WorldWideScience

Sample records for university family study

  1. [Family and psychosocial variables in the choice of university studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinto Arrillaga, A; Yllá Segura, L; Ortiz Jáuregi, A; Zupiria Gorostidi, X

    2003-01-01

    Family order of the children and family size as well as other psychosocial variables on University of the Basque Country (UBC) students are compared in order to relate these data with the choice of type of university studies. As a sample, we studied 6,013 students from the UBC in different careers and courses. Mean age was 20.26 years. The following instruments were used: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Scale and Yllá Alexithymia Scale. All them were validated for our country. The presence of women was greater in all the career studies except for engineering where the proportion of men was greater. The data verify the relationship between being the youngest or intermediate child of a family of three or more children and studying Journalism and Fine Arts and that the first born of families of two or more children are more represented in Engineering. It is interesting that there are fewer only children in Medicine where children of families of three or more, both first-born as well as intermediate, go. These variables, as well as extraversion, neuroticism and alexithymia, were different in the different career studies. It was also observed that the female university students scored higher in the neuroticism scale and that the levels of Alexithymia were higher among the men. Further, relations were found between child birth order and family size and personality, in the sense that the Medical and Odontology careers presented lower scores in Alexithymia while the more technical careers such as Engineering are those that present a higher alexithymia. Medicine and Odontology, followed by Mathematics and Journalism, obtained the highest scores in neuroticism. Engineering students obtain the lowest neuroticism. The most extroverted students are those from Journalism, Chemistry, Economics and Odontology. The choice of university studies is associated to gender, birth order, family size and personality patterns. Personality variables are related to

  2. Florida State University's Institute for Family Violence Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehme, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This article outlines the role of the Institute for Family Violence Studies (IFVS) within the Florida State University College of Social Work in navigating issues intersecting social work and the law ( http://familyvio.csw.fsu.edu/ ). By developing comprehensive state and national trainings for unique populations and conducting interdisciplinary research, the IFVS promotes public policy that benefits healthy families and decreases family and intimate partner violence. The crucial role of staff and students, the IFVS's collaborative alliances, and funding sources are highlighted. Projects such as the Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation, the National Prevention Toolkit on Officer-Involved Domestic Violence, Successful Co-Parenting After Divorce, and the LGBTQ Family Life Project are described. Plans for future projects, as well as other new avenues for research, are summarized.

  3. Creating at university the environment friendly for studies, students' employment, and family : approach of students

    OpenAIRE

    Sidlauskienė, Virginija

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of EQUAL project "FAMILY UNIVERSE: Family-Friendly Organization" was to create and to test innovative methodology and means for educational institutions and organizations, starting to reconcile family and professional life and trying to change stereotypical gender roles in the family and in the work, by forming family-friendly study and work environment in Siauliai University. Conditions for the establishment of family oriented organization at University of Šiauliai are analysed ...

  4. Family-specific vs. universal PCR primers for the study of mitochondrial DNA in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Jelena M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs or mitogenomes of seed plants are characterized by a notoriously unstable organization on account of which available so-called universal or consensus primers may fail to fulfil their foreseen function - amplification of various mtDNA regions in a broad range of plant taxa. Thus, the primers developed for groups assumed to have similar organization of their mitogenomes, such as families, may facilitate a broader usage of more variable non-coding portions of these genomes in group members. Using in silico PCR method and six available complete mitogenomes of Fabaceae, it has been demonstrated that only three out of 36 published universal primer and three Medicago sativa-specific primer pairs that amplify various mtDNA regions are suitable for six representatives of the Fabaceae family upon minor modifications, and develop 21 Fabaceae-specific primer pairs for amplification of all 14 cis-splicing introns in genes of NADH subunits (nad genes which represent the most commonly used non-coding mtDNA regions in various studies in plants. Using the same method and six available complete mitogenomes of representatives of related families Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Rosaceae and a model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, it has further been demonstrated that applicability of newly developed primer pairs for amplification of nad introns in more or less related taxa was dependent not only on species evolutionary distances but also on their genome sizes. A reported set of 24 primer pairs is a valuable resource which may facilitate a broader usage of mtDNA variability in future studies at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Fabaceae, which is the third largest family of flowering plants rarely studied at the mtDNA level, and in other more or less related taxa. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173005

  5. A NUMERICAL STUDY OF UNIVERSALITY AND SELF-SIMILARITY IN SOME FAMILIES OF FORCED LOGISTIC MAPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabassa, Pau; Jorba, Angel; Carles Tatjer, Joan

    We explore different two-parametric families of quasi-periodically Forced Logistic Maps looking for universality and self-similarity properties. In the bifurcation diagram of the one-dimensional Logistic Map, it is well known that there exist parameter values s(n) where the 2(n)-periodic orbit is

  6. A qualitative study of intimate partner violence universal screening by family therapy interns: implications for practice, research, training, and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todahl, Jeffrey L; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented-and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening-is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy interns when implementing universal screening for IPV in an outpatient clinic setting. Twenty-two graduate students in a COAMFTE-accredited program were interviewed using qualitative research methods grounded in phenomenology. Three domains, 7 main themes, and 26 subthemes were identified. The three domains that emerged in this study include (a) therapist practice of universal screening, (b) client response to universal screening, and (c) therapist response to universal screening. Implications for practice, research, training, and supervision are discussed.

  7. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  8. TRANSCENDING FAMILY/UNIVERSALITY: A PSYCHOANALYTIC STUDY OF ROHINTON MISTRY'S SUCH A LONG JOURNEY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Ram Lalit

    2017-01-01

    Tracing the origin of psychoanalytical interpretation of the literary texts M.A.R. Habib writes: Critics, rhetoricians, and philosophers since Aristotle have examined the psychological dimensions of literature, ranging from an author’s motivation and intentions to the effect of texts and performances on an audience. The application of psychoanalytic principles to the study of literature, however, is a relatively recent phenomenon, initiated primarily by Freud and in other directions by Alfred...

  9. Drug use, family support and related factors in university students. A cross-sectional study based on the uniHcos Project data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-De la Torre, Jorge; Fernández-Villa, Tania; Molina, Antonio José; Amezcua-Prieto, Carmen; Mateos, Ramona; Cancela, José María; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Ortíz-Moncada, Rocío; Alguacil, Juan; Almaraz, Ana; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Suárez-Varela, María Morales; Blázquez-Abellán, Gemma; Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Valero, Luis Félix; Ayán, Carlos; Vilorio-Marqués, Laura; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Martín, Vicente

    2018-01-09

    To assess the prevalence of illegal drug use in college students on any previous occasion, during the previous year and the previous month, and to analyze the relationship between illegal drug use and family support and other factors. A cross-sectional study using data from students participating in the uniHcos project (n = 3767) was conducted. The prevalence and age of onset of consumption of cannabis, non-prescription sedatives, stimulants and depressants was evaluated. Polyconsumption was also assessed. The independent variables were: family support, age, residence, and employment status. To determine the factors related to drug use multivariate logistic regression models stratified by gender were fitted. Differences between men and women in prevalence of illegal drug use except non-prescription sedatives were observed. In both genders, less family support was associated with higher consumption of all drugs, except depressants, and with polyconsumption. To be studying and looking for work was related to cannabis and stimulant use and to polyconsumption among women, but only to cannabis use among men. These results support the notion that the start of university studies is a particularly relevant stage in the onset of illegal drug use and its prevention, and that consumption may be especially associated with family support. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  11. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health.

  12. University related studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Over the years, opportunities for terrestrial ecology studies have attracted student researchers associated with Pacific Northwest colleges and universities. During the past year, four students have been involved with undergraduate or graduate thesis projects. Brief descriptions of these studies are included in this section. It is expected that university participation will be enhanced by designating parts of the Hanford Reservation as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP)

  13. On the analysis of genome-wide association studies in family-based designs: a universal, robust analysis approach and an application to four genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Won

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For genome-wide association studies in family-based designs, we propose a new, universally applicable approach. The new test statistic exploits all available information about the association, while, by virtue of its design, it maintains the same robustness against population admixture as traditional family-based approaches that are based exclusively on the within-family information. The approach is suitable for the analysis of almost any trait type, e.g. binary, continuous, time-to-onset, multivariate, etc., and combinations of those. We use simulation studies to verify all theoretically derived properties of the approach, estimate its power, and compare it with other standard approaches. We illustrate the practical implications of the new analysis method by an application to a lung-function phenotype, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 in 4 genome-wide association studies.

  14. University and family collaboration in substance abuse intervention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports a qualitative intervention research that utilized narrative inquiry ... of substance abuse issues, disciplinary dilemmas and family involvement at a ... socialization theory, private university, qualitative research, intervention ...

  15. Nuclear Industry Family Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a copy of the U.K.A.E.A. Question and Answer brief concerning an epidemiological study entitled the Nuclear Industry Family Study, to investigate the health of children of AEA, AWE, and BNFL Workers. The study is being carried out by an independent team of medical research workers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. (UK)

  16. A pilot study of self-esteem as a mediator between family factors and depressive symptoms in young adult university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restifo, Kathleen; Akse, Joyce; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Benjamins, Caroline; Dick, Katharina

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between family factors and depressive symptoms in young adults. Participants completed self-report questionnaires about overall family environment, conflict with mother or father, parental rearing, self esteem, and depressive symptoms. Self-esteem was found to mediate the relationship between the combined family factors and depressive symptoms. When examined simultaneously, none of the individual family variables uniquely predicted depressive symptoms or self-esteem. However, separate analysis of each of the three family factors provided evidence for self-esteem mediating the relationship between parental conflict and depressive symptoms, and the relationship between parental care and depressive symptoms. Self-esteem may play a role in the mechanism underlying the link between parent-offspring relationship factors and depressive symptoms.

  17. Statistical methods and errors in family medicine articles between 2010 and 2014-Suez Canal University, Egypt: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

    2016-01-01

    With limited statistical knowledge of most physicians it is not uncommon to find statistical errors in research articles. To determine the statistical methods and to assess the statistical errors in family medicine (FM) research articles that were published between 2010 and 2014. This was a cross-sectional study. All 66 FM research articles that were published over 5 years by FM authors with affiliation to Suez Canal University were screened by the researcher between May and August 2015. Types and frequencies of statistical methods were reviewed in all 66 FM articles. All 60 articles with identified inferential statistics were examined for statistical errors and deficiencies. A comprehensive 58-item checklist based on statistical guidelines was used to evaluate the statistical quality of FM articles. Inferential methods were recorded in 62/66 (93.9%) of FM articles. Advanced analyses were used in 29/66 (43.9%). Contingency tables 38/66 (57.6%), regression (logistic, linear) 26/66 (39.4%), and t-test 17/66 (25.8%) were the most commonly used inferential tests. Within 60 FM articles with identified inferential statistics, no prior sample size 19/60 (31.7%), application of wrong statistical tests 17/60 (28.3%), incomplete documentation of statistics 59/60 (98.3%), reporting P value without test statistics 32/60 (53.3%), no reporting confidence interval with effect size measures 12/60 (20.0%), use of mean (standard deviation) to describe ordinal/nonnormal data 8/60 (13.3%), and errors related to interpretation were mainly for conclusions without support by the study data 5/60 (8.3%). Inferential statistics were used in the majority of FM articles. Data analysis and reporting statistics are areas for improvement in FM research articles.

  18. Advantages of a Universal and Generous Family Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    allowances, child and elderly care and tax policies towards families. The Scandinavian region is a for-runner because of a combined effort of generous universal transfers and services, which has led a family (or women) friendly welfare state. The result is a high female labor market participation rate since...... generous policies allow women both to be mothers and workers and has resulted in a relatively high absolute fertility rate of 1.9; up from 1.4 in 1983 when the expansion of social services for families took off. The family welfare package has also resulted in low child poverty. Unfortunately, Scandinavian...

  19. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Zhai; Bing Bai; Lu Chen; Dong Han; Lin Wang; Zhengxue Qiao; Xiaohui Qiu; Xiuxian Yang; Yanjie Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were quest...

  20. A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathways to rural family practice at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; O'Keefe, Danielle; Ravalia, Mohamed; Moffatt, Scott; Parsons, Wanda; Duggan, Norah; Stringer, Katherine; Jong, Michael; Walsh, Kristin Harris; Hippe, Janelle

    2018-03-01

    To assess Memorial University of Newfoundland's (MUN's) commitment to a comprehensive pathways approach to rural family practice, and to determine the national and provincial effects of applying this approach. Analysis of anonymized secondary data. Canada. Memorial's medical degree (MD) graduates practising family medicine in Newfoundland and Labrador as of January 2015 (N = 305), MUN's 2011 and 2012 MD graduates (N = 120), and physicians who completed family medicine training programs in Canada between 2004 and 2013 and who were practising in Canada 2 years after completion of their postgraduate training (N = 8091). National effect was measured by the proportion of MUN's family medicine program graduates practising in rural Canada compared with those from other Canadian family medicine training programs. Provincial effect was measured by the location of MUN's MD graduates practising family medicine in Newfoundland and Labrador as of January 2015. Commitment to a comprehensive pathways approach to rural family practice was measured by anonymized geographic data on admissions, educational placements, and practice locations of MUN's 2011 and 2012 MD graduates, including those who completed family medicine residencies at MUN. Memorial's comprehensive pathways approach to training physicians for rural practice was successful on both national and provincial levels: 26.9% of MUN family medicine program graduates were in a rural practice location 2 years after exiting their post-MD training from 2004 to 2013 compared with the national rate of 13.3% (national effect); 305 of MUN's MD graduates were practising family medicine in Newfoundland and Labrador as of 2015, with 36% practising in rural areas (provincial effect). Of 114 MD students with known background who graduated in 2011 and 2012, 32% had rural backgrounds. Memorial's 2011 and 2012 MD graduates spent 20% of all clinical placement weeks in rural areas; of note, 90% of all first-year placements and 95% of

  2. Family History, Gender, and Eating and Body Image Concerns in University Students Seeking Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Adriane Q.; Erekson, David M.; Steinberg, Rachel M.; Clayson, Rachelle A.; Albright, Dallin D.

    2018-01-01

    Family history events have been shown to be reliable predictors of eating and body image concerns; however, little is known regarding how family history events compare in a clinical sample, or if these events differ by gender. The current study addresses this paucity, focusing on 3,129 university students seeking clinical services. Having a family…

  3. Learning to Lead in Higher Education: Insights into the Family Backgrounds of Women University Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the lived experiences of women university presidents related to becoming leaders or learning to lead. This manuscript highlights the research focused on the immediate family backgrounds and influences on these presidents. The research question was as follows: With regard to their family backgrounds and…

  4. Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

  5. Cultural Capital, Family Background and Education: Choosing University Subjects in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    This article employs Bourdieu's conceptual tools to unpack family influences on students' subject and university choices in China. This empirical study employed mixed research approaches, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, to examine students' choices of subjects and universities in a sample of secondary school students from the age…

  6. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183. Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students.

  7. Correlation between family environment and suicidal ideation in university students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

    2015-01-27

    This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students' suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students.

  8. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students. PMID:25633031

  9. Familiengründung bei Medizinerinnen und Medizinern bereits im Studium? Ergebnisse einer Pilotstudie zur Familienfreundlichkeit im Studium der Humanmedizin an der Universität Ulm [Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebhardt, Hubert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm.Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61% were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4 to 6 year of studies, preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’.Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development.[german] Zielsetzung: Die Ulmer Studie zur Familienfreundlichkeit des Medizinstudiums ermittelte Faktoren für eine erfolgreiche Kombination von Medizinstudium und Familie. Sie zeigt, inwieweit das Studium als richtiger Zeitpunkt für eine Familiengründung geeignet ist. Die

  10. University of Venda's male students' attitudes towards contraception and family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raselekoane, Nanga R; Morwe, Keamogetse G; Tshitangano, Takalani

    2016-07-08

    Many young men continue to disregard the importance of contraception and family planning in South Africa. The fact that even university students also do not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to their own health and well-being. This paper aims at investigating the attitudes of male students towards contraception and the promotion of female students' sexual health rights and well-being at the University of Venda. Quantitative research method is used to determine how attitudes of 60 male students towards contraception can jeopardise the health and well-being of both male and female students. This study reveals that the majority of 60 male students at the University of Venda have a negative attitude towards contraceptives. As a result, male students at the University of Venda are not keen on using contraceptives. Male students' negative attitude and lack of interest in contraceptives and family planning also limit progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals on primary health care, especially with regard to sexual and reproductive health and well-being of female students at the University of Venda. The fact that more than half of the male students interviewed did not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to health and well-being of students, including violation of female students' sexual and reproductive health rights in South Africa. This calls for radical health promotion and sexual and reproductive rights programmes which should specifically target male students at the University of Venda.

  11. Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction and Labour Turnover Intentions among State University Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oredein, Afolakemi Olasumbo; Alao, Foluso Toyin

    2010-01-01

    Examining the extent at which work-family conflict and job satisfaction could predict the labour turnover intentions among lecturers, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, as a case study, is the purpose of this study. 229 (95%) respondents out of 240 returned their copies of the questionnaire for data analysis. The results reveal that there was a…

  12. The Family-Study Interface and Academic Outcomes: Testing a Structural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise Ph.; Severiens, Sabine E.

    2011-01-01

    Expanding on family-work and work-study models, this article investigated a model for family-study conflict and family-study facilitation. The focus of the study was the relationship of family-study conflict and family-study facilitation with students' effortful behaviors and academic performance among a sample of university students (N = 1,656).…

  13. Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support

    OpenAIRE

    Jingyu Shi; Lu Wang; Yuhong Yao; Na Su; Xudong Zhao; Xudong Zhao; Xudong Zhao; Chenyu Zhan

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the association between family function and self-esteem of Chinese university students with grandparenting experience, and explores the moderating effects of social support in this link. Two thousand five hundred thirty university students (1372 males and 1158 females) from a Chinese university completed the Perceived Social Support Scale, the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale, and the Family Assessment Device (FAD). Six hundred and forty-five (25.69%) students reported grandp...

  14. Networking the Home and University: How Families Can Be Integrated into Proximate/Distant Computer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Allen; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that was conducted to determine the feasibility of networking home microcomputers with a university mainframe system in order to investigate a new family process research paradigm, as well as the design and function of the microcomputer/mainframe system. Test instrumentation is described and systems' reliability and validity are…

  15. Assessment of generalizability, applicability and predictability (GAP) for evaluating external validity in studies of universal family-based prevention of alcohol misuse in young people: systematic methodological review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Hermida, Jose Ramon; Calafat, Amador; Becoña, Elisardo; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Foxcroft, David R

    2012-09-01

    To assess external validity characteristics of studies from two Cochrane Systematic Reviews of the effectiveness of universal family-based prevention of alcohol misuse in young people. Two reviewers used an a priori developed external validity rating form and independently assessed three external validity dimensions of generalizability, applicability and predictability (GAP) in randomized controlled trials. The majority (69%) of the included 29 studies were rated 'unclear' on the reporting of sufficient information for judging generalizability from sample to study population. Ten studies (35%) were rated 'unclear' on the reporting of sufficient information for judging applicability to other populations and settings. No study provided an assessment of the validity of the trial end-point measures for subsequent mortality, morbidity, quality of life or other economic or social outcomes. Similarly, no study reported on the validity of surrogate measures using established criteria for assessing surrogate end-points. Studies evaluating the benefits of family-based prevention of alcohol misuse in young people are generally inadequate at reporting information relevant to generalizability of the findings or implications for health or social outcomes. Researchers, study authors, peer reviewers, journal editors and scientific societies should take steps to improve the reporting of information relevant to external validity in prevention trials. © 2012 The Authors. Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  17. Domestic Employment In Career Centered Families: A Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domestic Employment In Career Centered Families: A Case Study Of Covenant University Ota, ... Gender and Behaviour ... However, eighty three (83) useable instruments were returned with the teaching staff having the highest response rate.

  18. When Academics Become Parents: An Overview of Family Leave Policies at Canadian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Susan; Pankratz, Curtis J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews family leave policies in Canadian universities through March 2002. Analysis of pregnancy, adoption, and partner (paternity) leave policies reveal that most Canadian university policies produce income loss and disruption and are characterized by gender regulation and familialism. The paper proposes that improving faculty family leave…

  19. Study of university students' attitudes toward office space at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Eteadifard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Office space is the space where students first experience the university. In this paper, the attitude of students toward office space in the public sphere of university is discussed. This article is the result of the research conducted for the “Institute for Social and Cultural Studies” by the author. The main issues in this paper are: university students' attitudes towards quality office space at the universities and mental basis of common issues among students at the universities. Data were collected through individual and group interviews. More than eighty interviews with activists and students of University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Sharif University of Technology and Kharazmi University were done. The main indicators of office space in this study include: students’ satisfaction of office space, students’ welfare affairs and students’ feedback about this space. Problems and obstacles relating to the office space and their solutions were also studied in this paper.

  20. Study of a family that overcomes poverty issues: family resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ángela Mattar Yunes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generally, researches with families focus the difficulties and the negative aspects of family life by bringing up their maladjustments and failures. The interest in family resilience contributes to change this logic by demonstrating the healthy aspects of the family world. Nevertheless, the term resilience presents ideological controversies which are more severe when the discussion is about families and poverty. In order to diminish these contradictions this study adopted a systemic concept of resilience which refers to “those processes that make possible to overcome adversities”. A case study was realized with a low income family who lived in a “very poor” neighborhood in the deep south of Brazil. The methodological strategies to the formal investigation of the family were: life history of the family using the principles of reflexive interview, genograms and data analyses through the approach of the grounded theory. The results showed that the family lived a number of risk experiences such as adoption, privation of basic needs, migration and diseases. Among the indicators of their abilities of “overcoming adversities”, emerged the belief system as the core of the discourses. The family showed that they value the interpersonal relationships through intra and extra familiar interactions based in the patterns of help, learning, affection and solidarity. During the crisis the family gives meaning to the difficulties in order to maintaining the situation controlled through cohesion, open communication, mutual respect and getting support of the extended family/ social network. The pos-adversity period is perceived as benefic and transforming as the family feels stronger and with feelings of solidarity, which is a mark of this family. Their attitude in relation to the neighborhood is active in the sense of promoting the welfare of other families who live in the same social address. Would those above identified processes be adequate to

  1. University of Venda’s male students’ attitudes towards contraception and family planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morwe, Keamogetse G.; Tshitangano, Takalani

    2016-01-01

    Background Many young men continue to disregard the importance of contraception and family planning in South Africa. The fact that even university students also do not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to their own health and well-being. Aim This paper aims at investigating the attitudes of male students towards contraception and the promotion of female students’ sexual health rights and well-being at the University of Venda. Methods Quantitative research method is used to determine how attitudes of 60 male students towards contraception can jeopardise the health and well-being of both male and female students. Results This study reveals that the majority of 60 male students at the University of Venda have a negative attitude towards contraceptives. As a result, male students at the University of Venda are not keen on using contraceptives. Male students’ negative attitude and lack of interest in contraceptives and family planning also limit progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals on primary health care, especially with regard to sexual and reproductive health and well-being of female students at the University of Venda. Conclusion The fact that more than half of the male students interviewed did not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to health and well-being of students, including violation of female students’ sexual and reproductive health rights in South Africa. This calls for radical health promotion and sexual and reproductive rights programmes which should specifically target male students at the University of Venda. PMID:27542288

  2. Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

    2011-10-01

    This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science.

  3. Maconha e contexto familiar: um estudo psicossocial entre universitários do Rio de Janeiro Marijuana and family context: a psychosocial study among university students of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Martins Ferreira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o contexto familiar de usuários e não-usuários de maconha. Adotamos a teoria das representações sociais de Moscovici (1961/1976, 1988, além de algumas reflexões de Becker (1971 e Foucault (1977, 1994, 1997. Participaram da pesquisa sessenta universitários do Rio de Janeiro, de ambos os sexos, entre 17 e 30 anos. Utilizamos um questionário com perguntas abertas, no qual eles apresentaram seus familiares. O material obtido foi analisado em termos temáticos e estatísticos. Entre os usuários de maconha, prevaleceu a autoridade e a ênfase nos papéis sociais, sendo a interação familiar marcada pelo acento emocional e pela idealização. Entre os não-usuários a autoridade coexistiu com relações interpessoais de companheirismo e partilha, num contexto familiar em que predominaram não aspectos afetivos mas práticas de proteção e cuidados. Podemos afirmar que o papel da família na prevenção ao uso de drogas está associado à promoção da autonomia, diferenciação e garantia de um espaço próprio para o jovem.The objective of this paper was to study the family context among marijuana users and non-users. Moscovici's theory of social representations, as well as some considerations from Becker and Foucault, was used as theoretical basis for data analysis. The empirical research included sixty university students from Rio de Janeiro, 17-30 years old, of both sexes. Using a questionnaire with open questions, we requested participants to freely describe their family members. The answers were treated according to content analysis principles, followed by chi-square tests. The results presented significant differences between both groups. Among marijuana users, authority and emphasis of social roles predominated, family interactions being characterized by emotional emphasis and idealization. Among non-users, authority coexisted with interpersonal relations characterized by fellowship and sharing

  4. Intelligence Studies, Universities and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glees, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critical assessment of academic intelligence studies in higher education. It argues that universities (and academics) should value this subject far more highly than they currently do. Doing so will enhance better public understanding of an increasingly important and unique device in modern governance. It will also improve the…

  5. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL, and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students.

  6. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G.; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students. PMID:28932203

  7. Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict.

  8. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Höger, Yesli; Orellana, Ligia; Miranda, Horacio; Lobos, Germán; Sepúlveda, José; Sanchez, Mercedes; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Grunert, Klaus G; Salinas-Oñate, Natalia

    2017-04-03

    The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL), Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4), and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ). Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9%) had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8%) had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3%) had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  9. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL, Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4, and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ. Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9% had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8% had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3% had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  10. The Global Roadmap to Universal Access to Family Planning: From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It brought forward faith leaders, clinicians, researchers, program ... without immunization; how can we think about women's health without family ... learned. Three themes framed much of the dialogue: • Family Planning and the MDGs: Rights-.

  11. The Evolution of Family Studies Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Beth C.; Lloyd, Sally A.

    2001-01-01

    This review of methodological, theoretical, and topical trends in family studies research covers changes in definitions of family and in marriage, parent-child relationships, and family social ecology. Issues discussed include marital satisfaction, violence, social construction of gender, family-work relationship, parenting roles, socialization,…

  12. Familial risks of glomerulonephritis - a nationwide family study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrawi, Delshad Saleh; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Fjellstedt, Erik; Sundquist, Kristina; Zöller, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    Familial risks of glomerulonephritis (acute, chronic and unspecified glomerulonephritis) have not been studied. This study aims to determine the familial risks of glomerulonephritis. Individuals born from1932 onwards diagnosed with glomerulonephritis (acute [n = 7011], chronic [n = 10,242] and unspecified glomerulonephritis [n = 5762]) were included. The familial risk (Standardized incidence ratio = SIR) was calculated for individuals whose parents/full-siblings were diagnosed with glomerulonephritis compared to those whose parents/full-siblings were not. The procedure was repeated for spouses. Familial concordant risk (same disease in proband and exposed relative) and discordant risk (different disease in proband and exposed relative) of glomerulonephritis were determined. Familial concordant risks (parents/full-sibling history) were: SIR = 3.57 (95% confidence interval, 2.77-4.53) for acute glomerulonephritis, SIR = 3.84 (3.37-4.36) for chronic glomerulonephritis and SIR = 3.75 (2.85-4.83) for unspecified glomerulonephritis. High familial risks were observed if two or more relatives were affected; the SIR was 209.83 (150.51-284.87) in individuals with at least one affected parent as well as one full-sibling. The spouse risk was only moderately increased (SIR = 1.53, 1.33-1.75). Family history of glomerulonephritis is a strong predictor for glomerulonephritis, and is a potentially useful tool in clinical risk assessment. Our data emphasize the contribution of familial factors to the glomerulonephritis burden in the community. Key Messages The familial risks (full-sibling/parent history) of glomerulonephritis (acute, chronic and unspecified glomerulonephritis) have not been determined previously. The familial risks of glomerulonephritis were increased among individuals with family history of acute, chronic or unspecified glomerulonephritis. The familial risks of glomerulonephritis were slightly increased among spouses indicating a

  13. Family resources study: part 1: family resources, family function and caregiver strain in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganiban-Corales, Avegeille T; Medina, Manuel F

    2011-10-31

    Severe illness can disrupt family life, cause family dysfunction, strain resources, and cause caregiver burden. The family's ability to cope with crises depends on their resources. This study sought to assess families of children with cancer in terms of family function-dysfunction, family caregiver strain and the adequacy of family resources using a new family resources assessment instrument. This is a cross-sectional study involving 90 Filipino family caregivers of children undergoing cancer treatment. This used a self-administered questionnaire composed of a new 12-item family resources questionnaire (SCREEM-RES) based on the SCREEM method of analysis, Family APGAR to assess family function-dysfunction; and Modified Caregiver Strain Index to assess strain in caring for the patient. More than half of families were either moderately or severely dysfunctional. Close to half of caregivers were either predisposed to strain or experienced severe strain, majority disclosed that their families have inadequate economic resources; many also report inaccessibility to medical help in the community and insufficient educational resources to understand and care for their patients. Resources most often reported as adequate were: family's faith and religion; help from within the family and from health providers. SCREEM-RES showed to be reliable with Cronbach's alpha of 0.80. There is good inter-item correlation between items in each domain: 0.24-0.70. Internal consistency reliability for each domain was also good: 0.40-0.92. Using 2-point scoring system, Cronbach's alpha were slightly lower: full scale (0.70) and for each domain 0.26-.82. Results showed evidence of association between family resources and family function based on the family APGAR but none between family resources and caregiver strain and between family function and caregiver strain. Many Filipino families of children with cancer have inadequate resources, especially economic; and are moderately or severely

  14. Family resources study: part 1: family resources, family function and caregiver strain in childhood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panganiban-Corales Avegeille T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe illness can disrupt family life, cause family dysfunction, strain resources, and cause caregiver burden. The family's ability to cope with crises depends on their resources. This study sought to assess families of children with cancer in terms of family function-dysfunction, family caregiver strain and the adequacy of family resources using a new family resources assessment instrument. Methods This is a cross-sectional study involving 90 Filipino family caregivers of children undergoing cancer treatment. This used a self-administered questionnaire composed of a new 12-item family resources questionnaire (SCREEM-RES based on the SCREEM method of analysis, Family APGAR to assess family function-dysfunction; and Modified Caregiver Strain Index to assess strain in caring for the patient. Results More than half of families were either moderately or severely dysfunctional. Close to half of caregivers were either predisposed to strain or experienced severe strain, majority disclosed that their families have inadequate economic resources; many also report inaccessibility to medical help in the community and insufficient educational resources to understand and care for their patients. Resources most often reported as adequate were: family's faith and religion; help from within the family and from health providers. SCREEM-RES showed to be reliable with Cronbach's alpha of 0.80. There is good inter-item correlation between items in each domain: 0.24-0.70. Internal consistency reliability for each domain was also good: 0.40-0.92. Using 2-point scoring system, Cronbach's alpha were slightly lower: full scale (0.70 and for each domain 0.26-.82. Results showed evidence of association between family resources and family function based on the family APGAR but none between family resources and caregiver strain and between family function and caregiver strain. Conclusion Many Filipino families of children with cancer have inadequate

  15. A family study of hypochondriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R; Holt, C S; Happel, R L; Kathol, R G; Yagla, S J

    1997-04-01

    To examine the diagnostic validity of hypochondriasis, we undertook a preliminary family study. Nineteen probands with and 24 without DSM-III-R hypochondriasis were identified among outpatients attending a general medicine clinic. Seventy-two first-degree relatives of hypochondriasis probands and 97 relatives of control probands were personally interviewed with the use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. These relatives also completed self-administered measures of hypochondriasis, psychological and somatic symptoms, and personality traits. No increase in the rate of hypochondriasis was found among the relatives of hypochondriasis probands compared with the relatives of control probands. With respect to other mental disorders, only somatization disorder was more frequent among the hypochondriacal relatives. These relatives also scored higher on measures of hostility, antagonism, and dissatisfaction with medical care. The findings of this study suggest that hypochondriasis may not be an independent disorder but a variable feature of other psychopathology, one that may include somatization disorder.

  16. Family violence among mothers seen at the University of Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    76 articles. Family violence (FV) is a term used to describe any form of .... causes, among which adverse life events are prominent;21,22 .... work (71% of mothers v. 58% of .... The balance of these symptoms suggests depression, meaning.

  17. Family-Work Conflict and Type-E Personality as Stress Inducers in Married Female Nigerian University Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobola, A. A.; Nwoha, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    This piece of article is culled from a larger study. The study investigated the relationship between family-work conflict, Type-E personality and stress in married female Nigerian University Administrators. The study adopted ex-post facto design. The sample consisted of 800 female administrators in the senior cadre of executive/administrative…

  18. COMMUNITY INTERVENTION IN THE UNIVERSITY CONTEXT TO RAISE THE CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT OF FAMILIES

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    Norma Amalia Rodríguez-Barrera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The modern university has the mission of training of competent professionals, able to preserve, develop and promote the strengthening of cultural development of students and the community through academic, research and social work practice processes. This paper aims to present the results of Community action in the university context Career Early Childhood Education, to raise the cultural development of families. The intervention was designed according to three basic processes: planning, implementation, evaluation and control, and to ensure, as previous steps, the study programs of disciplines and subjects of the race, for determining the didactic treatment of the required content Community intervention from academic, scientific and practical work; of the main needs of the community and preparing students for the fulfillment of the tasks. The research was conducted with the application of a quasi-experiment Teaching and the use of theoretical, empirical (interview, observation, document analysis and for the collection and statistical data processing methods. The comparison of results between the experimental and control groups before and after application of the Community intervention allowed to check their effectiveness from raising the cultural development of families in the experimental group, in the motivational-regulative dimensions, cognitive, attitudinal and communication. The essential differences in the results of each dimension not only differ significantly between the groups, but all of them is able to distinguish very well the cultural development of families applied after the intervention actions.

  19. Juggling Higher Education Study and Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Women with families face particular challenges when they undertake Higher Education. Questions arise about coping with the demands of study, new family routines, and the changed identity when mother becomes student: Can I manage it all? How will my family react? Will they give me the time and support I need? The author, herself a mother and…

  20. Impulsivity, Substance Abuse, and Family/Friends History of Suicide Attempts in University Students With and Without Suicidal Ideation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaffari, Majid; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Abedi, Mohammad Reza; Fatehizade, Maryam; Baghban, Iran

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Impulsivity appears to play an important role in suicidal behavior. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the impulsivity, substance abuse, and family/friends history of suicide attempt between suicide-ideated and non suicide-ideated university students. Methods: The research population consisted of all the students of the University of Isfahan in the academic year of 2009-2010. Three hundred and forty students (136 boys and 204 girls) were selected randomly through ...

  1. "Sin Olvidar a los Padres": Families Collaborating within School and University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riojas-Cortez, Mari; Flores, Belinda Bustos

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the significance of 3 entities--the family, the school, and the university--working together to assist young Latino children succeed in school. In an effort to increase parental and teacher communication regarding school expectations, the Family Institute for Early Literacy Development was created. It uses principles of…

  2. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Grantham, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challen...

  4. Does being first in family matter? The role of identity in the stigma of seeking help among first and non-first in family university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Talebi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from secondary school to university is often perceived as stressful, perhaps more so for students who are the first in their family to seek higher education, as they might face challenges unique to their situation. Yet, the majority are less likely to acknowledge problems and are unlikely to engage in help-seeking behaviour. The present study, which  focuses on first in family students transitioning from secondary school to university, examined relations between identification (private regard, public regard, compatibility and the stigma (self and other associated with help-seeking in different domains (academic and mental health, and the moderating role of first in family status. Implications for these findings are addressed within the context of stigma reduction initiatives. 

  5. Work–Family Balance Choices of Women Working in Kenyan Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Muasya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of women working in the formal sector in Sub-Saharan Africa has increased in recent years. The kinship networks are weakening, leading to a decline in the traditional forms of support for child care and housework. This study examined the work–family balance options of women working in Kenyan universities within the context of changing national domestic workers’ legislation. Data were collected by use of surveys in two universities. Results showed that as the cost of hiring domestic workers increased, women became indifferent in their choice between employing domestic workers and using daycare centers. Women with older children who employed day domestic workers were more likely to use daycare centers than women with younger children who employed live-in domestic workers. Women with young children in preschool and primary school found their universities less accommodating in helping them balance work and family demands. Employers perceived that the domestic workers’ legislation led to a drop in morale among domestic workers, and demands of pay raises as they became choosier and more inclined to search for better paying employers. It also resulted in a shift of work–family balance strategy for women who opted to hire domestic workers on an “as-needed” or “weekend basis.” Some women stopped hiring them altogether and instead started taking their young children to daycare centers. Cost and affordability determined the use of domestic workers. These women suggested that their employers should increase their job flexibility and put up subsidized daycare centers.

  6. Relationship between work - family conflict and marital satisfaction among nurses and midwives in hospitals of Zabol university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mansouri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-family conflicts described as incompatibility between work and family roles. There is mutual relationship between marital satisfaction and job so that the tension in one of two areas of career and family are affected. Objective: To examine the relationship between marital satisfaction and work-family conflict among nurses and midwives. Methods: All of 289 employees of married nursing and midwifery of Zabol University of Medical Sciences hospitals participated in the study in 2014. The data were collected with questionnaires of Enrich marital satisfaction and Carlson work-family conflict and were analyzed with statistical tests including Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and linear regression analysis. Findings: Marital satisfaction score of the staff was 168.52 which indicates the relative satisfaction of spouses from each other. The mean score of work-family conflict among employees was 3.26; it can be said that employees in terms of work-family conflict, the conflict a moderate experience. There is a significant negative correlation among marital satisfaction and work-family conflict of employees. In fact, marital satisfaction decreases when the conflict between work and family is decreased. Nursing staffs have a higher marital satisfaction and in terms of work-family conflict they experience less conflict. Conclusion: According to the findings, the managers should create conditions that minimize the role conflicts and consequently increase the level of marital satisfaction.

  7. Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

  8. Familial clustering in burnout: a twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, C.M.; Stubbe, J.H.; Cath, D.C.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Research on risk factors for burnout has mainly focused on circumstances at work and on personal characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate whether burnout clusters within families and, if so, whether this is due to genetic influences or to environmental factors shared by

  9. Research publications in medical journals (1992-2013 by family medicine authors - Suez Canal University-Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajeed A Abdulmajeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research in family medicine (FM provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. Objective: To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. Materials and Methods: All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Results: Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles, followed by ′Patient′ category (n = 42. All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%. Conclusions: The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended.

  10. Research publications in medical journals (1992-2013) by family medicine authors - suez canal university-egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A; Ismail, Mosleh A; Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

    2014-01-01

    Research in family medicine (FM) provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles), followed by 'Patient' category (n = 42). All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%). The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended.

  11. Radiation Treatment for Ewing Family of Tumors in Adults: University of Florida Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Wenyin; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Morris, Christopher G.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, Parker C.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with Ewing family of tumors treated with radiation at University of Florida. Methods and Materials: Clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of 47 patients older than 18 years with Ewing family of tumors treated with combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy from 1970 to 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was stratified by age older or younger than 30 years. Patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis were excluded from the study. Results: The 29 men and 18 women had a median age of 24 years. Thirty-three patients were 18-30 years old and 14 patients were older than 30 years. Median follow-up of living patients was 8.2 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all patients was 43% (p = 0.8523). The 5-year local control rate for all patients was 75% (p = 0.9326). The 5-year rate of freedom from distant metastasis for all patients was 45% (p = 0.5471). There were no significant differences in 5-year overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastasis rates; patterns of distant failure; or toxicity profiles between older adult patients and younger adult patients. Conclusions: We found that the natural history and treatment outcomes of the Ewing family of tumors were consistently similar in adults (young and old) and children. Thus, aggressive combined modality approaches should be considered for adult patients

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice of family physicians regarding smoking cessation counseling in family practice centers, suez canal university, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour; Mansour, Nadia M; Mohamed, Samar F

    2013-04-01

    Family physicians are the first point of medical contact for most patients, and they come into contact with a large number of smokers. Also, they are well suited to offer effective counseling to people, because family physicians already have some knowledge of patients and their social environments. The present study was conducted to assess family physicians' knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling aiming to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling among family physicians. The study was descriptive analytic cross sectional study. It was conducted within family medicine centers. Sample was comprehensive. it included 75 family physicians. They were asked to fill previously validated anonymous questionnaire to collect data about their personal characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling, barriers and recommendations of physicians. Equal or above the mean scores were used as cut off point of the best scores for knowledge, attitude and practice. SPSS version 18 was used for data entry and statistical analysis. The best knowledge, attitude and practice scores among family physicians in the study sample were (45.3 %, 93.3% and 44% respectively). Age (P = 0.039) and qualification of family physicians (P = 0.04) were significant variables regarding knowledge scores while no statistically significance between personal characteristics of family physicians and their attitude or practice scores regarding smoking cessation counseling. More than half of the family physicians recommended training to improve their smoking cessation counseling. Favorable attitude scores of family physicians exceed passing knowledge scores or practice scores. Need for knowledge and training are stimulus to design an educational intervention to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling.

  13. Has Family Involvement Migrated into Higher Education? An Investigation of How Administrative Staff Document the Phenomenon in Students' University Experiences in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeou, Loizos; Theodorou, Eleni; Lamprianou, Iasonas; Rentzou, Konstantina; Andreou, Panayiota

    2018-01-01

    Families have been getting more and more involved in their children's education. This paper presents findings of a study investigating family involvement in their members' undergraduate studies attending a state (non-fee-paying) and a private (fee-paying) university in Cyprus. The data presented in the paper were collected via online logs…

  14. The Toronto Lesbian Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, S; Kaufman, M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven lesbian mothers completed standardized tools chosen to assess current functioning, followed by a video-taped interview. Verbal children were also interviewed. Questions involved perceptions of the mothers' and children's experiences of being homosexual or being raised by homosexual parents, knowledge and fantasies about the donor/father, feelings regarding the role of fathers, parents' experiences of being fathered, legal issues, and development. All mothers were strongly lesbian identified and most were completely "out." All but one mother planned to or had told their children. All mothers planned to reveal donor information at an appropriate age. Many, especially parents of boys, had concerns about lack of a male role model, but none felt this would negatively affect the child's development. Mothers were open to having their child ask questions and even seek out the donor when older. Thirty-one percent of mothers reported a positive relationship with their own father, 42% a father who was present but unavailable or punitive and 27% a completely absent father for large parts of their childhood. Couples divided parenting work based on individual strengths and interests, work schedules and demands. Only two of the couples felt that one of them played a role typical of a father. An aggregate score was compiled for each mother based on the number of negative outcomes in the standardized tools. The mean number of negative outcomes for the mothers was 3.15 (SD = 1.85). Of the six women with 5 or more negative outcomes on the scales, three were single parents and one had lost her partner when her child was two months old. On the CESD, three mothers showed depression levels that were high. The Internal External scale showed 42% of mothers to have an external locus of control. Three mothers scored negatively on the Family Assessment Device. Ninety-two percent of women showed moderate to high self-esteem on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Parenting

  15. Opportunity NYC--Family Rewards: Qualitative Study of Family Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraker, Carolyn A.; Greenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at low-income families in six of New York City's highest-poverty communities, the Family Rewards program ties cash rewards to a pre-specified set of activities. This paper presents the qualitative findings from interviews with 77 families. It examines how families incorporated the program into their households, and specifically the…

  16. University and family collaboration in substance abuse intervention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Family eating habits, family support and subjective well-being in university students in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Höger, Yesly; Orellana, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To characterize typologies of university students according to the perception of their families’ eating habits. Material and method: A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 372 students of both genders at the Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile. The instrument incl...

  18. University graduation dependent on family's wealth, ability and social status

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model showing an incentive for a group of people to vote for higher tuition fees, even if these fees have no quality effect. The incentive is based on a non-monetary influence on utility, namely the social status or prestige of graduating. The basic assumption is that the higher the prestige is, the lower the number of people studying. In a static equilibrium, it is shown that a group of wealthier and more able people can exist that attempts to prevent others from studying.

  19. Meson and baryon families as vibronic states in sl(2) quantum universal enveloping algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwao, Syurei; Ono, Yasuji

    1990-01-01

    A mass formula of the q-deformed modified harmonic oscillator type in the sl(2) quantum universal enveloping algebra is proposed for the meson and baryon families, by taking into account the known theories as a guide. Specifying the vibronic quantum number, the deformation parameter and associated ones of the theory are determined from available data for the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector meson and baryon families. The parameters determined from totally ten families not only predict many unobserved states, but also give restrictions on the observable number of states. The method may admit taking into account non-perturbative effects. (author)

  20. Intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences and a history of childhood psychosomatic disorders among Japanese university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munemoto Takao

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japan has been witnessing a considerable increase in the number of children with psychosomatic disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the risk of psychosomatic disorder in adolescents and intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences (ACEs. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1592 Japanese university students (52% male, mean age 19.9 years who completed a survey about intra- and extra-familial ACEs and the incidence of childhood psychosomatic disorders. Intra-familial ACEs included domestic violence, physical violence, emotional abuse, illness in household, parental divorce, no parental affection, and dysfunctional family. Extra-familial ACEs included physical violence or negative recognition by teachers, being bullied in elementary or junior high school, or sexual violence. Results The frequency of psychosomatic disorders among the respondents was 14.8%. Among the 7 intra-familial ACEs, emotional abuse (relative risk, RR = 1.9 and illness in household (RR = 1.7 increased the risk of psychosomatic disorders. Estimates of the relative risk for the 5 extra-familial ACEs were statistically significant and ranged from 1.5 for being bullied in elementary school or physical violence from teachers to 2.4. Students who had 3 or more intra-familial ACEs and 2 or more extra-familial ACEs had a 3.0 relative risk for psychosomatic disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that intra- and extra-familial ACEs are associated with the development of psychosomatic disorders. Therefore, sufficient evaluation of ACEs should be performed in adolescent patients with psychosomatic disorder.

  1. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  2. Prediction in Child Development: A Longitudinal Study of Adoptive and Nonadoptive Families. The Delaware Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Janet L.

    A longitudinal study was conducted to determine factors predicting successful adoptions before placement and to identify differences and similarities between adoptive and biological families. Data collected on both adopted children and on their adoptive families before placement was related to data collected on the same children and families 6…

  3. Influencing Factors for Developing Managerial Behaviours That Encourage a Work-Family Culture in the University Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Álvarez-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article develops and tests a theoretical model to find out which factors influence the behaviour of supervisors in terms of promoting a work-family culture. This model explains to what extent the factors studied are relevant to encourage deans to promote this type of culture at Spanish universities. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression analysis. Data were obtained through a questionnaire to deans. The results yield five key factors: (1 the personal work-family conflict of managers; (2 the transformational leadership style of managers; (3 the identification with subordinates in need of work-family cares; (4 the perceived institutional support; and (5 the perceived support from other supervisors in the centre. The findings have practical implications for human resources management (HRM practices. Human resources management practices such as (a providing deans and other supervisors with training about the importance of work-family programs; (b promoting deans’ training in order to develop transformational leadership skills; or (c increasing institutional support can be useful when implementing a work-family culture in Spanish universities.

  4. Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Stephen; Moen, Phyllis

    2004-01-01

    This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less…

  5. Efficiency Studies in the British Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Geoffrey

    1986-01-01

    The background, purposes, and methods of institutional efficiency studies conducted at selected British universities are discussed. The evaluations focused on financial management, purchasing, and building maintenance and space utilization. (MSE)

  6. My university. What I learned from the Productive Cooperative Movement to Promotion of Humanistic Family Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunii, C

    1990-07-01

    Based on experiences with the Productive Cooperative Movement and the Parasite Control Movement in Japan, the Japanese Family Planning Movement began in April 1954. The resultant private and nonprofit Japan Family Planning Association (JFPA) followed and it served to help Japan achieve its goal of reducing fertility by promoting family planning. It did so by publishing a monthly newsletter on family planning, hosting meetings and national conventions, spreading information via the mass media, and selling contraceptives and educational materials. JFPA earned funding from these sales with no support from the government thereby establishing self dependence and freedom to speak candidly to the government. The JFPA learned that families wanted to improve their standard of living and were willing to limit family size to 2 children. After the birth rate peaked in 1955, the birth rate and the number of illegal abortions decreased. In the 1950s, JFPA joined the International Planned Parenthood Federation and subsequently learned of the problems faced by developing countries. Based on the successful reduction of fertility in Japan and a strong economic base, JFPA and the government were in a position to organize an international cooperation program for family planning. Therefore, the leader of JFPA resigned to found the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning which promotes family planning in developing countries via its integrated family planning, nutrition, and parasite control program. A steering committee composed of leaders from government, universities, and private organizations sets the policies for the program in each country. It is to the Japanese government's advantage to work with private organizations instead of providing all social services because they are flexible and provide administrative stability and national expenses are minimized.

  7. Study of the Effect of Brand Equity Drivers on University Brand Resonance (Case Study:Amir Kabir university, Sharif university, Tarbiat Modares university, Tehran university)

    OpenAIRE

    mojtaba karimian; Hamid khodadad hosseini; Asqar moshabaki

    2015-01-01

    Branding in business of institutions of higher education is one of the issues that recently have been attracted by many researchers and therefore administrators must conduct in depth studies and take effective steps in order to devise a brand strategy so that they can make a strong brand for universities. Thus, this article investigated the quality of branding and presented suggestions to improve the brand resonance of university. The main objective of the study is to show that how brand reso...

  8. An Exploratory Study of the Nature of Family Resilience in Families Affected by Parental Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, James P.; Nochajski, Thomas; Maguin, Eugene; Safyer, Andrew; DeWit, David; Macdonald, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Resilient families are able to adapt to adversities, but the nature of family resilience is not well understood. This study examines patterns of family functioning that may protect families from the negative impact of alcohol abuse. Naturally occurring patterns of family functioning are identified and associations between these patterns and…

  9. A study of eating habits among female nursing students in the university of Babylon/Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma KJ

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion The study recommends that family can encourage their daughters to choose the healthiest food collections and schools, universities will assist in minimizing the consumption of fast foods and others.

  10. Assessing study skills among university students: an Iranian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didarloo, Alireza; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2014-05-05

    Numerous studies have revealed that study skills have a constructive role on the academic performance of students, in addition to educational quality, student' intelligence, and their affective characteristics. This study aims to examine study skills and the factors influencing them among the health sciences students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran. This was a cross-sectional study carried out from May to November 2013. A total of 340 Urmia health sciences students were selected using a simple sampling method. Data were collected using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire of Counseling Center of Houston University and analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean and standard deviation of the students' study skills were 172.5±23.2, out of a total score of 240. Around 1.2% of the study skills were weak; 86.8%, moderate; and 12%, good. Among the study skills, the scores of time management, and memory and concentration were better than the others. Also, there was a significant positive correlation between study skills scores and the students' family housing status and academic level (Pstudy skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

  11. Using vignettes to study family consumption processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2010-01-01

    The use of vignettes for qualitative consumer research is discussed in this article. More specifically, vignettes are proposed as a useful research technique for conducting systematic and rigorous studies of consumer interaction processes, in particular as these relate to family consumption issue...... for applying the vignette method are outlined and illustrated by two recent studies of proenvironmental consumer behavior in a family context. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits and the possible pitfalls of using vignettes.......The use of vignettes for qualitative consumer research is discussed in this article. More specifically, vignettes are proposed as a useful research technique for conducting systematic and rigorous studies of consumer interaction processes, in particular as these relate to family consumption issues....... Following an overview of methodological and practical problems of studying consumption interaction processes in families, a discussion of how vignettes may be used to enhance knowledge of family decision-making processes in real-life contexts is presented. Design implications are discussed and strategies...

  12. Family Planning in the Context of Latin America's Universal Health Coverage Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas; Dutta, Arin; Rosen, James; Olivetti, Agathe; Klein, Kate

    2017-09-27

    Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have substantially improved access to family planning over the past 50 years. Many have also recently adopted explicit declarations of universal rights to health and universal health coverage (UHC) and have begun implementing UHC-oriented health financing schemes. These schemes will have important implications for the sustainability and further growth of family planning programs throughout the region. We examined the status of contraceptive methods in major health delivery and financing schemes in 9 LAC countries. Using a set of 37 indicators on family planning coverage, family planning financing, health financing, and family planning inclusion in UHC-oriented schemes, we conducted a desk review of secondary sources, including population surveys, health financing assessments, insurance enrollment reports, and unit cost estimates, and interviewed in-country experts. Findings: Although the modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) has continued to increase in the majority of LAC countries, substantial disparities in access for marginalized groups remain. On average, mCPR is 20% lower among indigenous women than the general population, 5% lower among uninsured women than insured, and 7% lower among the poorest women than the wealthiest. Among the poorest quintile of women, insured women had an mCPR 16.5 percentage points higher than that of uninsured women, suggesting that expansion of insurance coverage is associated with increased family planning access and use. In the high- and upper-middle-income countries we reviewed, all modern contraceptive methods are typically available through the social health insurance schemes that cover a majority of the population. However, in low- and lower-middle-income countries, despite free provision of most family planning services in public health facilities, stock-outs and implicit rationing present substantial barriers that prevent clients from accessing their preferred method

  13. Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Shi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the association between family function and self-esteem of Chinese university students with grandparenting experience, and explores the moderating effects of social support in this link. Two thousand five hundred thirty university students (1372 males and 1158 females from a Chinese university completed the Perceived Social Support Scale, the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale, and the Family Assessment Device (FAD. Six hundred and forty-five (25.69% students reported grandparenting experience and they reported lower scores on self-esteem and social support than the students raised only by their parents. The grandparenting group scored higher on such dimensions of family functioning as Communication, Role, Affective Involvement, Affective Responsiveness, and General Family Function (GF than their counterpart group. For both groups, self-esteem scores were positively correlated with social support scores, while negatively correlated with FAD all sub-scale scores. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that for the students with grandparenting experience the social support moderated the relationship between GF and self-esteem. When students reported a high level of social support, those with low GF score reported higher scores in self-esteem than those with low self-esteem. However, in case of low social support, there were no differences in self-esteem between groups with high and low GF scores. These findings suggest that social support plays a positive role to relieve the adverse impact of poor family function on self-esteem of the adolescents with grandparenting experience. In addition, the significance and limitations of the results will be discussed.

  14. Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingyu; Wang, Lu; Yao, Yuhong; Su, Na; Zhao, Xudong; Zhan, Chenyu

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the association between family function and self-esteem of Chinese university students with grandparenting experience, and explores the moderating effects of social support in this link. Two thousand five hundred thirty university students (1372 males and 1158 females) from a Chinese university completed the Perceived Social Support Scale, the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale, and the Family Assessment Device (FAD). Six hundred and forty-five (25.69%) students reported grandparenting experience and they reported lower scores on self-esteem and social support than the students raised only by their parents. The grandparenting group scored higher on such dimensions of family functioning as Communication, Role, Affective Involvement, Affective Responsiveness, and General Family Function (GF) than their counterpart group. For both groups, self-esteem scores were positively correlated with social support scores, while negatively correlated with FAD all sub-scale scores. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that for the students with grandparenting experience the social support moderated the relationship between GF and self-esteem. When students reported a high level of social support, those with low GF score reported higher scores in self-esteem than those with low self-esteem. However, in case of low social support, there were no differences in self-esteem between groups with high and low GF scores. These findings suggest that social support plays a positive role to relieve the adverse impact of poor family function on self-esteem of the adolescents with grandparenting experience. In addition, the significance and limitations of the results will be discussed.

  15. Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingyu; Wang, Lu; Yao, Yuhong; Su, Na; Zhao, Xudong; Zhan, Chenyu

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the association between family function and self-esteem of Chinese university students with grandparenting experience, and explores the moderating effects of social support in this link. Two thousand five hundred thirty university students (1372 males and 1158 females) from a Chinese university completed the Perceived Social Support Scale, the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale, and the Family Assessment Device (FAD). Six hundred and forty-five (25.69%) students reported grandparenting experience and they reported lower scores on self-esteem and social support than the students raised only by their parents. The grandparenting group scored higher on such dimensions of family functioning as Communication, Role, Affective Involvement, Affective Responsiveness, and General Family Function (GF) than their counterpart group. For both groups, self-esteem scores were positively correlated with social support scores, while negatively correlated with FAD all sub-scale scores. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that for the students with grandparenting experience the social support moderated the relationship between GF and self-esteem. When students reported a high level of social support, those with low GF score reported higher scores in self-esteem than those with low self-esteem. However, in case of low social support, there were no differences in self-esteem between groups with high and low GF scores. These findings suggest that social support plays a positive role to relieve the adverse impact of poor family function on self-esteem of the adolescents with grandparenting experience. In addition, the significance and limitations of the results will be discussed. PMID:28611720

  16. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Susan M.; Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) family connectedness, (2) family conflict/family disconnection, and (3) family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area. PMID:26658077

  17. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Snyder

    Full Text Available This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1 family connectedness, (2 family conflict/family disconnection, and (3 family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area.

  18. The Cumulative Disadvantages of Socially Toxic Family Environments: A Comparison of Early Life Experiences of Incarcerated Men and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Michalski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the antecedents of criminal behavior through the process of retrospective family and life course histories in which incarcerated male inmates and male university students are compared. The main focus is on early childhood experiences and parental behaviors. The study data derive from intensive, face-to-face interviews with 38 men incarcerated for violent offences and a matched group of 66 men attending university at the same time. The interviews focus on the relative importance of adverse childhood experiences and linkages with adolescence. The interviews demonstrated that nearly four-fifths of the inmates experienced toxic family environments by the time they reached adolescence, as compared with only two of the university students. Qualitative analyses flesh out the major themes, experiences, and “risk factors” that helped shape the trajectories of both groups of men. The socially toxic family environments and sub-optimal parenting practices that most inmates endured produced long-term, adverse effects in reducing their capacities for resilience, forging healthy relationships with their peers, and remaining in school.

  19. How Is Family Support Related to Students' GPA Scores? A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen; Ickes, William; Verhofstadt, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of the influence of family support on college students' academic performance have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the link between family support and students' university-level academic performance in a more detailed way. First, we sought to clarify how two distinct aspects of perceived…

  20. Family affluence, socio - economic status and dietary habits of 1st year University students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Syligardou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low socio-economic status (SES is associated with health risk behaviours contributing to the social inequalities in health. However, the associations of dietary habits with socio-economic status have not been investigated in emerging adulthood in detail yet. Aim: To investigate the associations of dietary habits with socio-economic status in 1st year undergraduate university students. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis draws data from the LATO study, a longitudinal study of all 1st year undergraduate students of TEI Crete during the academic year 2012/13 (Ν=1138, 54% girls, Mean age 18,31 years, response rate 96,7%. The consumption frequencies of fruits, vegetables, soft drinks, breakfast and delivery food were associated with the following socio-economic indicators: Family affluence (FAS II, paternal and maternal educational level and self-reported economic status. The SPSS v21.0 was used to perform logistic regression models after adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Only 24,9%, 12% and 17% of the students were consuming breakfast, fruits and vegetables, respectively, in a daily basis. Soft drinks were consumed daily by 6,1% of the participants but most of them consumed delivery/junk food less than 1/week (73,8%. Higher family affluence was associated with increased odds of consuming breakfast (OR=2,90, 95%CI=1,13-7,44, soft drinks (OR=8,10, 95%CI=1,38-47,68 and delivery/junk food (OR=2,44, 95%CI=1,27-4,70 in boys. High paternal educational level was associated in a protective way with boys’ consumption of delivery food (OR=0,42, 95%CI=0,18-0,95 and soft drinks (OR=0,19, 95%CI=0,05-0,72. Fruits and vegetables consumption was not associated with any SES indicator. Conclusions: The majority of 1st year university students were not following current diet recommendations irrespective of SES. Interventions targeting eating behaviours are needed at higher education institutes.

  1. Where are family theories in family-based obesity treatment?: conceptualizing the study of families in pediatric weight management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, JA; Buehler, C; Irby, MB; Grzywacz, JG

    2014-01-01

    Family-based approaches to pediatric obesity treatment are considered the ‘gold-standard,’ and are recommended for facilitating behavior change to improve child weight status and health. If family-based approaches are to be truly rooted in the family, clinicians and researchers must consider family process and function in designing effective interventions. To bring a better understanding of family complexities to family-based treatment, two relevant reviews were conducted and are presented: (1) a review of prominent and established theories of the family that may provide a more comprehensive and in-depth approach for addressing pediatric obesity; and (2) a systematic review of the literature to identify the use of prominent family theories in pediatric obesity research, which found little use of theories in intervention studies. Overlapping concepts across theories include: families are a system, with interdependence of units; the idea that families are goal-directed and seek balance; and the physical and social environment imposes demands on families. Family-focused theories provide valuable insight into the complexities of families. Increased use of these theories in both research and practice may identify key leverage points in family process and function to prevent the development of or more effectively treat obesity. The field of family studies provides an innovative approach to the difficult problem of pediatric obesity, building on the long-established approach of family-based treatment. PMID:22531090

  2. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  3. [Genetic, epidemiologic and clinical study of familial prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valéri, Antoine

    2002-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most frequent cancer among men over 50 and its frequency increases with age. It has become a significant public health problem due to the ageing population. Epidemiologists report familial aggregation in 15 to 25% of cases and inherited susceptibility with autosomal dominant or X-linked model in 5 to 10% of cases. Clinical and biological features of familial CaP remain controversial. To perform: (1) Genetic study of familial Cap (mapping of susceptibility genes), (2) epidemiologic study (prevalence, associated cancers in the genealogy, model of transmission), and clinical study of familial CaP. (I) conducting a nationwide family collection (ProGène study) with 2+ CaP we have performed a genomewide linkage analysis and identified a predisposing locus on 1q42.2-43 named PCaP (Predisposing to Cancer of the Prostate); (II) conducting a systematic genealogic analysis of 691 CaP followed up in 3 University departments of urology (Hospitals of Brest, Paris St Louis and Nancy) we have observed: (1) 14.2% of familial and 3.6% of hereditary CaP, (2) a higher risk of breast cancer in first degree relatives of probands (CaP+) in familial CaP than in sporadic CaP and in early onset CaP (< 55 years) when compared with late onset CaP ([dG]75 years), (3) an autosomal dominant model with brother-brother dependance), (4) the lack of specific clinical or biological feature (except for early onset) in hereditary CaP when compared with sporadic CaP. (1) The mapping of a susceptibility locus will permit the cloning of a predisposing gene on 1q42.2-43, offer the possibility of genetic screening in families at risk and permit genotype/phenotype correlation studies; (2) the transmission model will improve parameteric linkage studies; (3) the lack of distinct specific clinical patterns suggest diagnostic and follow up modalities for familial and hereditary CaP similar to sporadic cancer while encouraging early screening of families at risk, given the earlier

  4. A family study of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W; Monahan, Patrick O; Temkit, M'Hamed; Shaw, Martha

    2006-03-30

    The cause of pathological gambling (PG) is unknown. The current study was conducted to determine whether PG is familial, and to examine patterns of familial aggregation of psychiatric disorder. To that end, 31 case probands with DSM-IV PG and 31 control probands were recruited and interviewed regarding their first degree relatives (FDRs). Available and willing FDRs were directly interviewed with structured instruments of known reliability, and best estimate final diagnoses were blindly assigned for 193 case and 142 control relatives over age 18 years. The results were analyzed using logistic regression by the method of generalized estimating equations. The lifetime rates of PG and "any gambling disorder" were significantly greater among the relatives of case probands (8.3% and 12.4%, respectively) than among the control relatives (2.1% and 3.5%, respectively) (OR=3.36 for "any gambling disorder"). PG relatives also had significantly higher lifetime rates of alcohol disorders, "any substance use disorder," antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and "any mental disorder". "Any gambling disorder," alcohol disorder, and "any substance use disorder" remained significant after a conservative Bonferroni correction. Interestingly, PG families were significantly larger than control families. We conclude that gambling disorders are familial and co-aggregate with substance misuse. The data are also suggestive that PG co-aggregates with ASPD. Further research on the heritability of PG is warranted.

  5. Relationship between work - family conflict and marital satisfaction among nurses and midwives in hospitals of Zabol university of medical sciences

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mansouri; Y. Jahani; H. Shahdadi; M. Khammari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-family conflicts described as incompatibility between work and family roles. There is mutual relationship between marital satisfaction and job so that the tension in one of two areas of career and family are affected. Objective: To examine the relationship between marital satisfaction and work-family conflict among nurses and midwives. Methods: All of 289 employees of married nursing and midwifery of Zabol University of Medical Sciences hospitals participated in the stu...

  6. Family and Consumer Studies 13: Fashion Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleo, A. Susan

    A description is provided of Family and Consumer Studies 13: Fashion Analysis, an introductory course on the basic principles of fashion and clothing, giving special consideration to the impact of societal, cultural, religious, and psychological factors on clothing choices. First, general information is provided on the course, its place in the…

  7. Compositional study of the Themis family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsset, Michael; Vernazza, Pierre; Birlan, Mirel; DeMeo, Francesca; Binzel, Richard P.; Dumas, Christophe; Milli, Julien; Popescu, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    .Assuming particle sizes (typically sub- to micrometer sizes) and end-members composition similar to those found in chondritic porous IDPs, we modeled the spectral properties of the Themis family members. The results of this study will be presented in details.

  8. Why do I study Chinese at university?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    . Based on the students' responses, answers to why students' choice of CFL are generalized by the following aspects; i.e. instrumentality, integration, individual development, and social-cultural interest. Findings of the study provide sources to reflection on its relationship with foreign language...... learning and its pedagogical consideration in CFL. Key words: Motivation, Chinese learning, case study, Danish university students...

  9. Professional Immigrant Women's Experiences of Managing Work and Family Conflicts: The Case of Chinese and Taiwanese Faculty in Research Intensive Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yun Ling

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates first-generation Chinese and Taiwanese immigrant women faculty's workplace experiences and their strategies for managing work and family demands. By looking at how immigration, ethnicity, gender, and work processes shape these women's ideology and practices, this study addresses the following questions: How do married Chinese and Taiwanese immigrant women in research-intensive universities handle work and family conflicts? How do they negotiate their gender-role expect...

  10. The pattern analysis of family business succession : a study on medium scale family business in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Utami, Christina Whidya; Bernardus, Denny; Sintha, Gek

    2017-01-01

    The family business is a business family members have developed, whose ownership and policy-making are dominated by members of a group with emotional kinship. The purpose of this study is to analyze whether the management succession patterns including a personality system, a family system, a ownership right system and a management system become the primary factors determining the success of the family business The results of the study, using Partial Least Square showed Family System var...

  11. Family physicians' attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care--Suez Canal University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians' attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians' practice. Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management.

  12. Evolution of interprofessional learning: Dalhousie University's "From Family Violence to Health" module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Grace M; Ryding, Helen A; Campbell, Lindsay M

    2003-11-01

    At Dalhousie University, interprofessional (IP) learning modules are used to help future health care professionals learn to work together in resolving complex problems. One module, "From Family Violence to Health," features the role of dental professionals. This paper describes the evolution of this module from the year 2000. By February 2003, 1,182 students from 15 health care professions had completed the module. Qualitative evaluation in years 1 and 2 of the program (2000 and 2001) revealed that, before participating in the IP module, many students were able to identify a role for themselves in the recognition of family violence and knew their responsibility to report incidents. However, after participating in the module, they had a greater understanding of the reporting of family violence, a more comprehensive and supportive perspective, increased recognition of how health care professionals could work together and improved awareness of the roles of other professions. In a quantitative evaluation in year 3 (2002), mean student ratings on a scale of 1 to 5 indicated that the IP module was relevant (4.2), increased their understanding of family violence (4.0), and had some impact in promoting IP learning (3.8). As health care delivery becomes more focused on care teams and system thinking, the provision of IP training is expected to increase. The Dalhousie University IP modules (available at http://www.dal.ca/~fhp/ipl/index.html) address health and social problems for which it is critical that health care and other professionals work together. Feedback from practitioners on the development of IP education is welcomed, particularly with regard to the IP module addressing family violence.

  13. Observed Sensitivity during Family Interactions and Cumulative Risk: A Study of Multiple Dyads per Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Dillon T.; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin…

  14. Global Cardiovascular Risk Assessment by Family Physicians in Suez Canal University-Family Medicine Centers-Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Abdelsalam, Shimaa A; Nasr, Gamila M; Abdelwahed, Hassan A

    2013-01-01

    The close sustained contact of family physician with their patients and local community makes preventive care an integral part of their routine work. Most cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can be prevented by addressing their risk factors. There are several guidelines that recommend different CV risk assessment tools to support CV prevention strategies. This study aimed to assess awareness and attitude of global CV risk assessment and use of their tools by family physicians; aiming to improve CV prevention service. The current study is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic. Sixty-five family physicians were asked to respond to, validated anonymous questionnaire to collect data about characteristics of family physicians, their awareness, attitude, current use, barriers, and recommendations of global CV risk assessment. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18 was used for data entry and analysis. Awareness of guidelines of global CV risk assessment was relatively higher regarding the American guidelines (30.8%) than that recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for Egypt (20.2%). 50.8% of participants had favorable attitude. There was statistical significant relationship between attitude scores and physician characteristics; age (P = 0.003), qualification (P = 0.001) and number of patients seen per week (P = 0.009). Routine use of global CV risk assessment tools was reported only (23%) by family physicians. Relative higher attitude scores than use of global CV risk assessment tools in practice. The most frequent barriers were related to lack of resources and shortage in training/skills and the raised suggestions were towards training.

  15. Studies in Family Planning, Number 38. Beyond Family Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, Bernard

    This paper, published by The Population Council, reviews 29 proposals dealing with population controls beyond the current efforts of national programs of voluntary family planning. The proposals are subsumed under eight descriptive categories which are: (1) Extensions of voluntary fertility control; (2) Establishment of involuntary fertility…

  16. A Time Allocation Study of University Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Albert N.; Swann, Christopher A.; Bozeman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Many previous time allocation studies treat work as a single activity and examine trade-offs between work and other activities. This paper investigates the at-work allocation of time among teaching, research, grant writing and service by science and engineering faculty at top US research universities. We focus on the relationship between tenure…

  17. Qualitative Parameters of Practice during University Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Norkute, Odeta

    2011-01-01

    In this article, relevance of practice during university studies is highlighted, as well as the main stages of its organisation, qualitative parameters, as well as criteria and indicators that validate them are defined. Discussion on the idea that taking into consideration qualitative parameters of organising practice as a component of studies…

  18. In Search of Cultural Universals: Translation Universals. Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DIMA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the world is disclosed under various shapes, among which language is the best representative. Specific to humans, it renders feelings and thoughts concerning different communication contexts where words become dynamic primitives endowed with meanings, which recreate themes and reconfigure space and time as universal coordinates. The main objective of the paper is to provide a tentative analysis of the way in which translation universals are manifest in translating proverbs and sayings in the short novels Popa Tanda (Pope Tanda and Moara cu Noroc (The Lucky Mill by Ioan Slavici.

  19. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  20. Rural Students in a Chinese Top-Tier University: Family Background, School Effects, and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiglione, Gerard A.; Ailei, Xie; Jung, Jisun; Yanbi, Hong

    2017-01-01

    New preferential policies in China promise to increase the number of rural students entering top-tier universities, where there is a wider path to a higher social status. While a substantial body of literature has investigated rural students' trajectories to university, there is a dearth of systematic empirical studies on the academic success of…

  1. Family Medicine needs assessment: Studying the clinical work of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Abstract. Background and Objective: Some universities in sub-Saharan Africa have initiated Family Medicine (FM) residency programs. ... were for information technology (78%) and HIV (46%) training. Conclusion: ..... Emergency medicine. 32.

  2. Family violence among mothers seen at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Ayinmode

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The attention given to family violence (FV in primary medical care in Nigeria is still very insufficient in relation to its known adverse medical and psychosocial implications for women’s health. The objective of this preliminary study was to assess the prevalence rate, correlates and effects of FV among mothers attending a primary care facility in Nigeria, with the aim of gaining an understanding of whether screening for FV in the primary care setting in Nigeria would be beneficial. Methodology . A cross-sectional study of FV among 250 mothers attending the General Outpatient Department of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital was undertaken over a 5-month period. Data on the mothers’ sociodemographic characteristics, and experience of FV and its psychosocial correlates and effects were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire and a 20-item Self- Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ as instruments. Data analysis . EPI Info version 6 was used to analyse the data. Results. Sixty-nine mothers (28% had experienced FV at the hands of their husbands. Of these women, 49 (71% indicated occurrences within the preceding 2 years; in 17 (25%, the violence was severe enough to warrant a hospital visit or treatment. Mothers who experienced FV were significantly more likely to have had previous experiences of violence by an in-law; to have reported child cruelty by a husband; to have children with difficult behaviour; and to have reported that they were neglected by their husbands and not enjoying their marriages. They were also significantly more likely to have a high score on the SRQ and be identified as probable cases with psychological problems (SRQ score ≥ 5. Conclusion. In view of these findings, screening for FV in the primary care setting would be beneficial. Primary care physicians should therefore increase their interest, improve their skill, and carry out more research in the identification and management of FV.

  3. Family and twin studies on methacholine hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Townley

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all asthmatics demonstrate a marked sensitivity to inhaled methacholine and histamine, termed non-specific bronchial (airway hyperresponsiveness (BHR. Airway hyperresponsiveness is a characteristic not only of asthmatics, but can be found in many persons with allergic rhinitis as well as in members of asthmatics' families. The presence of BHR usually precedes the development of clinically identifiable asthma. In recent years there has been an emphasis on inflammation, inducing hyperresponsiveness. However, these factors increase airway hyperresponsiveness by a magnitude of only three-fold compared with normal subjects. The important question is not why asthmatics respond, but why normal subjects do not. The normal subjects are quite able to maintain normal airway function in the presence of high concentrations of methacholine or histamine in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting the presence of protective mechanisms in vivo that are either lacking in, or are less effective in, the asthmatic subjects. There is a strong correlation between the degree of airway hyperresponsiveness and the severity of asthma. In order to determine whether methacholine sensitivity could be used as a potential genetic marker, we studied 750 subjects from 53 asthma families and 26 control families. The best sensitivity and specificity is at 200 breath units. Only 6% of the allergic rhinitis subjects showed a high positive response, but 30% overlapped with asthmatics in that they reacted with 200 breath units or less. There was a group of non-atopic subjects from asthma families who responded by 200 breath units, but there was a significantly lower percentage from normal families. Being from an asthma family is a risk factor in terms of subsequent development of asthma and increased airway reactivity. The parent data suggest that airway reactivity is transmitted to succeeding generations. Studies of twins have revealed that the concordance of asthma is higher in

  4. The Comparison Study of Six University Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fen Liu

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The university archives is not only the extension of a building, but also includes the archival records, archivists and equipments. The university archives is the historical memory of a university, which could let people to predict the future by reviewing the past. The university archives has abundant collections, both teachers and students can review history of this university. This paper mainly compares six university archives of Taiwan, and the interviewing method is used in this research. After comparison of the six university archives, we have found the six university archives have different organizational structures, budgets, and functions. Finally the authors propose some suggestions.[Article content in Chinese

  5. Family physicians’ attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care - Suez Canal University, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. The aim of the work: to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. Methods This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Results Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians′ attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians′ practice. Conclusion Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management. PMID:24244792

  6. Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

  7. Factorial Invariance of the Scale Beliefs about Children's Adjustment in Same-Sex Families in Spanish, Chilean, and Hispanic University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Soler, Marcos; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Barrientos-Delgado, Jaime; Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Monterde-i-Bort, Hector; Cárdenas-Castro, Manuel; Berrios-Riquelme, José

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the factorial invariance of the Scale on Beliefs About Children's Adjustment in Same-Sex Families (SBCASSF) across countries in three samples: Chilean, Spanish, and Hispanic university students. The scale analyzes attitudes toward the consequences of the rearing and education of children by parents with a homosexual sexual…

  8. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: a Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyono, Bambang Yudi

    2005-01-01

    This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained ...

  9. The effect of psychological capital between work-family conflict and job burnout in Chinese university teachers: Testing for mediation and moderation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jun; Hou, Hanpo; Ma, Ruiyang; Sang, Jinyan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between work-family conflict and job burnout as well as the potential mediation/moderation effects of psychological capital. Participants were 357 university teachers who completed a questionnaire packet containing a work-family conflict scale, psychological capital questionnaire, and Maslach Burnout Inventory-General survey. According to the results, work-family conflict and psychological capital were both significantly correlated with job burnout. In addition, psychological capital cannot mediate-but can moderate-the relationship between work-family conflict and job burnout. Taken together, our findings shed light on the psychological capital underlying the association of work-family conflict and job burnout.

  10. An Study on the Relationship Between Gender Believes and Family Function of Kourd and Fars Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    صدیقه خانی مجد

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to study comparatively the relationship between gender beliefs and the family function of Kurdish and Fars students. Correlational research method was employed in order to examine the relationship between variables. 200 students from each ethnicity (100 male 100 female and in total 400 students were selected from university of Kermanshah and Shahid beheshti University based on convenience sampling. Respondents completed Bem Sex Roles Inventory (Bem, 1974 and Family Assessment Device (Epstein, Bishop, Baldwin, 1983. Mean of scores for family function subscales and gender roles were computed and compared for independent samples. Also Pearson Correlation Coefficient between family function components and gender beliefs were measured. Findings revealed that there was not any signifycant relationship between gender roles’ beliefs and family function in Fars students. In Kourd students, significant relationship between androgynous belief and problem solving factor was found. Also we obtained significant relationship between the absolutely feminine belief and problem solving, affective involvement, affective responsiveness, behavior control, and family general function. Comparison of the family function of Kurdish with Fars indicated significant differences between groups in affective involvement factor. Based on the obtained findings, it can be concluded that national and cultural elements are effective elements that can impact the relationship between gender believes and family function. It also can be imagined that Kourds and Fars families are different in affective involvement criterion between their members and showing their interests and sentiments to the other members of the family.

  11. Adolescents Family Models : A Cross-Cultural Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Boris

    2009-01-01

    This study explores and compares the family models of adolescents across ten cultures using a typological and multilevel approach. Thereby, it aims to empirically contribute to Kagitcibasi s (2007) theory of family change. This theory postulates the existence of three ideal-typical family models across cultures: a family model of independence prevailing in Western societies, a family model of (total) interdependence prevailing in non-industrialized agrarian cultures, and as a synthesis of the...

  12. Family meal traditions. Comparing reported childhood food habits to current food habits among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Charlotte J S

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if reported childhood food habits predict the food habits of students at present. Questions addressed are: does the memory of childhood family meals promote commensality among students? Does the memory of (grand)parents' cooking influence students' cooking? And, is there still a gender difference in passing on everyday cooking skills? Using a cross-sectional survey, 104 students were asked about their current eating and cooking habits, and their eating habits and the cooking behavior of their (grand)parents during their childhood. Results show that frequencies in reported childhood family meals predict frequencies of students' commensality at present. The effects appear for breakfast and dinner, and stay within the same meal: recalled childhood family breakfasts predict current breakfast commensality, recalled childhood family dinners predict current dinner commensality. In terms of recalled cookery of (grand)parents and the use of family recipes a matrilineal dominance can be observed. Mothers are most influential, and maternal grandmothers outscore paternal grandmothers. Yet, fathers' childhood cooking did not pass unnoticed either. They seem to influence male students' cookery. Overall, in a life-stage of transgression students appear to maintain recalled childhood food rituals. Suggestions are discussed to further validate these results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adolescent culture brokering and family functioning: a study of families from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Edison J; Jones, Curtis J

    2007-04-01

    In immigrant families, culture brokering (CB) refers to the ways in which children and adolescents serve as mediator between their family and aspects of the new culture. This study focused on the debate in the literature about whether CB implies "role reversal" in the family and "adultification" of the adolescent or whether CB is better understood as simply one of the many ways that immigrant children contribute to family functioning. Results indicated a mixed picture with respect to this debate. Greater amounts of adolescent CB were indeed related to higher adolescent reports of family conflict, but also to greater family adaptability. In addition, the amount of CB was unrelated to family satisfaction and family cohesion. Secondary questions centered on the relationship of CB to adolescent and parent demographic and acculturation variables. Here, CB was related to parent acculturation patterns but not those of adolescents. Implications for future research on the CB role are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Universities' Role in Regional Development: A Case Study of University for Development Studies, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abonyi, Usman Kojo

    2016-01-01

    This study, employing an interpretive research paradigm, sought to investigate into how University for Development Studies (UDS) is responding to its regional development mandate with a specific focus on how it is responding to human capital development, innovation capabilities, and social and environmental development in northern Ghana. A study…

  15. Ergonomics: case study in a university library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Capri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This final paper aimed to analyze the real ergonomics of a university library from Florianópolis and compare it with the ergonomics perceived by the user to perform an ergonomic diagnosis. In order to meet this goal two specific goals were established such as: describe the physical and environmental aspects of the library related to the real ergonomics and verify the actual perception of users about the library. As a theoretical approach, aspects of ergonomics and environmental ergonomics were contextualized and linked to the library and the university library. Referring to the methodology, the Ergonomical Assessment of the Built Environment was used as a reference. The study subjects comprised a sample of 15, among students and library staff. In the results obtained, when related to the physical-environmental analysis of the library, it was found that there are some aspects that differ from the regulatory standards and that also fall short in relation to feedback from users. Aspects such as lighting and noise were cited as unsatisfactory, but the temperature factor was analyzed as satisfactory.

  16. Gay and Lesbian Adoptive Families: An Exploratory Study of Family Functioning, Adoptive Child's Behavior, and Familial Support Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich, Stephen; Leung, Patrick; Kindle, Peter; Carter, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Traditional legal and social forces have hindered the adoption of children by gay and lesbian individuals and couples. Using a convenience sample drawn from gay and lesbian support groups and Internet sites, this exploratory study examines adoptive families with gay and lesbian parents in terms of family functioning capabilities, child's behavior,…

  17. Eating disorders and body image concerns as influenced by family and media among university students in Sharjah, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Hadia; Hasan, Hayder A; Najm, Lina; Zaurub, Sara; Jami, Faridah; Javadi, Fahimeh; Deeb, Lina Adeeb; Iskandarani, Amani

    2018-01-01

    Eating disorders (ED) can be influenced by psychological and socio-cultural factors. The aim of this study was to explore the association between parental and media influences and body image concerns as factors in the onset of ED. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 662 students (407 women and 255 men) attending one of three universities in United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study employed an online self-administered questionnaire with validated scales: Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ), Media Influences Scale, and Family Influences Scale (FIS). About 33% of the sample had EAT- 26 scores >=20 and 45% showed mild to marked concerns about their body shape. Women students were significantly more concerned about their shape, and more influenced by media than men. There were significant differences in the means of all scores, except for media influence, among the four BMI groups. The EAT-26 score showed strongest correlation with BSQ (r=0.48), followed by FIS, Media and BMI (r=0.419, r=0.276 and r=0.18 respectively). The BSQ was the best predictor of ED and was inversely associated with the EAT-26 score (B=-1.51, OR=0.219, 95% CI: 0.152-0.316, pmedia and families exert on the development of ED among young adults. These findings provide baseline data for future longitudinal studies to investigate factors influencing ED.

  18. An examination of biracial college youths' family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment: do self-identification labels and university context matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittian, Aerika S; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Derlan, Chelsea L

    2013-04-01

    This study examined family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment among Latino/White and Asian/White biracial college students (n = 507), with special attention to how ethnic self-identification and university ethnic composition informed the ethnic identity process. Findings indicated that family ethnic socialization was positively related to participants' ethnic identity exploration and resolution, but not ethnic identity affirmation. Furthermore, ethnic identity resolution and affirmation were associated with higher self-acceptance and self-esteem, and lower depressive symptoms. Importantly, university ethnic composition moderated the association between ethnic identity resolution and anxiety, such that resolution promoted adjustment in contexts that were relatively more ethnically diverse. University ethnic composition also moderated the association between ethnic identity affirmation and both self-esteem and self-acceptance, such that affirmation was associated with better adjustment but only in schools that were less ethnically diverse.

  19. An Examination of Biracial College Youths’ Family Ethnic Socialization, Ethnic Identity, and Adjustment: Do Self-Identification Labels and University Context Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittian, Aerika S.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Derlan, Chelsea L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment among Latino/White and Asian/White biracial college students (n = 507), with special attention to how ethnic self-identification and university ethnic composition informed the ethnic identity process. Findings indicated that family ethnic socialization was positively related to participants’ ethnic identity exploration and resolution, but not ethnic identity affirmation. Furthermore, ethnic identity resolution and affirmation were associated with higher self-acceptance and self-esteem, and lower depressive symptoms. Importantly, university ethnic composition moderated the association between ethnic identity resolution and anxiety, such that resolution promoted adjustment in contexts that were relatively more ethnically diverse. University ethnic composition also moderated the association between ethnic identity affirmation and both self-esteem and self-acceptance, such that affirmation was associated with better adjustment but only in schools that were less ethnically diverse. PMID:22905967

  20. Efficacy of family mediation and the role of family violence: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleak, Helen; Schofield, Margot; Bickerdike, Andrew

    2014-01-21

    Family law reforms in Australia require separated parents in dispute to attempt mandatory family dispute resolution (FDR) in community-based family services before court attendance. However, there are concerns about such services when clients present with a history of high conflict and family violence. This study protocol describes a longitudinal study of couples presenting for family mediation services. The study aims to describe the profile of family mediation clients, including type of family violence, and determine the impact of violence profiles on FDR processes and outcomes, such as the type and durability of shared parenting arrangements and clients' satisfaction with mediated agreements. A mixed method, naturalistic longitudinal design is used. The sampling frame is clients presenting at nine family mediation centres across metropolitan, outer suburban, and regional/rural sites in Victoria, Australia. Data are collected at pre-test, completion of mediation, and six months later. Self-administered surveys are administered at the three time points, and a telephone interview at the final post-test. The key study variable is family violence. Key outcome measures are changes in the type and level of acrimony and violent behaviours, the relationship between violence and mediated agreements, the durability of agreements over six months, and client satisfaction with mediation. Family violence is a major risk to the physical and mental health of women and children. This study will inform debates about the role of family violence and how to manage it in the family mediation context. It will also inform decision-making about mediation practices by better understanding how mediation impacts on parenting agreements, and the implications for children, especially in the context of family violence.

  1. Efficacy of family mediation and the role of family violence: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Family law reforms in Australia require separated parents in dispute to attempt mandatory family dispute resolution (FDR) in community-based family services before court attendance. However, there are concerns about such services when clients present with a history of high conflict and family violence. This study protocol describes a longitudinal study of couples presenting for family mediation services. The study aims to describe the profile of family mediation clients, including type of family violence, and determine the impact of violence profiles on FDR processes and outcomes, such as the type and durability of shared parenting arrangements and clients’ satisfaction with mediated agreements. Methods A mixed method, naturalistic longitudinal design is used. The sampling frame is clients presenting at nine family mediation centres across metropolitan, outer suburban, and regional/rural sites in Victoria, Australia. Data are collected at pre-test, completion of mediation, and six months later. Self-administered surveys are administered at the three time points, and a telephone interview at the final post-test. The key study variable is family violence. Key outcome measures are changes in the type and level of acrimony and violent behaviours, the relationship between violence and mediated agreements, the durability of agreements over six months, and client satisfaction with mediation. Discussion Family violence is a major risk to the physical and mental health of women and children. This study will inform debates about the role of family violence and how to manage it in the family mediation context. It will also inform decision-making about mediation practices by better understanding how mediation impacts on parenting agreements, and the implications for children, especially in the context of family violence. PMID:24443936

  2. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details the findings of an annual survey of state child care regulatory agencies. The survey gathered data on both small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The report's introduction lists the survey categories and…

  3. Family Background and University Dropouts during the Crisis: The Case of Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    The Italian university system has long been characterised by high non-completion rates, though aggregate data show a slight reduction of dropouts in recent years. The most straightforward theoretical explanation for this lies in the lowering opportunity cost of studying due to the financial and economic crisis. Nonetheless, this interpretation is…

  4. CFSC (Community and Family Study Center) study finds birth rates falling everywhere - family planning (family planning) is a factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    The findings of the Community and Family Study Center study, based on estimated crude birthrates and total fertility rates for 1968 and 1975, indicate that there has been a significant reduction in fertility levels of both developed and developing countries. Despite regional variations, the estimates show an average proportional decline of 8.5% in total fertility rates between 1968 and 1975. Of the 148 nations studied, 113 were in developing regions and 35 in the developed regions. Information on important social and economic development factors, such as life expectancy, literacy, percent of labor force in agriculture, per capita income, and family planning program strength were gathered for each country. Analyses of these data are reported in "The Public Interest" (to be published) "Population Reference Bulletin," October 1978, and a paper presented at the 1978 Population Association of America Meetings in Atlanta, Georgia. The recent change in fertility affected 81% of the world's population, primarily the peoples of Asia, Latin America, and North America. The total fertility rate in the world in 1968 was 4635 and declined to 4068 in 1975. More substantial declines occurred in Asia and Latin America, where the number of fewer births 1000 women would bear under a given fertility schedule declined by 845 births and 617 births, respectively. As more research is conducted to investigate the underlying causes of this decline, it is likely to confirm the important role that family planning programs have had in developing nations. Although major improvements in the socioeconomic well-being of the developing areas continue as an essential goal, the need to maintain the organized provision of family planning services should not be understated.

  5. Family aggregation study for breast cancer in Cienfuegos province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosa Aguila, Leydi Maria; Marcheco Teruel, Beatriz; Ocanna Gil, Maria Antonia

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death in developed countries and it is the second cause of female mortality for malignant tumor in Cuba. We conducted an observational, analytic, transversal study of cases and controls for the purpose of evaluating the clinical, epidemiologic and genealogical behavior of breast cancer in Cienfuegos province, in a period of 6 years. The universe of the study was made up of 304 women distributed in 152 cases and 152 controls; they were surveyed after they gave their informed consent. Collected data were processed by means of methods of inferential statistics. It was observed that most of the cases were diagnosed in patients aged 50 to 59 years, with 24.34%, the most frequent type was infiltrating duct carcinoma, with 43.42%. We found statistical association with the personal history of benign breast pathology and the family history of cancer of any type. Presence of familial aggregation was observed for breast cancer in the first-degree relatives and the non-genetic risk factors; they did not show significant association with the occurrence of the disease in the studied population

  6. The framework of studying personal and family stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I suggest the analytical framework for interpreting personal and family stories about the loss of possessions, riches, job, reputation and status. I find the theoretic foothold in the decades long folkloristic and anthropological studies of personal stories and life histories, then in the concept by Gary Alan Fine, a sociologist and folklorist, about the idioculture of small groups through the discussion of the family folklore, and last in the discussion of the historic, social-economic and ideological context where personal and family losses occur. The incentive for me to deal with this type of stories resides in the fact that they have not been the subject of scientific analysis, neither in the world, nor in our country, except one work by an American folklorist Stanley Brandes from 1975, which served as my inspiration and model. The material for the analysis was collected in the form of term papers written by four generations of ethnology and anthropology third year students, attending the course in Folklore anthropology at the Ethnology and Anthropology Department of the Faculty of Philosophy of Belgrade University. A typology of these stories has been done, and they are divided into two groups with subtypes: stories about personal causes to material ruin, and about faith (destiny causing the ruin. Further on in the analysis I focused only on the context of the stories with the so-called "pre-destined (faith" causes of ruin, i.e., on the historic, social-economic and ideological changes in Serbia, which happened during the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century. The context of the revolutionary takeover of power by the Communists after the World War Two is discussed, as well as the violent dispossession of what was until then private property of many families in Serbia, and transferring that property into state and social possession (the so-called stories about nationalization, and also the specific context of post

  7. A family-universal anomalous U(1) in string models as the origin of supersymmetry breaking and squark degeneracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.; Pati, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    Recently a promising mechanism for supersymmetry breaking that utilizes both an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry and an effective mass term m ∼ 1TeV of certain relevant fields has been proposed. In this paper we examine whether such a mechanism can emerge in superstring derived free fermionic models. We observe that certain three generation string solutions, though not all, lead to an anomalous U(1) which couples universally to all three families. The advantages of this three-family universality of U(1) A , compared to the two-family case, proposed in earlier works, in yielding squark degeneracy, while avoiding radiative breaking of color and charge, are noted. The root cause of the flavor universality of U(1) A is the cyclic permutation symmetry that characterizes the Z 2 x Z 2 orbifold compactification with standard embedding, realized in the free fermionic models by the NAHE set. It is shown that nonrenormalizable terms which contain hidden-sector condensates, generate the required suppression of the relevant mass term m, compared to the Planck scale. While the D-term of the family universal U(1) A leads to squark degeneracy, those of the family dependent U(1)'s, remarkably enough, are found to vanish for the solutions considered, owing to minimization of the potential

  8. Factors associated with foreign language anxiety : A study of Chinese university learners of Japanese and English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Yinxing; de Bot, Kees; Keijzer, Merel

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a study that investigates and compares the effects of foreign language proficiency, social status of a learner’s family, self-esteem, and competitiveness on FL anxiety. Chinese university students (N = 146), who were learning Japanese and English, participated in this study.

  9. Space Weather Studies at Istanbul Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will introduce the Upper Atmosphere and Space Weather Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU). It has been established to support the educational needs of the Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2011 to conduct scientific research in Space Weather, Space Environment, Space Environment-Spacecraft Interactions, Space instrumentation and Upper Atmospheric studies. Currently the laboratory has some essential infrastructure and the most instrumentation for ionospheric observations and ground induced currents from the magnetosphere. The laboratory has two subunits: SWIFT dealing with Space Weather Instrumentation and Forecasting unit and SWDPA dealing with Space Weather Data Processing and Analysis. The research area covers wide range of upper atmospheric and space science studies from ionosphere, ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms, distant magnetotail, magnetopause and bow shock studies, as well as solar and solar wind disturbances and their interaction with the Earth's space environment. We also study the spacecraft environment interaction and novel plasma instrument design. Several scientific projects have been carried out in the laboratory. Operational objectives of our laboratory will be carried out with the collaboration of NASA's Space Weather Laboratory and the facilities are in the process of integration to their prediction services. Educational and research objectives, as well as the examples from the research carried out in our laboratory will be demonstrated in this presentation.

  10. Comparison of the heritability of schizophrenia and endophenotypes in the COGS-1 family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Gregory; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Sprock, Joyce; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2014-11-01

    Twin and multiplex family studies have established significant heritability for schizophrenia (SZ), often summarized as 81%. The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS-1) family study was designed to deconstruct the genetic architecture of SZ using neurocognitive and neurophysiological endophenotypes, for which heritability estimates ranged from 18% to 50% (mean = 30%). This study assessed the heritability of SZ in these families to determine whether there is a "heritability gap" between the diagnosis and related endophenotypes. Nuclear families (N = 296) with a SZ proband, an unaffected sibling, and both parents (n = 1366 subjects; mean family size = 4.6) underwent comprehensive endophenotype and clinical characterization. The Family Interview for Genetic Studies was administered to all participants and used to obtain convergent psychiatric symptom information for additional first-degree relatives of interviewed subjects (N = 3304 subjects; mean family size = 11.2). Heritability estimates of psychotic disorders were computed for both nuclear and extended families. The heritability of SZ was 31% and 44% for nuclear and extended families. The inclusion of bipolar disorder increased the heritability to 37% for the nuclear families. When major depression was added, heritability estimates dropped to 34% and 20% for nuclear and extended families, respectively. Endophenotypes and psychotic disorders exhibit comparable levels of heritability in the COGS-1 family sample. The ascertainment of families with discordant sibpairs to increase endophenotypic contrast may underestimate diagnostic heritability relative to other studies. However, population-based studies also report significantly lower heritability estimates for SZ. Collectively, these findings support the importance of endophenotype-based strategies and the dimensional view of psychosis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center 2014.

  11. CHINA‘S RADIO AND TV UNIVERSITIES AND THE BRITISH OPEN UNIVERSITY: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Desmond KEEGAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This book is a major contribution to the fields of distance education research, the field of comparative education and to the history of Chinese and British education.The book undertakes an impossible task: the comparative study of China‘s Radio and TV universities and of the British Open University. The task is impossible because the two entities to be compared are essentially disparate. The British Open University (OUUK is a single university set up at Milton Keynes in the United Kingdom by Royal Charter. China‘s Radio and TV universities, known as the Dianda system, is a network of 45 open universities set up all over China. The essence of the success of the British Open University was its creation as a full university, offering its own university degrees on the same level as all the other universities in the country. The Dianda institutions were set up in what Wei calls the ‗adult higher education sector‘ in China, offering what Wei calls sub-degrees and always regarded as inferior both to the great Chinese universities (Beijing University, Qinghua University, Fudan

  12. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained thoroughly, policies on plagiarism are informed to all university academic members, and there are mechanisms to manage cases related to plagiarism. In contrast, not all Indonesian universities treat plagiarism directly. Some universities depend on religious morality and academic ethics in dealing with plagiarism. Accordingly, this article recommends the explicit treatment of plagiarism in Indonesian universities.

  13. Interdependency Management in Universities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Dietmar; Benninghoff, Martin; Ramuz, Raphaël; Gorga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    There remains uncertainty in scientific discussions regarding the governance of universities in new public management regimes in terms of who actually "rules" in the university. Apparently, a strengthened management leadership is confronted with continuing elements of academic self-regulation and professional autonomy in knowledge…

  14. Key beliefs related to decisions for physical activity engagement among first-in-family students transitioning to university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Eloise; Hamilton, Kyra

    2014-08-01

    The current study investigated key beliefs related to decisions for physical activity (PA) engagement among first-in-family (FIF) students transitioning to university. FIF students (n = 157) completed an online questionnaire assessing standard theory of planned behaviour constructs and belief-based items. One week later, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire assessing self-reported PA during the previous week. Results identified a range of behavioural, normative, and control beliefs that were significantly correlated with both PA intention and behaviour. Various key beliefs were also identified in relation to FIF students' decisions to be regularly physically active, with behavioural beliefs such as "take up too much time", normative beliefs including "friends outside of university", and control beliefs such as "cost", identified. Finally, frequencies of those who strongly or fully accepted these beliefs were analysed, demonstrating that typically, a large number of FIF students did not hold the beliefs, and as such, these are relevant to target in resultant interventions. The current study effectively highlights a number of key beliefs that can be targeted in programs aimed at encouraging FIF students' PA. Further, the study addresses a gap in the literature of targeting FIF students, a cohort at risk for inactivity, and utilises a sound theoretical framework to identify the unique set of beliefs guiding decisions for PA for this at-risk community group.

  15. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  16. Case Study: Students of University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Samim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the existence of probable relationship between the popular music consumption and aggressive, anti-social behaviors. we took the fact of the existence of some kind of anti-social aggression amongst the students interested in popular music, as the basis for the this study The instrument used to collect data for this project was a self-report questionnaire, not objective observation The questionnaires were distributed to 410 students of the University of Isfahan The interpretation of survey results indicates the existence of an actual and meaningful relationship between the use of popular music and aggressive behaviors Survey results indicate negative feedback about the popular music consumption from the post-Revolutionary era (referring to 1978 Revolution in Iran, and reveal positive response with regard to the use of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era Another interesting result uncovers that the most aggressive students are amongst the audience for the Western genres of popular music (rap, rock, heavy metal As a result and considering the musicological features of the "popular music" as well as the socio-psychological characteristics of the youth, one may conclude that all types and genres of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era, seem to be more appropriate to the young population of nowadays Iran.

  17. Family-friendliness in Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg. Results of a state-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehues, Johanna; Prospero, Katrin; Fegert, Jörg M; Liebhardt, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the study on "Family-friendliness of the Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg" carried out in 2009-2011 by the working group "Family, Time policy and E-Learning" of the University Hospital of Ulm, supported by the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts of Baden-Württemberg. This state-wide survey of the studying conditions and personal circumstances of medical students with children at the five medical schools in Baden-Württemberg aims to describe existing and necessary factors of family-friendliness. A total of 238 students with children participated in the quantitative online survey conducted during the summer semester 2010 which was based on topics from previous qualitative interviews with student parents.The data shows that even though founding a family while at university is usually planned, student parents are faced with significant compatibility issues, demonstrating the need for additional measures to individualise course organisation and to make the curriculum more flexible. At the same time, the need to significantly increase information and advisory services alongside the establishment of additional support services for student parents is discernable. The study contributes to the debate on the family-friendliness of universities and university hospitals and adds practice-oriented approaches to solutions.

  18. How far is too far? An analysis of students’ perceptions of the impact of distance between university and family home on academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Rosalina Pisco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition to university is a challenging phase in youngsters’ lives. The literature indicates that geographical distance separating the places of study and of family residence adds to the difficulties of transition and adjustment to university. Recent evidence suggests that it also negatively impacts students’ grades. Despite important work done by economists, geographers and psychologists, sociology has devoted scarce interest in understanding this topic. This article seeks to bridge this gap, specifically exploring the reasons justifying the largely ignored effect of distance between the university and family home in academic performance. The study draws on data on undergraduate students of a Portuguese public university, collected through an online survey. Two dimensions, one more related to practical life occupations and another more linked to personal feelings and activities, are examined. It is argued that the negative impact of distance is mainly due to homesickness and to the time spent traveling home. Results from such analysis are twofold socially relevant: of the utmost importance for families, academics and students’ support services, deserve to be seriously considered by policy makers deciding on the territorial distribution of higher-education institutions.

  19. Clinical and genetic characterization of classical forms of familial adenomatous polyposis: a Spanish population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, B; González, S; Sánchez-Tomé, E; Blanco, I; Mercadillo, F; Letón, R; Benítez, J; Robledo, M; Capellá, G; Urioste, M

    2011-04-01

    Classical familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the appearance of >100 colorectal adenomas. We screened the APC and MUTYH genes for mutations and evaluated the genotype-phenotype correlation in 136 Spanish classical FAP families. APC/MUTYH mutations were detected in 107 families. Sixty-four distinct APC point mutations were detected in 95 families of which all were truncating mutations. A significant proportion (39.6%) had not been previously reported. Mutations were spread over the entire coding region and great rearrangements were identified in six families. Another six families exhibited biallelic MUTYH mutations. No APC or MUTYH mutations were detected in 29 families. These APC/MUTYH-negative families showed clinical differences with the APC-positive families. A poor correlation between phenotype and mutation site was observed. Our results highlight that a broad approach in the genetic study must be considered for classical FAP due to involvement of both APC and MUTYH and the heterogeneous spectrum of APC mutations observed in this Spanish population. The scarcely consistent genotype-phenotype correlation does not allow making specific recommendations regarding screening and management. Differences observed in APC/MUTYH-negative families may reflect a genetic basis other than mutations in APC and MUTYH genes for FAP predisposition. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology.

  20. Car safety seat usage and selection among families attending University Hospital Limerick

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scully, P

    2016-05-01

    The safest way for children to travel within a car is by provision of a weight-appropriate safety-seat. To investigate this, we conducted a cross-sectional study of adult parents who had children under 12 years, and collected information related to: car use, safety-seat legislation, and type of safety-seat employed. Data were reviewed on 120 children from 60 respondents. Ninety-eight (81.7%) children were transported daily by car. Forty-eight (81.4%) respondents were aware that current safety-seat legislation is based on the weight of the child. One hundred and seven (89.9%) children were restrained during travel using a car safety-seat. One hundred and two (96.2%) safety seats were newly purchased, installed in 82.3% (88) cases by family members with installation instructions fully read in 58 (55.2%) cases. Ninety-nine (83.2%) children were restrained using an appropriate safety-seat for their weight. The results show that four out of five families are employing the most appropriate safety-seat for their child, so providing an effective mechanism to reduce car-related injury. However, the majority of safety-seats are installed by family members, which may have child safety consequences.

  1. Assessing English proficiency for university study

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on strategies and procedures for assessing the academic language ability of students entering an English-medium university, so that those with significant needs can have access to opportunities to enhance their language skills.

  2. Self-esteem and self-efficacy; perceived parenting and family climate; and depression in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J M; Paull, J C

    1995-07-01

    This study examined associations among self-esteem and self-efficacy; perceived unfavorable Parental Rearing Style (perceived PRS) and unfavorable family climate in the family of origin; and depression in undergraduates still in frequent contact with their families (N = 186). Unfavorable perceived PRS and family climate were construed as "affectionless control," in which parents and family provide little affection, but excessive control. Constructs were measured by the Self-Esteem Inventory, the Self-Efficacy Scale, the Child Report of Parental Behavior Inventory, the Family Environment Scale, and the Beck Inventory. Perceived "affectionless control" in both PRS and family climate accounted for about 13% of the variance in self-esteem, self-efficacy, and depression. Neither introversion nor depression mediated the relation between family socialization and self-esteem.

  3. (Case Study: Allameh Tabatabaee University, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Karimi Alavijeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available News websites’ design quality plays an important role in retention time and increasing visitors’ motivation in order to maintain loyalty and e-wom. Therefore, these websites are trying to achieve this competitive advantage through improving their websites’ design quality. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of design quality of News websites on e-loyalty and e-wom. This article is applied in purpose, and is correlational descriptive-survey in terms of data collection. The population of the research includes the students of Allame Tabatabaee University who have at least once visited News websites. A sample of 374 students was selected using proportional stratified method and data was collected using a questionnaire. Finally, the hypotheses were tested using structural equation model (SEM and SPSS, LISREL software. The results of the study indicate that websites’ design quality has a direct and significant effect on visitors’ pleasure and perceived quality of information and has indirect and significant effect on e-Satisfaction, e-trust, e-loyalty and e-wom.

  4. Ready for University? A Cross-National Study of Students' Perceived Preparedness for University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; van der Meer, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured "before" students commenced their study at a university in New Zealand or in the Netherlands. This…

  5. Ready for university? A cross national study on students' perceived preparedness for university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; van der Meer, J.

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured before students commenced their study at a university in New

  6. A study of the stressor, family environment and family burden in dissociative (conversion disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal K Verma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dissociative disorder is a stress-related disorder usually present in adolescent and younger age group. It is also accompanied with significant impairment in activity of daily living and family relationship. Family environment plays important role in initiation and maintenance of symptoms and this put significant burden on family. Aim and Objective: To study presence of stressor, family environment, and assessment of family burden in dissociative disorder patients. Material and Method: This was a cross-sectional observational study in which 100 dissociatives disorder patients were included after fulfilling inclusion criteria from both inpatients and outpatient department of psychiatry. Results: In our study major part of the sample were women 60 (60%, among them most of were housewife and educated up to primary school. According to a stressor, 63 (63% patients had family stress/problem and out of them, 35 (58.4 were women. Seventy-four (74% patients had dissociative convulsion and out of them, 45 (75% were women. The dissociative disorder patients cause a considerable degree of burden over other family members in both men and women. There is a significant difference found in the family environment in term of personal growth dimension, relationship dimension in both men and women. Conclusion: Present study concludes that dissociative disorder patients cause a considerable degree of burden over other family members in term of leisure, physical, mental, financial, and routines family interrelationship domains. The family environment in term of personal growth dimension, relationship dimension has a casual effect on symptoms of dissociative disorder patients.

  7. B→K1l+l- decays in a family non-universal Z' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Hua, Juan; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2011-01-01

    The implications of the family non-universal Z' model in the B→K 1 (1270,1400)l + l - (l=e,μ,τ) decays are explored, where the mass eigenstates K 1 (1270, 1400) are the mixtures of 1 P 1 and 3 P 1 states with the mixing angle θ. In this work, considering the Z' boson and setting the mixing angle θ=(-34±13) , we analyze the branching ratio, the dilepton invariant mass spectrum, the normalized forward-backward asymmetry and lepton polarization asymmetries of each decay mode. We find that all observables of B→K 1 (1270)μ + μ - are sensitive to the Z' contribution. Moreover, the observables of B→K 1 (1400)μ + μ - have a relatively strong θ-dependence; thus, the Z' contribution will be buried by the uncertainty of the mixing angle θ. Furthermore, the zero crossing position in the FBA spectrum of B→K 1 (1270)μ + μ - at low dilepton mass will move to the positive direction with Z' contribution. For the tau modes, the effects of Z' are not remarkable due to the small phase space. These results could be tested in the running LHC-b experiment and super-B factory. (orig.)

  8. Family life in transition – a longitudinal study of family life in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan; Dencik, Lars; Andersen, Hans H. K.

    This paper is an outline of the background for the study and it’s methodological and theoretical framework. The study, Family Forms and Cohabitation in the Modern Welfare State (FAMOSTAT), was originally funded by the National Danish Research Council for the Human Sciences. Its focus is on the tr...... questionnaire (IFUSOFF) was adopted to the web-format (IFUSOFF II), adding more questions on the work-life/family-life balance....... is on the transformations of family life as a consequence of societal modernization in Denmark. The project was informed by Dencik’s (1996) social psychological perspective on family life, arguing that the impact of modernization should be studied through empirical investigations of everyday family life. Following Asplund...

  9. The Relationship between Family Environment and Parenting Style: A Preliminary Study of African American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy E.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of parenting style on aspects of family environment was studied with 174 9th graders, 11th graders and college freshmen (96% African American). Findings demonstrate that types of parenting styles are significantly related to outcome measures of family environment as predicted. Implications of authoritative parenting among blacks are…

  10. Client Experiences of Counselling and Treatment Interventions: A Qualitative Study of Family Views of Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, David

    1996-01-01

    Argues that personal experience and social life are inherently meaningful and that qualitative research designs can contribute to theory-building in counseling and psychotherapy. To illustrate the use of qualitative research designs and methods of analysis, a study of family members' views of family therapy is described. (RJM)

  11. A social work study on family patterns and street children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a social work study on relationship between various family characteristics and street children in rural area as well as city of Esfahan, Iran. The proposed study selects a sample of 150 street children, 75 from city and 75 from rural area, and using some statistical tests verifies the effects of three factors including family income, place of residency and family size on street children. The results indicate that the city residence had more street children than rural residence did. In addition, there was a meaningful difference between the number of street children in low-income families and high-income families. Finally, the survey results indicate that big size families more likely suffered from street children than low size families did.

  12. Blood Pressure and Its Association with Gender, Body Mass Index, Smoking, and Family History among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein H. Alhawari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we will assess the frequency of hypertension among healthy university students and its association with gender, body mass index, smoking, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. We screened healthy university students ranging from 18 to 26 years of age. For each participant, we performed blood pressure measurements using a previously validated device and obtained demographic data, body mass index (BMI, smoking status, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Out of the total number of 505 participants included in this study, 35.2% have blood pressure between 130/80 and 139/89, and 13.5% have blood pressure of more than 140/90. We found significant gender differences in both systolic pressure (p = 0.003 with mean difference = 18.08 mmHg (CI: 16.13 to 19.9 and diastolic pressure (p = 0.011 with mean difference = 3.6 mmHg (CI: 2.06 to 5.14, higher in males than in females. Upon comparing the mean difference in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure with BMI, we found significant differences in both systolic (p < 0.001 and diastolic (p = 0.002 blood pressure. We also found that smokers have significantly (p = 0.025 higher systolic blood pressure (mean difference = 4.2 mmHg, CI: 3.2 mmHg to 8.8 mmHg, but no significant difference for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.386, compared to nonsmokers. First-degree family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases affected systolic but not diastolic blood pressure. Taking into account the adverse short- and long-term effect of hypertension, we recommend adopting an awareness program highlighting the importance of screening blood pressure in young adolescent populations, keeping in mind that both high BMI and smoking are important modifiable factors.

  13. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a "high" score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout.

  14. Fast ignition studies at Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    After the invention of the chirped pulse amplification technique [1], the extreme conditions of matters have become available in laboratory spaces and can be studied with the use of ultra intense laser pulse (UILP) with a high energy. One such example is the fast ignition [2] where UILP is used to heat a highly compressed fusion fuel core within 1-10 pico-seconds before the core disassembles. It is predicted possible with use of 50-100 kJ lasers for both imploding the fuel and heating [2] to attain a large fusion gain. Fast ignition was shown to be a promising new scheme for laser fusion [3] with a PW (= 10 1 5 W) UILP and GEKKO XII laser systems at Osaka. Many new physics have been found with use of UILP in a relativistic parameter regime during the process of the fast ignition studies. UILP can penetrate into over-dense plasma for a couple hundred microns distance with a self-focusing and relativistic transparency effects. Hot electrons of 1-100 MeV can be easily created and are under studies for its spectral and emission angle controls. Strong magnetic fields of 10's of MGauss are created to guide these hot electrons along the target surface [4]. Based on these results, a new and largest UILP laser machine of 10 kJ energy at PW UILP peak power is under construction to test if we can achieve the sub-ignition fusion condition at Osaka University. The machine requires challenging optical technologies such as large size (0.9 m) gratings, tiling these gratings for UILP compression; segmenting four large UILP beams to obtain diffraction limited focal spot. We would like to over-view all of these activities. References [1]D. STRICKLAND and G. MOUROU, Opt. Commun., 56, 219 (1985) [2] S. ATZENI et al., Phys Plasmas, 6, 3316 (1999) [3] R. KODAMA, K.A. TANAKA et al., Nature, 418, 933 (2002) [4] A.L. LEI, K.A. TANAKA et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 96, 255006(2006) ; H. HABARA, K.A. TANAKA et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, 095004 (2006)

  15. Family presence during resuscitation: A descriptive study with Iranian nurses and patients' family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, Mahnaz; Hassankhani, Hadi; Powers, Kelly A; Dadashzadeh, Abbas; Rajaei Ghafouri, Rouzbeh

    2017-09-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) has advantages for the patients' family member to be present at the bedside. However, FPDR is not regularly practiced by nurses, especially in low to middle income countries. The purpose of this study was to determine Iranian nurses' and family members' attitudes towards FPDR. In a descriptive study, data was collected from the random sample of 178 nurses and 136 family members in four hospitals located in Iran. A 27-item questionnaire was used to collect data on attitudes towards FPDR, and descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted. Of family members, particularly the women, 57.2% (n=78) felt it is their right to experience FPDR and that it has many advantages for the family; including the ability to see that everything was done and worry less. However, 62.5% (n=111) of the nurses disagreed with an adult implementation of FPDR. Nurses perceived FPDR to have many disadvantages. Family members becoming distressed and interfering with the patient which may prolong the resuscitation effort. Nurses with prior education on FPDR were more willing to implement it. FPDR was desired by the majority of family members. To meet their needs, it is important to improve Iranian nurses' views about the advantages of the implementation of FPDR. Education on FPDR is recommended to improve Iranian nurses' views about the advantages of the implementation of FPDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tekanan dan Dukungan sebagai Anteseden Work-family Conflict; Studi pada Pegawai Bersekolah di Wilayah DIY

    OpenAIRE

    Widjajani, Susi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between job stress, job support, family support, and family stress , with work-family conflict. Variabel in this research were measured via survey of 226 student Magister Management on the University in the DIY. Multiple Regression Analysis were used to examine the effect to antecedent of work-family conflict. Result showed in this research that job stress, family support, and family stress significantly related to work-family...

  17. Exceptional memory performance in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Costa, Rosann

    2013-01-01

    Research to understand variability at the highest end of the cognitive performance distribution has been scarce. Our aim was to define a cognitive endophenotype based on exceptional episodic memory (EM) performance and to investigate familial aggregation of EM in families from the Long Life Family...... Study (LLFS). Using a sample of 1911 nondemented offspring of long-lived probands, we created a quantitative phenotype, EM (memory z ≥ 1.5), and classified LLFS families as EM and non-EM families based on the number of EM offspring. We then assessed differences in memory performance between LLFS...... = 1.4 × 10(-4)). We demonstrated that there is a familial correlation of the EM endophenotype, suggesting that genetic variants might influence memory performance in long-lived families....

  18. 74. Cardiovascular risk assessment for Saudi university employees and their families: Developing a framework for provision of an evidence-based cardiovascular disease preventative programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alzeidan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the primary cause of death among adults, representing 46% of total mortality in 2014. This study’s objectives were to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs, and calculate the cardiovascular risk (CVR among King Saud University employees and their families. Moreover, it aimed at assessing the possible effects of living in KSA on the heart health of expatriate employees and their families. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 4500 university employees and their families aged ⩾18 years old, using the World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance of CVRFs. CVR was then calculated for participants using the Framingham Coronary Heart Risk Score calculator. The mean age of participants was 39.3 ± 13.4 years. The prevalence of CVRFs was as follows: low fruit/vegetable consumption of 10% risk to develop CVD within the following 10-years. Furthermore, this study showed that expatriates had significant negative effects on behavioural risk factors after residing in KSA, namely: high rate of physical inactivity, high consumption of fast food, low consumption of fruit and vegetable. However, there was no effect on the pattern of tobacco use. The prevalence of CVRFs is substantially high among the study population. To combat the future expected burden of CVDs, a proposed prevention programme for employees’ cardiovascular wellness is designed and recommended to be implemented and institutionalized within the university.

  19. 26. Cardiovascular risk assessment for Saudi university employees and their families: developing a framework for provision of an evidence-based cardiovascular disease preventative programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alzeidan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the primary cause of death among adults, representing 46% of total mortality in 2014. This study’s objectives were to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs, and calculate the cardiovascular risk (CVR among King Saud University employees and their families. Moreover, it aimed at assessing the possible effects of living in KSA on the heart health of expatriate employees and their families.A cross-sectional study was conducted on 4500 university employees and their families aged ⩾18 years old, using the World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance of CVRFs. CVR was then calculated for participants using the Framingham Coronary Heart Risk Score calculator. The mean age of participants was 39.3±13.4 years. The prevalence of CVRFs was as follows: low fruit/vegetable consumption of 10% risk to develop CVD within the following 10-years. Furthermore, this study showed that expatriates had significant negative effects on behavioural risk factors after residing in KSA, namely: high rate of physical inactivity, high consumption of fast food, low consumption of fruit and vegetable. However, there was no effect on the pattern of tobacco use. The prevalence of CVRFs is substantially high among the study population. To combat the future expected burden of CVDs, a proposed prevention programme for employees’ cardiovascular wellness is designed and recommended to be implemented and institutionalized within the university.

  20. Internships at Greek Universities: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Greece has the highest youth unemployment rate in the European Union. Even though it is clear that persistent unemployment requires bold measures so as to engage young educated Greeks in the labour market, there is no coherent policy at present targeting that population group, especially university students. This paper explores university…

  1. Market Orientation in University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Ines; Aviles-Valenzuela, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to analyse the relationship between market orientation (MO) and results in the field of higher education, considering the importance of university teaching staff MO in relation to satisfaction and establishing that this orientation is directly and positively affected by the MO of the upper hierarchical levels. The focus is…

  2. Gender and Campus Violence: A Study of University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is an attempt to investigate the incidence of violence among university students using University of Lagos as a case study. A questionnaire on different kinds of violence was administered to 446 students of the university. In addition, four focus group discussion sessions were conducted to assess the types of ...

  3. A survey on critical factors on educational failure: A case study of private universities in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary issues on many developing countries is educational failure associated with schoolchildren or university students. Many students cannot continue their educations for different reasons such as lack of family support either financially or emotionally. In this paper, we study the effects of family background characteristics on educational participation in one of Iranian cities. We select 40 students who have the history of educational failure and distribute some questionnaire among them. Our survey is mainly based on relationship between family characteristics such as age, educational level, etc. The results indicate that different family characteristics could highly influence educational failure. Some of the most important factors that all students agreed on are family dispute, lack of interest and support on behalf of their parents, disregarding students' creativity, university professors with weak performance and high living expenses as well as high tuitions. There are other issues, which could impact educational failure such as having a university with good discipline and studying in overcrowded classes.

  4. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families....... A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides...... an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising...

  5. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A

    2015-01-01

    The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. GP/FM degree theses were reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master's degrees (84.1%). Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%). The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC)-based studies in 59.1%. The "Patient" category exceeded the other categories (28.4%). Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended.

  6. The Family Alliance Model: A Way to Study and Characterize Early Family Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Favez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the family alliance (FA model, which is designed to conceptualize the relational dynamics in the early family. FA is defined as the coordination a family can reach when fulfilling a task, such as playing a game or having a meal. According to the model, being coordinated as a family depends on four interactive functions: participation (all members are included, organization (members assume differentiated roles, focalization (family shares a common theme of activity, affect sharing (there is empathy between members. The functions are operationalized through the spatiotemporal characteristics of non-verbal interactions: for example, distance between the partners, orientation of their bodies, congruence within body segments, signals of readiness to interact, joint attention, facial expressions. Several standardized observational situations have been designed to assess FA: The Lausanne Trilogue Play (with its different versions, in which mother, father, and baby interact in all possible configurations of a triad, and the PicNic Game for families with several children. Studies in samples of non-referred and referred families (for infant or parental psychopathology have highlighted different types of FA: disorganized, conflicted, and cooperative. The type of FA in a given family is stable through the first years and is predictive of developmental outcomes in children, such as psychofunctional symptoms, understanding of complex emotions, and Theory of Mind development.

  7. A Case Study of Synchronous Distance Learning Between Shih Chien University and Beijing Foreign Studies University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Fen Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shih Chien University and Beijing Foreign Studies University collaboratively launched a project to offer synchronous distance learning courses on "Case Studies of Taiwanese Entrepreneurs" since February 2012. The three objectives of this study are: (1 to explore the Cross-Strait students' motives for selecting the course; (2 to examine the students' accommodation condition before and after completing the course; (3 to discuss the student's level of satisfaction of the course. This study uses qualitative data from case study interviews conducted in the second year of the project based on the research focus of the Cross-Strait students' motivation and satisfaction of the course. The research analysis tools are content analysis and theory triangulation. The findings are: (1 Cross-Strait students are motivated by their curiosity about the course, interest in the contents, and willingness to experience the novelty of distance learning to select the course; (2 the results of Cross-Strait students' accommodation condition are correlated to their interactions with the professor, the familiarity with the materials, the quality of the communication equipment, and the clarity of the images; (3 Cross-Strait students all accept the method of synchronous distance learning; (4 the quality of communication equipment has the lowest level of satisfaction.

  8. Does rural generalist focused medical school and family medicine training make a difference? Memorial University of Newfoundland outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, James; Asghari, Shabnam; Hurley, Oliver; Ravalia, Mohamed; Jong, Michael; Graham, Wendy; Parsons, Wanda; Duggan, Norah; O'Keefe, Danielle; Moffatt, Scott; Stringer, Katherine; Sturge Sparkes, Carolyn; Hippe, Janelle; Harris Walsh, Kristin; McKay, Donald; Samarasena, Asoka

    2018-03-01

    Rural recruitment and retention of physicians is a global issue. The Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, was established as a rural-focused medical school with a social accountability mandate that aimed to meet the healthcare needs of a sparse population distributed over a large landmass as well as the needs of other rural and remote areas of Canada. This study aimed to assess whether Memorial medical degree (MD) and postgraduate (PG) programs were effective at producing physicians for their province and rural physicians for Canada compared with other Canadian medical schools. This retrospective cohort study included medical school graduates who completed their PG training between 2004 and 2013 in Canada. Practice locations of study subjects were georeferenced and assigned to three geographic classes: Large Urban; Small City/Town; and Rural. Analyses were performed at two levels. (1) Provincial level analysis compared Memorial PG graduates practicing where they received their MD and/or PG training with other medical schools who are the only medical school in their province (n=4). (2) National-level analysis compared Memorial PG graduates practicing in rural Canada with all other Canadian medical schools (n=16). Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. Overall, 18 766 physicians practicing in Canada completed Canadian PG training (2004-2013), and of those, 8091 (43%) completed Family Medicine (FM) training. Of all physicians completing Canadian PG training, 1254 (7%) physicians were practicing rurally and of those, 1076 were family physicians. There were 379 Memorial PG graduates and of those, 208 (55%) completed FM training and 72 (19%) were practicing rurally, and of those practicing rurally, 56 were family physicians. At the national level, the percentage of all Memorial PG graduates (19.0%) and FM PG graduates (26.9%) practicing rurally was significantly better than the national average for PG (6.4%, p<0.000) and FM (12

  9. Ergonomics: case study in a university library

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Capri; Eliana Maria dos Santos Bahia; Adilson Luiz Pinto

    2012-01-01

    This final paper aimed to analyze the real ergonomics of a university library from Florianópolis and compare it with the ergonomics perceived by the user to perform an ergonomic diagnosis. In order to meet this goal two specific goals were established such as: describe the physical and environmental aspects of the library related to the real ergonomics and verify the actual perception of users about the library. As a theoretical approach, aspects of ergonomics and environmental ergonomics wer...

  10. Mental health professionals' family-focused practice with families with dependent children: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungpunkom, Patraporn; Maybery, Darryl; Reupert, Andrea; Kowalenko, Nick; Foster, Kim

    2017-12-08

    Many people with a mental illness are parents caring for dependent children. These children are at greater risk of developing their own mental health concerns compared to other children. Mental health services are opportune places for healthcare professionals to identify clients' parenting status and address the needs of their children. There is a knowledge gap regarding Thai mental health professionals' family-focused knowledge and practices when working with parents with mental illness and their children and families. This cross -sectional survey study examined the attitudes, knowledge and practices of a sample (n = 349) of the Thai mental health professional workforce (nurses, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists) using a translated version of the Family-Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire (FFMHPQ). The majority of clinicians reported no training in family (76.8%) or child-focused practice (79.7%). Compared to other professional groups, psychiatric nurses reported lower scores on almost all aspects of family-focused practice except supporting clients in their parenting role within the context of their mental illness. Social workers scored highest overall including having more workplace support for family-focused practice as well as a higher awareness of family-focused policy and procedures than psychiatrists; social workers also scored higher than psychologists on providing support to families and parents. All mental health care professional groups reported a need for training and inter-professional practice when working with families. The findings indicate an important opportunity for the prevention of intergenerational mental illness in whose parents have mental illness by strengthening the professional development of nurses and other health professionals in child and family-focused knowledge and practice.

  11. Enhancing the Homestay: Study Abroad from the Host Family's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Susan M.; Schmidt-Rinehart, Barbara C.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes interview data with 24 host families of home stay students in study abroad situations to determine salient, recurring topics. Discusses the study design and major themes that emerged. Concludes with hosts' recommendations on how students, programs, and the native families themselves can work together to enhance the homestay experience.…

  12. Study of a Biparametric Family of Iterative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Campos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a biparametric family for solving nonlinear equations is studied on quadratic polynomials. This biparametric family includes the c-iterative methods and the well-known Chebyshev-Halley family. We find the analytical expressions for the fixed and critical points by solving 6-degree polynomials. We use the free critical points to get the parameter planes and, by observing them, we specify some values of (α, c with clear stable and unstable behaviors.

  13. Familial Risks of Kidney Failure in Sweden: A Nationwide Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    Akrawi, Delshad Saleh; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Zöller, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of family history as a risk factor for kidney failure has not been determined in a nationwide setting. AIM: This nationwide family study aimed to determine familial risks for kidney failure in Sweden. METHODS: The Swedish multi-generation register on 0-78-year-old subjects were linked to the Swedish patient register and the Cause of death register for 1987-2010. Individuals diagnosed with acute kidney failure (n = 10063), chronic kidney failure (n = 18668), or unspecifie...

  14. Bringing migrant domestic work literature into family studies: the intricate dynamics of au pair families

    OpenAIRE

    Pelechova, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores families with live in au pairs. In particular, it investigates the changes that families go through as a result of the addition of an au pair, as well as the means by which the host parents and au pairs negotiate their new circumstances of living and working together. \\ud From a theoretical perspective, the thesis is positioned between two bodies of literature, namely, those of migrant domestic work and family studies. Up until now, research conducted in relation to au pa...

  15. Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Kirstin; Nürnberger, Frank; Sader, Robert; Dittrich, Winand

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept. Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010), which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”). Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis. Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved. Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies. PMID:22558026

  16. Family meals with young children: an online study of family mealtime characteristics, among Australian families with children aged six months to six years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterbach, Eloise-Kate V; Campbell, Karen J; Spence, Alison C

    2017-01-24

    Evidence suggests that family meals influence food intakes and behaviours, which in turn impact children's eating habits, diets and health. Mealtimes therefore offer potential as settings for health promotion. Given diet, health behaviours and health are often socioeconomically patterned, it is important to consider whether family meals differ by socioeconomic position (SEP). The Family Meals with Young Kids study was an online survey completed by parents in 2014. Mealtime characteristics measured included; frequency of shared meals across the day, duration and location of mealtimes, parental modelling, and parental perceived importance of the evening meal. Maternal education was used to assess SEP. The aims of this study were to describe family meal characteristics among Australian families with children aged six months to six years and to describe the socioeconomic patterning of these. Participants (n = 992) were mostly mothers (97%) with a university degree (71%). The evening meal was the most frequently reported meal eaten together with the responding parent and child (77% ≥ five nights/week). Snacks were least commonly eaten together (39% ≥ five days/week). The frequency of having everyone present for the evening meal was inversely associated with SEP (OR 0.70, CI 0.54-0.92). Parent rated importance of family meals was generally high and positively associated with higher SEP (OR 1.32, CI 1.00-1.76). Most children consumed breakfast (73%), lunch (58%) and dinner (82%) sitting at a table or bench and this was positively associated with higher SEP for all meal types (OR 1.61-2.37, p meals was inversely associated with SEP (OR 0.63, CI 0.54-0.72). Less than half of children (36%) watched TV during meals more than once a day. Australian families engage in many healthy mealtime behaviours. Evidence that parents share meals with children and place high value on mealtimes with children provides important opportunities for promoting healthy behaviours

  17. Family meals with young children: an online study of family mealtime characteristics, among Australian families with children aged six months to six years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise-kate V. Litterbach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that family meals influence food intakes and behaviours, which in turn impact children’s eating habits, diets and health. Mealtimes therefore offer potential as settings for health promotion. Given diet, health behaviours and health are often socioeconomically patterned, it is important to consider whether family meals differ by socioeconomic position (SEP. Methods The Family Meals with Young Kids study was an online survey completed by parents in 2014. Mealtime characteristics measured included; frequency of shared meals across the day, duration and location of mealtimes, parental modelling, and parental perceived importance of the evening meal. Maternal education was used to assess SEP. The aims of this study were to describe family meal characteristics among Australian families with children aged six months to six years and to describe the socioeconomic patterning of these. Results Participants (n = 992 were mostly mothers (97% with a university degree (71%. The evening meal was the most frequently reported meal eaten together with the responding parent and child (77% ≥ five nights/week. Snacks were least commonly eaten together (39% ≥ five days/week. The frequency of having everyone present for the evening meal was inversely associated with SEP (OR 0.70, CI 0.54-0.92. Parent rated importance of family meals was generally high and positively associated with higher SEP (OR 1.32, CI 1.00-1.76. Most children consumed breakfast (73%, lunch (58% and dinner (82% sitting at a table or bench and this was positively associated with higher SEP for all meal types (OR 1.61-2.37, p < 0.05. Increased television (TV viewing during meals was inversely associated with SEP (OR 0.63, CI 0.54-0.72. Less than half of children (36% watched TV during meals more than once a day. Conclusions Australian families engage in many healthy mealtime behaviours. Evidence that parents share meals with children and

  18. THE CARE OF NURSING TO THE FAMILY: A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claci Fátima Weirich

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: The objective of this study was to identify the scientific article about the care of nursing to the family, published in periodic of Brazilian nursing, index-linked article survey to the LILACS, in the period of 1993 the 2003, and to analyze them how much to the concept and composition of the families, systematization and proposals of action of nursing and formation and qualification of the authors. In the results we find in 10 years (1993-2003, 9 publications concerning nursing in family. Where we can find the predominance of works that focus the systematization and proposals of action, evidencing of a general form, a lack of studies in the area of nursing in family, where the Program of Health of the Family appears as principal source of promotion of care of nursing to the family and motivation for studies that approach this thematic one. All research had had as authorship nurses doctors, masters and specialists, which acted as professors. KEY WORDS: Assistance to the Family; Health of the Family and Nursing and Family.

  19. The Relationship of Experiential Avoidance, Familial Emotional Atmosphere and Self-Control with Online Gaming Addiction in Bachelor Student of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Zandipayam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: online game addiction is considered as a compulsive, excessive, uncontrollable and destructive physical and psychological behavior. With regard to the problem of persons with addiction to online gaming in the fields of experiential avoidance, families emotional atmosphere and self-control, this study was carried out with the aim of determining the relationship of experiential avoidance, families emotional atmosphere and self-control with online gaming addiction in the bachelor student of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Materials and Methods: The research design was descriptive and correlational, performed on 200 bachelor student of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran. Sampling was conducted using multi-stage random sampling. Information were collected via SPSS 16 and to analyze the data, Pearson’s correlation and regression (inter tests were used. Results: The results showed a significant positive correlation in familial emotional atmosphere and experiential avoidance with addiction to online games and there was a significant negative correlation between self-control and addiction to online games. Regression analysis indicated that familial emotional atmosphere determined 28% of the variance of addiction to online games. Conclusions: The results confirmed the relationship of addiction to online games with familial emotional atmosphere and experiential avoidance, also emphasized on the importance of family environment in intensified use of internet. The results of this study can be used to plan appropriate interventions, including awareness among students and practitioners in the field of symptoms and consequences of addiction to online games, and try to correct the use of internet among users, to prevent and effectively manage this disorder.

  20. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Attar, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare Family Archive of Walter de la Mare's Printed Oeuvre at Senate House Library, University of London, as an example of a modern author collections in an institutiona...

  1. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  2. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one's work is valued and rotations in family medicine. The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors.

  3. The Flynn Effect in Families: Studies of Register Data on Norwegian Military Conscripts and Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Martin Sundet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper published data and new analyses are presented and discussed in order to demonstrate the power of family data (siblings and parents to military conscripts with IQ data in the study of the Flynn effect (FE. In particular, it is shown how studies of the mean intelligence changes in sibships of different sizes and changing proportions of sibship sizes can enhance our understanding how these factors may influence FE. Some new analyses of correlations between intelligence and sibship sizes illustrate how family data can be used to investigate changes in the correlation pattern across generations. It is shown that comparison of the secular trends in the general population and in sibling pairs can be a powerful method in the exploration of the relative influence of between-families and within-families factors in the FE. Surprising connections between the birth order effect on intelligence and the FE are demonstrated.

  4. The Scholarly Communication Process within the University Research Corridor (Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University): A Case Study in Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Timothy; Holley, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The growth of open access publishing, the development of institutional repositories, and the availability of millions of digitized monographs and journals are rapidly changing scholarly communication. This case study looks at the current and possible uses of these tools by Michigan's three largest universities: Michigan State University, the…

  5. [Creativity and Character Traits of University Students: Transversal Association Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Hernando; Sánchez, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out to assess the relationship between character traits and creativity in a sample of students from a public university in Bogotá. A random sample of 157 students from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. The two instruments used for measuring character traits and creativity were the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) and the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA). Additional information about gender, psychopathological antecedents, current academic period and academic average have been recorded. Robust regression methods have been used to analyze the relationship between creativity and character traits. Creativity and narcissistic traits were associated. In a multivariate model, other variables showing a relationship with creativity were found, i.e., male gender, mental illness family antecedents, number of academic periods completed, and a high academic average. Relationship between creativity and narcissistic traits had not been reported in previous. Longitudinal studies using more accurate scales should be undertaken to determine the validity of these findings. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Family Medicine Education and Exams at Cathedras of Family Medicine of Universities in Southeastern Europe - "Splitska inicijativa", Sarajevo, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Mujanovic, Olivera Batic; Racic, Maja; Gavran, Larisa; Stanetic, Kosana; Hodzic, Merzika; Cojic, Milena; Cvejanov-Kezunovic, Ljiljana; Stepanovic, Aleksandar; Stavrikj, Katarina; Jatic, Zaim; Obrdalj, Edita Cerny; Zalihic, Amra; Tusek-Bunc, Ksenija

    2017-03-01

    the ability of students and physicians to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. This terminology essentially means not only the purchase of the computer and related equipment, but also the technological foresight and technological progress, which are defined as specific combination of fundamental scientific, research and development work that gives a concrete result. The quality of the teaching-learning process at the universities in former Yugoslav countries and abroad, depends mainly of infrastructure that includes an optimal teaching space, personnel and equipment, in accordance with existing standards and norms at the cantonal or entity level, which are required to implement adequately the educational curriculum for students from first to sixth year by Bologna studying concept. For all of this it is necessary to ensure adequate funding. Technologies (medical and information, including communications) have a special role and value in ensuring the quality of medical education at universities and their organizational units (faculties). "Splitska inicijativa" project, which started 6 years ago as simple intention to exchange experiences of application new model of education, based on: Bologna studying concept, and other types of under and postgraduate education, was good idea to improve also theory and practice of it within Family medicine as academic and scientific discipline. This year scope of our scientific meeting held in Sarajevo on 24th and 25th March 2017, was quality assessment of theoretical and practical education and, also, evaluation of knowledge by students exams (a-y).

  7. Jamaican families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival.

  8. THE CARE OF NURSING TO THE FAMILY: A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klever Souza Silva

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the scientific article about the care of nursing to the family,published in periodic of Brazilian nursing, index-linked article survey to the LILACS, in the period of 1993 the 2003,and to analyze them how much to the concept and composition of the families, systematization and proposals ofaction of nursing and formation and qualification of the authors. In the results we find in 10 years (1993-2003, 9publications concerning nursing in family. Where we can find the predominance of works that focus thesystematization and proposals of action, evidencing of a general form, a lack of studies in the area of nursing infamily, where the Program of Health of the Family appears as principal source of promotion of care of nursing tothe family and motivation for studies that approach this thematic one. All research had had as authorship nursesdoctors, masters and specialists, which acted as professors.

  9. Family Background and Students' Achievement on a University Entrance Exam in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Juliana; Sampaio, Breno

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of students' performance on the entrance test at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the importance of family background variables, such as parents' education and family income, on students' performance and how they relate to the probability of attending public schools…

  10. Usefulness of patient studies in learning family medicine at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Master's in Family Medicine (M Fam Med) is a postgraduate training programme in family medicine at Medunsa. M Fam Med students have to write patient studies as part of requirements to complete their degree. This research was undertaken to develop a deeper understanding of their perceptions about ...

  11. Children's Family Drawings: A Study of Attachment, Personality, and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, Limor; Scharf, Miri

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between children's attachment security, as manifested in their family drawings, and their personality and adjustment. Family drawings were collected from 222 Israeli children, as well as data regarding their personality and adjustment. Each drawing was coded and classified into 1 of 4 attachment categories…

  12. Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family: a case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exons of the COL4A5 gene in a total of 18 family members. ... During the study of family history we found that the patient's sister also have ... on 3730XL Genetic Analyzer, Applied Biosystems, Foster. City, USA. ... cedures were followed in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experi-.

  13. The readiness and motivation interview for families (RMI-Family) managing pediatric obesity: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Geoff D C; Spence, Nicholas D; Browne, Nadia E; O'Connor, Kathleen; Srikameswaran, Suja; Zelichowska, Joanna; Ho, Josephine; Gokiert, Rebecca; Mâsse, Louise C; Carson, Valerie; Morrison, Katherine M; Kuk, Jennifer L; Holt, Nicholas L; Kebbe, Maryam; Gehring, Nicole D; Cesar, Melody; Virtanen, Heidi; Geller, Josie

    2017-04-11

    Experts recommend that clinicians assess motivational factors before initiating care for pediatric obesity. Currently, there are no well-established clinical tools available for assessing motivation in youth with obesity or their families. This represents an important gap in knowledge since motivation-related information may shed light on which patients might fail to complete treatment programs. Our study was designed to evaluate the measurement properties and utility of the Readiness and Motivational Interview for Families (RMI-Family), a structured interview that utilizes a motivational interviewing approach to (i) assess motivational factors in youth and their parents, and (ii) examine the degree to which motivation and motivation-related concordance between youth and parents are related to making changes to lifestyle habits for managing obesity in youth. From 2016 to 2020, this prospective study will include youth with obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥97th percentile; 13-17 years old; n = 250) and their parents (n = 250). The study will be conducted at two primary-level, multidisciplinary obesity management clinics based at children's hospitals in Alberta, Canada. Participants will be recruited and enrolled after referral to these clinics, but prior to initiating clinical care. Each youth and their parent will complete the RMI-Family (~1.5 h) at baseline, and 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Individual (i.e., youth or parent) and family-level (i.e., across youth and parent) responses to interview questions will be scored, as will aspects of interview administration (e.g., fidelity to motivational interviewing tenets). The RMI-Family will also be examined for test-retest reliability. Youth data collected at each time point will include demography, anthropometry, lifestyle habits, psychosocial functioning, and health services utilization. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between individual and family-level interview scores on the RMI-Family

  14. The Relationship between Organizational Support, Work-Family Conflict, and the Job-Life Satisfaction of University Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Marlene A.; Sagas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between organizational support, work-family conflict, and job and life satisfaction among coaches. Data from collegiate head coaches with families (N = 253) were gathered through a mailed questionnaire. Results from a series of covariance structure models indicated that a partially mediated model was the best…

  15. Family needs after brain injury: A cross cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norup, Anne; Perrin, Paul B; Cuberos-Urbano, Gustavo; Anke, Audny; Andelic, Nada; Doyle, Sarah T; Cristina Quijano, Maria; Caracuel, Alfonso; Mar, Dulce; Guadalupe Espinosa Jove, Irma; Carlos Arango-Lasprilla, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore differences by country in the importance of family needs after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as well as differences in met/unmet needs. Two hundred and seventy-one family members of an individual with TBI in Mexico, Colombia, Spain, Denmark, and Norway completed the Family Needs Questionnaire. Eight of the ten needs rated as most important globally were from the Health Information subscale. Importance ratings on the Health Information, Professional Support, and Involvement With Care subscales were similar across countries, but Mexican family members rated Instrumental Support needs as less important than Colombian, Spanish, and Danish family members, and also rated their Community Support needs as less important than Danish and Spanish family members. Mexican family member's rated emotional support needs as less important than Colombian, Spanish, and Danish family members. Globally, the needs rated as most often met were from the Health Information subscale, and the most unmet needs were from the Emotional Support subscale. Despite some similarities across countries several differences were identified, and these can help professionals to provide more culturally appropriate rehabilitation services for family members in order to improve informal care for TBI.

  16. Micro sociological study of family relationships: heuristic potential theoretical principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Zolotnyik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to demonstrate the heuristic potential of theoretical principles by microsoсiological analysis of one of the indicators of familyfamily relations. Theoretical analysis of the interaction experience is quite large, but there is the question about it’s possibility to describe the specifics of that relationship that arise in family interaction. The study of family relationships requires an integrated approach to the comprehension of many related components: system of spouses value orientations, family life cycle, socio­economic living conditions of couple. However, the accentuation exactly on action­behavioral aspect allows to make assumptions about correlations between: success of family interaction and microclimate in the family; satisfaction level of interpersonal interaction and overall satisfaction with marriage, familiarity of family interaction and density of childbearing, and so on. The presentation of microsoсiological theoretical achievements will be carried out of sociological schools, orientations and their members that are the most popular references in this area. this paper will presents the theory of exchange, supporters of symbolic interactionism, dramatic and etnometodological approach and family systems theory.

  17. Construction of Agricultural University Students’ Entrepreneurship Incubation Base – Taking Sichuan Agricultural University as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Yao; Jianping Xie; Linchun He

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, as an effective practice in university students’ entrepreneurship education, construction of university students’ entrepreneurship incubation base has been rapidly developed in different universities. This paper takes construction of the entrepreneurship incubation base in Sichuan Agricultural University as a case study, analyzes the current status of university students’ entrepreneurship incubation base and makes a discussion on establishment of management institution, f...

  18. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has long been known as a common complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors. The pathophysiology and the specific genetic susceptibility are poorly understood. Common variants only explain a small part of the heritability of migraine. It is thought that rare genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families. A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising application of a family approach to migraine. PubMed was searched to find studies that looked for rare genetic variants in common complex diseases through a family-based design using NGS, excluding studies looking for de-novo mutations, or using a candidate-gene approach and studies on cancer. All issues from Nature Genetics and PLOS genetics 2014, 2015 and 2016 (UTAI June) were screened for relevant papers. Reference lists from included and other relevant papers were also searched. For the description of the family-based study design using NGS an in-house protocol was used. Thirty-two successful studies, which covered 16 different common complex diseases, were included in this paper. We also found a single migraine study. Twenty-three studies found one or a few family specific

  19. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  20. From the family universe to the outside world: family relations, school attitude, and perception of racism in Caribbean and Filipino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Cécile; Hassan, Ghayda; Measham, Toby; Moreau, Nicolas; Lashley, Myrna; Castro, Thelma; Blake, Caminee; McKenzie, Georges

    2009-09-01

    Caribbean and Filipino immigrant families in Canada have much in common: the women have often immigrated as domestic workers, first-generation children may be separated from their parents for long periods, and they must deal with negative stereotypes of their ethnic group. This transcultural study looks at the associations between family relations and adolescents' perceptions of both their own group and the host society, and analyzes how these affect their mental health. The results suggest that family cohesion plays a key role in shaping adolescents' perceptions of racism in the host country and in promoting a positive appraisal of their own community, thus highlighting the need for a systemic understanding of family and intergroup relations.

  1. The roles of men in family planning - a study of married men at the UKM primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jes; Tong, S F

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, family planning initiatives were concentrated on women despite it being a family matter. As family dynamics evolved over the years, fathers' involvement in family planning has become crucial in enhancing the family well-being. This study aimed to identify the role played by men in family planning activities and the association of socio-economic characteristics with these roles. This was a cross-sectional study carried out in a university primary care clinic. All married male attendees to the clinic, aged 50 years and below, were approached to answer a set of self-administered questionnaires, asking for their involvement in family planning practices. The data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. There were 167 participants in the study. A high proportion of men participated in the discussions regarding previous pregnancies (60.42%), future child planning (89.76%) and desired family size (89.76%). However, the discussions on the usage of family planning methods (FPMs; 39.16%) were significantly low. Socio-economic factors associated with higher likelihood of men discussing family planning activities were older age ( p family planning activities. The roles taken by men in family planning were associated with older age and higher socio-economic class. The majority of men needs to be encouraged to play a more active role in the discussion of FPMs.

  2. Measuring University Students' Approaches to Learning Statistics: An Invariance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesi, Francesca; Primi, Caterina; Bilgin, Ayse Aysin; Lopez, Maria Virginia; del Carmen Fabrizio, Maria; Gozlu, Sitki; Tuan, Nguyen Minh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to provide evidence that an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) was invariant across different languages and educational contexts in measuring university students' learning approaches to statistics. Data were collected on samples of university students attending…

  3. A Study of Digital Communications between Universities and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Perry D.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the digital and social media communication practices of nine urban universities including UMSL and compared those to known corporate best practices. The purpose of this study was to (1) research how these universities are using social/digital communications to engage with students and prospective students; (2) compare the…

  4. Hereditary association between testicular cancer and familial ovarian cancer: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, John Lewis; Eng, Kevin; Cannioto, Rikki; Kaur, Jasmine; Almohanna, Hani; Alqassim, Emad; Szender, J Brian; Joseph, Janine M; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2018-04-01

    Although family history of testicular cancer is well-established as a risk factor for testicular cancer, it is unknown whether family history of ovarian cancer is associated with risk of testicular cancer. Using data from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry on 2636 families with multiple cases of ovarian cancer, we systematically compared relative frequencies of ovarian cancer among relatives of men with testicular and non-testicular cancers. Thirty-one families with cases of both ovarian and testicular cancer were identified. We observed that, among men with cancer, those with testicular cancer were more likely to have a mother with ovarian cancer than those with non-testicular cancers (OR = 3.32, p = 0.004). Zero paternal grandmothers of men with testicular cancer had ovarian cancer. These observations provide compelling preliminary evidence for a familial association between ovarian and testicular cancers Future studies should be designed to further investigate this association and evaluate X-linkage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Entering University Studies: Identifying Enabling Factors for a Successful Transition from School to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie, Venicia

    2017-01-01

    The South African higher education sector is faced with high attrition and low retention rates. Studies conducted by the Council on Higher Education in South Africa have found that 50% of black students who access university study drop out, and the majority of dropouts occurred in the first year of study. While these studies revealed what the…

  6. Engaging families in physical activity research: a family-based focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen Elizabeth; Schiff, Annie; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2015-11-25

    Family-based interventions present a much-needed opportunity to increase children's physical activity levels. However, little is known about how best to engage parents and their children in physical activity research. This study aimed to engage with the whole family to understand how best to recruit for, and retain participation in, physical activity research. Families (including a 'target' child aged between 8 and 11 years, their parents, siblings, and others) were recruited through schools and community groups. Focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured approach (informed by a pilot session). Families were asked to order cards listing the possible benefits of, and the barriers to, being involved in physical activity research and other health promotion activities, highlighting the items they consider most relevant, and suggesting additional items. Duplicate content analysis was used to identify transcript themes and develop a coding frame. Eighty-two participants from 17 families participated, including 17 'target' children (mean age 9.3 ± 1.1 years, 61.1% female), 32 other children and 33 adults (including parents, grandparents, and older siblings). Social, health and educational benefits were cited as being key incentives for involvement in physical activity research, with emphasis on children experiencing new things, developing character, and increasing social contact (particularly for shy children). Children's enjoyment was also given priority. The provision of child care or financial reward was not considered sufficiently appealing. Increased time commitment or scheduling difficulties were quoted as the most pertinent barriers to involvement (especially for families with several children), but parents commented these could be overcome if the potential value for children was clear. Lessons learned from this work may contribute to the development of effective recruitment and retention strategies for children and their families. Making the wide

  7. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  8. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  9. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  10. Students' Experience of University Space: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen a wave of new building across British universities, so that it would appear that despite the virtualization discourses around higher education, space still matters in learning. Yet studies of student experience of the physical space of the university are rather lacking. This paper explores the response of one group of…

  11. Educational Technology Adopters: A Case Study in University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintoe, Seitebaleng Susan

    2018-01-01

    Although University of Botswana implemented national ICT policies and trained the lecturers to use educational technology, there was low-level use of eLearning in teaching and learning. In this regard, qualitative case study approach was used to explore and specifically focus on one aspect of the phenomenon; that is, the University of Botswana as…

  12. The Multidimensional Structure of University Absenteeism: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bonilla, Jesús Manuel; López-Bonilla, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Absenteeism has been a common and very extended problem in university spheres for several years. This problem has become a permanent feature in academic studies in general, yet it has received scarce empirical research attention. This work is focused on the analysis of the factors that determine university absenteeism. It evaluates a series of…

  13. A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for Ethiopia, Uganda, and Zambia. As national health systems in developing countries make progress toward achieving universal health service coverage, many face ethical challenges. In its 2010 World Health Report, the World Health Assembly called on the ...

  14. Exploring Universal Partnerships and Putative Marriages as Tools for Awarding Partnership Property in Contemporary Family Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsje Bonthuys

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following upon the Supreme Court of Appeal's judgment in Butters v Mncora 2012 4 SA 1 (SCA, which broadened the criteria and consequences of universal partnerships in cohabitation relationships, this article investigates the potential of universal partnerships and putative marriages to allocate rights to share in partnership property in other intimate relationships. It traverses several instances in which marriages are not recognised - bigamous marriages, Muslim and Hindu religious marriages and invalid customary marriages – examining whether the wives in these marriages could use universal partnerships and putative marriages to claim a share in property. It then considers the use of universal partnerships to obtain a share of property in civil marriages out of community of property. It concludes by pointing out several issues which are in need of clarification and where the common law should be developed to give effect to fundamental constitutional rights.

  15. Familial aggregation of VO(2max) response to exercise training: results from the HERITAGE Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, C; An, P; Rice, T; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Gagnon, J; Pérusse, L; Leon, A S; Rao, D C

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that individual differences in the response of maximal O(2) uptake (VO(2max)) to a standardized training program are characterized by familial aggregation. A total of 481 sedentary adult Caucasians from 98 two-generation families was exercise trained for 20 wk and was tested for VO(2max) on a cycle ergometer twice before and twice after the training program. The mean increase in VO(2max) reached approximately 400 ml/min, but there was considerable heterogeneity in responsiveness, with some individuals experiencing little or no gain, whereas others gained >1.0 l/min. An ANOVA revealed that there was 2.5 times more variance between families than within families in the VO(2max) response variance. With the use of a model-fitting procedure, the most parsimonious models yielded a maximal heritability estimate of 47% for the VO(2max) response, which was adjusted for age and sex with a maternal transmission of 28% in one of the models. We conclude that the trainability of VO(2max) is highly familial and includes a significant genetic component.

  16. The Impact on Family Functioning of Social Media Use by Depressed Adolescents: A Qualitative Analysis of the Family Options Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Andrew J.; Knight, Tess; Germanov, Galit; Benstead, Michelle Lisa; Joseph, Claire Ingrid; Poole, Lucinda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adolescent depression is a prevalent mental health problem, which can have a major impact on family cohesion. In such circumstances, excessive use of the Internet by adolescents may exacerbate family conflict and lack of cohesion. The current study aims to explore these patterns within an intervention study for depressed adolescents.Method: The current study draws upon data collected within the Family Options randomized controlled trial that examined family-based interventions for...

  17. A study on hypophosphatemic vitamin D resistant rickets in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Doo Young; Byon, Joo Nam; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin [Won Kwang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    Hypophosphatemic vitamin D resistant rickets is a form of rickets characterized by typical structural deformities and roentgenographic and metabolic changes. It has a strong familiar tendency and appear to genetically transmitted. Authors experienced 7 patients with hypophoshatemic vitamin D resistant rickets which have been manifested through three generation in a family at Won Kwang University Hospital from December 1982 to May 1984. Authors studied hypophoshatemic vitamin D resistant rickets clinically, radiologically, biochemically and pathologically, and reported with review of literatures.

  18. Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, F.J.; Skinner, T.C.; Beaufort, C.E. de

    2008-01-01

    -parent disagreement on responsibility for diabetes care practices (F = 8.46; d.f. = 2; P gender or insulin treatment regimen......Aims To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries. Methods Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate...... a questionnaire. Family demographic factors that were associated with metabolic outcomes included: parents living together (t = 4.1; P 2; d.f. = 3; P diabetes care (r = 0.11; P

  19. Exploring Familial Relationship Growth and Negotiation: A Case Study of Outward Bound Family Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Jillisa R.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of father-child relationship development within the context of an Outward Bound (OB) family course, an environment that may both disrupt the ordinary aspects of an established relationship, and provide activities to purposefully encourage relationship development through a variety of aspects inherent to the…

  20. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandegee Group

    1999-01-01

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997

  1. Communication Coaching: A Case Study of Family Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Koczywas, Marianna; Ferraro, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Problematic communication among providers, patients, and their family members can affect the quality of patient care, causing stress to all parties involved and decreased opportunities for collaborative decision making.
. The purpose of this article is to present one case from a pilot study of a family caregiver intervention focused on communication. 
. The nurse-delivered communication intervention includes a written communication guide for family caregivers, as well as a one-time nurse communication coaching call. The call is aimed at identifying caregiver communication concerns, providing communication education, and role playing problematic communication.
. Psychological distress and caregiver confidence in communication were improved for the caregiver. Data presented from the case study demonstrate the need for family caregiver communication support and training and the potential benefits of such training.

  2. A Study on the Measurement of Job-Related Stress among Women Academics in Research Universities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili

    2010-01-01

    This study intends to gain an understanding of the sources of stress among women academics in research universities of China. Studies have shown that, compared with their male counterparts, women report higher level of stress in work/family conflicts, gender barriers and career development. Based on the results of this study, the following…

  3. A comprehensive analysis of hadronic b → s transitions in a family non-universal Z′ model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Qin; Li, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Ya-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the latest improved measurements of B-meson decays, we make a comprehensive analysis of the impact of a family non-universal Z ′ boson on B s − B-bar s mixing and two-body hadronic B-meson decays, all being characterized by the quark-level b→s transition. Explicitly 22 decay modes and the related 52 observables are considered, and some interesting correlations between them are also carefully examined. Firstly, the allowed oases of b−s−Z ′ coupling parameters |B sb L,R | and ϕ s L,R are extracted from B s − B-bar s mixing. Then, in the ‘SM limit’ (i.e., no new types of Z ′ -induced four-quark operators arise compared to the SM case), we study the Z ′ effects on B→πK, πK ∗ and ρK decays. It is found that a new weak phase ϕ s L ∼−90 ∘ is crucial for resolving the observed ‘πK CP puzzle’ and the allowed cases of the other Z ′ coupling parameters are also strongly restricted. Moreover, the Z ′ effects on B-bar s →KK, KK ∗ and π 0 ϕ decays, being induced by the same quark-level b→sq q-bar (q=u,d) transitions, are also investigated. In particular, it is found that the decay B-bar s →π 0 ϕ, once measured, would play a key role in revealing the observed ‘πK CP puzzle’ and probing possible new physics hints. Finally, to check the non-universality of Z ′ couplings to light-quark pairs, we have studied the B→ϕK decays in detail and found that the left-handed s−s−Z ′ coupling is different from the d−d−Z ′ one, which is due to the large A CP dir (B − →ϕK − ) reported by the BaBar Collaboration. (paper)

  4. A Comparative Study on the Meaning in Life of Patients with Cancer and Their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Soheili, Amin; Hosseinpour, Issa; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Nahamin, Mina

    2017-12-01

    Introduction: The overwhelming effects of cancer could be catastrophic for the patients and their family members, putting them at risk of experiencing uncertainty, loss, and an interruption in life. Also, it can influence their sense of meaning, a fundamental need equated with the purpose in life. Accordingly, this study aimed to compare the meaning in life (MiL) of patients with cancer and their family members. Methods: This descriptive comparative study was conducted on 400 patients with cancer and their family members admitted to university hospitals in Tabriz and Ardebil provinces, Iran. The participants were sampled conveniently and the Life Evaluation Questionnaire (LEQ) were used for collecting data analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS ver. 13 Software. Results: The mean score for the MiL of the patients with cancer and their family members was 119 (16.92) and 146.2 (17.07), respectively. There was a significant difference between patients with cancer and their family members in terms of MiL. Conclusion: The MiL of patients with cancer is lower than that of their family members, which indicates the need for further attention to the psychological processes and their modification in Iranian healthcare systems.

  5. The Primacy of Discourse in the Study of Gender in Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Olga; LaMarre, Andrea; Rice, Carla

    2017-09-01

    Family therapists and scholars increasingly adopt poststructural and postmodern conceptions of social reality, challenging the notion of stable, universal dynamics within family members and families and favoring a view of reality as produced through social interaction. In the study of gender and diversity, many envision differences as social constructed rather than as "residing" in people or groups. There is a growing interest in discourse or people's everyday use of language and how it may reflect and advance interests of dominant groups in a society. Despite this shift from structures to discourse, therapists struggle to locate the dynamics of power in concrete actions and interactions. By leaving undisturbed the social processes through which gendered and other subjectivities and relations of power are produced, therapists may inadvertently become complicit in the very dynamics of power they seek to undermine. In this article, we argue that discourse analysis can help family therapy scholars and practitioners clarify the link between language and power. We present published examples of discourse analytic studies of gender and sexism and examine the relevance of these ideas for family therapy practice and research. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  6. CMC and Japanese University Students Studying English

    OpenAIRE

    Claro, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication (CMC) is becoming common in foreign language classes worldwide. In many countries, Japan included, students study English for years, rarely have the chance to use it. CMC has proven to be a viable and possibly even preferable alternative to face-to-face communication, providing an ideal environment in which English can be used in communicative situations. In addition to begin an environment where using learning, and modifying English takes place. CMC offers man...

  7. Trace element studies at University of Pittsburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.; Chan, K.C.; Shabason, L.; Wedberg, G.; Rudolph, H.

    1974-01-01

    Seven areas of research are discussed. A method was developed for analyzing samples for their major constituent elements by irradiating with protons and detecting prompt gamma rays, mostly produced in (p,p'γ) reactions. Among other applications, the method was used to analyze air particulates for C, N, O, Al, Si, S, Co, and Fe. Trace element analysis by proton or alpha particle induced x-ray fluorescence was used on thin samples in a study of the variations of Pb, Br, Fe, and Zn in air particulates as a function of time. Among other applications this method was also used in studying trace elements in rainwater. An x-ray fluorescence method that is effective in the analysis of thick samples was developed. A method based on measuring energies of elastically scattered protons was developed for the analysis of light elements. The use of proton and neutron activation analyses, as well as methods for studying depth profiles for hydrogen and helium in materials are discussed

  8. Flora of subfamily Prunoideae of family Rosaceae in botanical garden of Dnipropetrovsk university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Opanasenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The present state of genofond of the 24 taxa collection of subfamily Prunoideae Focke (family Rosaceae Juss in DNU botanical garden has been analysed. Valuable genotypes for practical use in the development of landscape, farm horticulture and further selection were marked out. The ways of further exploit was planned.

  9. Predicting Role Conflict, Overload and Contagion in Adult Women University Students with Families and Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Data from 443 women combining work, family, and schooling showed that lower income increased their vulnerability to role conflict. Perceived intensity of student demands was the strongest predictor of role conflict, overload, and contagion (preoccupation with one role while performing another). Conflict and overload were eased somewhat by distance…

  10. Adapting services to the needs of children and families with complex migration experiences: The Toulouse University Hospital's intercultural consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Gesine; Guerraoui, Zohra; Bonnet, Sylvie; Gouzvinski, Françoise; Raynaud, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-01

    This article presents the recently created intercultural consultation at the Medical and Psychological Health Care Service (CMP) of the University Hospital la Grave at Toulouse. The approach of the intercultural consultation was elaborated in response to the increasing diversity of children and families using the service in Toulouse. It is also based on local research that indicates the difficulties service providers encounter when trying to establish a solid therapeutic alliance with families with complex migration backgrounds who accumulate different disadvantaging factors. The intercultural consultation adapts existing models of culture-sensitive consultations in child mental health care in France and Canada to the local context in Toulouse. We describe the underlying principles of the intercultural consultation work, the therapeutic and mediation techniques used, and the way the work is integrated into the global service provision of the CMP. The process is illustrated with a case study followed by a discussion of the innovations.

  11. Psychologicai study on independence consciousness of chinese female university students : Applying Cinderella Complex Scales and of Women's Social Roles

    OpenAIRE

    鄭, 艶花; Zheng, Yanhua

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and clarify the independence consciousness of female university students of China applying psychological research methods. In the course of the study a questionnaire research was conducted on eighty three Chinese female university students with regard to the scales of Cinderella complex and the social role attitudes. Firstly the results indicate positive correlations between the independent variable of "defend-family-traditionalism factor" with three fa...

  12. RATAN - 600 studies the large Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parijskij, Yu.N.

    1981-01-01

    The results of investigations in the range of outergalactic radioastronomy obtained using the RATAN-600 radiotelescope in 1980, are presented. The main attention is paid to the studies of radiogalaxies and, particularly, revealing the frequency dependence of radioimages. The nature of activity of radiogalactic nuclei is specified. The experimental data available prove that the nucleus of our Galaxy consists of ordinary stars and does not have massive black hole. The most profound review of the sky is carried out for the first time in the history of radioastronomy. About 3000 radiosourses were registered within the experiment. Sources with the radiation flux density about 1 mJy are registered reliably. In the range of weak fluxes (up to 1mJy), the growth of the number of sources practically ceases with the decrease in the density of the radiation flux [ru

  13. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This quarterly report outlines the progress made by the Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University in the development of specialized educational programs for the nuclear industry through the month of February, 1976

  14. [Familial retinoblastoma: cytogenetic study of the tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo Batanero, M; Manzanal Martínez, A; Ayuso García, C; Benítez Ortiz, J

    1990-05-01

    We report a case of familiar retinoblastoma, in which both mother and daughter show bilateral retinoblastoma. The cytogenetic study, in both peripheral blood lymphocytes and tumoral tissue did not show alterations on the 13 chromosome, although we found a complex kariotype in tumoral tissue defined by three celular lines. In all of them appears a marker in which the 6 chromosome is involved (der 6). The derivated of 6 chromosome are markers highly characteristic of the retinoblastoma cases, and can be related with the aggressivity of tumor and the appearance of the second tumors.

  15. Cosmic Topology: Studying The Shape And Size Of Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzaguirre, Amelia; Hajian, A.

    2010-01-01

    The question of the size and the shape of our universe is a very old problem that has received considerable attention over the past few years. The simplest cosmological model predicts that the mean density of the universe is very close to the critical density, admitting a local geometry of the universe that is flat. Current results from different cosmological observations confirm this to the percent level accuracy. General Relativity (being a local theory) only determines local geometry, which allows for the possibility of a multiply connected universe with a zero (or small) curvature. To study the global shape, or topology, of the universe, one can use cosmological observations on large scales. In this project we investigate the possibility of a ``small universe'', that is, a compact finite space, by searching for planar symmetries in the CMB anisotropy maps provided by the five-year WMAP observations in two foreground cleaned maps (WMAP ILC map and the Tegmark, et al. (TOH) map ). Our results strongly suggest that the small universe model is not a viable topology for the universe.

  16. DATA MINING IN HIGHER EDUCATION : UNIVERSITY STUDENT DROPOUT CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadeer S. Abu-Oda; Alaa M. El-Halees

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we apply different data mining approaches for the purpose of examining and predicting students’ dropouts through their university programs. For the subject of the study we select a total of 1290 records of computer science students Graduated from ALAQSA University between 2005 and 2011. The collected data included student study history and transcript for courses taught in the first two years of computer science major in addition to student GPA , high school average ...

  17. ICT and the Project Studies at Roskilde University, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Ou, Tie

    2004-01-01

    needs for qualification and reform. With distinctive philosophy and approach in education, studies at Roskilde University are organized as project work characterized by problem orientation, participant direction, exemplarity, interdisciplinarity and collaborative learning. The paper addresses how...... the increasing application of ICT is changing the educational environments at Roskilde University and, consequently, facilitating and challenging the project studies. The discussion is mainly based on an empirical research in which we observed a group of students and participated in their project work. The data...

  18. Korean University Students' Attitudes and Motivation towards Studying English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify the attitudes of Korean university students towards studying English and to determine if attending after-school English academies has had a negative impact on their attitudes towards studying English. The study also sought to determine if studying English leads to anxiety, and more importantly if…

  19. Segregation analysis of abdominal visceral fat: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, T; Després, J P; Pérusse, L; Gagnon, J; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Rao, D C; Bouchard, C

    1997-09-01

    A major gene hypothesis for abdominal visceral fat (AVF) level, both before and after adjustment for total body fat mass, was investigated in 86 white families who participated in the HERITAGE Family Study. In this study, sedentary families were tested for a battery of measures (baseline), endurance exercise trained for 20 weeks, and then remeasured again. The baseline measures reported here are unique in that the variance due to a potentially important environmental factor (activity level) was limited. AVF area was assessed at L4 to L5 by the use of computerized tomography scan, and total body fat mass was assessed with underwater weighing. For fat mass, a putative locus accounted for 64% of the variance, but there was no evidence of a multifactorial component (i.e., no polygenic and/or common familial environmental effects). For AVF area, both a major gene effect accounting for 54% of the variance and a multifactorial component accounting for 17% of the variance were significant. However, after AVF area was adjusted for the effects of total level of body fat, the support for a major gene was reduced. In particular, there was a major effect for fat mass-adjusted AVF area, but it was not transmitted from parents to offspring (i.e., the three transmission probabilities were equal). The importance of this study is twofold. First, these results confirm a previous study that suggested that there is a putative major locus for AVF and for total body fat mass. Second, the findings from the HERITAGE Family Study suggest that the factors underlying AVF area in sedentary families may be similar to those in the population at large, which includes both sedentary and active families. Whether the gene(s) responsible for the high levels of AVF area is the same as that which influences total body fat content remains to be further investigated.

  20. Continuity or Change? Gender, Family, and Academic Work for Junior Faculty in Ontario Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra; Webber, Michelle; Smyth, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 40 or so years, women's share of faculty positions in Canada and elsewhere has increased considerably, if not yet reaching parity. Yet working in the gendered university remains problematic. This article uses data from a qualitative research project in which 38 junior academics were interviewed about their responses to being on the…

  1. University and College Counselors as Athletic Team Consultants: Using a Structural Family Therapy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcover, Jason A.; Mettrick, Jennifer; Parcover, Cynthia A. D.; Griffin-Smith, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, university and college counselors are sought out by their institution's sports coaches for assistance in achieving team goals. Traditional sport psychology models that have the individual athlete as their primary focus are insufficient frameworks for team-level consultations. The authors believe that systemic approaches may provide…

  2. INFORMATION SYSTEM DESIGN OF PERFORMANCE ACHIEVEMENTS MONITORING IN THE UNIVERSITY: A CASE STUDY IN BINUS UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Irawati Ibrahim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dashboard is a computer interface that displays a variety of charts, graphs, tables, which are selected reports from various data that are considered important to display rapidly, with an attractive appearance, dynamic, and relevant so that it can immediately be seen quickly to analyze a condition. Dashboard information system is widely used in various companies as a support system for decision-making where Dashboard usually displays data business trends of the company or the achievement of KPI (Key Performance Indicator of a company. The method used is descriptive analysis by means of collecting information that areimportant for universities to be considered asthe Key Success Factors (KSF of the university, and then, the design of the dashboard is made in accordance with these important factors.The result of this study is a grand design of information systems for the university performance monitoring, starting from the reception of students, faculty performance, student academic achievement, effectiveness and efficiency of services, including graduates. It is expected that by the time the system has been fully implemented, the university can take action quickly and accurately with respect to the required conditions.Keywords: Information System Dashboard; Dashboard; Academic Dashboard; University Dashboard

  3. A universe of dwarfs and giants: genome size and chromosome evolution in the monocot family Melanthiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Jaume; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Fay, Michael F

    2014-03-01

    • Since the occurrence of giant genomes in angiosperms is restricted to just a few lineages, identifying where shifts towards genome obesity have occurred is essential for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms triggering this process. • Genome sizes were assessed using flow cytometry in 79 species and new chromosome numbers were obtained. Phylogenetically based statistical methods were applied to infer ancestral character reconstructions of chromosome numbers and nuclear DNA contents. • Melanthiaceae are the most diverse family in terms of genome size, with C-values ranging more than 230-fold. Our data confirmed that giant genomes are restricted to tribe Parideae, with most extant species in the family characterized by small genomes. Ancestral genome size reconstruction revealed that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for the family had a relatively small genome (1C = 5.37 pg). Chromosome losses and polyploidy are recovered as the main evolutionary mechanisms generating chromosome number change. • Genome evolution in Melanthiaceae has been characterized by a trend towards genome size reduction, with just one episode of dramatic DNA accumulation in Parideae. Such extreme contrasting profiles of genome size evolution illustrate the key role of transposable elements and chromosome rearrangements in driving the evolution of plant genomes. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Family science: An ethnographic case study of the ordinary science and literacy experiences of one family

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Glenda M.

    Despite the copious research available on science learning, little is known about ways in which the public engages in free-choice science learning and even fewer studies have focused on how families engage in science to learn about the world around them. The same was true about studies of literacy development in the home until the 1980s when researchers (e.g. Bissex, 1980; Heath, 1983; Taylor, 1983) began documenting the literacy happenings and practices of young children in natural settings. Findings from intensive emergent literacy research studies have challenged traditional approaches to the teaching and learning of literacy, especially drawing attention to the active role children take in their own learning. Drawing upon those early literacy studies, this research project uses ethnographic case study methods along with a naturalistic inquiry approach, to document the daily explorations of one science-oriented family. Over a three year span, I have followed my own family, in our natural setting, through our day-to-day experiences with science and literacy as we seek to mediate and understand the world around us. In doing so, I have explored the ways we have shared knowledge and constructed learning through science books and read alouds, self-initiated inquiry learning, and communication. Throughout the three year research period, I have collected data and documented my own young children's understanding of the nature of science by observing their engagement with world around them.

  5. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAHID ZARIF SANAIEY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician’s idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians’ educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique. Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts’ opinion and Cronbach’s alpha of 80%. The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ, t-test, ANOVAs. A significance level of 0.05. The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%. In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. Conclusions: The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational needs.

  6. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men’s lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men’s health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20–30 years from three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese and Indian). Thematic analysis approach was used to extract data. NVIVO v8 qualitative software was used for data management. Results From the data collected several concepts emerged that reflected the meanings of masculinity from the participants’ view points. These meanings were associated with a combination of traditional and non-traditional norms that generally benefit men who behave according to culturally dominant role expectations. These included: “Having a good body shape”, “being respected”, “having success with women”, “being a family man”, and “having financial independence”. Socio-cultural factors, such as family environment, religion, public media and popular life style patterns helped to shape and reinforce the meanings of masculinities among university men. Conclusions This study revealed that the university context provided a particular culture for construction and reinforcement of the meanings of masculinities, which should be considered by the educators to help in development of healthy masculinities. PMID:24215138

  7. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli Khalaf, Zahra; Low, Wah Yun; Ghorbani, Behzad; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2013-11-11

    Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men's lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men's health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20-30 years from three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese and Indian). Thematic analysis approach was used to extract data. NVIVO v8 qualitative software was used for data management. From the data collected several concepts emerged that reflected the meanings of masculinity from the participants' view points. These meanings were associated with a combination of traditional and non-traditional norms that generally benefit men who behave according to culturally dominant role expectations. These included: "Having a good body shape", "being respected", "having success with women", "being a family man", and "having financial independence". Socio-cultural factors, such as family environment, religion, public media and popular life style patterns helped to shape and reinforce the meanings of masculinities among university men. This study revealed that the university context provided a particular culture for construction and reinforcement of the meanings of masculinities, which should be considered by the educators to help in development of healthy masculinities.

  8. The Effect of Family Background, University Quality and Educational Mismatch on Wage: An Analysis Using a Young Cohort of Italian Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordine, Patrizia; Rose, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of university quality, family background and mismatch on the wages of young Italian graduates. An empirical analysis is undertaken using a representative sample of graduates merged with a dataset containing information on the characteristics of universities. By utilizing quantile regression techniques, some evidence…

  9. Progressive exhaustion: A qualitative study on the experiences of Iranian family caregivers regarding patients undergoing hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Salehitali

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the burden of care for patients undergoing hemodialysis from the experiences of family caregivers. Methods: In this qualitative study, a content analysis approach was used for data collection and analysis. Participants were 16 family caregivers selected through purposive sampling from four medical education centers affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect data. Results: Four categories were developed as follows: ‘care challenges’, ‘psychological vulnerabilities’, ‘the chronic nature of care ’and “care in the shade”. The categories led to the development of the main theme of ‘progressive exhaustion’ experienced by the family caregivers during the provision of care to patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion: Family caregivers have a significant role in the process of patient care, and this role leads them to progressive exhaustion; therefore, the overall health of the caregivers should be taken into account and more attention should be paid to their quality of life, social welfare, and satisfaction level. Keywords: Family caregivers, Hemodialysis, Progressive exhaustion, Qualitative study

  10. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stacy L; Sun, Jenny X; Sebastiani, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study.Method. Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were...... assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. RESULTS: A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring...... generation of long-lived families scored low in neuroticism, high in extraversion, and within average values for the other three domains. Older participants tended to score higher in neuroticism and lower in the other domains compared with younger participants, but the estimated scores generally remained...

  11. Dipion decay modes of the UPSILON family from a universal epsilon coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffou, E.; Martinis, M.; Mikuta-Martinis, V.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of a universal-epsilon-coupling scheme we obtain predictions for the decay rates of UPSILON'→UPSILONππ, UPSILON''→UPSILONππ, and UPSILON''→UPSILON'ππ in agreement with CLEO and CUSB measurements. We also predict the shape of the dipion mass distribution for these transitions. The shape predicted for UPSILON'→UPSILONππ is found to be in excellent agreement with experiment

  12. Family Structure and Eating Disorders: The Family Environment Scale and Bulimic-Like Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Carol A.

    1991-01-01

    Family variables derived from the Family Environment Scale are examined using data from 174 college women at a Pacific Northwest university and 2 universities in Houston (Texas) with varying degrees of bulimia. Subjects' self-reports indicate family dysfunctions, but the study illustrates the complexity of the family's role in bulimia. (SLD)

  13. Anatomical studies of some medicinal plants of family polygonaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, I.; Hussain, F.; Dastgir, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anatomical studies of the 6 different species of family Polygonaceae viz., Rumex hastatus D. Don, Rumex dentatus Linn, Rumex nepalensis Spreng, Rheum australe D. Don, Polygonum plebejum R. Br and Persicaria maculosa S.F. Gay are presented. The study is based on the presence and absence of epidermis, parenchyma, collenchyma, sclerenchyma, endodermis, pericycle, xylem, phloem, pith, mesophyll cells and stone cells. (author)

  14. Pharmacognostical study of achenes of some plants from Asteraceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.O. Bychkova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper are represented morphological studies on determination of weight of 1000 achenes, and sieve analysis of fruits of some plants from Asteraceae family (Arctium lappa L., Leuzea carthamoides (Willd. D.C, Inula helenium L., Echinacea purpurea Moench., Calendula officinalis L.. Lipid, alcohol-soluble and water-soluble complexes in fruits of C. officinalis were studied.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Adjustment Following Family Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschena, Eda; Prior, Margot; Sanson, Ann; Smart, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study examined the impact of family transitions, that is, parental separation, divorce, remarriage and death, upon the lives of Australian children and adolescents in a longitudinal study of temperament and development. Methods: Using longitudinal and concurrent questionnaire data, outcomes for young people experiencing…

  16. Smoking among university students: a comparative study between Malaysian students in Malaysia and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashami, B; Abdul Halim, O; Yusoff, K

    1994-06-01

    A total of 209 randomly selected Malaysian university students (128 from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 81 from the University of New South Wales) completed a self-filled questionnaire enquiring about their smoking behaviour and psychosocial characteristics. The prevalence of smoking was 26.6 per cent among students in Malaysia and 18.8 per cent among students in Australia (average 23.4%). Both samples have similar patterns in terms of age of starting smoking, time of the day when they smoked, family and peer history of smoking, and whether or not they inhaled deeply during smoking. The smokers tend to be male, studying beyond the first year, staying with peers outside the hostel, having financial sources other than a scholarship, and abnormal mental health score. However, the smokers from the Australian samples were noted to smoke less and made fewer attempts at quitting the habit.

  17. Phenomenological study of the isovector tensor meson family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Cheng-Qun; He, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we study all the observed a2 states and group them into the a2 meson family, where their total and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka allowed strong decay partial widths are calculated via the quark pair creation model. Taking into account the present experimental data, we further give the corresponding phenomenological analysis, which is valuable to test whether each a2 state can be assigned into the a2 meson family. What is more important is that the prediction of their decay behaviors will be helpful for future experimental study of the a2 states.

  18. A comprehensive family-based replication study of schizophrenia genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aberg, Karolina A; Liu, Youfang; Bukszár, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

     768 control subjects from 6 databases and, after quality control 6298 individuals (including 3286 cases) from 1811 nuclear families. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Case-control status for SCZ. RESULTS Replication results showed a highly significant enrichment of SNPs with small P values. Of the SNPs...... in an independent family-based replication study that, after quality control, consisted of 8107 SNPs. SETTING Linkage meta-analysis, brain transcriptome meta-analysis, candidate gene database, OMIM, relevant mouse studies, and expression quantitative trait locus databases. PATIENTS We included 11 185 cases and 10...

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Sri Lankan University Students as a Consequence of Their Exposure to Family Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

    2009-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri…

  20. Family Stigma Associated With Epilepsy: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza nabi amjad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Harmful nature of epilepsy can affect the patient and their parent. Stigma, arising from it, affects the patient and their family. To relieve it understanding the experiences of the parent are useful. This study was aimed at understanding the experiences of parent of child with epilepsy in Iran. Methods: In this interpretative phenomenological study, 10 parents who took care of their child with epilepsy were participated. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. After transcription, data were analyzed using Van Manen’s method. Results: Family stigma emerged as a main theme in data analysis with three subthemes including becoming verbally abusive, a dull and heavy shadowed look, and associates interference. Conclusion: Family stigma is a major challenge for parents of child with epilepsy need to special attention by health system. Nurses, as a big part of the system, can play an important role to manage this problem.

  1. Pushing Or Pulling Of The Business By Family Members: A Study Of Family Businesses In Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruppuge Ravindra H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of family business researches affirm benefits of family involvement to the business while some of other studies assure only detriments of family involvement. When comparative studies of family businesses begin to surface on the family involvement in business, there is that irritating question on what effect is brought about by family involvement to the business. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore business advantages and disadvantages generated by family involvement in businesses in Sri Lanka. The present study attempted to address the above knowledge gap, using qualitative research approach and multiple case studies as the strategy of inquiry. Purposive sampling technique was used to select both cases and respondents. Privately held, successfully conducted four family businesses were selected as cases and, existing business owner and one family related manager from each case were taken as respondents. Data was collected mainly via semi-structured, in depth interviews, observations, and secondary documents. Data collection from interviews consisted of 15 interviews with 09 different people from four cases. Before the data analysis, coding and categorization of respondents’ views from interviews helped to identify common patterns and themes from both within the case and across cases. The analysis was carried out in the light of Agency Theory and resulted in a rich understanding of business advantages and disadvantages of family involvement in businesses in Sri Lanka. The findings of this study indicated that the agency cost is created not only on business matters but also on family matters. Further, findings revealed that agency benefit also can be obtained by family business by handling the family matters carefully in line with business matters. Findings of this study clearly indicated that an extension to Agency Theory is required to explain owner agent relationship in family businesses.

  2. Professional Learning in Part-time University Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The theme of this article is adult students' learning in part-time studies at university level in Denmark. One issue discussed is the interplay of research and teaching in this kind of study programme. Examples are presented from the Master of Learning Processes study programme at Aalborg...

  3. A Study on Metacognitive Thinking Skills of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Yemliha

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the university students' metacognition thinking skills. The research is a descriptive study in the screening model.The study was carried out with 407 students from the faculties of physical education and sports, education science and letters, business administration, theology, engineering, forestry and…

  4. Preparation of Social Studies Teachers at Major Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a study of the preparation of secondary social studies teachers at major state-supported research universities. Finds relatively few institutions have followed the Holmes Group recommendations and many continue to prepare broad field social studies teachers leaving them deficient in some social science fields. (CFR)

  5. Japanese University Athletes' Dilemma: Study, Sport Performance, or Both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the Japanese university athletes' dilemma of managing both study and sport performance effectively, and to try to find answers to how they can effectively manage both their study and sport club activities. Questionnaires were used in order to collect the data (1st year, 2nd year, and 3rd year students). A…

  6. Multidisciplinary Rural Studies in the Land Grant University Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David L; Ranney, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a multidisciplinary graduate program in rural studies within the land grant university context. Requires a universitywide Rural Studies Center to coordinate efforts across the various colleges. Students could earn dual-title master's and Ph.D. degrees in rural studies and applied economics, sociology, geography, public administration,…

  7. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif Sanaiey, Nahid; Karamnejad, Sahar; Rezaee, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician's idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians' educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique.  Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts' opinion and Cronbach's alpha of 80%.  The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ), t-test, ANOVAs). A significance level of mental health (SQ= 0.38), and environmental and professional health was the lowest priority (SQ= _0.24). Additionally, within each of the areas above specific priorities were determined. Based on the results of this study, gender, graduation date, cooperation time, and university they were educated in did not affect expressing educational needs (p>0.05). The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%). In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational needs.

  8. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  9. Familial transmission of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adoptees: a Swedish nationwide family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Bengt; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-04-13

    Familial clustering of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is well established, but the familial risk of COPD has not been determined among adoptees. The aim was to determine whether the familial transmission of COPD is related to disease in biological and/or adoptive parents. Historic cohort study. 80,214 (50% females). The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was used to follow all Swedish-born adoptees born in 1932-2004 (n=80,214) between 1 January 1964 and 31 December 2010 for COPD (n=1978). The risk of COPD was estimated in adoptees with at least one biological parent with COPD but no adoptive parent with COPD (n=162) compared with adoptees without a biological or adoptive parent with COPD. The risk of COPD was also determined in adoptees with at least one adoptive parent but no biological parent with COPD (n=110), and in adoptees with both affected biological and adoptive parents (n=162). COPD in adoptees. Adoptees with COPD in at least one biological parent but no adoptive parent were more likely to have COPD than adoptees without a biological or adoptive parent with COPD (standardised incidence ratio, SIR=1.98 (95% CI 1.69 to 2.31)). The familial SIR for adoptees with both a biological parent and an adoptive parent with COPD was 1.68 (95% CI 1.39 to 2.00). Adoptees with at least one adoptive parent with COPD but no biological parent with COPD were not at an increased risk of COPD (SIR=1.12 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.35)). The findings of the study show that the familial transmission of COPD is associated with COPD in biological but not adoptive parents, suggesting that genetic or early life factors are important in the familial transmission of COPD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. A Descriptive Study of Decision-Making Conversations during Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Family Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Clayman, Marla L; Frader, Joel; Arenson, Melanie; Haber-Barker, Natalie; Ryan, Claire; Emanuel, Linda; Michelson, Kelly

    2018-06-19

    Little is known about how decision-making conversations occur during pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) family conferences (FCs). Describe the decision-making process and implementation of shared decision making (SDM) during PICU FCs. Observational study. University-based tertiary care PICU, including 31 parents and 94 PICU healthcare professionals involved in FCs. We recorded, transcribed, and analyzed 14 PICU FCs involving decision-making discussions. We used a modified grounded theory and content analysis approach to explore the use of traditionally described stages of decision making (DM) (information exchange, deliberation, and determining a plan). We also identified the presence or absence of predefined SDM elements. DM involved the following modified stages: information exchange; information-oriented deliberation; plan-oriented deliberation; and determining a plan. Conversations progressed through stages in a nonlinear manner. For the main decision discussed, all conferences included a presentation of the clinical issues, treatment alternatives, and uncertainty. A minority of FCs included assessing the family's understanding (21%), assessing the family's need for input from others (28%), exploring the family's desired decision-making role (35%), and eliciting the family's opinion (42%). In the FCs studied, we found that DM is a nonlinear process. We also found that several SDM elements that could provide information about parents' perspectives and needs did not always occur, identifying areas for process improvement.

  11. Systematization of experiences in the professor formation to integrate the university and the family to the professional formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geycell Emma Guevara Fernández

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents a systematization of experiences carried out at the University José Martí Pérez of Sancti Spíritus as a modality of participative action research which permitted, from the articulation of theory and practice, to organize the knowledge about family-university relationship and its influence in the professional formation. As a starting point, different diagnostic techniques were applied such as: document analysis, participating observation, auto assessing scales, discussion groups, interviews, survey and the methodological triangulation data which led to the determination of shortages and potentialities that the staff had as to formation to face it. By means of a shared process, the implied actors agreed the execution of actions which supplied the formative needs and led to grow up gradually towards the improvement of a continuing formation for the educative orientation carried out in higher education and where the development social situation of the young university professor demands as a fundamental category.

  12. Colorado State University: A Midscale Market Solar Customer Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Alison [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Despite substantial increases in solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment between 2005 and 2015, a large untapped market for solar PV deployment still exists in midscale market investments by universities. Recent estimates show that if all universities in the United States installed enough solar PV to meet 25% of their annual electricity consumption, this would cumulatively result in just over 16 gigawatts (GW) of additional installed PV capacity. Within this context, midscale market projects - loosely defined as solar PV installations ranging from 100 kilowatts (kW) to 2 megawatts (MW), but more broadly representing installations not captured in the residential or utility-scale sectors - could be an attractive option for universities. This case study focuses on one university solar customer, Colorado State University (CSU), to provide a detailed example of the challenges, solutions, and opportunities associated with university solar power procurement. Between 2009 and 2015, a combined 6,754 kW of both ground-mounted and rooftop solar PV was installed across multiple CSU campuses in Fort Collins, Colorado. This case study highlights CSU's decision-making process, campus engagement strategies, and relationships with state, local, and utility partners, which have culminated in significant on-campus PV deployment.

  13. Assessing Moroccan University Students’ English Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmane Omari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to survey whether students are motivated to learn English or not and to evaluate the differences within and between three most known universities in Morocco, involving a private one, in terms of students’ English learning motivation. Moreover, factors that make a student more motivated to learn English were investigated. This study examines motivation of university students according to their institution, gender, and other variables. Assessment of university students’ motivation was by scores on items from the Academic Motivation Scale. The sample consisted of 329 undergraduate students from three different Moroccan universities. The most important finding was that participants in general are quite motivated to learn English with a score of (M = 3.80 with regard to the overall score using a 5-point Likert scale, and a higher level of introjected extrinsic motivation (M = 4.11, which means that they do such tasks because they are supposed or asked to do them. Moreover, factors such as how students consider university, their location during the academic year, and their decision behind choosing to go to university were found to affect students’ motivation.

  14. Mechatronics Engineers’ Perception of Code Mixing: Philadelphia University and Hashemite University as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Al-Khawaldeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been widely recognized that code-switching is prevalent in Jordanians' daily conversation in various situations such as home, cafés, universities, restaurants and clubs. Abalhassan and Alshalawi (2000: 183 made a very related observation on code switching behavior among Arab speakers of English that “without exception, all respondents switched into English to some degree”. This could be referred to the increase number of technological advances and people travelling across countries for pleasure or for pursuing further education. In light of this observation, the crucial role of language in people's life, ambivalent attitudes towards code-switching (Akbar, 2007, the dearth of research in this area, such a present study is required to explore Jordanian university students’ and instructors’ perceptions of code-switching in their daily classroom conversation and its expected impact on their language proficiency. In particular, it investigates the factors leading them to code mix and their underlying attitudes towards its expected future impact on their language proficiency. To the best knowledge of the present researcher, this study is the first of its kind in Jordan. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire from 70 university students and 30 instructors from both Philadelphia University and the Hashemite University. Data revealed that code mixing between English and Arabic is a common phenomenon in lectures they have attended in their academic institutions. The participants also show that they find code mixing fascinating and believe that though code switching might have a positive impact on their learning as it helps them better understand the topic. The instructors revealed that code mixing fulfill a set of functions that serve the educational process.

  15. Family context assessment in a public health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, David; Sánchez de Miguel, Manuel; Egurza, Maitane; Arranz, Enrique; Aranbarri, Aritz; Fano, Eduardo; Ibarluzea, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the factorial structure of a new instrument to assess the quality of the family context (Etxadi-Gangoiti Scale) in a sample from the Gipuzkoa cohort of the Environment and Childhood (Infancia y Medio Ambiente [INMA]) study. Families in a sample of 433 two-year-old children were assessed in a home visit with subsequent analysis of the factorial structure and psychometric properties of the data. An exploratory factorial analysis (principal axis factoring and varimax rotation) and a confirmatory factorial analysis were carried out; partial confirmation of the original factorial structure of the instrument was obtained, which revealed the following factorial structures. Subscale (1): promotion of cognitive and linguistic development, social skills, psychomotor skills, and pretend play and imitation; subscale (2): promotion of independence and self-esteem, provision of optimal frustration, social and emotional quality of the relationship, and absence of physical punishment; subscale (3): paternal involvement, low exposure to family conflict, low frequency of family conflict, relationship with the extended family, social support, diversity of experiences, low frequency of stressful events, and low parental perception of stress. The structure of the original instrument structure was partially confirmed, which was attributed to the characteristics of the sample. We stress the importance of the variability obtained in the evaluation of the families, as well as of adequate indicators of reliability in such evaluation. The new instrument could be used in public health to identify deficient family contexts and to design preventive interventions focused on parenting skills. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Family adaptability and cohesion in families consisting of Asian immigrant women living in South Korea: A 3-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Pyo; Kim, Sun; Joh, Ju-Youn

    2015-06-01

    South Korea's low birth rate, aging society, and female migration to urban areas due to industrialization have caused an accelerated inflow of Asian female immigrants into Korea to marry Korean men, especially in rural areas. This study was performed to determine how family function of multicultural families changes over time and what factors affect the changes in family function of multicultural families. The study subjects were 62 Asian immigrant women married to South Korean men living in South Korea. In a 1st wave study in August 2008, the socioeconomic factors and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) scores were measured. A 3-year follow-up study was then conducted in August 2011, and the results were compared with the 1st wave study results. The mean family adaptability score was 24.6 in the 1st wave study and 26.1 at the 3-year follow-up. The average family cohesion score was 31.0 in the 1st wave study and 36.7 at the 3-year follow-up. There was a statistically significant increase in family cohesion after 3 years (P adaptability did not change over time; however, conversely, family cohesion increased. The age difference between husband and wife and the subjective SES had a positive association with the changes in family cohesion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. [Work and family in the sociodemographic study of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, B; De Oliveira, O

    1991-06-01

    This work reviews sociodemographic studies of the interrelationship between work and family in Mexico from 1950 to the present. 3 main themes are distinguished and examined in separate sections. The 1st are labor market studies focusing on aggregates of individuals, a trend most prominent through the mid 1970s but still somewhat in evidence. The 2nd type of studies stress the household or domestic unit as the relevant unit of analysis and often conceptualize economic participation as part of the family life strategy or survival strategy. This perspective reached its maximum development in the late 1970s and early 1980s but also still appears. The last type of study stresses the increasing heterogeneity of labor markets related to the increase in nonsalaried employment and increasing female employment. The domestic unit is present as a determinant of family-based economic activity and female employment, but differences and conflicts between generations within the household are stressed. This perspective began to gain importance in the mid-1980s. The objective of the differentiation into 3 periods and types of study is to analyze changes in theoretical elements considered, principal thematic contents, methodological tools utilized, and results. The work is based on a selective review of literature considered representative. On the theoretical level, relations between work and family are now perceived as more complex and incorporate more elements of social reality than they did in the earlier studies. Most studies of this type have concerned female employment. The belief that male employment depends less on the family context requires reassessment, especially in view of the differential employment opportunities of men and women. Quantitative sociodemographic research in Mexico has been greatly aided by the growing availability of detailed survey data. This, together with advances in statistics and computation, has allowed a greater use of multivariate analysis to

  18. The Role of Continuous Education Programs Organized by Saudi Universities in Literacy--A Case Study of King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rawaf, Haya Saad Abdulla; Fattah, Azza Khalil Abdel; Megeid, Fadia Yousif Abdel; Nazmy, Rania Mohammed Aziz; Alarifi, Sarah Nasser; Al Sulaihm, Hind Sulaiman

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the role of Continuous Education Programs at the Saudi Universities in Religious, Social, and Health Literacy; King Saud University was taken as an example. To achieve the goals of the study two questionnaires were distributed among two samples from King Saud University; (101) of students, and (9) of continuous…

  19. Long-Term Effects of a Universal Family Intervention: Mediation Through Parent-Adolescent Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M.; Wong, J.J.; Gonzales, N.A.; Dumka, L.E.; Millsap, R.; Coxe, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This randomized trial of a family-focused preventive intervention for Mexican American middle schoolers examined internalizing, externalizing, and substance use outcomes in late adolescence, five years after completing the intervention. Parent-adolescent conflict was tested as a mediator of these effects. The role of parent and adolescent acculturation in these pathways was also examined. Method 498 7th grade adolescents and their primary female caregivers were randomized to receive either a 9-week, multi-component intervention or a brief workshop control group. Assessments were conducted at pre-test, two year follow-up (9th grade), and five year follow-up (when most participants were in the 12th grade). Results The Bridges program significantly reduced mother-adolescent conflict measured in the 9th grade, with conflict mediating program effects on internalizing and externalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and diagnosed internalizing disorder in late adolescence. Mother and child acculturation were both significantly predictive of late adolescence outcomes. Contrary to hypotheses, neither mother nor child acculturation emerged as a significant predictor of mother-adolescent conflict, and the interaction of mother and adolescent acculturation was similarly not related to mother-adolescent conflict. Intervention effects were largely consistent across different levels of acculturation. Conclusions These findings provide support for the efficacy of family-focused intervention during early adolescence, both in reducing mental health problems and substance use in the long term, as well as in impacting parent-adolescent conflict processes that appear to play an important role in the development of later adjustment problems. PMID:24730357

  20. Families' Views of Pediatric Palliative Aquatics: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Erin; Steinhorn, David M

    2015-08-01

    Although pediatric palliative care policies and services have been developed, research in this area continues to lag. An integrated model of palliative care has been suggested by the American Academy of Pediatrics and includes complementary and alternative services aimed at improving the well-being of children and their families. The first-known pediatric palliative aquatics program (PPAP) in California uses several techniques to decrease pain and promote well-being through relaxation and interaction between patients, specialists, and family members. This study investigates the perceptions of family members of their children's experiences with a PPAP. Researchers from an outside institution conducted focus groups and interviews. Themes were extracted from the focus group transcripts using Braun and Clarke's method of inductive thematic analysis. Data were collected at the host site, local libraries, and participant homes. Participants were primary caregivers and siblings (n = 23) of children in a PPAP, an independent children's respite, transitional, and end-of-life care facility in California. The research described and drew implications from the diverse perceptions that family members expressed about the benefits of having a child in the PPAP, including sensory, physical, and social experiences. Although the PPAP aims to promote well-being through relaxation, several other benefits were expressed by family members of children going through the program, including pain relief. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Family building using embryo adoption: relationships and contact arrangements between provider and recipient families-a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Lucy; Blyth, Eric; Lui, Steve

    2017-05-01

    What contact arrangements are established between providers and recipients of embryos using Snowflakes® Embryo Adoption Program? Contact arrangements varied considerably and were generally positively described, although some challenges were acknowledged. Reproductive technologies create new and diverse family forms, and the ways in which families created by embryo adoption are negotiated in practice have not been extensively investigated. This exploratory, mixed-methods study had two phases: (i) an online survey (open May-September 2013) and (ii) qualitative semi-structured interviews by email (conducted between 2014 and 2015), exploring participants' experiences of contact with their embryo provider or recipient. Phase I included 17 providers (14 women and 3 men) and 28 recipients (27 women and 1 man). Phase II included 8 providers (5 women and 3 men) and 12 recipients (10 women and 2 men). All participants, except one, were located in the US. This study illustrates how embryo adoption in the US, as a form of conditional donation, can operate and how the participants define and negotiate these emerging relationships. All families were open with their children about how they were conceived and early contact between recipients and providers (frequently before birth) was valued. On the whole, participants were happy with the amount and type of contact they had, and where the current contact did not involve the children, it was seen as a way of keeping the channels open for future contact when the children were older. Participants often portrayed the opportunities for contact as being in the best interests of the child. The study participants are a particular group who had chosen to either receive or give their embryos via a conditional embryo adoption agency in the US and had established contact. Therefore, this is not a representative sample of those who provide or receive embryos for family building. This embryo adoption model clearly fulfils a need; some people

  2. How to add more "family" to the work-life-balance? - family friendliness in medical under- and postgraduate studies and the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university's profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation.

  3. Alcohol effects on family relations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaldo, Amanda Márcia Dos Santos; Pillon, Sandra Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Problems related to alcohol abuse have been associated to different factors, regardless of the causes attributed to this phenomenon. Alcohol consumption and dependence is considered a public health problem and deserve attention because of the social, work, family, physical, legal and violence-related risks it represents. This study aimed to identify the effects of alcoholism on family relations and, by means of case management, to encourage the recovery of these relationships. The results show that the problems caused by alcohol abuse impose profound suffering to family members, which contributes to high levels of interpersonal conflict, domestic violence, parental inadequacy, child abuse and negligence, financial and legal difficulties, in addition to clinical problems associated to it.

  4. A model for fine mapping in family based association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Ruth M

    2009-01-01

    Genome wide association studies for complex diseases are typically followed by more focused characterization of the identified genetic region. We propose a latent class model to evaluate a candidate region with several measured markers using observations on families. The main goal is to estimate linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the observed markers and the putative true but unobserved disease locus in the region. Based on this model, we estimate the joint distribution of alleles at the observed markers and the unobserved true disease locus, and a penetrance parameter measuring the impact of the disease allele on disease risk. A family specific random effect allows for varying baseline disease prevalences for different families. We present a likelihood framework for our model and assess its properties in simulations. We apply the model to an Alzheimer data set and confirm previous findings in the ApoE region.

  5. Family-focused dementia care - a qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohrsen Busted, Laila; Nielsen, Dorthe; Birkelund, Regner

    to decrease the experienced burden that relatives to persons with dementia experience. The qualitative research project consists of three parts; 1) An interview study to investigate the problem area as experienced by 24 relatives. 2) Initiate family intervention, conducted by professional caregivers......Relatives to persons with dementia are in the literature described as the "invisible second patients." They get a more burdensome responsibility to the family’s everyday life and relation within the family. Furthermore, relatives as caregivers provide most of the assistance and supervision...... to fulfill the basic needs of the person with dementia. The experience of being close to a person with dementia may seem as a burden that involves emotional chaos and uncertainty which can lead to stress and depressions. Family health therapeutic conversations may be an intervention to relieve the suffering...

  6. A culturally adapted family intervention for African American families coping with parental cancer: outcomes of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Maureen P; Kissil, Karni; Lynch, Laura; Harmon, La-Rhonda; Hodgson, Nancy

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this 2-year pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted family intervention in improving family communication among African American parents coping with cancer and their school-age children. A secondary objective was to determine its impact on other symptoms of psychosocial distress (depression and anxiety). The third objective was to assess for acceptability and feasibility. Using a two-arm pre-intervention and post-intervention prospective design, 12 African American families received five bi-monthly sessions of either a culturally adapted family intervention (n=7 families) or psycho-education treatment (n=5 families). Parents and their children completed pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaires assessing perceptions of family communication, quality of their relationship, and symptoms of depression. School-age children additionally completed a questionnaire assessing their levels of anxiety. Consumer satisfaction was also evaluated at post-intervention. Parents and school-age children who completed the culturally adapted family intervention reported significantly better communication with each other and were more satisfied compared with the psycho-education control group. No changes were noted in symptoms of anxiety or depression. The culturally adapted family intervention was acceptable based on our findings, families' feedback, and rates of retention. Feasibility is uncertain because our oncology clinic approach to recruitment was slower than expected. Providing culturally adapted family intervention programs to African American families who are coping with parental cancer may result in improved family communication. This pilot study serves as the first step in the development of culturally adapted family intervention programs to help African American families cope with parental cancer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Sibling Incest in a Clergy Family: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Jocelyn; Hoey, Helen

    1994-01-01

    A case study is presented of a female adult survivor of childhood sexual abuse where the perpetrator was her older brother. The family dynamics are described, emphasizing the physically absent father (a clergyman), the emotionally distant mother, and the surrogate parent status of the perpetrator. The individual's efforts to receive appropriate…

  8. Product derivation in software product families : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelstra, S; Sinnema, M; Bosch, J

    2005-01-01

    From our experience with several organizations that employ software product families, we have learned that, contrary to popular belief, deriving individual products from shared software assets is a time-consuming and expensive activity. In this paper we therefore present a study that investigated

  9. Results of Experimental Study on Flexitime and Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winett, Richard A.; Neale, Michael S.

    1980-01-01

    According to two small experimental studies of flexible working hours, federal workers with young children choose to arrive at and depart from work earlier, allowing them to increase the time spent with their families and to engage in recreational, educational, and household activities. (Author/SK)

  10. Genetic risk of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a familial aggregation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Go, S.L.; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the magnitude of the genetic risk of nonsyndromic rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs) in a familial aggregation study. DESIGN: Two hundred three consecutive patients with RRD and 461 controls without RRD were ascertained at the Department of Ophthalmology of the

  11. Genetic risk of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment a familial aggregation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Go (Sioe Lie); C. Hoyng (Carel); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate the magnitude of the genetic risk of nonsyndromic rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs) in a familial aggregation study. Design: Two hundred three consecutive patients with RRD and 461 controls without RRD were ascertained at the Department of Ophthalmology

  12. Composite likelihood and two-stage estimation in family studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford

    2004-01-01

    In this paper register based family studies provide the motivation for linking a two-stage estimation procedure in copula models for multivariate failure time data with a composite likelihood approach. The asymptotic properties of the estimators in both parametric and semi-parametric models are d...

  13. [Genetic and environmental contribution to rheumatoid arthritis: a family study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iebba, Filippo; Di Sora, Fiorella; Leti, Wilma; Montella, Tatiana; Montella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We report on the HLA typing of three brothers (A, B, C) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their six sons. This family is interesting for the full concordance for RA between parents. The aim of this study was the discovery of genetic and/or enviromental cofactors determining this absolute concordance.

  14. Psychological impact of family history risk assessment in primary care: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Linda; Emery, Jon D; Prevost, A Toby; Sutton, Stephen; Walter, Fiona M

    2014-08-01

    Routine family history risk assessment for chronic diseases could enable primary care practitioners to efficiently identify at-risk patients and promote preventive management strategies. To investigate patients' understanding and responses to family history risk assessment in primary care. A mixed methods study set in 10 Eastern England general practices. Participants in a family history questionnaire validation study were triaged into population or increased risk for four chronic diseases (type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, colorectal cancer). Questionnaires completed immediately prior to the family history consultation (baseline) and 4 weeks later (follow-up) assessed the psychological impact, including State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores. Semi-structured interviews explored the meaning participants gave to their personal familial disease risk. Four hundred and fifty-three participants completed both baseline and follow-up questionnaires and 30 were interviewed. At follow-up, there was no increase in anxiety among either group, or differences between the groups [difference in mean change 0.02, 95% confidence interval -2.04, 2.08, P = 0.98]. There were no significant changes over time in self-rated health in either group. At follow-up, participants at increased risk (n = 153) were more likely to have recent changes to behaviour and they had stronger intentions to make changes to diet (P = 0.001), physical activity (P = 0.006) and to seek further information in the future than those at population risk (n = 300; P assessment for familial risk of chronic diseases may be undertaken in primary care without causing anxiety or reducing self-rated health. Patient responses to family history risk assessment may inform promotion of preventive management strategies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Fostering Entrepreneurship at the University: A Spanish Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis VÁZQUEZ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to suggest best practices for improving the effectiveness of entrepreneurship education programs in the European area, based on their impact on expected attitudes of undergraduate students towards business startup as a career choice. Particularly, the paper presents some results from a study carried out in two Spanish universities aimed at validating a structure of entrepreneurship education based on a double component of curricular teaching and extracurricular support, and to analyze their effect upon undergraduates’ entrepreneurial selfefficacy and outcome expectations as immediate antecedents of entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors. Sample was comprised of 800 university students, and statistical treatment of data was based on factorial and regression analyses. Findings underline the very limited involvement of Spanish universities in entrepreneurship education as perceived by students, together with the existence of different effects of curricular and extracurricular elements when fostering entrepreneurial careers among future graduates. Implications of these results and limitations of the study are discussed.

  16. Assessing Perseverance in Studies at the Open University of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri-Rozenblit, Sarah

    1990-01-01

    A study at the Open University of Israel found students who study in organized groups and get weekly tutorials have a higher persistence rate than those with tutorials every three weeks. More experienced students and those in liberal arts and social sciences have a higher course completion rate. Age, sex, and educational background have little…

  17. Comparative Study of Teenage Pregnancy in Lagos State University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... a comparative study of the obstetric performance of primiparous teenagers and ... 2006-31st December, 2007) in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital,Ikeja. ... The incidence of teenage pregnancy in the study population was 1.01% with ...

  18. Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Kemparaju, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study of the institutional repositories (IRs) in use in Indian universities and research institutes. Design/methodology/approach: Repositories in various institutions in India were accessed and described in a standardised way. Findings: The 20 repositories studied covered collections of diverse…

  19. Evaluation of family history of permanent hearing loss in childhood as a risk indicator in universal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valido Quintana, Mercedes; Oviedo Santos, Ángeles; Borkoski Barreiro, Silvia; Santana Rodríguez, Alfredo; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    Sixty percent of prelingual hearing loss is of genetic origin. A family history of permanent childhood hearing loss is a risk factor. The objective of the study is to determine the relationship between this risk factor and hearing loss. We have evaluated clinical and epidemiological characteristics and related nonsyndromic genetic variation. This was a retrospective, descriptive and observational study of newborns between January 2007 and December 2010 with family history as risk factor for hearing loss using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem response. A total of 26,717 children were born. Eight hundred and fifty-seven (3.2%) had family history. Fifty-seven(0.21%) failed to pass the second test. A percentage of 29.1 (n=16) had another risk factor, and 17.8% (n=9) had no classical risk factor. No risk factor was related to the hearing loss except heart disease. Seventy-six point four percent had normal hearing and 23.6% hearing loss. The mean of family members with hearing loss was 1.25. On genetic testing, 82.86% of homozygotes was normal, 11.43% heterozygosity in Connexin 26 gene (35delG), 2.86% R143W heterozygosity in the same gene and 2.86% mutant homozygotes (35delG). We found no relationship between hearing loss and mutated allele. The percentage of children with a family history and hearing loss is higher than expected in the general population. The genetic profile requires updating to clarify the relationship between hearing loss and heart disease, family history and the low prevalence in the mutations analyzed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  20. Study findings on evaluation of integrated family planning programme performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    In 1976 the United Nations's Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific launched a comparative study on integrated family planning programs in a number of countries in the region. In November 1979 the study directors from the participating countries meet in Bangkok to discuss the current status of the studies in their countries. The Korean and Malaysian studies were completed, the Bangladesh study was in the data collecting phase, and the Pakistani research design phase was completed. The meeting participants focused their attention on the findings and policy implications of the 2 completed studies and also discussed a number of theorectical and methodological issues which grew out of their research experience. The Malaysian study indicated that group structure, financial resources, and the frequency and quality of worker-client contact were the most significant variables determining program effectiveness. In the Korean Study, leadership, financial resources, and the frequency and quality of contact between agencies were the key variables in determining program effectiveness. In the Malaysian study there was a positive correlation between maternal and child health service performance measures and family planning service performance measures. This finding supported the contention that these 2 types of service provision are not in conflict with each other but instead serve to reinforce each other. Policy implications of the Korean study were 1) family planning should be an integral part of all community activities; 2) family planning workers should be adequately supported by financial and supply allocations; and 3) adequate record keeping and information exchange procedures should be incorporated in the programs.

  1. Molecular study of the perforin gene in familial hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Abed Rim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perforin gene (PRF1 mutations have been identified in some patients diagnosed with the familial form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH and in patients with lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with a familial aggregation of hematological malignancies harbor germline perforin gene mutations. For this purpose, 81 unrelated families from Tunisia and France with aggregated hematological malignancies were investigated. The variants detected in the PRF1 coding region amounted to 3.7% (3/81. Two of the three variants identified were previously described: the p.Ala91Val pathogenic mutation and the p.Asn252Ser polymorphism. A new p.Ala 211Val missense substitution was identified in two related Tunisian patients. In order to assess the pathogenicity of this new variation, bioinformatic tools were used to predict its effects on the perforin protein structure and at the mRNA level. The segregation of the mutant allele was studied in the family of interest and a control population was screened. The fact that this variant was not found to occur in 200 control chromosomes suggests that it may be pathogenic. However, overexpression of mutated PRF1 in rat basophilic leukemia cells did not affect the lytic function of perforin differently from the wild type protein.

  2. Developing an integrated evidence-based medicine curriculum for family medicine residency at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Tan, Amy; Hindle, Hugh; Kung, Lina; Manca, Donna

    2008-06-01

    There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop new strategies as needed. Input from stakeholders including faculty and residents was sought, and evidence regarding the teaching and practical application of EBM was gathered. The committee drafted goals and objectives, the primary of which were to assist residents to (1) become competent self-directed, lifelong learners with skills to effectively and efficiently keep up to date, and 2) develop EBM skills to solve problems encountered in daily practice. New curriculum components, each evidence based, were introduced in 2005 and include a family medicine EBM workshop to establish basic EBM knowledge; a Web-based Family Medicine Desktop promoting easier access to evidence-based Internet resources; a brief evidence-based assessment of the research project enhancing integration of EBM into daily practice; and a journal club to support peer learning and growth of rapid appraisal skills. Issues including time use, costs, and change management are discussed. Ongoing evaluation of the curriculum and its components is a principal factor of the design, allowing critical review and adaptation of the curriculum. The first two years of the curriculum have yielded positive feedback from faculty and statistically significant improvement in multiple areas of residents' opinions of the curriculum and comfort with evidence-based practice.

  3. Introduction to genetics in ophthalmology, value of family studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba

    2000-05-01

    This paper reviews the author's personal experience with genetic eye diseases and discusses the significance of family studies in providing key information for the advancement of molecular research. Choroideremia: This disease has long been known as an X-linked progressive tapetoretinal degeneration, but it was first described in Japan in 1974 after finding asymptomatic fundus changes in heterozygous female carriers that are compatible with X chromosomal inactivation. Mutations in the disease-causing gene (REP-1) provide a clue to the diagnosis and pathophysiology of the disease.Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The clinical expression is so variable among affected individuals and families that mild optic nerve disease of insidious onset should be differentiated from autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Molecular assessment of mitochondrial DNA leads to a definite diagnosis of the disease, but mitochondrial DNA mutations do not fully account for the clinical manifestation and phenotypic variability of the disease.Norrie Disease: This rare X-linked vitreoretinal dysplasia, characterized by congenital bilateral blindness, was documented in Japan some twenty years ago and the disease has been identified in four unrelated Japanese families. The disease, once diagnosed on the basis of elaborate clinical and familial studies, can now be defined by molecular assessment of the Norrie disease gene.Congenital Nystagmus: A four-generation family was described which presented with autosomal dominantly inherited congenital nystagmus, peripheral corneal opacity, and foveal hypoplasia without any iris tissue malformation. The diagnosis of this family was established by detection of a missense mutation in the paired domain of the PAX 6 gene, hence conforming to a forme fruste of congenital aniridia.Sorsby's Fundus Dystrophy: Two Japanese families with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy showed late-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by submacular hemorrhage and atrophy. Our patients

  4. [Introduction to genetics in ophthalmology. Value of family studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, N

    1999-12-01

    This paper reviews the author's personal experience with genetic eye diseases and discusses the significance of family studies in providing key information for the advancement of molecular research. CHOROIDEREMIA: This disease has long been known as an X-linked progressive tapetoretinal degeneration, but it was first described in Japan in 1974 after finding asymptomatic fundus changes in heterozygous female carriers that are compatible with X chromosomal inactivation. Mutations in the disease-causing gene (REP-1) provide a clue to the diagnosis and pathophysiology of the disease. LEBER'S HEREDITARY OPTIC NEUROPATHY: The clinical expression is so variable among affected individuals and families that mild optic nerve disease of insidious onset should be differentiated from autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Molecular assessment of mitochondrial DNA leads to a definite diagnosis of the disease, but mitochondrial DNA mutations do not fully account for the clinical manifestation and phenotypic variability of the disease. NORRIE DISEASE: This rare X-linked vitreoretinal dysplasia, characterized by congenital bilateral blindness, was documented in Japan some twenty years ago and the disease has been identified in four unrelated Japanese families. The disease, once diagnosed on the basis of elaborate clinical and familial studies, can now be defined by molecular assessment of the Norrie disease gene. CONGENITAL NYSTAGMUS: A four-generation family was described which presented with autosomal dominantly inherited congenital nystagmus, peripheral corneal opacity, and foveal hypoplasia without any iris tissue malformation. The diagnosis of this family was established by detection of a missense mutation in the paired domain of the PAX 6 gene, hence conforming to a forme fruste of congenital aniridia. SORSBY'S FUNDUS DYSTROPHY: Two Japanese families with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy showed late-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by submacular hemorrhage and atrophy. Our patients

  5. Family system characteristics and psychological adjustment to cancer susceptibility genetic testing: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Brocker-Vriends, A.H.; Asperen, C.J. van; Sijmons, R.H.; Seynaeve, C.; Gool, A.R. van; Klijn, J.G.M.; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined prospectively the contribution of family functioning, differentiation to parents, family communication and support from relatives to psychological distress in individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial pathogenic BRCA1/2 or Hereditary nonpolyposis

  6. Family system characteristics and psychological adjustment to cancer susceptibility genetic testing: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Bröcker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined prospectively the contribution of family functioning, differentiation to parents, family communication and support from relatives to psychological distress in individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial pathogenic BRCA1/2 or Hereditary nonpolyposis

  7. Family system characteristics and psychological adjustment to cancer susceptibility genetic testing : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Brocker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; Van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    This study examined prospectively the contribution of family functioning, differentiation to parents, family communication and support from relatives to psychological distress in individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial pathogenic BRCA1/2 or Hereditary nonpolyposis

  8. Management of Pulmonary Tuberculosis- A Family Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family medicine tools including the Family circle, Family life cycle, Home visits and Family counseling were used in the management of this case. This case emphasizes the need for a thorough contact tracing, family involvement in care, home visits and individualization in the management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  9. A Study of Universal Thermodynamics in Brane World Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Saugata; Saha, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-01-01

    A study of Universal thermodynamics is done in the framework of RSII brane model and DGP brane scenario. The Universe is chosen as FRW model bounded by apparent or event horizon. Assuming extended Hawking temperature on the horizon, the unified first law is examined for perfect fluid (with constant equation of state) and Modified Chaplygin Gas model. As a result there is a modification of Bekenstein entropy on the horizons. Further the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics and thermodynamical equilibrium are also investigated

  10. Vocal quality in university teachers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, E; Claeys, S; Wuyts, F; Van Lierde, K M

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the vocal quality of 20 male and 9 female university teachers using a multi-parameter approach. Secondly, the effect of an academic lecture on the voice profiles of the university teachers was measured. All groups underwent subjective voice evaluations (perceptual evaluation, Voice Handicap Index, anamnesis of vocal complaints and vocal abuse) and objective voice evaluations (aerodynamic and acoustic parameters, vocal performance, and the Dysphonia Severity Index). The same voice assessment was performed after an academic lecture with a mean length of one and a half hours. The mean DSI score was + 2.2 for the male teachers and + 4.0 for the female teachers. The mean VHI score was 13. Perceptually, all voice parameters were rated as normal. The questionnaire revealed a relatively high amount of vocal abuse. No changes in the objective vocal parameters were found after the lecture. Perceptually, however, the voices of the university teachers were significantly less instable after the lecture. Although no negative changes in objective vocal quality were observed, 48% of the university teachers experienced subjective vocal changes. The authors concluded that university teachers are professional voice users with good vocal quality who suffer no handicapping effect from possible voice disorders. No important changes in the vocal profile after a teaching activity of one and a half hours were found, despite the high prevalence of voice complaints.

  11. An Empirical Study of State University Students' Perceived Service Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaedi, Sik; Bakti, Gede Mahatma Yuda; Metasari, Nur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify: university students' perceived service quality dimensions; the dimensions contributing most towards overall students' perceived service quality; and whether there is a difference in perceived quality level of each dimension based on students' year of study and gender in the context of undergraduate students of…

  12. The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2001-01-01

    Begun in 1994, the Native American Studies program at the University of Oklahoma is an interdisciplinary B.A. program with a liberal arts orientation and strong emphasis on contemporary American Indian policy. Program strengths include the number and diversity of the faculty involved, the four Native languages taught, connections to tribal…

  13. Education Technology Services at Indiana University: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichelmeyer, B. A.; Hara, Noriko; Yi, Jessi; Dennen, Vanessa; Avers, Dale; Tzeng, Jeng-Yi

    1998-01-01

    This paper, based on a qualitative research study, describes the technology resources available in the Indiana University School of Education, explains the range of services provided by Education Technology Services (ETS), documents the organizational structure of ETS, and describes the key processes and culture of ETS. (Author/AEF)

  14. Are Students Their Universities' Customers? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Treena Gillespie; Finney, R. Zachary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the aim is to empirically examine the relationship between students' perceptions of themselves as customers of their university and their educational attitudes and behaviors. It also seeks to investigate the extent to which students' characteristics predict their involvement with education. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  15. Personality and Field of Study Choice in University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humburg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the Big five personality traits (openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and emotional stability) measured at age 14 can be linked to field of study choice in university at around age 19. While personality matters less than cognitive skills, such as math ability and verbal ability, for…

  16. Governance Paradigms of Public Universities: An International Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop a conceptual model of the wider influencing forces impacting the governance paradigms of public universities. It draws on the multi-theoretical governance concept and seeks to identify these forces through the lens of chief audit executives using a qualitative research approach. The interview data supported by published…

  17. International Students' Networks: A Case Study in a UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nashrawan; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The great influx of international students into UK universities has led to internationalisation becoming an important issue. Previous studies have focused on the integration of home and international students, illustrating a lack of intercultural interaction. Yet there has been a lack of research investigating international students' networks and…

  18. Aligning IT and Business Strategy: An Australian University Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Alignment with business objectives is considered to be an essential outcome of information technology (IT) strategic planning. This case study examines the process of creating an IT strategy for an Australian university using an industry standard methodology. The degree of alignment is determined by comparing the strategic priorities supported by…

  19. Attendance and Exam Performance at University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David O.; Webber, Don J.

    2010-01-01

    The link between absenteeism and students' academic performance at university is perpetually a hot topic for teaching academics. Most studies suggest the effect is negative, although the strength of this effect is in dispute. The issue is complicated further when researchers draw their inferences from different angles, such as the removal of a…

  20. The "Carbon-Neutral University"--A Study from Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udas, Erica; Wölk, Monique; Wilmking, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Nowadays, several higher education institutions around the world are integrating sustainability topics into their daily operations, functionality and education systems. This paper presents a case study from a pilot project implemented by the Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald (hereafter, Greifswald University), Germany on its way…

  1. Study on Evolutionary Path of University Students’ Entrepreneurship Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojian Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at studying the evolution pattern of cultivating the ability of university students’ entrepreneurship, this paper established the payoff matrix between the university and students agent with the evolutionary economics method. The analysis of the evolution of the communication process model reveals how the choice strategy of individuals influences that of groups. Numerical simulation also demonstrates the influences of different values of decision-making parameters and the change of initial conditions on the result of evolution. It is found that the evolution path system of university students’ entrepreneurial ability has two kinds of modes: one is the ideal state; and the other one is the bad “lock” state. By adjusting parameters, we can jump out of the bad “lock” state, thus optimizing cultivation path.

  2. A Bayesian phylogenetic study of the Dravidian language family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipakam, Vishnupriya

    2018-01-01

    The Dravidian language family consists of about 80 varieties (Hammarström H. 2016 Glottolog 2.7) spoken by 220 million people across southern and central India and surrounding countries (Steever SB. 1998 In The Dravidian languages (ed. SB Steever), pp. 1–39: 1). Neither the geographical origin of the Dravidian language homeland nor its exact dispersal through time are known. The history of these languages is crucial for understanding prehistory in Eurasia, because despite their current restricted range, these languages played a significant role in influencing other language groups including Indo-Aryan (Indo-European) and Munda (Austroasiatic) speakers. Here, we report the results of a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of cognate-coded lexical data, elicited first hand from native speakers, to investigate the subgrouping of the Dravidian language family, and provide dates for the major points of diversification. Our results indicate that the Dravidian language family is approximately 4500 years old, a finding that corresponds well with earlier linguistic and archaeological studies. The main branches of the Dravidian language family (North, Central, South I, South II) are recovered, although the placement of languages within these main branches diverges from previous classifications. We find considerable uncertainty with regard to the relationships between the main branches. PMID:29657761

  3. Perception on obesity among university students: A case study using factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Suriani; Rahman, Nur Amira Abdol; Ghazali, Khadizah; Ismail, Norlita; Budin, Kamsia

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the university students' perceptions on obesity and to compare the difference in mean scores factor based on demographic factors. Data was collected randomly using questionnaires. There were 321 university students participated in this study. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, normality test, independent t test, one-way ANOVA and non-parametric tests were used in this study. Factor analysis results managed to retrieve three new factors namely impact of the health, impact of the physical appearance and personal factors. The study found that Science students have higher awareness and perceptions than Art students on Factor 1, impact of the health towards overweight problems and obesity. The findings of the study showed students, whose family background has obesity problem have higher awareness and perceptions than students' whose family background has no obesity problem on Factor 1, impact of the health towards overweight problems and obesity. The study also found that students' whose father with primary school level had the lowest awareness and perceptions on Factor 2, impact of the physical appearance towards overweight problems and obesity than other students whose father with higher academic level.

  4. Traditionalism and Feminism: A Typology of Strategies Used by University Women to Manage Career-Family Conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an Eriksonian analysis of the impact of traditionalism and feminism on the identity formation of university-attending women and postulates four "identity strategies": traditionalism, ambivalent semi-traditionalism, confident semi-traditionalism, and feminism. Describes a study assessing the reliability and validity of an…

  5. A Study on Depression among Pre-University Students Kazeron City 1379-80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Shoja'ei-Zadeh

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ultimate goal of this research is determining of depression prevalence and effective factors among boys of pre university level in Kazeron city. Materials & Methods: The present research is an analytical - descriptive and cross sectional study, which was done in February 2001. In order to achieve the goal, 240 pre university boys were selected through random classified sampling and the data gathered by questionnaires and Zung depression scale. Results: The results indicate that 42.9 percent of students suffered from depression. The rate of depression among the students is as follows: low depression 28.8%, medium depression 9.6% high depression 3.3%, and profound depression 1.3%. The statistical test, such as X2 and X2 for trend has been used. The results showed that there is a significant relationship between depression and family financial status, parents’ relations, talking about problems with others, anxiety about joining to military services, anxiety for entering to university, treatment of teachers and principals and educational level of mothers. With respect to the above mentioned variables and using a logistic regression model the following results achieved: Four variables had increasing effect on depression incidence: family financial status, parents’ relations, talking about problems with others and anxiety about going to military duty. Conclusion: The advantage of the above model is not only to identify the effectiveness of the variables in depression but also by understanding of the students it is likely to prevent depression incidence.

  6. THE COMPATIBILITY STUDENT CHOICE OF UNIVERSITY MAJORING; A PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daharnis Daharnis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous improvements in order to optimize the basic education to higher education are still running. Based on that purpose, there are many factors to supporting the students' learning activities success; one of the factors is suitability with majors in university. The purpose of this study is to reveal the condition of the compatibility of students majoring with their interest, then to describe the information when the student choose their majoring. Samples in this study were 122 peoples, taken by random sampling from the Padang State University. Data obtained by distributing questionnaires. The results showed that there are students that their major do not match with their interest (22.13%, only 3.28% of students who feel compatible with their major. This result should be a major concern, particularly for counselor in schools for design counseling services to solve these problems. The result of this study used as a grand tour or a preliminary study for further research.

  7. Performance management in a family business: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Paulino; Silva, Rui

    2014-01-01

    This research, still at an early stage, and then presented in a poster format, intended to explain the management of organizational performance of a family business in the succession process using the case study method. The scripts for semi-structured interviews that will apply to managers, owners and other workers who are deemed suitable for the investigation, which include relatives of the owners of the company are being developed. For this work the model of organizational performance manag...

  8. Attendance and exam performance at university: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, D. O.; Webber, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    The link between absenteeism and students’ academic performance at university is perpetually a hot topic for teaching academics. Most studies suggest the effect is negative, although the strength of this effect is in dispute. The issue is complicated further when researchers draw their inferences from different angles, such as the removal of a mandatory attendance policy or the implementation of a module-specific attendance policy. Although previous studies have suggested the effect on exam p...

  9. Religion and Happiness: A Study Among University Students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J; Ok, Üzeyir; Robbins, Mandy

    2017-08-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that higher levels of positive religious affect are associated with higher levels of personal happiness among a sample of 348 students studying at a state university in Turkey who completed the Ok Religious Attitude Scale (Islam), the Oxford Happiness Inventory, and the short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised. The data reported a small but statistically significant association between religiosity and happiness after taking sex and individual differences in personality into account.

  10. Commercialising university inventions for sustainability : A case study of (non-)intermediating 'cleantech' at Aalto University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivimaa, Paula; Boon, Wouter; Antikainen, Riina

    2017-01-01

    The challenge to transform towards more sustainable societies requires action on multiple levels, including commercialisation of inventions created in universities. We examine intermediation in the pre-commercialisation phase of cleantech inventions developed at Aalto University, Finland, focusing

  11. Family planning providers' perspectives on family planning service delivery in Ibadan and Kaduna, Nigeria: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Luciana Estelle; Schwandt, Hilary Megan; Boulay, Marc; Skinner, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    In Nigeria, fertility continues to be high and contraceptive prevalence remains low. This study was conducted in order to understand the perceptions of, experiences with and challenges of delivering family planning services in two urban areas of Nigeria from the perspectives of family planning service providers. A qualitative study using 59 in-depth interviews was conducted among family planning providers working in hospitals, primary health centres, clinics, pharmacies and patent medicine vendors in Ibadan and Kaduna, Nigeria. Providers support a mix of individuals and organisations involved in family planning provision, including the government of Nigeria. The Nigerian government's role can take a variety of forms, including providing promotional materials for family planning facilities as well as facilitating training and educational opportunities for providers, since many providers lack basic training in family planning provision. Providers often describe their motivation to provide in terms of the health benefits offered by family planning methods. Few providers engage in any marketing of their services and many providers exclude youth and unmarried individuals from their services. The family planning provider community supports a diverse network of providers, but needs further training and support in order to improve the quality of care and market their services. Adolescents, unmarried individuals and women seeking post-abortion care are vulnerable populations that providers need to be better educated about and trained in how to serve. The perspectives of providers should be considered when designing family planning interventions in urban areas of Nigeria.

  12. How to add more "Family" to the Work-Life-Balance? – Family Friendliness in Medical Under- and Postgraduate Studies and the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university’s profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

  13. Female science faculty in liberal arts colleges and research universities: A case study of building careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Kerry Michelle

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the lives of twelve female science faculty in higher education, in both the Liberal Arts College and the Research University environments. The study focuses on two areas---the gender issue and women's positive experiences in being science faculty. The methods used are qualitative, including interviews and self-esteem, achievement-motivation, and self-descriptive word ranking scales, which were used to determine success and determination to understand the desire to continue in the field of academic science. The central findings of the study focused on the rampant gender and sexual discrimination that was apparent at the Liberal Arts College science department, and the desire to balance a family with a career. The common misperception that a woman cannot be an academic science and have a family appeared to have troubled most of the subjects in the study. It appeared that the support of a spouse and family are two factors that have led to the continuation of the majority of the women to want to remain in academic science. The issue of gender touched on the lack of financial compensation among some of the female science faculty in the study, as well as the need for more institutional and structural support for human relations within the science departments.

  14. Tobacco control programmes for universities: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, M L

    1997-03-01

    University may be a good time for smoking cessation, because younger, lighter smokers are more successful at stopping. An initial survey of 4141 students at Cambridge and Anglia Polytechnic universities identified the prevalence of smoking; questionnaires were given to smokers asking about desire to stop. Some respondents were invited to a discussion, but very few came. Those wanting to quit were sent a second questionnaire about what help they wanted. On National No Smoking Day, 101 students were interviewed about "stop smoking' advertisements, and those wanting to stop smoking were offered different forms of help. Lastly, student union welfare officers at 54 universities in the United Kingdom were interviewed over the telephone, about what motivation and support they provide for students to stop smoking, and what more they would consider providing. Prevalence of smoking varied according to university, subject studied and sex. Desire to quit varied with subject studied, duration of habit and amount smoked. Some "stop smoking' TV adverts were widely remembered, but their motivational impact remains unclear. Most of those wanting to stop found it difficult, but few requested help unless approached directly. Only books were widely used, and innovative ones seemed most popular. Few student unions provided effective encouragement or help for students to stop smoking. Most said they would consider doing more. There is a need for smoking cessation programmes at universities. More research is needed on ways of motivating those who do not want to stop. "Direct marketing' of books seems the best way of reaching those who want to stop. The effectiveness of different books needs to be evaluated. There is great potential for improving the quality, quantity and availability of cessation aids through student unions.

  15. Pedigrees, propaganda, and paranoia: family studies in a historical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, P A

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the uses of family studies carried out in the early 20th century under the banner of eugenics, a companion discipline to early genetics. It explores how, in an attempt to analyze and quantify purportedly biologic bases of social problems, the eugenicists constructed pedigree charts of notoriously "defective" families. Investigation of individuals with suspect traits formed the basis for instruction of field workers who linked those traits to larger groups. The resulting eugenic family studies provided a "scientific" face for a popular hereditarian mythology that claimed to explain all social failure in systematic terms. The eugenicists were successful in fueling public fear about the growing "army of idiots and imbeciles" graphically depicted in their pedigree charts. Their success was the result of a finely crafted educational program--propaganda that reduced science to simplistic terms. The tendency to oversimplify concepts of genetic causation and the rush to amplify the significance of research findings through the popular media is also apparent today. What begins as publicity has the potential to be transformed into propaganda. Although many in the scientific community are understandably reluctant to revisit the abuses of the past, that community must confront the history of eugenics as a necessary antidote to the genetic hype that surrounds us.

  16. Workplace Bullying Among Family Physicians: A Gender Focused Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Linda P; Gallagher-Garza, Shalena; Gebhard, Roberta E; Harrison, Suzanne L; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2016-09-01

    Continuing gender disparities within the medical profession have raised concerns about the extent to which women physicians face an inhospitable work environment. The purpose of this study was to examine the types and frequency of workplace bullying reported by a national sample of family physicians employed in academic settings, as related to gender. Data for this study were gathered as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAMF) Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus electronic survey. Respondents completed questions addressing sociodemographic and practice characteristics, general experience with bullying, types of bullying, actions in response to bullying, and outcomes. A total of 1065 academic family physicians (male = 56.8%; female = 43.2%), mostly non-Hispanic white (84.2%) or Asian (5.3%) and between the ages 30 and 60 (58.7%) completed the CERA survey. One in 10 respondents acknowledged bullying someone in the workplace; 30% had been personally bullied in the workplace. Compared to men, female physicians were more likely to report being bullied overall and, specifically, to experience having their opinions ignored, lack of recognition for good work, feeling pressured not to claim rightful benefits, and being given unmanageable workloads. Despite some gender differences in actions taken, outcomes for each kind of action were the same for men and women.

  17. Psychological Stress and Parenting Behavior among Chinese Families: Findings from a Study on Parent Education for Economically Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching Man

    2011-01-01

    With the recognition of the crucial role of family and with the belief that parents have the greatest influence on a child's life, family and parent education has been widely practiced in Hong Kong and many other countries as measure for poverty alleviation. A study, employed quantitative method of a cross-sectional parent survey (N = 10,386) was…

  18. Pay Benefits and Workplace Milieu Effecting Job Satisfaction Level of University Teachers: A Case Study of Punjab University

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Nisar; Muhammad Iqbal Zafar; Babak Mahmood; Malik Muhammad Sohail; Falak Sher; Muhammad Rizwan Safdar

    2012-01-01

    The major concern of the study was to examine the influence of pay satisfaction and workplace milieu on job satisfaction levels in the teaching faculty members of University of Punjab. There were three major objectives of this study. First one was to examine the pay satisfaction level of teaching faculty members of University of the Punjab. Second objective was to examine the effect of workplace milieu on job satisfaction level of teaching faculty members of University of the Punjab. And the ...

  19. Heritability of tic disorders: a twin-family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilhão, N R; Olthof, M C; Smit, D J A; Cath, D C; Ligthart, L; Mathews, C A; Delucchi, K; Boomsma, D I; Dolan, C V

    2017-04-01

    Genetic-epidemiological studies that estimate the contributions of genetic factors to variation in tic symptoms are scarce. We estimated the extent to which genetic and environmental influences contribute to tics, employing various phenotypic definitions ranging between mild and severe symptomatology, in a large population-based adult twin-family sample. In an extended twin-family design, we analysed lifetime tic data reported by adult mono- and dizygotic twins (n = 8323) and their family members (n = 7164; parents and siblings) from 7311 families in the Netherlands Twin Register. We measured tics by the abbreviated version of the Schedule for Tourette and Other Behavioral Syndromes. Heritability was estimated by genetic structural equation modeling for four tic disorder definitions: three dichotomous and one trichotomous phenotype, characterized by increasingly strictly defined criteria. Prevalence rates of the different tic disorders in our sample varied between 0.3 and 4.5% depending on tic disorder definition. Tic frequencies decreased with increasing age. Heritability estimates varied between 0.25 and 0.37, depending on phenotypic definitions. None of the phenotypes showed evidence of assortative mating, effects of shared environment or non-additive genetic effects. Heritabilities of mild and severe tic phenotypes were estimated to be moderate. Overlapping confidence intervals of the heritability estimates suggest overlapping genetic liabilities between the various tic phenotypes. The most lenient phenotype (defined only by tic characteristics, excluding criteria B, C and D of DSM-IV) rendered sufficiently reliable heritability estimates. These findings have implications in phenotypic definitions for future genetic studies.

  20. Online Learning - Between University Studies and Workplace Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    2018-01-01

    —by attending a blended learning course? The study builds on Engeström’s (2001) expansive learning model of two interacting activity systems, namely, the students’ master’s course and their professional work places. The study follows a mixed methods approach and finds that the students integrated requirements......This study explores learning when professionals return to education and use their professional work experience to fulfil their study objectives. The research question is: How do students learn from experiences in two contexts—a master’s course at a university and their organisations of employment...

  1. Physically active families - de-bunking the myth? A qualitative study of family participation in physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L; Jago, R; Brockman, R; Cartwright, K; Page, A S; Fox, K R

    2010-03-01

    The benefits of physical activity for reducing obesity and related chronic diseases are well known. The need for more family-based interventions to increase physical activity is frequently cited in the literature; however, little is known about if and how families are physically active together, and what factors might influence family-based participation in regular physical activity. This study examined the types of activities (physical and sedentary) engaged in as a family and explored parents' perceptions of the importance, frequency, nature and barriers to family physical activity. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 30 parents (26 female, four male) of 10- to 11-year-old schoolchildren who attended either low, middle or high socio-economic status schools in Bristol, UK. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, anonymized and analysed using conventional content analysis. The majority of parents rated family engagement in physical activity as important, and identified benefits such as increased parent-child communication, spending time together, enjoyment, enhanced mental health, weight control and physical fitness. Despite these benefits most parents reported their families did little or no physical activity together as a family unit during the week, and any activities performed together were usually sedentary in nature. They reported increased family physical activity on the weekends but rarely including the full family unit simultaneously. Parents in two-parent households commonly paired off with one or more children because of complexities of schedules. Commonly reported barriers were busy lifestyles, diverse ages and interests of children and adults, bad weather, and lack of access to facilities, transportation and money to support activities. Family-based interventions might be more effective if they are designed to accommodate the complex demands and needs of two-parent and single-parent families and provide affordable, diverse activities

  2. Family communication as strategy in diabetes prevention: an observational study in families with Dutch and Surinamese South-Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Suzanne C M; Cornel, Martina C; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, Petronella H L M; Snoek, Frank J

    2012-04-01

    To explore the possibility of utilizing family communication as a diabetes prevention strategy, specifically targeting high-risk families with South-Asian ancestry in The Netherlands. In a cross-sectional study, type 2 diabetes patients from Dutch (n=311) and Surinamese South-Asian (n=157) origin filled in a questionnaire assessing socio-demographic characteristics, beliefs and concerns about familial diabetes risk, primary prevention, and diabetes-related family communication. Discussing diabetes is regarded acceptable in most families. Especially Surinamese South-Asian patients (68%) seemed motivated to convey risk messages to their relatives; they reported a higher risk perception and expressed more concern than Dutch patients. While 40% in both groups thought relatives are able to prevent developing diabetes, 46% in Dutch and 33% in Surinamese South-Asian patients were unsure. Promoting family communication appears a feasible strategy in diabetes prevention in high-risk (Surinamese South-Asian) families. Health care providers should address patients' concern and emphasize opportunities for prevention. Findings favor training of clinicians in utilizing a family approach as prevention strategy. Patients (particularly Surinamese South-Asians) are in need of professional help in the process of family risk disclosure. (Online) Educational tools should be made available at which patients can refer their relatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Under the Threat of Mount Saint Helens: A Study of Chronic Family Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    reported in the buil] It ins and shown in the eruption maps. After each of the 14 messages, the family member- business manager was allowed to choose... Family Stress Robert K. Leik 2 2 19 Sheila A. Leik Knut Ekker I Gregory A. Gifford EI I i University of Minnesota for Federal Emergency Management Agency...activLty. The game was so constructed that if an eruption had covered the geographil area where the family was located, difficulties with the business

  4. Financing Universal Coverage in Malaysia: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Hong Teck; Cheah, Julius Chee Ho

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain an agenda for universal coverage and equitable health system is to develop effective structuring and management of health financing. Global experiences with different systems of health financing suggests that a strong public role in health financing is essential for health systems to protect the poor and health systems with the strongest state role are likely the more equitable and achieve better aggregate health outcomes. Using Malaysia as a case study, this...

  5. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  6. Theoretical study of nuclear physics with strangeness at Nankai University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Pingzhi

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical study of nuclear physics with strangeness from the nuclear physics group at Nankai university is briefly introduced. Theoretical calculations on hyperon mean free paths in nuclear medium have been done. The other 4 topics in the area of strangeness nuclear physics are the effect of different baryon impurities in nucleus, the heavy flavored baryon hypernuclei, the eta-mesons in nuclear matter and the properties of kaonic nuclei. (authors)

  7. Study on Motives of University Students for Watching Sport Events (Sırnak Province Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifi ÜZÜM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study has been conducted to determine the factors influencing motives of university students in Sirnak on watching sport events. The sampling group includes 73 females and 107 males, totally 180 students. External motivations scale for sport spectators (EMSSS and internal motivations scale for sport spectators (IMSSS developed by Polat and Yalçın (2014 were used as a data collection tool for this study. (EMSSS consists of totally 34 articles and 9 sub - dimensions, which are defined as Social Sharing , Popularity and Actuality, Family Bonds, Promotion and Media, Ethics, Opportunities for Betting, Knowledge, Cultural Development, and Esthetic Values (IMSSS consists of 40 articles and 7 sub - dimensions, whic h are described as National Sentiments, Passion for the Sport, Quality and Sense of Competition, Fanship, Regional Loyalty, Success and Level of Skill, Relaxation and Reducing Stress . T - test, Pearson's correlation analysis and one - way analysis of varianc e test were applied for the analysis of survey data. According to the survey findings; it is possible to say that factors such as gender, active sportsmanship, the most watched sport branch, age, the amount of expenses for watching competitions etc. can in fluence motives for watching sport events.

  8. A Comparative Study of Entrepreneurship Curriculum Development and Review at the University of Zimbabwe and Botho University, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Svotwa, Douglas; Rudhumbu, Norman; Mutsau, Morgen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make comparative study of the development and review process of the entrepreneurship curriculum at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Faculty of Commerce and Botho University, (BU) Faculty of Business and Accounting in Gaborone, Botswana. The study focused on the processes and influences of curriculum development…

  9. An Organizational Culture Study of Missouri State University Faculty/Staff in Relation to the University's Public Affair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Marissa LeClaire

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address a problem of practice of the public affairs mission through the perceptions of faculty and staff members at Missouri State University of the University's organizational culture. The design included a phenomenological study with a set of organizational culture procedural questions related to the perceptions…

  10. A Comparative Study between Universal Eclectic Septoplasty Technique and Cottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral Neto, Odim Ferreira do; Mizoguchi, Flavio Massao; Freitas, Renato da Silva; Maniglia, João Jairney; Maniglia, Fábio Fabrício; Maniglia, Ricardo Fabrício

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  Since the last century surgical correction of nasal septum deviation has been improved. The Universal Eclectic Technique was recently reported and there are still few studies dedicated to address this surgical approach. Objective  The objective of this study is to compare the results of septal deviation correction achieved using the Universal Eclectic Technique (UET) with those obtained through Cottle's Technique. Methods  This is a prospective study with two consecutive case series totaling 90 patients (40 women and 50 men), aged between 18 and 55 years. We divided patients into two groups according to the surgical approach. Fifty-three patients underwent septoplasty through Universal Eclectic Technique (UET) and thirty-seven patients were submitted to classical Cottle's septoplasty technique. All patients have answered the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation Scale (NOSE) questionnaire to assess pre and postoperative nasal obstruction. Results  Statistical analysis showed a significantly shorter operating time for the UET group. Nasal edema assessment performed seven days after the surgery showed a prevalence of mild edema in UET group and moderate edema in Cottle's technique group. In regard to complication rates, UET presented a single case of septal hematoma while in Cottle's technique group we observed: 02 cases of severe edemas, 01 case of incapacitating headache, and 01 complaint of nasal pain. Conclusion  The Universal Eclectic Technique (UET) has proven to be a safe and effective surgical technique with faster symptomatic improvement, low complication rates, and reduced surgical time when compared with classical Cottle's technique. PMID:28680499

  11. Identifying factors related to family management during the coping process of families with childhood chronic conditions: a multi-site study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wei, Min; Shen, Nanping; Zhang, Yaqing

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the key predictors for each aspect of family management of families with children who have chronic conditions in China. The participants included 399 caregivers whose children have chronic illnesses. We used the following instruments: Child Behavior Checklist; Feetham Family Functioning Survey; and Family Management Measures. The final modes of the hierarchical regression explained 29-48% of the variance in aspects of family management. More family support should be provided for those with low family income, children with renal and genetic disorders and rheumatic diseases and those living in rural areas. Child and family functioning affects family management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Family members of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms are at increased risk for aneurysms: analysis of 618 probands and their families from the Liège AAA Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalihasan, Natzi; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Kerstenne, Marie-Ange; Cheramy-Bien, Jean-Paul; Smelser, Diane T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-05-01

    The objectives were to answer the following questions with the help of a well-characterized population in Liège, Belgium: 1) what percentage of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have a positive family history for AAA? 2) what is the prevalence of AAAs among relatives of patients with AAA? and 3) do familial and sporadic AAA cases differ in clinical characteristics? Patients with unrelated AAA diagnosed at the Cardiovascular Surgery Department, University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between 1999 and 2012 were invited to the study. A detailed family history was obtained in interviews and recorded using Progeny software. We divided the 618 patients into 2 study groups: group I, 296 patients with AAA (268; 91% men) were followed up with computerized tomography combined with positron emission tomography; and group II, 322 patients with AAA (295; 92% men) whose families were invited to ultrasonographic screening. In the initial interview, 62 (10%) of the 618 patients with AAA reported a positive family history for AAA. Ultrasonographic screening identified 24 new AAAs among 186 relatives (≥50 years) of 144 families yielding a prevalence of 13%. The highest prevalence (25%) was found among brothers. By combining the number of AAAs found by ultrasonographic screening with those diagnosed previously the observed lifetime prevalence of AAA was estimated to be 32% in brothers. The familial AAA cases were more likely to have a ruptured AAA than the sporadic cases (8% vs. 2.4%; P AAA among brothers, support genetic contribution to AAA pathogenesis, and provide rationale for targeted screening of relatives of patients with AAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mistreatment of university students most common during medical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuutinen Matti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study concerns the occurrence of various forms of mistreatment by staff and fellow students experienced by students in the Faculty of Medicine and the other four faculties of the University of Oulu, Finland. Methods A questionnaire with 51 questions on various forms of physical and psychological mistreatment was distributed to 665 students (451 females after lectures or examinations and filled in and returned. The results were analysed by gender and faculty. The differences between the males and females were assessed statistically using a test for the equality of two proportions. An exact two-sided P value was calculated using a mid-P approach to Fisher's exact test (the null hypothesis being that there is no difference between the two proportions. Results About half of the students answering the questionnaire had experienced some form of mistreatment by staff during their university studies, most commonly humiliation and contempt (40%, negative or disparaging remarks (34%, yelling and shouting (23%, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based mistreatment (17% and tasks assigned as punishment (13%. The students in the Faculty of Medicine reported every form of mistreatment more commonly than those in the Faculties of Humanities, Education, Science and Technology. Experiences of mistreatment varied, but clear messages regarding its patterns were to be found in each faculty. Female students reported more instances of mistreatment than males and were more disturbed by them. Professors, lecturers and other staff in particular mistreated female students more than they mistreated males. About half of the respondents reported some form of mistreatment by their fellow students. Conclusion Students in the Faculty of Medicine reported the greatest amount of mistreatment. If a faculty mistreats its students, its success in the main tasks of universities, research, teaching and learning, will be threatened. The results

  14. Supporting Families: A Nurturing Teacher Education Strategy in Nauru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terence; Serow, Penelope; Taylor, Neil; Angell, Emily; Tarrant, Jodana; Burnett, Greg; Smardon, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    There has been little recent documentation concerning Pacific family support for family members locally involved in university study in their Pacific home country and how such responses affect both parties. Some studies dealing with family support for student family members, including Pacific families residing in the USA, have been published. A…

  15. Surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira.

    1980-04-01

    The surface studies for nuclear fusion research consist of the studies on the surface process and the surface damage. The problems with the surface study are different at different research stages. The plasma-wall interaction in the ignition stage is mainly concerned with heating. The impurity control becomes important in the breakeven stage. In the longer burn experiment, the problems of plasma contamination and ash accumulation are serious, and the blistering is also a problem. From the reactor aspect, the reduction of life of wall due to the irradiation of high fluence must be considered. The surface damage due to plasma disruption is a very big problem. The activities concerning the surface studies in university-linked organizations are the surface characterization for fusion reactor materials by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, the high power ion irradiation test for CTR first wall, data compilation on plasma-wall interaction, the studies of sputtering process and surface coating, and the study on hydrogen isotope permeation through metals for fusion reactors. Other activities such as the sample characterization at many universities using the SUS 304 samples from the same lot, and the collaboration works on JIPP-T-2 plasma wall experiments are introduced. Concerning the surface study, US-Japan or international collaboration are strongly expected. (Kato, T.)

  16. Establishing a Methodology to Examine the Effects of War-Zone PTSD on the Family: The Family Foundations Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasterling, Jennifer J.; Taft, Casey T.; Proctor, Susan P.; MacDonald, Helen Z.; Lawrence, Amy; Kalill, Kathleen; Kaiser, Anica P.; Lee, Lewina O.; King, Daniel W.; King, Lynda A.; Fairbank, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Military deployment may adversely affect not only returning veterans, but their families, as well. As a result, researchers have increasingly focused on identifying risk and protective factors for successful family adaptation to war-zone deployment, re-integration of the returning veteran, and the longer-term psychosocial consequences of deployment experienced by some veterans and families. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among returning veterans may pose particular challenges to military and military veteran families; however, questions remain regarding the impact of the course of veteran PTSD and other potential moderating factors on family adaptation to military deployment. The Family Foundations Study builds upon an established longitudinal cohort of Army soldiers (i.e., the Neurocognition Deployment Health Study) to help address remaining knowledge gaps. This report describes the conceptual framework and key gaps in knowledge that guided the study design, methodological challenges and special considerations in conducting military family research, and how these gaps, challenges, and special considerations are addressed by the study. PMID:26077194

  17. A Family Longevity Selection Score: Ranking Sibships by Their Longevity, Size, and Availability for Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Hadley, Evan C; Province, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Family studies of exceptional longevity can potentially identify genetic and other factors contributing to long life and healthy aging. Although such studies seek families that are exceptionally long lived, they also need living members who can provide DNA and phenotype information. On the basis...... of these considerations, the authors developed a metric to rank families for selection into a family study of longevity. Their measure, the family longevity selection score (FLoSS), is the sum of 2 components: 1) an estimated family longevity score built from birth-, gender-, and nation-specific cohort survival...... probabilities and 2) a bonus for older living siblings. The authors examined properties of FLoSS-based family rankings by using data from 3 ongoing studies: the New England Centenarian Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and screenees for the Long Life Family Study. FLoSS-based selection yields families...

  18. An exploratory study of the outdoor recreation participation of families who have a child under sixteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Du Lee; Alan Graefe; Robert Burns

    2007-01-01

    Family recreation has been recognized as an effective way to nurture family customs and promote healthy youth development. In particular, outdoor-based recreation that includes inherent challenges often offers opportunities for a family to grow together and promotes family cohesion and youth development. Building on earlier research, this study attempts to further...

  19. Genetic liability, prenatal health, stress and family environment: risk factors in the Harvard Adolescent Family High Risk for schizophrenia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Deborah J; Faraone, Stephen V; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsuang, Ming T; Seidman, Larry J

    2014-08-01

    The familial ("genetic") high-risk (FHR) paradigm enables assessment of individuals at risk for schizophrenia based on a positive family history of schizophrenia in first-degree, biological relatives. This strategy presumes genetic transmission of abnormal traits given high heritability of the illness. It is plausible, however, that adverse environmental factors are also transmitted in these families. Few studies have evaluated both biological and environmental factors within a FHR study of adolescents. We conceptualize four precursors to psychosis pathogenesis: two biological (genetic predisposition, prenatal health issues (PHIs)) and two environmental (family environment, stressful life events (SLEs)). Participants assessed between 1998 and 2007 (ages 13-25) included 40 (20F/20M) adolescents at FHR for schizophrenia (FHRs) and 55 (31F/24M) community controls. 'Genetic load' indexed number of affected family members relative to pedigree size. PHI was significantly greater among FHRs, and family cohesion and expressiveness were less (and family conflict was higher) among FHRs; however, groups did not significantly differ in SLE indices. Among FHRs, genetic liability was significantly associated with PHI and family expressiveness. Prenatal and family environmental disruptions are elevated in families with a first-degree relative with schizophrenia. Findings support our proposed 'polygenic neurodevelopmental diathesis-stress model' whereby psychosis susceptibility (and resilience) involves the independent and synergistic confluence of (temporally-sensitive) biological and environmental factors across development. Recognition of biological and social environmental influences across critical developmental periods points to key issues relevant for enhanced identification of psychosis susceptibility, facilitation of more precise models of illness risk, and development of novel prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Beyond sperm cells: a qualitative study on constructed meanings of the sperm donor in lesbian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyverkens, E; Provoost, V; Ravelingien, A; De Sutter, P; Pennings, G; Buysse, A

    2014-06-01

    What meanings do lesbian couples construct regarding their sperm donor? For some parents, the donor was increasingly presented as a person, whereas for other parents, the donor was seen as an instrument from the moment they received the sperm donation. Few studies specifically focus on how lesbian couples deal with the issue of third-party anonymous gamete donation. It is often assumed that they have fewer difficulties than heterosexual couples with the involvement of a male procreator, since their status as a donor conception family is 'socially visible' and there is no social father who fears exclusion. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 lesbian couples (20 participants), recruited via the Ghent University Hospital. All couples had at least one child, conceived through anonymous donor insemination, between 7 and 10 years old. Within the data corpus, a particular data set was analyzed where couples referred to their donor and his position in their family. Step-by-step inductive thematic analysis was performed resulting in themes that are grounded in the data. All phases of the analysis were followed by team discussion. This study reveals different donor constructs, indicating different ways of dealing with the third-party involvement in the family. Some parents diminish the role of the donor throughout family life and continue to present him as an instrument: something they needed in order to become parents. Others show an increasing interest in the donor as the children mature, which results in a more personalized account of the donor. In our qualitative cross-sectional study, we collected retrospectively constructed stories. Longitudinal qualitative and quantitative research is required to allow for an extrapolation of the conclusions made. This study shows how the concept of the donor is constructed within lesbian families and how it is challenged by the child's developing personality and features. When counseling prospective parents, it could

  1. Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

  2. Sociological Analysis of Professional Identity of the Students, Case Study: Students of University of Mazandaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Heydari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By studying of present situation of universities in Iran, through research regarding students' lives, this article seeks to consider the features of students' professional identity. The professional identity is a social one, made, in relation with other individuals, through practical learning and instruction and professional experiments. For the students, the formally start of a social involvement, coincides with the start of their studies, and the formation of their professional identities will be intensified and reinforced through practical instructions concerning their fields. The method used in this study is qualitative research in the way of grounded theory method. To create the sample, the theoretical method is used and continued to reach saturation stage. The findings, hence, are collected applying the prevalence interview technique for 19 students and group interview for 15 students of University ofMazandaran. The research findings suggest that, the professional identities of the students have two features of scientific and personal identities. The students' scientific identity is formed by the students' tendencies and attitudes, and also their scientific actions and efforts. The personal identity is a perception that student builds up of himself as a scientific actor present at university environment. The development of a professional identity, in addition, is associated with the position of the individual within the community. Hence, the gender, socio-economic status, supports by family and friends, individual's social environment and networks influence on the formation of his professional identity.

  3. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  4. Gendered Universities and the Wage Gap: Case Study of a Pay Equity Audit in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Jan; Hill, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    Studies worldwide have found that women's pay lags behind men's in academia. This article describes pay equity policies in Australia and overseas and the use of a pay equity audit as a strategic tool to reduce gender inequities at The University of Western Australia (UWA). As a research-intensive university, UWA resembles similar universities…

  5. Redefining University Roles in Regional Economies: A Case Study of University-Industry Relations and Academic Organization in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso M.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology has created a new frontier for the convergence of university and industrial research. In the United States, major federal investments provided a massive boom for this field over the decade. This paper reports on a case study of how the University at Albany came to establish the first college of nanotechnology…

  6. Student Dropout at the Hellenic Open University: Evaluation of the Graduate Program, "Studies in Education"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Vergidis

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study traces the root causes of dropout rates in one post-graduate course “Studies in Education,” offered by the Hellenic Open University (HOU. From our research findings, it was found that the main cause of dropping out stem from a combination of adult learners’ obligations, specifically balancing their academic workload with their employment commitments and family obligations (mainly for female students. The second reason for dropout rates among adult distance education learners include students’ miscalculation of the available time for studying and their underestimation of the extra effort required for effective learning. These reasons can be compared to the educational material, which, in general, was not considered overly difficult and did not appear to compel students to abandon their studies.

  7. A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three occasions,…

  8. Comparative Study of the Characteristics of Family Planning Service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In logistics regression analysis family planning was significantly lower in the illiterate. Positive husband\\'s attitude had the strongest association (0R 9.3, 95% CI 4.6,18.7) with family planning, in addition to programs that create demand for smaller well-spread children, IEC and family planning services should target men and ...

  9. A genetic basis for infectious mononucleosis: evidence from a family study of hospitalized cases in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2014-06-01

    Circumstantial evidence from genome-wide association and family studies of various Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases suggests a substantial genetic component in infectious mononucleosis (IM) etiology. However, familial aggregation of IM has scarcely been studied. We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register to study rate ratios of IM in a cohort of 2 823 583 Danish children born between 1971 and 2011. Specifically, we investigated the risk of IM in twins and in first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of patients with IM. In the analyses, IM was defined as a diagnosis of IM in a hospital contact. Effects of contagion between family members were dealt with by excluding follow-up time the first year after the occurrence of IM in a relative. A total of 16 870 cases of IM were observed during 40.4 million person-years of follow-up from 1977 to 2011. The rate ratios and the associated 95% confidence intervals were 9.3 (3.0-29) in same-sex twins, 3.0 (2.6-3.5) in siblings, 1.9 (1.6-2.2) in children, 1.4 (1.3-1.6) in second-degree relatives, and 1.0 (0.9-1.2) in third-degree relatives of IM patients. The rate ratios were very similar for IM in children (aged 0-6 years) and older children/adolescents (aged 7-19 years). We found evidence of familial aggregation of IM that warrants genome-wide association studies on IM disease etiology, especially to examine commonalities with causal pathways in other Epstein-Barr virus-related diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Death with dignity from the perspective of the surviving family: a survey study among family caregivers of deceased older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Isis E; Pasman, H Roeline W; Kaspers, Pam J; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Willems, Dick L; Deeg, Dorly J H; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2013-07-01

    Death with dignity has been identified as important both to patients and their surviving family. While research results have been published on what patients themselves believe may affect the dignity of their deaths, little is known about what family caregivers consider to be a dignified death. (1) To assess the prevalence of death with dignity in older adults from the perspective of family caregivers, (2) to determine factors that diminish dignity during the dying phase according to family caregivers, and (3) to identify physical, psychosocial, and care factors associated with death with dignity. A survey study with a self-administered questionnaire. Family caregivers of 163 deceased older (>55 years of age) adults ("patients") who had participated in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. Of the family caregivers, 69% reported that their relative had died with dignity. Factors associated with a dignified death in a multivariate regression model were patients feeling peaceful and ready to die, absence of anxiety and depressive mood, presence of fatigue, and a clear explanation by the physician of treatment options during the final months of life. The physical and psychosocial condition of the patient in combination with care factors contributed to death with dignity from the perspective of the family caregiver. The patient's state of mind during the last phase of life and clear communication on the part of the physician both seem to be of particular importance.

  11. The evaluation of family functioning by the family assessment device: a systematic review of studies in adult clinical populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, Laura; Tomba, Elena; Grandi, Silvana; Keitner, Gabor I

    2015-03-01

    A large body of research, documenting the impact of a family's functioning on health outcomes, highlights the importance of introducing the evaluation of patients' family dynamics into clinical judgment. The Family Assessment Device (FAD) is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess specific dimensions of family functioning. This qualitative systematic review, which follows PRISMA guidelines, aimed to identify the FAD's clinimetric properties and to report the incremental utility of its inclusion in clinical settings. A thorough literature search was performed, using both computerized and manual searches, yielding a total of 148 studies that were included in this review. The FAD has been extensively used in a variety of research contexts. In the majority of studies it was able to discriminate between clinical populations and controls and among groups of patients with different illnesses. The FAD also showed good test-retest and concurrent reliability, and modest sensitivity to change after treatment. FAD-dysfunctional family functioning was related to several patient clinical outcomes, including lower recovery rates and adherence to treatment, longer recovery time, poorer quality of life, and increased risk of relapse and drop-out. The present review demonstrates that the FAD is a suitable instrument for the evaluation of family functioning both in clinical and research settings. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  12. Patients' and families' perspectives of patient safety at the end of life: a video-reflexive ethnography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Aileen; Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients' and families' perspectives of safety and quality in the setting of a life-limiting illness. Data reported here were generated from a qualitative study using video-reflexive ethnographic methodology. Data were collected over 18 months and generated through participant observation, shadowing of clinicians, field-interviews and semi-structured interviews with patients and families. The study was conducted at two hospital sites in Sydney, Australia and in patients' homes. Patients with an advanced life-limiting illness (n = 29) ranging in age between 27 and 89 years and family members (n = 5) participated in the study. Patient safety remains important to dying patients and families. For dying people, iatrogenic harm is not regarded as 'one off' incidents. Rather, harm is experienced as a result of an unfolding series of negative events. Critically, iatrogenic harm is emotional, social and spiritual and not solely technical-clinical misadventure and is inextricably linked with feeling unsafe. Thus, patient safety extends beyond narrowly defined technical-clinical parameters to include interpersonal safety. Current approaches to patient safety do not address fully the needs of dying patients and their families. Patients and their families regard poor communication with and by health professionals to be harmful in and of itself. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  13. [Associated costs with dental studies in a public Mexican university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Medina-Solís, June Janette; Sánchez-de la Cruz, Alicia; Ascencio-Villagrán, Arturo; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    To calculate associated costs with dental studies (ACDS) in a public university. We performed a cross-sectional study using a costing system on a random sample of 376 dental students enrolled at any semester in a public university. To calculate ACDS (Mexican pesos of 2009-1), we used a questionnaire divided into eight sections. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables, housing costs, food, transportation, instruments and equipment, as well as remunerations associated with patient care along 16 weeks of classes in each semester were included. We used linear regression. The average of ACDS was of 18,357.54 ± 12,746.81 Mexican pesos. The largest percentage of ACDS (30.2 %) was for clinical instruments (5,537.66 ± 6,260.50). Students also spent funds in paying to patients for their time during care delivered (2,402.11 ± 4,796.50). Associated variables (p 〈 0.001) with the ACDS were having completed at least one clinical course or one theoretical-practical course, living within the state or out of state (compared to students who live in the city where dental studies take place), and being enrolled in the more advanced dental studies. The results indicate that a significant percentage of the cost to students (13.1 %) is related with clinical care delivery.

  14. Young people's experiences of managing Type 1 diabetes at university: a national study of UK university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, J; Sampson, M; Swords, F; Murphy, H R; Clark, A; Howe, A; Price, C; Datta, V; Myint, K S

    2018-04-23

    Little is known about the challenges of transitioning from school to university for young people with Type 1 diabetes. In a national survey, we investigated the impact of entering and attending university on diabetes self-care in students with Type 1 diabetes in all UK universities. Some 1865 current UK university students aged 18-24 years with Type 1 diabetes, were invited to complete a structured questionnaire. The association between demographic variables and diabetes variables was assessed using logistic regression models. In total, 584 (31%) students from 64 hospitals and 37 university medical practices completed the questionnaire. Some 62% had maintained routine diabetes care with their home team, whereas 32% moved to the university provider. Since starting university, 63% reported harder diabetes management and 44% reported higher HbA 1c levels than before university. At university, 52% had frequent hypoglycaemia, 9.6% reported one or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia and 26% experienced diabetes-related hospital admissions. Female students and those who changed healthcare provider were approximately twice as likely to report poor glycaemic control, emergency hospital admissions and frequent hypoglycaemia. Females were more likely than males to report stress [odds ratio (OR) 4.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.19-7.16], illness (OR 3.48, 95% CI 2.06-5.87) and weight management issues (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.99-5.11) as barriers to self-care. Despite these difficulties, 91% of respondents never or rarely contacted university support services about their diabetes. The study quantifies the high level of risk experienced by students with Type 1 diabetes during the transition to university, in particular, female students and those moving to a new university healthcare provider. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. University-to-industry advanced technology transfer. A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhor, R S; Lung, R T

    1983-06-01

    This case study examines the events in the transfer of an advanced technology (a text-to-speech reading machine) from the university group that developed the technology to an industrial firm seeking to exploit the innovation. After a brief history of the six-year project, the paper discusses the roles of the participants, markets, and time and cost considerations. A model of technology transfer is presented and policy implications derived from the case are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need for matching technical competence between donor and recipient, and on the function of a transfer agent in facilitating the social process of technology transfer. 42 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Master′s and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebatallah Nour-Eldein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master′s and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM. A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master′s and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM degree theses were  reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Results: Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master′s degrees (84.1%. Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%. The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of  research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC-based studies in 59.1%. The "Patient" category exceeded the other categories (28.4%. Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. Conclusion: The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended.

  17. ANALYSES OF FAMILY OWNED ENTERPRISE’S CONTINUITY (CASE STUDY OF FOUR FAMILY OWNED ENTERPRISE IN JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Maharani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the roles that have an influence on the Family-Owned Enterprise (FOE succession. This issue is raised because of the transition phenomena that occur between generations of the FOE, is interesting to study. Transition within the meaning of the Family Owned Enterprise is business continuity between generations. Gender aspects, was appointed as one of the problems in this study because gender is related to the sustainability of the Family-Owned Enterprise, among others because of aspects of the approach. Aspects of leadership became one of the problems in this research because it has relevance to the sustainability of the Family-Owned Enterprise, among others because of aspects of decision making. The aspects of entrepreneurship was appointed as one of the problems (because they have a relationship with the Family-Owned Enterprise continuity, partly because aspects of entrepreneurial orientation. This research will focus on all three roles at the level of Small and Medium Enterprises and Medium Enterprises. Literatures used in this study includes: Unified System, Sustainable Family, Dynamics Triangular. This research method is qualitative, and the approach is inductive-deductive. Information in this research will be conducted in four companies, namely small and medium enterprises and medium enterprises engaged in rice distribution.

  18. The etiology of social aggression: a nuclear twin family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawinski, Brooke L; Klump, Kelly L; Burt, S Alexandra

    2018-04-02

    Social aggression is a form of antisocial behavior in which social relationships and social status are used to damage reputations and inflict emotional harm on others. Despite extensive research examining the prevalence and consequences of social aggression, only a few studies have examined its genetic-environmental etiology, with markedly inconsistent results. We estimated the etiology of social aggression using the nuclear twin family (NTF) model. Maternal-report, paternal-report, and teacher-report data were collected for twin social aggression (N = 1030 pairs). We also examined the data using the classical twin (CT) model to evaluate whether its strict assumptions may have biased previous heritability estimates. The best-fitting NTF model for all informants was the ASFE model, indicating that additive genetic, sibling environmental, familial environmental, and non-shared environmental influences significantly contribute to the etiology of social aggression in middle childhood. However, the best-fitting CT model varied across informants, ranging from AE and ACE to CE. Specific heritability estimates for both NTF and CT models also varied across informants such that teacher reports indicated greater genetic influences and father reports indicated greater shared environmental influences. Although the specific NTF parameter estimates varied across informants, social aggression generally emerged as largely additive genetic (A = 0.15-0.77) and sibling environmental (S = 0.42-0.72) in origin. Such findings not only highlight an important role for individual genetic risk in the etiology of social aggression, but also raise important questions regarding the role of the environment.

  19. Gender Stereotyping in Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hussain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender stereotyping and gender role development is one of the debatable concerns to sociologists especially those who are interested in sociology of gender. This study attempts to investigate the role of family inculcating gender stereotyping in Pakhtun culture and its impact on gender role development conducted in public-sector universities of Malakand Division, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The data were collected through in-depth interview method using interview guide as a tool of data collection. A sample size of 24 respondents consisting male and female students and teachers (8 samples from each university through purposive sampling technique was selected from three universities in the region, that is, University of Malakand, University of Swat, and Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University Sharingal (main campus. The collected information has been analyzed qualitatively where primary information has been linked with secondary data for further elaboration and attainment of grounded facts. The study reveals that gender stereotyping and gender role formation are sociocultural and relational constructs, which are developed and inculcated in the institutional network, social interaction, and social relationships especially in family. The study indicated that in family sphere, gender stereotyping and gender role formation are the outcome of gender socialization, differential familial environment, and parents’ differential role with children. The study recommends that gender-balanced familial environment, adopting the strategy of gender mainstreaming and positive role of media, can overcome gender stereotyping and reduce its impacts on gender and social role formation.

  20. The Impacts of Gender Discrimination, Socio-Economic Capital & University Enrollment Plans: A Case Study in Ankara Distinct

    OpenAIRE

    Ulusoy, M. Demet

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on a sample of 726 non-clinical adolescents (aged 17-18 years) from high schools in Ankara/ Turkey, this study investigated the interacting relationships between Turkish adolescents’ university plans and personal capital variables such as gender, school achievement, self-esteem, anxiety/depression, goal setting, course attendance and family atmosphere such as parental supporting, parental monitoring, parental separation and socio-economic c...

  1. Assessing the Internship Program in Universities: Case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on business skills in an effort to address a gap between theory and practice. This in essence increases the student's degree of employability after graduating from university. To address this mismatch, companies and universities have initiated ...

  2. Official website usage by university in crisis communication: Case study from Islamic University of Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Prastya, Narayana Mahendra

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss about crisis communication activities using official website in educational organizations. The case of this paper is how Islamic University of Indonesia (UII) responding the crisis following the death of three students in UII freshman orientation program. The data of this research using UII official statement that posted in the university official website between 23 January 2017- 31 January 2017. The consideration to choose the time frame because it was the most cri...

  3. Migraine attacks among medical students in Soochow University, Southeast China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu X

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Gu,1,2 Yaojie Xie1 1School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong; 2Intensive Care Unit, Suzhou Municipal Hospital, Suzhou, China Purpose: Migraine is one of the most common primary headache disorders and is burdensome to both the individual and society, influencing the academic performance and quality of daily lives of medical students worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the migraine prevalence in a sample of university medical students in China and to examine the features and typical trigger factors of migraine among these students. Patients and methods: From May 2016 to August 2016, a total of 1,060 medical students who were enrolled in Soochow University in Jiangsu Province in China were chosen through stratified random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire that included the ID MigraineTM for screening of migraine cases was used to collect data. The frequency, severity, duration of migraine attacks, and relevant trigger factors were measured for migraine cases. In total, 986 students completed the questionnaire. Results: The overall migraine prevalence among students was 7.91%, with 4.64% in male and 9.84% in female students. Junior-grade students had a higher migraine prevalence than senior students (prevalence of migraine of year 1 to year 5 undergraduates: 10.83%, 8.9% vs. 6.25%, 4.42%, 5.33%, P<0.05; prevalence of migraine of year 1 to year 3 graduates: 9.68%, 9.71% vs. 6.38%, P<0.05. Students with a positive family history were more likely to suffer migraine than those without (OR=8.48, 95% CI: 4.33–16.59. Stress (n=73, 93.59%, lack of sleep (n=72, 92.31%, and change of sleeping time (n=68, 87.18% were the top three trigger factors among the students. Conclusion: Migraine was common among medical students from a university in China, and especially higher in female and junior-grade students, and those with a family history of migraine. Reducing stress and improving sleep quality might be effective

  4. A Study on the Tacit Knowledge of University Faculty: A Case Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingchang; Lin, Hsiuhsu; Lin, YiKai; Chang, Wenlung

    2013-01-01

    The tacit knowledge of university faculty might take roots deep down in their own cognition system and influence their ways of thinking and reasoning. This study aims at (1) the exploration of the characteristics of university professors' tacit knowledge in Taiwan and (2) the disentangling of the factors underlying its development. Drawn from the…

  5. The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD module and the new facet Family/Family life: reliability and validity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Manuela; Sousa, Liliana B; Simões, Mário R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD). The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD includes a new identified facet, Family/Family life. A convenience sample of older adults was recruited (N = 921). The assessment protocol included demographics, self-perceived health, depressive symptoms (GDS-30), cognitive function (ACE-R), daily life activities (IAFAI), health status (SF-12) and QoL (WHOQOL-Bref, EUROHIS-QOL-8 and WHOQOL-OLD). The internal consistency was excellent for the total 24-item WHOQOL-OLD original version and also for the final 28-item European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version. The test-retest reliability for total scores was good. The construct validity of the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD was supported in the correlation matrix analysis. The results indicated good convergent/divergent validity. The WHOQOL-OLD scores differentiated groups of older adults who were healthy/unhealthy and without/mild/severe depressive symptoms. The new facet, Family/Family life, presented evidence of good reliability and validity parameters. Comparatively to international studies, the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version showed similar and/or better psychometric properties. The new facet, Family/Family life, introduces cross-cultural specificity to the study of QoL of older adults and generally improves the psychometric robustness of the WHOQOL-OLD.

  6. Prospective Students' Perceptions of University Brands: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger; Ali-Choudhury, Rehnuma

    2009-01-01

    A model of the elements of a university brand was developed together with an instrument for measuring how favorably each of these elements was perceived by a sample of young people who were considering entering university. One hundred and ninety-eight students undertaking pre-university courses in two further education colleges in East London…

  7. Factors Related to Prevalence of Hallux Valgus in Female University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Hiroto; Juman, Sachiko; Ueda, Ai; Miki, Tomohiro; Shima, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the prevalence of hallux valgus (HV) and examined its association with various factors in a cross-sectional study of Japanese female university students. Methods A questionnaire survey of foot symptoms, lifestyle, and body mass index (BMI) was administered to 343 women who provided informed consent at a women’s university. Footprints were obtained and bone density was measured. Associations of HV with various factors were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results Big toe pain was reported in 26.5% of the women. HV (HV angle, ≥15°) was present in the left foot in 22.4%, the right foot in 20.7%, and unilaterally or bilaterally in 29.7% of women. Mild HV (HV angle, ≥15° to <20°) was noted in the left foot and right foot in 13.4% and 13.1% of women, respectively; no severe HV (HV angle, ≥40°) was observed. HV was associated with big toe pain (adjusted OR: 3.56, 95% CI: 2.01–6.32), history of HV in the mother or maternal grandmother (adjusted OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.19–5.02), and history of HV in other family members (adjusted OR: 3.09, 95% CI: 1.35–7.06). Moderate HV was associated with big toe pain (adjusted OR: 4.58, 95% CI: 2.17–9.66) and history of HV in the mother or maternal grandmother (adjusted OR: 3.36, 95% CI: 1.40–8.07). The proportion of women with big toe pain increased significantly with HV severity. Conclusions HV was present in about 30% of female university students. Young women with big toe pain or a family history of HV should be evaluated for HV. PMID:24705646

  8. Ethical issues in human genome epidemiology: a case study based on the Japanese American Family Study in Seattle, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A

    2002-04-01

    Recent completion of the draft sequence of the human genome has been greeted with both excitement and skepticism, and the potential of this accomplishment for advancing public health has been tempered by ethical concerns about the protection of human subjects. This commentary explores ethical issues arising in human genome epidemiology by using a case study approach based on the ongoing Japanese American Family Study at the University of Washington in Seattle (1994-2003). Ethical issues encountered in designing the study, collecting the data, and reporting the study results are considered. When developing studies, investigators must consider whether to restrict the study to specific racial or ethnic groups and whether community involvement is appropriate. Once the study design is in place, further ethical issues emerge, including obtaining informed consent for DNA banking and protecting the privacy and confidentiality of family members. Finally, investigators must carefully consider whether to report genotype results to study participants and whether pedigrees illustrating the results of the study will be published. Overall, the promise of genomics for improving public health must be pursued based on the fundamental ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice.

  9. Advancing Theory on Knowledge Governance in Universities: A Case Study of a Higher Education Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Mehdi; Håkanson, Lars

    2018-01-01

    The deep structure of university knowledge governance system is uncharted. In an exploratory case study of a university merger with an art college, this study inductively examines how knowledge governance structures in universities affect (and are affected by) the creation and passing on of knowledge. The authors found the university governance…

  10. A Tale of Two (or More Sustainabilities: A Q Methodology Study of University Professors’ Perspectives on Sustainable Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sylvestre

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available If change for sustainability in higher education is to be effective, change efforts must be sensitive to the institutional culture in which they will be applied. Therefore, gaining insight into how institutional stakeholders engage with the concept of sustainable universities is an important first step in understanding how to frame and communicate change. This study employed Q methodology to explore how a group of professors conceptualize sustainable universities. We developed a Q sample of 46 statements comprising common conceptions of sustainable universities and had 26 professors from Dalhousie University rank-order them over a quasi-normal distribution. Our analysis uncovered four statistically significant viewpoints amongst the participants: ranging from technocentric optimists who stress the importance of imbuing students with skills and values to more liberal arts minded faculty suspicious of the potential of sustainability to instrumentalize the university. An examination of how these viewpoints interact on a subjective level revealed a rotating series of alignments and antagonisms in relation to themes traditionally associated with sustainable universities and broader themes associated with the identity of the university in contemporary society. Finally, we conclude by discussing the potential implications that the nature of these alignments and antagonisms may hold for developing a culturally sensitive vision of a sustainable university.

  11. Financing universal coverage in Malaysia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hong Teck; Cheah, Julius Chee Ho

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain an agenda for universal coverage and equitable health system is to develop effective structuring and management of health financing. Global experiences with different systems of health financing suggests that a strong public role in health financing is essential for health systems to protect the poor and health systems with the strongest state role are likely the more equitable and achieve better aggregate health outcomes. Using Malaysia as a case study, this paper seeks to evaluate the progress and capacity of a middle income country in terms of health financing for universal coverage, and also to highlight some of the key underlying health systems challenges.The WHO Health Financing Strategy for the Asia Pacific Region (2010-2015) was used as the framework to evaluate the Malaysian healthcare financing system in terms of the provision of universal coverage for the population, and the Malaysian National Health Accounts (2008) provided the latest Malaysian data on health spending. Measuring against the four target indicators outlined, Malaysia fared credibly with total health expenditure close to 5% of its GDP (4.75%), out-of-pocket payment below 40% of total health expenditure (30.7%), comprehensive social safety nets for vulnerable populations, and a tax-based financing system that fundamentally poses as a national risk-pooled scheme for the population.Nonetheless, within a holistic systems framework, the financing component interacts synergistically with other health system spheres. In Malaysia, outmigration of public health workers particularly specialist doctors remains an issue and financing strategies critically needs to incorporate a comprehensive workforce compensation strategy to improve the health workforce skill mix. Health expenditure information is systematically collated, but feedback from the private sector remains a challenge. Service delivery-wise, there is a need to enhance financing capacity to expand preventive

  12. Predicting the number and sizes of IBD regions among family members and evaluating the family size requirement for linkage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanling; Wang, Zhanyong; Wang, Lusheng; Sham, Pak-Chung; Huang, Peng; Lau, Yu Lung

    2008-12-01

    With genotyping of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) replacing that of microsatellite markers in linkage studies, it becomes possible to accurately determine the genomic regions shared identity by descent (IBD) by family members. In addition to evaluating the likelihood of linkage for a region with the underlining disease (the LOD score approach), an appropriate question to ask is what would be the expected number and sizes of IBD regions among the affecteds, as there could be more than one region reaching the maximum achievable LOD score for a given family. Here, we introduce a computer program to allow the prediction of the total number of IBD regions among family members and their sizes. Reversely, it can be used to predict the portion of the genome that can be excluded from consideration according to the family size and user-defined inheritance mode and penetrance. Such information has implications on the feasibility of conducting linkage analysis on a given family of certain size and structure or on a few small families when interfamily homogeneity can be assumed. It can also help determine the most relevant members to be genotyped for such a study. Simulation results showed that the IBD regions containing true mutations are usually larger than regions IBD due to random chance. We have made use of this feature in our program to allow evaluation of the identified IBD regions based on Bayesian probability calculation and simulation results.

  13. Impact of family capital & social capital on youth entrepreneurship – a study of Uttarakhand state, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    The research paper intends to interpret how the three forms of family capital viz. family's financial capital, family's man power capital and family's human capital influences the career choice intention of students of HEI's of Uttarakhand, India. Additionally the study also evaluates the impact of student's individual social capital on his career intent. This is a quantitative study conducted at Uttarakhand state of India on a large sample of students studying in various professional courses...

  14. A STUDY ON THE SUCCESSION MODEL OF FAMILY BUSINESSS

    OpenAIRE

    Hung-Jung Chang; Szu-Ju Lin

    2011-01-01

    Family business has to face issues such as ownership issue, governance structure issue and succession issue, etc. in enterprise development history. Among them, the succession issue is an important transition point in enterprise’s survival and development. It is thus thought of as one of the most important strategic and decision making issues in the enterprise. This article aims at investigating the succession model of Family business. First, reviews are done on the meaning of Family business...

  15. A study on measuring the quality of university website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Andalib

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, many organizations try to provide some of their services through their websites. This would help them provide fast and reliable services to various people around the world. In this paper, we present an empirical survey to measure the relative performance of a university website in Iran using Parasuraman's technological readiness index. The proposed study uses a standard questionnaire and distributes it among 387 active website users and the results are analyzed using structural equation modeling. The proposed study of this paper considers the effects of four factors including efficiency, accessibility, achievement and security on customer loyalty via two variables of trust and satisfaction. The results demonstrate that three components of trust, efficiency and achievement play essential role on customer loyalty.

  16. A californium-252 source for radiobiological studies at Hiroshima University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Takeoka, Seiji; Kuroda, Tokue; Tsujimura, Tomotaka; Kawami, Masaharu; Hoshi, Masaharu; Sawada, Shozo

    1987-01-01

    A 1.93 Ci (3.6 mg) californium-252 source was installed in the radiation facility of the Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University. This source produces fission neutrons (8.7 x 10 9 n/s at the time of its installation), which are similar to neutron spectrum of the atomic bombs. It is useful for studying biological effects of fission neutrons and neutron dosimetry. An apparatus was dosigned to accomodate this source and to apply it to such studies. It has resulted in profitable fission neutron exposures, while suppressing scattered neutrons and secondary gamma rays. This apparatus incorporates many safety systems, including one which interlocks with all of doors and an elevator serving the exposure room, so as to prevent accidents involving users. (author)

  17. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 12; a three family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Annette; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1992-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 12 has been followed in three large independently ascertained Danish families. Out of a total number of 52 persons examined, 25 were found to carry the inversion. The breakpoints in all three families were localized to p13 and q13, resulting in more than one...... rate is calculated to be 0.58, which is not significantly different from an expected segregation rate of 0.5. In family 3, an additional inversion of a chromosome 9 has been found in 4 individuals. Our results are discussed in relation to previous findings and with respect to the genetic counselling...... of families with pericentric inversions....

  18. Japanese universities' activities for PFC development and PMI studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.

    1998-01-01

    Development of reliable plasma facing components (PFC) with active cooling structures is required for divertor plates of fusion devices in order to remove a large heat flow to the divertor. It is also known that plasma material interactions (PMIs), i.e. fuel hydrogen recycling and erosion of plasma facing material (PFM) determine the energy confinement characteristics. The lifetime of PFCs is limited by the erosion of PFMs. In Japanese universities, studies concerning PFCs and PMIs have been carried out so far for LHD and ITER. For the LHD divertor, both graphite/copper brazed components and mechanical joint components have been developed, and the heat load performance has been examined. For the particle control in LHD, a localized divertor called LID has been designed, the preliminary experiment was conducted in a small helical device, the CHS. In order to reduce the oxygen impurity level, boronization experiments have been conducted systematically, and properties such as oxygen gettering and hydrogen retention were clarified. In the TRIAM-1M tokamak, the damage of PFMs has been investigated using a surface probe. Data on hydrogen retention, which determines the degree of hydrogen recycling, have been accumulated for graphite, Li, B, B 4 C, SiC and W. Conditioning methods are also suggested. In this paper, the problems associated with PFCs and PMIs are pointed out and data recently obtained in Japanese universities and NIFS are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  19. With a Little Help From My Family: A Mixed-Method Study on the Outcomes of Family Support and Workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Lo Presti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate some predictors and outcomes of family-to-work enrichment (FWE via a mixed-method approach. We sampled 447 married employees of an Italian factory. Survey results from Study 1 showed that emotional support from family positively predicted FWE, while this latter mediated the associations between the former on one side, and work engagement and life satisfaction on the other. Moreover, extra-household support directly associated positively with life satisfaction. Evidence from 20 anthropological in-depth interviews (Study 2 returned a more complex picture, highlighting the gendered role of partners inside couples, the importance of kinship support, the sense and the value of filiation and parenthood in their connection with job roles, the complex and continuous interplay between family and life domains. In combination, results from both studies stressed the importance of family support; additionally, evidences from Study 2 suggested that FWE could be better understood taking into account crossover dynamics and the compresence of work-to-family enrichment and conflict. In sum, these studies contributed to shed light on FWE dynamics, an under-researched topic in Italy, whose knowledge could be of great empirical and practical value.

  20. With a Little Help From My Family: A Mixed-Method Study on the Outcomes of Family Support and Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Alessandro; D'Aloisio, Fulvia; Pluviano, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate some predictors and outcomes of family-to-work enrichment (FWE) via a mixed-method approach. We sampled 447 married employees of an Italian factory. Survey results from Study 1 showed that emotional support from family positively predicted FWE, while this latter mediated the associations between the former on one side, and work engagement and life satisfaction on the other. Moreover, extra-household support directly associated positively with life satisfaction. Evidence from 20 anthropological in-depth interviews (Study 2) returned a more complex picture, highlighting the gendered role of partners inside couples, the importance of kinship support, the sense and the value of filiation and parenthood in their connection with job roles, the complex and continuous interplay between family and life domains. In combination, results from both studies stressed the importance of family support; additionally, evidences from Study 2 suggested that FWE could be better understood taking into account crossover dynamics and the compresence of work-to-family enrichment and conflict. In sum, these studies contributed to shed light on FWE dynamics, an under-researched topic in Italy, whose knowledge could be of great empirical and practical value.

  1. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Frisicale, Emanuela Maria; Parente, Paolo; de Waure, Chiara; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk") questionnaire. 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93) were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest) seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  2. Evidence for shared susceptibility to epilepsy and psychosis: a population-based family study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Mary C

    2012-05-01

    There is emerging evidence of an etiological overlap between a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. Here we investigate shared familial vulnerability to psychotic illness and epilepsy in a family-based study.

  3. Familial clustering of habitual constipation: a prospective study in children from West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwani, Waseem; Dolan, Jenna; Elitsur, Yoram

    2010-03-01

    To investigate familial clustering of habitual constipation in pediatric patients who attended our medical facilities. Children with the diagnosis of functional, habitual constipation or patients without constipation and their respective family members were prospectively recruited to our study. Constipation was established in all participants using a standard questionnaire (Rome criteria). A total of 112 children and their families participated in the study, of which 37 were probands families (test) and 75 children and their respective family members constituted the control group. A total of 310 family members completed the questionnaire. No significant differences were found between the study and the control groups in age, sex, or family size. Siblings or parents from the study group (probands) had significantly higher rates of constipation compared with the control group (30% vs 7% and 42% vs 9%, respectively; P = 0.001). Habitual constipation in children seemed to cluster in families. The pathophysiology behind this phenomenon is yet unknown.

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Family Structure and Size and Adoption Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Richard P.; Brooks, Devon

    1997-01-01

    This follow-up study of international and domestic adoptions, involving participants first studied in 1981, investigated the role of family size and structure, particularly the presence of both biological and adopted children in a family, on adoption outcomes. Data suggested that families who adopt children and have birth children may have less…

  5. Family Resilience in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Beckett, Megan K.; Bowling, Kirby; Golinelli, Daniela; Fisher, Michael P.; Martin, Laurie T.; Meredith, Lisa S.; Osilla, Karen Chan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Military life presents a variety of challenges to military families, including frequent separations and relocations as well as the risks that service members face during deployment; however, many families successfully navigate these challenges. Despite a recent emphasis on family resilience, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) does not have a standard and universally accepted definition of family resilience. A standard definition is a necessary for DoD to more effectively assess its efforts to sustain and improve family resilience. RAND authors reviewed the literature on family resilience and, in this study, recommend a definition that could be used DoD-wide. The authors also reviewed DoD policies related to family resilience, reviewed models that describe family resilience and identified key family resilience factors, and developed several recommendations for how family-resilience programs and policies could be managed across DoD. PMID:28083409

  6. PROFESSIONAL CONTENTMENT IN A RESEARCH UNIVERSITY:A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidah Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many studies conducted to determine variables that affect professional contentment. Some of these studies hav e looked at factors such as organizational involvement and commitment to organi zations. Several of these studies found that a larger percentage of unemploye d and employed personnel expressed dissatisfaction with their work commitmen t. The implications of those studies suggested that unemployed could reflect und erlying adjustment disorders which have an impact on someone’s potential for suc cessful employment. However, for those who are contented with their per formance, in the long run these workers would have a higher gratification. Th ey would give more attention on the quality of their work, more committed to the organization, have a higher retention rates, and would be more productive. Refl ecting on these findings and how severe this issue may render, this study is con ducted to identify the level of professional satisfaction of the academic staffs in a research university in the southern part of Malaysia. This paper will present the findings of the study which aimed to determine the level of satisfaction based on factors such as pay, promotion, supervision, fringe benefit, contingent eward, operating condition, coworkers, nature of work and communication

  7. A twin-family study of general IQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M; van den Berg, Stéphanie Martine; Boomsma, D.I.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we assess the presence of assortative mating, gene¿environment interaction and the heritability of intelligence in childhood usinga twin family design with twins, their siblings and parents from 112 families. We evaluate two competing hypotheses about the cause of assortativemating in

  8. A twin-family study of general IQ.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; van den Berg, S.M.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we assess the presence of assortative mating, gene-environment interaction and the heritability of intelligence in childhood using a twin family design with twins, their siblings and parents from 112 families. We evaluate two competing hypotheses about the cause of assortative mating

  9. Self-Esteem: A Family Affair. An Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoft, David J.

    Over the past decade parent education programs, following either a democratic or behavior modification model, have gained in recognition and support. To investigate the effectiveness of Jean Illsley Clarke's parent education program, Self Esteem: A Family Affair, on self-esteem, conflict resolution, and family togetherness and flexibility, 27…

  10. Multimedia Instruction & Language Learning Attitudes: A Study with University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Izquierdo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of two types of Multimedia Instruction (MI and learners’ second language (L2 proficiency on language learning attitudes. During four weeks, university learners of French received MI on the distinctive use of the perfective and the imperfective past in one of the four following conditions: learners with low L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=17 or without language awareness tasks (n=17, and learners with intermediate L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=14 or without language awareness tasks (n=28. Before and after the experiment, participants completed the Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (AMTB. Non-parametric analyses revealed a positive enhancement of classroom-related attitudes only among intermediate learners exposed to MI without Language Awareness Tasks. Nevertheless, the results showed similar as well as stable attitudes towards language learning in all the experimental conditions.

  11. Thermodynamical Study of FRW Universe in Quasi-Topological Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moradpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By applying the unified first law of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon of FRW universe, we get the entropy relation for the apparent horizon in quasi-topological gravity theory. Throughout the paper, the results of considering the Hayward-Kodama and Cai-Kim temperatures are also addressed. Our study shows that whenever there is no energy exchange between the various parts of cosmos, we can get an expression for the apparent horizon entropy in quasi-topological gravity, which is in agreement with other attempts that followed different approaches. The effects of a mutual interaction between the various parts of cosmos on the apparent horizon entropy as well as the validity of second law of thermodynamics in quasi-topological gravity are perused.

  12. The impact on family functioning of social media use by depressed adolescents: a qualitative analysis of the Family Options Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew James Lewis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescent depression is a prevalent mental health problem, which can have a major impact on family cohesion. In such circumstances, excessive use of the Internet by adolescents may exacerbate family conflict and lack of cohesion. The current study aims to explore these patterns within an intervention study for depressed adolescents.Method: The current study draws upon data collected within the Family Options randomized controlled trial that examined family-based interventions for adolescent depression (12-18 years old in Melbourne (2012-2014. Inclusion in the trial required meeting diagnosis for a Major depressive disorder via the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (KID-SCID. The transcripts of sessions from 7 group treatments were examined using qualitative thematic analysis. The transcribed sessions consisted of 56 hours of recordings in total from 39 parents who took part in the interventions.Results: The thematic analysis explored parental perceptions of their adolescent’s use of social media and access to Internet content, focusing on the possible relationship between adolescent Internet use and the adolescent’s depressive disorder. Two overarching themes emerged: The sense of loss of parental control over the family environment, and parents’ perceived inability to protect their adolescent from material encountered on the Internet and social interactions via social media.Conclusions: The excessive use of social media often interacted with cyber-bullying and altered the adolescent’s understanding of friendship. Parents within the context of family based treatments felt that prolonged exposure to social media exposed their already vulnerable child to cyber-bullying. The thematic analysis uncovered a sense of parental despair and lack of control, which is consistent with their perception of social media and the internet as relentless and threatening to their parental authority and family cohesion.

  13. The Impact on Family Functioning of Social Media Use by Depressed Adolescents: A Qualitative Analysis of the Family Options Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Knight, Tess; Germanov, Galit; Benstead, Michelle Lisa; Joseph, Claire Ingrid; Poole, Lucinda

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent depression is a prevalent mental health problem, which can have a major impact on family cohesion. In such circumstances, excessive use of the Internet by adolescents may exacerbate family conflict and lack of cohesion. The current study aims to explore these patterns within an intervention study for depressed adolescents. The current study draws upon data collected from parents within the family options randomized controlled trial that examined family based interventions for adolescent depression (12-18 years old) in Melbourne, Australia (2012-2014). Inclusion in the trial required adolescents to meet diagnostic criteria for a major depressive disorder via the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders. The transcripts of sessions were examined using qualitative thematic analysis. The transcribed sessions consisted of 56 h of recordings in total from 39 parents who took part in the interventions. The thematic analysis explored parental perceptions of their adolescent's use of social media (SM) and access to Internet content, focusing on the possible relationship between adolescent Internet use and the adolescent's depressive disorder. Two overarching themes emerged as follows: the sense of loss of parental control over the family environment and parents' perceived inability to protect their adolescent from material encountered on the Internet and social interactions via SM. Parents within the context of family based treatments felt that prolonged exposure to SM exposed their already vulnerable child to additional stressors and risks. The thematic analysis uncovered a sense of parental despair and lack of control, which is consistent with their perception of SM and the Internet as relentless and threatening to their parental authority and family cohesion.

  14. Transition to the new role of caregiving for families of patients with breast cancer: a qualitative descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Ghasemabadi, Masoumeh; Taleghani, Fariba; Yousefy, Alireza; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2016-03-01

    Families, especially in Eastern and Muslim countries, routinely accept the responsibility of caring for cancer patients. This study describes the transition to the new role of caregiving from the perspective of family caregivers in Iran as part of the current trend of recognizing the experiences of family members of breast cancer patients from different cultural perspectives. A descriptive exploratory qualitative research approach was used to investigate the experiences of family caregivers of patients with breast cancer in the transition to caregiving. The subjects were 23 family caregivers of breast cancer patients referred to cancer centers at Isfahan University hospitals who were selected by purposive sampling. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis with an inductive approach. Data analysis identified the following categories: grasping a new situation without preparation, perceived inefficiency, infinite absence, and abandoned in the role. Caregivers believed that they were not prepared for their new circumstances and did not have the necessary competence and capabilities to meet the challenges of caregiving. They experienced negative consequences resulting from the difficult responsibility of caregiving. Moreover, they believed that they received limited support from relatives, health-care providers, and the community. The transition to the new role of caregiving is affected by experiences specific to the conditions of the caretakers. When these conditions can be understood and identified, it is possible to provide detailed information for policymaking and planning for family-centered care.

  15. Family Medicine Global Health Fellowship Competencies: A Modified Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Fadya El; Filip, Anna; Doubeni, Anna; Wilson, Calvin; Haq, Cynthia; Debay, Marc; Anandarajah, Gowri; Heffron, Warren; Jayasekera, Neil; Larson, Paul; Dahlman, Bruce; Valdman, Olga; Hunt, Vince

    2017-02-01

    Many US medical schools and family medicine departments have responded to a growing interest in global health by developing global health fellowships. However, there are no guidelines or consensus statements outlining competencies for global health fellows. Our objective was to develop a mission and core competencies for Family Medicine Global Health Fellowships. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop consensus on fellowship competencies. A panel, comprised of 13 members with dual expertise in global health and medical education, undertook an iterative consensus process, followed by peer review, from April to December 2014. The panel developed a mission statement and identified six domains for family medicine global health fellowships: patient care, medical knowledge, professionalism, communication and leadership, teaching, and scholarship. Each domain includes a set of core and program-specific competencies. The family medicine global health competencies are intended to serve as an educational framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of individual family medicine global health fellowship programs.

  16. Online Disclosure of University Social Responsibility: A Comparative Study of Public and Private US Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde Sánchez, Raquel; Rodríguez Bolívar, Manuel Pedro; López-Hernández, Antonio M.

    2013-01-01

    Public and private universities tasked with incorporating principles of social responsibility (SR) into their activities face the multiple challenges of addressing expectations of diverse stakeholders, establishing mechanisms for dialogue, and achieving greater information transparency. This article has two goals: first, to analyze whether SR has…

  17. Interlinguistics and Esperanto studies at universities: The experience at the University of Turin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbo, F.

    2014-01-01

    After 2010, following the Bologna process and the so-called ‘Gelmini reform’, universities in Italy were subjected to deep changes in administration, in research and education. The course in ‘Language Planning and Planned Languages’ was established in 2011-2012, under the initiative of the Istituto

  18. Reforming a University during Political Transformation: A Case Study of Yangon University in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, James; Wang, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Since 2010, Myanmar has been transitioning from an authoritarian military regime towards a parliamentary democracy. Several education policies have been launched as part of this political transformation process, including the reform of Myanmar's flagship higher education institution, Yangon University. This article investigates the reform of…

  19. Study on the Innovation Ability Construction of University Financing Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Fei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the domestic economy, college education resources between the increasingly fierce competition, colleges and universities for the sake of development is bound to increase the investment funds for education facilities, under the new situation, the author tries to from the change of the financial environment of analysis of financial environment changes to the financial work of colleges and universities bring practical problems, and puts forward the measures to strengthen the financial capacity of colleges and universities.

  20. Why study abroad? : Sorting of Chinese students across British universities

    OpenAIRE

    Cebolla-Boado, H; Hu, Yang; Soysal, Y

    2018-01-01

    This research contributes to the booming literature on the mobility of international students in higher education. Specifically, it analyzes university-level factors that affect the sorting of Chinese international students across British universities. To do so, we produced a unique dataset merging university-level data from the the 2014 UK Higher Education Statistics Agency and the Higher Expectations Survey, supplemented by qualitative evidence from six focus groups which we use for illustr...

  1. A study of the determinants of work-to-family conflict among hospital nurses in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembrechts, Lieve; Dekocker, Vickie; Zanoni, Patrizia; Pulignano, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the relative impact of three sources of work-to-family conflict among hospital nurses: work-family policy use (childcare assistance, schedule flexibility, part-time work), job dimensions (work overload, job autonomy, overtime hours, night shifts, regularity in type of shift, weekend work, hierarchical position, variation in tasks) and organisational support (physician/co-worker support). Many studies claim that organisational support and job dimensions are more important sources of work-to-family conflict than work-family policy use, a relation that has not been fully investigated. This study attempts to fill this gap by empirically assessing the relative impact of these sources on nurses' work-to-family conflict. Four hundred and fifty three Belgian nurses completed a web survey. The sources of work-to-family conflict were analysed using a hierarchical linear regression. Organisational support influences work-to-family conflict, above and beyond work-family policy use and job dimensions, while policy use has no influence. Physician and co-worker support have a unique decreasing effect, while work overload and overtime hours increase work-to-family conflict. Organisational support, lack of work overload and absence of overtime hours reduce work-to-family conflict, whereas work-family policy use does not. To retain and attract nurses by reducing work-to-family conflict, hospitals should not (only) rely on work-family policies but should also invest in organisational support and adapted job dimensions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Construction and validation of Experiences Questionnaire on Violence in Couple and Family Relations in University Students [Desarrollo del Cuestionario de Experiencias de Violencia en las Relaciones de Pareja y Familia en Estudiantes Universitarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel A. Villafañe Santiago

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the process of developing the Experiences of Violence in Couple and Family Relationships in University Students Questionnaire, its psychometric properties and the results of the pilot study. The research design used for this study was a nonexperimental, transversal co relational design. The nonrandomized sample consisted of 267 students. The final version of the questionnaire consisted of 41 items and four sub-scales which measured experiences with violence in a relationship as an Aggressor and as a Victim, Observed between the Parents and in the Parent-child relationship as a victim. The total scale and the subscales obtained adequate reliability indexes. On average, the sample reported ten experiences with violence in different contexts. The results of this study contribute data on the prevalence of violence in college students’ romantic and family relationships which in turn, provide valuable information for planning prevention and early intervention efforts with this population.

  3. Family, Socialization and Migration in Norwegian-Pakistani Families: A Study of the First and the Second Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Shakari, Yasmine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Author s name: Yasmine Shakari Title: Family, Socialization and Migration in Norwegian-Pakistani Families: A Study of the First and the Second Generation Supervisor: Øystein Gullvåg Holter Co-supervisor: Thomas Walle Aim of study: This thesis seeks to obtain knowledge about 1) how the first generation of Norwegian-Pakistanis were raised in Pakistan in terms of socialization of gender roles, 2) how the second generation of Norwegian-Pakistanis have been raised here in Norway, and 3) if...

  4. Factors affecting the nurse-patients' family communication in intensive care unit of kerman: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, Laleh; Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    The communication between nurses and patients' families impacts patient well-being as well as the quality and outcome of nursing care, this study aimed to demonstrated the facilitators and barriers which influence the role of communication among Iranian nurses and families member in ICU. This study is a qualitative study with content analysis. Participants were eight registered nurses and ten of patients' families. Patients were admitted to the ICU of two large university hospitals in Kerman, Iran. We used non-structured interviews for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim with a simultaneous, constant comparative analysis of the audio tapes. According to data analysis, facilitative factors between nurses and families' communication consisted of spiritual care, emotional support, Participation, notification and consultation and barriers that were misunderstandings regarding treatment, job and patient difficulties. The findings led into the recognition of the important barriers and facilitators in communication between ICU team and the family of the patients. By identification of the barriers and facilitators of communication, establishing new rules and using creative methods in education and establishing the communication of ICU team especially using patient-based approach we can have effective communication.

  5. Measuring family needs of people living with cancer. Portuguese validation and descriptive studies of the Family Inventory of Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areia, Neide P; Major, Sofia; Relvas, Ana P

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the Portuguese version of the Family Inventory of Needs (FIN). The FIN aims to measure important family needs and their fulfilment by a healthcare team. This cross-sectional study involved a sample of 364 family members of cancer patients, recruited from three medical institutions and through online recruitment. Three instruments were used: a socio-demographic questionnaire, the FIN and the Brief Symptom Inventory - 18 (BSI-18). Construct validity and reliability were considered regarding the FIN's psychometric properties. The method used to determine construct validity was factor structure analysis (confirmatory factor analysis), inter-factor correlations (Spearman's rank correlation) and convergent validity (Spearman's rank correlation). To assess scale reliability, the FIN's internal consistency was evaluated (Cronbach's alpha coefficient). Descriptive and frequency statistics and tests to compare means were used to assess important needs and to what extent they were met. The four-factor structure of the FIN was confirmed. Thus, the FIN has four domains: Basic Information, Information on treatment and care, Support and Patient Comfort. Convergent validity with the BSI-18 was verified. Both subscales of the FIN and each domain exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70. Family members also reported important needs that were not adequately met by healthcare professionals. The Portuguese version of the FIN seems to be a reliable and valid tool for identifying cancer patients' important family needs and to what extent these are met. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Economic Motives to Attend University: A Cross-Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers students' economic motives to attend university. Drawing on selected results from a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and interviews with students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it examines and compares this particular extrinsic motivational dimension, alongside the influence of the national…

  7. A Comparative Study of Subject Specialisation at the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Botswana Library and the Rand University Library have both adopted subject specialisation approach in the delivery of their services. The article seeks to establish ... It concludes by highlighting the importance of customer services, which are inherent in subject specialisation. (African Journal of Library, ...

  8. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" questionnaire. METHODS: 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93 were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. RESULTS: 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p < 0.05, older students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p < 0.05 and students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. CONCLUSION: Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  9. Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching......Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching...

  10. Mechatronics Engineers’ Perception of Code Mixing: Philadelphia University and Hashemite University as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Al-Khawaldeh; Nisreen Al-Khawaldeh; Baker Bani-Khair; Hussein Algwery

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been widely recognized that code-switching is prevalent in Jordanians' daily conversation in various situations such as home, cafés, universities, restaurants and clubs. Abalhassan and Alshalawi (2000: 183) made a very related observation on code switching behavior among Arab speakers of English that “without exception, all respondents switched into English to some degree”. This could be referred to the increase number of technological advances and people travelling across cou...

  11. OUTDOOR SPACE QUALITY: CASE STUDY OF A UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PLAZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Aydin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studied the concept of campus plaza, i.e. the outdoor space of the Selcuk University located in Konya, Turkey. The objective of the study in which the survey, observation and photographic methods were used, was to examine the plaza as an outdoor space providing individual and social benefits to campus people and to determine the principles regarding the establishment of this space. Two hundred forty-three students participating in the survey were asked about the outdoor spaces they use in the campus area, the qualities of the plaza, their purposes and the frequency of plaza use, and a descriptive analysis was performed to determine the plaza’s quality. Additionally, a correlation analysis was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the landscape accessory and the manner in which the users’ senses were affected by the experienced space (profiles of the space. At the end of this study, two main components determining the campus plaza’s quality were found: (i qualities of the physical environment (climatic features, location of plaza, its relation with the surrounding structuring, pedestrian / vehicle relation in terms of accessibility, fixed elements / equipment in the area, quality of open space area, quality of landscape accessory and area’s being in good repair (ii user characteristics. User characteristics also comprised two quality criteria: (i the behavioural and functional quality, (ii the visual quality.

  12. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is the progress report of the research activities in the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies during the period from April, 1980, to March, 1981. The activities were carried out by the OULNS staffs and also by outsiders at the OULNS. In this period, the X-ray astrophysics group, the radiation physics group and the high energy physics group joined the OULNS. The main accelerators in the OULNS are a 110 cm variable energy cyclotron and a 4.7 MeV Van de Graaff machine. The detailed experimental studies on inbeam e-gamma spectroscopy and beta-decay were carried out at two accelerator laboratories. The radiochemistry facility and a mass spectrometer were fully used. The research activities extended to high energy physics by utilizing national facilities, such as a 230 cm cyclotron in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics and a proton synchrotron in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The theoretical studies on elementary particles and nuclear physics were carried out also. It is important that the facilities in the OULNS were used by the outsiders in Osaka University, such as solid state physics group and particle-induced X-ray group. The activities of the divisions of cyclotron, Van de Graaff, high energy physics, accelerator development and nuclear instrumentation, mass spectroscopy, radioisotope, solid state and theoretical physics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Fetullahist Terror Organization in the Universities: A Study on the Academics Dismissed from Turkish Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza ATES

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gülen community, which started as a service movement, first became a parallel state structure and then was converted into a terrorist organization from the beginning of 2010. This organization led one of the most horrific and bloody coup attempts in Turkey on July 15, 2016. However, the Turkish people have overcome this coup attempt with an exemplary resistance. This coup attempt, which took place on July 15th, has about half a century of preparation. In this preparation process, the organization has been staffed in strategic institutions such as the state, military and judiciary, and they have found important positions in important institutions. One of the areas where this terrorist organization is staffed is the education sector that the organization attaches great importance since its establishment and development stages. the Fetullahist Terrorist Organization (FETO had considered organizing in higher education institutions and filling both the state and the foundation universities with FETO sympathizers as a strategic priority. The purpose of this article is to reveal the situation of the Fetullahist Terrorist Organization in the academy. By analyzing the academicians who have been dismissed from public service through Decrees of Laws No. 667, 672, 675, 677 and 679 and their universities, the article aims to reveal how FETO, previously Gulen Movement, made progress in Turkish Academia, which scientific areas it attaches importance to as well as the profile of the academicians in the organization in terms of their respective universities.

  14. FACTORS THAT INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF VIOLENCE IN THE FAMILY ANDSEEKING FOR HELP AT FAMILY PRACTITIONER. PILOT STUDY ABOUTVIOLENCE IN THE FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Selič

    2008-08-01

    The study showed that investigation of medical files and evaluations of physicians aboutpossible factors, which increase the possibility of persons being exposed to violence are notso useful. Physicians are not equipped well enough to give needed help and support topersons exposed to violence in the family. Physicians do not feel that they are the right oneswho should in their practice help victims of violence

  15. A Socio-Cultural Perspective on Children's Early Language: A Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic-Umek, Ljubica; Fekonja-Peklaj, Urška; Socan, Gregor; Tašner, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of certain socio-cultural factors of the family environment on the language of toddlers and children in early childhood. The sample included 86 families with one- to six-year-old children. The data on the social, economic, and cultural factors of the family environment, parental reading literacy, parental knowledge…

  16. Balancing work and family obligations in Pakistan and the Netherlands : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syed, S.; Arain, G.A.; Schalk, Rene; Freese, C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of 486 banking employees in Pakistan and the Netherlands investigated the effect of work-family conflict on psychological contract breach of work-family balance obligations. The results showed that 127 Dutch respondents were more likely to experience work interference with family than

  17. Study of a large Anglo-Saxon family with beta-thalassaemia trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raik, E; Powell, E; Gordon, S

    1976-01-01

    Study of a large Anglo-Saxon family with beta-thalassaemia trait revealed evidence of consanguinity, moreover both branches of the family shared a Spanish ancestor. The manifestations of the disorder were varied in severity and yet the degree of severity appeared to breed true within any individual part of the family. Our explanation for the inheritance pattern observed in the family was to postulate the existence of two non-allelic genes influencing the rate of beta-chain synthesis.

  18. 2. A Study to Assess Problems Encountered by Immediate Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    probability sampling method. A total number of 145 .... the health workers. The above ... health workers, media, peer, books, family friends .... distributed in every province in Zambia , therefore there is ... D.(1993). Psychological Adjustment of.

  19. Analysis of bachelor study programs of nursing at universities of Eastern Slovakia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kuriplachová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profile of the nursing studies in Slovakia is harmonized with the criteria of European Directives, enhanced by the adoption of the Declaration of Munich and implemented into the curriculum of educational institutions that provide this traning. Objective: The main objective of the pilot study was to determinate satisfaction of graduates with accredited programs of nursing (prior to the accreditation and after accreditation at two state universities in the eastern region of Slovakia. Methods: The monitored group consisted of total 132 respondents (nursing graduates who completed the 1st degree of nursing study at University of Presov in Presov or University of P. J. Safarik in Kosice in the timeframe 2007-2011. The study was realized during calendar years 2012-2013. One year of nursing clinical practice of graduates was required for this study. Data was collected through a modified questionnaire of feedback used at the University of Presov, Faculty of Health Care within the improvement of curricula program and the whole educational program. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in area of optional courses of nursing study program (p < 0.05. Compulsory optional courses of nursing program at both universities were more interest and important for clinical practice of graduates after accreditation than before accreditation. Conclusions: The nursing study program meets the educational requirements of European Union. However, study program needs courses, which would be more interesting and effective for clinical practice.

  20. Study of science students' expectation for university writing courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Nadarajan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The New Malaysia Education Blueprint (2012 states that the private sector continues to have concerns for Malaysian graduates’ English proficiency. The present study investigates the views and expectations of science students taking English courses in a public university. The findings revealed that learners saw opportunities to communicate and job applications process as important soft skills. They preferred practical learning methods above traditional teaching methods. Learners considered group performance, personal attitudes and online activities as important learning opportunities, while factual knowledge, report writing were least supported despite the fact that the majority viewed both assessments and instructional process as relevant. The data revealed that though they were dissatisfied with their existing level of proficiency, many students continued to expect an A for their course. An assessment of the learner’s’ language ability revealed that language ability was less under the learner’s control and more dependent on learner proficiency level. Taken together, this study suggests that the curriculum for the Professional Writing course should be highly diversified and balanced, with some emphasis on getting less proficient learners to read and improve their grammar skills while better students should be given opportunities to develop creative talents and interpersonal skills.

  1. The Roles of a University Professor in a Teacher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Chin; Hung, Hsiu-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The opportunities in which university professors collaborate with the practicing school teachers in a teacher study group are few. This study investigated how a university professor facilitated a collaborative teacher study group to enhance teachers' professional growth. Five primary school teachers and a university professor collaborated on…

  2. Adolescents of the U.S. National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study: can family characteristics counteract the negative effects of stigmatization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.; Gartrell, N.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examines the impact of homophobic stigmatization on the well-being of 17-year-old adolescents who were conceived through donor insemination and whose mothers enrolled before they were born in the largest, longest-running, prospective study of lesbian families, with a 93% retention

  3. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies...... will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one...

  4. Family load estimates and risk factors of anxiety disorders in a nationwide three generation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helenius, Dorte; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    region. Psychiatric diagnoses were also obtained for parents, siblings, and offspring. A family load component was obtained by using various mixed regression models. Anxiety disorders occurred significantly more often in case than in control families. Having a mother, father, or a sibling......The present study investigated how often anxiety disorders with different ages of onset occurred in affected families compared to control families. Furthermore, the study addressed the impact of sex, region of residence, year and month of birth, and parental age at birth. The sample included N=1373......, provide further and solid evidence for the family aggregation of anxiety disorders....

  5. A family longevity selection score: ranking sibships by their longevity, size, and availability for study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Hadley, Evan C; Province, Michael; Christensen, Kaare; Rossi, Winifred; Perls, Thomas T; Ash, Arlene S

    2009-12-15

    Family studies of exceptional longevity can potentially identify genetic and other factors contributing to long life and healthy aging. Although such studies seek families that are exceptionally long lived, they also need living members who can provide DNA and phenotype information. On the basis of these considerations, the authors developed a metric to rank families for selection into a family study of longevity. Their measure, the family longevity selection score (FLoSS), is the sum of 2 components: 1) an estimated family longevity score built from birth-, gender-, and nation-specific cohort survival probabilities and 2) a bonus for older living siblings. The authors examined properties of FLoSS-based family rankings by using data from 3 ongoing studies: the New England Centenarian Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and screenees for the Long Life Family Study. FLoSS-based selection yields families with exceptional longevity, satisfactory sibship sizes and numbers of living siblings, and high ages. Parameters in the FLoSS formula can be tailored for studies of specific populations or age ranges or with different conditions. The first component of the FLoSS also provides a conceptually sound survival measure to characterize exceptional longevity in individuals or families in various types of studies and correlates well with later-observed longevity.

  6. Evolution of family medicine in Kenya (1990s to date): a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PM Chege

    1999-08-26

    Aug 26, 1999 ... aDepartment of Family Medicine, Moi University College of Health, Eldoret, Kenya. bDepartment ... The challenges include the lack of Kenyan teachers of the programme and the introduction ... in the establishment of FM departments in medical schools in .... Kenya Commission for Higher Education (CHE).

  7. Genetic and Environmental Parent-Child Transmission of Value Orientations: An Extended Twin Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Christian; Gottschling, Juliana; Spinath, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite cross-cultural universality of core human values, individuals differ substantially in value priorities, whereas family members show similar priorities to some degree. The latter has often been attributed to intrafamilial socialization. The analysis of self-ratings on eight core values from 399 twin pairs (ages 7-11) and their biological…

  8. Sexual offending runs in families: A 37-year nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Långström, Niklas; Babchishin, Kelly M; Fazel, Seena; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisell, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Sexual crime is an important public health concern. The possible causes of sexual aggression, however, remain uncertain. We examined familial aggregation and the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to sexual crime by linking longitudinal, nationwide Swedish crime and multigenerational family registers. We included all men convicted of any sexual offence (N = 21,566), specifically rape of an adult (N = 6131) and child molestation (N = 4465), from 1973 to 2009. Sexual crime rates among fathers and brothers of sexual offenders were compared with corresponding rates in fathers and brothers of age-matched population control men without sexual crime convictions. We also modelled the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors to the liability of sexual offending. We found strong familial aggregation of sexual crime [odds ratio (OR) = 5.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.5-5.9] among full brothers of convicted sexual offenders. Familial aggregation was lower in father-son dyads (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 3.2-4.4) among paternal half-brothers (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.5-2.9) and maternal half-brothers (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2-2.4). Statistical modelling of the strength and patterns of familial aggregation suggested that genetic factors (40%) and non-shared environmental factors (58%) explained the liability to offend sexually more than shared environmental influences (2%). Further, genetic effects tended to be weaker for rape of an adult (19%) than for child molestation (46%). We report strong evidence of familial clustering of sexual offending, primarily accounted for by genes rather than shared environmental influences. Future research should possibly test the effectiveness of selective prevention efforts for male first-degree relatives of sexually aggressive individuals, and consider familial risk in sexual violence risk assessment.

  9. An epidemiological study of ADHD and conduct disorder: does family conflict moderate the association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Hall, Hildigunnur Anna; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik; Young, Susan; Gudjonsson, Gisli H

    2017-04-01

    To examine the role of family conflict in the relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD). A cross-sectional national population survey was carried out among 10,838 14-16 year old students in all secondary schools in Iceland. Three latent measures, financial status, ADHD and CD, and one observed measure, family structure, were included in the study. A structural equation model was used to evaluate direct effects between ADHD and CD for four different groups; females and males, experiencing family conflict and those not experiencing family conflict. ADHD was significantly and positively associated with CD for all groups. When controlling for financial status and family structure it was found that ADHD was positively and significantly associated with CD for adolescent females and males not experiencing family conflict as well as for those experiencing family conflict. The link between ADHD and CD was significantly stronger for those adolescents who had experienced family conflict compared to those who had not experienced family conflict. These results suggest that family conflict moderates the association between ADHD and CD for both girls and boys. The results of this study indicate that family environment and ADHD symptoms are important when predicting CD among adolescent youth. Most notably, family conflict exacerbates the effects of ADHD symptoms on CD among both females and males.

  10. Gender in Engineering Studies at Brazilian Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima Sobreira, Josimeire

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The research on a Technological University of Brazil, among students in Engineering, revealed that women occupy no more than 12 % (in general of the places at the Institution. The university study that the girls most prefer is the Engineering of Buildings and the other one, where there are the least number of women, is Mechanics Engineering. The qualitative research with the students, made by interviews, showed that there is a gender discrimination among them. The boys do not consider their schoolmates competents for the exact sciences. The girls have to do a greater effort than the boys to success and to be respected by them. But even so they recognize that will not have the same opportunities of work that the men will. However, gender changes among the students are evidences that women have reached important places at the technological field.La investigación en una Universidad Tecnológica de Brasil entre estudiantes de los cursos de ingeniería ha mostrado que las mujeres no ocupan más que 12 % (en general de las plazas de la Institución. El curso con más estudiantes es el de Ingeniería Civil, mientras el curso con el más pequeño número de mujeres es el de Mecánica. La metodología de la investigación ha sido cualitativa. Las entrevistas con chicas-chicos de los cursos investigados revelaron que hay discriminación entre los estudiantes que no consideran a sus compañeras de curso competentes para los estudios de ciencias exactas. Para que sean respetadas ellas tienen que estudiar mucho más que ellos, pero, aunque logren muy buenas evaluaciones, reconocen que en el mercado laboral tendrán menos oportunidades de trabajo que sus colegas. Entretanto, los cambios de género entre los y las estudiantes evidencian que las mujeres están conquistando espacios importantes.

  11. [Development and family environment in compulsive neurotic children and adolescents: a retrospective and comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, H; Klosinski, G

    1989-09-01

    In a retrospective study the patient histories of 113 children and adolescents who received outpatient (89 cases) or inpatient (24 cases) treatment from 1973 to 1984 in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Tübingen with the diagnosis "compulsive neurosis" were examined in terms of the criteria personality development, family structure, frequency of certain forms and contents of compulsory behavior, significance and symbolism of the compulsive behavior within the family dynamics. In addition, a comparison was made with the other patients (n = 8,774) receiving child and adolescent psychiatric treatment during this period. The ratio of boys to girls was 7.3. The average age was 13.8 years in the boys and 12.6 years in the girls. The youngest patient was four years old. Compulsive washing was the predominant compulsive behavior in all age groups. Compulsive fears were most frequently manifested in fears about the mother, followed by poisoning and hypochondriac fears. Compulsive impulses were only found from prepuberty. In the girls they were always directed to killing the mother. The analysis of personality development revealed that there were indications of special features in the anal phase in only three cases. On the other hand, special events of pathoplastic significance were found in half of the patients. In about 33%, anancastic characteristics were present in the parents (eight parents were manifestly subject to compulsive neurosis). Conflict avoidance and ambitious demands on the children concerned were typical in the families. In contrast to the reference population, the compulsively neurotic children and adolescents were of average intelligence, frequently attended higher schools and belonged to a higher social class.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE WORLD VISION OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN A BRAZILIAN AND PORTUGUESE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia Salheb Fonseca

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available UNESCO (2011 states that education should focus on students and consider them as protagonists of their learning and not as recipients of teaching. It is becoming increasingly clear in this and in numerous studies dealing with issues related to the learning processes of students, the importance of knowing more about their worldviews and trajectories. In order to identify aspects of the world view of the students. We used a quantitative and qualitative approach, a comparative, descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study, using a questionnaire survey, Escala (Pagan, 2009. Sample of 1,240 students from two universities, 533 from the Portuguese University and 707 from the Brazilian University. Statistical analysis with SPSS (22.0 and content analysis using the word cloud.

  13. Work-Family Conflict and Employee Sleep: Evidence from IT Workers in the Work, Family and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Orfeu M; Lee, Soomi; Beverly, Chloe; Berkman, Lisa F; Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L; Hammer, Leslie B; Almeida, David M

    2016-10-01

    Work-family conflict is a threat to healthy sleep behaviors among employees. This study aimed to examine how Work-to-Family Conflict (demands from work that interfere with one's family/personal life; WTFC) and Family-to-Work Conflict (demands from family/personal life that interfere with work; FTWC) are associated with several dimensions of sleep among information technology workers. Employees at a U.S. IT firm (n = 799) provided self-reports of sleep sufficiency (feeling rested upon waking), sleep quality, and sleep maintenance insomnia symptoms (waking up in the middle of the night or early morning) in the last month. They also provided a week of actigraphy for nighttime sleep duration, napping, sleep timing, and a novel sleep inconsistency measure. Analyses adjusted for work conditions (job demands, decision authority, schedule control, and family-supportive supervisor behavior), and household and sociodemographic characteristics. Employees who experienced higher WTFC reported less sleep sufficiency, poorer sleep quality, and more insomnia symptoms. Higher WTFC also predicted shorter nighttime sleep duration, greater likelihood of napping, and longer nap duration. Furthermore, higher WTFC was linked to greater inconsistency of nighttime sleep duration and sleep clock times, whereas higher FTWC was associated with more rigidity of sleep timing mostly driven by wake time. Results highlight the unique associations of WTFC/FTWC with employee sleep independent of other work conditions and household and sociodemographic characteristics. Our novel methodological approach demonstrates differential associations of WTFC and FTWC with inconsistency of sleep timing. Given the strong associations between WTFC and poor sleep, future research should focus on reducing WTFC. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. The Current Situation of Knowledge Economy at Yemeni Universities from Academic Staff Perspectives: A field Study at Sana'a University and University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood A. H. M. Al-Azizi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to assess the current situation of the knowledge economy in the Yemeni universities (Public and private from the point of view of their faculty members. A further investigation into the possible significant differences between faculty members’ views regarding the knowledge economy in both Yemeni public and private universities was also attempted. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, the researchers used the descriptive approach, and designed a questionnaire as the research tool which consisted of four main dimensions: research, development, innovation, education and training, ICT infrastructure, and governance. The validity and reliability of the tool were statistically checked, and data was analyzed using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: -        The current knowledge economy at Sana’a University was rated as very low by the faculty members.-        The current knowledge economy at the University of Science and Technology was rated by the academic staff as medium.-        There were statistically significant differences between the opinions of the members of the research sample in favor of the University of Science and Technology. A number of recommendations and suggested areas for further research were proposed. Keywords: Knowledge economy, Research, Development, Innovation, Education and training, ICT infrastructure, Governance.

  15. A Study on the Role of Web Technology in Enhancing Research Pursuance among University Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Durrani, Muhammad Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of web technologies in promoting research pursuance among university teachers, examine the use of web technologies by university teachers in conducting research and identify the problems of university academia in using web technologies for research. The study was delimited to academia of social…

  16. Family model of HIV care and treatment: a retrospective study in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nyanza Province, Kenya, had the highest HIV prevalence in the country at 14.9% in 2007, more than twice the national HIV prevalence of 7.1%. Only 16% of HIV-infected adults in the country accurately knew their HIV status. Targeted strategies to reach and test individuals are urgently needed to curb the HIV epidemic. The family unit is one important portal. Methods A family model of care was designed to build on the strengths of Kenyan families. Providers use a family information table (FIT) to guide index patients through the steps of identifying family members at HIV risk, address disclosure, facilitate family testing, and work to enrol HIV-positive members and to prevent new infections. Comprehensive family-centred clinical services are built around these steps. To assess the approach, a retrospective study of patients receiving HIV care between September 2007 and September 2009 at Lumumba Health Centre in Kisumu was conducted. A random sample of FITs was examined to assess family reach. Results Through the family model of care, for each index patient, approximately 2.5 family members at risk were identified and 1.6 family members were tested. The approach was instrumental in reaching children; 61% of family members identified and tested were children. The approach also led to identifying and enrolling a high proportion of HIV- positive partners among those tested: 71% and 89%, respectively. Conclusions The family model of care is a feasible approach to broaden HIV case detection and service reach. The approach can be adapted for the local context and should continue to utilize index patient linkages, FIT adaption, and innovative methods to package services for families in a manner that builds on family support and enhances patient care and prevention efforts. Further efforts are needed to increase family member engagement. PMID:22353553

  17. Developing family rooms in mental health inpatient units: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobel, Sophie; Foster, Kim; Edwards, Clair

    2015-06-19

    Family-friendly spaces for children and families to visit inpatient mental health units are recommended in international mental health guidelines as one way to provide service delivery that is responsive to the needs of parent-consumers and families. There is a lack of evidence on the implementation of family-friendly spaces or Family Rooms. This study aimed to explore the development, role, and function of Family Rooms in four mental health inpatient units in a local health district in NSW Australia. An exploratory descriptive inductive-deductive design using multiple data sources was employed. Methods included Family Room usage and parental status data over a 12 week period, an open-ended questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews with 20 nurses. Available parental status data indicated that between 8-14 % of inpatients were parents of dependent children under 18. Family Room usage was multipurpose and used specifically for children & families 29 % of the time. As spaces in the units, Family Rooms were perceived as acknowledging of the importance of family, and providing comfortable, secure spaces for parent-consumers and their children and family to maintain connections. Units did not have local policies or guidelines on the development, maintenance, and/or use of the rooms. Despite long-standing recognition of the need to identify consumers' parental status, there remains a lack of systematic processes for identifying parents in mental health inpatient services nationally. Family Rooms as spaces within inpatient units acknowledge the importance of families and are a step towards provision of family-focused mental health care. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining Family Rooms are outlined.

  18. Prospective studies of infectious mononucleosis in university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jennifer M; Schmeling, David O; Dunmire, Samantha K; Knight, Jennifer A; Mullan, Beth D; Ed, Julie A; Brundage, Richard C; Hogquist, Kristin A; Balfour, Henry H

    2016-01-01

    We performed an intensive prospective study designed to obtain as much data as possible on the incubation and early illness periods of primary Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. Undergraduate students who lacked EBV antibody and oral EBV DNA (EBV-naive) were seen every 2 weeks during their freshman year. Clinical and behavioral data, oral washes and venous blood were obtained. EBV antibodies were quantified by enzyme immunoassay and viral loads by PCR. During a median 8 months of observation, 14/85 subjects experienced primary EBV infections (24 cases/100 person-years). The only significant risk factor for acquisition of EBV infection was deep kissing (P=0.02). Eleven subjects had infectious mononucleosis with a median duration of 21 days. Two subjects were hospitalized. Infections were initially identified in 12 subjects by finding EBV DNA in oral cells before onset of symptoms and in 2 subjects by symptom reporting. EBV DNA and viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgM and gp350 IgG antibodies were present in the blood before onset of illness. To provide a more robust evaluation of primary EBV infection in undergraduate university students, we combined data on risk factors and antibody responses from this and an earlier study that used the exact same clinical and laboratory methods. The observation that the only significant risk factor for acquisition of EBV infection was deep kissing was confirmed. Most importantly, higher amounts of gp350 antibody correlated significantly with a lower severity of infectious mononucleosis (P<0.0001), which strengthens the rationale for a gp350-based prophylactic EBV vaccine. PMID:27588199

  19. INS VNTR is not associated with childhood obesity in 1,023 families: a family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; De Graeve, Franck; Brönner, Günter; Lecoeur, Cécile; Vatin, Vincent; Durand, Emmanuelle; Lichtner, Peter; Nguyen, Thuy T; Heude, Barbara; Weill, Jacques; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Hebebrand, Johannes; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have described genetic associations of the insulin gene variable number tandem repeat (INS VNTR) variant with childhood obesity and associated phenotypes. We aimed to assess the contribution of INS VNTR genotypes to childhood obesity and variance of insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and birth weight using family-based design. Participants were either French or German whites. We used transmission disequilibrium tests (TDTs) for assessing binary traits and quantitative pedigree disequilibrium tests for assessing continuous traits. In contrast to previous findings, we did not observe any familial association with childhood obesity (T = 50%, P = 0.77) in the 1,023 families tested. In French obese children, INS VNTR did not associate with fasting insulin levels (P = 0.23) and class I allele showed only borderline association with increased insulin secretion index at 30 min (P = 0.03). INS VNTR did not associate with birth weight in obese children (P = 0.98) and TDT analyses in 350 French families with history of low birth weight (LBW) showed no association with this condition (P = 0.92). In summary, our study, the largest performed so far, does not support the previously reported associations between INS VNTR and childhood obesity, insulin resistance, or birth weight, and does not suggest any major role for this variant in modulating these traits.

  20. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  1. Genotype–phenotype study of familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieni, Elena; Cetica, Valentina; Santoro, Alessandra; Beutel, Karin; Mastrodicasa, Elena; Meeths, Marie; Ciambotti, Benedetta; Brugnolo, Francesca; zur Stadt, Udo; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M; Henter, Jan-Inge; Janka, Gritta; Aricò, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations of UNC13D are causative for familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3 (FHL3; OMIM 608898). Objective To carry out a genotype–phenotype study of patients with FHL3. Methods A consortium of three countries pooled data on presenting features and mutations from individual patients with biallelic UNC13D mutations in a common database. Results 84 patients with FHL3 (median age 4.1 months) were reported from Florence, Italy (n=54), Hamburg, Germany (n=18), Stockholm, Sweden (n=12). Their ethnic origin was Caucasian (n=57), Turkish (n=10), Asian (n=7), Hispanic (n=4), African (n=3) (not reported (n=3)). Thrombocytopenia was present in 94%, splenomegaly in 96%, fever in 89%. The central nervous system (CNS) was involved in 49/81 (60%) patients versus 36% in patients with FHL2 (p=0.001). A combination of fever, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia and hyperferritinaemia was present in 71%. CD107a expression, NK activity and Munc 13-4 protein expression were absent or reduced in all but one of the evaluated patients. 54 different mutations were observed, including 15 new ones: 19 missense, 14 deletions or insertions, 12 nonsense, nine splice errors. None was specific for ethnic groups. Patients with two disruptive mutations were younger than patients with two missense mutations (p<0.001), but older than comparable patients with FHL2 (p=0.001). Conclusion UNC13D mutations are scattered over the gene. Ethnic-specific mutations were not identified. CNS involvement is more common than in FHL2; in patients with FHL3 and disruptive mutations, age at diagnosis is significantly higher than in FHL2. The combination of fever, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia and hyperferritinaemia appears to be the most easily and frequently recognised clinical pattern and their association with defective granule release assay may herald FHL3. PMID:21248318

  2. A novel healthy blood pressure phenotype in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marron, Megan M; Singh, Jatinder; Boudreau, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    in the Long Life Family Study, a cohort of two-generation families selected for longevity. Participants from the offspring generation (n = 2211, ages 32-88) were classified as having healthy BP if their age-adjusted and sex-adjusted SBP z-score was between -1.5 and -0.5. Offspring on antihypertensive...... examining the 419 families, only 44 (10.5%) families met the criteria for the healthy BP phenotype. Both offspring and probands from families with healthy BP performed better on neuropsychological tests that place demands on complex attention and executive function when compared with offspring and probands...

  3. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Floor V. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Huizink, Anja C.

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years.

  4. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); J. Ormel (Johan Hans); A.C. Huizink (Anja)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFor prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14

  5. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years.

  6. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F.V.A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years.

  7. Assessment of knowledge regarding tuberculosis among non-medical university students in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Masud; Sayem, Abu; Karim, Reazul; Islam, Nurul; Islam, Rafiqul; Zaman, Tunku Kamarul; Hossain, Golam

    2015-07-28

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of human death and TB is one of the major public health problems in Bangladesh. The aim of the present study was to assess the Knowledge about TB among non-medical university students in Bangladesh. A cross-sectional survey was performed on 839 non-medical university students. Data were collected from University of Rajshahi from March to August 2013 using a standard semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square test was utilized to find the factors which are associated with students' knowledge about TB. Among 839 students, male and female were 68.2 % and 31.8 % respectively. Most of the students (94.4 %) were informed about the term TB, among them 50 % got information from electronic media. More than 50 % students believed that TB is a communicable disease, 42.8 % students agreed that bacteria is an agent for TB, most of the subjects (93 %) had the knowledge about the vaccination against TB and 97.6 % students believed that TB is curable. However, students had poor knowledge about latent TB (13.7 %) and DOTs program (28.5 %). χ (2)-test demonstrated that gender, residence, type of family and parents education were associated with students' knowledge of TB. In the present study demonstrated that the level of general knowledge about TB was insufficient among non-medical university students. Consequently, health education program is needed to improve the knowledge among university students regarding TB.

  8. Risky Behaviors of University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Ozcebe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to identify certain risky behavior patterns (unsafe sex, tobacco and drug use, and binge drinking and the factors affecting these behaviors among first- and third-year students in a university. Method: The study included a total of 8407 students enrolled as first- (4392 and third- (4015 year students. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. In data analysis, respecting sampling weights, models were formed by logistic regression method to determine factors that affect the risky behaviors. Results: 731 male–1114 female students from the first year and 560 male–1096 female students from the third year were interviewed. Male students were found to be engaged in risky behaviors more frequently than females. Logistic models of the study indicated that gender, place of residence, relationship with parents, and socialization with friends have profound effects on risky behaviors. Conclusion: After leaving home, young people develop their own lifestyles, and this study demonstrates that lifestyle is the main effective factor for risky behaviors in this group. Universities need to assume more responsibility to guide students’ lives and to provide the facilities and opportunities that encourage and facilitate their adoption of a healthy lifestyle.   Key Words: University students, risky behaviours Bir Üniversitede Öğrencilerin Riskli Davranışları: Kesitsel Bir Çalışma Amaç: Bu çalışmanın amacı, bir üniversitenin birinci ve üçüncü sınıf öğrencileri arasında bazı riskli davranış modellerini (güvensiz seks, tütün ve uyuşturucu kullanımı ve aşırı alkol ve bu davranışları etkileyen faktörleri saptamaktır. Yöntem: Araştırmanın evrenini birinci (4392 ve üçüncü (4015 sınıflarda kayıtlı 8407 öğrenci oluşturmaktadır. Veri öğrencilerin gözlem altında doldurdukları anket aracılığı ile toplanmıştır. Riskli davranışları etkileyen fakt

  9. Barriers to utilization of modern methods of family planning amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barriers to utilization of modern methods of family planning amongst women in a ... is recognized by the world health organization (WHO) as a universal human right. ... Conclusion: The study finds numerous barriers to utilization of family ...

  10. The Entrepreneurial University: A Case Study of the University of New Mexico in a Competitive Research Environment, 1972-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Lars G.

    Factors affecting the emergence of the University of New Mexico as a research institution in a period of increased competition for research support are discussed. The case study covers the period of 1972-1978 and focuses on the development of the Office of the Vice President for Research and its entrepreneurial activities, including its increased…

  11. Management Head and Neck Ewing's Sarcoma Family of tumors: Experience of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.; El-Baradie, T.; Bahaa, Sh.; Shalan, M.; El-Baradie, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma accounts for 4-6% of primary malignant bone tumors and it affects the head and neck in only 1-4% of cases. The purpose of this study was to review the NCI experience with Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck in children. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of patient files with head and neck Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, during the period from 1997 to 2008 was done. Files were reviewed and data for patients, tumor and treatment profile were extracted. Results: Twenty patients out of 280 with Ewing's sarcoma were identified during an 11 -year period. Patients had a median age of 11.5 years (range 5 months - 22 years) with a male to female ratio of 1:1. The most common tumor site was in the mandible (9/20, 45%) followed by a neck mass (4/20, 20%) and a clavicular mass (3/20, 15%). Six patients (30%) were metastatic at presentation. Most of the patients (19/20, 95%) received chemotherapy. Local therapy was in the form of radical radiotherapy for 8 patients (40%), 2 patients (10%) had surgery alone, while five patients (25%) had surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival ranged from 1 to 128 months, with a median of 36 months. At the end of the study, 9 patients (45%) were alive in CR, 6 (30%) were lost to FU in disease progression, while 5 patients died from disease progression. Conclusion: Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck is a disease of a rare incidence with debate about the optimum local therapy. Small non-metastatic tumors with good response to chemotherapy have abetter outcome.

  12. Family Planning for Inner-City Adolescent Males: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janet; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a pilot family planning program in an inner-city pediatric practice. Male adolescents were more likely to accept contraceptives if the provider first raised the topic of birth control to them. Identified a desire for anonymity/confidentiality and embarrassment or discomfort as the key reasons for not seeking contraceptives. Emphasizes…

  13. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Rutherford

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors.

  14. Considering Justice: An Exploratory Study of Family Therapy with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Stephanie Weiland; Kearney, Lisa K.; Lumadue, Christine A.; St. Germain, Noelle R.

    2002-01-01

    Feminist approaches to therapy with adolescents emphasize an empowering focus on the strengths of adolescents while simultaneously insisting that therapists become aware of their own biases toward today's adolescents. However, a review of the family therapy literature finds little mention of feminist approaches for addressing injustices (e.g.,…

  15. A Qualitative Study of Participants in a Family Law Course

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... period 2009-2012. This research sets out to examine the change ... adopted a mixed methods approach with a primarily qualitative focus, and was ..... An example of the type of assessment in the family law course would be to ...

  16. Economic impact of university veterinary diagnostic laboratories: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lee L; Hayes, Dermot J; Holtkamp, Derald J; Swenson, David A

    2018-03-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories (VDLs) play a significant role in the prevention and mitigation of endemic animal diseases and serve an important role in surveillance of, and the response to, outbreaks of transboundary and emerging animal diseases. They also allow for business continuity in livestock operations and help improve human health. Despite these critical societal roles, there is no academic literature on the economic impact of VDLs. We present a case study on the economic impact of the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ISUVDL). We use economic contribution analysis coupled with a stakeholder survey to estimate the impact. Results suggest that the ISUVDL is responsible for $2,162.46 million in direct output, $2,832.45 million in total output, $1,158.19 million in total value added, and $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years. In an animal health emergency this increases to $8,446.21 million in direct output, $11,063.06 million in total output, $4,523.70 million in total value added, and $124.15 million in state taxes. The ISUVDL receives $4 million annually as a direct state government appropriation for operating purposes. The $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years and the $124.15 million in state taxes in an animal health emergency equates to a 795% and 3104% return on investment, respectively. Estimates of the economic impact of the ISUVDL provide information to scientists, administrators, and policymakers regarding the efficacy and return on investment of VDLs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hospital enterprise Architecture Framework (Study of Iranian University Hospital Organization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighathoseini, Atefehsadat; Bobarshad, Hossein; Saghafi, Fatehmeh; Rezaei, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays developing smart and fast services for patients and transforming hospitals to modern hospitals is considered a necessity. Living in the world inundated with information systems, designing services based on information technology entails a suitable architecture framework. This paper aims to present a localized enterprise architecture framework for the Iranian university hospital. Using two dimensions of implementation and having appropriate characteristics, the best 17 enterprises frameworks were chosen. As part of this effort, five criteria were selected according to experts' inputs. According to these criteria, five frameworks which had the highest rank were chosen. Then 44 general characteristics were extracted from the existing 17 frameworks after careful studying. Then a questionnaire was written accordingly to distinguish the necessity of those characteristics using expert's opinions and Delphi method. The result showed eight important criteria. In the next step, using AHP method, TOGAF was chosen regarding having appropriate characteristics and the ability to be implemented among reference formats. In the next step, enterprise architecture framework was designed by TOGAF in a conceptual model and its layers. For determining architecture framework parts, a questionnaire with 145 questions was written based on literature review and expert's opinions. The results showed during localization of TOGAF for Iran, 111 of 145 parts were chosen and certified to be used in the hospital. The results showed that TOGAF could be suitable for use in the hospital. So, a localized Hospital Enterprise Architecture Modelling is developed by customizing TOGAF for an Iranian hospital at eight levels and 11 parts. This new model could be used to be performed in other Iranian hospitals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Study on University Financial Management under Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongfan, Xu

    The coming of knowledge economy creates unprecedented situation of economy development. The trend of education's globalization as well as communication means frequently updated severely hit the system of financial management. Along with the deep going of education industrialization, and development of logistics management socialization, system and content of university financial management are increasingly expending and getting more and more complex that result in new challenge and problems to financial management. In order to step up with university development of internationalization and the logistics development of socialization, the financial management has to reform in response to this new challenge and trend.

  19. MENTAL TOUGHNESS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON KFUPM UNIVERSITY TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMED HAMDAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMental toughness is an attribute that is often associated with successful performance in competitions. Mental toughness and its importance in competitive Sports have been documented in literature (A.S. Goldberg, 1998; K. Hodge, 1994; J. Tunney, 1987; R.M. Williams, 1988. In sports, many things are left to chance as, sports are predictably unpredictable. Sports persons who enter the competitive arena soon realize that there is more to competition than simply learning the physical skills. It is one thing to possess the physical and mental skills and yet another to be able to use them when needed. Every athletic contest is a contest of control of the delicate mind-body connection, which is dramatically clear within the competitive arena (J.E. Loehr, 1982.Purpose: 1. To compare the mental toughness between King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM Judo and Karate teams; 2. To compare the mental toughness between KFUPM Swimming and Track & Field teams. Methods A total of 26 players who are part of KFUPM Judo, Karate , Swimming and Track & Field University teams (2011-12 with age ranging from 18-20 years were selected as subjects for study and were divided into four groups namely; Judo (N= 6, Karate (N= 5, Swimming (N= 8 and Track & Field (N= 7. Mental toughness questionnaire of Tiwari and Sharma (2006 was administered to the subjects. The questionnaire consists of 48 statements and has six sub- scales namely: Self Confidence, Attention Control, Motivation, Goal Setting, Visual Imagery and Attitude Control. T- Test was applied to compare means between the groups. Statistical significance was set at 0.05 levels. Results T- Test failed to reveal significant difference on mental toughness (MT between KFUPM Judo and Karate teams (p = .7 > .05. T-Test also failed to reveal significant difference on MT between KFUPM Swimming and Track & Field teams (p = .122 > .05. T-Test revealed significant difference on Self Confidence between KFUPM

  20. The Relationship of Experiential Avoidance, Familial Emotional Atmosphere and Self-Control with Online Gaming Addiction in Bachelor Student of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Zandipayam; Iran davoudi; Mahnaz Mehrabizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: online game addiction is considered as a compulsive, excessive, uncontrollable and destructive physical and psychological behavior. With regard to the problem of persons with addiction to online gaming in the fields of experiential avoidance, families emotional atmosphere and self-control, this study was carried out with the aim of determining the relationship of experiential avoidance, families emotional atmosphere and self-control with online gaming addiction in t...