proprietary hospitals employ 1.3 RNs per bed and 1.9 nursing personnel per bed in urban hospitals compared with 1.7 RNs per bed and 2.3 nursing personnel per bed for nonprofit and government-owned hospitals (P G .05). States with higher ratios of RN compared with LPN licenses used fewer LPNs in the inpatient setting. The findings from this study can be helpful in comparing nursing care across different types of hospitals, ownership, and geographic locations and used as a benchmark for future nursing workforce needs and costs.

  2. Effects of bystander CPR following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest on hospital costs and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geri, Guillaume; Fahrenbruch, Carol; Meischke, Hendrika; Painter, Ian; White, Lindsay; Rea, Thomas D; Weaver, Marcia R

    2017-06-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with a greater likelihood of survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However the long-term survival benefits in relationship to cost have not been well-studied. We evaluated bystander CPR, hospital-based costs, and long-term survival following OHCA in order to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of bystander CPR. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive EMS-treated OHCA patients >=12years who arrested prior to EMS arrival and outside a nursing facility between 2001 and 2010 in greater King County, WA. Utstein-style information was obtained from the EMS registry, including 5-year survival. Costs from the OHCA hospitalization were obtained from the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Cost effectiveness was based on hospital costs divided by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for a 5-year follow-up window. Of the 4448 eligible patients, 18.5% (n=824) were discharged alive from hospital and 12.1% (n=539) were alive at 5 years. Five-year survival was higher in patients who received bystander CPR (14.3% vs. 8.7%, pbystander CPR. The average (SD) total cost of the initial acute care hospitalization was USD 19,961 (40,498) for all admitted patients and USD 75,175 (52,276) for patients alive at year 5. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with bystander CPR was USD 48,044 per QALY. Based on this population-based investigation, bystander CPR was positively associated with long-term survival and appears cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC) and info......) and information from The National Patient Registry and The Danish Case-Mix System (DRG)....

  4. Hospital Costs Associated With Agitation in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cots, Francesc; Chiarello, Pietro; Pérez, Victor; Gracia, Alfredo; Becerra, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The study determined hospital costs associated with a diagnosis of agitation among patients at 14 general hospitals in Spain. Data from discharge records of adult patients (2008-2012) with a diagnosis of agitation (ICD-9-CM code 293.0) were analyzed. Incremental hospital costs for agitated patients and a control group of patients without agitation were quantified, and the adjusted cost and incremental cost for both groups were compared by use of a recycled-predictions approach. The analysis included 355,496 hospital discharges, 5,334 of which were of patients with a diagnosis of agitation. Among patients with a diagnosis of agitation, hospital stays were significantly longer (12 days versus nine days). A significant difference in mean costs of €472 (95% confidence interval [CI]=€351-€593) was noted between patients with agitation and those in the control group. A recycled-predictions approach showed a difference of €1,593(CI=€1,556-€1,631). Findings indicate that agitation increased the use of hospital resources by at least 8%.

  5. Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic hospitals--a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linna, Miika; Häkkinen, Unto; Peltola, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data......, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden. This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices. More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic...

  6. Cost of Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes in Prenda Hospital Medicine Service, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Zangulo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes has a major impact on morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that by 2040, about 642 million people are affected worldwide, of which, 34.2 million are from sub-Saharan countries. The direct annual cost of diabetes health care worldwide is estimated at about 153 billion dollars. These patients represent 30% to 40% of all admissions to emergency services, leading to high values of hospital expenditure. We aim to evaluate the cost of treatment of patients with diabetes admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012. Methods: Retrospective analytical observational study, with data collected from the clinical processes of medical service (age and gender, length of hospitalization, resources consumed, cost of treatment per patient and discharge. Results: Out of 121 patients, the majority was female (n = 70, 57.9%. The age group of 36 to 45 years old was the most frequent among these patients (n = 26, 21.5%. November was the month that recorded the largest number of admissions (n = 17, 14%. About 45.5% were hospitalized during five to eight days, on average for nine days. The majority (76.9% was discharged due to health condition improvement. The price of materials used for treatment of the disease had high variation, and 31 550.15 kwanzas was spent to acquire them. The direct cost per patient per day was 4170.11 kwanzas and the estimated annual cost of care of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital was 45 525 490.9 kwanzas in 2012. Discussion and Conclusion: These results are in accordance with other studies, indicating a relevant cost of treatment of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012.

  7. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Riu

    Full Text Available To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility.We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive.A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859. Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210. Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency.Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve prevention strategies

  8. Healthcare Costs for Acute Hospitalized and Chronic Heart Failure in South Korea: A Multi-Center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hyemin; Chung, Wook Jin; Lee, Hae Young; Yoo, Byung Soo; Choi, Jin Oh; Han, Seoung Woo; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Eui Kyung; Kang, Seok Min

    2017-09-01

    Although heart failure (HF) is recognized as a leading contributor to healthcare costs and a significant economic burden worldwide, studies of HF-related costs in South Korea are limited. This study aimed to estimate HF-related costs per Korean patient per year and per visit. This retrospective cohort study analyzed data obtained from six hospitals in South Korea. Patients with HF who experienced ≥one hospitalization or ≥two outpatient visits between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013 were included. Patients were followed up for 1 year [in Korean won (KRW)]. Among a total of 500 patients (mean age, 66.1 years; male sex, 54.4%), the mean 1-year HF-related cost per patient was KRW 2,607,173, which included both, outpatient care (KRW 952,863) and inpatient care (KRW 1,654,309). During the post-index period, 22.2% of patients had at least one hospitalization, and their 1-year costs per patient (KRW 8,530,290) were higher than those of patients who had only visited a hospital over a 12-month period (77.8%; KRW 917,029). Among 111 hospitalized patients, the 1-year costs were 1.7-fold greater in patients (n=52) who were admitted to the hospital via the emergency department (ED) than in those (n=59) who were not (KRW 11,040,453 vs. KRW 6,317,942; pSouth Korea was related to hospitalization, especially admissions via the ED. Appropriate treatment strategies including modification of risk factors to prevent or decrease hospitalization are needed to reduce the economic burden on HF patients. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  9. Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic hospitals--a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linna, Miika; Häkkinen, Unto; Peltola, Mikko; Magnussen, Jon; Anthun, Kjartan S; Kittelsen, Sverre; Roed, Annette; Olsen, Kim; Medin, Emma; Rehnberg, Clas

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data were collected using harmonized definitions of inputs and outputs for 184 hospitals and data envelopment analysis was used to calculate Farrell efficiency estimates for the year 2002. Results suggest that there were marked differences in the average hospital efficiency between Nordic countries. In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden. This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices. More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals.

  10. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea......-associated hospitalizations coded as nonspecified viral or presumed infectious have demonstrated a marked winter peak similar to that of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations, which suggests that the registered rotavirus-coded admissions are grossly underestimated. We therefore obtained more realistic estimates by 2...... different models, which indicated 2.4 and 2.5 (for children rotavirus-associated admissions per 1,000 children per year, respectively. These admissions amount to associated direct medical costs of US $1.7-1.8 million per year. Using 2 simple...

  11. Hand hygiene noncompliance and the cost of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Keith L; Anderson, Deverick J; Kaye, Keith S

    2010-04-01

    Hand hygiene noncompliance is a major cause of nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infection cost data exist, but the effect of hand hygiene noncompliance is unknown. To estimate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related cost of an incident of hand hygiene noncompliance by a healthcare worker during patient care. Two models were created to simulate sequential patient contacts by a hand hygiene-noncompliant healthcare worker. Model 1 involved encounters with patients of unknown MRSA status. Model 2 involved an encounter with an MRSA-colonized patient followed by an encounter with a patient of unknown MRSA status. The probability of new MRSA infection for the second patient was calculated using published data. A simulation of 1 million noncompliant events was performed. Total costs of resulting infections were aggregated and amortized over all events. Duke University Medical Center, a 750-bed tertiary medical center in Durham, North Carolina. Model 1 was associated with 42 MRSA infections (infection rate, 0.0042%). Mean infection cost was $47,092 (95% confidence interval [CI], $26,040-$68,146); mean cost per noncompliant event was $1.98 (95% CI, $0.91-$3.04). Model 2 was associated with 980 MRSA infections (0.098%). Mean infection cost was $53,598 (95% CI, $50,098-$57,097); mean cost per noncompliant event was $52.53 (95% CI, $47.73-$57.32). A 200-bed hospital incurs $1,779,283 in annual MRSA infection-related expenses attributable to hand hygiene noncompliance. A 1.0% increase in hand hygiene compliance resulted in annual savings of $39,650 to a 200-bed hospital. Hand hygiene noncompliance is associated with significant attributable hospital costs. Minimal improvements in compliance lead to substantial savings.

  12. Incidence and costs of hip fractures vs strokes and acute myocardial infarction in Italy: comparative analysis based on national hospitalization records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piscitelli P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Prisco Piscitelli,1,2 Giovanni Iolascon,3 Alberto Argentiero,2 Giovanna Chitano,2 Cosimo Neglia,2 Gemma Marcucci,1 Manuela Pulimeno,2 Marco Benvenuto,2 Santa Mundi,2 Valentina Marzo,2 Daniela Donato,4 Angelo Baggiani,4 Alberto Migliore,5 Mauro Granata,6 Francesca Gimigliano,3 Raffaele Di Blasio,7 Alessandra Gimigliano,3 Lorenzo Renzulli,7 Maria Luisa Brandi,1 Alessandro Distante,2,4 Raffaele Gimigliano3,71University of Florence, Florence Italy; 2ISBEM Research Centre, Brindisi, Italy; 3Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 4University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 5Fatebenefratelli St Peter’s Hospital, Rome, Italy; 6St Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy; 7Casa di Cura Santa Maria del Pozzo, Somma Vesuviana, ItalyObjectives: As osteoporotic fractures are becoming a major health care problem in countries characterized by an increasing number of older adults, in this study we aimed to compare the incidence and costs of hip fragility fractures in Italian elderly people versus those of major cardiovascular diseases (strokes and acute myocardial infarctions [AMI] occurring in the whole adult population.Methods: We analyzed hospitalization records maintained at the national level by the Italian Ministry of Health for the diagnosis of hip fractures (ICD-9-CM codes 820–821, AMI (code 410, hemorrhagic (codes 430, 431, 432 and ischemic strokes (codes 433–434, and TIA (code 435 between 2001–2005. Cost analyses were based on diagnosis-related groups.Results: The incidence of hip fractures in elderly people has increased (+12.9% between 2001 and 2005, as well as that of AMI (+20.2% and strokes (hemorrhagic: +9.6%; ischemic: +14.7 occurring in the whole adult population; conversely, hospitalization due to TIA decreased by a rate of 13.6% between 2001 and 2005. In 2005, the hospital costs across the national health care system that were associated with hip fragility fractures in the elderly were comparable to those of strokes (both hemorrhagic and

  13. Costs, charges, and revenues for hospital diagnostic imaging procedures: differences by modality and hospital characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistrom, Christopher Lee; McKay, Niccie L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined financial data reported by Florida hospitals concerning costs, charges, and revenues related to imaging services. Financial reports to the Florida Hospital Uniform Reporting System by all licensed acute care facilities for fiscal year 2002 were used to calculate four financial indices on a per procedure basis. These included charge, net revenue, operating expense (variable cost), and contribution margin. Analysis, stratified by cost center (imaging modality), tested the effects of bed size, ownership, teaching status, and urban or rural status on the four indices. The mean operating expense and charge per procedure were as follows: computed tomography (CT): $51 and $1565; x-ray and ultrasound: $55 and $410; nuclear medicine (NM): $135 and $1138; and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): $165 and $2048. With all four modalities, for-profit hospitals had higher charges than not-for-profit and public facilities. Excepting NM, however, the difference by ownership disappeared when considering net revenue. Operating expense did not differ by ownership type or bed size. Operating expense (variable cost) per procedure is considerably lower for CT than for MRI. Consequently, when diagnostically equivalent, CT is preferable to MRI in terms of costs for hospitals. If the cost structure of nonhospital imaging is at all similar to hospitals, the profit potential for performing CT and MRI seems to be substantial, which has relevance to the issue of imaging self-referral.

  14. A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2014-09-01

    A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Two-tier charging in Maputo Central Hospital: costs, revenues and effects on equity of access to hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPake, Barbara; Hongoro, Charles; Russo, Giuliano

    2011-06-02

    Special services within public hospitals are becoming increasingly common in low and middle income countries with the stated objective of providing higher comfort services to affluent customers and generating resources for under funded hospitals. In the present study expenditures, outputs and costs are analysed for the Maputo Central Hospital and its Special Clinic with the objective of identifying net resource flows between a system operating two-tier charging, and, ultimately, understanding whether public hospitals can somehow benefit from running Special Clinic operations. A combination of step-down and bottom-up costing strategies were used to calculate recurrent as well as capital expenses, apportion them to identified cost centres and link costs to selected output measures. The results show that cost differences between main hospital and clinic are marked and significant, with the Special Clinic's cost per patient and cost per outpatient visit respectively over four times and over thirteen times their equivalent in the main hospital. While the main hospital cost structure appeared in line with those from similar studies, salary expenditures were found to drive costs in the Special Clinic (73% of total), where capital and drug costs were surprisingly low (2 and 4% respectively). We attributed low capital and drug costs to underestimation by our study owing to difficulties in attributing the use of shared resources and to the Special Clinic's outsourcing policy. The large staff expenditure would be explained by higher physician time commitment, economic rents and subsidies to hospital staff. On the whole it was observed that: (a) the flow of capital and human resources was not fully captured by the financial systems in place and stayed largely unaccounted for; (b) because of the little consideration given to capital costs, the main hospital is more likely to be subsidising its Special Clinic operations, rather than the other way around. We conclude that the

  16. Two-tier charging in Maputo Central Hospital: Costs, revenues and effects on equity of access to hospital services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giuliano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Special services within public hospitals are becoming increasingly common in low and middle income countries with the stated objective of providing higher comfort services to affluent customers and generating resources for under funded hospitals. In the present study expenditures, outputs and costs are analysed for the Maputo Central Hospital and its Special Clinic with the objective of identifying net resource flows between a system operating two-tier charging, and, ultimately, understanding whether public hospitals can somehow benefit from running Special Clinic operations. Methods A combination of step-down and bottom-up costing strategies were used to calculate recurrent as well as capital expenses, apportion them to identified cost centres and link costs to selected output measures. Results The results show that cost differences between main hospital and clinic are marked and significant, with the Special Clinic's cost per patient and cost per outpatient visit respectively over four times and over thirteen times their equivalent in the main hospital. Discussion While the main hospital cost structure appeared in line with those from similar studies, salary expenditures were found to drive costs in the Special Clinic (73% of total, where capital and drug costs were surprisingly low (2 and 4% respectively. We attributed low capital and drug costs to underestimation by our study owing to difficulties in attributing the use of shared resources and to the Special Clinic's outsourcing policy. The large staff expenditure would be explained by higher physician time commitment, economic rents and subsidies to hospital staff. On the whole it was observed that: (a the flow of capital and human resources was not fully captured by the financial systems in place and stayed largely unaccounted for; (b because of the little consideration given to capital costs, the main hospital is more likely to be subsidising its Special Clinic

  17. Is the system really the solution? Operating costs in hospital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton Robert; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Wholey, Douglas R; Kruse, Gregory; Kralovec, Peter; Muller, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Hospital system formation has recently accelerated. Executives emphasize scale economies that lower operating costs, a claim unsupported in academic research. Do systems achieve lower costs than freestanding facilities, and, if so, which system types? We test hypotheses about the relationship of cost with membership in systems, larger systems, and centralized and local hub-and-spoke systems. We also test whether these relationships have changed over time. Examining 4,000 U.S. hospitals during 1998 to 2010, we find no evidence that system members exhibit lower costs. However, members of smaller systems are lower cost than larger systems, and hospitals in centralized systems are lower cost than everyone else. There is no evidence that the system's spatial configuration is associated with cost, although national system hospitals exhibit higher costs. Finally, these results hold over time. We conclude that while systems in general may not be the solution to lower costs, some types of systems are. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Counting Costs under Severe Financial Constraints: A Cost-of-Illness Analysis of Spondyloarthropathies in a Tertiary Hospital in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsifetaki, Niki; Migkos, Michail P; Papagoras, Charalampos; Voulgari, Paraskevi V; Athanasakis, Kostas; Drosos, Alexandros A

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the total annual direct cost of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) in Greece. Retrospective study with 156 patients diagnosed and followed up in the rheumatology clinic of the University Hospital of Ioannina. Sixty-four had ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 92 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Health resource use for each patient was elicited through a retrospective chart review that documented the use of monitoring visits, medications, laboratory/diagnostic tests, and inpatient stays for the previous year from the date that the review took place. Costs were calculated from a third-party payer perspective and are reported in 2014 euros. The mean ± SD annual direct cost for the patients with SpA reached €8680 ± 6627. For the patients with PsA and AS, the cost was estimated to be €8097 ± 6802 and €9531 ± 6322, respectively. The major cost was medication, which represented 88.9%, 88.2%, and 89.3% of the mean total direct cost for SpA, AS, and PsA, respectively. The annual amount of the scheduled tests for all patients corresponded to 7.5%, and for those performed on an emergency basis, 1.1%. Further, the cost for scheduled and emergency hospitalization, as well as the cost of scheduled visits to an outpatient clinic, corresponded to 2.5% of the mean total annual direct cost for the patients with SpA. SpA carries substantial financial cost, especially in the era of new treatment options. Adequate access and treatment for patients with SpA remains a necessity, even in times of fiscal constraint. Thus, the recommendations of the international scientific organizations should be considered when administering high-cost drugs such as biological treatments.

  19. Hospital costs for patients with lower extremity cellulitis: a retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, Douglas; Marcelin, Jasmine; Visscher, Sue; Baddour, Larry

    2017-12-01

    Hospital admissions for non-purulent lower extremity cellulitis (NLEC) are common and can be prolonged and costly. Newer treatment options and preventive strategies are expected to result in cost savings before implementation, but few studies have quantified the cost of conventional treatment. Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, the incidence of NLEC in Olmsted County, MN in 2013 was 176.6 per 100,000 persons. The subset of patients who required hospitalization for NLEC in 2013 was determined. Hospital admissions were analyzed retrospectively using standardized cost analysis within several relevant categories. Thirty-four patients had an average hospital length of stay of 4.7 days. The median total inpatient cost was $7,341. The median cost per day was $2,087, with 49% due to room and board. Antibiotics administered for treatment of NLEC contributed a median cost of $75 per day of hospitalization, and laboratory and imaging test costs were $73 and $44, respectively, per day of hospitalization. Hospitalizations for NLEC can be costly and prolonged with room and board accounting for much of the cost. Therefore, newer management strategies should seek to reduce hospital length of stay and/or avoid inpatient admission to reduce cost.

  20. Cost of management in epistaxis admission: Impact of patient and hospital characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goljo, Erden; Dang, Rajan; Iloreta, Alfred M; Govindaraj, Satish

    2015-12-01

    To investigate patient and hospital characteristics associated with increased cost and length of stay in the inpatient management of epistaxis. Retrospective cross-sectional study of the 2008 to 2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. Patient and hospital characteristics of epistaxis admissions were analyzed. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to ascertain variables associated with increased cost and length of hospital stay. Variables significantly associated with high cost were further analyzed to determine the contribution of operative intervention and total procedures to cost. A total of 16,828 patients with an admitting diagnosis of epistaxis were identified. The average age was 67.5; 52.3% of the patients were male; 73.3% of the patients were Caucasian; and 70.7% of the hospital stays were government funded. The average length of stay was 3.24 days, and average hospitalization cost was $6,925. Longer length of stay was associated with black race, alcohol abuse, sinonasal disease, renal disease, Medicaid, and care at a northeastern U.S. hospital. Increased hospitalization costs of > $1,000 were associated with Asian/Pacific Islander race; sinonasal disease; renal disease; top income quartile; and care at urban teaching, northeastern, and western hospitals in the United States. High costs were predicted by procedural intervention in patients with comorbid alcohol abuse, sinonasal disease, renal disease, patients with private insurance, and patients managed at large hospitals. Although hospitalization costs are complex and multifactorial, we were able to identify patient and hospital characteristics associated with high costs in the management of epistaxis. Early identification and intervention, combined with implementation of targeted hospital management protocols, may improve outcomes and reduce financial burden. 2C. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Perioperative nursing in public university hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Olsen, Ida Østrup; Tewes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, perioperative nursing has received ongoing attention as part of an interprofessional collaboration. Perioperative nursing is constantly faced with new challenges and opportunities that necessitate continual updates of nursing knowledge and technical skills. In light...... of the longstanding relationship between nursing and technology, it is interesting that few studies with this focus have been performed. Therefore, our research question was: What is the content of perioperative nursing and how do nurses facilitate the interaction between nursing care and technology in highly...... specialized operating rooms in public university hospitals? METHODS: An ethnography involving participant observations and interviews was conducted during a 9-month study period. The participants comprised 24 nurses from 9 different operating wards at 2 university hospitals in different regions of Denmark...

  2. Reliability of hospital cost profiles in inpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenda, Tyler R; Krell, Robert W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-02-01

    With increased policy emphasis on shifting risk from payers to providers through mechanisms such as bundled payments and accountable care organizations, hospitals are increasingly in need of metrics to understand their costs relative to peers. However, it is unclear whether Medicare payments for surgery can reliably compare hospital costs. We used national Medicare data to assess patients undergoing colectomy, pancreatectomy, and open incisional hernia repair from 2009 to 2010 (n = 339,882 patients). We first calculated risk-adjusted hospital total episode payments for each procedure. We then used hierarchical modeling techniques to estimate the reliability of total episode payments for each procedure and explored the impact of hospital caseload on payment reliability. Finally, we quantified the number of hospitals meeting published reliability benchmarks. Mean risk-adjusted total episode payments ranged from $13,262 (standard deviation [SD] $14,523) for incisional hernia repair to $25,055 (SD $22,549) for pancreatectomy. The reliability of hospital episode payments varied widely across procedures and depended on sample size. For example, mean episode payment reliability for colectomy (mean caseload, 157) was 0.80 (SD 0.18), whereas for pancreatectomy (mean caseload, 13) the mean reliability was 0.45 (SD 0.27). Many hospitals met published reliability benchmarks for each procedure. For example, 90% of hospitals met reliability benchmarks for colectomy, 40% for pancreatectomy, and 66% for incisional hernia repair. Episode payments for inpatient surgery are a reliable measure of hospital costs for commonly performed procedures, but are less reliable for lower volume operations. These findings suggest that hospital cost profiles based on Medicare claims data may be used to benchmark efficiency, especially for more common procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital efficiency and transaction costs: a stochastic frontier approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Martijn; Groot, Wim; Van Merode, Frits

    2009-07-01

    The make-or-buy decision of organizations is an important issue in the transaction cost theory, but is usually not analyzed from an efficiency perspective. Hospitals frequently have to decide whether to outsource or not. The main question we address is: Is the make-or-buy decision affected by the efficiency of hospitals? A one-stage stochastic cost frontier equation is estimated for Dutch hospitals. The make-or-buy decisions of ten different hospital services are used as explanatory variables to explain efficiency of hospitals. It is found that for most services the make-or-buy decision is not related to efficiency. Kitchen services are an important exception to this. Large hospitals tend to outsource less, which is supported by efficiency reasons. For most hospital services, outsourcing does not significantly affect the efficiency of hospitals. The focus on the make-or-buy decision may therefore be less important than often assumed.

  4. Custo do transplante hepático no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná Cost of liver transplantation at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Parana, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.U. Coelho

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Determinar o custo do transplante hepático no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná. MÉTODO. Os dados do prontuário de 24 pacientes submetidos a 25 transplantes hepáticos foram avaliados do dia da internação para o transplante hepático até a data da alta hospitalar ou óbito para determinar o número de dias de internação, o local de internação, a quantidade de material e medicamentos usados, os exames complementares e procedimentos realizados. Honorários médicos não foram incluídos no estudo. RESULTADOS. A idade dos pacientes variou de 6 a 56 anos, tendo seis deles menos que 14 anos de idade. Cinco pacientes foram a óbito durante a internação hospitalar. Retransplante foi realizado em somente um paciente. O custo médio da retirada do fígado do doador foi de US$ 2,783.19. O custo total do transplante hepático variou amplamente entre os pacientes, na dependência de ocorrência de complicações pós-operatórias, do número de dias de internação hospitalar e da quantidade de transfusão de hemoderivados. O custo total variou de US$ 6,359.84 a US$ 75,434.18, com média de US$ 21,505.53. O item mais caro do transplante hepático foi o custo com a hemoterapia, seguido do custo com medicamentos e diária hospitalar. CONCLUSÃO. O custo do transplante hepático varia muito entre os pacientes e pode ser realizado no Brasil a um custo inferior ao relatado nos Estados Unidos e na Europa.PURPOSE - To determine the cost of liver transplantation at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Parana. METHODS - The data of 24 patients subjected to 25 liver transplantations were evaluated from the day of hospital admission until the day of discharge to determine the length of hospitalization, quantity of material and medications used, and exams and procedures performed. Professional fees were not included in the study. RESULTS - The age of the patients varied from 6 to 56 years. Six patients were

  5. Has cost containment after the National Health Insurance system been successful? Determinants of Taiwan hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jung-Hua; Chang, Li

    2008-03-01

    Taiwan implemented the National Health Insurance system (NHI) in 1995. After the NHI, the insurance coverage expanded and the quality of healthcare improved, however, the healthcare costs significantly escalated. The objective of this study is to determine what factors have direct impact on the increased costs after the NHI. Panel data analysis is used to investigate changes and factors affecting cost containment at Taipei municipal hospitals from 1990 to 2001. The results show that the expansion of insured healthcare coverage (especially to the elderly and the treatment of more complicated types of diseases), and the increased competition (requiring the growth of new technology and the longer average length of stay) are important driving forces behind the increase of hospital costs, directly influenced by the advent of the NHI. Therefore, policymakers should emphasize health prevention activities and disease management programs for the elderly to improve cost containment. In addition, hospital managers should find ways to improve the hospital efficiency (shorten the LOS) to reduce excess services and medical waste. They also need to better understand their market position and acquire suitable new-tech equipment earlier, to be a leader, not a follower. Finally, policymakers should establish related benchmark indices for what drivers up hospital costs (micro-aspect) and to control healthcare expenditures (macro-level).

  6. Practice, efficacy, and costs of thyroid nodule evaluation: a retrospective study in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, Lotty; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Boers, Maarten; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van Diest, Paul; Lips, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules has markedly reduced the role of thyroid scintigraphy. This is often limited to nondiagnostic or follicular (tumor) FNA classifications. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and cost of such a strategy in a university center. From 1992-1998, 995

  7. Cost-benefit of hospitalization compared with outpatient care for pregnant women with pregestational and gestational diabetes or with mild hyperglycemia, in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavassini, Ana Claudia Molina; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancies complicated by diabetes are associated with increased numbers of maternal and neonatal complications. Hospital costs increase according to the type of care provided. This study aimed to estimate the cost-benefit relationship and social profitability ratio of hospitalization, compared with outpatient care, for pregnant women with diabetes or mild hyperglycemia. This was a prospective observational quantitative study conducted at a university hospital. It included all pregnant women with pregestational or gestational diabetes, or mild hyperglycemia, who did not develop clinical intercurrences during pregnancy and who delivered at the Botucatu Medical School Hospital (Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, HC-FMB) of Universidade Estadual de São Paulo (Unesp). Thirty pregnant women treated with diet were followed as outpatients, and twenty treated with diet plus insulin were managed through frequent short hospitalizations. Direct costs (personnel, materials and tests) and indirect costs (general expenses) were ascertained from data in the patients' records and the hospital's absorption costing system. The cost-benefit was then calculated. Successful treatment of pregnant women with diabetes avoided expenditure of US$ 1,517.97 and US$ 1,127.43 for patients treated with inpatient and outpatient care, respectively. The cost-benefit of inpatient care was US$ 143,719.16, and outpatient care, US$ 253,267.22, with social profitability of 1.87 and 5.35, respectively. Decision-tree analysis confirmed that successful treatment avoided costs at the hospital. Cost-benefit analysis showed that outpatient management was economically more advantageous than hospitalization. The social profitability of both treatments was greater than one, thus demonstrating that both types of care for diabetic pregnant women had positive benefits.

  8. Investigating DRG cost weights for hospitals in middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Shahram; Doran, Christopher; Wilson, Andrew; Aisbett, Chris; Jackson, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the cost of hospital outputs, particularly acute inpatients measured by Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), is an important component of casemix implementation. Measuring the relative costliness of specific DRGs is useful for a wide range of policy and planning applications. Estimating the relative use of resources per DRG can be done through different costing approaches depending on availability of information and time and budget. This study aims to guide costing efforts in Iran and other countries in the region that are pursuing casemix funding, through identifying the main issues facing cost finding approaches and introducing the costing models compatible with their hospitals accounting and management structures. The results show that inadequate financial and utilisation information at the patient's level, poorly computerized 'feeder systems'; and low quality data make it impossible to estimate reliable DRGs costs through clinical costing. A cost modelling approach estimates the average cost of 2.723 million Rials (Iranian Currency) per DRG. Using standard linear regression, a coefficient of 0.14 (CI = 0.12-0.16) suggests that the average cost weight increases by 14% for every one-day increase in average length of stay (LOS).We concluded that calculation of DRG cost weights (CWs) using Australian service weights provides a sensible starting place for DRG-based hospital management; but restructuring hospital accounting systems, designing computerized feeder systems, using appropriate software, and development of national service weights that reflect local practice patterns will enhance the accuracy of DRG CWs.

  9. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  10. The hospital costs of treating work-related sawmill injuries in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Tompa, Emile; Koehoorn, Mieke; Ostry, Aleck; Demers, Paul A

    2007-05-01

    This study estimates the hospital costs of treating work-related injury among a cohort of sawmill workers in British Columbia. Hospital discharge records were extracted from 1989 to 1998 for a cohort of 5,876 actively employed sawmill workers. Injury cases were identified as work-related from these records using ICD-9 external cause of injury codes that indicate place of occurrence and the responsibility of payment schedule that identifies workers' compensation as being responsible for payment. The hospitals in British Columbia have a standard ward rate chart prepared annually by the provincial Ministry of Health to bill and collect payment from agency like workers' compensation agency. Costs were calculated from the hospital perspective using this billing chart. All costs were expressed in 1995 Canadian dollars. The workers' compensation claim records for this study population were extracted and matched with the hospitalised work-related injury records. Costs were also calculated for work-related hospitalisations that the hospital did not appear to be reimbursed for by the workers' compensation system. There were 173 injuries requiring hospitalisation during the 10-year followup period. The median stay in hospitals was 3 days and the median hospital costs were $847. The most costly cause of injury categories were fire, flame, natural and environmental and struck against with median costs of $10,575 and $1,206, respectively, while the least costly category was cutting and piercing with median costs of $296. The most costly nature of injury categories were burns and fracture of lower limb with median costs of $10,575 and $1,800, respectively, while the least costly category was dislocation, sprains and strains with median costs of $437. The total hospital costs for all the work-related injuries were $434,990. Out of a total hospital cost of $434,990 for the 173 work-related injuries, the provincial compensation agency apparently did not compensate $50,663 (12

  11. The economic cost of hospital malnutrition in Europe; a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari-Soltani, Saman; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Malnutrition among hospitalized patients increases length of stay (LOS) and carries extra hospitalization costs. To review the impact of malnutrition on hospital LOS and costs in Europe. PubMed and Google Scholar search. All articles from January 2004 until November 2014 were identified. Reference lists of relevant articles were also manually searched. Ten studies on LOS and nine studies on costs were reviewed. The methods used to assess malnutrition and to calculate costs differed considerably between studies. Malnutrition led to an increased LOS ranging from 2.4 to 7.2 days. Among hospitalized patients, malnutrition led to an additional individual cost ranging between 1640 € and 5829 €. At the national level, the costs of malnutrition ranged between 32.8 million € and 1.2 billion €. Expressed as percentage of national health expenditures, the values ranged between 2.1% and 10%. In Europe, malnutrition leads to an increase in LOS and in hospital costs, both at the individual and the national level. Standardization of methods and results reported is needed to adequately compare results between countries. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rentabilidad de un hospital de día: análisis de actividad, coste y eficacia Profitability of a day hospital: analysis of activity, cost and effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Hernando Ortiz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El hospital de día supone una alternativa asistencial a la hospitalización convencional. Durante el año 2009 se realizó un análisis del funcionamiento y la rentabilidad del hospital de día del Hospital Clínico de Valladolid, España. Expresamos la rentabilidad como la prestación de una idéntica cobertura sanitaria a un menor coste generado respecto a la hospitalización convencional y cumpliendo unos indicadores de calidad. Métodos: Estudio de tipo retrospectivo, transversal, observacional y descriptivo, sobre la información obtenida de cada paciente atendido en el hospital de día, entre el 1 de enero y el 31 de diciembre de 2009. Se determinaron cuatro indicadores de calidad: la determinación de la cancelación de sesiones, la tasa de reacciones transfusionales, el índice de ambulatorización y el índice de satisfacción. El ahorro estimado de cada proceso atendido resulta de la diferencia del coste medio por proceso en hospitalización menos el coste medio del proceso en hospital de día. Resultados: La patología más prevalente fueron las enfermedades sistémicas y del tejido conectivo, que representan el 25,4%; de ellas, el 17,1% corresponde a artritis reumatoide. La satisfacción global de los pacientes es del 93%, la cancelación de sesiones y la tasa de reacciones transfusionales fue del 0%, y el índice de ambulatorización de un 26%. Los costes del hospital de día representan el 8,6% de los costes generados en la hospitalización convencional, con un ahorro de 78.390,69 euros. Conclusión: El hospital de día es rentable, debido al ahorro generado respecto a la hospitalización convencional, a la vez que consigue unos adecuados índices de calidad.Objective: Day hospitals are an alternative to conventional hospital care. We analyzed the functioning and profitability of the day hospital of Hospital Clínico de Valladolid, Spain, in 2009. Profitability is expressed as the provision of identical health coverage

  13. Impact of self-financed rotavirus vaccines on hospital stays and costs in Spain after a 3-year introductory period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-González, O; Tenías-Burillo, J M; Ruiz-Gonzalo, J

    2017-07-01

    Vaccination has reduced rotavirus hospitalizations by 25% in European regions with low-moderate vaccine availability. We aimed to quantify the reduction in hospital costs after the longest period in which Rotarix® and Rotateq® were simultaneously commercially available in Spain. Cases, length of stay (LOS), and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) were retrieved from the Minimum Basic Data Set. Healthcare expenditure was estimated through the cost accounting system Gescot®. DRGs were clustered: I, non-bacterial gastroenteritis with complications; II, without complications; III, requiring surgical/other procedures or neonatal cases (highest DRG weights). Comparisons between pre (2003-2005)- and post-vaccine (2007-2009) hospital stays and costs by DRG group were made. Rotaviruses were the most common agents of specific-coded gastroenteritis (N = 1657/5012). LOS and extended LOS of rotaviruses fell significantly in 2007-2009 (β-coefficient = -0·43, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) -0·68 to -0·17; and odds ratio 0·62, 95% CI 0·50-0·76, respectively). Overall, costs attributable to rotavirus hospitalizations fell approximately €244 per patient (95% CI -365 to -123); the decrease in DRG group III was €2269 per patient (95% CI -4098 to -380). We concluded modest savings in hospital costs, largely attributable to cases with higher DRG weights, and a faster recovery. A universal rotavirus vaccination program deserves being re-evaluated, regarding its potential high impact on both at-risk children and societal costs.

  14. Assessing the impact of privatizing public hospitals in three American states: implications for universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Stefano; Kane, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Many countries with universal health systems have relied primarily on publicly-owned hospitals to provide acute care services to covered populations; however, many policymakers have experimented with expansion of the private sector for what they hope will yield more cost-effective care. The study provides new insight into the effects of hospital privatization in three American states (California, Florida, and Massachusetts) in the period 1994 to 2003, focusing on three aspects: 1) profitability; 2) productivity and efficiency; and 3) benefits to the community (particularly, scope of services offered, price level, and impact on charity care). For each variable analyzed, we compared the 3-year mean values pre- and postconversion. Pre- and postconversion changes in hospitals' performance were then compared with a nonequivalent comparison group of American public hospitals. The results of our study indicate that following privatization, hospitals increased operating margins, reduced their length of stay, and enjoyed higher occupancy, but at some possible cost to access to care for their communities in terms of higher price markups and loss of beneficial but unprofitable services. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Template matching for auditing hospital cost and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; Ross, Richard N; Ludwig, Justin M; Wang, Wei; Niknam, Bijan A; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Saynisch, Philip A; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Kelz, Rachel R; Fleisher, Lee A

    2014-10-01

    Develop an improved method for auditing hospital cost and quality. Medicare claims in general, gynecologic and urologic surgery, and orthopedics from Illinois, Texas, and New York between 2004 and 2006. A template of 300 representative patients was constructed and then used to match 300 patients at hospitals that had a minimum of 500 patients over a 3-year study period. From each of 217 hospitals we chose 300 patients most resembling the template using multivariate matching. The matching algorithm found close matches on procedures and patient characteristics, far more balanced than measured covariates would be in a randomized clinical trial. These matched samples displayed little to no differences across hospitals in common patient characteristics yet found large and statistically significant hospital variation in mortality, complications, failure-to-rescue, readmissions, length of stay, ICU days, cost, and surgical procedure length. Similar patients at different hospitals had substantially different outcomes. The template-matched sample can produce fair, directly standardized audits that evaluate hospitals on patients with similar characteristics, thereby making benchmarking more believable. Through examining matched samples of individual patients, administrators can better detect poor performance at their hospitals and better understand why these problems are occurring. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. A new costing model in hospital management: time-driven activity-based costing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öker, Figen; Özyapıcı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cost systems cause cost distortions because they cannot meet the requirements of today's businesses. Therefore, a new and more effective cost system is needed. Consequently, time-driven activity-based costing system has emerged. The unit cost of supplying capacity and the time needed to perform an activity are the only 2 factors considered by the system. Furthermore, this system determines unused capacity by considering practical capacity. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the efficiency of the time-driven activity-based costing system and to display how it can be applied in a health care institution. A case study was conducted in a private hospital in Cyprus. Interviews and direct observations were used to collect the data. The case study revealed that the cost of unused capacity is allocated to both open and laparoscopic (closed) surgeries. Thus, by using the time-driven activity-based costing system, managers should eliminate the cost of unused capacity so as to obtain better results. Based on the results of the study, hospital management is better able to understand the costs of different surgeries. In addition, managers can easily notice the cost of unused capacity and decide how many employees to be dismissed or directed to other productive areas.

  17. [Cost-effectiveness of two hospital care schemes for psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevárez-Sida, Armando; Valencia-Huarte, Enrique; Escobedo-Islas, Octavio; Constantino-Casas, Patricia; Verduzco-Fragoso, Wázcar; León-González, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico, six of every twenty Mexicans suffer psychiatric disorders at some time in their lives. This disease ranks fifth in the country. The objective was to determine and compare the cost-effectiveness of two models for hospital care (partial and traditional) at a psychiatric hospital of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). a multicenter study with a prospective cohort of 374 patients was performed. We made a cost-effectiveness analysis from an institutional viewpoint with a six-month follow-up. Direct medical costs were analyzed, with quality of life gains as outcome measurement. A decision tree and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis were used. patient care in the partial model had a cost 50 % lower than the traditional one, with similar results in quality of life. The cost per successful unit in partial hospitalization was 3359 Mexican pesos while in the traditional it increased to 5470 Mexican pesos. treating patients in the partial hospitalization model is a cost-effective alternative compared with the traditional model. Therefore, the IMSS should promote the infrastructure that delivers the psychiatric services to the patient attending to who requires it.

  18. Medical costs, Cesarean delivery rates, and length of stay in specialty hospitals vs. non-specialty hospitals in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ju Kim

    Full Text Available Since 2011, specialty hospitals in South Korea have been known for providing high- quality care in specific clinical areas. Much research related to specialty hospitals and their performance in many such areas has been performed, but investigations about their performance in obstetrics and gynecology are lacking. Thus, we aimed to compare specialty vs. non-specialty hospitals with respect to mode of obstetric delivery, especially the costs and length of stay related to Cesarean section (CS procedures, and to provide evidence to policy-makers for evaluating the success of hospitals that specialize in obstetric and gynecological (OBGYN care.We obtained National Health Insurance claim data from 2012 to 2014, which included information from 418,141 OBGYN cases at 214 hospitals. We used a generalized estimating equation model to identify a potential association between the likelihood of CS at specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals. We also evaluated medical costs and length of stay in specialty hospitals according to type of delivery.We found that 150,256 (35.9% total deliveries were performed by CS. The odds ratio of CS was significantly lower in specialty hospitals (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.96compared to other hospitals Medical costs (0.74% and length of stay (1% in CS cases increased in specialty hospitals, although length of stay following vaginal delivery was lower (0.57% in specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals.We determined that specialty hospitals are significantly associated with a lower likelihood of CS delivery and shorter length of stay after vaginal delivery. Although they are also associated with higher costs for delivery, the increased cost could be due to the high level of intensive care provided, which leads to improve quality of care. Policy-makers should consider incentive programs to maintain performance of specialty hospitals and promote efficiency that could reduce medical costs accrued by patients.

  19. Hospitalization stay and costs attributable to Clostridium difficile infection: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, L; Beriot-Mathiot, A

    2014-09-01

    In most healthcare systems, third-party payers fund the costs for patients admitted to hospital for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) whereas, for CDI cases arising as complications of hospitalization, not all related costs are refundable to the hospital. We therefore aimed to critically review and categorize hospital costs and length of hospital stay (LOS) attributable to Clostridium difficile infection and to investigate the economic burden associated with it. A comprehensive literature review selected papers describing the costs and LOS for hospitalized patients as outcomes of CDI, following the use of statistics to identify costs and LOS solely attributable to CDI. Twenty-four studies were selected. Estimated attributable costs, all ranges expressed in US dollars, were $6,774-$10,212 for CDI requiring admission, $2,992-$29,000 for hospital-acquired CDI, and $2,454-$12,850 where no categorization was made. The ranges for LOS values were 5-13.6, 2.7-21.3, and 2.8-17.9 days, respectively. The categorization of CDI attributable costs allows budget holders to anticipate the cost per CDI case, a perspective that should enrich the design of appropriate incentives for the various budget holders to invest in prevention so that CDI prevention is optimized globally. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does Prescription Drug Adherence Reduce Hospitalizations and Costs?

    OpenAIRE

    William Encinosa; Didem Bernard; Avi Dor

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the impact of diabetic drug adherence on hospitalizations, ER visits, and hospital costs, using insurance claims from MarketScan® employer data. However, it is often difficult to measure the impact of drug adherence on hospitalizations since both adherence and hospitalizations may be correlated with unobservable patient severity. We control for such unobservables using propensity score methods and instrumental variables for adherence such as drug coinsurance levels and direct-to- ...

  1. Cost and utilisation of hospital based delivery care in Empowered Action Group (EAG) states of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2013-10-01

    Large scale investment in the National Rural Health Mission is expected to increase the utilization and reduce the cost of maternal care in public health centres in India. The objective of this paper is to examine recent trends in the utilization and cost of hospital based delivery care in the Empowered Action Group (EAG) states of India. The unit data from the District Level Household Survey 3, 2007-2008 is used in the analyses. The coverage and the cost of hospital based delivery at constant price is analyzed for five consecutive years preceding the survey. Descriptive and multivariate analyses are used to understand the socio-economic differentials in cost and utilization of delivery care. During 2004-2008, the utilization of delivery care from public health centres has increased in all the eight EAG states. Adjusting for inflation, the household cost of delivery care has declined for the poor, less educated and in public health centres in the EAG states. The cost of delivery care in private health centres has not shown any significant changes across the states. Results of the multivariate analyses suggest that time, state, place of residence, economic status; educational attainment and delivery characteristics of mother are significant predictors of hospital based delivery care in India. The study demonstrates the utility of public spending on health care and provides a thrust to the ongoing debate on universal health coverage in India.

  2. Hospital cost of Clostridium difficile infection including the contribution of recurrences in French acute-care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Monnier, A; Duburcq, A; Zahar, J-R; Corvec, S; Guillard, T; Cattoir, V; Woerther, P-L; Fihman, V; Lalande, V; Jacquier, H; Mizrahi, A; Farfour, E; Morand, P; Marcadé, G; Coulomb, S; Torreton, E; Fagnani, F; Barbut, F

    2015-10-01

    The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on healthcare costs is significant due to the extra costs of associated inpatient care. However, the specific contribution of recurrences has rarely been studied. The aim of this study was to estimate the hospital costs of CDI and the fraction attributable to recurrences in French acute-care hospitals. A retrospective study was performed for 2011 on a sample of 12 large acute-care hospitals. CDI costs were estimated from both hospital and public insurance perspectives. For each stay, CDI additional costs were estimated by comparison to controls without CDI extracted from the national DRG (diagnosis-related group) database and matched on DRG, age and sex. When CDI was the primary diagnosis, the full cost of stay was used. A total of 1067 bacteriological cases of CDI were identified corresponding to 979 stays involving 906 different patients. Recurrence(s) were identified in 118 (12%) of these stays with 51.7% of them having occurred within the same stay as the index episode. Their mean length of stay was 63.8 days compared to 25.1 days for stays with an index case only. The mean extra cost per stay with CDI was estimated at €9,575 (median: €7,514). The extra cost of CDI in public acute-care hospitals was extrapolated to €163.1 million at the national level, of which 12.5% was attributable to recurrences. The economic burden of CDI is substantial and directly impacts healthcare systems in France. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic cost shifting in hospitals: evidence from the 1980s and 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J P

    The purpose of this paper is to determine whether dynamic cost shifting occurred among acute care hospitals during the period from the early 1980s to the early 1990s and, if so, whether market factors affected the ability to shift costs. Evidence from this study of California acute care hospitals during three time intervals shows that the hospital did practice dynamic cost shifting, but that their ability to shift costs decreased over time. Surprisingly, hospital competition and HMO penetration did not influence cost shifting. However, increasing HMO penetration (measured as the HMO percentage of hospital discharges) did decrease both net prices and costs for the early part of the study, but later was associated with increases in both.

  4. Humans, 'things' and space: costing hospital infection control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, K; Graves, N; Halton, K; Barnett, A G

    2013-07-01

    Previous attempts at costing infection control programmes have tended to focus on accounting costs rather than economic costs. For studies using economic costs, estimates tend to be quite crude and probably underestimate the true cost. One of the largest costs of any intervention is staff time, but this cost is difficult to quantify and has been largely ignored in previous attempts. To design and evaluate the costs of hospital-based infection control interventions or programmes. This article also discusses several issues to consider when costing interventions, and suggests strategies for overcoming these issues. Previous literature and techniques in both health economics and psychology are reviewed and synthesized. This article provides a set of generic, transferable costing guidelines. Key principles such as definition of study scope and focus on large costs, as well as pitfalls (e.g. overconfidence and uncertainty), are discussed. These new guidelines can be used by hospital staff and other researchers to cost their infection control programmes and interventions more accurately. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hospital Costs of Foreign Non-Resident Patients: A Comparative Analysis in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Borrell, Elena; Renart-Vicens, Gemma; Saez, Marc; Carreras, Marc

    2017-09-14

    Although patient mobility has increased over the world, in Europe there is a lack of empirical studies. The aim of the study was to compare foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients for the particular Catalan case, focusing on patient characteristics, hospitalisation costs and differences in costs depending on the typology of the hospital they are treated. We used data from the 2012 Minimum Basic Data Set-Acute Care hospitals (CMBD-HA) in Catalonia. We matched two case-control groups: first, foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients and, second, foreign non-resident patients treated by Regional Public Hospitals versus other type of hospitals. Hospitalisation costs were modelled using a GLM Gamma with a log-link. Our results show that foreign non-resident patients were significantly less costly than domestic patients (12% cheaper). Our findings also suggested differences in the characteristics of foreign non-resident patients using Regional Public Hospitals or other kinds of hospitals although we did not observe significant differences in the healthcare costs. Nevertheless, women, 15-24 and 35-44 years old patients and the days of stay were less costly in Regional Public Hospitals. In general, acute hospitalizations of foreign non-resident patients while they are on holiday cost substantially less than domestic patients. The typology of hospital is not found to be a relevant factor influencing costs.

  6. Positioning matrix of economic efficiency and complexity: a case study in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Adelaide; Viggiani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    At the end of 2010, the Federico II University Hospital in Naples, Italy, initiated a series of discussions aimed at designing and applying a positioning matrix to its departments. This analysis was developed to create a tool able to extract meaningful information both to increase knowledge about individual departments and to inform the choices of general management during strategic planning. The name given to this tool was the positioning matrix of economic efficiency and complexity. In the matrix, the x-axis measures the ratio between revenues and costs, whereas the y-axis measures the index of complexity, thus showing "profitability" while bearing in mind the complexity of activities. By using the positioning matrix, it was possible to conduct a critical analysis of the characteristics of the Federico II University Hospital and to extract useful information for general management to use during strategic planning at the end of 2010 when defining medium-term objectives. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The determinants of hospital cost: a cost-volume-profit analysis of health services in the occupied territories: Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mustafa Z; Jaber, Samer; Smith, Pamela C; Hartmann, Michael; Bongyu, Moye

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the unit costs of a multi-service hospital in Palestine for the period 2005-2007. We investigate the cost structure of the Rafidya Hospital located in Nablus city, for both inpatient and outpatient departments. This study uses cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis, also known as breakeven analysis. CVP analysis requires examining total costs, along with fixed and variable costs. CVP analysis illuminates how changes in assumptions about cost behaviour and the relevant range in which those assumptions are valid affect the relationships among revenues, variable costs and fixed costs at various production levels. For the hospital of interest, we find that fixed costs account for 70% of total costs, and variable costs were 30% of total costs. Inpatient departments accounted for 86% of total costs, and outpatient departments were 14% of total costs. Results of the breakeven analysis illustrate that several departments charge sufficient fees to cover all unit costs. Results provide useful information about unit cost based on four categories: (1) unit cost per admission of each department, (2) unit cost per patient day of each department, (3) unit cost per admission with annual capital cost of each department and (4) unit cost per patient day with annual capital cost. Our results provide hospital cost information that can be used by decision-makers to provide and expand healthcare services, in an effort to increase sustainability and profitability. The use of cost analysis by administrators and regulators will improve the quality of financial information, as well as enhance the efficient use of scarce resources.

  8. New indicators based on personnel cost for management efficiency in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2011-08-01

    A simple and fair benchmarking system or financial indicators for use on the clinical department level have been lacking to evaluate the management efficiency and activity of each clinical department or division of a hospital. New financial indicators have therefore been developed based on personnel costs. Indicator 1: The ratio of marginal profit after personnel cost per personnel cost (RMP). Indicator 2: The ratio of investment (=indirect cost) per personnel cost (RIP). The difference between RMP and RIP demonstrates the operation profit in US Dollars for personnel cost (OPP). A turning point in profitability similar to the break-even point (BEP) and break-even ratio (BER) could be also defined by the combination of the RMP and RIP. The merits of these two indicators are not only the ability to indicate the relationship between the medical profit and the investments in the hospital, but also the capability to demonstrate such indicators as BEP, BER and OPP on a single graph. The two indicators were applied to the hospitals in the National Hospital Organization and to the clinical department in one hospital. Using these two indicators, it was possible to evaluate the management efficiency and medical activity not only in the whole hospital but also in each department and DPC/DRG group. This will be of use to a manager of a hospital in checking the management efficiency of his/her hospital despite the variations among hospitals, departments and divisions.

  9. Econometric estimation of country-specific hospital costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Christopher JL

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on the unit cost of inpatient and outpatient care is an essential element for costing, budgeting and economic-evaluation exercises. Many countries lack reliable estimates, however. WHO has recently undertaken an extensive effort to collect and collate data on the unit cost of hospitals and health centres from as many countries as possible; so far, data have been assembled from 49 countries, for various years during the period 1973–2000. The database covers a total of 2173 country-years of observations. Large gaps remain, however, particularly for developing countries. Although the long-term solution is that all countries perform their own costing studies, the question arises whether it is possible to predict unit costs for different countries in a standardized way for short-term use. The purpose of the work described in this paper, a modelling exercise, was to use the data collected across countries to predict unit costs in countries for which data are not yet available, with the appropriate uncertainty intervals. The model presented here forms part of a series of models used to estimate unit costs for the WHO-CHOICE project. The methods and the results of the model, however, may be used to predict a number of different types of country-specific unit costs, depending on the purpose of the exercise. They may be used, for instance, to estimate the costs per bed-day at different capacity levels; the "hotel" component of cost per bed-day; or unit costs net of particular components such as drugs. In addition to reporting estimates for selected countries, the paper shows that unit costs of hospitals vary within countries, sometimes by an order of magnitude. Basing cost-effectiveness studies or budgeting exercises on the results of a study of a single facility, or even a small group of facilities, is likely to be misleading.

  10. Transfusion practice in Helsinki University Central Hospital: an analysis of diagnosis-related groups (DRG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjälä, M T; Kytöniemi, I; Mikkolainen, K; Ranimo, J; Lauharanta, J

    2001-12-01

    Transfusion data combined with data automatically recorded in hospital databases provides an outstanding tool for blood utilization reporting. When the reporting is performed with an online analytical processing (OLAP) tool, real time reporting can be provided to blood subscribers. When this data is combined with a common patient classification system, Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG), it is possible to produce statistical results, that are similar in different institutions and may provide a means for international transfusion bench-marking and cost comparison. We use a DRG classification to describe the transfusion practice in Helsinki University Central Hospital. The key indicators include the percentage of transfused patients, the number of transfused units and costs in different DRG groups, as well as transfusion rates per DRG weighted treatment episodes. Ninety-three per cent of all transfusions could be classified into different DRGs. The largest blood-using DRG group was acute adult leukaemia (DRG 473), which accounted for 10.4% of all transfusion costs. The 13 largest blood consuming DRGs accounted for half the total costs in 1998. Currently, there is a lack of an internationally accepted standardized way to report institutional or national transfusion practices. DRG-based transfusion reporting might serve as a means for transfusion benchmarking and thus aid studies of variations in transfusion practice.

  11. Cost-Analysis of Seven Nosocomial Outbreaks in an Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H; Dinkelacker, Ariane G; Vemer, Pepijn; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Lokate, Mariëtte; Sinha, Bhanu; Friedrich, Alex W; Postma, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-)resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study sets out to provide a comparable overview of the costs of multiple outbreaks in a single academic hospital in the Netherlands. Based on interviews with the involved staff, multiple databases and stored records from the Infection Prevention Division all actions undertaken, extra staff employment, use of resources, bed-occupancy rates, and other miscellaneous cost drivers during different outbreaks were scored and quantified into Euros. This led to total costs per outbreak and an estimated average cost per positive patient per outbreak day. Seven outbreaks that occurred between 2012 and 2014 in the hospital were evaluated. Total costs for the hospital ranged between €10,778 and €356,754. Costs per positive patient per outbreak day, ranged between €10 and €1,369 (95% CI: €49-€1,042), with a mean of €546 and a median of €519. Majority of the costs (50%) were made because of closed beds. This analysis is the first to give a comparable overview of various outbreaks, caused by different microorganisms, in the same hospital and all analyzed with the same method. It shows a large variation within the average costs due to different factors (e.g. closure of wards, type of ward). All outbreaks however cost considerable amounts of efforts and money (up to €356,754), including missed revenue and control measures.

  12. Cost-Analysis of Seven Nosocomial Outbreaks in an Academic Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem H Dik

    Full Text Available Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study sets out to provide a comparable overview of the costs of multiple outbreaks in a single academic hospital in the Netherlands.Based on interviews with the involved staff, multiple databases and stored records from the Infection Prevention Division all actions undertaken, extra staff employment, use of resources, bed-occupancy rates, and other miscellaneous cost drivers during different outbreaks were scored and quantified into Euros. This led to total costs per outbreak and an estimated average cost per positive patient per outbreak day.Seven outbreaks that occurred between 2012 and 2014 in the hospital were evaluated. Total costs for the hospital ranged between €10,778 and €356,754. Costs per positive patient per outbreak day, ranged between €10 and €1,369 (95% CI: €49-€1,042, with a mean of €546 and a median of €519. Majority of the costs (50% were made because of closed beds.This analysis is the first to give a comparable overview of various outbreaks, caused by different microorganisms, in the same hospital and all analyzed with the same method. It shows a large variation within the average costs due to different factors (e.g. closure of wards, type of ward. All outbreaks however cost considerable amounts of efforts and money (up to €356,754, including missed revenue and control measures.

  13. Pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization costs of patients with neurocysticercosis treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN in Mexico City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Bhattarai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to estimate the direct costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC during pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization periods for 108 NCC patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN in Mexico City, Mexico. Information on clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, hospitalizations, surgical procedures, prescription medication, and other treatments was collected via medical chart reviews. Uncertain values for costs and frequency of treatments were imputed using bootstrap techniques. The average per-patient pre-hospitalization and hospitalization costs were US$ 257 (95% CI: 185 – 329 and US$ 2,576 (95% CI: 2,244 – 2,908, respectively. Post-hospitalization costs tended to decrease over time, with estimates for the first five years post-hospitalization of US$ 475 (95% CI: 423 – 527, US$ 228 (95% CI: 167 – 288, US$ 157 (95% CI: 111 – 202, US$ 150 (95% CI: 106 – 204, and US$ 91 (95% CI: 27 – 154, respectively. NCC results in a significant economic burden for patients requiring hospitalization, with this burden continuing years post-hospitalization.

  14. Cost variation in diabetes care delivered in English hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Laudicella, Mauro; Ejersted, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    are transferred between hospitals, suffer infections and other complications, or for those who die in hospital. Even so, around 8-9% of the variation in costs is related to the hospital in which the patient is treated, with geographical variation in factor prices being the prime reason for this variation...

  15. The impact of reducing intensive care unit length of stay on hospital costs: evidence from a tertiary care hospital in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jessica; Kobewka, Daniel; Thavorn, Kednapa; D'Egidio, Gianni; Rosenberg, Erin; Kyeremanteng, Kwadwo

    2018-02-23

    To use theoretical modelling exercises to determine the effect of reduced intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) on total hospital costs at a Canadian centre. We conducted a retrospective cost analysis from the perspective of one tertiary teaching hospital in Canada. Cost, demographic, clinical, and LOS data were retrieved through case-costing, patient registry, and hospital abstract systems of The Ottawa Hospital Data Warehouse for all new in-patient ward (30,483) and ICU (2,239) encounters between April 2012 and March 2013. Aggregate mean daily variable direct (VD) costs for ICU vs ward encounters were summarized by admission day number, LOS, and cost centre. The mean daily VD cost per ICU patient was $2,472 (CAD), accounting for 67.0% of total daily ICU costs per patient and $717 for patients admitted to the ward. Variable direct cost is greatest on the first day of ICU admission ($3,708), and then decreases by 39.8% to plateau by the fifth day of admission. Reducing LOS among patients with ICU stays ≥ four days could potentially result in an annual hospital cost saving of $852,146 which represents 0.3% of total in-patient hospital costs and 1.2% of ICU costs. Reducing ICU LOS has limited cost-saving potential given that ICU costs are greatest early in the course of admission, and this study does not support the notion of reducing ICU LOS as a sole cost-saving strategy.

  16. Developing marketing strategies for university teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D J

    1980-07-01

    University teaching hospitals face increasing competition from community hospitals, expanding regulation of health care, a rising tide of consumerism, and in many cases a declining urban population base. These problems, which may threaten the teaching hospital's ability to continue tertiary care, teaching, and research functions, may be solved with the aid of new marketing strategies. In developing its marketing strategy, a hospital must assess its strengths and weaknesses, specify its goals in measurable terms, implement tactics to achieve these goals, and evaluate its marketing program. The strategies should be directed toward achieving better relationships with institutions, practitioners, and surrounding communities and increasing patient, visitor, and employee satisfaction. A wide variety of programs can be used to reach these goals and to help teaching hospitals meet the competitive challenges of this decade.

  17. Real money: complications and hospital costs in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmila, Mark R; Jakubus, Jill L; Maggio, Paul M; Wahl, Wendy L; Dimick, Justin B; Campbell, Darrell A; Taheri, Paul A

    2008-08-01

    Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, duration of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected for 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004-2005). Patients were placed in 1 of 3 groups: no complications (none), >or=1 minor complication (minor, eg, urinary tract infection), or >or=1 major complication (major, eg, pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and duration of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost-accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, sex, new injury severity score, Glasgow coma scale score, maximum head abbreviated injury scale, and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. A total of 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had >or= 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had >or= 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, P = .7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day compared to the no complication group ($2,168, P costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (P costs associated with traumatic injury provides a window for assessing the potential cost reductions associated with improved quality care. To optimize system benefits, payers and providers should develop integrated

  18. Direct hospital costs of total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared with fast-track open hysterectomy at a tertiary hospital: a retrospective case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhou, Yoon J J; Pather, Selvan; Loadsman, John A; Campbell, Neil; Philp, Shannon; Carter, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    To assess the direct intraoperative and postoperative costs in women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy and fast-track open hysterectomy. A retrospective review of the direct hospital-related costs in a matched cohort of women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) and fast-track open hysterectomy (FTOH) at a tertiary hospital. All costs were calculated, including the cost of advanced high-energy laparoscopic devices. The effect of the learning curve on cost in laparoscopic hysterectomy was also assessed, as was the hospital case-weighted cost, which was compared with the actual cost. Fifty women were included in each arm of the study. TLH had a higher intraoperative cost, but a lower postoperative cost than FTOH (AUD$3877 vs AUD$2776 P funding model in our hospital is inaccurate when compared to directly calculated hospital costs. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  19. EVALUATION OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BY RATIO ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda BÜLÜÇ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the financial performances of public university hospitals in Turkey; make contribution to the related literature in accordance with the findings and develop recommendations for the decision makers. Within the scope of the study, financial statements of revolving fund of the 43 public university hospitals for the years of 2013, 2014 and 2015 were obtained from the Ministry of Finance General Directorate of Public Accounts. Financial statements were evaluated by ratio analysis method. After analysing, it has been reached that the burden of debt of the hospitals were high,  they have been experiencing the problem of paying short term debts, stock turnover rates and turnover rates were low and the incomes of the hospitals can not cover their expenses. It is recomended that hospitals should use resources more efficiently and decision makers should consider education and research activities in budget allocation to university hospitals.

  20. Extreme Markup: The Fifty US Hospitals With The Highest Charge-To-Cost Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Anderson, Gerard F

    2015-06-01

    Using Medicare cost reports, we examined the fifty US hospitals with the highest charge-to-cost ratios in 2012. These hospitals have markups (ratios of charges over Medicare-allowable costs) approximately ten times their Medicare-allowable costs compared to a national average of 3.4 and a mode of 2.4. Analysis of the fifty hospitals showed that forty-nine are for profit (98 percent), forty-six are owned by for-profit hospital systems (92 percent), and twenty (40 percent) operate in Florida. One for-profit hospital system owns half of these fifty hospitals. While most public and private health insurers do not use hospital charges to set their payment rates, uninsured patients are commonly asked to pay the full charges, and out-of-network patients and casualty and workers' compensation insurers are often expected to pay a large portion of the full charges. Because it is difficult for patients to compare prices, market forces fail to constrain hospital charges. Federal and state governments may want to consider limitations on the charge-to-cost ratio, some form of all-payer rate setting, or mandated price disclosure to regulate hospital markups. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  1. Cost Accounting as a Possible Solution for Financial Sustainability of Croatian Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dražić Lutilsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the current usage of cost accounting methodology in Croatian public hospitals through conducted empirical research and to provide opinions of accountants and financial officers regarding possible implementation of cost accounting methodology in public hospitals. In the paper, the authors analyze the accounting system in Croatian public hospitals, identifying the flaws of the current accounting system with regard to the recording and allocation of costs. National healthcare systems of different European countries provide a theoretical background for the usage of accrual accounting basis and cost accounting methodologies, showing better governance and financial sustainability of public hospitals which have introduced cost accounting methodology. The conducted empirical research shows that accountants and financial officers believe that the healthcare system in Croatia is ready for a change in the current accounting system based on the modified accrual basis through the implementation of accrual accounting basis and full costing approach to cost allocation. Full costing approach is also known as activity-based accounting method for cost allocation. The authors also recommend some initial steps for implementation of the new cost accounting system in Croatian public hospitals.

  2. Cost-benefit analysis of telehealth in pre-hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Alqusairi, Diaa; Kim, Junghyun; Jackson, Adria; Persse, David; Gonzalez, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Objective There has been very little use of telehealth in pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), yet the potential exists for this technology to transform the current delivery model. In this study, we explore the costs and benefits of one large telehealth EMS initiative. Methods Using a case-control study design and both micro- and gross-costing data from the Houston Fire Department EMS electronic patient care record system, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) comparing costs with potential savings associated with patients treated through a telehealth-enabled intervention. The intervention consisted of telehealth-based consultation between the 911 patient and an EMS physician, to evaluate and triage the necessity for patient transport to a hospital emergency department (ED). Patients with non-urgent, primary care-related conditions were then scheduled and transported by alternative means to an affiliated primary care clinic. We measured CBA as both total cost savings and cost per ED visit averted, in US Dollars ($USD). Results In total, 5570 patients were treated over the first full 12 months with a telehealth-enabled care model. We found a 6.7% absolute reduction in potentially medically unnecessary ED visits, and a 44-minute reduction in total ambulance back-in-service times. The average cost for a telehealth patient was $167, which was a statistically significantly $103 less than the control group ( p cost savings from the societal perspective, or $2468 cost savings per ED visit averted (benefit). Conclusion Patient care enabled by telehealth in a pre-hospital environment, is a more cost effective alternative compared to the traditional EMS 'treat and transport to ED' model.

  3. Estimating the unit costs of public hospitals and primary healthcare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mustafa Z; Jaber, Samer; Mawson, Anthony R; Hartmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many factors have affected the rise of health expenditures, such as high-cost medical technologies, changes in disease patterns and increasing demand for health services. All countries allocate a significant portion of resources to the health sector. In 2008, the gross domestic product of Palestine was estimated to be at $6.108bn (current price) or about $1697 per capita. Health expenditures are estimated at 15.6% of the gross domestic product, almost as much as those of Germany, Japan and other developed countries. The numbers of hospitals, hospital beds and primary healthcare centers in the country have all increased. The Ministry of Health (MOH) currently operates 27 of 76 hospitals, with a total of 3074 beds, which represent 61% of total beds of all hospitals in the Palestinian Authorities area. Also, the MOH is operating 453 of 706 Primary Health Care facilities. By 2007, about 40 000 people were employed in different sectors of the health system, with 33% employed by the MOH. This purpose of this study was to develop a financing strategy to help cover some or all of the costs involved in operating such institutions and to estimate the unit cost of primary and secondary programs and departments. A retrospective study was carried out on data from government hospitals and primary healthcare centers to identify and analyze the costs and output (patient-related services) and to estimate the unit cost of health services provided by hospitals and PHCs during the year 2008. All operating costs are assigned and allocated to the departments at MOH hospitals and primary health care centers (PPHCs) and are identified as overhead departments, intermediate-service and final-service departments. Intermediate-service departments provide procedures and services to patients in the final-service departments. The costs of the overhead departments are distributed to the intermediate-service and final-service departments through a step-down method, according to allocation

  4. The impact of HMO penetration on the rate of hospital cost inflation, 1985-1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that growth in health maintenance organization (HMO) enrollment slows hospital cost inflation. During the period 1985-1993, hospitals in areas with high rates of HMO penetration and growth had a slower rate of growth in expenses (8.3%) than hospitals in low penetration areas (11.2%). From 1992-1993, HMO growth lowered the rate of hospital cost inflation by .34 to 3.40 percentage points, depending on the base-year level and the annual change in HMO penetration. Declines in Medicare Prospective Payment System (PPS) margins also lowered hospital cost inflation; over the time period, annual hospital cost inflation was reduced by .38 percentage points. The estimates imply that the cumulative effect of HMO growth on hospital costs has been a $56.2 billion reduction (in 1993 dollars).

  5. Performance Based Supplementary Payment System at University Hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahit YÝÐÝT

    2017-06-01

    Results: The result of the analysis has revealed that PBSP system encourage physicians who would like to receive financial incentives. PBSP system supports the individual performance, reduces waiting times in patients, increases revenues and decreases expenditures and increases in efficiency of department. However, this payment system increases work load, number of examinations and provokes the conflict among personals. Conclusions: University hospitals are academic institutions that perform important missions such as research, medical education and health services provision. Therefore, PBSP system should be revised so as to encourage performing these missions at university hospitals. There is also shortage of financial resources at the university hospitals. This situation leads to less additional payments to physicians. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(2.000: 126-131

  6. The cost of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in hospital in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Petrosillo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The cost of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in hospital in ItalyObjectiveTo describe characteristics, resource utilization and cost for patients experiencing a primary episode of CDI and recurrent CDI.MethodsA retrospective observational cohort study was conducted. CDI data were collected with an electronic case report form (CRF from five Hospitals in Italy. Hospitals collected all resource use attributable to CDI during the period 2011-2014. All resource use from initial presentation to the healthcare provider for CDI symptoms, until resolution of infection attributable to CDI in each enrolled patient was included. The patient cohort was analysed both as a whole and in stratified subgroups (by age, gender and co-morbidities. The impact of CDI on hospital length of stay (LOS was used to calculate CDI-attributable costs. The total cost of a CDI episode was estimated by multiplying each resource used by its unit cost (national tariffs and market prices; finally, the mean cost/patient was calculated across the cohort.ResultsIn total, data were collected for 488 adult infected patients (mean age 76.0 years [SD ± 15.48]; female 56.6%. Five hundred and three (503 episodes were evaluated (mean number per patient: 1.03 [SD ± 0.23]. LOS attributable to CDI was 14.6 days (SD ± 13.14. Attributable cost per adult patient was €10,224.08 (SD ± €8,963.86, with the majority of the cost being due to hospitalization. The mean cost of a recurrent episode of CDI was €9,504.87 [SD ± €8,614.11].ConclusionsThese findings show that the economic burden of CDI is considerable in Italy. The most important cost driver was the LOS attributable to CDI.

  7. A cost-analysis model for anticoagulant treatment in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Samir H; Huynh, Lynn; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Tran, Kevin N; Lefebvre, Patrick; Bookhart, Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Rivaroxaban is the first oral factor Xa inhibitor approved in the US to reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots among people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT), treat pulmonary embolism (PE), reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE, and prevent DVT and PE after knee or hip replacement surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the costs from a hospital perspective of treating patients with rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents across these five populations. An economic model was developed using treatment regimens from the ROCKET-AF, EINSTEIN-DVT and PE, and RECORD1-3 randomized clinical trials. The distribution of hospital admissions used in the model across the different populations was derived from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. The model compared total costs of anticoagulant treatment, monitoring, inpatient stay, and administration for patients receiving rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents. The length of inpatient stay (LOS) was determined from the literature. Across all populations, rivaroxaban was associated with an overall mean cost savings of $1520 per patient. The largest cost savings associated with rivaroxaban was observed in patients with DVT or PE ($6205 and $2742 per patient, respectively). The main driver of the cost savings resulted from the reduction in LOS associated with rivaroxaban, contributing to ∼90% of the total savings. Furthermore, the overall mean anticoagulant treatment cost was lower for rivaroxaban vs the reference groups. The distribution of patients across indications used in the model may not be generalizable to all hospitals, where practice patterns may vary, and average LOS cost may not reflect the actual reimbursements that hospitals received. From a hospital perspective, the use of rivaroxaban may be associated with cost savings when compared to other anticoagulant treatments due to lower drug cost and shorter LOS associated with

  8. Teleradiology and PACS - strategy of the Innsbruck University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, R.

    2005-01-01

    Systems for management of digital imaging data are very important and widespread at the Innsbruck University Hospital and constitute a central component of the IT strategies followed by the hospital operating company TILAK (Tyrolean public hospitals). The particular goal is to integrate all imaging data into the electronic medical records and make these available online to each of the approx. 2500 clinic workstations and ensure electronic data exchange with other healthcare services. Teleradiology connections have been established at the University Clinic for Radiology since 1995; these have been continually expanded and linked to the central PACS. An eHealth web portal was recently established to facilitate transfer of images and findings from TILAK hospitals to other healthcare organizations. Registered users can be cleared for a limited time to access all radiological imaging data via this web portal. (orig.) [de

  9. Consultation clinics for complementary and alternative medicine at Japanese university hospitals: An analysis at Tokushima University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGAWA, HIROAKI; TERAO, JUNJI; TAKEDA, EIJI; TAKAISHI, YOSHIHISA; KASHIWADA, YOSHIKI; KAWAZOE, KAZUYOSHI; FUSHITANI, SHUJI; TSUCHIYA, KOICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, AIKO; SATO, CHIHO; IRAHARA, MINORU

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report on a Consultation Clinic for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) which we established at Tokushima University Hospital in July of 2007 with the aim of providing person-to-person information on CAM, though not CAM therapy itself. In December of 2008, we received 55 applications for consultation, 37% concerning health foods, 37% Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo), and 26% various other topics. The consultants (nutritionists and pharmacists) communicated individually with 38 applicants; malignancies (26%) and cardiovascular disease (24%) were the main underlying concerns. To promote the quality of consultation, data was collected by means of focus group interviews concerning the perspective of the consultants. Safe and effective use of CAM requires a network of communication linking individuals, consultation teams, physicians, primary care institutions and university hospitals. To advance this goal, we plan to broaden the efforts described herein. Our findings indicate that the specific role of the consultation clinic in promoting the scientific use of CAM merits further study. PMID:22993564

  10. Direct costs associated with the appropriateness of hospital stay in elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-García Sergio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing of Mexican population implies greater demand of hospital services. Nevertheless, the available resources are used inadequately. In this study, the direct medical costs associated with the appropriateness of elderly populations hospital stay are estimated. Methods Appropriateness of hospital stay was evaluated with the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP. Direct medical costs associated with hospital stay under the third-party payer's institutional perspective were estimated, using as information source the clinical files of 60 years of age and older patients, hospitalized during year 2004 in a Regional Hospital from the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, in Mexico City. Results The sample consisted of 724 clinical files, with a mean of 5.3 days (95% CI = 4.9–5.8 of hospital stay, of which 12.4% (n = 90 were classified with at least one inappropriate patient day, with a mean of 2.2 days (95% CI = 1.6 – 2.7. The main cause of inappropriateness days was the inexistence of a diagnostic and/or treatment plan, 98.9% (n = 89. The mean cost for an appropriate hospitalization per patient resulted in US$1,497.2 (95% CI = US$323.2 – US$4,931.4, while the corresponding mean cost for an inappropriate hospitalization per patient resulted in US$2,323.3 (95% CI = US$471.7 – US$6,198.3, (p Conclusion Elderly patients who were inappropriately hospitalized had a higher rate of inappropriate patient days. The average of inappropriate patient days cost is considerably higher than appropriate days. In this study, inappropriate hospital-stay causes could be attributable to physicians and current organizational management.

  11. Hospital cost-containment strategies that earn the respect of rating agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopoulos, Jason

    2016-01-01

    To confirm that hospitals have the necessary structures and strategies in place to reduce costs and secure future market share, credit rating agencies analyze a variety of quantitative and qualitative criteria, including: Salaries and benefits, bad debt, age of plant and depreciation, and other line items that may point to inefficiencies in a hospital's expense structure. Cost-benefit analyses, strategic plans, and leadership qualities that show the long-term value of expense cuts, capital investments, and mergers and acquisitions. Cost-effective and clinically appropriate shifts in a hospital's outpatient-to-inpatient ratio. Liquidity and market share.

  12. Hospital cost and quality performance in relation to market forces: an examination of U.S. community hospitals in the "post-managed care era".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Friedman, Bernard; Jiang, Shenyi

    2013-03-01

    Managed care substantially transformed the U.S. healthcare sector in the last two decades of the twentieth century, injecting price competition among hospitals for the first time in history. However, total HMO enrollment has declined since 2000. This study addresses whether managed care and hospital competition continued to show positive effects on hospital cost and quality performance in the "post-managed care era." Using data for 1,521 urban hospitals drawn from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we examined hospital cost per stay and mortality rate in relation to HMO penetration and hospital competition between 2001 and 2005, controlling for patient, hospital, and other market characteristics. Regression analyses were employed to examine both cross-sectional and longitudinal variation in hospital performance. We found that in markets with high HMO penetration, increase in hospital competition over time was associated with decrease in mortality but no change in cost. In markets without high HMO penetration, increase in hospital competition was associated with increase in cost but no change in mortality. Overall, hospitals in high HMO penetration markets consistently showed lower average costs, and hospitals in markets with high hospital competition consistently showed lower mortality rates. Hospitals in markets with high HMO penetration also showed lower mortality rates in 2005 with no such difference found in 2001. Our findings suggest that while managed care may have lost its strength in slowing hospital cost growth, differences in average hospital cost associated with different levels of HMO penetration across markets still persist. Furthermore, these health plans appear to put quality of care on a higher priority than before.

  13. [Costs of chronic dialysis in a public hospital: myths and realities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, J; Alonso, M; Saavedra, J; García-Trío, G; Rionda, M; Ameijeiras, M

    2001-01-01

    In this study regular dialysis treatment costs during 1998 and 1999 in a public hospital, which is responsible for a population of 178,000, has been analysed. Hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) costs have been differentiated and compared with those of external providers. The best technical and productive efficiency of both treatments have been estimated by analyzing the "treatment cost/human resources of the community utilized" relationship. The HD treatment costs per patient per year were 20,343 and 18,871 euros in 1988 and 1,999, respectively, lower than the costs reported in other studies. In 1999 these costs were similar to those of external providers and lower than the PD treatment costs (23,295 euros). HD retains its advantage even after costs of erythropoietin, hospital admissions and transport are included. In the hospital studied, the best technical efficiency in HD would be reached with 64 patients on treatment (17,851 euros per patient per year) and in PD with 48 patients (21,167 euros per patient per year). If we take into account our population characteristics and consider a patient distribution of 70% on HD and 30% on PD, the best productive efficiency would be reached with 56 patients on HD (17,916 euros per patient per year) and 24 patients on PD (21,813 euros per patient per year). HD confers the greatest economic and social benefits on the population supplied by the hospital since it provides the community with more jobs than PD in relation to treatment costs while the two yield the same clinical results. In conclusion, HD in a public hospital, at least in our environment, may be efficient and competitive with HD from external providers and it may be more efficient and provide a bigger economic and social profit for the population serviced by the hospital than PD, at least while the current supply systems for this treatment in our country are maintained.

  14. Cost Cutting in Hospitals. Innovative Methods & Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Pandit, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging need of hospitals to address efficiency issues confronting health care reforms in the present environment. The main objective is to investigate the cost efficiency of hospitals using various methods and variables, and compare the results estimated by the different methods and variables. Reinforcing a common agenda between medical, paramedical and administrative staff, and sharing a common vision among professionals and decision makers in the planning of care, may be the grea...

  15. An analysis of the adoption of managerial innovation: cost accounting systems in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glandon, G L; Counte, M A

    1995-11-01

    The adoption of new medical technologies has received significant attention in the hospital industry, in part, because of its observed relation to hospital cost increases. However, few comprehensive studies exist regarding the adoption of non-medical technologies in the hospital setting. This paper develops and tests a model of the adoption of a managerial innovation, new to the hospital industry, that of cost accounting systems based upon standard costs. The conceptual model hypothesizes that four organizational context factors (size, complexity, ownership and slack resources) and two environmental factors (payor mix and interorganizational dependency) influence hospital adoption of cost accounting systems. Based on responses to a mail survey of hospitals in the Chicago area and AHA annual survey information for 1986, a sample of 92 hospitals was analyzed. Greater hospital size, complexity, slack resources, and interorganizational dependency all were associated with adoption. Payor mix had no significant influence and the hospital ownership variables had a mixed influence. The logistic regression model was significant overall and explained over 15% of the variance in the adoption decision.

  16. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and

  17. Development of a practical costing method for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengyu; Toyabe, Shin-Ichi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2006-03-01

    To realize an effective cost control, a practical and accurate cost accounting system is indispensable in hospitals. In traditional cost accounting systems, the volume-based costing (VBC) is the most popular cost accounting method. In this method, the indirect costs are allocated to each cost object (services or units of a hospital) using a single indicator named a cost driver (e.g., Labor hours, revenues or the number of patients). However, this method often results in rough and inaccurate results. The activity based costing (ABC) method introduced in the mid 1990s can prove more accurate results. With the ABC method, all events or transactions that cause costs are recognized as "activities", and a specific cost driver is prepared for each activity. Finally, the costs of activities are allocated to cost objects by the corresponding cost driver. However, it is much more complex and costly than other traditional cost accounting methods because the data collection for cost drivers is not always easy. In this study, we developed a simplified ABC (S-ABC) costing method to reduce the workload of ABC costing by reducing the number of cost drivers used in the ABC method. Using the S-ABC method, we estimated the cost of the laboratory tests, and as a result, similarly accurate results were obtained with the ABC method (largest difference was 2.64%). Simultaneously, this new method reduces the seven cost drivers used in the ABC method to four. Moreover, we performed an evaluation using other sample data from physiological laboratory department to certify the effectiveness of this new method. In conclusion, the S-ABC method provides two advantages in comparison to the VBC and ABC methods: (1) it can obtain accurate results, and (2) it is simpler to perform. Once we reduce the number of cost drivers by applying the proposed S-ABC method to the data for the ABC method, we can easily perform the cost accounting using few cost drivers after the second round of costing.

  18. Smoking, depression, and hospital costs of respiratory cancers: Examining race and sex variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baqar A. Husaini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of smoking and depression on hospital costs for lung cancer (LC. Methods: We extracted data on depression, smoking history, demographics, and hospital charges for patients with respiratory cancers (ICD-9 codes 161–163, 165 from the 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharge Data System. The sample (n=6665 was mostly white (86% and male (57%. Age-adjusted rates were developed in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention methods, and hospital costs were compared for patients with LC with versus without depression and a smoking history. Results: Three findings (P<0.001 emerged: (1 the LC rate was higher among blacks than among whites, and higher among men than among women; (2 while 66% of LC patients smoked (more men than women without racial variation, 24% had depression (more females and whites were depressed; (3 the LC hospital cost was 54% higher than the non-LC hospital cost, and this cost doubled for patients with LC with depression and smoking versus those without such characteristics. Conclusion: While LC is more prevalent among blacks and men, depression is higher among female and white patients. Since depression with higher costs existed among LC patients, our findings point to (1 the possibility of cost savings by diagnosing and treating depression among LC patients, and (2 implementation of proven smoking cessation programs to reduce LC morbidity and hospital costs.

  19. The costs of HIV/AIDS care at government hospitals in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Chapman, Glyn; Chitsike, Inam

    2000-01-01

    and care of HIV/AIDS patients in health facilities is necessary in order to have an idea of the likely costs of the increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, the present study estimated the costs per in-patient day as well as per in-patient stay for patients in government health facilities...... of the study indicate that hospital care for HIV/AIDS patients was considerably higher than for non-HIV/AIDS patients. In five of the seven hospitals visited, the average costs of an in-patient stay for an HIV/AIDS patient were found to be as much as twice as high as a non-HIV/AIDS patient. This difference...... could be attributed to higher direct costs per in-patient day (medication, laboratory tests and X-rays) as well as longer average lengths of stay in hospital for HIV/AIDS patients compared with non-infected patients. Therefore, the impact on hospital services of increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients...

  20. [Cost of intensive care in a German hospital: cost-unit accounting based on the InEK matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Neurohr, C; Bauer, M; Weiss, M; Schleppers, A

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the actual cost per intensive care unit (ICU) day in Germany based on routine data from an electronic patient data management system as well as analysis of cost-driving factors. A differentiation between days with and without mechanical ventilation was performed. On the ICU of a German focused-care hospital (896 beds, 12 anesthesiology ICU beds), cost per treatment day was calculated with or without mechanical ventilation from the perspective of the hospital. Costs were derived retrospectively with respect to the period between January and October 2006 by cost-unit accounting based on routine data collected from the ICU patients. Patients with a length of stay of at least 2 days on the ICU were included. Demographic, clinical and economical data were analyzed for patient characterization. Data of 407 patients (217 male and 190 female) were included in the analysis, of which 159 patients (100 male, 59 female) were completely or partially mechanically ventilated. The mean simplified acute physiology (SAPS) II score at the onset of ICU stay was 28.2. Average cost per ICU day was 1,265 EUR and costs for ICU days with and without mechanical ventilation amounted to 1,426 EUR and 1,145 EUR, respectively. Personnel costs (50%) showed the largest cost share followed by drugs plus medicinal products (18%) and infrastructure (16%). For the first time, a cost analysis of intensive care in Germany was performed with routine data based on the matrix of the institute for reimbursement in hospitals (InEK). The results revealed a higher resource use on the ICU than previously expected. The large share of personnel costs on the ICU was evident but is comparable to other medical departments in the hospital. The need for mechanical ventilation increases the daily costs of resources by approximately 25%.

  1. Economic analysis of an epilepsy outreach model of care in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Eimer; McGinty, Ronan N; Costello, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability is higher than in the general population and prevalence rates increase with increasing levels of disability. Prevalence rates of epilepsy are highest among those living in residential care. The healthcare needs of people with intellectual disability and epilepsy are complex and deserve special consideration in terms of healthcare provision and access to specialist epilepsy clinics, which are usually held in acute hospital campuses. This patient population is at risk of suboptimal care because of significant difficulties accessing specialist epilepsy care which is typically delivered in the environs of acute hospitals. In 2014, the epilepsy service at Cork University Hospital established an Epilepsy Outreach Service providing regular, ambulatory outpatient follow up at residential care facilities in Cork city and county in an effort to improve access to care, reduce the burden and expense of patient and carer travel to hospital outpatient appointments, and to provide a dedicated specialist phone service for epilepsy related queries in order to reduce emergency room visits when possible. We present the findings of an economic analysis of the outreach service model of care compared to the traditional hospital outpatient service and demonstrate significant cost savings and improved access to care with this model. Ideally these cost savings should be used to develop novel ways to enhance epilepsy care for persons with disability. We propose that this model of care can be more suitable for persons with disability living in residential care who are at risk of losing access to specialist epilepsy care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hospital costs estimation and prediction as a function of patient and admission characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiarina, Robert; Almeida, Renan Mvr; Pereira, Wagner Ca

    2008-01-01

    The present work analyzed the association between hospital costs and patient admission characteristics in a general public hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The unit costs method was used to estimate inpatient day costs associated to specific hospital clinics. With this aim, three "cost centers" were defined in order to group direct and indirect expenses pertaining to the clinics. After the costs were estimated, a standard linear regression model was developed for correlating cost units and their putative predictors (the patients gender and age, the admission type (urgency/elective), ICU admission (yes/no), blood transfusion (yes/no), the admission outcome (death/no death), the complexity of the medical procedures performed, and a risk-adjustment index). Data were collected for 3100 patients, January 2001-January 2003. Average inpatient costs across clinics ranged from (US$) 1135 [Orthopedics] to 3101 [Cardiology]. Costs increased according to increases in the risk-adjustment index in all clinics, and the index was statistically significant in all clinics except Urology, General surgery, and Clinical medicine. The occupation rate was inversely correlated to costs, and age had no association with costs. The (adjusted) per cent of explained variance varied between 36.3% [Clinical medicine] and 55.1% [Thoracic surgery clinic]. The estimates are an important step towards the standardization of hospital costs calculation, especially for countries that lack formal hospital accounting systems.

  3. Cost analysis of inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents: hospital and caregiver perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Matthew; Katzman, Debra K.; Akseer, Nadia; Steinegger, Cathleen; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Coyte, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Admission to hospital is the treatment of choice for anorexia nervosa in adolescent patients who are medically unstable; however, stays are often prolonged and frequently disrupt normal adolescent development, family functioning, school and work productivity. We sought to determine the costs of inpatient treatment in this population from a hospital and caregiver perspective, and to identify determinants of such costs. Methods We used micro-costing methods for this cohort study involving all adolescent patients (age 12–18 yr) admitted for treatment of anorexia nervosa at a tertiary care child and adolescent eating disorder program in Toronto, between Sept. 1, 2011, and Mar. 31, 2013. We used hospital administrative data and Canadian census data to calculate hospital and caregiver costs. Results We included 73 adolescents in our cohort for cost-analysis. We determined a mean total hospital cost in 2013 Canadian dollars of $51 349 (standard deviation [SD] $26 598) and a mean total societal cost of $54 932 (SD $27 864) per admission, based on a mean length of stay of 37.9 days (SD 19.7 d). We found patient body mass index (BMI) to be the only significant negative predictor of hospital cost (p adolescents with anorexia nervosa on hospitals and caregivers is substantial, especially among younger patients and those with lower BMI. Recognizing the symptoms of eating disorders early may preclude the need for admission to hospital altogether or result in admissions at higher BMIs, thereby potentially reducing these costs. PMID:26389097

  4. Activity-Based Costing (ABC and Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing (TDABC: Applicable Methods for University Libraries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate-Riin Kont

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This article provides an overview of how university libraries research and adapt new cost accounting models, such as “activity-based costing” (ABC and “time-driven activity-based costing” (TDABC, focusing on the strengths and weaknesses of both methods to determine which of these two is suitable for application in university libraries.Methods – This paper reviews and summarizes the literature on cost accounting and costing practices of university libraries. A brief overview of the history of cost accounting, costing, and time and motion studies in libraries is also provided. The ABC and the TDABC method, designed as a revised and easier version of the ABC by Kaplan and Anderson (Kaplan & Anderson 2004 at the beginning of the 21st century, as well as the adoption and adaptation of these methods by university libraries are described, and their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their suitability for university libraries, are analyzed. Results – Cost accounting and costing studies in libraries have a long history, the first of these dating back to 1877. The development of cost accounting and time and motion studies can be seen as a natural evolution of techniques which were created to solve management problems. The ABC method is the best-known management accounting innovation of the last 20 years, and is already widely used in university libraries around the world. However, setting up an ABC system can be very costly, and the system needs to be regularly updated, which further increases its costs. The TDABC system can not only be implemented more quickly (and thus more cheaply, but also can be updated more easily than the traditional ABC, which makes the TDABC the more suitable method for university libraries.Conclusion – Both methods are suitable for university libraries. However, the ABC method can only be implemented in collaboration with an accounting department. The TDABC method can be tested and implemented by

  5. Review of thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients attending Cork University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen; Weaver, Daniel Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Although preventable, venous thromboembolism remains a common cause of hospital acquired morbidity and mortality. Guidelines, such as the one produced by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), are aimed at reducing hospital associated venous thromboemboli. Unfortunately the majority of studies have revealed inadequate adherence to these guidelines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis at Cork University Hospital. Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. Data from the patient's chart, drug kardex and laboratory results were recorded during April 2010. A Caprini score, a venous thromboembolism risk factor assessment tool, was subsequently calculated for each patient based on data collected. Appropriate prophylaxis was determined after examining data collected, Caprini score and prophylactic regime according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines. Primary outcome was to analyse adherence to VTE prophylaxis guidelines. A total of 394 patients met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed, of which, 60% (n = 236) were medical and 37% (n = 146) were surgical patients. In total 63% of patients received some form of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Furthermore, 54% of medical and 76% of surgical patients received prophylaxis. However only 37% of the patients studied received appropriate thromboprophylaxis according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). Additionally 51% of surgical and 27% of medical patients received appropriate prophylaxis. Data collected from Cork University Hospital revealed poor adherence to international venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines. As stated in the ACCP 8th edition guidelines, every hospital should develop a formal strategy for venous thromboembolism prevention (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). In order to improve adherence to guidelines, Cork University Hospital should develop, implement and

  6. Cost Accounting and Analysis for University Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuhler, Ferdinand F.; Cooper, Michael D.

    The approach to library planning studied in this report is the use of accounting models to measure library costs and implement program budgets. A cost-flow model for a university library is developed and listed with historical data from the Berkeley General Library. Various comparisons of an exploratory nature are made of the unit costs for…

  7. Risk of malnutrition of hospitalized children in a university public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Esparza, Nelly Carolina; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to demonstrate that the duration of hospitalization has a significant effect on the nutritional status of children treated in a university hospital. A longitudinal study was conducted during 2014, with a non-random sampling site concentration in children from birth to 19 years who were admitted to the hospital in the past 24 hours and who met the inclusion criteria and had signed informed consent. Upon entering, at 7 days, and at discharge, anthropometric indices, including weight/age, height/age, weight/height, BMI/age, head circumference/age, triceps and subscapular skin folds, and fat percentage, were obtained. Student's t-test, U Mann-Whitney, ANOVA, chi square, Wilcoxon, and odds ratios were used to analyze the data. In total, 206 patients were included: 40% infants, 25% preschoolers, 15% schoolchildren, and 20% teenagers. Infants had a significant improvement from admission to discharge in the indices weight/length (p = 0.042) and BMI (p = 0.002); adolescents showed decreased BMI from admission to discharge from the hospital (p = 0.05). Patients with longer hospitalization (more than 10 days) had an increased deficit in anthropometric indices at admission (p malnutrition and require greater monitoring of nutritional status during hospitalization.

  8. The Real Cost of "Cosmetic Tourism" Cost Analysis Study of "Cosmetic Tourism" Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Ryan; Berlund, Paul; Eccles-Smith, Jade; Sawhney, Raja

    2015-01-01

    "Cosmetic Tourism," the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Our aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from "cosmetic tourism" and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve "cosmetic tourism" patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis. The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The "cosmetic tourism" model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad. This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

  9. [Clinical and economic analysis of an internal medicine-infectious disease department at a university general hospital (2005-2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Joaquín; García-Vázquez, Elisa; Antonio Puertas, José; Ródenas, Julio; Herrero, José Antonio; Albaladejo, Carmen; Baños, Víctor; Canteras, Manuel; Alcaraz, Manolo

    2009-02-01

    Comparative study in patients with infectious diseases admitted to a specialized Internal Medicine-Infectious Diseases Department (IMID) versus those admitted to other medical departments in a university general hospital, investigating quality and cost-effectiveness. Analysis of patients in 10 principle diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) of infectious diseases admitted to the IMID were compared to those admitted to other medical departments (2005-2006). The DRG were divided in 4 main groups: respiratory infections (DGR 88, 89, 90, 540), urinary infections (DRG 320, 321), sepsis (DRG 416, 584), and skin infections (DRG 277, 278). For each group, quality variables (mortality and readmission rate), efficacy variables (mean hospital stay and mean DRG-based cost per patient) and complexity variables (case mix, relative weight, and functional index) were analyzed. 542 patients included in the 10 main infectious disease DRGs were admitted to IMID and 2404 to other medical departments. After adjusting for DRG case mix (case mix 0.99 for IMID and 0.89 for others), mean hospital stay (5.11 days vs. 7.65 days), mortality (3.5% vs. 7.9%) and mean DRG-based economic cost per patient (1521euro/patient vs. 2952euro/patient) was significantly lower in the group of patients hospitalized in IMID than the group in other medical departments (peconomic cost per patient. Creation and development of IMID departments should be an essential objective to improve healthcare quality and respond to social demands.

  10. Association of Hospital Costs With Complications Following Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Luke V; Gennarelli, Renee L; Schnorr, Geoffrey C; Solomon, Stephen B; Schattner, Mark A; Elkin, Elena B; Bach, Peter B; Strong, Vivian E

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative complications are associated with increased hospital costs following major surgery, but the mechanism by which they increase cost and the categories of care that drive this increase are poorly described. To describe the association of postoperative complications with hospital costs following total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma. This retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected gastric cancer surgery database at a single National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center included all patients undergoing curative-intent total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2009 and December 2012 and was conducted in 2015 and 2016. Ninety-day normalized postoperative costs. Hospital accounting system costs were normalized to reflect Medicare reimbursement levels using the ratio of hospital costs to Medicare reimbursement and categorized into major cost categories. Differences between costs in Medicare proportional dollars (MP $) can be interpreted as the amount that would be reimbursed to an average hospital by Medicare if it paid differentially based on types and extent of postoperative complications. In total, 120 patients underwent curative-intent total gastrectomy for stage I through III gastric adenocarcinoma between 2009 and 2012. Of these, 79 patients (65.8%) were men, and the median (interquartile range) age was 64 (52-70) years. The 51 patients (42.5%) who underwent an uncomplicated total gastrectomy had a mean (SD) normalized cost of MP $12 330 (MP $2500), predominantly owing to the cost of surgical care (mean [SD] cost, MP $6830 [MP $1600]). The 34 patients (28.3%) who had a major complication had a mean (SD) normalized cost of MP $37 700 (MP $28 090). Surgical care was more expensive in these patients (mean [SD] cost, MP $8970 [MP $2750]) but was a smaller contributor to total cost (24%) owing to increased costs from room and board (mean [SD] cost, MP $11 940 [MP $8820]), consultations (mean [SD

  11. Optimizing diagnostic workup in the DRG environment: Dynamic algorithms and minimizing radiologic costs may cost your hospital money

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Louis, L.A.; Henschke, C.I.; Balter, S.; Whalen, J.P.; Balter, P.

    1987-01-01

    In certain diagnosis-related group (DRG) categories, the availability of sufficient CT scanners or of new equipment, such as MR equipment, can expedite the definitive workup. This will reduce the average length of stay and hospital cost. We analyzed the total hospital and radiologic charges by DRG category for all patients admitted to our hospital in 1985 and 1986. Although the cost per procedure is relatively high, the radiologic component is a small percentage of total hospital costs (median, 3%; maximum, <10%). The authors developed alternative diagnostic algorithms for radiologic-intensive DRG categories. Different diagnostic algorithms proposed for the same clinical problems were compared analytically in terms of impact on the hospital (cost, equipment availability, and length of stay). An example is the workup for FUO. Traditional approach uses plain x-rays and gallium scans and only uses CT when localizing symptoms are present. An alternative approach is to perform CT only. Although more CT examinations would be required, there is considerable reduction in the length of hospital stay and in overall charges. Neurologic and thoracic workups will be given as examples of classes or problems that can be addressed analytically: sequencing of the workup; prevalence; patient population; resource of allocation; and introduction of new imaging modality

  12. Health care costs associated with hospital acquired complications in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlouli, Babak; Jackson, Terri; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Klarenbach, Scott

    2017-12-28

    Patients with CKD are at increased risk of potentially preventable hospital acquired complications (HACs). Understanding the economic consequences of preventable HACs, may define the scope and investment of initiatives aimed at prevention. Adult patients hospitalized from April, 2003 to March, 2008 in Alberta, Canada comprised the study cohort. Healthcare costs were determined and categorized into 'index hospitalization' including hospital cost and in-hospital physician claims, and 'post discharge' including ambulatory care cost, physician claims, and readmission costs from discharge to 90 days. Multivariable regression was used to estimate the incremental healthcare costs associated with potentially preventable HACs. In fully adjusted models, the median incremental index hospitalization cost was CAN-$6169 (95% CI; 6003-6336) in CKD patients with ≥1 potentially preventable HACs, compared with those without. Post-discharge incremental costs were 1471(95% CI; 844-2099) in those patients with CKD who developed potentially preventable HACs within 90 days after discharge compared with patients without potentially preventable HACs. Additionally, the incremental costs associated with ≥1 potentially preventable HACs within 90 days from admission in patients with CKD were $7522 (95% CI; 7219-7824). A graded relation of the incremental costs was noted with the increasing number of complications. In patients without CKD but with ≥1 preventable HACs incremental costs within 90 days from hospital admission was $6688 (95% CI: 6612-6723). Potentially preventable HACs are associated with substantial increases in healthcare costs in people with CKD. Investment in implementing targeted strategies to reduce HACs may have a significant benefit for patient and health system outcomes.

  13. Complementary effect of patient volume and quality of care on hospital cost efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong Hoon; Park, Imsu; Jung, Ilyoung; Dey, Asoke

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the direct effect of an increase in patient volume in a hospital and the complementary effect of quality of care on the cost efficiency of U.S. hospitals in terms of patient volume. The simultaneous equation model with three-stage least squares is used to measure the direct effect of patient volume and the complementary effect of quality of care and volume. Cost efficiency is measured with a data envelopment analysis method. Patient volume has a U-shaped relationship with hospital cost efficiency and an inverted U-shaped relationship with quality of care. Quality of care functions as a moderator for the relationship between patient volume and efficiency. This paper addresses the economically important question of the relationship of volume with quality of care and hospital cost efficiency. The three-stage least square simultaneous equation model captures the simultaneous effects of patient volume on hospital quality of care and cost efficiency.

  14. Hospitals' vertical integration into skilled nursing: a rational approach to controlling transaction costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, S; Shore, K K

    1998-01-01

    Using 1985 and 1988 American Hospital Association data, this study examines 1,523 hospitals nationwide and concludes that hospitals' ownership of skilled nursing facilities helps minimize the transaction costs associated with post-acute patient transfers while productively using empty hospital beds. Unfortunately, such ownership creates complex cost, quality, and accessibility trade-offs in terms of the skilled nursing care provided.

  15. Hospital payroll costs, productivity, and employment under prospective reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, D; Sullivan, D

    1982-12-01

    This paper reports preliminary findings from the National Hospital Rate-Setting Study regarding the effects of State prospective reimbursement (PR) programs on measures of payroll costs and employment in hospitals. PR effects were estimated through reduced-form equations, using American Hospital Association Annual Survey data on over 2,700 hospitals from 1969 through 1978. These tests suggest that hospitals responded to PR by lowering payroll expenditures. PR also seems to have been associated with reductions in full-time equivalent staff per adjusted inpatient day. However, tests did not confirm the hypothesis that hospitals reduce payroll per full-time equivalent staff as a result of PR.

  16. Hospital Costs Of Extracorporeal Life Support Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lansink-Hartgring, Annemieke; van den Hengel, Berber; van der Bij, Wim; Erasmus, Michiel E.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Rienstra, Michiel; Cernak, Vladimir; Vermeulen, Karin M.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    Objectives: To conduct an exploration of the hospital costs of extracorporeal life support therapy. Extracorporeal life support seems an efficient therapy for acute, potentially reversible cardiac or respiratory failure, when conventional therapy has been inadequate, or as bridge to transplant, but

  17. An essential hospital package for South Africa--selection criteria, costs and affordability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, N

    1999-07-01

    In 1995 the Committee of Enquiry into National Health Insurance (NHI) recommended that formally employed individuals and their employers be required to fund at least a minimum package of hospital cover for workers and their dependents. This has recently been echoed in a Department of Health policy paper on social health insurance. This research aims to define and cost a minimum package of essential hospital care for competing (public and private) health insurers in South Africa. CRITERIA FOR PACKAGE DEFINITION: Based on the objectives implict in the NHI Committee report, the following criteria were used to define the essential package: (i) the extent to which there was another appropriate responsible party who should pay for treatment; (ii) the degree of discretion in deciding whether or not to provide treatment (roughly equivalent to 'urgency'); and (iii) the cost and effectiveness of treatment. On the basis of the above criteria, 396 out of 598 possible interventions were included in the package. Using local mine hospital and private sector utilisation rates and mine hospital cost data, it was estimated that the essential inpatient package would cost around R502 per enrollee per year, using 1998 prices, for a working age population and their dependents. Age-sex standardised outpatient care costs in the mine hospital population studied were estimated at R183 per person per year. It was therefore estimated that the total inpatient and outpatient hospital package would cost around R685 per person per year. The results presented in this paper are intended to inform the process of defining a national essential hospital benefit package. Assuming that contributions were proportionally related to income, and that costs should not exceed 6% of wages, the package should be affordable to all of those earning above R20,000 per year. Significant additional work is required, firstly at a technical level to assess the appropriateness of the prioritization approach used here

  18. Hospital costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. Buisman (Leander); S.S. Tan (Siok Swan); P.J. Nederkoorn (Paul); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); W.K. Redekop (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractObjectives: There have been no ischemic stroke costing studies since major improvements were implemented in stroke care. We therefore determined hospital resource use and costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands for 2012. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cost

  19. Cost implication of irrational prescribing of chloroquine in Lagos State general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, Bolajoko A; Tayo, Fola; Taylor, Ogori

    2008-02-01

    A major share of the hospital budget is spent on drugs. Irrational use of these drugs is a waste of financial and human resources that could have been deployed for another use within the hospital setting especially in cases where such drugs are provided free to patients. Also there is increased morbidity and progression of severity with irrational use. The objective of this study was to determine the irrational use of chloroquine and the subsequent cost implications in Lagos State general hospitals. A retrospective study period of one year (January to December, 2000) was selected. A total of 18,781 prescription forms of "Free Eko Malaria" were sampled for children and adults from all the Lagos State general hospitals. Drug costs in each prescription form were identified. Cost effectiveness analysis of chloroquine tablet and intramuscular injection was undertaken. The average cost of medicine per prescription was 132.071 ($1.03) which should have been 94.22 ($0.73) if prescribed rationally. The total cost of prescriptions for malaria under study was 2,480,425.00 ($19,348.09). About 68% {(1,679,444.00) ($13,100.19)} of the total cost was lost to irrational prescribing. This is a waste of scarce resources. When the prescriptions were differentiated into the different dosage forms prescribed, the prescriptions containing intramuscular injections only had over 90% of the cost lost to irrational prescribing. Cost effectiveness analysis showed that chloroquine tablet was 17 times more cost effective than chloroquine injection (intramuscular) from a health care system perspective while it was 14 times more cost effective from a patient perspective. There is waste of scarce resources with irrational dispensing of drugs and these resources could have been deployed to other uses or areas within the hospitals. The tablet chloroquine was more cost effective than injection chloroquine (intramuscular). Increasing the cost of tablets, decreasing effectiveness of tablets

  20. [Evaluation of financial status of public hospitals considering the updated costs of their services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid P, Camilo; Bastías S, Gabriel

    2014-02-01

    In 2011 the Chilean National Health Fund (FONASA) commissioned a study to assess the costs of the 120 most relevant hospital care services with an established fee, in a large sample of public hospitals. We herein report the cost evaluation results of such study, considering the financial condition of those hospitals in the year of the study. Based on the premise that the expenses derived from the provision of institutional and appraised hospital services should be identical to the billing of hospitals to FONASA, the prices are undervalued, since they cover only 56% of billing, generating a gap between expenses and invoicing. This gap shows an important limitation of tariffs, since their prices do not cover the real costs. However not all hospitals behave in the same way. While the provision of services of some hospitals is even higher than their billing, most hospitals do not completely justify their invoicing. These assumptions would imply that, generally speaking, hospital debts are justified by the costs incurred. However, hospitals have heterogeneous financial situations that need to be analyzed carefully. In particular, nothing can be said about their relative efficiency if cost estimations are not adjusted by the complexity of patients attended and comparison groups are not defined.

  1. Implementation of Continuous Video-Electroencephalography at a Community Hospital Enhances Care and Reduces Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolls, Brad J; Mace, Brian E; Dombrowski, Keith E

    2017-10-24

    Despite data indicating the importance of continuous video-electroencephalography (cvEEG) monitoring, adoption has been slow outside major academic centers. Barriers to adoption include the need for technologists, equipment, and cvEEG readers. Advancements in lower-cost lead placement templates and commercial systems with remote review may reduce barriers to allow community centers to implement cvEEG. Here, we report our experience, lessons learned, and financial impact of implementing a community hospital cvEEG-monitoring program. We implemented an adult cvEEG service at Duke Regional Hospital (DRH), a community hospital affiliate, in June of 2012. Lead placement templates were used in the implementation to reduce the impact on technologists by using other bedside providers for EEG initiation. Utilization of the service, study quality, and patient outcomes were tracked over a 3-year period following initiation of service. Service was implemented at essentially no cost. Utilization varied from a number of factors: intensive care unit (ICU) attending awareness, limited willingness of bedside providers to perform lead placement, and variation in practice of the consulting neurologists. A total of 92 studies were performed on 88 patients in the first 3 years of the program, 24 in year one, 27 in year two, and 38 in year three, showing progressive adoption. Seizures were seen in 25 patients (27%), 19 were in status, of which 18 were successfully treated. Transfers to the main hospital, Duke University Medical Center, were prevented for 53 patients, producing an estimated cost savings of $145,750. The retained patients produced a direct contribution margin of about $75,000, and the margin was just over $100,000 for the entire monitored cohort. ICU cvEEG service is feasible and practical to implement at the community hospital level. Service was initiated at little to no cost and clearly enhanced care, increased breadth of care, increased ICU census, and reduced

  2. Hospital enterprise Architecture Framework (Study of Iranian University Hospital Organization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighathoseini, Atefehsadat; Bobarshad, Hossein; Saghafi, Fatehmeh; Rezaei, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays developing smart and fast services for patients and transforming hospitals to modern hospitals is considered a necessity. Living in the world inundated with information systems, designing services based on information technology entails a suitable architecture framework. This paper aims to present a localized enterprise architecture framework for the Iranian university hospital. Using two dimensions of implementation and having appropriate characteristics, the best 17 enterprises frameworks were chosen. As part of this effort, five criteria were selected according to experts' inputs. According to these criteria, five frameworks which had the highest rank were chosen. Then 44 general characteristics were extracted from the existing 17 frameworks after careful studying. Then a questionnaire was written accordingly to distinguish the necessity of those characteristics using expert's opinions and Delphi method. The result showed eight important criteria. In the next step, using AHP method, TOGAF was chosen regarding having appropriate characteristics and the ability to be implemented among reference formats. In the next step, enterprise architecture framework was designed by TOGAF in a conceptual model and its layers. For determining architecture framework parts, a questionnaire with 145 questions was written based on literature review and expert's opinions. The results showed during localization of TOGAF for Iran, 111 of 145 parts were chosen and certified to be used in the hospital. The results showed that TOGAF could be suitable for use in the hospital. So, a localized Hospital Enterprise Architecture Modelling is developed by customizing TOGAF for an Iranian hospital at eight levels and 11 parts. This new model could be used to be performed in other Iranian hospitals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investing in CenteringPregnancy™ Group Prenatal Care Reduces Newborn Hospitalization Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Amy; Heberlein, Emily C; Glasscock, Leah; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Shea, Karen; Khan, Imtiaz A

    CenteringPregnancy™ group prenatal care is an innovative model with promising evidence of reducing preterm birth. The outpatient costs of offering CenteringPregnancy pose barriers to model adoption. Enhanced provider reimbursement for group prenatal care may improve birth outcomes and generate newborn hospitalization cost savings for insurers. To investigate potential cost savings for investment in CenteringPregnancy, we evaluated the impact on newborn hospital admission costs of a pilot incentive project, where BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid managed care organization paid an obstetric practice offering CenteringPregnancy $175 for each patient who participated in at least five group prenatal care sessions. Using a one to many case-control matching without replacement, each CenteringPregnancy participant was matched retrospectively on propensity score, age, race, and clinical risk factors with five individual care participants. We estimated the odds of newborn hospital admission type (neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] or well-baby admission) for matched CenteringPregnancy and individual care cohorts with four or more visits using multivariate logistic regression. Cost savings were calculated using mean costs per admission type at the delivery hospital. Of the CenteringPregnancy newborns, 3.5% had a NICU admission compared with 12.0% of individual care newborns (p Investing in CenteringPregnancy for 85 patients ($14,875) led to an estimated net savings for the managed care organization of $67,293 in NICU costs. CenteringPregnancy may reduce costs through fewer NICU admissions. Enhanced reimbursement from payers to obstetric practices supporting CenteringPregnancy sustainability may improve birth outcomes and reduce associated NICU costs. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intensive care unit drug costs in the context of total hospital drug expenditures with suggestions for targeted cost containment efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawalbeh, Shoroq M; Saul, Melissa I; Seybert, Amy L; Thorpe, Joshua M; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2018-04-01

    To assess costs of intensive care unit (ICU) related pharmacotherapy relative to hospital drug expenditures, and to identify potential targets for cost-effectiveness investigations. We offer the unique advantage of comparing ICU drug costs with previously published data a decade earlier to describe changes over time. Financial transactions for all ICU patients during fiscal years (FY) 2009-2012 were retrieved from the hospital's data repository. ICU drug costs were evaluated for each FY. ICU departments' charges were also retrieved and calculated as percentages of total ICU charges. Albumin, prismasate (dialysate), voriconazole, factor VII and alteplase denoted the highest percentages of ICU drug costs. ICU drug costs contributed to an average of 31% (SD 1.0%) of the hospital's total drug costs. ICU drug costs per patient day increased by 5.8% yearly versus 7.8% yearly for non-ICU drugs. This rate was higher for ICU drugs costs at 12% a decade previous. Pharmacy charges contributed to 17.7% of the total ICU charges. Growth rates of costs per year have declined but still drug expenditures in the ICU are consistently a significant driver in this resource intensive environment with a high impact on hospital drug expenditures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hospital costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, Leander R.; Tan, Siok Swan; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Redekop, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:There have been no ischemic stroke costing studies since major improvements were implemented in stroke care. We therefore determined hospital resource use and costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands for 2012.Methods:We conducted a retrospective cost analysis using individual

  6. An estimate of the cost of administering intravenous biological agents in Spanish day hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolla JM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Miquel Nolla,1 Esperanza Martín,2 Pilar Llamas,3 Javier Manero,4 Arturo Rodríguez de la Serna,5 Manuel Francisco Fernández-Miera,6 Mercedes Rodríguez,6 José Manuel López,7 Alexandra Ivanova,8 Belén Aragón9 1Rheumatology Department, IDIBELL-Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Barcelona, 2Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid, 3Hospital Universitario Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, 4Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, 5Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, 6Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, 7Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, 8Max Weber Institute, Madrid, 9MSD, Madrid, Spain Objective: To estimate the unit costs of administering intravenous (IV biological agents in day hospitals (DHs in the Spanish National Health System.Patients and methods: Data were obtained from 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, collected from nine DHs, receiving one of the following IV therapies: infliximab (n=48, rituximab (n=38, abatacept (n=41, or tocilizumab (n=61. The fieldwork was carried out between March 2013 and March 2014. The following three groups of costs were considered: 1 structural costs, 2 material costs, and 3 staff costs. Staff costs were considered a fixed cost and were estimated according to the DH theoretical level of activity, which includes, as well as personal care of each patient, the DH general activities (complete imputation method, CIM. In addition, an alternative calculation was performed, in which the staff costs were considered a variable cost imputed according to the time spent on direct care (partial imputation method, PIM. All costs were expressed in euros for the reference year 2014.Results: The average total cost was €146.12 per infusion (standard deviation [SD] ±87.11; CIM and €29.70 per infusion (SD ±11.42; PIM. The structure-related costs per infusion varied between €2.23 and €62.35 per patient and DH; the cost of consumables oscillated

  7. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohammad Ashraf; Tabish, S A; Jan, Farooq A; Khan, Nazir A; Wafai, Z A; Pandita, K K

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health problem in all communities worldwide. Rising healthcare costs associated with treating advanced cancers present a significant economic challenge. It is a need of the hour that the health sector should devise cost-effective measures to be put in place for better affordability of treatments. To achieve this objective, information generation through indigenous hospital data on unit cost of in-patient cancer chemotherapy in medical oncology became imperative and thus hallmark of this study. The present prospective hospital based study was conducted in Medical Oncology Department of tertiary care teaching hospital. After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96). This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket). The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  8. Hospitality Major Vocational High School Students' Expectations on University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ya-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hospitality is not a new industry in Asia, but high quality hospitality industry has become more and more important in the trend of questing service-based economy and the increasing number of tourists in Asia. Thus there are more universities opened hospitality degree programs in Asia, Taiwan is no exception. In this context, why high school…

  9. Universal access, cost recovery, and payment services

    OpenAIRE

    Sujit Chakravorti; Jeffery W. Gunther; Robert R. Moore

    2005-01-01

    We suggest a subtle, yet far- reaching, tension in the objectives specified by the Monetary Control Act of 1980 (MCA) for the Federal Reserve’s role in providing retail payment services, such as check processing. Specifically, we argue that the requirement of an overall cost-revenue match, coupled with the goal of ensuring equitable access on a universal basis, partially shifted the burden of cost recovery from high-cost to low-cost service points during the MCA’s early years, thereby allowin...

  10. The cost of lower respiratory tract infections hospital admissions in the Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Banerji

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Inuit infants who reside in the Nunavut (NU regions of Arctic Canada have extremely high rates of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs associated with significant health expenditures, but the costs in other regions of Arctic Canada have not been documented. Objective . This prospective surveillance compares, across most of Arctic Canada, the rates and costs associated with LRTI admissions in infants less than 1 year of age, and the days of hospitalization and costs adjusted per live birth. Design . This was a hospital-based surveillance of LRTI admissions of infants less than 1 year of age, residing in Northwest Territories (NT, the 3 regions of Nunavut (NU; [Kitikmeot (KT, Kivalliq (KQ and Qikiqtani (QI] and Nunavik (NK from 1 January 2009 to 30 June 2010. Costs were obtained from the territorial or regional governments and hospitals, and included transportation, hospital stay, physician fees and accommodation costs. The rates of LRTI hospitalizations, days of hospitalization and associated costs were calculated per live birth in each of the 5 regions. Results . There were 513 LRTI admissions during the study period. For NT, KT, KQ, QI and NK, the rates of LRTI hospitalization per 100 live births were 38, 389, 230, 202 and 445, respectively. The total days of LRTI admission per live birth were 0.25, 3.3, 2.6, 1.7 and 3 for the above regions. The average cost per live birth for LRTI admission for these regions was $1,412, $22,375, $14,608, $8,254 and $10,333. The total cost for LRTI was $1,498,232 in NT, $15,662,968 in NU and $3,874,881 in NK. Medical transportation contributed to a significant proportion of the costs. Conclusion . LRTI admission rates in NU and Nunavik are much higher than that in NT and remain among the highest rates globally. The costs of these admissions are exceptionally high due to the combination of very high rates of admission, very expensive medical evacuations and prolonged hospitalizations

  11. [Costs of serious adverse events in a community teaching hospital, in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Luis Meave; Torres-Montes, Abraham; Soria-Orozco, Manuel; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely; Ramírez-Hernández, María Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Serious adverse events during hospital care are a worldwide reality and threaten the safety of the hospitalised patient. To identify serious adverse events related to healthcare and direct hospital costs in a Teaching Hospital in México. A study was conducted in a 250-bed Teaching Hospital in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Data were obtained from the Quality and Patient Safety Department based on 2012 incidents report. Every event was reviewed and analysed by an expert team using the "fish bone" tool. The costs were calculated since the event took place until discharge or death of the patient. A total of 34 serious adverse events were identified. The average cost was $117,440.89 Mexican pesos (approx. €7,000). The great majority (82.35%) were largely preventable and related to the process of care. Undergraduate medical staff were involved in 58.82%, and 14.7% of patients had suffered adverse events in other hospitals. Serious adverse events in a Teaching Hospital setting need to be analysed to learn and deploy interventions to prevent and improve patient safety. The direct costs of these events are similar to those reported in developed countries. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct Medical Costs of Hospitalizations for Cardiovascular Diseases in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Petzold, Max; Cao, Junshan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Weibing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few studies in China have focused on direct expenditures for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), making cost trends for CVDs uncertain. Epidemic modeling and forecasting may be essential for health workers and policy makers to reduce the cost burden of CVDs. To develop a time series model using Box–Jenkins methodology for a 15-year forecasting of CVD hospitalization costs in Shanghai. Daily visits and medical expenditures for CVD hospitalizations between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 were analyzed. Data from 2012 were used for further analyses, including yearly total health expenditures and expenditures per visit for each disease, as well as per-visit-per-year medical costs of each service for CVD hospitalizations. Time series analyses were performed to determine the long-time trend of total direct medical expenditures for CVDs and specific expenditures for each disease, which were used to forecast expenditures until December 31, 2030. From 2008 to 2012, there were increased yearly trends for both hospitalizations (from 250,354 to 322,676) and total costs (from US $ 388.52 to 721.58 million per year in 2014 currency) in Shanghai. Cost per CVD hospitalization in 2012 averaged US $ 2236.29, with the highest being for chronic rheumatic heart diseases (US $ 4710.78). Most direct medical costs were spent on medication. By the end of 2030, the average cost per visit per month for all CVDs was estimated to be US $ 4042.68 (95% CI: US $ 3795.04–4290.31) for all CVDs, and the total health expenditure for CVDs would reach over US $1.12 billion (95% CI: US $ 1.05–1.19 billion) without additional government interventions. Total health expenditures for CVDs in Shanghai are estimated to be higher in the future. These results should be a valuable future resource for both researchers on the economic effects of CVDs and for policy makers. PMID:25997060

  13. Healthcare professionals' work engagement in Finnish university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepistö, Sari; Alanen, Seija; Aalto, Pirjo; Järvinen, Päivi; Leino, Kaija; Mattila, Elina; Kaunonen, Marja

    2017-10-10

    Concerns about the sufficiency and dedication of the healthcare workforce have arisen as the baby boomer generation is retiring and the generation Y might have different working environment demands. To describe the association between work engagement of healthcare professionals' and its background factors at five Finnish university hospitals. Survey data were collected from nurses, physicians and administrative staff (n = 561) at all five university hospitals in Finland. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire that comprised the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (9 items) and 13 questions regarding the respondents' backgrounds. Descriptive and correlational analyses were used to examine the data. Most respondents were female (85%) and nursing staff (72%). Baby boomers (49%) were the largest generational cohort. The work engagement composite mean for the total sample was 5.0, indicating high work engagement. Significant differences in work engagement existed only among sex and age groups. The highest work engagement scores were among administrative staff. Work engagement among healthcare professionals in Finnish university hospitals is high. High work engagement might be explained by suitable job resources and challenges, as well as opportunities provided by a frontline care environment. Attention should especially be paid to meeting the needs of young people entering the workforce to strengthen their dedication and absorption. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. [Subjective Workload, Job Satisfaction, and Work-Life-Balance of Physicians and Nurses in a Municipal Hospital in a Rural Area Compared to an Urban University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Michael; Schmid, Klaus; Drexler, Hans; Kiesel, Johannes

    2018-05-01

    Medical and nursing shortages in rural areas represent a current serious public health problem. The healthcare of the rural population is at risk. This study compares perceived workload, job satisfaction and work-life balance of physicians and nurses at a clinic in a rural area with two clinics of a University hospital. Physicians and nurses were interviewed anonymously with a standardized questionnaire (paper and pencil), including questions on job satisfaction, subjective workload and work-life balance. The response rate was almost 50% in the University hospital as well as in the municipal hospital. 32 physicians and 54 nurses from the University hospital and 18 physicians and 137 nurses from the municipal hospital participated in the survey. Nurses at the University hospital assessed the organization of the daily routine with 94.1% as better than those at the municipal hospital (82.4%, p=0.03). Physicians at the University hospital were able to better implement acquired knowledge at a University clinic with 87.5% than their counterparts at the municipal hospital (55.5%, p=0.02). In contrast to their colleagues at the municipal hospital, only 50% of the physicians at the University hospital subjectively considered their workload as just right (83.3% municipal, p=0.02). 96.9% of the physicians at the University hospital were "daily" or "several times a week" under time pressure (municipal 50%, pwork and family life (62.9% University hospital, 72.8% Municipal hospital). In contrast, only 20% of the physicians at the University Hospital but 42.9% of the physicians of the municipal hospital had sufficient opportunities to balance workload and family (p=0.13). The return rate of almost 50% can be described as good. Due to the small number of physicians, especially from the municipal hospital, it can be assumed that some interesting differences could not be detected. There were only slight differences between the nurses from the two hospitals. In contrast, subjective

  15. Activity-based costs of blood transfusions in surgical patients at four hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shander, Aryeh; Hofmann, Axel; Ozawa, Sherri; Theusinger, Oliver M; Gombotz, Hans; Spahn, Donat R

    2010-04-01

    Blood utilization has long been suspected to consume more health care resources than previously reported. Incomplete accounting for blood costs has the potential to misdirect programmatic decision making by health care systems. Determining the cost of supplying patients with blood transfusions requires an in-depth examination of the complex array of activities surrounding the decision to transfuse. To accurately determine the cost of blood in a surgical population from a health system perspective, an activity-based costing (ABC) model was constructed. Tasks and resource consumption (materials, labor, third-party services, capital) related to blood administration were identified prospectively at two US and two European hospitals. Process frequency (i.e., usage) data were captured retrospectively from each hospital and used to populate the ABC model. All major process steps, staff, and consumables to provide red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to surgical patients, including usage frequencies, and direct and indirect overhead costs contributed to per-RBC-unit costs between $522 and $1183 (mean, $761 +/- $294). These exceed previously reported estimates and were 3.2- to 4.8-fold higher than blood product acquisition costs. Annual expenditures on blood and transfusion-related activities, limited to surgical patients, ranged from $1.62 to $6.03 million per hospital and were largely related to the transfusion rate. Applicable to various hospital practices, the ABC model confirms that blood costs have been underestimated and that they are geographically variable and identifies opportunities for cost containment. Studies to determine whether more stringent control of blood utilization improves health care utilization and quality, and further reduces costs, are warranted.

  16. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsa P. Mutowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR for patients with diabetes, $994 (385–1553 mean $1319 (95% CI: 981–1657, was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494–1147 mean $914 (95% CI: 825–1003. Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177–1828. Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004–4149 for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589–3156 for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy, the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities.

  17. [Description of current hypnosis practice in French university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabridon, G; Nekrouf, N; Bioy, A

    2017-10-01

    Hypnosis is very fashionable as an entertainment through TV shows searching for new sensational experiences. What about its practice in the medical world? The aim of this article is to answer to this question. Therefore, we contacted every French University Hospital of each region to find out if hypnosis was practiced for the care of pain (hypnoanalgesia), for chirurgical procedures (hypnosedation) and in adult psychiatry care units (hypnotherapy). For this last practice, we also questioned the type of indications. All 30 of the French University Hospitals had replied by November 2015. Hypnoanalgesia is practiced by all and two-thirds offer hypnosedation. Hypnotherapy is practiced by 40 % of the University Hospitals, 91,7 % for anxiety disorders, 66,7 % for psychotraumatic care and 25 % for mood disorders. Therefore, hypnosis seems to have found its place in the care of pain and as an anesthetic to replace standard procedures. However, the use of hypnotherapy in psychiatry is less frequent, indications for its use being variable and not very consensual. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Cole

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%. Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0, lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days, costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056, but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%. Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that

  19. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D K; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were ' 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and ' 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was ' 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, pcosts for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care.

  20. Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Jimma University Specialized Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. ... and there was a significant association between prolapse and residence area. ... Awareness creation on risk factors of pelvic organ prolapse and use of ...

  1. Relative costs of anesthesiologist prepared, hospital pharmacy prepared and outsourced anesthesia drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelacic, Srdjan; Craddick, Karen; Nair, Bala G; Bounthavong, Mark; Yeung, Kai; Kusulos, Dolly; Knutson, Jennifer A; Somani, Shabir; Bowdle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Anesthesia drugs can be prepared by anesthesia providers, hospital pharmacies or outsourcing facilities. The decision whether to outsource all or some anesthesia drugs is challenging since the costs associated with different anesthesia drug preparation methods remain poorly described. The costs associated with preparation of 8 commonly used anesthesia drugs were analyzed using a budget impact analysis for 4 different syringe preparation strategies: (1) all drugs prepared by anesthesiologist, (2) drugs prepared by anesthesiologist and hospital pharmacy, (3) drugs prepared by anesthesiologist and outsourcing facility, and (4) all drugs prepared by outsourcing facility. A strategy combining anesthesiologist and hospital pharmacy prepared drugs was associated with the lowest estimated annual cost in the base-case budget impact analysis with an annual cost of $225 592, which was lower than other strategies by a margin of greater than $86 000. A combination of anesthesiologist and hospital pharmacy prepared drugs resulted in the lowest annual cost in the budget impact analysis. However, the cost of drugs prepared by an outsourcing facility maybe lower if the capital investment needed for the establishment and maintenance of the US Pharmacopeial Convention Chapter compliant facility is included in the budget impact analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of direct causes and costs of medical admissions in Bingham University Teaching Hospital – Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter U Bassi

    2017-01-01

    the length of stay, suggesting early discharge from hospital did not necessarily eliminate the cost of patient management.

  3. Implementation of a radiology information system in an University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de Azevedo; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Elias Junior, Jorge; Trad, Clovis Simao; Goes, Wilson Moraes; Castro, Carlos Roberto de

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a radiology information system (RIS) developed and in the process of implementation in an University Hospital (Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto - Universidade de Sao Paulo) which integrates a plan for a 'filmless' radiology facility. (author)

  4. Delayed Hospital Discharges of Older Patients: A Systematic Review on Prevalence and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeiro, Filipa; Roberts, Kenny; Gray, Alastair Mcintosh; Leal, José

    2017-05-23

    To determine the prevalence of delayed discharges of elderly inpatients and associated costs. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health, CAB Abstracts, Econlit, Web of Knowledge, EBSCO - CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Health Management Information Consortium, and SCIE - Social Care Online for evidence published between 1990 and 2015 on number of days or proportion of delayed discharges for elderly inpatients in acute hospitals. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted. Data on proportions of delayed discharges were pooled using a random effects logistic model and the association of relevant factors was assessed. Mean costs of delayed discharge were calculated in USD adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP). Of 64 studies included, 52 (81.3%) reported delayed discharges as proportions of total hospital stay and 9 (14.1%) estimated the respective costs for these delays. Proportions of delayed discharges varied widely, from 1.6% to 91.3% with a weighted mean of 22.8%. This variation was also seen in studies from the same country, for example, in the United Kingdom, they ranged between 1.6% and 60.0%. No factor was found to be significantly associated with delays. The mean costs of delayed discharge also varied widely (between 142 and 31,935 USD PPP adjusted), reflecting the variability in mean days of delay per patient. Delayed discharges occur in most countries and the associated costs are significant. However, the variability in prevalence of delayed discharges and available data on costs limit our knowledge of the full impact of delayed discharges. A standardization of methods is necessary to allow comparisons to be made, and additional studies are required-preferably by disease area-to determine the postdischarge needs of specific patient groups and the estimated costs of delays. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Hospital Costs Associated With Laparoscopic and Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer Netto, Fernando; Quereshy, Fayez; Camilotti, Bruna G.; Pitzul, Kristen; Kwong, Josephine; Jackson, Timothy; Penner, Todd; Okrainec, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the total hospital costs associated with elective laparoscopic and open inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods: A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent elective inguinal herniorrhaphy from April 2009 to March 2011. A retrospective review of electronic patient records was performed along with a standardized case-costing analysis using data from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative. The main outcomes were operatin...

  6. Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The article, Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs, 2002-2009, Implications For the Future, published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of Medicare and Medicaid...

  7. Association of Hospital Market Concentration With Costs of Complex Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Marcelo; Chen, Sophia Y; Dillhoff, Mary; Schmidt, Carl; Canner, Joseph K; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2017-09-20

    Trade-offs involved with market competition, overall costs to payers and consumers, and quality of care have not been well defined. Less competition within any given market may enable provider-driven increases in charges. To examine the association between regional hospital market concentration and hospital charges for hepatopancreaticobiliary surgical procedures. This study included all patients undergoing hepatic or pancreatic resection in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2011. Hospital market concentration was assessed using a variable-radius Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) in the 2003, 2006, and 2009 Hospital Market Structure files. Data were analyzed from November 19, 2016, through March 2, 2017. Hepatic or pancreatic resection. Multivariable mixed-effects log-linear models were constructed to determine the association between HHI and total costs and charges for hepatic or pancreatic resection. Weighted totals of 38 711 patients undergoing pancreatic resection (50.8% men and 49.2% women; median age, 65 years [interquartile range, 55-73 years]) and 52 284 patients undergoing hepatic resection (46.8% men and 53.2% women; median age, 59 years [interquartile range, 49-69 years]) were identified. Higher institutional volume was associated with lower cost of pancreatic resection (-5.4%; 95% CI, -10.0% to -0.5%; P = .03) and higher cost of hepatic resection (13.4%; 95% CI, 8.2% to 18.8%; P markets relative to moderately concentrated markets, although overall charges were 8.3% lower (95% CI, -14.0% to -2.3%; P = .008) in highly concentrated markets. For hepatic resections, hospitals in highly concentrated markets had 8.4% lower costs (95% CI, -13.0% to -3.6%; P = .001) compared with those in unconcentrated markets and charges that were 13.4% lower (95% CI, -19.3% to -7.1%; P markets and 10.5% lower (95% CI, -16.2% to -4.4%; P = .001) compared with unconcentrated markets. Higher market concentration was

  8. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-05-01

    We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient's characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP's being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. The consequences of hospital autonomization in Colombia: a transaction cost economics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Ramon; Mills, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Granting autonomy to public hospitals in developing countries has been common over recent decades, and implies a shift from hierarchical to contract-based relationships with health authorities. Theory on transactions costs in contractual relationships suggests they stem from relationship-specific investments and contract incompleteness. Transaction cost economics argues that the parties involved in exchanges seek to reduce transaction costs. The objective of this research was to analyse the relationships observed between purchasers and the 22 public hospitals of the city of Bogota, Colombia, in order to understand the role of relationship-specific investments and contract incompleteness as sources of transaction costs, through a largely qualitative study. We found that contract-based relationships showed relevant transaction costs associated mainly with contract incompleteness, not with relationship-specific investments. Regarding relationships between insurers and local hospitals for primary care services, compulsory contracting regulations locked-in the parties to the contracts. For high-complexity services (e.g. inpatient care), no restrictions applied and relationships suggested transaction-cost minimizing behaviour. Contract incompleteness was found to be a source of transaction costs on its own. We conclude that transaction costs seemed to play a key role in contract-based relationships, and contract incompleteness by itself appeared to be a source of transaction costs. The same findings are likely in other contexts because of difficulties in defining, observing and verifying the contracted products and the underlying information asymmetries. The role of compulsory contracting might be context-specific, although it is likely to emerge in other settings due to the safety-net role of public hospitals.

  10. The role of expectations in patients' hospital assessments: a Turkish university hospital example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Coskun; Akgün, H Seval; Al Assaf, A F

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to conduct a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding important aspects of service dimensions using SERVQUAL. The SERVQUAL scale is routinely used at the Baskent University Hospitals Network, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member of the hospital network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities. The patients' perceived scores were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high-quality hospital. Young patients had a high-expected service score gap and a low adequate service score difference. Highly educated patients had a high-expected service score difference. Uninsured patients had a low adequate service score difference. Baskent University multidisciplinary healthcare teams have performed periodic patient satisfaction surveys in order to identify strengths and problem areas, formulate the quality improvement objectives and monitor progress towards achieving these objectives. However, patient satisfaction survey results are often highly positive. In these cases, improving care is not easy because measures are not sensitive enough to changes. Therefore a more sensitive measurement tool based on the SERVQUAL scale was developed. The authors believe that patient opinions are extremely important because they provide information that is not necessarily emphasized by managers or health care professionals, resulting in a more complete assessment of past performance and a clearer road map for future action.

  11. The trade-off between hospital cost and quality of care. An exploratory empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, R C; Fine, D J; Loree, S W; Retzlaff-Roberts, D L; Tsubakitani, S

    1992-08-01

    The debate concerning quality of care in hospitals, its "value" and affordability, is increasingly of concern to providers, consumers, and purchasers in the United States and elsewhere. We undertook an exploratory study to estimate the impact on hospital-wide costs if quality-of-care levels were varied. To do so, we obtained costs and service output data regarding 300 U.S. hospitals, representing approximately a 5% cross section of all hospitals operating in 1983; both inpatient and outpatient services were included. The quality-of-care measure used for the exploratory analysis was the ratio of actual deaths in the hospital for the year in question to the forecasted number of deaths for the hospital; the hospital mortality forecaster had earlier (and elsewhere) been built from analyses of 6 million discharge abstracts, and took into account each hospital's actual individual admissions, including key patient descriptors for each admission. Such adjusted death rates have increasingly been used as potential indicators of quality, with recent research lending support for the viability of that linkage. The authors then utilized the economic construct of allocative efficiency relying on "best practices" concepts and peer groupings, built using the "envelopment" philosophy of Data Envelopment Analysis and Pareto efficiency. These analytical techniques estimated the efficiently delivered costs required to meet prespecified levels of quality of care. The marginal additional cost per each death deferred in 1983 was estimated to be approximately $29,000 (in 1990 dollars) for the average efficient hospital. Also, over a feasible range, a 1% increase in the level of quality of care delivered was estimated to increase hospital cost by an average of 1.34%. This estimated elasticity of quality on cost also increased with the number of beds in the hospital.

  12. Hospital costs during the first 5 years of life for multiples compared with singletons born after IVF or ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heesch, M M J; Evers, J L H; van der Hoeven, M A H B M; Dumoulin, J C M; van Beijsterveldt, C E M; Bonsel, G J; Dykgraaf, R H M; van Goudoever, J B; Koopman-Esseboom, C; Nelen, W L D M; Steiner, K; Tamminga, P; Tonch, N; Torrance, H L; Dirksen, C D

    2015-06-01

    Do in vitro fertilization (IVF) multiples generate higher hospital costs than IVF singletons, from birth up to age 5? Hospital costs from birth up to age 5 were significantly higher among IVF/ICSI multiple children compared with IVF/ICSI singletons; however, when excluding the costs incurred during the birth admission period, hospital costs of multiples and singletons were comparable. Concern has risen over the long-term outcome of children born after IVF. The increased incidence of multiple births in IVF as a result of double-embryo transfer predisposes children to a poorer neonatal outcome such as preterm birth and low birthweight. As a consequence, IVF multiples require more medical care. Costs and consequences of poorer neonatal outcomes in multiples may also exist later in life. All 5497 children born from IVF in 2003-2005, whose parents received IVF or ICSI treatment in one of five participating Dutch IVF centers, served as a basis for a retrospective cohort study. Based on gestational age, birthweight, Apgar and congenital malformation, children were assigned to one of three risk strata (low-, moderate- or high-risk). To enhance the efficiency of the data collection, 816 multiples and 584 singletons were selected for 5-year follow-up based on stratified (risk) sampling. Parental informed consent was received of 322 multiples and 293 singletons. Individual-level hospital resource use data (hospitalization, outpatient visits and medical procedures) were retrieved from hospital information systems and patient charts for 302 multiples and 278 singletons. The risk of hospitalization (OR 4.9, 95% CI 3.3-7.0), outpatient visits (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.8-3.6) and medical procedures (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.2) was higher for multiples compared with singletons. The average hospital costs amounted to €10 018 and €2093 during the birth admission period (P IVF/ICSI multiples compared with IVF/ICSI singletons. Single-embryo transfer may result in substantial savings

  13. Bacteriology of hospital-acquired infection and antibiotic resistance in a hospital university of Bushehr Port Fatemeh Zahra (s in 2002-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Vahdat

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection is an increasing problem. The global problem of antimicrobial resistance is particularly pressing in developing countries, where the infectious disease burden is high and cost constraints prevent the widespread application of newer, more expensive agents. In a prospective study, 203 consecutive cases with hospital-acquired infection in a university hospital in Bushehr port were evaluated. The most common hospital-acquired infection was urinary (76 cases, conjunctivitis (16 cases, bacteremia (8 cases, meningitis (5 cases, wound (3 cases, empyema (2 cases and peritonitis (1 case. The patients with hospital-acquired infection were from surgical and internal medicine I.C.Us (53.2% & 15.6%, respectively. The most frequent isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.6%, Acinetobacter baumannii (19.7%, E. coli (13.3%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (8.4%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (7.9%, Enterobacter species (7%, Streptococcus species (6.4%, and Proteus mirabilis (0.5%. The most resistant organisms to antimicrobial agents were Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 97 & 93.3% of these bacteria were resistant to third generation cephalosporins. The isolated Staphylococcal species were resistant to amikacin (94%. In conclusion, gram negative bacteria were the most common etiologic agent of hospital-acquired infection and had a high level of resistance to amikacin and third generation cephalosporins. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies should be designed to combat these microorganisms.

  14. Performance Analysis of Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pabon Lasso Model: A Six-Year-Trend Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalhor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays, productivity and efficiency are considered a culture and a perspective in both life and work environments. This is the starting point of human development. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using the Pabon Lasso Model. Methods The present study was a descriptive-analytic research, with a cross-sectional design, conducted during six years (2009 - 2014, at selected hospitals. The studied hospitals of this study were 21 public hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The data was obtained from the treatment Deputy of Khorasan Razavi province. Results Results from the present study showed that only 19% of the studied hospitals were located in zone 3 of the diagram, indicating a perfect performance. Twenty-eight percent were in zone 1, 19% in zone 2, and 28% in zone 4. Conclusions According to the findings, only a few hospitals are at the desirable zone (zone 3; the rest of the hospitals fell in other zones, which could be a result of poor performance and poor management of hospital resources. Most of the hospitals were in zones 1 and 4, whose characteristics are low bed turnover and longer stay, indicating higher bed supply than demand for healthcare services or longer hospitalization, less outpatient equipment use, and higher costs.

  15. The cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in hospitals and nursing homes in Flanders: A cost-of-illness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarré, Liesbet; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Annemans, Lieven; Van Hecke, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2015-07-01

    The economic impact of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment is high. The results of cost-of-illness studies can assist the planning, allocation, and priority setting of healthcare expenditures to improve the implementation of preventive measures. Data on the cost of current practice of pressure ulcer prevention or treatment in Flanders, a region of Belgium, is lacking. To examine the cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in an adult population in hospitals and nursing homes from the healthcare payer perspective. A cost-of-illness study was performed using a bottom-up approach. Hospitals and nursing homes in Flanders, a region of Belgium. Data were collected in a series of prospective multicentre cross-sectional studies between 2008 and 2013. Data collection included data on risk assessment, pressure ulcer prevalence, preventive measures, unit cost of materials for prevention and treatment, nursing time measurements for activities related to pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, and nursing wages. The cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in hospitals and nursing homes was calculated as annual cost for Flanders, per patient, and per patient per day. The mean (SD) cost for pressure ulcer prevention was €7.88 (8.21) per hospitalised patient at risk per day and €2.15 (3.10) per nursing home resident at risk per day. The mean (SD) cost of pressure ulcer prevention for patients and residents identified as not at risk for pressure ulcer development was €1.44 (4.26) per day in hospitals and €0.50 (1.61) per day in nursing homes. The main cost driver was the cost of labour, responsible for 79-85% of the cost of prevention. The mean (SD) cost of local treatment per patient per day varied between €2.34 (1.14) and €77.36 (35.95) in hospitals, and between €2.42 (1.15) and €16.18 (4.93) in nursing homes. Related to methodological differences between studies, the cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in hospitals and nursing

  16. Effect of lean process improvement techniques on a university hospital inpatient pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintzen, Barbara L; Knoer, Scott J; Van Dyke, Christie J; Milavitz, Brian S

    2009-11-15

    The effect of lean process improvement on an inpatient university hospital pharmacy was evaluated. The University of Minnesota Medical Center (UMMC), Fairview, implemented lean techniques in its inpatient pharmacy to improve workflow, reduce waste, and achieve substantial cost savings. The sterile products area (SPA) and the inventory area were prospectively identified as locations for improvement due to their potential to realize cost savings. Process-improvement goals for the SPA included the reduction of missing doses, errors, and patient-specific waste by 30%, 50%, and 30%, respectively, and the reallocation of two technician full-time equivalents (FTEs). Reductions in pharmaceutical inventory and returns due to outdating were also anticipated. Work-flow in the SPA was improved through the creation of accountability, standard work, and movement toward one-piece flow. Increasing the number of i.v. batches decreased pharmaceutical waste by 40%. Through SPA environment improvements and enhanced workload sharing, two FTE technicians from the SPA were redistributed within the department. SPA waste reduction yielded an annual saving of $275,500. Quality and safety were also improved, as measured by reductions in missing doses, expired products, and production errors. In the inventory area, visual control was improved through the use of a double-bin system, the number of outdated drugs decreased by 20%, and medication inventory was reduced by $50,000. Lean methodology was successfully implemented in the SPA and inventory area at the UMMC, Fairview, inpatient pharmacy. Benefits of this process included an estimated annual cost saving of $289,256 due to waste reduction, improvements in workflow, and decreased staffing requirements.

  17. Length of stay and associated costs of obesity related hospital admissions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vellinga, Akke

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is the cause of other chronic diseases, psychological problems, obesity shortens the lifespan and puts strain on health systems. The risk associated with childhood obesity in particular, which will accelerate the development of adult morbidity and mortality, has been identified as an emerging public health problem. METHODS: To estimate the length of stay and associated hospital costs for obesity related illnesses a cost of illness study was set up. All discharges from all acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland from 1997 to 2004 with a principal or secondary diagnostic code for obesity for all children from 6 to 18 years of age and for adults were collected.A discharge frequency was calculated by dividing obesity related discharges by the total number of diagnoses (principal and secondary) for each year. The hospital costs related to obesity was calculated based on the total number of days care. RESULTS: The discharge frequency of obesity related conditions increased from 1.14 in 1997 to 1.49 in 2004 for adults and from 0.81 to 1.37 for children. The relative length of stay (number of days in care for obesity related conditions per 1000 days of hospital care given) increased from 1.47 in 1997 to 4.16 in 2004 for children and from 3.68 in 1997 to 6.74 in 2004 for adults.Based on the 2001 figures for cost per inpatient bed day, the annual hospital cost was calculated to be 4.4 Euromillion in 1997, increasing to 13.3 Euromillion in 2004. At a 20% variable hospital cost the cost ranges from 0.9 Euromillion in 1997 to 2.7 Euromillion in 2004; a 200% increase. CONCLUSION: The annual increase in the proportion of hospital discharges related to obesity is alarming. This increase is related to a significant increase in economic costs. This paper emphasises the need for action at an early stage of life. Health promotion and primary prevention of obesity should be high on the political agenda.

  18. [The role of university hospital executive board members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debatin, J F; Rehr, J

    2009-09-01

    Demographic changes and medical progress in combination with vastly altered regulatory and economic environments have forced considerable change in the structure of German university hospitals in recent years. These changes have affected medical care as well as research and medical school training. To allow for more flexibility and a higher level of reactivity to the changing environment German university hospitals were transferred from state agencies to independent corporate structures. All but one remains wholly owned by the respective state governments. The governing structure of these independent medical hospitals consists of an executive board, generally made up of a medical director, a financial director, a director for nursing, and the dean of the medical faculty. In most hospitals, the medical director serves as chief executive officer. The regulations governing the composition and responsibility of the members of the executive board differ from state to state. These differences do affect to some degree the interactive effectiveness of the members of the executive boards. Modalities that stress the overall responsibility for all board members seem to work better than those that define clear portfolio limits. Even more than organizational and regulatory differences, the effectiveness of the work of the executive boards is influenced by the personality of the board members themselves. Success appears to be a clear function of the willingness of all members to work together.

  19. Inpatient Hospitalization Costs: A Comparative Study of Micronesians, Native Hawaiians, Japanese, and Whites in Hawai‘i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Hagiwara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable interest exists in health care costs for the growing Micronesian population in the United States (US due to their significant health care needs, poor average socioeconomic status, and unique immigration status, which impacts their access to public health care coverage. Using Hawai‘i statewide impatient data from 2010 to 2012 for Micronesians, whites, Japanese, and Native Hawaiians (N = 162,152 hospitalizations, we compared inpatient hospital costs across racial/ethnic groups using multivariable models including age, gender, payer, residence location, and severity of illness (SOI. We also examined total inpatient hospital costs of Micronesians generally and for Medicaid specifically. Costs were estimated using standard cost-to-charge metrics overall and within nine major disease categories determined by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups. Micronesians had higher unadjusted hospitalization costs overall and specifically within several disease categories (including infectious and heart diseases. Higher SOI in Micronesians explained some, but not all, of these higher costs. The total cost of the 3486 Micronesian hospitalizations in the three-year study period was $58.1 million and 75% was covered by Medicaid; 23% of Native Hawaiian, 3% of Japanese, and 15% of white hospitalizations costs were covered by Medicaid. These findings may be of particular interests to hospitals, Medicaid programs, and policy makers.

  20. Health workers' ICT literacy in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the ICT literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University Teaching Hospital. The emergence of Internet for Telemedicine and health information revolution necessitates that issue of computer and other communication technology literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University ...

  1. Cost-utility analysis of treating out of hospital cardiac arrests in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary M; Kark, Jeremy D; Einav, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) initiates a chain of responses including emergency medical service mobilization and medical treatment, transfer and admission first to a hospital Emergency Department (ED) and then usually to an intensive care unit and ward. Costly pre- and in-hospital care may be followed by prolonged post discharge expenditure on treatment of patients with severe neurological sequelae. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of treatment of OHCA by calculating the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. We studied 3355 consecutive non-traumatic OHCAs (2005-2010) in Jerusalem, Israel, supplemented by hospital utilization data extracted from patient files (n = 570) and post-discharge follow-up (n = 196). Demographic, utilization and economic data were incorporated into a spreadsheet model to calculate the cost-utility ratio. Advanced life support was administered to 2264 of the 3355 OHCAs (67.5%) and 1048 (45.6%) patients were transferred to the ED. Of 676 (20.1%) patients who survived the ED and were admitted, there were 206 (6.1%) survivors to discharge, among them only 113 (3.4%) neurologically intact. Total cost ($39,100,000) per DALY averted (1353) was $28,864. The current package of OHCA interventions in Jerusalem appears to be very cost-effective as the cost per averted DALY of $28,864 is less than the Gross Domestic Product per capita ($33,261). This paper provides a basis for studying the effects of potential interventions that can be evaluated in terms of their incremental costs per averted DALY for treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through public sector district hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Jeet, Gursimer; Verma, Ramesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite an impetus for strengthening public sector district hospitals for provision of secondary health care in India, there is lack of robust evidence on cost of services provided through these district hospitals. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the unit cost of an outpatient visit consultation, inpatient bed-day of hospitalization, surgical procedure and overall per-capita cost of providing secondary care through district hospitals. Methods: Economic costing of five randomly selected district hospitals in two north Indian States - Haryana and Punjab, was undertaken. Cost analysis was done using a health system perspective and employing bottom-up costing methodology. Quantity of all resources - capital or recurrent, used for delivering services was measured and valued. Median unit costs were estimated along with their 95 per cent confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to assess the effect of uncertainties in prices and other assumptions; and to generalize the findings for Indian set-up. Results: The overall annual cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through a public sector district hospital in north India was 11,44,13,282 [US Dollars (USD) 2,103,185]. Human resources accounted for 53 per cent of the overall cost. The unit cost of an inpatient bed-day, surgical procedure and outpatient consultation was 844 (USD 15.5), i; 3481 (USD 64) and 170 (USD 3.1), respectively. With the current set of resource allocation, per-capita cost of providing health care through district hospitals in north India was 139 (USD 2.5). Interpretation & conclusions: The estimates obtained in our study can be used for Fiscal planning of scaling up secondary-level health services. Further, these may be particularly useful for future research such as benefit-incidence analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis and national health accounts including disease-specific accounts in India. PMID:29355142

  3. Cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through public sector district hospitals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Jeet, Gursimer; Verma, Ramesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    Despite an impetus for strengthening public sector district hospitals for provision of secondary health care in India, there is lack of robust evidence on cost of services provided through these district hospitals. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the unit cost of an outpatient visit consultation, inpatient bed-day of hospitalization, surgical procedure and overall per-capita cost of providing secondary care through district hospitals. Economic costing of five randomly selected district hospitals in two north Indian States - Haryana and Punjab, was undertaken. Cost analysis was done using a health system perspective and employing bottom-up costing methodology. Quantity of all resources - capital or recurrent, used for delivering services was measured and valued. Median unit costs were estimated along with their 95 per cent confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to assess the effect of uncertainties in prices and other assumptions; and to generalize the findings for Indian set-up. The overall annual cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through a public sector district hospital in north India was ' 11,44,13,282 [US Dollars (USD) 2,103,185]. Human resources accounted for 53 per cent of the overall cost. The unit cost of an inpatient bed-day, surgical procedure and outpatient consultation was ' 844 (USD 15.5), ' 3481 (USD 64) and ' 170 (USD 3.1), respectively. With the current set of resource allocation, per-capita cost of providing health care through district hospitals in north India was ' 139 (USD 2.5). The estimates obtained in our study can be used for Fiscal planning of scaling up secondary-level health services. Further, these may be particularly useful for future research such as benefit-incidence analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis and national health accounts including disease-specific accounts in India.

  4. Histopathological diagnosis of eyelid tumors in Chiang Mai University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithithanaphat, Chanut; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Wiwatwongwana, Damrong; Mahanupab, Pongsak

    2014-10-01

    To report the histopathological diagnosis ofeyelid tumors and to study the prevalence of eyelid tumors in Chiang Mai University Hospital Chiang Mai, Thailand. A retrospective review of medical and pathological records ofpatients diagnosed as eyelid tumor that underwent histopathological biopsy between January 2007 and December 2013 in Chiang Mai University Hospital was done. Three hundred sixteen cases of eyelid tumors were reviewed. The mean age at diagnosis was 54.2 +/- 19.6 years (range 1 month-99 years), women were 59.5% (n = 188) and men 40.5% (n = 128). The tumor sites were left lower eyelid (27.5%), right upper eyelid (24.4%), right lower eyelid (21.2%), and left upper eyelid (18.7%). There were 204 (64.6%) benign tumors and 112 (35.4%) malignant tumors. Nevi were the most common in benign group (16.4%) and basal cell carcinoma was the most common eyelid malignancy (18.0%). The most common histopathological diagnosis for benign eyelid tumor was nevus, while the most common malignant eyelid tumor was basal cell carcinoma at Chiang Mai University Hospital.

  5. Assessment of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative in Three Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Bairami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the critical standards of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI. Materials and Methods:In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2014, we used PSFHI assessment tool to evaluate the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences; these general referral hospitals were selected purposefully. PSFHI assessment tool is comprised of 140 patient safety standards in five domains, categorized in 24 sub-domains. The five major domains include leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, safe environment, and lifelong learning. Results: All three hospitals met more than 70% of the critical standards. The highest score in critical standards (> 80% was related to the domain of leadership and management in all hospitals. The average score in the domain of safe evidence-based clinical practices was 70% in the studied hospitals. Finally, all the hospitals met 50% of the critical standards in the domains of patient and public involvement and safe environment. Conclusion: Based on the findings, PSFHI is a suitable program for meeting patient safety goals. The selected hospitals in this survey all had a high managerial commitment to patient safety; therefore, they could obtain high scores on critical standards.

  6. Six hospitals describe decentralization, cost containment, and downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, L A; Battle, C E; Schilling, R M; Nall, C M

    1999-01-01

    Decentralization, cost containment, and downsizing continue in full force as healthcare organizations continue to adapt to constant economic change. Hospitals are forced to take a second and third look at how health care is managed in order to survive. Six Northwest Florida hospitals were surveyed in an effort to explore current changes within the healthcare delivery system. This article provides both managers and staff with an overview of recent healthcare changes in an area of the country with implications for staff development.

  7. Overall Hospital Cost Estimates in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: Analysis of the 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraoni, David; Nasr, Viviane G; DiNardo, James A

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine overall hospital cost in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to compare cost associated with cardiac surgical procedures, cardiac catheterizations, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical admissions. The 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kid's Inpatient Database was used to evaluate hospital cost in neonates and children with CHD undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac catheterization, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical treatments. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to determine independent predictors for increased hospital cost. In 2012, total hospital cost was 28,900 M$, while hospital cost in children with CHD represented 23% of this total and accounted for only 4.4% of hospital discharges. The median cost was $51,302 ($32,088-$100,058) in children who underwent cardiac surgery, $21,920 ($13,068-$51,609) in children who underwent cardiac catheterization, $4134 ($1771-$10,253) in children who underwent non-cardiac surgery, and $23,062 ($5529-$71,887) in children admitted for medical treatments. Independent predictors for increased cost were hospital bed size cost in children with CHD represented 23% of global cost while accounting for only 4.4% of discharges. This study identified factors associated with increased cost of cardiac surgical procedures, cardiac catheterizations, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical management in children with CHD.

  8. Controlling for endogeneity in attributable costs of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from a Canadian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Smith, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    Decisions regarding the optimal provision of infection prevention and control resources depend on accurate estimates of the attributable costs of health care-associated infections. This is challenging given the skewed nature of health care cost data and the endogeneity of health care-associated infections. The objective of this study is to determine the hospital costs attributable to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) while accounting for endogeneity. This study builds on an attributable cost model conducted by a retrospective cohort study including 1,292 patients admitted to an urban hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Attributable hospital costs were estimated with multivariate generalized linear models (GLMs). To account for endogeneity, a control function approach was used. The analysis sample included 217 patients with health care-associated VRE. In the standard GLM, the costs attributable to VRE are $17,949 (SEM, $2,993). However, accounting for endogeneity, the attributable costs were estimated to range from $14,706 (SEM, $7,612) to $42,101 (SEM, $15,533). Across all model specifications, attributable costs are 76% higher on average when controlling for endogeneity. VRE was independently associated with increased hospital costs, and controlling for endogeneity lead to higher attributable cost estimates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robberstad Bjarne

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia.

  11. Provision of an emergency theatre in tertiary hospitals is cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cancellations of planned elective surgical operations increase financial cost to the patient and the hospital. Objectives. To determine the rate and reasons for cancellations, estimate the cost incurred by such cancellations and recommend possible solutions. Methods. We did a prospective descriptive study of ...

  12. Cost of childhood diarrhoea in rural South Africa: exploring cost-effectiveness of universal zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhagan, Meera K; Van den Broeck, Jan; Luabeya, Kany-Kany Angelique; Mpontshane, Nontobeko; Bennish, Michael L

    2014-09-01

    To describe the cost of diarrhoeal illness in children aged 6-24 months in a rural South African community and to determine the threshold prevalence of stunting at which universal Zn plus vitamin A supplementation (VAZ) would be more cost-effective than vitamin A alone (VA) in preventing diarrhoea. We conducted a cost analysis using primary and secondary data sources. Using simulations we examined incremental costs of VAZ relative to VA while varying stunting prevalence. Data on efficacy and societal costs were largely from a South African trial. Secondary data were from local and international published sources. The trial included children aged 6-24 months. The secondary data sources were a South African health economics survey and the WHO-CHOICE (CHOosing Interventions that are Cost Effective) database. In the trial, stunted children supplemented with VAZ had 2·04 episodes (95 % CI 1·37, 3·05) of diarrhoea per child-year compared with 3·92 episodes (95 % CI 3·02, 5·09) in the VA arm. Average cost of illness was $Int 7·80 per episode (10th, 90th centile: $Int 0·28, $Int 15·63), assuming a minimum standard of care (oral rehydration and 14 d of therapeutic Zn). In simulation scenarios universal VAZ had low incremental costs or became cost-saving relative to VA when the prevalence of stunting was close to 20 %. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were sensitive to the cost of intervention and coverage levels. This simulation suggests that universal VAZ would be cost-effective at current levels of stunting in parts of South Africa. This requires further validation under actual programmatic conditions.

  13. "Factors associated with non-small cell lung cancer treatment costs in a Brazilian public hospital".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Reis, Carla; Knust, Renata Erthal; de Aguiar Pereira, Claudia Cristina; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo

    2018-02-17

    The present study estimated the cost of advanced non-small cell lung cancer care for a cohort of 251 patients enrolled in a Brazilian public hospital and identified factors associated with the cost of treating the disease, considering sociodemographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics of patients, service utilization patterns and survival time. Estimates were obtained from the survey of direct medical cost per patient from the hospital's perspective. Data was collected from medical records and available hospital information systems. The ordinary least squares (OLS) method with logarithmic transformation of the dependent variable for the analysis of cost predictors was used to take into account the positive skewness of the costs distribution. The average cost of NSCLC was US$ 5647 for patients, with 71% of costs being associated to outpatient care. The main components of cost were daily hospital bed stay (22.6%), radiotherapy (15.5%) and chemotherapy (38.5%). The OLS model reported that, with 5% significance level, patients with higher levels of education, with better physical performance and less advanced disease have higher treatment costs. After controlling for the patient's survival time, only education and service utilization patterns were statistically significant. Individuals who were hospitalized or made use of radiotherapy or chemotherapy had higher costs. The use of these outpatient and hospital services explained most of the treatment cost variation, with a significant increase of the adjusted R 2 of 0.111 to 0.449 after incorporation of these variables in the model. The explanatory power of the complete model reached 62%. Inequities in disease treatment costs were observed, pointing to the need for strategies that reduce lower socioeconomic status and population's hurdles to accessing cancer care services.

  14. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Capital Costs: A Conceptual Framework for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Samuel G.

    2004-01-01

    The increased attention to costs in recent years at colleges and universities draws attention to the matter of whether all costs are reflected and accounted for in the institution's internal and external financial reports. One category--capital costs--is thought by some to be overlooked at times. The possible neglect of capital costs in…

  16. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  17. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (Phospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform.

  18. [Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Paula Buck de Oliveira; Perroca, Marcia Galan; Jericó, Marli de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%), and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8%) The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%), for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%). The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff.

  19. Costs of Planned Home vs. Hospital Birth in British Columbia Attended by Registered Midwives and Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Janssen

    Full Text Available Home birth is available to women in Canada who meet eligibility requirements for low risk status after assessment by regulated midwives. While UK researchers have reported lower costs associated with planned home birth, there have been no published studies of the costs of home versus hospital birth in Canada.Costs for all women planning home birth with a regulated midwife in British Columbia, Canada were compared with those of all women who met eligibility requirements for home birth and were planning to deliver in hospital with a registered midwife, and with a sample of women of similar low risk status planning birth in the hospital with a physician. We calculated costs of physician service billings, midwifery fees, hospital in-patient costs, pharmaceuticals, home birth supplies, and transport. We compared costs among study groups using the Kruskall Wallis test for independent groups.In the first 28 days postpartum, we report a $2,338 average savings per birth among women planning home birth compared to hospital birth with a midwife and $2,541 compared to hospital birth planned with a physician. In longer term outcomes, similar reductions were observed, with cost savings per birth at $1,683 compared to the planned hospital birth with a midwife, and $1,100 compared to the physician group during the first eight weeks postpartum. During the first year of life, costs for infants of mothers planning home birth were reduced overall. Cost savings compared to planned hospital births with a midwife were $810 and with a physician $1,146. Costs were similarly reduced when findings were stratified by parity.Planned home birth in British Columbia with a registered midwife compared to planned hospital birth is less expensive for our health care system up to 8 weeks postpartum and to one year of age for the infant.

  20. Knowledge of the mothers of hospitalized children in a university hospital regarding diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula do Rego

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research aimed at identifying the knowledge of the mothers regarding diarrhea. It was conducted with eight mothers of hospitalized children in a university hospital located in Santa Cruz, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, in 2012. Data were collected through open interviews and the analysis was based on Bardin. The categories emerging from the analysis were: understanding diarrhea and preventing/treating diarrhea. Regarding the understanding of diarrhea, mothers conceptualize and understand it from the symptoms, habits/eating mistakes and/or cultural beliefs. Concerning the prevention and treatment of the disease, the mothers highlight hygiene and home cleaning as preventive measures, as well the importance of home and hospital care measures. The interviewees have basic knowledge of pathology, further studies are necessary in order to define the current gap between the knowledge of mothers and recurrence of diarrhea cases, resulting in hospitalization and expenses with unnecessary treatment.

  1. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue-Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. METHODS: We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS, cost per day (CPD, inpatient mortality rate (IMR, and length of stay (LOS, using a generalized additive model. FINDINGS: There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001, from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. INTERPRETATIONS: These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role

  2. On Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Universal Design of ICT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Till; Fuglerud, Kristin Skeide

    2016-01-01

    In the ICT and IT domains, Universal Design is typically viewed as a burden and an expense, and its application is often justified only by ethics and/or legislation. Advocates for Universal Design (UD) are arguing that it is cost-effective, but so far there are few studies that document this in a detailed way. In this work, we discuss related research and studies dealing with the costs and benefits of accessible and usable ICT solutions. In particular, we discuss the findings regarding what is a universally designed solution, what is needed to make such a solution, how much does it cost, what impact can be anticipated by the extra effort, and how it can be measured. Finally, we suggest an approach for carrying out cost-benefit analyses of developing universally designed solutions. There is a weak indication that the economical benefits of UD solutions are much higher than the initial and running costs.

  3. Economic costs of hospitalized diarrheal disease in Bangladesh: a societal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abdur Razzaque; Sultana, Marufa; Mahumud, Rashidul Alam; Ali, Nausad; Huda, Tanvir M; Salim Uzzaman, M; Haider, Sabbir; Rahman, Hafizur; Islam, Ziaul; Khan, Jahangir A M; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec

    2018-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major threat to human health and still represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the burden of the diarrheal diseases is much lower in developed countries, it is a significant public health problem in low and middle-income countries like Bangladesh. Though diarrhea is preventable and managed with low-cost interventions, it is still the leading cause of morbidity according to the patient who sought care from public hospitals in Bangladesh indicating that significant resources are consumed in treating those patients. The aim of the study is to capture the inpatients and outpatient treatment cost of diarrheal disease and to measure the cost burden and coping mechanisms associated with diarrheal illness. This study was conducted in six randomly selected district hospitals from six divisions (larger administrative units) in Bangladesh. The study was performed from the societal perspective which means all types of costs were identified, measured and valued no matter who incurred them. Cost analysis was estimated using the guideline proposed by the World Health Organization for estimating the economic burden of diarrheal diseases. The study adopted quantitative techniques to collect the household and hospital level data including structured and semi-structured questionnaires, observation checklists, analysis of hospital database, telephone interviews and compilation of service statistics. The average total societal cost of illness per episode was BDT 5274.02 (US $ 67.18) whereas the average inpatient and outpatient costs were BDT 8675.09 (US $ 110.51) and BDT 1853.96 (US $ 23.62) respectively. The cost burden was significantly highest for poorest households, 21.45% of household income, compared to 4.21% of the richest quintile. Diarrheal diseases continue to be an overwhelming problem in Bangladesh. The economic impact of any public health interventions (either preventive or promotive) that can reduce the prevalence

  4. [Direct hospitalization costs associated with chronic Hepatitis C in the Valencian Community in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrachina Martínez, Isabel; Giner Durán, Remedios; Vivas-Consuelo, David; López Rodado, Antonio; Maldonado Segura, José Alberto

    2018-04-23

    Hospital costs associated with Chronic Hepatitis C (HCC) arise in the final stages of the disease. Its quantification is very helpful in order to estimate and check the burden of the disease and to make financial decisions for new antivirals. The highest costs are due to the decompensation of cirrosis. Cross-sectional observational study of hospital costs of HCC diagnoses in the Valencian Community in 2013 (n= 4,486 hospital discharges). Information source: Minimum basic set of data/ Basic Minimum Data Set. The costs were considered according to the rates established for the DRG (Diagnosis related group) associated with the episodes with diagnosis of hepatitis C. The average survival of patients since the onset of the decom- pensation of their cirrhosis was estimated by a Markov model, according to the probabilities of evolution of the disease existing in Literatura. There were 4,486 hospital episodes, 1,108 due to complications of HCC, which generated 6,713 stays, readmission rate of 28.2% and mortality of 10.2%. The hospital cost amounted to 8,788,593EUR: 3,306,333EUR corresponded to Cirrhosis (5,273EUR/patient); 1,060,521EUR to Carcinoma (6,350EUR/ patient) and 2,962,873EUR to transplantation (70,544EUR/paciente. Comorbidity was 1,458,866EUR. These costs are maintai- ned for an average of 4 years once the cirrhosis decompensation begins. Cirrhosis due to HCC generates a very high hospitalization's costs. The methodology used in the estimation of these costs from the DRG can be very useful to evaluate the trend and economic impact of this disease.

  5. Quality of life at work among nurses of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane de Fátima Almeida Lima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the quality of life at work of nurses from a university hospital, between January and April of 2011. A sample of 90 nurses answered the WHOQOL-Bref and a questionnaire addressing their sociodemographic profile and working conditions. Most subjects were female, aged between 23 and 40 years, married, and holding a specialization degree. The Physical domain had the highest mean (73.05 and the Environment domain the lowest (63.12. Subjects with the best scores in the quality of life domains were male, married, public servants, holding a master’s/doctorate degree, and working three jobs or more. The chosen instrument allowed for outlining the nurses’ profile and learning the domains and variables that affect their quality of life. It is suggested that university hospitals encourage nurses to pursue a stricto sensu graduate course. Descriptors: Quality of Life; Nurses, Male; Working Conditions; Hospitals, University.

  6. Cost-benefit analysis simulation of a hospital-based violence intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtle, Jonathan; Rich, Linda J; Bloom, Sandra L; Rich, John A; Corbin, Theodore J

    2015-02-01

    Violent injury is a major cause of disability, premature mortality, and health disparities worldwide. Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) show promise in preventing violent injury. Little is known, however, about how the impact of HVIPs may translate into monetary figures. To conduct a cost-benefit analysis simulation to estimate the savings an HVIP might produce in healthcare, criminal justice, and lost productivity costs over 5 years in a hypothetical population of 180 violently injured patients, 90 of whom received HVIP intervention and 90 of whom did not. Primary data from 2012, analyzed in 2013, on annual HVIP costs/number of clients served and secondary data sources were used to estimate the cost, number, and type of violent reinjury incidents (fatal/nonfatal, resulting in hospitalization/not resulting in hospitalization) and violent perpetration incidents (aggravated assault/homicide) that this population might experience over 5 years. Four different models were constructed and three different estimates of HVIP effect size (20%, 25%, and 30%) were used to calculate a range of estimates for HVIP net savings and cost-benefit ratios from different payer perspectives. All benefits were discounted at 5% to adjust for their net present value. Estimates of HVIP cost savings at the base effect estimate of 25% ranged from $82,765 (narrowest model) to $4,055,873 (broadest model). HVIPs are likely to produce cost savings. This study provides a systematic framework for the economic evaluation of HVIPs and estimates of HVIP cost savings and cost-benefit ratios that may be useful in informing public policy decisions. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  8. Controlling cost escalation of healthcare: making universal health coverage sustainable in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    An increasingly number of low- and middle-income countries have developed and implemented a national policy towards universal coverage of healthcare for their citizens over the past decade. Among them is China which has expanded its population coverage by health insurance from around 29.7% in 2003 to over 90% at the end of 2010. While both central and local governments in China have significantly increased financial inputs into the two newly established health insurance schemes: new cooperative medical scheme (NCMS) for the rural population, and urban resident basic health insurance (URBMI), the cost of healthcare in China has also been rising rapidly at the annual rate of 17.0%% over the period of the past two decades years. The total health expenditure increased from 74.7 billion Chinese yuan in 1990 to 1998 billion Chinese yuan in 2010, while average health expenditure per capital reached the level of 1490.1 Chinese yuan per person in 2010, rising from 65.4 Chinese yuan per person in 1990. The repaid increased population coverage by government supported health insurance schemes has stimulated a rising use of healthcare, and thus given rise to more pressure on cost control in China. There are many effective measures of supply-side and demand-side cost control in healthcare available. Over the past three decades China had introduced many measures to control demand for health care, via a series of co-payment mechanisms. The paper introduces and discusses new initiatives and measures employed to control cost escalation of healthcare in China, including alternative provider payment methods, reforming drug procurement systems, and strengthening the application of standard clinical paths in treating patients at hospitals, and analyses the impacts of these initiatives and measures. The paper finally proposes ways forward to make universal health coverage in China more sustainable. PMID:22992484

  9. From bibliometric analysis to research policy: the use of SIGAPS in Lille University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Patrick; Lefranc, Helene; Dufresne, Eric; Beuscart, Regis

    2006-01-01

    In French hospitals, the progressive setting up of the new rating systems has obliged the university hospitals to justify a certain amount of activities such as research, training or moreover recourse, which are specific missions of the university hospitals. In order to justify research activities, the Lille University Hospital has developed for now three years SIGAPS, a full-web bibliometric software which census and analyse, the scientific publications referenced in the Medline database. After data downloading, each article is classified on a 6 levels "quality scale derived from the impact factors. The system then performs, for a researcher or a team, a report allowing a quantitative and qualitative analysis. Started in Lille in November 2004, the inventory and analysis of data is now ending. For the period 2001-2004, 2814 articles have been published in 700 different journals. The total number of articles increased from 688 in 2001 to 757 in 2004. The mean impact factor was equal to 2.26 and 15.5 % of articles were classified as A, 20.9% as B. Those results confirm the high level of research of the University Hospital of Lille, in agreement with two other national studies which ranks our establishment at the 6th position for medical research activities among the French University Hospitals. Currently a similar evaluation has now began in the 9 other university hospital which have subscribed to the SIGAPS project. We works currently on new indicators as patents, thesis or conferences, or access to other databases as Sciencedirect or Scopus via the RIS format. The next step in the project is the implementation of a meta-base which will federate the information provided by each SIGAPS system. This meta-base will then allow us to perform comparisons between different hospitals, determine the national "sites of excellence" and create some clinical and research networks.

  10. Comparing methodologies for the allocation of overhead and capital costs to hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siok Swan; van Ineveld, Bastianus Martinus; Redekop, William Ken; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2009-06-01

    Typically, little consideration is given to the allocation of indirect costs (overheads and capital) to hospital services, compared to the allocation of direct costs. Weighted service allocation is believed to provide the most accurate indirect cost estimation, but the method is time consuming. To determine whether hourly rate, inpatient day, and marginal mark-up allocation are reliable alternatives for weighted service allocation. The cost approaches were compared independently for appendectomy, hip replacement, cataract, and stroke in representative general hospitals in The Netherlands for 2005. Hourly rate allocation and inpatient day allocation produce estimates that are not significantly different from weighted service allocation. Hourly rate allocation may be a strong alternative to weighted service allocation for hospital services with a relatively short inpatient stay. The use of inpatient day allocation would likely most closely reflect the indirect cost estimates obtained by the weighted service method.

  11. What do hypnotics cost hospitals and healthcare? [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Kripke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypnotics (sleeping pills are prescribed widely, but the economic costs of the harm they have caused have been largely unrecognized. Randomized clinical trials have observed that hypnotics increase the incidence of infections. Likewise, hypnotics increase the incidence of major depression and cause emergency admissions for overdoses and deaths.  Epidemiologically, hypnotic use is associated with cancer, falls, automobile accidents, and markedly increased overall mortality.  This article considers the costs to hospitals and healthcare payers of hypnotic-induced infections and other severe consequences of hypnotic use. These are a probable cause of excessive hospital admissions, prolonged lengths of stay at increased costs, and increased readmissions. Accurate information is scanty, for in-hospital hypnotic benefits and risks have scarcely been studied -- certainly not the economic costs of inpatient adverse effects.  Healthcare costs of outpatient adverse effects likewise need evaluation. In one example, use of hypnotics among depressed patients was strongly associated with higher healthcare costs and more short-term disability. A best estimate is that U.S. costs of hypnotic harms to healthcare systems are on the order of $55 billion, but conceivably might be as low as $10 billion or as high as $100 billion. More research is needed to more accurately assess unnecessary and excessive hypnotics costs to providers and insurers, as well as financial and health damages to the patients themselves.

  12. Abdominal Injuries in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operative findings, postoperative complications, and outcome of management. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16. Abdominal Injuries in University of Port Harcourt. Teaching Hospital. Amabra ...

  13. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831-308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93-6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66-4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257-US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033-US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%-24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55-8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94-7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044-US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353-US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%-12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%-11.77%). Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population.

  14. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, T.A.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Neder, H.D. [Instituto de Economia, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Araújo-Junqueira, L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); De-Souza, D.A. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica e Curso de Nutrição, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-12-17

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant.

  15. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, T.A.S.; Neder, H.D.; Araújo-Junqueira, L.; De-Souza, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant

  16. Career path determinants of Eco-Tourism and Hospitality Management university graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoneta Njeri Kariru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increase in the number of hospitality management university graduates working in non hospitality organizations in Kenya. Despite this, studies have not been undertaken to investigate the factors that influence these graduates’ career decisions. The purpose of this study was thus to investigate the career path determinants of Maseno University’s hospitality management graduates. The population of study was ecotourism, hotel and institution management graduates of Maseno University working within and outside the hospitality industry. 150 respondents, from the sampling frame consisting of students who graduated between the years 2005 and 2010, were selected through snowballing. Structured questionnaires were self-administered to the respondents. Frequencies, percentages, means, factor loadings and regressions were computed and presented using SPSS version 17. The study revealed that the graduates’ major career path determinants are unpredictable events, career satisfaction levels, chance and permanency of career.

  17. Application of Target Costing method in the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andor Pajrok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional approaches to managing costs are based on the costs that are the result of existing capabilities and resources in the company. Adding to these costs a specified margin or profit, leads to the sales price. If the market is not ready to accept such a selling price, managers need to find opportunities for rationalization and cost reduction. Target cost management begins the process of managing the sales price and the planned profit that the market can accept, and only then is it possible to determine the cost of the product. In the planning phase of the product and the manufacturing process the approach is to finding a method to lower costs and to reduce them as much as possible. The aim this of study is to investigate the application of target (strategy cost accounting methods in the Hospitality Industry.

  18. Length of stay and hospital costs among high-risk patients with hospital-origin Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca; Dean, Bonnie; Nathanson, Brian; Haidar, Tracy; Strauss, Marcie; Thomas, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (HO-CDAD) has been associated with longer length of stay (LOS) and higher hospital costs among patients in general. The burden of HO-CDAD is unknown among patients who may be at particular risk of poor outcomes: older patients, those with complex or chronic conditions (renal disease, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]), and those with concomitant antibiotic (CAbx) use during treatment for CDAD. A retrospective analysis (2005-2011) of the Health Facts® database (Cerner Corp., Kansas City, MO) containing comprehensive clinical records from 186 US hospitals identified hospitalized adult patients with HO-CDAD based on a positive C. difficile toxin collected >48 h after admission. Control patients were required to have total hospital LOS ≥2 days. Separate logistic regression models to estimate propensities were developed for each study group, with HO-CDAD vs controls as the outcome. Differences in LOS and costs were calculated between cases and controls for each group. A total of 4521 patients with HO-CDAD were identified. Mean age was 70 years, 54% were female, and 13% died. After matching, LOS was significantly greater among HO-CDAD patients (vs controls) in each group except IBD. The significant difference in LOS ranged from 3.0 (95% CI = 1.4-4.6) additional days in older patients to 7.8 (95% CI = 5.7-9.9) days in patients with CAbx exposure. HO-CDAD was associated with significantly higher costs among older patients (p cost data and potential misclassification of colonized patients as infected. Renal impairment, advanced age, cancer, and CAbx use are associated with significantly longer LOS among HO-CDAD patients, with CAbx users being the most resource intensive. Early identification and aggressive treatment of HO-CDAD in these groups may be warranted.

  19. Mandatory cost and other cost coming from the adoption of quality certifications in the hospitality business

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Rebull, M. Victoria; Hernandez, Ana Betriz; Banchieri, Lucia; Campa Planas, Fernando; Ginieis, Matias

    2011-01-01

    The adaptation to the regulation of hospitality business implies a relevant cost in the profit and loss account. Additionally, some companies in this business decide to add some voluntary quality and environmental certification systems, which also yields to increased costs. The purpose of this paper is to quantify these costs and to analyse if the hotel size influences them. A total of 67 different costs were considered in hotels of all sizes, in the region of Catalonia as one of the most rel...

  20. [Management accounting in hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzović, Z; Richter, D; Simunić, S; Bozić, R; Hadjina, N; Piacun, D; Harcet, B

    1998-12-01

    The periodic income and expenditure accounts produced at the hospital and departmental level enable successful short term management, but, in the long run do not help remove tensions between health care demand and limited resources, nor do they enable optimal medical planning within the limited financial resources. We are trying to estabilish disease category costs based on case mixing according to diagnostic categories (diagnosis related groups, DRG, or health care resource groups, HRG) and calculation of hospital standard product costs, e.g., radiology cost, preoperative nursing cost etc. The average DRG cost is composed of standard product costs plus any costs specific to a diagnostic category. As an example, current costing procedure for hip artheroplasty in the University Hospital Center Zagreb is compared to the management accounting approach based on British Health Care Resource experience. The knowledge of disease category costs based on management accounting requirements facilitates the implementation of medical programs within the given financial resources and devolves managerial responsibility closer to the clinical level where medical decisions take place.

  1. Economic analysis of intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange therapies for the treatment of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in a university-based hospital in the South of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Paulo Machado de Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Direct costs for treating Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS represent a significant financial burden to public hospitals. Few studies compared the cost of plasma exchange (PE treatment with human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg. Objectives: To compare the cost of two therapies for GBS: IVIg and PE. Secondary objective was to evaluate compliance to IVIg prescription guidelines of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee (PTC. Methods: A cross-sectional study included 25 patients with GBS admitted in a university affiliated hospital from June, 2003 through June, 2008. The costs of IVIg (n=20 and PE (n=5 were evaluated through the cost minimization method, considering direct medical costs yield by the management of the institution. Patients receiving treatments other than PE or IVIg were excluded. Data were collected by medical records review. Clinical endpoint was disability on discharge, established by the 7-point scale of Hughes. Compliance to the PTC guidelines was evaluated considering the dose and prescription regime of IVIg. Results: Twenty-five participants, ranging from 2 to 70 years of age, were included. No difference occurred in any medical variables related to the treatment or in the main clinical outcome measured by the Hughes’ scale. The mean direct cost of PE treatment was US$ 6,059± 1,701 per patient, and the same expense for IVIg was US$ 18,344±12,259 (P = 0.035. Total inpatient cost was US$ 25,730± 18,714 in the PE group, and 34,768± 27,766 (p=0.530 in the IVIg group. Conclusions: In a university-based hospital, PE is equally effective and less expensive than IVIg to treat GBS.

  2. Financial cost of the admissions for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant in a Brazilian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzedas-Netto, Alcides Augusto; Gonzalez, Adriano Miziara; Fagundes, Ulysses; Linhares, Marcelo Moura; Vicentine, Fernando Pompeu Piza; Romero, Luis Ramiro Núñez; Martins, José Luis; Pestana, José Osmar Medina; Oliva, Carlos Alberto Garcia

    2014-11-01

    To perform a cost analysis of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) in a Brazilian hospital. Between January 2008 and December 2011, 105 consecutive SPKTs at the Hospital of Kidney and Hypertension in Sao Paulo were evaluated. We evaluated the patient demographics, payment source (public health system or supplementary system), and the impact of each hospital cost component. The evaluated costs were corrected to December 2011 values and converted to US dollars. Of the 105 SPKT patients, 61.9% were men, and 38.1% were women. Eight patients died, and 97 were discharged (92.4%). Eighty-nine procedures were funded by the public health system. The cost for the patients who were discharged was $18.352.27; the cost for the deceased patients was $18.449.96 (p = 0.79). The FOR for SPKT during this period was positive at $5,620.65. The costs were distributed as follows: supplies, 36%; administrative costs, 20%; physician fees, 15%; intensive care unit, 10%; surgical center, 10%; ward, 9%. Mortality did not affect costs, and supplies were the largest cost component.

  3. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Sodhi

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care.

  4. Preventing hospital malnutrition: a survey on nutritional policies in an Italian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, M G; Pittiruti, M; De Rosa, S; Franchi, P; Pintaudi, G; Caricato, A; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    A proper strategy for fighting hospital malnutrition should include nutritional screening of all hospitalized patients, adequate utilization of the Hospital facilities - such as Clinical Nutrition Services or Nutrition Teams - and an adequate algorithm for the adoption of proper nutrition support (oral, enteral or parenteral) with proper timing. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the current policies of different non-intensive wards of our institution (a 1100 beds University Hospital) in terms of prevention of hospital malnutrition. We conducted a one-day survey to verify the current policies of nutritional screening and the indication to nutritional support in adult patients, interviewing nurses and physicians of our non-intensive hospital wards. A total of 29 wards were considered, which sum up to 755 hospitalized patients. We found that nutritional screening at admission is routinely assessed only in 41% of wards and that oral nutrient intake is controlled regularly only in 72%. Indication to clinical nutrition support and specifically to artificial nutrition is not consistent with the current international guidelines. Only 14% of patients were receiving artificial nutrition at the moment of the survey and the majority of them were given parenteral nutrition rather than enteral feeding. Our survey confirmed that in large hospitals the main barriers to the fight against hospital malnutrition are the lack of knowledge and/or commitment by nurses and physicians as well as the lack of well-defined hospital policies on early nutritional screening, surveillance of nutritional status and indication to nutrition support.

  5. Costs for Hospital Stays in the United States, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lauren M. Wier, M.P.H., and Claudia Steiner, M.D., M.P.H. Introduction Health care ... Truven Health Analytics), Wier, LM (Truven Health Analytics), Steiner, C (AHRQ). Costs for Hospital Stays in the ...

  6. Overviewof Contraceptive Use In Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Modern contraceptive methods accepted by 17,846 new clients in Jos University Teaching Hospital, a tertiary health institution, over two decades are presented. Methods: This was a review of the contraceptive trend in new clients who used the various methods of contraception over an 18-year period, ...

  7. Outpatient waiting time in Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Long waiting time for services has been identified as a reason people avoid presenting to for care in African countries. Design Examination of causes for long outpatient waiting time and the effect of measures to reduce waiting time. Setting Outpatient department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital.

  8. Home versus hospital immunoglobulin treatment for autoimmune neuropathies: A cost minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Solé, Guilhem; Desnuelle, Claude; Delmont, Emilien; Gauthier-Darnis, Marc; Puget, Sophie; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle

    2018-02-01

    Prior clinical trials have suggested that home-based Ig treatment in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and its variant Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS) is safe and effective and is less costly than hospital-administered intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). A French prospective, dual-center, cost minimization analysis was carried out to evaluate IVIg administration (5% concentrated) at home versus in hospital with regard to costs, patients' autonomy, and patients' quality of life. The primary endpoint was the overall cost of treatment, and we adopted the perspective of the payer (French Social Health Insurance). Twenty-four patients aged 52.3 (12.2) years were analyzed: nine patients with MMN, eight with CIDP, and seven with LSS. IVIg (g/kg) dosage was 1.51 ± 0.43 in hospital and 1.52 ± 0.4 at home. Nine-month total costs per patient extrapolated to 1 year of treatment were €48,189 ± 26,105 versus €91,798 ± 51,125 in the home and hospital groups, respectively ( p  home treatment were the good tolerance and absence of side effects of IVIg administration, as well as a good understanding of the advantages and drawbacks of home treatment (75% of respondents). The mRankin scores before and after switch to home treatment were 1.61 ± 0.72 and 1.36 ± 0.76, respectively ( p  =   .027). The switch from hospital-based to home-based IVIg treatment for patients with immune neuropathy represents potentially significant savings in the management of the disease.

  9. Estimating the Hospital Delivery Costs Associated With Severe Maternal Morbidity in New York City, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Renata E; Angley, Meghan; Won, Sang Hee; Wilcox, Wendy; Searing, Hannah; Tsao, Tsu-Yu

    2018-02-01

    To quantify the average and total hospital delivery costs associated with severe maternal morbidity in excess of nonsevere maternal morbidity deliveries over a 5-year period in New York City adjusting for other sociodemographic and clinical factors. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using linked birth certificates and hospital discharge data for New York City deliveries from 2008 to 2012. Severe maternal morbidity was defined using a published algorithm of International Classification of Diseases, 9 Revision, Clinical Modification disease and procedure codes. Hospital costs were estimated by converting hospital charges using factors specific to each year and hospital and to each diagnosis. These estimates approximate what it costs the hospital to provide services (excluding professional fees) and were used in all subsequent analyses. To estimate adjusted mean costs associated with severe maternal morbidity, we used multivariable regression models with a log link, gamma distribution, robust standard errors, and hospital fixed effects, controlling for age, race and ethnicity, neighborhood poverty, primary payer, number of deliveries, method of delivery, comorbidities, and year. We used the adjusted mean cost to determine the average and total hospital delivery costs associated with severe maternal morbidity in excess of nonsevere maternal morbidity deliveries from 2008 to 2012. Approximately 2.3% (n=13,502) of all New York City delivery hospitalizations were complicated by severe maternal morbidity. Compared with nonsevere maternal morbidity deliveries, these hospitalizations were clinically complicated, required more and intensive clinical services, and had a longer stay in the hospital. The average cost of delivery with severe maternal morbidity was $14,442 (95% CI $14,128-14,756), compared with $7,289 (95% CI $7,276-7,302) among deliveries without severe maternal morbidity. After adjusting for other factors, the difference between deliveries

  10. Childhood pneumonia at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-01-09

    Jan 9, 2013 ... which was significantly higher ... University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital between 1st July ..... two organisms formed more than 40% of the isolates. ... Educational Services; 2007:425-. 41. 3. ... Brazilian children in a metropoli-.

  11. The Cost of Nurse-Midwifery Care: Use of Interventions, Resources, and Associated Costs in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Molly R; Murphy, Sean M; Fitzgerald, Cynthia E; Andersen, H Frank; Daratha, Kenn B

    Obstetrical care often involves multiple expensive, and often elective, interventions that may increase costs to patients, payers, and the health care system with little effect on patient outcomes. The objectives of this study were to examine the following hospital related outcomes: 1) use of labor and birth interventions, 2) inpatient duration of stay, and 3) total direct health care costs for patients attended by a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) compared with those attended by an obstetrician-gynecologist (OB-GYN), within an environment of safe and high-quality care. Electronic health records for 1,441 medically low-risk women who gave birth at a hospital located in the U.S. Pacific Northwest between January and September 2013 were sampled. Multilevel regression and generalized linear models were used for analysis. Reduced use of selected labor and birth interventions (cesarean delivery, vacuum-assisted delivery, epidural anesthesia, labor induction, and cervical ripening), reduced maternal duration of stay, and reduced overall costs associated with CNM-led care relative to OB-GYN-led care were observed for medically low-risk women in a hospital setting. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were comparable across groups. This study supports consideration of increased use of CNMs as providers for the care of women at low risk for complications to decrease costs for the health care system. The use of CNMs to the fullest extent within state-regulated scopes of practice could result in more efficient use of hospital resources. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic Pregnancy in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We set out to determine the socio-demographic factors,pattern of presentation and management of ectopic pregnancy in a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. A retrospective descriptive analysis of all cases of ectopic pregnancy over a 2-year period was carried out. The case notes were retrieved from the ...

  13. Web-based training in German university eye hospitals - Education 2.0?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handzel, Daniel M; Hesse, L

    2011-01-01

    To analyse web-based training in ophthalmology offered by German university eye hospitals. In January 2010 the websites of all 36 German university hospitals were searched for information provided for visitors, students and doctors alike. We evaluated the offer in terms of quantity and quality. All websites could be accessed at the time of the study. 28 pages provided information for students and doctors, one page only for students, three exclusively for doctors. Four pages didn't offer any information for these target groups. The websites offered information on events like congresses or students curricular education, there were also material for download for these events or for other purposes. We found complex e-learning-platforms on 9 pages. These dealt with special ophthalmological topics in a didactic arrangement. In spite of the extensive possibilities offered by the technology of Web 2.0, many conceivable tools were only rarely made available. It was not always possible to determine if the information provided was up-to-date, very often the last actualization of the content was long ago. On one page the date for the last change was stated as 2004. Currently there are 9 functional e-learning-applications offered by German university eye hospitals. Two additional hospitals present links to a project of the German Ophthalmological Society. There was a considerable variation in quantity and quality. No website made use of crediting successful studying, e.g. with CME-points or OSCE-credits. All German university eye hospitals present themselves in the World Wide Web. However, the lack of modern, technical as well as didactical state-of-the-art learning applications is alarming as it leaves an essential medium of today's communication unused.

  14. Universal isolation precautions for patients at an academic hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Maziero,Vanessa Gomes; Vannuchi,Marli Terezinha Oliveira; Vituri,Dagmar Willamourius; Haddad,Maria do Carmo Lourenço; Tada,Cristiane Nakaya

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply universal isolation precautions for patients at an academic hospital by a nursing team. METHODS: This descriptive and prospective study used data from advice service of quality control and nursing care that were gathered in observational reports of universal isolation precautions for patients admitted in two surgical inpatient units during 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: The mean general classification for both units was between desirable and adequate in the observational analysis...

  15. Hospital information systems: experience at the fully digitized Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Hwang, Hee; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-08-01

    The different levels of health information technology (IT) adoption and its integration into hospital workflow can affect the maximization of the benefits of using of health IT. We aimed at sharing our experiences and the journey to the successful adoption of health IT over 13 years at a tertiary university hospital in South Korea. The integrated system of comprehensive applications for direct care, support care, and smart care has been implemented with the latest IT and a rich user information platform, achieving the fully digitized hospital. The users experience design methodology, barcode and radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies, smartphone and mobile technologies, and data analytics were integrated into hospital workflow. Applications for user-centered electronic medical record (EMR) and clinical decision support (CDS), closed loop medication administration (CLMA), mobile EMR and dashboard system for care coordination, clinical data warehouse (CDW) system, and patient engagement solutions were designed and developed to improve quality of care, work efficiency, and patient safety. We believe that comprehensive electronic health record systems and patient-centered smart hospital applications will go a long way in ensuring seamless patient care and experience.

  16. Discharges with surgical procedures performed less often than once per month per hospital account for two-thirds of hospital costs of inpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Liam; Dexter, Franklin; Park, Sae-Hwan; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-09-01

    Most surgical discharges (54%) at the average hospital are for procedures performed no more often than once per month at that hospital. We hypothesized that such uncommon procedures would be associated with an even greater percentage of the total cost of performing all surgical procedures at that hospital. Observational study. State of Texas hospital discharge abstract data: 4th quarter of 2015 and 1st quarter of 2016. Inpatients discharged with a major therapeutic ("operative") procedure. For each of N=343 hospitals, counts of discharges, sums of lengths of stay (LOS), sums of diagnosis related group (DRG) case-mix weights, and sums of charges were obtained for each procedure or combination of procedures, classified by International Classification of Diseases version 10 Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS). Each discharge was classified into 2 categories, uncommon versus not, defined as a procedure performed at most once per month versus those performed more often than once per month. Major procedures performed at most once per month per hospital accounted for an average among hospitals of 68% of the total inpatient costs associated with all major therapeutic procedures. On average, the percentage of total costs associated with uncommon procedures was 26% greater than expected based on their share of total discharges (Pcosts among surgical patients can be attributed to procedures performed at most once per month per hospital. The finding that such uncommon procedures account for a large percentage of costs is important because methods of cost accounting by procedure are generally unsuitable for them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Costs, mortality likelihood and outcomes of hospitalized US children with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junxin; Xiang, Huiyun; Wheeler, Krista; Smith, Gary A; Stallones, Lorann; Groner, Jonathan; Wang, Zengzhen

    2009-07-01

    To examine the hospitalization costs and discharge outcomes of US children with TBI and to evaluate a severity measure, the predictive mortality likelihood level. Data from the 2006 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) were used to report the national estimates and characteristics of TBI-associated hospitalizations among US children percentage of children with TBI caused by motor vehicle crashes (MVC) and falls was calculated according to the predictive mortality likelihood levels (PMLL), death in hospital and discharge into long-term rehabilitation facilities. Associations with the PMLL, discharge outcomes and average hospital charges were examined. In 2006, there were an estimated 58 900 TBI-associated hospitalizations among US children, accounting for $2.56 billion in hospital charges. MVCs caused 38.9% and falls caused 21.2% of TBI hospitalizations. The PMLL was strongly associated with TBI type, length of hospital stay, hospital charges and discharge disposition. About 4% of children with fall or MVC related TBIs died in hospital and 9% were discharged into long-term facilities. The PMLL may provide a useful tool to assess characteristics and treatment outcomes of hospitalized TBI children, but more research is still needed.

  18. QUALITY OF WORKING LIFE IN COMMODITIZED HOSPITALS AND UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Blanch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New Public Management (NPM turns public hospital and university services into market enterprises. The aim of the paper is to analyze and describe the impact of this metamorphosis on the labor subjectivity of the staff employed in such services. Empirical studies in Spanish and Latin American hospitals and universities uncover a paradoxical experience: relative manifest satisfaction with material and technical conditions allowing them to work harder and better, but also latent discomfort with the task overload, and professional and ethical dilemmas posed by new organizational demands, in the face of which staff develop ways of coping ranging from manifest obedience to latent resistance. This supports the reasons for the redesign of these services based on a better balance between commercial and social demands, managerial and professional values, and between business efficiency and quality of working life.

  19. Influencing Factor of Postoperation Fast-track Recovery and in Hospital Cost after Lobctomy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua SU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It is unknown that the postoperation fast-track recovery and in hospital cost of the lobectomy in lung cancer, we explored the influencing factor of postoperative fast-track recovery and in hospital cost after undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients (n=176 who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2010 and November 2011 by a thoracic surgeon. Results The hospital costs of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS lobectomy (47,308.21 ¥ is significantly higher than open lobectomy (45,664.31 ¥(P=0.007. The hospital costs of body mass index (BMI ≥ 24 kg/m2 (51,186.99 ¥ is significantly higher than BMI < 24 kg/m2 (41,701.64 ¥(P=0.032. The hospital stay of VATS lobectomy (5.70 d is significantly less than open lobectomy (7.10 d(P<0.001. Conclusion These findings indicate that preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation and VATS lobectomy is contributed to fast-track recovery for patients who undergo lobectomy, but increase the hospital costs.

  20. Event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major complications of diabetes: a multicountry comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Clarke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes imposes a substantial burden globally in terms of premature mortality, morbidity, and health care costs. Estimates of economic outcomes associated with diabetes are essential inputs to policy analyses aimed at prevention and treatment of diabetes. Our objective was to estimate and compare event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major diabetes-related complications in high-, middle-, and low-income countries.Incidence and history of diabetes-related complications, hospital admissions, and length of stay were recorded in 11,140 patients with type 2 diabetes participating in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE study (mean age at entry 66 y. The probability of hospital utilization and number of days in hospital for major events associated with coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, and nephropathy were estimated for three regions (Asia, Eastern Europe, and Established Market Economies using multiple regression analysis. The resulting estimates of days spent in hospital were multiplied by regional estimates of the costs per hospital bed-day from the World Health Organization to compute annual acute and long-term costs associated with the different types of complications. To assist, comparability, costs are reported in international dollars (Int$, which represent a hypothetical currency that allows for the same quantities of goods or services to be purchased regardless of country, standardized on purchasing power in the United States. A cost calculator accompanying this paper enables the estimation of costs for individual countries and translation of these costs into local currency units. The probability of attending a hospital following an event was highest for heart failure (93%-96% across regions and lowest for nephropathy (15%-26%. The average numbers of days in hospital given at least one admission were greatest for stroke (17-32 d across

  1. Hospitable Gestures in the University Lecture: Analysing Derrida's Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Based on archival research, this article analyses the pedagogical gestures in Derrida's (largely unpublished) lectures on hospitality (1995/96), with particular attention to the enactment of hospitality in these gestures. The motivation for this analysis is twofold. First, since the large-group university lecture has been widely critiqued as…

  2. A hospital-level cost-effectiveness analysis model for toxigenic Clostridium difficile detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoye, E; Vandecandelaere, P; De Beenhouwer, H; Coppens, G; Cartuyvels, R; Van den Abeele, A; Frans, J; Laffut, W

    2015-10-01

    Despite thorough analyses of the analytical performance of Clostridium difficile tests and test algorithms, the financial impact at hospital level has not been well described. Such a model should take institution-specific variables into account, such as incidence, request behaviour and infection control policies. To calculate the total hospital costs of different test algorithms, accounting for days on which infected patients with toxigenic strains were not isolated and therefore posed an infectious risk for new/secondary nosocomial infections. A mathematical algorithm was developed to gather the above parameters using data from seven Flemish hospital laboratories (Bilulu Microbiology Study Group) (number of tests, local prevalence and hospital hygiene measures). Measures of sensitivity and specificity for the evaluated tests were taken from the literature. List prices and costs of assays were provided by the manufacturer or the institutions. The calculated cost included reagent costs, personnel costs and the financial burden following due and undue isolations and antibiotic therapies. Five different test algorithms were compared. A dynamic calculation model was constructed to evaluate the cost:benefit ratio of each algorithm for a set of institution- and time-dependent inputted variables (prevalence, cost fluctuations and test performances), making it possible to choose the most advantageous algorithm for its setting. A two-step test algorithm with concomitant glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin testing, followed by a rapid molecular assay was found to be the most cost-effective algorithm. This enabled resolution of almost all cases on the day of arrival, minimizing the number of unnecessary or missing isolations. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost-Effective Recruitment need for 24x7 Paediatricians in the State General Hospitals in Relation to the Reduction of Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ranjana; Chatterjee, Sukanta

    2016-10-01

    According to World Health Organisation (WHO), improvement of hospital based care can have an impact of upto 30% in reducing Infant Mortality Rate (IMR), whereas, strengthening universal outreach and family-community based care is known to have a greater impact. The study intends to assess how far gaps in the public health facilities contribute towards infant mortality, as 2/3 rd of infant mortality is due to suboptimum care seeking and weak health system. To identify cost-effectiveness of employment of additional paediatric manpower to provide round the clock skilled service to reduce IMR in the present state health facilities at the district general hospitals. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital and district hospitals of 2 districts (Hooghly and Howrah in West Bengal). Factors affecting infant mortality and shift wise analysis of proportion of infant deaths were analysed in both tertiary and district level hospitals. Information was gathered in a predesigned proforma for one year period by verifying hospital records and by personal interview with service personnel in the health establishment. SPSS software version 17 (Chicago, IL) was used. The p-value was calculated by Fischer exact t-test. Available hospital beds per 1000 population were 1.1. Percentage of paediatric beds available in comparison to total hospital bed was disproportionately lower (10%). Dearth of skilled medical care provider at odd hours in district hospitals resulted in significantly greater infant death (p based infant mortality and it is cost-effective.

  4. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  5. Water immersion during labor and birth: is there an extra cost for hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G

    2017-06-01

    Water immersion during labor and birth is growing in popularity, and many hospitals are now considering offering this service to laboring women. Some advantages of water immersion are demonstrated, but others remain uncertain, and particularly, few studies have examined the financial impact of such a device on hospitals. This study simulated what could be the extra cost of water immersion for hospitals. Clinical outcomes were drawn from the results of systematic reviews already published, and cost units were those used in the Quebec health network. A decision tree was used with microsimulations of representative laboring women. Sensitivity analyses were performed as regards analgesic use and labor duration. Microsimulations indicated an extra cost between $166.41 and $274.76 (2014 Canadian dollars) for each laboring woman as regards the scenario considered. The average extra cost was $221.12 (95% confidence interval, 219.97-222.28). While water immersion allows better clinical outcomes, implementation and other costs are higher than the savings generated, which leads to a small extra cost to allow women to potentially have more relaxation and less pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The calculation of costs of postal network and universal postal service based on standard and average cost principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Mladenka Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of universal postal service involves high costs for operator, especially in rural areas. The aim of this paper is to propose and test tool for managing the cost of providing universal postal service and maintaining the postal network in order to facilitate understanding of the problem in the sector. The proposed approach use standard prices and standard quantities (the redefined number of postal units, the number of employees, etc. as well as average costs for calculation of the costs of the universal postal service and postal network. The methodology provides the efficiency analysis, benchmarking and identification of causes of poor performance of management and resource allocation. It can be used for postal operators that do not have modern accounting systems.

  7. Economic rationalism and the cost efficiency of hospital chaplaincy: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, C; Carey, L B

    2000-01-01

    Health care reform is also occurring in Australia and effects hospital chaplaincy programs. "Economic rationalism" is the philosophic foundation of this effort and its contrast with the values inherit in hospital chaplaincy are highlighted. Selected research results from the Australian system are described and the authors offer a perspective on the cost efficiency of hospital chaplaincy.

  8. In-hospital costs associated with chronic constipation in Belgium: a retrospective database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, P; Lamotte, M; Joseph, A; Dubois, D; Boeckxstaens, G

    2014-03-01

    Real-life data on the economic burden of chronic idiopathic constipation are scarce. The objectives of this study were to assess hospitalization resource use and costs associated with chronic constipation and its complications in Belgium. This was a single country, retrospective study using the IMS Hospital Disease Database (2008), which comprises data on 34% of acute hospital beds in Belgium and contains information on patient demographics, length of stay (LOS), billed costs, drug use, diagnoses, and procedures. Stays with a primary diagnosis of constipation, or a secondary diagnosis of constipation and a concomitant diagnosis of a constipation-related complication, were selected. Patients with diagnoses of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, or who had stays involving potentially constipation-inducing procedures, were excluded as having secondary constipation. Patients receiving opioids, calcium-antagonists, antipsychotics or antidepressants were excluded as having drug-induced constipation. In total, 1541 eligible patients were identified. The average unadjusted cost per day in hospital for idiopathic constipation was €441 (€311 ± 1.4 in day clinic visits without overnight stays; €711 ± 14.0 in full hospitalizations with complications). The average LOS in a full hospitalization setting was 7.0 and 4.0 days in stays with and without complications, respectively. The most frequent drug and procedural treatments were osmotically acting laxatives (with complications: 42.61%; without complications: 35.69%), and transanal enema (2.32% and 2.03%), respectively. The burden of constipation is often underestimated; it is a condition reflected by hospital-related costs comparable to such indications as migraine, which increase when associated with complications. © 2013 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Cost Analysis of Hospitalizations for Infections Related to Injection Drug Use at a County Safety-Net Hospital in Miami, Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansel Tookes

    Full Text Available Infections related to injection drug use are common. Harm reduction strategies such as syringe exchange programs and skin care clinics aim to prevent these infections in injection drug users (IDUs. Syringe exchange programs are currently prohibited by law in Florida. The goal of this study was to estimate the mortality and cost of injection drug use-related bacterial infections over a 12-month period to the county safety-net hospital in Miami, Florida. Additionally, the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus among this cohort of hospitalized IDUs was estimated.IDUs discharged from Jackson Memorial Hospital were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for illicit drug abuse and endocarditis, bacteremia or sepsis, osteomyelitis and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs. 349 IDUs were identified for chart abstraction and 92% were either uninsured or had publicly funded insurance. SSTIs, the most common infection, were reported in 64% of IDUs. HIV seroprevalence was 17%. Seventeen patients (4.9% died during their hospitalization. The total cost for treatment for injection drug use-related infections to Jackson Memorial Hospital over the 12-month period was $11.4 million.Injection drug use-related bacterial infections represent a significant morbidity for IDUs in Miami-Dade County and a substantial financial cost to the county hospital. Strategies aimed at reducing risk of infections associated with injection drug use could decrease morbidity and the cost associated with these common, yet preventable infections.

  10. Safety and cost savings of reducing adult dengue hospitalization in a tertiary care hospital in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda K; Earnest, Arul; Carrasco, Luis R; Thein, Tun L; Gan, Victor C; Lee, Vernon J; Lye, David C; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2013-01-01

    Previously, most dengue cases in Singapore were hospitalized despite low incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or death. To minimize hospitalization, the Communicable Disease Centre at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) in Singapore implemented new admission criteria which included clinical, laboratory, and DHF predictive parameters in 2007. All laboratory-confirmed dengue patients seen at TTSH during 2006-2008 were retrospectively reviewed for clinical data. Disease outcome and clinical parameters were compared over the 3 years. There was a 33.0% mean decrease in inpatients after the new criteria were implemented compared with the period before (p hospitalization, yielding considerable cost savings. A minority of DHF patients with mild symptoms recovered uneventfully through outpatient management.

  11. Association between payer mix and costs, revenues and profitability: a cross-sectional study of Lebanese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, S; Ammar, W; Natafgi, N; Mourad, Y; Dimassi, H; Harb, H

    2015-09-08

    This study aimed to examine the association between the payer mix and the financial performance of public and private hospitals in Lebanon. The sample comprised 24 hospitals, representing the variety of hospital characteristics in Lebanon. The distribution of the payer mix revealed that the main sources of revenue were public sources (61.1%), out-of-pocket (18.4%) and private insurance (18.2%). Increases in the percentage of revenue from public sources were associated with lower total costs and revenues, but not profit margins. An inverse association was noted between increased revenue from private insurance and profitability, attributed to increased costs. Increased percentage of out of- pocket payments was associated with lower costs and higher profitability. The study provides evidence that payer mix is associated with hospital costs, revenues and profitability. This should initiate/inform discussions between public and private payers and hospitals about the level of payment and its association with hospital sector financial viability.

  12. U.S. and International In-Hospital Costs of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael J; Gaies, Michael G; Prosser, Lisa A

    2015-08-01

    The in-hospital costs of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have not been well established. To evaluate the in-hospital costs of ECMO technology in both US and non-US settings for all patient types. Systematic review of English-language articles, using the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and EconLit databases. Searches consisted of the terms 'ECMO' AND 'health expenditures' or 'resource use' or 'costs' or 'cost analysis' or 'cost(-)effectiveness' or 'cost(-)benefit' or 'cost(-)utility' or 'economic(-)evaluation' or 'economic' or 'QALY' or 'cost per quality-adjusted life year'. Only full scientific research articles were included. The exclusion criteria included papers that focused on pumpless ECMO, simulation training or decision support systems; papers that did not include human subjects or were not written in English; papers that did not mention ECMO, costs, economics or resource utilization; and papers that included only outside-hospital, infrastructure capital or device capital costs. Data extraction was completed by one author, using predefined criteria. From the database searches, 1371 results were returned, 226 records underwent a full review and 18 studies were included in the final review. Three papers studied adult populations, two studied adult and paediatric populations, five studied only paediatric populations, one studied a paediatric and neonatal population, and the remaining seven exclusively examined ECMO in neonatal populations. The sample sizes ranged from 8 to 8753 patients. ECMO for respiratory conditions was the most common diagnosis category, followed by congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and then cardiac conditions. Most papers (n = 14) used retrospective cost collection. Only eight papers stated the perspective of the cost analysis. The results show a large variation in the cost of ECMO over multiple cost categories (e.g., range of total in-hospital costs of treatment: USD 42,554-537,554 [in 2013 values]). In the U.S.A., the

  13. Triple Gestations in Two University Teaching Hospitals in Yaounde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Central Hospital Yaounde/Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences,. University of Yaounde I, BP 337, Yaounde, Cameroon. Address correspondence to E. Nkwabong, enkwabong@yahoo.fr. Received 27 November 2010; Accepted 19 January 2011. Abstract The frequency of ...

  14. Direct medical costs of hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases in Shanghai, China: trends and projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Petzold, Max; Cao, Junshan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Weibing

    2015-05-01

    Few studies in China have focused on direct expenditures for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), making cost trends for CVDs uncertain. Epidemic modeling and forecasting may be essential for health workers and policy makers to reduce the cost burden of CVDs.To develop a time series model using Box-Jenkins methodology for a 15-year forecasting of CVD hospitalization costs in Shanghai.Daily visits and medical expenditures for CVD hospitalizations between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 were analyzed. Data from 2012 were used for further analyses, including yearly total health expenditures and expenditures per visit for each disease, as well as per-visit-per-year medical costs of each service for CVD hospitalizations. Time series analyses were performed to determine the long-time trend of total direct medical expenditures for CVDs and specific expenditures for each disease, which were used to forecast expenditures until December 31, 2030.From 2008 to 2012, there were increased yearly trends for both hospitalizations (from 250,354 to 322,676) and total costs (from US $ 388.52 to 721.58 million per year in 2014 currency) in Shanghai. Cost per CVD hospitalization in 2012 averaged US $ 2236.29, with the highest being for chronic rheumatic heart diseases (US $ 4710.78). Most direct medical costs were spent on medication. By the end of 2030, the average cost per visit per month for all CVDs was estimated to be US $ 4042.68 (95% CI: US $ 3795.04-4290.31) for all CVDs, and the total health expenditure for CVDs would reach over US $1.12 billion (95% CI: US $ 1.05-1.19 billion) without additional government interventions.Total health expenditures for CVDs in Shanghai are estimated to be higher in the future. These results should be a valuable future resource for both researchers on the economic effects of CVDs and for policy makers.

  15. Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations among severe acute respiratory infections cases in three provinces in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. METHODS: Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital's Hospital Information System (HIS and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range and median (interquartile range [IQR] costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years, adults (16-64 years and elderly (≥65 years groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80-$27,545 for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR direct medical cost was $231 ($164, $854 ($890, and $2,263 ($7,803 for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. CONCLUSION: Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies.

  16. The impact of hospital market structure on patient volume, average length of stay, and the cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C; Luft, H S

    1985-12-01

    A variety of recent proposals rely heavily on market forces as a means of controlling hospital cost inflation. Sceptics argue, however, that increased competition might lead to cost-increasing acquisitions of specialized clinical services and other forms of non-price competition as means of attracting physicians and patients. Using data from hospitals in 1972 we analyzed the impact of market structure on average hospital costs, measured in terms of both cost per patient and cost per patient day. Under the retrospective reimbursement system in place at the time, hospitals in more competitive environments exhibited significantly higher costs of production than did those in less competitive environments.

  17. Potential Cost-effectiveness of Early Identification of Hospital-acquired Infection in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Li, Yanhong; Hudson, Lori L; Chu, Vivian H; Himmel, Tiffany; Limkakeng, Alex T; Katz, Jason N; Glickman, Seth W; McClain, Micah T; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Fowler, Vance G; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Woods, Christopher W; Reed, Shelby D

    2016-03-01

    Limitations in methods for the rapid diagnosis of hospital-acquired infections often delay initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy. New diagnostic approaches offer potential clinical and cost-related improvements in the management of these infections. We developed a decision modeling framework to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of a rapid biomarker assay to identify hospital-acquired infection in high-risk patients earlier than standard diagnostic testing. The framework includes parameters representing rates of infection, rates of delayed appropriate therapy, and impact of delayed therapy on mortality, along with assumptions about diagnostic test characteristics and their impact on delayed therapy and length of stay. Parameter estimates were based on contemporary, published studies and supplemented with data from a four-site, observational, clinical study. Extensive sensitivity analyses were performed. The base-case analysis assumed 17.6% of ventilated patients and 11.2% of nonventilated patients develop hospital-acquired infection and that 28.7% of patients with hospital-acquired infection experience delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy with standard care. We assumed this percentage decreased by 50% (to 14.4%) among patients with true-positive results and increased by 50% (to 43.1%) among patients with false-negative results using a hypothetical biomarker assay. Cost of testing was set at $110/d. In the base-case analysis, among ventilated patients, daily diagnostic testing starting on admission reduced inpatient mortality from 12.3 to 11.9% and increased mean costs by $1,640 per patient, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $21,389 per life-year saved. Among nonventilated patients, inpatient mortality decreased from 7.3 to 7.1% and costs increased by $1,381 with diagnostic testing. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $42,325 per life-year saved. Threshold analyses revealed the probabilities of developing

  18. In search of financial sufficiency in the Spanish public university: From financing to the cost control and cost management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Aguilà

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current socio-economic context characterized by restrictive budgetary policies in the countries of the European Union has led to a reduction in public funding in the Spanish public university raising the deficit in many universities. That is why, while they are completing the implementation of a cost accounting model (Modelo Canoa to quantify their real financial needs, are also increasing academic rates with the limits established in the Decree-Law 14/2012 of 20 April as practically the only resource. This fact may ultimately affect demand. It is urgent to find therefore new sources of private funding as well as implementing techniques to control and reduce costs justified by the extreme financial situations of some universities. Design/methodology: These new sources of private funding as well as the specific techniques of control and cost management that are used in public universities outside of Spain are described. It has also made a poll to the managers of the Spanish public universities considering the diversification of funding sources and the feasibility of adopting specific techniques of control and cost management to help the achievement of financial sufficiency. Findings: Especially in the US universities, financing is more diversified and not depend so much of the increase in public rates. Specific techniques of control and cost management are also used and they are applicable to the Spanish case according to the opinion of the managers. Research limitations/implications: 82% of managers have completed the proposed poll. Originality/value: Identifying sources of private funding and specific techniques of control and cost management applicable to the Spanish public universities.

  19. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) and Potential Cost Savings and Shortened Bed Stays In an Acute Hospital Setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Brien, C

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inserted central catheters (PICCs) have increasingly become the mainstay of patients requiring prolonged treatment with antibiotics, transfusions, oncologic IV therapy and total parental nutrition. They may also be used in delivering a number of other medications to patients. In recent years, bed occupancy rates have become hugely pressurized in many hospitals and any potential solutions to free up beds is welcome. Recent introductions of doctor or nurse led intravenous (IV) outpatient based treatment teams has been having a direct effect on early discharge of patients and in some cases avoiding admission completely. The ability to deliver outpatient intravenous treatment is facilitated by the placement of PICCs allowing safe and targeted treatment of patients over a prolonged period of time. We carried out a retrospective study of 2,404 patients referred for PICCs from 2009 to 2015 in a university teaching hospital. There was an exponential increase in the number of PICCs requested from 2011 to 2015 with a 64% increase from 2012 to 2013. The clear increase in demand for PICCs in our institution is directly linked to the advent of outpatient intravenous antibiotic services. In this paper, we assess the impact that the use of PICCs combined with intravenous outpatient treatment may have on cost and hospital bed demand. We advocate that a more widespread implementation of this service throughout Ireland may result in significant cost savings as well as decreasing the number of patients on hospital trollies.

  20. At What Cost? Examining the Cost Effectiveness of a Universal Social-Emotional Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Leah J.; DiPerna, James C.; Hart, Susan Crandall; Crowley, Max

    2018-01-01

    Although implementation of universal social-emotional learning programs is becoming more common in schools, few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of such programs. As such, the purpose of this article is two fold. First, we provide an overview of cost-effectiveness methods for school-based programs, and second, we share results of a…

  1. Taxes, bankruptcy costs, and capital structure in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean S; Yang, Jie; Carroll, Nathan

    2018-02-01

    About 60% of the US hospitals are not-for-profit and it is not clear how traditional theories of capital structure should be adapted to understand the borrowing behavior of not-for-profit hospitals. This paper identifies important determinants of capital structure taken from theories describing for-profit firms as well as prior literature on not-for-profit hospitals. We examine the differential effects these factors have on the capital structure of for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. Specifically, we use a difference-in-differences regression framework to study how differences in leverage between for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals change in response to key explanatory variables (i.e. tax rates and bankruptcy costs). The sample in this study includes most US short-term general acute hospitals from 2000 to 2012. We find that personal and corporate income taxes and bankruptcy costs have significant and distinct effects on the capital structure of for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. Specifically, relative to not-for-profit hospitals: (1) higher corporate income tax encourages for-profit hospitals to increase their debt usage; (2) higher personal income tax discourages for-profit hospitals to use debt; and (3) higher expected bankruptcy costs lead for-profit hospitals to use less debt. Over the past decade, the capital structure of for-profit hospitals has been more flexible as compared to that of not-for-profit hospitals. This may suggest that not-for-profit hospitals are more constrained by external financing resources. Particularly, our analysis suggests that not-for-profit hospitals operating in states with high corporate taxes but low personal income taxes may face particular challenges of borrowing funds relative to their for-profit competitors.

  2. Extent, nature and hospital costs of fireworks-related injuries during the Wednesday Eve festival in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinia, Siros; Rezaei, Satar; Daroudi, Rajabali; Hadadi, Mashyaneh; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Fireworks are commonly used in local and national celebrations. The aim of this study is to explore the extent, nature and hospital costs of injuries related to the Persian Wednesday Eve festival in Iran. Data for injuries caused by fireworks during the 2009 Persian Wednesday Eve festival were collected from the national Ministry of Health database. Injuries were divided into nine groups and the average and total hospital costs were estimated for each group. The cost of care for patients with burns was estimated by reviewing a sample of 100 patients randomly selected from a large burn center in Tehran. Other costs were estimated by conducting semi structured interviews with expert managers at two large government hospitals. 1817 people were injured by fireworks during the 2009 Wednesday Eve festival. The most frequently injured sites were the hand (43.3%), eye (24.5%) and face (13.2%), and the most common types of injury were burns (39.9%), contusions/abrasions (24.6%) and lacerations (12.7%). The mean length of hospital stay was 8.15 days for patients with burns, 10.7 days for those with amputations, and 3 days for those with other types of injury. The total hospital cost of injuries was US$ 284 000 and the average cost per injury was US$ 156. The total hospital cost of patients with amputations was US$ 48 598. Most of the costs were related to burns (56.6%) followed by amputations (12.2%). Injuries related to the Persian Wednesday Eve festival are common and lead to extensive morbidity and medical costs. © 2013 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  3. What Does It Cost a University to Educate One Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andrea Lotho Santiago

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A dilemma administrators continually face is whether to continue offering degree programs despite low student uptake, especially because producing reliable cost data to aid decision making can prove difficult. Often, a university determines a standard cost per credit or unit and uses this figure as a basis for computing the total cost of running a degree program. This is then compared to a revenue stream and the difference, whether positive or negative, is used in decision making. However, this method of computing costs, although appealing for its simplicity, may fail to capture the effects of economies that may arise as one school or college services another. In this paper, we use a basic cost accounting methodology applied to the higher education system of the Philippines to compute for a cost per degree per student for a sample of public and private universities. Although the methodology is more time consuming, the computed figures are deemed closer to actual costs and, thus, we argue, are more reliable as inputs to financial decision making.

  4. Use of seatbelts by vehicle occupants in University College Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of seatbelts by vehicle occupants in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. AO Sangowawa, SEU Ekanem, BT Alagh, IP Ebong, B Faseru, O Uchendu, BJ Adekunle, VHS Shaahu, A Fajola, GI Ogbole ...

  5. Workplace violence against nursing staff in a Saudi university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorashy, Hanan A Ezzat; Al Moalad, Fawziah Bakheet

    2016-06-01

    Violence against nurses is a major challenge for healthcare administrators. It is gaining more attention because it has a negative impact on nurses, the quality of health care and health organization. Common types of violence include physical harassment, sexual abuse, aggression, mobbing and bullying. Patients, their relatives and co-workers are considered the main perpetrators. To determine the prevalence rate of workplace violence against nursing professionals in a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, most frequent type and perpetrators as well as the contributing factors. This quantitative cross-sectional study adapted a survey questionnaire from the Massachusetts Nurses Association Survey on Workplace Violence/Abuse to collect data from a quota sample of 370 nursing personnel. Almost half of the participants had experienced violence in the professional setting during the 12 months prior to the study. The majority of subjects perceived workplace violence as verbal abuse. Nearly all nursing professionals identified patients as the leading cause. Slightly more than half mentioned understaffing, misunderstandings, long waits for service and lack of staff training and policies for preventing crisis as contributing factors. The prevalence rate is extremely high among nurses in the targeted Saudi university hospital. Saudi health as well as university hospitals' administration and policy makers should adopt and introduce a 'zero tolerance policy', set standards and develop practical measures for preventing the incidence and for controlling the prevalence of violence against nurses. Besides, healthcare organizations, particularly hospitals, can fulfil their obligations to provide both staff and patients with more secure environment. Further research on the topic is needed. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Hospital costs for treatment of acute heart failure: economic analysis of the REVIVE II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lissovoy, Greg; Fraeman, Kathy; Teerlink, John R; Mullahy, John; Salon, Jeff; Sterz, Raimund; Durtschi, Amy; Padley, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the leading cause of hospital admission among older Americans. The Randomized EValuation of Intravenous Levosimendan Efficacy (REVIVE II) trial compared patients randomly assigned to a single infusion of levosimendan (levo) or placebo (SOC), each in addition to local standard treatments for AHF. We report an economic analysis of REVIVE II from the hospital perspective. REVIVE II enrolled patients (N = 600) hospitalized for treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who remained dyspneic at rest despite treatment with intravenous diuretics. Case report forms documented index hospital treatment (drug administration, procedures, days of treatment by care unit), as well as subsequent hospital and emergency department admissions during follow-up ending 90 days from date of randomization. These data were used to impute cost of admission based on an econometric cost function derived from >100,000 ADHF hospital billing records selected per REVIVE II inclusion criteria. Index admission mean length of stay (LOS) was shorter for the levo group compared with standard of care (SOC) (7.03 vs 8.96 days, P = 0.008) although intensive care unit (ICU)/cardiac care unit (CCU) days were similar (levo 2.88, SOC 3.22, P = 0.63). Excluding cost for levo, predicted mean (median) cost for the index admission was levo US $13,590 (9,458), SOC $19,021 (10,692) with a difference of $5,431 (1,234) favoring levo (P = 0.04). During follow-up through end of study day 90, no significant differences were observed in numbers of hospital admissions (P = 0.67), inpatient days (P = 0.81) or emergency department visits (P = 0.41). Cost-effectiveness was performed with a REVIVE-II sub-set conforming to current labeling, which excluded patients with low baseline blood pressure. Assuming an average price for levo in countries where currently approved, there was better than 50% likelihood that levo was both cost-saving and improved survival. Likelihood that levo would

  7. Financial implications of ventral hernia repair: a hospital cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Drew; Davenport, Daniel L; Korosec, Ryan L; Roth, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    Complicated ventral hernias are often referred to tertiary care centers. Hospital costs associated with these repairs include direct costs (mesh materials, supplies, and nonsurgeon labor costs) and indirect costs (facility fees, equipment depreciation, and unallocated labor). Operative supplies represent a significant component of direct costs, especially in an era of proprietary synthetic meshes and biologic grafts. We aim to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of complex abdominal wall hernia repair at a tertiary care referral facility. Cost data on all consecutive open ventral hernia repairs (CPT codes 49560, 49561, 49565, and 49566) performed between 1 July 2008 and 31 May 2011 were analyzed. Cases were analyzed based upon hospital status (inpatient vs. outpatient) and whether the hernia repair was a primary or secondary procedure. We examined median net revenue, direct costs, contribution margin, indirect costs, and net profit/loss. Among primary hernia repairs, cost data were further analyzed based upon mesh utilization (no mesh, synthetic, or biologic). Four-hundred and fifteen patients underwent ventral hernia repair (353 inpatients and 62 outpatients); 173 inpatients underwent ventral hernia repair as the primary procedure; 180 inpatients underwent hernia repair as a secondary procedure. Median net revenue ($17,310 vs. 10,360, p costs for cases performed without mesh were $5,432; median direct costs for those using synthetic and biologic mesh were $7,590 and 16,970, respectively (p financial loss was $8,370. Outpatient ventral hernia repairs, with and without synthetic mesh, resulted in median net losses of $1,560 and 230, respectively. Ventral hernia repair is associated with overall financial losses. Inpatient synthetic mesh repairs are essentially budget neutral. Outpatient and inpatient repairs without mesh result in net financial losses. Inpatient biologic mesh repairs result in a negative contribution margin and striking net financial losses. Cost

  8. Costs and risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a Turkish University Hospital's Intensive Care Unit: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serin Simay

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP which is an important part of all nosocomial infections in intensive care unit (ICU is a serious illness with substantial morbidity and mortality, and increases costs of hospital care. We aimed to evaluate costs and risk factors for VAP in adult ICU. Methods This is a-three year retrospective case-control study. The data were collected between 01 January 2000 and 31 December 2002. During the study period, 132 patients were diagnosed as nosocomial pneumonia of 731 adult medical-surgical ICU patients. Of these only 37 VAP patients were assessed, and multiple nosocomially infected patients were excluded from the study. Sixty non-infected ICU patients were chosen as control patients. Results Median length of stay in ICU in patients with VAP and without were 8.0 (IQR: 6.5 and 2.5 (IQR: 2.0 days respectively (P Conclusion Respiratory failure, coma, depressed consciousness, enteral feeding and length of stay are independent risk factors for developing VAP. The cost of VAP is approximately five-fold higher than non-infected patients.

  9. Management of leg and pressure ulcer in hospitalized patients: direct costs are lower than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Oswald, Joseph S; Leisten, Rainer; Hinz, Peter; Daeschlein, Georg; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    In Germany, cost calculations on the financial burden of wound treatment are scarce. Studies for attributable costs in hospitalized patients estimate for pressure ulcer additional costs of € 6,135.50 per patient, a calculation based on the assumption that pressure ulcers will lead to prolonged hospitalization averaging 2 months. The scant data available in this field prompted us to conduct a prospective economical study assessing the direct costs of treatment of chronic ulcers in hospitalized patients. The study was designed and conducted as an observational, prospective, multi-centre economical study over a period of 8 months in three community hospitals in Germany. Direct treatment costs for leg ulcer (n=77) and pressure ulcer (n=35) were determined observing 67 patients (average age: 75±12 years). 109 treatments representing 111 in-ward admissions and 62 outpatient visits were observed. During a total of 3,331 hospitalized and 867 outpatient wound therapies, 4,198 wound dressing changes were documented. Costs of material were calculated on a per item base. Direct costs of care and treatment, including materials used, surgical interventions, and personnel costs were determined. An average of € 1,342 per patient (€ 48/d) was spent for treatment of leg ulcer (staff costs € 581, consumables € 458, surgical procedures € 189, and diagnostic procedures € 114). On average, each wound dressing change caused additional costs of € 15. For pressure ulcer, € 991 per patient (€ 52/d) was spent on average (staff costs € 313, consumables € 618, and for surgical procedures € 60). Each wound dressing change resulted in additional costs of € 20 on average. When direct costs of chronic wounds are calculated on a prospective case-by-case basis for a treatment period over 3 months, these costs are lower than estimated to date. While reduction in prevalence of chronic wounds along with optimised patient care will result in substantial cost saving, this

  10. Short-term Cost-effectiveness of Reteplase versus Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute STEMI a Tertiary Hospital in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Alimohammadzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: This study aimed to compare primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI versus reteplase in terms of clinical and para-clinical outcomes; as well as cost-effectiveness in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI.Primary percutaneous coronary intervention is the method of choice in all patients especially those at higher risks. But an on-site professional team in a 24/7 facilitated system is a difficult goal to achieve in many areas and countries, therefore the cost-effectiveness of these two treatment strategies (PPCI and reteplase needs to be discussed.Methods: This prospective cohort study included 220 patients presented with STEMI who were admitted to a university hospital between January 2014 to July 2016. Patients were divided into two groups of 120, either receiving reteplase or PPCI. Clinical outcomes were considered duration of hospital stay and MACE (Major Advanced Cardiovascular Events including death, cerebrovascular accident, need for repeat revascularization, and major bleeding. LVEF (Left ventricular ejection fraction was considered as a para-clinical outcome. The outcomes and total hospital cost were compared between two treatment groups.Results: Demographic characteristics between two groups of PPCI or reteplase didn’t show any significant differences. But in para-clinical outcomes, patients in PPCI group showed higher LVEF, compared with reteplase group (45.9 ± 11.5% versus 42.0 ± 11.8%; P = 0.02. Complication rates were similar in both groups but repeat revascularization or coronary artery bypass surgery was more prevalent in those who received thrombolytic therapy (P < 0.05. Length of hospital stay in both groups was similar in two groups but total cost was higher in patients who have received PPCI. (147769406.9 ± 103929358.9 Tomans vs. 117116656.9 ± 67356122.6 Tomans; respectively, P = 0.01.Conclusions: In STEMI patients who present during off-hours, thrombolytic therapy

  11. Costs at Public Universities: How Does California Compare with Other States? Report 10-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The cost of attending the University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) has increased in recent years as UC and CSU have raised fees in response to reduced state funding. Fees are generally lower than fees at public universities in other states, but with California's higher living costs, the overall cost of attendance at UC…

  12. Analysis of Private Cost of Education in a Selected Nigerian University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of Private Cost of Education in a Selected Nigerian University. ... Journal of Research in National Development. Journal Home ... The results revealed that there was a gap between the average institutional unit cost and private cost.

  13. MRI: unique costing and pricing issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, H W; Jarl, D F

    1985-01-01

    Acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) involves a plethora of costs not traditionally encountered in radiology procedure cost accounting models. Experiences with MRI gained at the University of Minnesota Hospitals and Clinics during 1984 uncovered a wide variety of unique costing issues which were eventually identified at the time when the MRI hospital charge was being established. Our experience at UMHC can provide those radiology departments now acquiring MRI with an earlier awareness of these special costing issues, hopefully resulting in better and more timely data collection. Current reimbursement and pricing issues are also having a dramatic impact on MRI costs at each institution and must be assessed in terms of third-party payor intentions.

  14. Hospitalization resource use and costs before and after TIA and stroke: results from a population-based cohort study (OXVASC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Silver, Louise E; Gutnikov, Sergei A; Gray, Alastair M; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    High hospitalization rates, prolonged length of stay, and increased risks of subsequent events mean a steep increase in health care usage after stroke. No study, however, has examined to what extent increased costs after transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke are due to hospitalizations for the initial event, recurrent events, and/or nonvascular hospitalizations, and how costs compare with the year prior to the event. We studied patients in a population-based cohort study (Oxford Vascular Study) in the United Kingdom from 2003 to 2007. Hospitalization and cost details were obtained from patients' individualized Hospital Episode Statistics records. A total of 295 incident TIA and 439 incident stroke patients were included. For patients with stroke, average costs increased from £1437 in the year pre-event to £6629 in the year post-event (PTIA, costs increased from £876 1 year before the event to £2410 in the year post-event (PTIA incurred nonsignificantly higher costs due to hospitalizations linked to subsequent vascular events (£774) than for hospitalizations linked to the index TIA (£720). Hospital costs increased after TIA or stroke, primarily because of increased initial cerebrovascular hospitalizations. The finding that costs due to nonvascular diagnoses also increased after TIA or stroke appears, in part, to be explained by the miscoding of TIA/stroke-related hospitalizations in electronic information systems. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hospital costs associated with depression in a cohort of older men living in Western Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prina, A.M.; Huisman, M.; Yeap, B.B.; Hankey, G.J.; Flicker, L.; Brayne, C.; Almeida, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is lack of information of the hospital costs related to depression. Here, we compare the costs associated with general hospital admissions over 2 years between older men with and without a documented past history of depression. Methods: A community-based cohort of older men living

  16. Feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) networking in university hospitals in Brussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, D; Cremagnani, P; Gaillard, A; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Mascart, G; Ebraert, A; Attalibi, S; Dediste, A; Vandenberg, O

    2014-05-01

    The mutualisation of analytical platforms might be used to address rising healthcare costs. Our study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of networking a unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system for common use in several university hospitals in Brussels, Belgium. During a one-month period, 1,055 successive bacterial isolates from the Brugmann University Hospital were identified on-site using conventional techniques; these same isolates were also identified using a MALDI-TOF MS system at the Porte de Hal Laboratory by sending target plates and identification projects via transportation and the INFECTIO_MALDI software (Infopartner, Nancy, France), respectively. The occurrence of transmission problems (MS networking always provided a faster identification result than conventional techniques, except when chromogenic culture media and oxidase tests were used (p MS networking could lead to substantial annual cost savings. MALDI-TOF MS networking presents many advantages, and few conventional techniques (optochin and oxidase tests) are required to ensure the same quality in patient care from the distant laboratory. Nevertheless, such networking should not be considered unless there is a reorganisation of workflow, efficient communication between teams, qualified technologists and a reliable IT department and helpdesk to manage potential connectivity problems.

  17. Incidence, hospital costs and in-hospital mortality rates of surgically treated patients with traumatic cranial epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atci Ibrahim Burak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, the patients who were operated in two clinics due to traumatic cranial epidural hematoma (EDH were assessed retrospectively and the factors that increase the costs were tried to be revealed through conducting cost analyses. Methods: The patients who were operated between 2010 and 2016 with the diagnosis of EDH were assessed in terms of age, sex, trauma etiology, Glasgow coma scale (GCS at admission, the period from trauma to hospital arrival, trauma-related injury in other organs, the localization of hematoma, the size of hematoma, length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU, length of antibiotherapy administration, number of consultations conducted, total cost of in-hospital treatments of the patients and prognosis. Results: Distribution of GCS were, between 13-15 in 18 (36% patients, 9-13 in 23 (46% patients and 3-8 in 9 (18% patients. The reasons for emergency department admissions were fall from high in 29 (58% patients, assault in 11 (22% patients and motor vehicle accident in 10 (20% patients. The average cost per ICU stay was 2838 $ (range=343-20571 $. The average cost per surgical treatment was 314 $. ICU care was approximately 9 times more expensive than surgical treatment costs. The mortality rate of the study cohort was 14% (7 patients. Conclusion: The prolonged period of stay in the ICU, antibiotherapy and repeat head CTs increase the costs for patients who are surgically treated for EDH.

  18. Burkholderia cepacia infection at A university Teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty five isolates of B. cepacia, representing 1.4% of all isolates, were obtained at the Microbiology Laboratory of a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos between January 1996 and December 1997. Identification of isolates was done using analytical profile index systems (Biomerieux, France) and sensitivity testing was ...

  19. Racial/ethnic differences in hospital use and cost among a statewide population of children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Taletha Mae; Kotelchuck, Milton; Plummer, Katrina; Cabral, Howard; Lin, Angela E; Belanoff, Candice; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo; Grosse, Scott D

    2013-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) use hospital services more often than children without DS, but data on racial/ethnic variations are limited. This study generated population-based estimates of hospital use and cost to 3 years of age by race/ethnicity among children with DS in Massachusetts using birth certificates linked to birth defects registry and hospital discharge data from 1999 to 2004. Hospital use (≥ 1 post-birth hospitalization and median days hospitalized birth and post-birth) and reasons for hospitalization were compared across maternal race/ethnicity using relative risk (RR) and Wilcoxon rank sums tests, as appropriate. Costs were calculated in 2011 United States dollars. Greater hospital use was observed among children with DS with Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White (NHW) mothers (post-birth hospitalization: RR 1.4; median days hospitalized: 20.0 vs. 11.0, respectively). Children with DS and congenital heart defects of Non-Hispanic Black (NHB) mothers had significantly greater median days hospitalized than their NHW counterparts (24.0 vs. 16.0, respectively). Respiratory diagnoses were listed more often among children with Hispanic vs. NHW mothers (50.0% vs. 29.1%, respectively), and NHBs had more cardiac diagnoses (34.1% vs. 21.5%, respectively). The mean total hospital cost was nine times higher among children with DS ($40,075) than among children without DS ($4053), and total costs attributable to DS were almost $18 million. Median costs were $22,781 for Hispanics, $18,495 for NHBs, and $13,947 for NHWs. Public health interventions should address the higher rates of hospital use and hospitalizations for respiratory and cardiac diseases among racial/ethnic minority children with DS in Massachusetts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Private finance initiative hospital architecture: towards a political economy of the Royal Liverpool University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul

    2018-02-01

    Sociological analysis has done much to illuminate the architectural contexts in which social life takes place. Research on care environments suggests that the built environment should not be understood as a passive backdrop to healthcare, but rather that care is conditioned by the architecture in which it happens. This article argues for the importance of going beyond the hospital walls to include the politics that underwrite the design and construction of hospital buildings. The article assesses the case of the yet-to-be-realised Liverpool Royal University Hospital, and the private finance initiative (PFI) funding that underpins the scheme, which is suggested as a salient 'external' context for understanding architecture's role in the provision of healthcare of many kinds for many years to come. PFI has major implications for democratic accountability and local economy, as well as for the architecture of the hospital as a site of care. Critical studies can illuminate these paradoxically visible-but-opaque hospital spaces by going beyond that which is immediately empirically evident, so as to reveal the ways in which hospital architecture is conditioned by political and economic forces. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  1. Estimating the direct costs of ischemic heart disease: evidence from a teaching hospital in BRAZIL, a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Rosane Paixão; Hirakata, Vânia Naomi; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2017-07-04

    Coronary artery disease is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease. In the United States, 7% of adults over 20 years of age are estimated to have coronary artery disease. In Brazil, a prevalence of 5 to 8% has been estimated in adults over 40 years of age, with an increased number of hospitalizations associated with both stable and acute clinical manifestations; and health care costs have quadrupled in the last decade. To estimate the direct costs of managing ischemic heart disease patient care in a teaching hospital in Brazil from the perspective of the service payer, the Brazilian Unified Health System. This study was a retrospective cohort study for the identification and valuation of resources used at both the outpatient and in-hospital levels in a sample of 330 patients selected from the hospital's ischemic heart disease clinic. Data were collected from computerized hospital records and patients' hospital bills from January 2000 to October 2015. A bivariate analysis and binary logistic regression were performed with p cost of outpatient management was US $1,521 per patient. The mean cost per hospitalization was US $1,976, and the expenses were higher in the first and last years of follow-up. Unstable angina, revascularization procedures, diabetes, hypertension and obesity were predictors of higher hospitalization costs (p cost estimates in this study indicate a high proportion of drug treatment costs in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Treatment costs are higher in the first year and at the end of treatment, and some clinical factors are associated with greater hospital care costs. These results may serve as a basis for the evaluation of existing public policies and inputs for cost-effectiveness studies in coronary artery disease. CEP HCPA 11-0460 . Ethics Committee of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre.

  2. The challenge of tobacco control at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Ferreira Cruz

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the actions taken by the Commission of Tobacco Control (CTC to control smoking in the hospital environment.Methods: Descriptive and exploratory retrospective documentary research conducted at a university hospital in southern Brazil, in 2014. The content of the minutes of CTC meetings was used to create a database, and the rounds reports were descriptively analyzed. We sought to identify the most relevant actions from 2005 to 2014.Results: The CTC implemented the Tobacco-Free Environment programme restricted cigarette smoking to designated areas and subsequently deactivated these areas. The only remaining outdoor smoking area in 2014 was deactivated.Conclusion: CTC actions have contributed to tobacco control in the hospital environment. This study will hopefully serve as a model to encourage other institutions to implement similar actions.

  3. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Doles Sama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. Patients and Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 January to 30 June 2012. Data collected include: demography, type of surgery, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA classification, anaesthetic protocol, analgesia technique, post-operative complications and cost of analgesia. Results: The study includes 106 post-operative children. Abdominal surgery was performed in 41.5% and orthopaedic surgery in 31.1%. A total of 75% of patients were classified ASA 1. General anaesthesia (GA was performed in 88%. Anaesthetists supervised post-operative care in 21.7% cases. Multimodal analgesia was used in every case and 12% of patients received a regional block. The most frequently unwanted effects of analgesics used were nausea and/or vomiting in 12.3%. At H24, child under 7 years have more pain assessment than those from 7 to 15 years (46% vs 24% and this difference was statistically significant (chi-square = 4.7598; P = 0.0291 < 0.05. The average cost of peri-operative analgesia under loco regional analgesia (LRA versus GA during the first 48 h post-operative was US $23 versus $46. Conclusion: Our study showed that post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery is often not well controlled and paediatric loco regional analgesia technique is under practiced in sub Saharan Africa.

  4. Forceps delivery at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forceps delivery at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. ... Ibadan, Nigeria. CO Aimakhu, O Olayemi, OO Enabor, FA Oluyemi, VE Aimakhu ... Methodology: A retrospective analysis of all forceps delivery done at this centre between the 1st of January 1997 and 31st December 2001, a 5-year period was done.

  5. Vacuum Delivery in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstetric practice continues to change, particularly assisted vaginal delivery. Vacuum delivery is a mode of delivery technique in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in the maternity unit. The objective of the study was to determine the rate of ventouse delivery, its indications, and maternal and fetal morbidity in our ...

  6. [Cost assessment for endoscopic procedures in the German diagnosis-related-group (DRG) system - 5 year cost data analysis of the German Society of Gastroenterology project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathmayer, Markus; Heinlein, Wolfgang; Reiß, Claudia; Albert, Jörg G; Akoglu, Bora; Braun, Martin; Brechmann, Thorsten; Gölder, Stefan K; Lankisch, Tim; Messmann, Helmut; Schneider, Arne; Wagner, Martin; Dollhopf, Markus; Gundling, Felix; Röhling, Michael; Haag, Cornelie; Dohle, Ines; Werner, Sven; Lammert, Frank; Fleßa, Steffen; Wilke, Michael H; Schepp, Wolfgang; Lerch, Markus M

    2017-10-01

    Background  In the German hospital reimbursement system (G-DRG) endoscopic procedures are listed in cost center 8. For reimbursement between hospital departments and external providers outdated or incomplete catalogues (e. g. DKG-NT, GOÄ) have remained in use. We have assessed the cost for endoscopic procedures in the G-DRG-system. Methods  To assess the cost of endoscopic procedures 74 hospitals, annual providers of cost-data to the Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System (InEK) made their data (2011 - 2015; § 21 KHEntgG) available to the German-Society-of-Gastroenterology (DGVS) in anonymized form (4873 809 case-data-sets). Using cases with exactly one endoscopic procedure (n = 274 186) average costs over 5 years were calculated for 46 endoscopic procedure-tiers. Results  Robust mean endoscopy costs ranged from 230.56 € for gastroscopy (144 666 cases), 276.23 € (n = 32 294) for a simple colonoscopy, to 844.07 € (n = 10 150) for ERCP with papillotomy and plastic stent insertion and 1602.37 € (n = 967) for ERCP with a self-expanding metal stent. Higher costs, specifically for complex procedures, were identified for University Hospitals. Discussion  For the first time this catalogue for endoscopic procedure-tiers, based on § 21 KHEntgG data-sets from 74 InEK-calculating hospitals, permits a realistic assessment of endoscopy costs in German hospitals. The higher costs in university hospitals are likely due to referral bias for complex cases and emergency interventions. For 46 endoscopic procedure-tiers an objective cost-allocation within the G-DRG system is now possible. By international comparison the costs of endoscopic procedures in Germany are low, due to either greater efficiency, lower personnel allocation or incomplete documentation of the real expenses. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Exposure to fine particulate matter and hospital admissions due to pneumonia: Effects on the number of hospital admissions and its costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, Nicole Vargas; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Mantovani, Katia Cristina C; Vieira, Luciana C P F S; Moreira, Demerval S

    2016-07-01

    Given that respiratory diseases are a major cause of hospitalization in children, the objectives of this study are to estimate the role of exposure to fine particulate matter in hospitalizations due to pneumonia and a possible reduction in the number of these hospitalizations and costs. An ecological time-series study was developed with data on hospitalization for pneumonia among children under 10 years of age living in São José do Rio Preto, state of São Paulo, using PM2.5 concentrations estimated using a mathematical model. We used Poisson regression with a dependent variable (hospitalization) associated with PM2.5 concentrations and adjusted for effective temperature, seasonality and day of the week, with estimates of reductions in the number of hospitalizations and costs. 1,161 children were admitted to hospital between October 1st, 2011, and September 30th, 2013; the average concentration of PM2.5 was 18.7 µg/m3 (≈32 µg/m3 of PM10) and exposure to this pollutant was associated with hospitalization four and five days after exposure. A 10 µg/m3 decrease in concentration would imply 256 less hospital admissions and savings of approximately R$ 220,000 in a medium-sized city.

  8. Decrease Hospital Spending: There's an App for That! A Retrospective Analysis of Implementation of a Mobile Resident Handbook on Hospital Costs and Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Matthew D

    2017-10-01

    Patient care involves time sensitive decisions. Matching a patient's presenting condition with possible diagnoses requires proper assessment and diagnostic tests. Timely access to necessary information leads to improved patient care, better outcomes, and decreased costs. This study evaluated objective outcomes of the implementation of a novel Resident Handbook Application (RHAP) for smart phones. The RHAP included tools necessary to make proper assessments and to order appropriate tests. The RHAPs effectiveness was accessed using the Military Health System Military Mart database. This database includes patient specific aggregate data, including diagnosis, patient demographics, itemized cost, hospital days, and disposition status. Multivariable analysis was used to compare before and after RHAP implementation, controlling for patient demographics and diagnosis. Internal medicine admission data were used as a control group. There was a statistically significant decrease in laboratory costs and a strong trend toward statistically significant decreases in the cost of radiology performed after implementation of RHAP (p value of <0.02 and <0.07, respectively). There was also a decrease in hospital days (3.66-3.30 days), in total cost per admission ($18,866-$16,305), and in cost per hospital day per patient ($5,140-$4,936). During the same time period a Control group had no change or increases in these areas. The use of the RHAP resulted in decreases in costs in a variety of areas and a decrease in hospital bed days without any apparent negative effect upon patient outcomes or disposition status.

  9. The tremendous cost of seeking hospital obstetric care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsana, Kaosar

    2004-11-01

    In Bangladesh, maternal mortality is estimated to be 320 per 100,000 live births, among the highest in the world, and most deliveries in rural areas occur at home. Women with obstetric complications fear to seek hospital care for various reasons; one of which is the tremendous cost. This paper shows how cost impedes rural, poor women's access to emergency obstetric care. The data are from a larger ethnographic study of childbirth practices in 2000--01 in Apurbabari village, the adjacent sub-district health complex and more distant tertiary hospitals at district level. Families had to spend what for them added up to a fortune for a caesarean section and other surgery, medicines, laboratory investigations, blood transfusion, food, travel and other expenses. Corruption in the form of demands for under-the-table payments to obtain these aspects of essential care is rife. Adequate resources should be allocated to the different health facilities, including for emergency obstetric treatment. Thana health complexes (sub-district hospitals) should be upgraded to provide comprehensive obstetric care. The system for prescribing drugs should be reformed and the causes of corruption investigated and addressed. Hospital care should not be allowed to further impoverish the poor. Addressing these issues will help to encourage rural, poor women to seek skilled delivery and post-partum care, particularly in emergency situations.

  10. Estudo comparativo das indicações de cesariana entre um hospital público-universitário e um hospital privado Comparative study of cesarean section indications between a public university hospital and a private hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Humberto Fabri

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: analisar a incidência e as indicações de cesariana realizadas no Hospital Escola da Falculdade de Medicina do Triângulo Mineiro e um hospital privado, ambos localizados em Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brasil. MÉTODOS: trata-se de estudo transversal desenvolvido a partir da coleta nos prontuários dos hospitais, consistindo da idade, procedência, situação conjugal, escolaridade, paridade e indicações de cesariana. RESULTADOS: a incidência de cesariana foi de 24,3% no Hospital Escola contra 89,2% no hospital privado. As indicações mais freqüentes de cesariana no Hospital Escola foram a cesárea iterativa (26,7%, distócia (22,4% e o sofrimento fetal agudo (18,2%, e no hospital privado foram cesárea iterativa (36% e distócia (36%. As pacientes do hospital privado tinham maior escolaridade. CONCLUSÕES: os dados sugerem que o aumento de cesarianas no hospital privado foi decorrente de iteratividade, distócia e a escolaridade mais elevada das pacientes.OBJECTIVES: to analyse the incidence and the indications of cesarean section performed in the University Hospital of the "Triângulo Mineiro Faculty of Medicine " and a private hospital in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil. METHODS: a cross sectional study was carried out by using the data source of the medical files from both hospitals consisting of patient age, place of origin, marital status, education level, parity and cesarean sections indications. RESULTS: the cesarean sections rate was 24,3 % (325 of 1.441 births at the university hospital against 89,2% (100 of 112 births of the private hospital. The most frequent indications in the University Hospital were previous cesarean sections (26,7%, dystocia (22,4% and acute fetal distress (18,2%. In the private hospital, indications were previous cesarean section (36% and dystocia (36%. The private hospital's patients had higher education levels. CONCLUSIONS: the higher rate of cesarean sections observed in the private hospital

  11. COST ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL PRACTICE NURSING PROFESSION STUDENTS WITH ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC METHOD IN Dr. SOEWANDHI HOSPITAL SURABAYA EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hasinuddin

    2017-02-01

    Research result. The results using the ABC method showed that the unit cost to the cost of professional practice nurses in the hospital Dr. Soewandhi Surabaya is Rp. 460,000, - / month / person, while the cost of practice set by the RS Dr. Soewandhi is Rp. 1.200.000, - / month / person. There is a practice of the profession excess costs Rp. 740,000, -. RS Dr. Surabaya Soewandhi practice fees apply without using a standard based on the unit cost accordingly. Some educational institutions felt the cost was very heavy so the impact to the cancellation of the filing of the professional nurses student practice. Conclusions and recommendations. The hospital used a professional students practice nurses should use the standard fees in accordance with needs through precise calculations that the fees charged to students through educational institutions in accordance with the appropriate calculations. Keyword: ABC system - Profession nurses - Fee Practices

  12. Cost inefficiency under financial strain: a stochastic frontier analysis of hospitals in Washington State through the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izón, Germán M; Pardini, Chelsea A

    2017-06-01

    The importance of increasing cost efficiency for community hospitals in the United States has been underscored by the Great Recession and the ever-changing health care reimbursement environment. Previous studies have shown mixed evidence with regards to the relationship between linking hospitals' reimbursement to quality of care and cost efficiency. Moreover, current evidence suggests that not only inherently financially disadvantaged hospitals (e.g., safety-net providers), but also more financially stable providers, experienced declines to their financial viability throughout the recession. However, little is known about how hospital cost efficiency fared throughout the Great Recession. This study contributes to the literature by using stochastic frontier analysis to analyze cost inefficiency of Washington State hospitals between 2005 and 2012, with controls for patient burden of illness, hospital process of care quality, and hospital outcome quality. The quality measures included in this study function as central measures for the determination of recently implemented pay-for-performance programs. The average estimated level of hospital cost inefficiency before the Great Recession (10.4 %) was lower than it was during the Great Recession (13.5 %) and in its aftermath (14.1 %). Further, the estimated coefficients for summary process of care quality indexes for three health conditions (acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and heart failure) suggest that higher quality scores are associated with increased cost inefficiency.

  13. [Efforts to achieve and effects of acquiring ISO 15189 in Tokushima University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, Kazuko; Kishi, Misako; Satou, Mituyo; Nagamine, Yasunori; Doi, Tosio

    2009-12-01

    The medical laboratory of Tokushima University Hospital acquired ISO 15189, an international standard for medical laboratories, on July 6th, 2007, resulting in it achieving the 24th place in Japan and 5th place among national university hospitals. The first surveillance was just performed on October 6th, 2008. Tokushima University Hospital, in which our medical laboratory is included as one section, already succeeded in acquiring ISO 9001, PrivacyMark System, and Quality Health Care ver. 5 before accomplishing ISO 15189. To achieve ISO 15189, we prepared documents based on ISO 9001 without any consultation, resulting in a review of the difference between ISO 9001 and ISO 15189 after the preliminary survey. Although achieving ISO 15189 resulted in an improvement in the reliability of laboratory results and accuracy, leading to the development of our technical skills and awareness, and sharing of knowledge, we consider that the considerable investment of time to prepare the requirements remains to be overcome.

  14. The cost of dysphagia in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westmark S

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Signe Westmark,1 Dorte Melgaard,1,2 Line O Rethmeier,3 Lars Holger Ehlers3 1Center for Clinical Research, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 2Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 3Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Objectives: To estimate the annual cost at the hospital and in the municipality (social care due to dysphagia in geriatric patients.Design: Retrospective cost analysis of geriatric patients with dysphagia versus geriatric patients without dysphagia 1 year before hospitalization.Setting: North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring Municipality, Frederikshavn Municipality, and Brønderslev Municipality.Subjects: A total of 258 hospitalized patients, 60 years or older, acute hospitalized in the geriatric department.Materials and methods: Volume-viscosity swallow test and the Minimal Eating Observation Form-II were conducted for data collection. A Charlson Comorbidity Index score measured comorbidity, and functional status was measured by Barthel-100. To investigate the cost of dysphagia, patient-specific data on health care consumption at the hospital and in the municipality (nursing, home care, and training were collected from medical registers and records 1 year before hospitalization including the hospitalization for screening for dysphagia. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between dysphagia and hospital and municipality costs, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidity.Results: Patients with dysphagia were significantly costlier than patients without dysphagia in both hospital (p=0.013 and municipality costs (p=0.028 compared to patients without dysphagia. Adjusted annual hospital costs in patients with dysphagia were 27,347 DKK (3,677 EUR, 4,282 USD higher than patients without dysphagia at the hospital, and annual health care costs in the

  15. Violence experienced by nurses at six university hospitals in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsal Atan, S; Baysan Arabaci, L; Sirin, A; Isler, A; Donmez, S; Unsal Guler, M; Oflaz, U; Yalcinkaya Ozdemir, G; Yazar Tasbasi, F

    2013-12-01

    This research was conducted to analyse the violence experienced by nurses employed at six university hospitals. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The research sample consisted of 441 nurses who worked in the emergency, intensive care and psychiatry units of six university hospitals in Turkey between June 2008 and June 2009 and who voluntarily agreed to participate. It was found that 60.8% of the nurses were subjected to verbal violence and/or physical violence from patients, visitors or health staff. Of the nurses who were subjected to workplace violence, 42.9% stated that their experience of verbal and/or physical violence had a negative impact on their physical and/or psychological health, and 42.9% stated that their work performance was negatively affected. Of these nurses, 1.8% stated that they received professional help, 13.6% stated that a report was made and 9.5% stated that they contacted the hospital police in some way. According to the findings of this research, similar to the situation worldwide, nurses in Turkey are subjected to verbal and/or physical violence from patients, visitors and health staff. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Susceptibility of yeasts to antifungal agents in Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodeniene, Erika; Dambrauskiene, Asta; Vitkauskiene, Astra

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the species of yeast and their susceptibility to antifungal agents isolated from clinical specimens of patients treated in Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital. A total of 142 yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens of patients hospitalized in Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital were included in this study. All yeasts were cultivated on Sabouraud dextrose agar and identified using either CHROM agar or API 20C AUX system. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B were determined by the ATB FUNGUS 2 agar microdilution test. In all clinical specimens except blood, Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated yeast (65.5%, pyeast strains showed resistance to fluconazole. Nearly one-fourth of Candida albicans strains (24.7%) and 23.2% of all isolated yeast strains showed resistance to itraconazole. Almost all of fluconazole-resistant (93.3%) and 12.6% of fluconazole-susceptible yeast were found to be resistant to itraconazole (pyeast strains were susceptible to amphotericin B. Candida albicans strains were significantly frequently resistant to fluconazole than non-albicans Candida species (15.1% and 4.1%, respectively, pyeast isolated in Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital. There was determined that yeasts resistant to fluconazole were commonly resistant to itraconazole too. All isolated yeast strains were susceptible to amphotericin B.

  17. The costs of inequality: whole-population modelling study of lifetime inpatient hospital costs in the English National Health Service by level of neighbourhood deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Tim; Cookson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background There are substantial socioeconomic inequalities in both life expectancy and healthcare use in England. In this study, we describe how these two sets of inequalities interact by estimating the social gradient in hospital costs across the life course. Methods Hospital episode statistics, population and index of multiple deprivation data were combined at lower-layer super output area level to estimate inpatient hospital costs for 2011/2012 by age, sex and deprivation quintile. Survival curves were estimated for each of the deprivation groups and used to estimate expected annual costs and cumulative lifetime costs. Results A steep social gradient was observed in overall inpatient hospital admissions, with rates ranging from 31 298/100 000 population in the most affluent fifth of areas to 43 385 in the most deprived fifth. This gradient was steeper for emergency than for elective admissions. The total cost associated with this inequality in 2011/2012 was £4.8 billion. A social gradient was also observed in the modelled lifetime costs where the lower life expectancy was not sufficient to outweigh the higher average costs in the more deprived populations. Lifetime costs for women were 14% greater than for men, due to higher costs in the reproductive years and greater life expectancy. Conclusions Socioeconomic inequalities result in increased morbidity and decreased life expectancy. Interventions to reduce inequality and improve health in more deprived neighbourhoods have the potential to save money for health systems not only within years but across peoples’ entire lifetimes, despite increased costs due to longer life expectancies. PMID:27189975

  18. Costs of examinations performed in a hospital laboratory in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Germán Lobos; Palma, Carolina Salas

    2018-01-01

    To determine the total average costs related to laboratory examinations performed in a hospital laboratory in Chile. Retrospective study with data from July 2014 to June 2015. 92 examinations classified in ten groups were selected according to the analysis methodology. The costs were estimated as the sum of direct and indirect laboratory costs and indirect institutional factors. The average values obtained for the costs according to examination group (in USD) were: 1.79 (clinical chemistry), 10.21 (immunoassay techniques), 13.27 (coagulation), 26.06 (high-performance liquid chromatography), 21.2 (immunological), 3.85 (gases and electrolytes), 156.48 (cytogenetic), 1.38 (urine), 4.02 (automated hematological), 4.93 (manual hematological). The value, or service fee, returned to public institutions who perform laboratory services does not adequately reflect the true total average production costs of examinations.

  19. Emetogenicity-risk procedures in same day surgery center of an academic university hospital in United States: a retrospective cost-audit of postoperative nausea vomiting management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak; Haber, Halim

    2014-06-01

    Despite the variable results of published studies, it is imperative for ambulatory surgery centers to self-audit local cost-implications for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) management. Our retrospective cost-audit assessed if there were comparative peri-anesthesia care cost-trends among patients who had undergone Low-Emetogenicity-Risk Procedures (LERP), Moderate-Emetogenicity-Risk Procedures (MERP) and Severe-Emetogenicity-Risk Procedures (SERP). This study was a review of Same Day Surgery Center practices in an academic university hospital setting during a three-year period (2010-2012). The patient lists were accessed from CIS and CITRIX App Bar for time audit and OR (operating room) schedule reports. Subsequently, OR pharmacy department ran a search for peri-operative anti-emetics and opioids that were billed for the patients at Same Day Surgery Center for the review period. The primary outcomes were the comparative costs/charges of these medications and comparative durations/ charges for these patients' stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). Secondary outcomes analyzed in the study included peri-anesthesia durations. A total of 8,657 patient records were analyzed. Almost all analyzed variables revealed statistically significant inter-variable positive correlations. The patients' age was significantly (P < 0.001) different among LERP/MERP/SERP patients (LERP: 48.8 +/- 14.7 years; MERP: 61.8 +/- 14.6 years; SERP: 51.3 +/- 14.5 years). In regards to primary and secondary outcomes, the statistical significant differences among LERP/MERP/SERP patients (after correcting for both patients' age as well as patients' sex) were only achieved for preoperative times (P = 0.002; Power = 0.9), operating room recovery times (P = 0.003; Power = 0.9), PACU stay times (P < 0.001; Power = 1.0), and PACU charges (P < 0.001; Power = 1.0). PACU stay times and PACU charges were significantly higher in patients who had undergone SERP as compared to patients who had

  20. Association of Resident Coverage with Cost, Length of Stay, and Profitability at a Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, Daniel; Beg, Sumbul; Jaeger, Joseph; Pencak, Dorothy; Panush, Richard

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The effect of care by medical residents on hospital length of stay (LOS), indirect costs, and reimbursement was last examined across a range of illnesses in 1981; the issue has never been examined at a community hospital. We studied resource utilization and reimbursement at a community hospital in relation to the involvement of medical residents. DESIGN This nonrandomized observational study compared patients discharged from a general medicine teaching unit with those discharged from nonteaching general medical/surgical units. SETTING A 620-bed community teaching hospital with a general medicine teaching unit (resident care) and several general medicine nonteaching units (no resident care). PATIENTS All medical discharges between July 1998 and February 1999, excluding those from designated subspecialty and critical care units. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Endpoints included mean LOS in excess of expected LOS, mean cost in excess of expected mean payments, and mean profitability (payments minus total costs). Observed values were obtained from the hospital's database and expected values from a proprietary risk–cost adjustment program. No significant difference in LOS between 917 teaching-unit patients and 697 nonteaching patients was demonstrated. Costs averaged $3,178 (95% confidencence interval (CI) ± $489) less than expected among teaching-unit patients and $4,153 (95% CI ± $422) less than expected among nonteaching-unit patients. Payments were significantly higher per patient on the teaching unit than on the nonteaching units, and as a result mean, profitability was higher: $848 (95% CI ± $307) per hospitalization for teaching-unit patients and $451 (95% CI ± $327) for patients on the nonteaching units. Teaching-unit patients of attendings who rarely admitted to the teaching unit (nonteaching attendings) generated an average profit of $1,299 (95% CI ± $613), while nonteaching patients of nonteaching attendings generated an average profit of $208

  1. Cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus vaccination in reducing rotavirus gastroenteritis in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tilson, L

    2011-10-06

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal infant rotavirus (RV) vaccination compared to current standard of care of "no vaccination". Two RV vaccines are currently licensed in Ireland: Rotarix and RotaTeq. A cohort model used in several European countries was adapted using Irish epidemiological, resource utilisation and cost data. The base case model considers the impact of Rotarix vaccination on health-related quality of life of children under five years old from a healthcare payer perspective. Other scenarios explored the use of RotaTeq, impact on one caregiver, on societal costs and on cases that do not seek medical attention. Cost was varied between the vaccine list price (€100\\/course) in the base case and an assumed tender price (€70\\/course). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Implementing universal RV vaccination may prevent around 1970 GP visits, 3280 A&E attendances and 2490 hospitalisations. A vaccination programme was estimated to cost approximately €6.54 million per year but €4.65 million of this would be offset by reducing healthcare resource use. The baseline ICER was €112,048\\/QALY and €72,736\\/QALY from the healthcare payer and societal perspective, respectively, falling to €68,896 and €43,916\\/QALY, respectively, if the impact on one caregiver was considered. If the price fell to €70 per course, universal RV vaccination would be cost saving under all scenarios. Results were sensitive to vaccination costs, incidence of RV infection and direct medical costs. Universal RV vaccination would not be cost-effective under base case assumptions. However, it could be cost-effective at a lower vaccine price or from a wider societal perspective.

  2. [Quality management according to DIN EN ISO 9001 at a university eye hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, U; Händel, A; Naumann, G O

    2001-02-01

    Quality assurance is an integral part of modern microsurgical ophthalmology. Health care laws also mandate overall quality management. In recent years we have standardized the preexisting features of quality management according DIN EN ISO 9001 and have integrated previously missing features. Establishing quality management according to ISO 9001 is possible even at a university eye hospital and department of ophthalmology. Certification according to ISO 9001 specifications was granted in April 1999. The major difficulty was in translating industrial norms to the context of an eye hospital. It was also difficult to overcome skepticism towards quality-assurance measures that lie beyond ophthalmological quality control. It is useful and feasible to establish a quality management system at German university eye hospitals and departments of ophthalmology. Certification according to ISO 9001 is one possibility to make a quality management system transparent and evaluable both inside and outside the hospital.

  3. Renewed growth in hospital inpatient cost since 1998: variation across metropolitan areas and leading clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bernard S; Wong, Herbert S; Steiner, Claudia A

    2006-03-01

    To use disaggregated data about metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and clinical conditions to better describe the variation in cost increases and explore some of the hypothesized influences. The study uses the state inpatient databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, containing all discharges from hospitals in 172 MSAs in 1998 and 2001. The discharge summary information was combined with standardized hospital accounting files, surveys of managed care plans, MSA demographics, and state data pertaining to caps on medical malpractice awards. The analysis used descriptive comparisons and multivariate regressions of admission rate and cost per case in 9 leading disease categories across the MSAs. The increase in hospital input prices and changes in severity of illness were controlled. Metropolitan statistical areas with higher HMO market penetration continued to show lower admission rates, no less so in 2001 than in 1998. A cap on malpractice awards appeared to restrain admissions, but the net effect on hospital cost per adult eroded for those states with the most experience with award caps. Higher admission rates and increase in cost were found in several disease categories.

  4. Incidence and cost analysis of hospital admission and 30‐day readmission among patients with cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirapongsathorn, Sakkarin; Krittanawong, Chayakrit; Enders, Felicity T.; Pendegraft, Richard; Mara, Kristin C.; Borah, Bijan J.; Visscher, Sue L.; Loftus, Conor G.; Shah, Vijay H.; Talwalkar, Jayant A.

    2018-01-01

    We examined risks for first hospitalization and the rate, risk factors, costs, and 1‐year outcome of 30‐day readmission among patients admitted for complications of cirrhosis. Data were retrospectively analyzed for adult patients with cirrhosis residing in Minnesota, Iowa, or Wisconsin and admitted from 2010 through 2013 at both campuses of the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester, MN. Readmission was captured at the two hospitals as well as at community hospitals in the tristate area within the Mayo Clinic Health System. The incidence of hospitalization for complications of cirrhosis was 100/100,000 population, with increasing age and male sex being the strongest risks for hospitalization. For the 2,048 hospitalized study patients, the overall 30‐day readmission rate was 32%; 498 (24.3%) patients were readmitted to Mayo Clinic hospitals and 157 (7.7%) to community hospitals, mainly for complications of portal hypertension (52%) and infections (30%). Readmission could not be predicted accurately. There were 146 deaths during readmission and an additional 105 deaths up to 1 year of follow‐up (50.4% total mortality). Annual postindex hospitalization costs for those with a 30‐day readmission were substantially higher ($73,252) than those readmitted beyond 30 days ($62,053) or those not readmitted ($5,719). At 1‐year follow‐up, only 20.4% of patients readmitted within 30 days were at home. In conclusion, patients with cirrhosis have high rates of hospitalization, especially among men over 65 years, and of unscheduled 30‐day readmission. Readmission cannot be accurately predicted. Postindex hospitalization costs are high; nationally, the annual costs are estimated to be more than $4.45 billion. Only 20% of patients readmitted within 30 days are home at 1 year. (Hepatology Communications 2018;2:188–198) PMID:29404526

  5. Economic costs and health-related quality of life outcomes of hospitalised patients with high HIV prevalence: A prospective hospital cohort study in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Petrou, Stavros; Cohen, Danielle; MacPherson, Peter; Kumwenda, Felistas; Lalloo, David G; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Aileen

    2018-01-01

    amongst HIV-positive participants, but not significantly different between those on and not on ART. HIV-related hospital care poses substantial financial burdens on health systems and patients; however, per-admission costs are substantially lower for those already initiated onto ART prior to admission. These potential cost savings could offset some of the additional resources needed to provide universal access to ART.

  6. [Accidents with biological material at West Paraná University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murofuse, Neide Tiemi; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Gemelli, Lorena Moraes Goetem

    2005-08-01

    It is a descriptive and retrospective study with the purpose of investigating labor accidents with biological material involving workers and trainees occurred in 2003 and 2004 in a University Hospital of Parana. For data collection, the electronic form of the Net of Occupational Accidents Prevention - REPAT has been utilized. Out of the 586 hospital workers, there was a register of 20 (3,4%) injured workers in 2003 and 23 (3,8%) in 2004, representing an increase of 15% in the notifications from one year to the other.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of hospital treatment and outcomes of acute methanol poisoning during the Czech Republic mass poisoning outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulisek, Jan; Balik, Martin; Polak, Ferdinand; Waldauf, Petr; Pelclova, Daniela; Belohlavek, Jan; Zakharov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    During an outbreak of mass methanol poisoning in the Czech Republic in 2012-2014, we compared the total hospital costs and one-year medical costs in the patients treated with different antidotes (fomepizole versus ethanol) and modalities of hemodialysis (intermittent hemodialysis, IHD, versus continuous renal replacement therapy, CRRT). Cross-sectional study in 106 patients with confirmed diagnosis treated in 30 ICU settings. For each patient, the following data were analyzed: admission laboratory data, GCS, PSS, ICU length of stay, organ failures, treatment, outcome, and total hospital costs. Of 83 survivors, in 54 (65%) patients the follow-up examination, quality of life measurement with SF36 questionnaire two years after discharge, and one-year medical costs analysis were performed. The median total hospital costs were 7200 (IQR 1500-10,900) euros and the median one-year medical costs were 1447 (IQR 133-1163) euros in the study population. The total hospital costs were higher in the patients treated with fomepizole comparing to ethanol: 12,890 (IQR 6910-16,210) versus 5590 (IQR 1430-6940) euros (ppoisoning was 3.30 (1.70-3.80 CI 95%), p0.05). The total hospital costs in the patients with acute methanol poisoning were more than three times higher in the patients treated with fomepizole than in the patients treated with ethanol after adjustment for the severity of poisoning. The dialysis modality did not affect the total hospital costs, but the trend to lower costs was present in IHD-group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation and comparison of medical records department of Iran university of medical sciences teaching hospitals and medical records department of Kermanshah university of medical sciences teaching hospitals according to the international standards ISO 9001-2000 in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam ahmadi

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The rate of final conformity of medical records system by the criteria of the ISO 9001-2000 standards in hospitals related to Iran university of medical sciences was greater than in hospitals related to Kermanshah university of medical sciences. And total conformity rate of medical records system in Kermanshah hospitals was low. So the regulation of medical records department with ISO quality management standards can help to elevate its quality.

  9. Competition in the Dutch hospital sector: an analysis of health care volume and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Groot, T L C M; Lindeboom, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of market competition on health care volume and cost. At the start of 2005, the financing system of Dutch hospitals started to be gradually changed from a closed-end budgeting system to a non-regulated price competitive prospective reimbursement system. The gradual implementation of price competition is a 'natural experiment' that provides a unique opportunity to analyze the effects of market competition on hospital behavior. We have access to a unique database, which contains hospital discharge data of diagnosis treatment combinations (DBCs) of individual patients, including detailed care activities. Difference-in-difference estimates show that the implementation of market-based competition leads to relatively lower total costs, production volume and number of activities overall. Difference-in-difference estimates on treatment level show that the average costs for outpatient DBCs decreased due to a decrease in the number of activities per DBC. The introduction of market competition led to an increase of average costs of inpatient DBCs. Since both volume and number of activities have not changed significantly, we conclude that the cost increase is likely the result of more expensive activities. A possible explanation for our finding is that hospitals look for possible efficiency improvements in predominantly outpatient care products that are relatively straightforward, using easily analyzable technologies. The effects of competition on average cost and the relative shares of inpatient and outpatient treatments on specialty level are significant but contrary for cardiology and orthopedics, suggesting that specialties react differently to competitive incentives.

  10. Urinary tract infections at aga Khan University hospital nairobi - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... (Uti) are normally treated empirically and urine culture is usual ordered for as a last ... symptomatic Uti in patients at aga Khan University hospital by looking at the trends of Uti ... in the context of pyelonephritis in pregnancy(9).

  11. A cohort cost analysis of lumbar laminectomy--current trends in surgeon and hospital fees distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Camilo A; Zadnik, Patricia L; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Witham, Timothy F; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    Spine-related health-care expenditures accounted for $86 billion dollars in 2005, a 65% increase from 1997. However, when adjusting for inflation, surgeons have seen decreased reimbursement rates over the last decade. To assess contribution of surgeon fees to overall procedure cost, we reviewed the charges and reimbursements for a noninstrumented lumbar laminectomy and compared the amounts reimbursed to the hospital and to the surgeon at a major academic institution. Retrospective review of costs associated with lumbar laminectomies. Seventy-seven patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy for spinal stenosis throughout an 18-month period at a single academic medical center were included in this study. Cost and number of laminectomy levels. The reimbursement schedule of six academic spine surgeons was collected over 18 months for performed noninstrumented lumbar laminectomy procedures. Bills and collections by the hospital and surgeon professional fees were comparatively analyzed and substratified by number of laminectomy levels and patient insurance status. Unpaired two-sample Student t test was used for analysis of significant differences. During an 18-month period, patients underwent a lumbar laminectomy involving on average three levels and stayed in the hospital on average 3.5 days. Complications were uncommon (13%). Average professional fee billing for the surgeon was $6,889±$2,882, and collection was $1,848±$1,433 (28% overall, 30% for private insurance, and 23% for Medicare/Medicaid insurance). Average hospital billing for the inpatient hospital stay minus professional fees from the surgeon was $14,766±$7,729, and average collection on such bills was $13,391±$7,256 (92% overall, 91% for private insurance, and 85% for Medicare/Medicaid insurance). Based on this analysis, the proportion of overall costs allocated to professional fees for a noninstrumented lumbar laminectomy is small, whereas those allocated to hospital costs are far greater. These findings

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risoer, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Soerensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. Methods An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary...... outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent...... variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number...

  13. Comparing the organisational structure of the preoperative assessment clinic at eight university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edward, G. M.; Biervliet, J. D.; Hollmann, M. W.; Schlack, W. S.; Preckel, B.

    2008-01-01

    The preoperative assessment clinic (PAC) has been implemented in most major hospitals. However, there is no uniformity in the way PACs are organised. We compared the organisational structure of the PACs from all eight university hospitals in The Netherlands, looking at the following variables:

  14. Design and Implementation of PACS at Georgetown University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, S. K.; Benson, H.. R.; Choyke, P.; Fahey, F. H.; Wang, P. C.; Zeman, R. K...; Elliott, L. P.

    1985-09-01

    During the preparation and planning phase of the PACS project at Georgetown University Hospital it was realized that PACS requires truly the state of the art technology in data communication, image processing and man machine interfacing. It was also realized that un-like many other technology intensive devices used in radiology, PACS cannot be seen as an independent system that will provide well defined services. PACS will be the backbone of the department operation in clinical, educational and managerial functions. It will indeed be the nerve center of the radiologic services affecting every aspect of the department. PACS will have to be designed to perform in a cost-effective manner to widely varying needs within the radiology departments. The integration of ever changing complex technology that will impact every aspect of a radiology service is not a trivial matter. This transition period going from current manual film based PACS to Digital PACS can be long, expansive and disruptive unless careful planning preceeds the implementation. PACS is still an emerging technology at its infancy. Performance monitoring and evaluation of diversified functions have to be also established so that improvement to the system can be efficiently implemented. Thus the evaluation criteria should be also established as early as possible.

  15. Patients' perception of the ambulance services at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisah, A; Chew, K S; Mohd Shaharuddin Shah, C H; Nik Hisamuddin, N A R

    2008-08-01

    Little is known regarding public opinion of prehospital care in Malaysia. This study was conducted to find out the public's perception and expectations of the ambulance services in one of the university hospitals in Malaysia. A six-month prospective cross-sectional study to look at patients' perception of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia's (HUSM) ambulance service was conducted from February 2006 to July 2006. Upon arrival at the hospital, patients or their relatives (who used our hospital's ambulances) were interviewed with a set of questions regarding their perception of the ambulance services and were asked to rate the perception on a Likert Scale from 1 to 10. A convenient sampling method was applied. A total of 87 samples were obtained. Despite the many problems faced by the ambulance service in HUSM, the mean score for each of the questions on patient's perception ranged from 9.33 to 9.70 out of 10. The questions with the highest mean score, which were both 9.70 each, were related to staff attentiveness and staff gentleness. Patients' perceptions can be very subjective, but until further similar studies could be carried out in other parts of Malaysia, this set of data merely represents a numerical measure of public perception of the ambulance services from HUSM.

  16. Trends in hospitalization for atrial fibrillation: epidemiology, cost, and implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Azfar; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Nalluri, Nikhil; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Spagnola, Jonathan; Patel, Aashay; Asti, Deepak; Kanotra, Ritesh; Khan, Hafiz; Savani, Chirag; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Neil; Pau, Dhaval; Badheka, Apurva O; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Kowalski, Marcin; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Paydak, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia worldwide and the most common arrhythmia leading to hospitalization. Due to a substantial increase in incidence and prevalence of AF over the past few decades, it attributes to an extensive economic and public health burden. The increasing number of hospitalizations, aging population, anticoagulation management, and increasing trend for disposition to a skilled facility are drivers of the increasing cost associated with AF. There has been significant progress in AF management with the release of new oral anticoagulants, use of left atrial catheter ablation, and novel techniques for left atrial appendage closure. In this article, we aim to review the trends in epidemiology, hospitalization, and cost of AF along with its future implications on public health. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Opportunities for the improvement of cost accounting systems in public hospitals in Italy and Croatia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bertoni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight similarities and differences between one Croatian and one Italian public hospital regarding the implementation of cost accounting and full costing method in their accounting systems. Moving from the theoretical background, it is evident that cost accounting methods introduced in healthcare sector bring benefits to the whole society through an increased efficiency of the healthcare services provided. It primarily ensures better governing of hospital’s resources allowing more transparency in spending public funds. The main topic is that with the introduction of cost accounting system for internal purposes in public hospitals, the management would be able to govern them in a more efficient and effective way while reducing costs. The research for this paper was conducted through the interview of accounting officers in one Croatian and one Italian public hospital. The main results show that there are differences in legislation background regarding how they record costs, but also how they allocate costs to the cost objects and in how they use cost information in their decision-making process. In order to successfully manage public hospitals, it is crucial that true, timely and valid information are obtained as a base for the decision-making process. The cost accounting methodology is therefore essential to the management of public hospitals. It must provide information on the type and amount of resources spent, and thus enable the preconditions for control, management and potential reduction of costs.

  18. Building new university hospital--what citizens know and policy makers should be aware of.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresković, S; Letica, S; Mastilica, M; Babić-Bosanac, S; Civljak, M; Bozicević, I; Borovecki, A

    2002-12-01

    Survey of citizens' attitudes in the process of strategic decision making is one of the most important methods for determining health care priorities. We describe the results of a survey carried out in December 2001, with an aim to collect and analyze the attitudes of the citizens and health care professionals toward the possibilities and strategies of construction of the University Hospital in Blato, Zagreb. The first referendum on the construction of the new hospital was conducted among Zagreb citizens in 1982, when they agreed that the new University Hospital was much needed. Zagreb citizens confirmed once again their attitudes toward and opinions on the need to continue the construction of new hospital in the city outskirts. By 1992, when the construction of the hospital was halted due to insufficient financial means, Zagreb citizens had already invested over 150 epsilon million in the project. It is interesting that today, 89.4% of the citizens and 74.5% of physicians agree that the new hospital building should be completed. Also, 66.7% of the citizens and 88% of physicians think that this hospital should be a University hospital that could offer the most complex treatments and medical education. To finish the construction of the new hospital further 200 epsilon million needs to be invested. Survey showed that 71% of citizens and 82.2% of physicians think that funds should be raised from some form of credit or budget rather than by special local tax, additional tax or voluntary tax. This project will significantly determine the future of hospital and health care system in Croatia due to its capacities in terms of space, technology, and staff. Before the decision to continue with the new hospital construction be made, the expected future needs, demands, and supply of the health care services in hospital sector in Zagreb and Croatia should be provided using SWOT analysis for each of existing the facilities.

  19. Hospital costs and benefits of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results from a randomised population screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2002-01-01

    to analyse the hospital costs and benefits of screening older males for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIALS and......to analyse the hospital costs and benefits of screening older males for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIALS and...

  20. Supply chain management with cost-containment & financial-sustainability in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Hem; Rinkoo, Arvind Vashishta; Verma, Jitendra Kumar; Verma, Shuchita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, R K

    2013-01-01

    Financial crunch in the present recession results in the non-availability of the right materials at the right time in large hospitals. However due to insufficient impetus towards systems development, situation remains dismal even when funds are galore. Cost incurred on materials account for approximately one-third of the total recurring expenditures in hospitals. Systems development for effective and efficient materials management is thus tantamount to cost-containment and sustainability. This scientific paper describes an innovative model, Hospital Revolving Fund (HRF), developed at a tertiary care research institute in Asia. The main idea behind inception of HRF was to ensure availability of all supplies in the hospital so that the quality of healthcare delivery was not affected. The model was conceptualized in the background of non-availability of consumables in the hospital leading to patient as well as staff dissatisfaction. Hospital supplies have been divided into two parts, approximately 3250 unit items and 1750 miscellaneous items. This division is based on cost, relative-utility and case-specific utilization. 0.1 Million USD, separated from non-planned budget, was initially used as seed money in 1998. HRF procures supplies from reputed firms on concessional rates (8-25%) and make them available to patients at much lesser rates vis-à-vis market rates, levying minimal maintenance charges. In 2009-10, total annual purchases of 14 Million USD were made. The balance sheet reflected 1.4 Million USD as fixed deposit investment. The minimal maintenance charges levied on the patients along with the interest income were sufficient to pay for all recurring expenses related to HRF. Even after these expenses, HRF boosted of 0.2 Million USD as cash-in-hand in financial year 2009-10. In-depth analysis of 'balance sheet' and 'Income and Expenditure' statement of the fund for last five financial years affirms that HRF is a self-sustainable and viable supply chain

  1. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  2. The Trade Practices Act, Competitive Neutrality and Research Costing: Issues for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzobs, Tania

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly universities are becoming commercial enterprises and their core activities of teaching and research subject to business imperatives. This paper reviews the research costing methodologies of 17 Australian universities. Tension between Competition Law and Competitive Neutrality exists which could be resolved through improved costing and…

  3. Quantifying the hidden healthcare cost of diabetes mellitus in Australian hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahalios, Amalia; Somarajah, Gowri; Hamblin, Peter S; Karunajeewa, Harin; Janus, Edward D

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus in hospital inpatients is most commonly present as a comorbidity rather than as the primary diagnosis. In some hospitals, the prevalence of comorbid diabetes mellitus across all inpatients exceeds 30%, which could add to complexity of care and resource utilisation. However, whether and to what extent comorbid diabetes mellitus contributes indirectly to greater hospitalisation costs is ill-defined. To determine the attributable effect of comorbid diabetes mellitus on hospital resource utilisation in a General Internal Medical service in Melbourne, Australia. We extracted data from a database of all General Internal Medical discharge episodes from July 2012 to June 2013. We fitted multivariable regression models to compare patients with diabetes mellitus to those without diabetes mellitus with respect to hospitalisation cost, length of stay, admissions per year and inpatient mortality. Of 4657 patients 1519 (33%) had diabetes mellitus, for whom average hospitalisation cost (AUD9910) was higher than those without diabetes mellitus (AUD7805). In multivariable analysis, this corresponded to a 1.22-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.33, P diabetes was 8.2 days versus 6.8 days for those without diabetes, with an adjusted 1.19-fold greater odds (95% CI 1.06-1.33, P = 0.001) of staying an additional day. Number of admissions and mortality were similar. Comorbid diabetes mellitus adds significantly to hospitalisation duration and costs in medical inpatients. Moreover, diabetes mellitus patients with chronic complications had a greater-still cost and hospitalisation duration compared to those without diabetes mellitus. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Methods: Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices. Results: In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million. The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467 and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874, thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Conclusion

  5. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, Laetitia C; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Globally, flexible work arrangements - through the use of temporary nursing staff - are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices). In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million) on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million). The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467) and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874), thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Hospital managers and policy-makers need to address the effective

  6. patronage and cost of malaria treatment in private hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    000 deaths. The burden was heaviest in WHO African. Region where an estimated 90% of all malaria death occurred and in children aged under 5 years, who accounted for 10% of all ... account for the number of deaths due to malaria. This cannot be .... therefore asking patient to bear the cost of admission in hospitals may ...

  7. Pulmonary Embolism Inpatients Treated With Rivaroxaban Had Shorter Hospital Stays and Lower Costs Compared With Warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jay M; Deitelzweig, Steven; Kline, Jeffrey; Tran, Oth; Smith, David M; Crivera, Concetta; Bookhart, Brahim; Schein, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Using real-world data, this study compares inpatient length of stay (LOS) and costs for patients with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) initiating treatment with oral anticoagulation with rivaroxaban versus warfarin. Hospitalizations from MarketScan's Hospital Drug Database were selected from November 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013, for adults with a primary diagnosis of PE initiating treatment with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Warfarin patients were matched 1:1 to rivaroxaban patients using exact and propensity score matching. Hospital LOS, treatment patterns, and hospitalization costs were evaluated. Matched cohorts included 751 rivaroxaban-treated patients and 751 warfarin-treated patients. Adjusted mean LOS was 3.77 days for rivaroxaban patients (95% CI, 3.66-3.87 days) and 5.48 days for warfarin patients (95% CI, 5.33-5.63 days; P < .001). Mean (SD) LOS was shorter for patients taking rivaroxaban whether admission was for provoked PE (rivaroxaban: 5.2 [5.1] days; warfarin: 7.0 [6.5] days; P < .001) or unprovoked PE (rivaroxaban: 3.4 [2.3] days; warfarin: 5.1 [2.7] days; P < .001). Mean (SD) days from first dose to discharge were 2.5 (1.7) (rivaroxaban) and 4.0 (2.9) (warfarin) when initiated with parenteral anticoagulants (P < .001) and 2.7 (1.7) (rivaroxaban) and 4.0 (2.2) (warfarin) without parenteral anticoagulants (P < .001). The rivaroxaban cohort incurred significantly lower unadjusted mean (SD) hospitalization costs (rivaroxaban: $8473 [$9105]; warfarin: $10,291 [$9185]; P < .001), confirmed by covariate adjustment with generalized linear modeling estimating predicted mean hospitalization costs of $8266 for rivaroxaban patients (95% CI, $7851-$8681) and $10,511 for warfarin patients (95% CI, $10,031-$10,992; P < .001). patients with PE treated with rivaroxaban incurred significantly lower hospitalization costs by $2245 per admission compared with patients treated with warfarin, which was attributable to cost offsets from 1.71 fewer days of

  8. Nursing staff turnover at a Swedish university hospital: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, Stina F; Kajermo, Kerstin N; Ekvall, Göran; Tomson, Göran

    2009-11-01

    The aim was to explore opinions on individual needs and other factors that may influence nursing staff turnover. High staff turnover is a great problem for many hospitals. It is shown to have a negative effect on the quality of nursing care and to increase hospital costs. In 2004 in a large university hospital in Sweden five focus group discussions (FGDs) including department heads (1), nursing managers (2) and members of nursing staff (2) were carried out. The questions to be addressed were 'Why do nurses leave?' and 'Why do nurses stay?' In addition, register data of staff turnover for 2002-2003 were analysed in relation to different facts about the units, such as number of employees, type of care and medical specialty. Categories of opinions identified in the FGDs were compared with results of the statistical analyses on the relationship between staff turnover and unit parameters to identify overall factors that may influence on nurse staff turnover. Four major factors were identified as having a possible influence on staff turnover: 'intrinsic values of motivation', 'work load', 'unit size 'and 'leadership'. Smaller units had lower staff turnover as well as outpatient units and day care. It was not possible to compare statements from participants from smaller units with those from participants from larger units. Two factors had diverging data, 'salary' and 'spirit of the time'. A surprising finding was the little mention of patient care in relation to staff turnover. It is important for managers to ensure that intrinsic values of nurses are met to minimise the risk for high turnover rates. Inpatient care must receive adequate staffing and nursing care could be organised into smaller units or work teams to avoid dissatisfaction and high turnover.

  9. Hospital cost analysis of a prospective, randomized trial of early vs interval appendectomy for perforated appendicitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Adrianne L; Williams, Regan F; Giles, Kim; Waters, Teresa M; Eubanks, James W; Hixson, S Douglas; Huang, Eunice Y; Langham, Max R; Blakely, Martin L

    2012-04-01

    The methods of surgical care for children with perforated appendicitis are controversial. Some surgeons prefer early appendectomy; others prefer initial nonoperative management followed by interval appendectomy. Determining which of these two therapies is most cost-effective was the goal of this study. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial in children with a preoperative diagnosis of perforated appendicitis. Patients were randomized to early or interval appendectomy. Overall hospital costs were extracted from the hospital's internal cost accounting system and the two treatment groups were compared using an intention-to-treat analysis. Nonparametric data were reported as median ± standard deviation (or range) and compared using a Wilcoxon rank sum test. One hundred thirty-one patients were randomized to either early (n = 64) or interval (n = 67) appendectomy. Hospital charges and costs were significantly lower in patients randomized to early appendectomy. Total median hospital costs were $17,450 (range $7,020 to $55,993) for patients treated with early appendectomy vs $22,518 (range $4,722 to $135,338) for those in the interval appendectomy group. Median hospital costs more than doubled in patients who experienced an adverse event ($15,245 vs $35,391, p < 0.0001). Unplanned readmissions also increased costs significantly and were more frequent in patients randomized to interval appendectomy. In a prospective randomized trial, hospital charges and costs were significantly lower for early appendectomy when compared with interval appendectomy. The increased costs were related primarily to the significant increase in adverse events, including unplanned readmissions, seen in the interval appendectomy group. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY EXPERIENCES AT NARA MEDICAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Ueda, Atsushi; Noriyama, Yoshinobu; Nagai, Toshiya; Hirayama, Tomohide; Kirita, Ikuhiro; Hata, Kazuya; Ikawa, Genro

    1995-01-01

    We surveyed the clinical electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatment expe- riences between 1987 and 1992 at Nara Medical University Hospital. ECT is restrictedly applied to severely ill patients who have no response to other somatic therapies. For 5 years, 43 cases were treated with ECT, of which 27 suffered from depressive disorders, 3 from schizophrenia, 3 from somatoform disorders, and 10 from anxiety disorders. ECT was selected by psychiatrists for severe depressive states after failure of ...

  11. General hospital costs in England of medical and psychiatric care for patients who self-harm: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; McDaid, David; Casey, Deborah; Brand, Fiona; Leal, Jose; Park, A-La; Geulayov, Galit; Hawton, Keith

    2017-10-01

    Self-harm is an extremely common reason for hospital presentation. However, few estimates have been made of the hospital costs of assessing and treating self-harm. Such information is essential for planning services and to help strengthen the case for investment in actions to reduce the frequency and effects of self-harm. In this study, we aimed to calculate the costs of hospital medical care associated with a self-harm episode and the costs of psychosocial assessment, together with identification of the key drivers of these costs. In a retrospective analysis, we estimated hospital resource use and care costs for all presentations for self-harm to the John Radcliffe Hospital (Oxford, UK), between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Episode-related data were provided by the Oxford Monitoring System for Self-harm and we linked these with financial hospital records to quantify costs. We assessed time and resources allocated to psychosocial assessments through discussion with clinical and managerial staff. We then used generalised linear models to investigate the associations between hospital costs and methods of self-harm. Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, 1647 self-harm presentations by 1153 patients were recorded. Of these, 1623 (99%) presentations by 1140 patients could be linked with hospital finance records. 179 (16%) patients were younger than 18 years. 1150 (70%) presentations were for self-poisoning alone, 367 (22%) for self-injury alone, and 130 (8%) for a combination of methods. Psychosocial assessments were made in 75% (1234) of all episodes. The overall mean hospital cost per episode of self-harm was £809. Costs differed significantly between different types of self-harm: self-injury alone £753 (SD 2061), self-poisoning alone £806 (SD 1568), self-poisoning and self-injury £987 (SD 1823; p<0·0001). Costs were mainly associated with the type of health-care service contact such as inpatient stay, intensive care, and psychosocial assessment. Mean

  12. Hospitalization costs of severe bacterial pneumonia in children: comparative analysis considering different costing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sheila Elke Araujo; Minamisava, Ruth; Vieira, Maria Aparecida da Silva; Itria, Alexander; Pessoa, Vicente Porfirio; Andrade, Ana Lúcia Sampaio Sgambatti de; Toscano, Cristiana Maria

    2017-01-01

    To determine and compare hospitalization costs of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia cases via different costing methods under the Brazilian Public Unified Health System perspective. Cost-of-illness study based on primary data collected from a sample of 59 children aged between 28 days and 35 months and hospitalized due to bacterial pneumonia. Direct medical and non-medical costs were considered and three costing methods employed: micro-costing based on medical record review, micro-costing based on therapeutic guidelines and gross-costing based on the Brazilian Public Unified Health System reimbursement rates. Costs estimates obtained via different methods were compared using the Friedman test. Cost estimates of inpatient cases of severe pneumonia amounted to R$ 780,70/$Int. 858.7 (medical record review), R$ 641,90/$Int. 706.90 (therapeutic guidelines) and R$ 594,80/$Int. 654.28 (Brazilian Public Unified Health System reimbursement rates). Costs estimated via micro-costing (medical record review or therapeutic guidelines) did not differ significantly (p=0.405), while estimates based on reimbursement rates were significantly lower compared to estimates based on therapeutic guidelines (pmetodologias de custeio, na perspectiva do Sistema Único de Saúde. Estudo de custo, com coleta de dados primários de uma amostra de 59 crianças com 28 dias a 35 meses de idade hospitalizadas por pneumonia bacteriana. Foram considerados custos diretos médicos e não médicos. Três metodologias de custeio foram utilizadas: microcusteio por revisão de prontuários, microcusteio considerando diretriz terapêutica e macrocusteio por ressarcimento do Sistema Único de Saúde. Os custos estimados pelas diferentes metodologias foram comparados utilizando o teste de Friedman. Os custos hospitalares de crianças com pneumonia grave foram R$ 780,70 ($Int. 858.7) por revisão de prontuários, R$ 641,90 ($Int. 706.90) por diretriz terapêutica e R$ 594,80 ($Int. 654.28) por

  13. Assessing medication adherence and healthcare utilization and cost patterns among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Sudeep; Markowitz, Michael; Fu, Dong-Jing; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Candrilli, Sean D; Alphs, Larry

    2014-06-01

    Hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder have a high risk of re-hospitalization. However, limited data exist evaluating critical post-discharge periods during which the risk of re-hospitalization is significant. Among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder, we assessed pharmacotherapy adherence and healthcare utilization and costs during sequential 60-day clinical periods before schizoaffective disorder-related hospitalization and post-hospital discharge. From the MarketScan(®) Medicaid database (2004-2008), we identified patients (≥18 years) with a schizoaffective disorder-related inpatient admission. Study measures including medication adherence and healthcare utilization and costs were assessed during sequential preadmission and post-discharge periods. We conducted univariate and multivariable regression analyses to compare schizoaffective disorder-related and all-cause healthcare utilization and costs (in 2010 US dollars) between each adjacent 60-day post-discharge periods. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. We identified 1,193 hospital-discharged patients with a mean age of 41 years. The mean medication adherence rate was 46% during the 60-day period prior to index inpatient admission, which improved to 80% during the 60-day post-discharge period. Following hospital discharge, schizoaffective disorder-related healthcare costs were significantly greater during the initial 60-day period compared with the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period (mean US$2,370 vs US$1,765; p schizoaffective disorder-related costs declined during the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period and remained stable for the remaining post-discharge periods (days 121-365). We observed considerably lower (46%) adherence during 60 days prior to the inpatient admission; in comparison, adherence for the overall 6-month period was 8% (54%) higher. Our study findings suggest that both short-term (e.g., 60 days) and long-term (e.g., 6-12 months) medication

  14. A cost analysis of a hospital-based palliative care outreach program: implications for expanding public sector palliative care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoro, Charles; Dinat, Natalya

    2011-06-01

    Increasing access to palliative care services in low- and middle-income countries is often perceived as unaffordable despite the growing need for such services because of the increasing burden of chronic diseases including HIV and AIDS. The aim of the study was to establish the costs and cost drivers for a hospital outreach palliative care service in a low-resource setting, and to elucidate possible consequential quality-of-life improvements and potential cost savings. The study used a cost accounting procedure to cost the hospital outreach services--using a step-down costing method to measure unit (average) costs. The African Palliative Care Association Palliative Outcome Score (APCA POS) was applied at five intervals to a cohort of 72 consecutive and consenting patients, enrolled in a two-month period. The study found that of the 481 and 1902 patients registered for outreach and in-hospital visits, respectively, 4493 outreach hospital visits and 3412 in-hospital visits were done per year. The costs per hospital outreach visit and in-hospital visit were US$71 and US$80, respectively. The cost per outreach visit was 50% less than the average cost of a patient day equivalent for district hospitals of $142. Some of the POS of a subsample (n=72) showed statistically significant improvements. Hospital outreach services have the potential to avert hospital admissions in generally overcrowded services in low-resource settings and may improve the quality of life of patients in their home environments. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Nutritional Support for the Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffaha, Haitham W; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy; Gordon, Louisa G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support compared with standard care in preventing pressure ulcers (PrUs) in high-risk hospitalized patients. An economic model using data from a systematic literature review. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of nutritional support in reducing the incidence of PrUs was conducted. Modeled cohort of hospitalized patients at high risk of developing PrUs and malnutrition simulated during their hospital stay and up to 1 year. Standard care included PrU prevention strategies, such as redistribution surfaces, repositioning, and skin protection strategies, along with standard hospital diet. In addition to the standard care, the intervention group received nutritional support comprising patient education, nutrition goal setting, and the consumption of high-protein supplements. The analysis was from a healthcare payer perspective. Key outcomes of the model included the average costs and quality-adjusted life years. Model results were tested in univariate sensitivity analyses, and decision uncertainty was characterized using a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Compared with standard care, nutritional support was cost saving at AU $425 per patient and marginally more effective with an average 0.005 quality-adjusted life years gained. The probability of nutritional support being cost-effective was 87%. Nutritional support to prevent PrUs in high-risk hospitalized patients is cost-effective with substantial cost savings predicted. Hospitals should implement the recommendations from the current PrU practice guidelines and offer nutritional support to high-risk patients.

  16. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay Candil, Sergio; Balsa Barro, José Antonio; Álvarez Hernández, Julia; Crespo Palomo, Carlos; Pérez-Alcántara, Ferrán; Polanco Sánchez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in Spain as compared to high risk screening and no screening. A decision-analytic model comparing the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of universal screening versus high risk screening and versus no screening. was used for the pregnancy and postpartum period. Probabilities from randomized controlled trials were considered for adverse obstetrical outcomes. A Markov model was used to assess the lifetime period after the first postpartum year and account for development of overt hypothyroidism. The main assumptions in the model and use of resources were assessed by local clinical experts. The analysis considered direct healthcare costs only. Universal screening gained .011 QALYs over high risk screening and .014 QALYS over no screening. Total direct costs per patient were €5,786 for universal screening, €5,791 for high risk screening, and €5,781 for no screening. Universal screening was dominant compared to risk-based screening and a very cost-effective alternative as compared to no screening. Use of universal screening instead of high risk screening would result in €2,653,854 annual savings for the Spanish National Health System. Universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in the first trimester is dominant in Spain as compared to risk-based screening, and is cost-effective as compared to no screening (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €374 per QALY). Moreover, it allows diagnosing and treating cases of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism that may not be detected when only high-risk women are screened. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Costs and Risk Factors for Hospital Readmission After Periprosthetic Knee Fractures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Russell A; Schairer, William W; Jevsevar, David S

    2018-02-01

    Periprosthetic fractures (PPFX) around total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are devastating complications with significant morbidity. With growing healthcare costs, hospital readmissions have become a marker for quality healthcare delivery. However, little is known about the risk factors or costs associated with readmission after treatment of PPFX. We sought to identify the patient demographics, prevalence of treatment types (open reduction internal fixation [ORIF] vs revision TKA), 30 and 90-day readmission rates, costs of initial treatment and readmission, and risk factors for readmission. We used the 2013 Nationwide Readmissions Database to select patients who underwent TKA, revision TKA, and treatment of PPFX with either ORIF or revision TKA. The 90-day readmission rate was determined through a survival analysis, and risk factors were identified using a cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. We identified 1526 patients with PPFX treated with ORIF and 1458 treated with revision TKA. Ninety-day readmissions were 20.5% and 21.8%, respectively. Patients with ORIF were more often female and had multiple medical comorbidities. Patient factors associated with readmission included advanced age, male gender, comorbidities, discharge to a skilled nursing facility or home with health aide, and Medicare or Medicaid insurance. Treatment at a teaching hospital was the only hospital-associated risk factor identified. ORIF cost USD 25,539 and revision THA cost USD 37,680, with associated readmissions costing 15,269 and 16,806, respectively. PPFX results in greater costs compared to primary and revision TKA. This study highlights risk factors for readmission