WorldWideScience

Sample records for university digital museum

  1. Contemporary collaborations between museums and universities

    Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Simonsen, Celia Ekelund

    2017-01-01

    Numerous new types of cross-institutional collaborations have been conducted recently at the intersection between museums and universities. Museums of all subject areas have collaborated with university researchers, just as scholars from a broad range of disciplines including communications, media...... studies, IT and performance design and tourism increasingly collaborate with museums. Based on qualitative evaluation material and autobiographical experiences, this article analyzes a large Danish research project in which collaborations between several museums and universities took place. We investigate...

  2. Poaching Museum Collections using Digital 3D Technologies

    Sarah Younan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creative engagement with digital 3D models of museum artefacts and gives insight into new uses of museum collections enabled by digital scanning, editing and 3D printing technologies. Digital 3D models of museum artefacts are malleable and increasingly easy to use. Additionally, freely available 3D software has made 3D scanning, editing and manufacturing possible for non-specialists. These technologies allow users to create new artworks through the creation and transformation of digital replicas of museum artefacts. Examples of creative works, taken from two case studies that involve the creative use of digital reproductions of museum artefacts are presented in this paper. These projects are illustrative of a larger trend: the digital ‘poaching’ of heritage artefacts. This paper examines how digital 3D technologies can foster creative forms of museum engagement, democratise access to museum collections and engage users with personal forms of museum experience.

  3. Furtive Museums and Digital Reciprocity

    Anabel Fernández Moreno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of museums has gone through many stages where, depending on the time, priority is given to education, collection, curation, conservation or leisure. Museums have played an essential role for several centuries, but it was in the middle decades of the 20th Century when they were developed as a new type of institution that belongs to their community. With the arrival of Information and Communication Technology (hereafter ICT, they will continue to evolve and adapt to their social and cultural context. The idea of common heritage of humankind begins to mature at a time when privatization is imposed in all areas. In this context, the commons civic potential makes it an ideal tool for revitalizing the only institution capable of providing theories for understanding human beings as social beings through their material and immaterial content.

  4. Multicultural University Education and Museum Pedagogy

    Melnikova, G. F.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The specifics of the educational process in the museum are revealed. The experience of using the multicultural educational space of the museum for developing non-humanitarian directions of the university of general cultural competencies is expounded. The emphasis is on the formation of the ability to tolerate social, ethnic, confessional and cultural differences.

  5. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  6. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  7. The Role of Large Enterprises in Museum Digitization

    Ying Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By actively promoting museum digitalization, Japan finds an idiosyncratic way to museum digitalization. The mode of collaboration, in which the government plays a leading role while large enterprises’ R&D capabilities and museum’s cultural dynamics are both allowed to give full play, turns these powerful enterprises into the solid backing of museum digitalization, provides a concrete solution to the common financial and technical challenges museums face in the process. In the course of such collaboration, large enterprises succeed in cultivating a number of talents who understand both business world and museum operation. Thanks to their experiences in the business world, compared with museum professionals, they play a more vital role in marketing the potential commercial exploitation of related digital technologies. The benefits large enterprises could possibly gain from such mode of collaboration - realizing social values, enhancing corporate image, for instance - help to motivate their active involvement, thereby forming a positive cycle of sustainable development.

  8. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years the possibilities for engaging in dialogue and participation with museum visitors have been greatly improved by developments in digital technologies. Throughout the world museums are experimenting with inclusive and participatory digital projects that can enhance the museum...... visitor experience. Many of these projects are unique and creative in their use of cutting edge technology, and in their search for finding new ways to reach differentiated groups of users. However, building on insights from user studies at a Danish digital museum installation, this paper also suggests...

  9. Project AccessIT, Digitalization in Museums and Europeana (European Digital Library Project

    Latif Özen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article emphasizes the importance of digitizing museum inventory records and establishing a data set in solving the problems of collection management in the museums of Turkey. Besides, the museum staff is encouraged to share the already existing digital content at the Europeana Digital Culture Portal by means of AccessIT project.

  10. Building and Sustaining Digital Collections: Models for Libraries and Museums.

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    In February 2001, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage (NINCH) convened a meeting to discuss how museums and libraries are building digital collections and what business models are available to sustain them. A group of museum and library senior executives met with…

  11. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    2012-06-12

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in..., University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 3260 South...

  12. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    2011-05-13

    ...: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park... in the possession of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology professional staff...

  13. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated..., Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue...

  14. 76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2011-10-11

    ...: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... the human remains may contact the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

  15. 75 FR 52023 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  16. 75 FR 36672 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  17. A Study of Applying Digital Mobile Museum Guide

    Chao-yun Chaucer Liang

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available With the prosperous development of information technology, museums begin to apply new technology to enhance operation and communication efficiency. One of the information technology. Personal Digital Mobile, featuring light weight and mobility, can help museum to set up an interactive navigation system, which offering capability of user-controlled guidance and both broad and depth information. In this study, literature related to museum tour guide, digital mobile navigation, and multimedia interaction design were reviewed, and two examples were offered for reference. The first one example is Exploratorium in American, which is cooperated with HP labs to integrate wireless networking and PDA devices. The domestic example is the design project of the Personal Digital Mobile Guide for the Emperor Ch’ien-lung’s Grand Cultural Enterprise Exhibition in National Palace Museum, 2002. This paper introduces the techniques involved, interactive storyboard, interface design, color planning, electronic element planning, etc. The process of applying theory into creative project may help future researches in the related areas.[Article content in Chinese

  18. 76 FR 73663 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of...

    2011-11-29

    ... below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of... ethnographic collection from the Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated funerary items in the museum storage area and...

  19. Survey of library & museum digitization projects, 2016 edition

    2015-01-01

    The study looks at how 61 academic, public and special libraries, museums and historical societies organize their collection digitization efforts. The study gives highly detailed data on spending, budgets, uses of staff time, digitization volumes and back logs and much more. The study helps its readers to answer questions such as: how much digitization is done in-house? How much is outsourced? If outsourced, which companies are favored suppliers? How much are organizations spending on digitization? How much of their staff time is spent on issues of cataloging and metadata? How much is spent on collection marketing? What kind of equipment is being used and what are future plans for equipment? Also covered: crowdsourcing, use of blogs and social media, online showcases and exhibits and much more.

  20. 78 FR 64006 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-10-25

    ... inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum. The human remains were removed from Island....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  1. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ... completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum, Seattle, WA. The human....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  2. Dagik Earth: A Digital Globe Project for Classrooms, Science Museums, and Research Institutes

    Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    Digital globe system is a powerful tool to make the audiences understand phenomena on the Earth and planets in intuitive way. Geo-cosmos of Miraikan, Japan uses 6-m spherical LED, and is one of the largest systems of digital globe. Science on a Sphere (SOS) by NOAA is a digital globe system that is most widely used in science museums around the world. These systems are so expensive that the usage of the digital globes is mainly limited to large-scale science museums. Dagik Earth is a digital globe project that promotes educational programs using digital globe with low cost. It aims to be used especially in classrooms. The cost for the digital globe of Dagik Earth is from several US dollars if PC and PC projector are available. It uses white spheres, such as balloons and balance balls, as the screen. The software is provided by the project with free of charge for the educational usage. The software runs on devices of Windows, Mac and iOS. There are English and Chinese language versions of the PC software besides Japanese version. The number of the registered users of Dagik Earth is about 1,400 in Japan. About 60% of them belongs to schools, 30% to universities and research institutes, and 8% to science museums. In schools, it is used in classes by teachers, and science activities by students. Several teachers have used the system for five years and more. In a students' activity, Dagik Earth contents on the typhoon, solar eclipse, and satellite launch were created and presented in a school festival. This is a good example of the usage of Dagik Earth for STEM education. In the presentation, the system and activity of Dagik Earth will be presented, and the future expansion of the project will be discussed.

  3. Digital fruition of archaeological finds. The experience at the Archaeological Museum of Bologna

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents a series of investigations undertaken thanks to the collaboration between the Department of Architecture and Territorial Planning of the University of Bologna and the Archaeological Museum of Bologna , aimed at finding a procedure for the 3d digital survey and exploration of archaeological finds. In particular, this paper shows how users can benefit from the use of digital technologies for the fruition of historical-artistic heritage. As a matter of fact, digital communication tools stimulate multisensory perception mechanisms and therefore allow to actively involve users in the exploration of contents presented through collections. Immersive visualizations, augmented reality and both tactile and visual exploration of findings can ease the establishment of a more immediate and direct communication channel with users that generally communicate and access information using digital technologies and mediums.

  4. THE HERPETOLOGICAL COLLECTION OF ZOOLOGY MUSEUM, ISTANBUL UNIVERSITY

    Nilgün Kaya; Oya Özuluğ

    2017-01-01

    Amphibia and Reptilia collections at the Zoological Museum, University of Istanbul (ZMUI) were studied and revised. The samples were collected from 1921 until today. The localities of most species are found in the diffrent regions of Turkey. The collection have 74 species of which 20 species are amphibia and 54 species are reptiles.

  5. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, that meet the definition of unassociated... funerary objects should contact Carla Sinopoli, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor...

  6. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2011-09-13

    ...: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has... contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico. Repatriation of the human remains to...

  7. 76 FR 73664 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA

    2011-11-29

    ...: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU) has completed an... University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, telephone (509) 335-4314. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  8. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no...

  9. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    2011-08-08

    ... Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an... contact the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remain...

  10. Digital Museum Collections and Social Media: Ethical Considerations of Ownership and Use

    Kalliopi Fouseki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of digital collections and digital information in the democratisation process of museums. The paper focuses on ethical and ownership issues regarding Wikipedia’s online encyclopaedia initiative to widen access to digital images and knowledge through digital media, for the wider public. The paper draws on three cases of national museums in the UK, namely the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. The paper argues that notions of governmentality, power, authority, and control - which traditionally characterise national museums - are still dominant in digital collections. This occasionally results in tensions that revolve around the issue of ownership of digital images and digital museum objects as well as their commercial and non-commercial uses. The paper shows that recent disputes and discourse related to the use of digital images by Wikipedians (active users of Wikipedia have raised issues of authority and control not only of physical objects but also of the information and knowledge related to these objects. The paper demonstrates that the level of collaboration with Wikipedia reflects to some extent the participatory nature, philosophy, and ideology of each museum institution.

  11. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  12. 77 FR 65404 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Correction... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  13. 77 FR 74871 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    2012-12-18

    ... Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology has completed an... objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. Repatriation of the human...

  14. 78 FR 2432 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology has completed an... objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. Repatriation of the human...

  15. 78 FR 59964 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ....S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Washington (Burke Museum), and Central Washington University have completed an inventory of human remains, in...

  16. Digital Repatriation: Constructing a Culturally Responsive Virtual Museum Tour

    Loriene Roy、Mark Christal

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available

    頁次:14-18

    This paper describe a project that involved educators and three Native American communities in the construction of a virtual tour now available on the Web site of the National Museum of the American Indian(http://www. conexus.si.edu/. In fall 1998, the Pueblo of Laguna Department of Education, the College of Education and Graduate School of Library and Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin, and the Smithsonians National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI began the first collaboration that brought Native American students, teachers, and cultural representatives to the NMAI George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. The virtual tour makes extensive use of QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR. The panoramas of the exhibition space serve as an interface for accessing the featured objects selected by the students. Clicking on a hot spot over the museum display of a featured object causes the QTVR object to load in a separate Webpage frame accompanied by an interpreted essay written by a student. Clickable floor plans of the exhibition- space offer another method of navigating the virtual tour and accessing the virtual objects.

  17. 76 FR 80392 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-12-23

    ...: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Michigan officials and its Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives... accessioned into the Museum of Anthropology. Between 2007 and 2009 the remains were inventoried at the...

  18. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    2012-08-28

    ... Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an... cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the...

  19. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    2011-08-08

    ...: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an inventory of a human remain... human remain should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 7...

  20. 78 FR 19301 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in... Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  1. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology has completed... has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at...

  2. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the... Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural...

  3. 77 FR 51564 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2012-08-24

    ... Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington... of human remains under the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum...

  4. Web-Based Museum Trails on PDAs for University-Level Design Students: Design and Evaluation

    Reynolds, R.; Walker, K.; Speight, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of web-based museum trails for university-level design students to access on handheld devices in the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London. The trails offered students a range of ways of exploring the museum environment and collections, some encouraging students to interpret objects and…

  5. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  6. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  7. Management of small digital collections with Omeka: the MoRE experience (A Museum of REfused and unrealised art projects

    Alberto Salarelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the main features of Omeka, a free and open source CMS (Content Management System for online digital collections developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Omeka presents very interesting features: first, a remarkable ease of use that, however, does not affect its multiple functions; secondly, it provides tools to create, in an innovative way, virtual exhibitions for archives, libraries and museums in order to promote their collections on the web; thirdly, its extreme adaptability to collection size: in fact Omeka is used by large and celebrated institutions such as the New York Public Library and Europeana, but also by many small initiatives including MoRE (A Museum of REfused and unrealized art projects. Specifically, the second part of the article describes, in brief, the objectives and characteristics of this virtual museum dedicated to contemporary unrealized artworks; it is an experimental project, still under development, devised by a working group of the University of Parma (Italy, who found in Omeka the most suitable IT solution to collect and expose these unique museum materials.

  8. Education at the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

    Edmonson, James M

    2009-01-01

    The Dittrick Museum of Medical History pursues an educational mission as being part of a major research university. While the Dittrick dates to 1899 as a historical committee of the Cleveland Medical Library Association, it first affiliated with Case Western Reserve University in 1966, and became a department of the College of Arts and Sciences of CWRU in 1998. The Dittrick maintains a museum exhibition gallery that is open to the public free of charge, and museum staff provide guided tours on appointment. Much of the teaching and instruction at the Dittrick is conducted by university professors; their classes meet in the museum and use museum resources in the form of artifacts, images, archives, and rare books. Class projects using Dittrick collections may take the form of research papers, exhibitions, and online presentations. Dittrick staff assist in these classes and are available to help researchers use museum resources.

  9. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    2013-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13042; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by Rev...

  10. 78 FR 64007 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    2013-10-25

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology has corrected an inventory of human remains and...

  11. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian...

  12. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    2012-04-19

    ...: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed an inventory of human [[Page 23503

  13. 78 FR 59963 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13770; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of..., Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

  14. The Theory and Implementation for Metadata in Digital Library/Museum

    Hsueh-hua Chen

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital Libraries and Museums (DL/M have become one of the important research issues of Library and Information Science as well as other related fields. This paper describes the basic concepts of DL/M and briefly introduces the development of Taiwan Digital Museum Project. Based on the features of various collections, wediscuss how to maintain, to manage and to exchange metadata, especially from the viewpoint of users. We propose the draft of metadata, MICI (Metadata Interchange for Chinese Information , developed by ROSS (Resources Organization and SearchingSpecification team. Finally, current problems and future development of metadata will be touched.[Article content in Chinese

  15. Exploring information seeking behaviour in a digital museum context

    Skov, Mette; Ingwersen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a case study of task-based interactive information seeking and retrieval behaviour of virtual museum visitors in context. The research described here is part of a larger study: this paper specifically looks at 1) leisure tasks/interests and derived ...

  16. 76 FR 54485 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

    2011-09-01

    ... A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University... associated funerary objects may contact the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

  17. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    2011-07-27

    ... Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with... contact the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that...

  18. Active Art Education in a University Museum: The Example of the Barber Institute

    Şehnaz Yalçın Wells

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Museums provide individuals with access to a variety of artworks at a quality and quantity that is not possible any other way. Museum education is of great importance to get effective benefit from museums. Nowadays museum education starts at an early age, and is simultaneously given in appropriate subjects of different lessons. Turkey has made important progresses in museum education and museum studies in recent years, but clearly there is much more to do when compared to more developed countries. These steps can be summarised (a increasing research into museum education and museology, (b staff training, (c creation of social awareness, (d development and application of new projects. Managing all these is not possible with the state’s efforts. Private entrepreneurs and civil society should take the initiative and contribute towards museum education and museology. The aim of this research is to determine the potential and function of art education, and to introduce the museum/art activities made in this context in the Barber Museum of Fine Arts Institute at Birmingham University, England. In line with these aims the answers to these questions are being sought: 1. How was Barber Institute Museum been established and developed? a What is the history of the museum’s foundation? b In the context of the development of museology and art, how can the establishment of the museum by a person/family be evaluated? 2. What are the institutional features of the Barber Institute Museum? a What are the administrative features of the museum? b What are the spatial features and importance of the museum? c What is the artistic significance of its collections? 3. How is museum/art education applied at the Barber Institute Museum? 4. How can the example of the Barber Institute be assessed in terms of museology and museum/art education? Method: This is a qualitative research study, and the case study method is used accordingly. This method foresees the portrayal

  19. 76 FR 73670 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-11-29

    ...: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Museum of Anthropology NAGPRA collections staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills... Anthropology purchased the human remains from Reverend L. P. Rowland in November of 1924 as part of a larger...

  20. History and highlights of the teratological collection in the Museum Anatomicum of Leiden University, The Netherlands

    Boer, Lucas L.; Boek, Peter L. J.; van Dam, Andries J.; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2018-01-01

    The anatomical collection of the Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center (historically referred to as Museum Anatomicum Academiae Lugduno-Batavae) houses and maintains more than 13,000 unique anatomical, pathological and zoological specimens, and include the oldest teratological

  1. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  2. 76 FR 58033 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  3. 76 FR 58034 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  4. 76 FR 58039 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  5. 78 FR 78379 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA

    2013-12-26

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology at... Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation...

  6. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  7. A Spectrum of Interoperability: The Site for Science Prototype for the NSDL; Re-Inventing the Wheel? Standards, Interoperability and Digital Cultural Content; Preservation Risk Management for Web Resources: Virtual Remote Control in Cornell's Project Prism; Safekeeping: A Cooperative Approach to Building a Digital Preservation Resource; Object Persistence and Availability in Digital Libraries; Illinois Digital Cultural Heritage Community-Collaborative Interactions among Libraries, Museums and Elementary Schools.

    Arms, William Y.; Hillmann, Diane; Lagoze, Carl; Krafft, Dean; Marisa, Richard; Saylor, John; Terizzi, Carol; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Gill, Tony; Miller, Paul; Kenney, Anne R.; McGovern, Nancy Y.; Botticelli, Peter; Entlich, Richard; Payette, Sandra; Berthon, Hilary; Thomas, Susan; Webb, Colin; Nelson, Michael L.; Allen, B. Danette; Bennett, Nuala A.; Sandore, Beth; Pianfetti, Evangeline S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital libraries, including interoperability, metadata, and international standards; Web resource preservation efforts at Cornell University; digital preservation at the National Library of Australia; object persistence and availability; collaboration among libraries, museums and elementary schools; Asian digital libraries; and a Web…

  8. Digital Workflows for Restoration and Management of the Museum Affandi - a Case Study in Challenging Circumstances

    Herbig, U.; Styhler-Aydın, G.; Grandits, D.; Stampfer, L.; Pont, U.; Mayer, I.

    2017-08-01

    The appropriate restoration of architectural heritage needs a careful and comprehensive documentation of the existing structures, which even elaborates, if the function of the building needs special attention, like in museums. In a collaborative project between the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and two universities in Austria (TU Wien and the Danube University Krems) a restoration and adaptation concept of the Affandi Museum in Yogyakarta is currently in progress. It provides a perfect case study for the development of a workflow to combine data from a building survey, architectural research, indoor climate measurements and the documentation of artwork in a challenging environment, from hot and humid tropical climate to continuous threads by natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The Affandi Museum houses the collection of Affandi, who is considered to be Indonesia's foremost Expressionist painter and partly designed and constructed the museum by himself. With the spirit of the artist still perceptible in the complex the Affandi Museum is an important part of the Indonesian cultural heritage. Thus its preservation takes special attention and adds to the complexity of the development of a monitoring and maintenance concept. This paper describes the ongoing development of an approach to a workflow from the measurement and research of the objects, both architectural and artwork, to the semantically enriched BIM Model as the base for a sustainable monitoring tool for the Affandi Museum.

  9. DIGITAL WORKFLOWS FOR RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE MUSEUM AFFANDI - A CASE STUDY IN CHALLENGING CIRCUMSTANCES

    U. Herbig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate restoration of architectural heritage needs a careful and comprehensive documentation of the existing structures, which even elaborates, if the function of the building needs special attention, like in museums. In a collaborative project between the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and two universities in Austria (TU Wien and the Danube University Krems a restoration and adaptation concept of the Affandi Museum in Yogyakarta is currently in progress. It provides a perfect case study for the development of a workflow to combine data from a building survey, architectural research, indoor climate measurements and the documentation of artwork in a challenging environment, from hot and humid tropical climate to continuous threads by natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The Affandi Museum houses the collection of Affandi, who is considered to be Indonesia's foremost Expressionist painter and partly designed and constructed the museum by himself. With the spirit of the artist still perceptible in the complex the Affandi Museum is an important part of the Indonesian cultural heritage. Thus its preservation takes special attention and adds to the complexity of the development of a monitoring and maintenance concept. This paper describes the ongoing development of an approach to a workflow from the measurement and research of the objects, both architectural and artwork, to the semantically enriched BIM Model as the base for a sustainable monitoring tool for the Affandi Museum.

  10. Tropical veterinary parasites at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    Conn, David Bruce

    2008-12-01

    Tropical veterinary parasites have been maintained by the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University since the mid 1800s. Most of these are maintained by the Department of Invertebrate Zoology, but many vectors and intermediate hosts are maintained by the Departments of Entomology and Malacology. The largest collections are of avian and mammalian ticks (Acarina) that are important as both parasites and vectors. Nematodes are second in numbers, followed by cestodes, trematodes, and several minor helminth groups, crustacean parasites of fish, and protozoan parasites of various hosts. The MCZ directed or participated in several major expeditions to tropical areas around the globe in the early 1900s. Many of these expeditions focused on human parasites, but hundreds of veterinary and zoonotic parasites were also collected from these and numerous, smaller, tropical expeditions. Host sources include companion animals, livestock, laboratory species, domestic fowl, reptiles, amphibians, exotics/zoo animals, commercially important fishes, and other wildlife. Specimens are curated, either fixed whole in vials or mounted on slides as whole mounts or histopathological sections. The primary emphasis of MCZ's current work with tropical veterinary parasites is on voucher specimens from epidemiological, experimental, and clinical research.

  11. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  12. Annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae (Hymenoptera) in the Oxford University Museum

    Achterberg, van C.; O'Toole, C.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae in the Hope Entomological Collections, University Museum, Oxford, is given. The following new combinations are proposed: Aleiodes rothneyi (Shenefelt, 1975); Aniphiaulax agraensis (Cameron, 1897); Balcemena ruficollis (Cameron, 1899); Bicarinibracon

  13. 76 FR 36151 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-06-21

    ... made by Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, professional staff in consultation with... picked up on the plains near Fort Rice Dakota.'' No known individual was identified. No associated...

  14. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural items may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  15. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian... Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item...

  16. 75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-09-24

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service... in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge... was a project of Harvard University faculty in 1972. No known individuals were identified. No...

  17. [Human remains in museums: research, preservation and communication. The experience of Turin University Museum of Anthropology and Etnography].

    Boano, Rosa; Grilletto, Renato; Rabino Massa, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The creation of large scientific collections has been an important development for anthropological and paleopathological research. Indeed the biological collections are irreplaceable reference systems for the biological reconstruction of past population. They also assume the important role of anthropological archives and, in the global description of man, permit the integration of historical data with those from bio-anthropolgical research. Thinking about the role of mummies and bones as scientific resources, best practice of preservation of ancient specimens should be of high priority for institution and researchers. By way of example, the authors mention their experience regarding ancient human remains preserved in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography at the University of Turin.

  18. 78 FR 19299 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12395; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound... History, University of Puget Sound, has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the...

  19. Digital Downsides: Exploring University Students' Negative Engagements with Digital Technology

    Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are now an integral feature of university study. As such, academic research has tended to concentrate on the potential of digital technologies to support, extend and even "enhance" student learning. This paper, in contrast, explores the rather more messy realities of students' engagements with digital technology. In…

  20. What a Tangible Digital Installation for Museums Can Offer to Autistic Children and Their Teachers

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    of curricular subjects and enabling learning through conceptual thinking and social interaction. An existing digital and tangible installation called MicroCulture, originally created by the authors to bridge history learning across museums and schools was re-contextualised and placed at the school's disposal......, in a three weeks study involving 15 pupils. Data was gathered unobtrusively, with qualitative methods. Through mediated play and teacher's facilitation, children occasionally engaged in interactions leading to conceptual thinking, cooperation, and forms of role play. The authors present both problems...

  1. What a Tangible Digital Installation for Museums Can Offer to Autistic Children and Their Teachers

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    of curricular subjects and enabling learning through conceptual thinking and social interaction. An existing digital and tangible installation called MicroCulture, originally created by the authors to bridge history learning across museums and schools was re-contextualised and placed at the school's disposal......, in a three weeks study involving 15 pupils. Data was gathered unobtrusively, with qualitative methods. Through mediated play and teacher's facilitation, children occasionally engaged in interactions leading to conceptual thinking, cooperation, and forms of role play. The authors present both problems...

  2. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    2011-05-13

    ... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definitions of unassociated... 4 eagle feathers, 1 stone purifying bowl, 3 medicine man's baskets, 1 medicine basket lid, 4 medicine man's basket fragments, 1 animal bone, 2 carved animal effigies, 1 carved human effigy, 1 feather...

  3. Field Studies for Key Stage 4 on Mine Water Pollution: A University and Museum Collaboration

    Hopwood, Jeremy D.; Berry, Stuart D.; Ambrose, Jayne L.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how a university and a museum have worked together to create a "How science works" workshop entitled "What's in our water?" The workshop teaches students about the continuing pollution from a disused coal mine, how the pollution is cleaned up using a state-of-the-art treatment works and how scientists…

  4. 77 FR 34991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI...

    2012-06-12

    ... administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native... affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of...

  5. 78 FR 45958 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-07-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13406; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke...

  6. 77 FR 46117 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-10823; 2200-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  7. 78 FR 11675 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12080;2200-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  8. 75 FR 36671 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Correction AGENCY: National Park... human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  9. 78 FR 44595 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13407; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke...

  10. Palaeontological collections at the Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen: from Cabinet of Curiosities to databases

    Harper, D.A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Geological collections were established in the University of Copenhagen during the early 1700s with the presentation of fossil, mineral and rock collections by Count A.G. Moltke, mainly assembled by Ole Worm (1588-1654) in his Museum Wormianum. Currently the palaeontological collections in the

  11. Digital Technologies as Education Innovation at Universities

    Kryukov, Vladimir; Gorin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of digital technology-based education innovations in higher education. It demonstrated that extensive implementation of digital technologies in universities is the main factor conditioning the acceleration of innovative changes in educational processes, while digital technologies themselves become one of the key…

  12. MILLION BOOK UNIVERSAL DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECTS: INDIA

    Waghmode, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Digital Library of India is a digital library of books, which is free-to-read, searchable, predominantly in India languages, available to everyone over the Internet. Very soon it is expected that this portal would provide a gateway to Indian Digital Libraries in Science, Arts, Culture, Music, Movies, Traditional Medicine, Palm Leaves and many more. This project is collaboration between Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Universities and Carnegie Mellon University under MILLION BOOK UNIVE...

  13. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2012-08-02

    ... Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico... Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined that a collection of... cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the...

  14. University Students and Local Museums: Developing Effective Partnerships with Oral History

    Jane Eva Baxter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive paper that details the collaboration between a group of twenty-one DePaul University students and the Exhibitions Committee of the Chinese American Museum of Chicago (CAMOC in the spring of 2010.  The students were all junior and senior Anthropology Majors participating in a course on applied-anthropology, or the applications of anthropological methods and perspectives outside of an academic setting.  CAMOC is a significant, volunteer-driven Chicago museum devoted to the collection, study, and exhibition of materials relating to the Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians who settled in the regions between the coasts of these nations.  The museum first opened its doors in 2005, and in 2008 suffered a devastating fire resulting in the loss of most of the collections and exhibits.  DePaul students partnered with the Exhibitions Committee to collect, archive, and display oral histories of community members to assist in their rebuilding efforts.  The presentation of this particular project focusing on three significant ideas: (1 The importance of developing a project that can be brought to fruition in the course of a single collaborative episode, (2 The types of infrastructure that should be provided by the partners in such a collaboration, and (3 The necessity of creating a project that can simultaneously address the needs of a small museum and the educational goals for student participants.

  15. University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments

    2011-01-01

    University libraries around the world have embraced the possibilities of the digital learning environment, facilitating its use and proactively seeking to develop the provision of electronic resources and services. The digital environment offers opportunities and challenges for librarians in all aspects of their work – in information literacy, virtual reference, institutional repositories, e-learning, managing digital resources and social media. The authors in this timely book are leading exp...

  16. Digital museums of the imagined architecture: an integrated approach to the definition of cultural heritage’s knowledge paths

    Aldo R.D. Accardi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to highlight a multidisciplinary approach to define new ways of knowledge of architectures and urban contexts that were drawn but never built. In particular, the focus is on a set of 18th century representations, created in the field of scenic illusion. The work was firstly carried out in order to define the structure of a Digital Museum Ontology, a complex semantic resource able to store documents of various typologies. Then, it was elaborated a digital museum project, which starting from existing images will introduce to an interactive way of experiencing the heritage in question. This experimentation has the intent of finding a best practice for the creation of virtual exhibitions. 

  17. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Engaging Subject Matter Experts to Support Museum Alliance Science Briefings

    Marcucci, Emma; Slivinski, Carolyn; Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Squires, Gordon K.; Biferno, Anya A.; Lestition, Kathleen; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Lee, Janice C.; Rivera, Thalia; Walker, Allyson; Spisak, Marilyn

    2018-06-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University and is part of the NASA SMD Science Activation Collective. The NASA’s Universe of Learning projects pull on the expertise of subject matter experts (scientist and engineers) from across the broad range of NASA Astrophysics themes and missions. One such project, which draws strongly on the expertise of the community, is the NASA’s Universe of Learning Science Briefings, which is done in collaboration with the NASA Museum Alliance. This collaboration presents a monthly hour-long discussion on relevant NASA astrophysics topics or events to an audience composed largely of informal educators from informal learning environments. These professional learning opportunities use experts and resources within the astronomical community to support increased interest and engagement of the informal learning community in NASA Astrophysics-related concepts and events. Briefings are designed to create a foundation for this audience using (1) broad science themes, (2) special events, or (3) breaking science news. The NASA’s Universe of Learning team engages subject matter experts to be speakers and present their science at these briefings to provide a direct connection to NASA Astrophysics science and provide the audience an opportunity to interact directly with scientists and engineers involved in NASA missions. To maximize the usefulness of the Museum Alliance Science Briefings, each briefing highlights resources related to the science theme to support informal educators in incorporating science content into their venues and/or interactions with the public. During this

  18. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  19. Developing Digital Technologies for Undergraduate University Mathematics

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Our research effort presented in this paper relates with developing digital tools for mathematics education at undergraduate university level. It focuses specifically on studies where mathematics is not a core subject but it is very important in order to cope with core subjects. For our design, we...... requirements for the development of digital tools that support mathematics teaching and learning at university level....... during lectures and exercise time. During these observations we were able to investigate how the applets were used in practice but also to get insight in the challenges that the students face during mathematics learning. These findings together with student feedback inspire the next round of design...

  20. Portable technologies at the museum

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study...... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....

  1. Digitalization of the exceptional building and decorative stones collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Steinwender, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Natural History Museum Vienna (NHMV) owns one of the largest building, decorative, and ornamental stones collections in Europe. This important collection dates back to the 19th century and was initiated by curator Felix Karrer after a donation of the "Union-Baugesellschaft" (Karrer, 1892). It contains rock samples used for the construction of most of the famous buildings and monuments in Vienna and in the entire Austria and surrounding countries, as well as from other famous constructions and antique (Egyptian, Greek, Roman, etc.) monuments in the world. Decorative stones that were used for the inside parts of buildings as well as artificial materials, such as stucco, tiles, and building-materials like gravel, are also part of this collection. Unfortunately, most specimens of this collection cannot be displayed at the NHMV (i.e., only 500 specimens are visible in the display Hall I) and are therefore preserved in storage rooms, and not accessible to the public. The main objective of our project of digitalization is to share our rock collection and all treasures it contains with the large majority of interested persons, and especially to provide knowledge on these rocks for people who need this information, such as people who work in cultural, architectural, scientific, and commercial fields. So far 4,500 samples from our collection have been processed with the support of the Open Up! project (Opening up the Natural History Heritage for Europeana). Our database contains all information available on these samples (including e.g., the name of the rock, locality, historic use, heritage utilization, etc.), high-quality digital photographs (with both top and bottom sides of the samples), and scanned labels (both "old" NHMV labels and other (original) labels attached to the samples). We plan to achieve the full digitalization of our unique collection within the next two years and to develop a website to provide access to the content of our database (if adequate

  2. Four steps in the history of museum technologies and visitors' digital participation

    Christensen, Jørgen Riber

    2011-01-01

    technologies used today in three different museums and galleries: the Bode Museum in Berlin, the Victoria and Albert Museum and Dr. Johnson's House in London. The historical verification and documentation in this article describe four steps in the development of exhibition technologies: the Boydell Shakespeare...... participation of visitors and audience. Here the argumentation is based on how the displayed object creates signification in its position between its autonomy and its contexts. The following display technologies are described and analysed: stipple engraving, photography, the audio guide, and the interactive...

  3. 3D Adaptive Virtual Exhibit for the University of Denver Digital Collections

    Shea-Tinn Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the gaming industry has taken the world by storm with its three-dimensional (3D user interfaces, current digital collection exhibits presented by museums, historical societies, and libraries are still limited to a two-dimensional (2D interface display. Why can’t digital collections take advantage of this 3D interface advancement? The prototype discussed in this paper presents to the visitor a 3D virtual exhibit containing a set of digital objects from the University of Denver Libraries’ digital image collections, giving visitors an immersive experience when viewing the collections. In particular, the interface is adaptive to the visitor’s browsing behaviors and alters the selection and display of the objects throughout the exhibit to encourage serendipitous discovery. Social media features were also integrated to allow visitors to share items of interest and to create a sense of virtual community.

  4. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    2013-04-10

    ..., has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... the control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition... material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archaeological tradition and indicate occupation between...

  5. [Surgical Roman instruments in the Museum of History of Medicine of the University of Rome "La Sapienza"].

    Gazzaniga, V; Serarcangeli, C

    1999-01-01

    The Museum of History of Medicine at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" keeps numerous roman surgical instruments, dating from the 1st century A.D. This article offers a short review of the critical literature existing on the topic, together with a temporary catalogue of the instruments.

  6. Between a Microscope and a Museum: The Tension Between Content and Context in Digital Collections

    Mitchell, Kenneth

    2015-12-15

    What should a digital collection of research data look like? Should we treat it as a “born-digital” collection and apply library special collections treatments to it? Should we view it solely as part of the research process life-cycle and focus on contextualized and accessible storage techniques? Or are there other solutions that can combine these approaches? Can we incorporate the benefits of both research data management practices and special collections traditions, focusing on utility, reuse, preservation and meaningful context, while avoiding pitfalls of obscurity, excesses of branding, boutique-style presentations, or simply redundancy? Using the example of a research project on Saudi desert microbes and the challenges we’ve faced in contextualizing, organizing and framing the data, we will present how a young Saudi Arabian science and technology university has been tackling these issues as it works to develop a digital collections and data curation program that can serve its present and future researchers, and the university, as well as advance scholarship within the global scientific community.

  7. Digital reading practices of university students

    Karen Shirley LÓPEZ GIL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on digital reading. The main objective of the research was to analyze the reading on screens practices of university students and how their practices are guided by professors and institutions of higher education. The research design was mixed and the type of study was descriptive of cross-sectional. The data collection techniques were questionnaire, document analysis and discussion group. ibm spss v.22 was used for statistical treatment of data and Atlas.Ti 7.0 was used for content analysis of qualitative information. The study showed that students usually read on screens, although many of their reading practices have recreational purposes. Students have troubles to find reliable information on the Internet when they have academic pursuits and frequently consult secondary sources. When texts are on screens, students generally scan information and surf from one document to another along hyperlinks. The boundaries between academic and leisure activities are not well defined; multitasking appears frequently. Students indicate there is a little guidance received from their professors or university. These findings show that students are constantly faced with digital reading, but practices do not always allow them to achieve their academic purposes, so it is necessary to strengthen the support offered to them, mainly from the classroom language. 

  8. Wastewater treatment by artificial wetlands in the Museum of Popular Culture of the National University

    Carolina Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals in terms of sustainable access to sanitation requires increasing the development of research programs that promote simple and low cost technological options, appropriate to the social, economic, and environmental conditions of each population. These processes must be accompanied by actions of environmental and sanitation education, which allow appropriation of these systems by the communities. In this sense, there are two projects in the National University converging on this subject. The Museum of Popular Culture together with the Public Service Company of Heredia develop an environmental education project that promotes the protection of water, from an historical perspective of its management, which has an artificial wetland as the main teaching unit. On the other hand, the Waste Management Laboratory at the School of Chemistry evaluates the performance of this artificial wetland as part of a research project that promotes this type of alternative sanitation. This paper presents results of the monitoring of this artificial wetland, showing average removal percentages of 93% BOD5,20 , 95% COD, 73% P-PO4, and 95% for SS.

  9. 76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    2011-06-21

    ... ``unknown/is possibly the Creswell burial excavated by Peterson.'' Based on museum records, the remains may have been recovered from Creswell, Lane County, OR. Elsewhere, the remains are cataloged as ``unknown...

  10. The Hans Gross Museum of Criminology at the Karl-Franzens-University Graz

    Christian, Bachhiesl

    2008-01-01

    The Hans Gross Museum of Criminology combines scientific research and academic activity with a wide range of public events, such as crime thriller readings and stage plays, connecting the campus with the wider community.

  11. Digitizing Villanova University's Eclipsing Binary Card Catalogue

    Guzman, Giannina; Dalton, Briana; Conroy, Kyle; Prsa, Andrej

    2018-01-01

    Villanova University’s Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science has years of hand-written archival data on Eclipsing Binaries at its disposal. This card catalog began at Princeton in the 1930’s with notable contributions from scientists such as Henry Norris Russel. During World War II, the archive was moved to the University of Pennsylvania, which was one of the world centers for Eclipsing Binary research, consequently, the contributions to the catalog during this time were immense. It was then moved to University of Florida at Gainesville before being accepted by Villanova in the 1990’s. The catalog has been kept in storage since then. The objective of this project is to digitize this archive and create a fully functional online catalog that contains the information available on the cards, along with the scan of the actual cards. Our group has built a database using a python-powered infrastructure to contain the collected data. The team also built a prototype web-based searchable interface as a front-end to the catalog. Following the data-entry process, information like the Right Ascension and Declination will be run against SIMBAD and any differences between values will be noted as part of the catalog. Information published online from the card catalog and even discrepancies in information for a star, could be a catalyst for new studies on these Eclipsing Binaries. Once completed, the database-driven interface will be made available to astronomers worldwide. The group will also acquire, from the database, a list of referenced articles that have yet to be found online in order to further pursue their digitization. This list will be comprised of references in the cards that were neither found on ADS nor online during the data-entry process. Pursuing the integration of these references to online queries such as ADS will be an ongoing process that will contribute and further facilitate studies on Eclipsing Binaries.

  12. Det medialiserede museum

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, digital technologies have gained a greater and more important role in communication and dissemination of knowledge by museums. This article argues that the digitization of museum communication can be viewed as a result of a mediatization process that is connected...... to a cultural-political and museological focus on digital dissemination, in which user experience, interactivity, and participation are central concepts. The article argues that the different forms of communication, representation, and reception offered by digital media, together with the interactive and social...... of museum visiting has been transformed and somewhat adapted to new media-created forms of communication and action. From a more general perspective, the article may be regarded as a contribution to a continuous discussion of the role museums must play in a mediatized society....

  13. The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education. The Benaki Museum, Athens, 17 October 2013

    Dimitra Christidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of 'The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education 'conference, third in a series of conferences organised by the Benaki Museum in partnership with the American Embassy and the British Council in Greece, was the use of technology and social media as means of transforming museum education and, sometimes, funding museum exhibitions and educational programmes. Among others, the conference aimed to discuss the use of digital applications such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter by museums in order to attract a wider audience, interpret their collections and even fund their programmes.

  14. Digital Natives Revisited: Developing Digital Wisdom in the Modern University

    Harris, David

    2012-01-01

    The seminal work of Prensky on "digital natives" and "digital wisdom" is used to launch a broader discussion on the relations between electronic communication, higher education, and popular and elite culture. Prensky's critics commonly contrast his polarisations and generational divisions with a more complex picture of types of engagement with…

  15. A Study of Digital Communications between Universities and Students

    Drake, Perry D.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the digital and social media communication practices of nine urban universities including UMSL and compared those to known corporate best practices. The purpose of this study was to (1) research how these universities are using social/digital communications to engage with students and prospective students; (2) compare the…

  16. From Point Cloud to Digital Fabrication: a Tangible Reconstruction of Ca' Venier Dei Leoni, the Guggenheim Museum in Venice

    Balletti, C.; D'Agnano, F.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes how new digital methodologies can be used within the field of Cultural Heritage, not only with the aim of documenting the actual state of an architecture but to review the past transformations it has undergone, conserving and representing these histories as well. The premise to conservation and enhancement of our Heritage is a deep study in terms of position, shape, colour, and also of the historical and artistic features. Survey methods have acquired data acquisition techniques in line with technological progress: today's electronic and IT technologies, that are the tools of modern Geomatics, allow the effective survey and representation of 3D objects, from architectural structures to sculptures or archaeological finds. Over the last few years, the methodologies of acquisition and integrated representation for 3D patrimony documentation have developed and consolidated considerably: the possibilities of the digital realm can augment the understanding and the valorisation of a monument. The specific case offered in the present paper, Ca' Venier dei Leoni, the palace where is the Guggenheim Museum in Venice, is a significant example. It suggests not only the theme of the "no longer existing", or better never built, but also the opportunity to formulate hypotheses regarding its implementation and the impact that the palace would have had in the Venetian contest.

  17. Museum of Comparative Zoology Library--The Agassiz Library: Harvard University.

    Jonas, Eva S.; Regen, Shari S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the Museum of Comparative Zoology Library reflects the union between the nineteenth century natural history values of Louis Agassiz and the twentieth century library and information science methodology. Special collections, records, cataloging and classification, serials and their classification, policies, services, and procedures are…

  18. 75 FR 28648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of... finding a copper vessel and other ``small articles'' with the human remains. However, these items were not...

  19. 77 FR 32986 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL

    2012-06-04

    ... notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the... than 2,032 glass beads, 1 lot of more than 17 shell beads, 1 unidentified bead, 1 gun lock, 1 gun butt plate, 1 gun stock, 2 gun barrels, 1 brass ramrod support, 8 musket balls, 2 iron buckles, 1 iron handle...

  20. "Carol I" Central University Library Continuous Training Program through Documentary Visits. A Documentary Visit to Cotroceni Museum

    Emanuela Florea-Paraipan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay we aim to emphasize the role of documentary visits in continuous training programs of library professionals. As alternative form of continuous training, the "Carol I" Central University Library runs an annual program of documentary visits to Bucharest museums, in order to identify from the historical, biographical, literary, artistic and scientific perspective, the manner in which evolved Romanian spirituality nationally and beyond. As a form of initial training for national inheritance understanding, the professional visits to cultural institutions allows the discovery of the categories of collections, the structure and their pedagogical value in learning, teaching and training.

  1. Different conceptions of digital university in Ibero-America

    Jesús Salinas Ibáñez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the term of digital university has been a buzzword or trend in different contexts in Spanish-speaking countries. However, there is no available clear definition of the concept that helps us specify its implementation further. Therefore, this study was aimed at analyzing the different existing conceptions of digital university in Ibero-America, via a systematic literature review and the analysis of the semantic field through a network analysis. This enabled us to identify what was understood by being a digital university from the perspective of different Ibero-American universities. Spanish keywords derived from the thesaurus -including “digital university”- were used in the search through diverse catalogs and databases, and documents of different kinds were found between 2007 and 2017. The literature review was based on the abstracts of the documents and we considered the creation of categories with diverse topics that represent how Ibero-America understands the digital university and with which restrictions has to deal with. The discussion incorporates the integration of those categories and topics into the digital university models that were previously identified. As a conclusion, a summary on the concept of digital university is presented and we point towards some remarks so that the conception is made a reality in its practice.

  2. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia)

    Ortiz-Yusty,Carlos; Daza,Juan; Paez,Vivian; Bock,Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de A...

  3. The Worldly Space: The Digital University in Network Time

    Hassan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This article considers the effect of information technology upon teaching, learning and research in the "digital university". In less than a generation the university has become a business like any other. It does so in the determining context of neoliberal globalisation and the computer revolution. The university develops through what we…

  4. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  5. The School Museum as a Catalyst for a Renewal of the Teaching of History of Education. Practices and Experiences from the University of Macerata, Italy

    Brunelli, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the educational activities that, since its establishment, the Museum of the School of the University of Macerata has developed with particular attention to university and school students. As a result of a fruitful synthesis of the most recent trends in History of Education, Heritage Education and finally in History Teaching,…

  6. EFFECTIVE 3D DIGITIZATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTIFACTS FOR INTERACTIVE VIRTUAL MUSEUM

    G. Tucci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of results of an on-going research on digital 3D reproduction of medium and small size archaeological artifacts which is intended to support the elaboration of a virtual and interactive exhibition environment, and also to provide a scientific archive of highly accurate models for specialists. After a short illustration of the background project and its finalities, we present the data acquisition through triangulation-based laser scanning and the post-processing methods we used to face the challenge of obtaining a large number of reliable digital copies at reasonable costs and within a short time frame, giving an account of the most recurrent problematic issues of the established work-flow and how they were solved (the careful placing of the artifacts to be digitized so to achieve the best results, the cleaning operations in order to build a coherent single polygon mesh, how to deal with unavoidable missing parts or defected textures in the generated model, etc..

  7. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  8. Museums, Environments, Information

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and

  9. MRI for transformation of preserved organs and their pathologies into digital formats for medical education and creation of a virtual pathology museum. A pilot study.

    Venkatesh, S K; Wang, G; Seet, J E; Teo, L L S; Chong, V F H

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the transformation of preserved organs and their disease entities into digital formats for medical education and creation of a virtual museum. MRI of selected 114 pathology specimen jars representing different organs and their diseases was performed using a 3 T MRI machine with two or more MRI sequences including three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted (T1W), 3D-T2W, 3D-FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery), fat-water separation (DIXON), and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences. Qualitative assessment of MRI for depiction of disease and internal anatomy was performed. Volume rendering was performed on commercially available workstations. The digital images, 3D models, and photographs of specimens were archived into a workstation serving as a virtual pathology museum. MRI was successfully performed on all specimens. The 3D-T1W and 3D-T2W sequences demonstrated the best contrast between normal and pathological tissues. The digital material is a useful aid for understanding disease by giving insights into internal structural changes not apparent on visual inspection alone. Volume rendering produced vivid 3D models with better contrast between normal tissue and diseased tissue compared to real specimens or their photographs in some cases. The digital library provides good illustration material for radiological-pathological correlation by enhancing pathological anatomy and information on nature and signal characteristics of tissues. In some specimens, the MRI appearance may be different from corresponding organ and disease in vivo due to dead tissue and changes induced by prolonged contact with preservative fluid. MRI of pathology specimens is feasible and provides excellent images for education and creating a virtual pathology museum that can serve as permanent record of digital material for self-directed learning, improving teaching aids, and radiological-pathological correlation. Copyright © 2012

  10. MRI for transformation of preserved organs and their pathologies into digital formats for medical education and creation of a virtual pathology museum. A pilot study

    Venkatesh, S.K.; Wang, G.; Seet, J.E.; Teo, L.L.S.; Chong, V.F.H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the transformation of preserved organs and their disease entities into digital formats for medical education and creation of a virtual museum. Materials and methods: MRI of selected 114 pathology specimen jars representing different organs and their diseases was performed using a 3 T MRI machine with two or more MRI sequences including three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted (T1W), 3D-T2W, 3D-FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery), fat–water separation (DIXON), and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences. Qualitative assessment of MRI for depiction of disease and internal anatomy was performed. Volume rendering was performed on commercially available workstations. The digital images, 3D models, and photographs of specimens were archived into a workstation serving as a virtual pathology museum. Results: MRI was successfully performed on all specimens. The 3D-T1W and 3D-T2W sequences demonstrated the best contrast between normal and pathological tissues. The digital material is a useful aid for understanding disease by giving insights into internal structural changes not apparent on visual inspection alone. Volume rendering produced vivid 3D models with better contrast between normal tissue and diseased tissue compared to real specimens or their photographs in some cases. The digital library provides good illustration material for radiological–pathological correlation by enhancing pathological anatomy and information on nature and signal characteristics of tissues. In some specimens, the MRI appearance may be different from corresponding organ and disease in vivo due to dead tissue and changes induced by prolonged contact with preservative fluid. Conclusions: MRI of pathology specimens is feasible and provides excellent images for education and creating a virtual pathology museum that can serve as permanent record of digital material for self-directed learning, improving teaching aids, and

  11. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  12. An Appraisal of Digital Reference Services in Nigerian University ...

    This study examined digital reference services in Nigeria university libraries. A descriptive research design of the ex-post facto was adopted in the study. The instrument used in collecting data for this study was the questionnaire. One hundred and twenty respondents were randomly selected from six Nigerian universities ...

  13. Awareness and use of digital assistants by University of Ilorin ...

    Awareness and use of digital assistants by University of Ilorin postgraduate students. ... agents that help people with communication, information and time management. ... the use of DAs by postgraduate students of the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  14. Are Digital Natives a Myth or Reality? University Students' Use of Digital Technologies

    Margaryan, Anoush; Littlejohn, Allison; Vojt, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent and nature of university students' use of digital technologies for learning and socialising. The findings show that students use a limited range of mainly established technologies. Use of collaborative knowledge creation tools, virtual worlds, and social networking sites was low. "Digital natives" and students of…

  15. The Digital Divide among University Freshmen

    Ricoy, Carmen; Feliz, Tiberio; Couto, Maria Joao

    2013-01-01

    Use of new technologies in university training is an ongoing reality today. However, the inequalities that exist among university students are the source of an important problem. Such inequalities need to be detected and analyzed and therefore a study of college freshmen can be very valuable. This qualitative study intends to analyze the digital…

  16. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Sandra Medić; Nataša Pavlović

    2014-01-01

    In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of t...

  17. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia).

    Ortiz-Yusty, Carlos E; Daza, Juan M; Paez, Vivian P; Bock, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de Antioquia (Medellín, Colombia) has been increasing the collection in the last 16 years to better understand the herpetofaunal diversity and thus contribute to ecological, systematic, biogeographic and conservation research in the Neotropics. Here, we present the results of this effort and highlight how future collection will impact our understanding of the Neotropical herpetofauna.

  18. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia

    Carlos Ortiz-Yusty

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de Antioquia (Medellín, Colombia has been increasing the collection in the last 16 years to better understand the herpetofaunal diversity and thus contribute to ecological, systematic, biogeographic and conservation research in the Neotropics. Here, we present the results of this effort and highlight how future collection will impact our understanding of the Neotropical herpetofauna.

  19. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  20. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  1. Museum Learning.

    Black, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Virtual museums focus on a specific curriculum theme and showcase electronic museum-type collections such as artifacts, paintings, photographs, numerous databases, and Web links to resources around the world. Museums of all types include vital teaching tools that help students make discoveries and form connections with the past, present, and…

  2. Eight-Channel Digital Signal Processor and Universal Trigger Module

    Skulski, Wojtek; Wolfs, Frank

    2003-04-01

    A 10-bit, 8-channel, 40 megasamples per second digital signal processor and waveform digitizer DDC-8 (nicknamed Universal Trigger Module) is presented. The digitizer features 8 analog inputs, 1 analog output for a reconstructed analog waveform, 16 NIM logic inputs, 8 NIM logic outputs, and a pool of 16 TTL logic lines which can be individually configured as either inputs or outputs. The first application of this device is to enhance the present trigger electronics for PHOBOS at RHIC. The status of the development and the first results are presented. Possible applications of the new device are discussed. Supported by the NSF grant PHY-0072204.

  3. VIRTUAL MUSEUMS AS DIGITAL STORYTELLERS FOR DISSEMINATION OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT: POSSIBLE NARRATIVES AND OUTLOOKS FOR APPEALING AND RICH ENCOUNTERS WITH THE PAST

    S. Caspani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Museums (VMs have emerged from the ongoing crossbreeding process between museums and digital technologies as an additional "channel" for disseminating content and providing knowledge about cultural heritage. VMs is a concept still in definition, as this paper attempts to briefly retrace, the recognition of its potential has motivated our efforts for further developments. Core questions that motivated the first phase of the research presented have been: can digital storytelling become the key feature of future VMs? May narratives approach support communication and understanding of cultural heritage providing enriching encounters with the past? May complex systems, such as the built environment and landscape (characterized by space-time relations among elements, that are often difficult to read or appreciate find in digital storytelling a method that exploits their values as documents and palimpsests of human history? Can an increased awareness of the past contribute to support a sense of belonging and identity construction? Which kind of stories can be currently designed with the existing tools? The paper, after an introductory overview, provides a tentative reply to these questions combining the main findings offered by a series of recent studies related to this scenario with some preliminary direct investigations and, eventually, it proposes some outlooks for future developments.

  4. Virtual Museums as Digital Storytellers for Dissemination of Built Environment: Possible Narratives and Outlooks for Appealing and Rich Encounters with the Past

    Caspani, S.; Brumana, R.; Oreni, D.; Previtali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Virtual Museums (VMs) have emerged from the ongoing crossbreeding process between museums and digital technologies as an additional "channel" for disseminating content and providing knowledge about cultural heritage. VMs is a concept still in definition, as this paper attempts to briefly retrace, the recognition of its potential has motivated our efforts for further developments. Core questions that motivated the first phase of the research presented have been: can digital storytelling become the key feature of future VMs? May narratives approach support communication and understanding of cultural heritage providing enriching encounters with the past? May complex systems, such as the built environment and landscape (characterized by space-time relations among elements, that are often difficult to read or appreciate) find in digital storytelling a method that exploits their values as documents and palimpsests of human history? Can an increased awareness of the past contribute to support a sense of belonging and identity construction? Which kind of stories can be currently designed with the existing tools? The paper, after an introductory overview, provides a tentative reply to these questions combining the main findings offered by a series of recent studies related to this scenario with some preliminary direct investigations and, eventually, it proposes some outlooks for future developments.

  5. 75 FR 33328 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-06-11

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service..., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard [[Page 33329

  6. The museum as information space

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    space to being outside the museum in the online information space of the Internet. This has fundamental implications for the institutional role of museums, our understanding of metadata and the methods of documentation. The onsite museum institution will, eventually, not be able to function...... as an institutional entity on the Internet, for in this new information space, objects, collections and museums, all function as independent components in a vast universe of data, side by side at everyone’s disposal at anytime. Potentially, users can access cultural heritage anytime, anywhere and anyhow. © The Author......Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisting...

  7. The Digitally Disadvantaged: Access to Digital Communication Technologies among First Year Students at a Rural South African University

    Oyedemi, Toks; Mogano, Saki

    2018-01-01

    Considering the importance of digital skills in university education, this article reports on a study which examined access to technology among first year students at a rural South African university. The study focused on the digital readiness of students prior to their admission to the university, since many universities provide access to…

  8. Ghosts in the Machine: Incarcerated Students and the Digital University

    Hopkins, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Providing higher education to offenders in custody has become an increasingly complex business in the age of digital learning. Most Australian prisoners still have no direct access to the internet and relatively unreliable access to information technology. As incarceration is now a business, prisons, like universities, are increasingly subject to…

  9. Digitization Of Federal University Libraries In Nigeria: A Doyen ...

    The Federal Government of Nigeria's proposal to digitize her university libraries is a right step in the right direction. The proposal amongst others intended to enhance the intellectual and manpower development as well as halt and reverse the falling standard of education in the country. The study discovered that for effective ...

  10. Online Astronomy Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    Steiner, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's largest natural history museums, is the locus of a rich array of scientific research, exhibition and educational resources through its Department of Astrophysics, its Rose Center for Earth and Space and its Hall of Meteorites. For the past decade, the Museum's National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology has leveraged these assets to create a panoply of web-based resources for students, teachers and the general public. This session will review several of these resources, including the Digital Universe (a three-dimensional mapping of the Universe); The Solar System (an online graduate course for K-12 teachers); multimedia highlighting searches for exoplanets and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays; Journey to the Stars (a DVD version of the current planetarium show); and the astronomy section of Ology (a website for children ages 7 and up). A copy of the Journey to the Stars DVD will be provided to all attendees. )

  11. The Ecology of Arts and Humanities Education: Bridging the Worlds of Universities and Museums

    Salazar-Porzio, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, colleges and universities have been talking seriously about civic learning, but other stakeholders, particularly public arts, culture, and humanities institutions, must be part of the conversation in order to create a context for learning that develops the skills of graduates in robust ways that reflect the full promise of liberal…

  12. The Tedeschi collection: A collection of documented and undocumented human skeletal remains at the Museum of Anthropology, Padua University (Italy).

    Carrara, Nicola; Scaggion, Cinzia; Holland, Emily

    2018-04-01

    Documented and undocumented skeletal collections offer unique windows into life in the past and are integral for research in biological anthropology. The objective of this article is to describe the documented and undocumented collections curated by the Museum of Anthropology at Padua University (Italy) to demonstrate their potential for research and encourage researchers to consider them for future projects. The collection was established by Prof. Enrico Tedeschi at the beginning of 20th century, and dates to the late 19th and early 20th century. The collection consists primarily of individuals excavated from cemeteries, ossarios, or unclaimed individuals donated by hospitals or other institutions. Both documented and undocumented human skeletal remains are included in the collection, totalling 1,580 individuals. Associated documented information including age at death, date of death, sex, occupation, and cause of death is available in different combinations for 293 individuals of varying completeness (188 crania only, 93 crania and postcranial, 12 postcranial only). Origin and chronological period are known for the remaining 1,287 individuals. Overall, this little studied collection could be particularly useful for researchers interested in craniometrics, dentition, and 19th and 20th century health and demography in Italy. The documented skeletons will be especially useful for forensic anthropological research. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Forgery at the Snite Museum of Art? Improving AMS Radiocarbon Dating at the University of Notre Dame

    Troyer, Laura; Bagwell, Connor; Anderson, Tyler; Clark, Adam; Nelson, Austin; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The Snite Museum of Art recently obtained several donations of artifacts. Five of the pieces lack sufficient background information to prove authenticity and require further analysis to positively determine the artwork's age. One method to determine the artwork's age is radiocarbon dating via Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) performed at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory. Samples are prepared by combustion of a small amount of material and subsequent reduction to carbon into an iron powder matrix (graphitization). The graphitization procedure affects the maximum measurement rate, and a poor graphitization can be detrimental to the AMS measurement of the sample. Previous graphitization procedures resulted in a particle current too low or inconsistent to optimize AMS measurements. Thus, there was a desire to design and refine the graphitization system. The finalized process yielded physically darker samples and increased sample currents by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the first testing of the samples was successful, yet analysis of the dates proved inconclusive. AMS measurements will be performed again to obtain better sampling statistics in the hopes of narrowing the reported date ranges. NSF and JINA-CEE.

  14. Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching......Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching...

  15. The Information Seeking Behavior of Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Students of Bogor Agricultural University

    Janti Gristinawati Sujana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological expansion and the changing way individuals gain access to information has deeply impacted the structure of libraries – physically as well as conceptually. A new generation of digital services platforms for libraries is emerging, designed to provide a more comprehensive  approach  to  the  management  and  access  to  all  formats  of  library  materials. Despite the modernization of libraries and their adaption to the digital age, the library still hold a critical role within community to serve its users, continuing to be beacons of information sharing, learning, and entertainment even amidst tight fiscal times.  As one of the leading university in Indonesia, Bogor Agricultural University Library must find solutions to new challenges, overhaul many of their entrenched business processes, and foster systems that engage students.  This study examined the information seeking behavior of the digital native and digital immigrant students of Bogor Agricultural University, in order to remind the library that there are some changes happened in its users and to recommend the new services should be taken by the library. The similarities and differences in seeking information of those two group students were discussed.

  16. Mathematical models from the collections of universities and museums : photograph volume and commentary

    2017-01-01

    This book presents beautiful photos of mathematical models of geometric surfaces made from a variety of materials including plaster, metal, paper, wood, and string. The construction of these models at the time (of Felix Klein and others) was not an end in itself, but was accompanied by mathematical research especially in the field of algebraic geometry. The models were used to illustrate the mathematical objects defined by abstract formulas, either as equations or parameterizations. In the second part of the book, the models are explained by experts in the field of geometry. This book is a reprint thirty years after the original publication in 1986 with a new preface by Gert-Martin Greuel. The models have a timeless appeal and a historical value. The Editor Prof. Dr. Gerd Fischer, Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Munich.

  17. Styding of meteorites of Geological museum (Kazan Federal University): magnetic properties and elemental composition

    Kuzina, D.; Nourgaliev, D. K.; Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Silantiev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of different types meteorites were performed by non-destructive method using polycapillary Micro X-ray Fluorescence spectrometer M4 Tornado (Bruker). Analysis conditions were chosen individually, depending on a sample. Maximum possible current is 600mkA, voltage - up to 50 kV, minimum size of X-ray point from 25 micron. Result of the measurements is elements distribution on the surface of meteorites. Obtained data used for analyzing conclusions in chondrites, find out iron, nickel distribution in the sample (for comparison with thermomagnetic data), studying secondary alterations such as melting, diffusion. Meteorites which have small amount of material after preparing exhibition samples were studied using thermomagnetic analysis among them: Brownfield-iron (IID), Ochansk - ordinary chondrite (H4), Murchison - carbonaceous chondrite (CM2), Kainsaz - carbonaceous chondrite (CO3.2) and others. Thermomagnetic analysis shows us magneto-mineralogical composition. It makes reliably detection of pure Fe, Ni or their alloys. Measurements were carried out on express Curie balance, constructed in Laboratory of magnetism and paleomagnetism of Kazan Federal University [1]. We measured induced magnetization as a function of temperature in a constant magnetic field - 400 mT. The heating rate is 100°C/min. Thermomagnetic curves measured twice - first and second heating up to 800°C. The weight of the sample is maximum 0.1 gram. Results shows that all samples contain Fe-Ni alloys and according [2] it corresponds to Ni concentration between 4-10%. [1] Burov B.V. et al. 1986. Kazan: Publishing house of KSU, 167 p. (In Russian). [2] Cacciamani C. et al. 2006. Intermetallics, 14. 1312-1325

  18. Digitally Programmable High-Q Voltage Mode Universal Filter

    D. Singh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new low-voltage low-power CMOS current feedback amplifier (CFA is presented in this paper. This is used to realize a novel digitally programmable CFA (DPCFA using transistor arrays and MOS switches. The proposed realizations nearly allow rail-to-rail swing capability at all the ports. Class-AB output stage ensures low power dissipation and high current drive capability. The proposed CFA/ DPCFA operates at supply voltage of ±0.75 V and exhibits bandwidth better than 95 MHz. An application of the DPCFA to realize a novel voltage mode high-Q digitally programmable universal filter (UF is given. Performances of all the proposed circuits are verified by PSPICE simulation using TSMC 0.25μm technology parameters.

  19. Investigating the Digital Addiction Level of the University Students According to Their Purposes for Using Digital Tools

    Kesici, Ahmet; Tunç, Nazenin Fidan

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the digital addiction (DA) level of the university students according to their purposes for using digital tools. 527 students studying at the faculties of education of Erzincan, Dicle, and Siirt Universities participated this study in which general survey model was used. A form was used to reveal for which…

  20. University students’ self-regulated learning using digital technologies

    Carmen Yot-Domínguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysing the process by which students—whether at university or not—manage and facilitate their own learning has been a recurrent educational research problem. Recently, the question arises about how the development of strategies taking place during the aforementioned process could be made easier by using technologies. In an effort to know whether university students really use digital technologies to plan, organize and facilitate their own learning, we have proposed three research questions. Which technologies do university students use to self-regulate their learning? What self-regulated learning strategies do they develop using technologies? What profiles could be identified among students based on their use of self-regulation strategies with technology? To answer these questions, the “Survey of Self-regulated Learning with Technology at the University” was designed. Information from a sample group with 711 students from various universities located in the region of Andalusia (Spain was collected with this survey. The results indicate that university students, even when they are frequent users of digital technology, they tend not to use these technologies to regulate their own learning process. Of all technologies analysed, Internet information search and instant communication tools are used continually. In turn, the most generalised self-regulation learning strategies are those relative to social support. Nevertheless, students differ from each other regarding their use and frequency. There are groups of students who make use of self-regulation strategies when learning with technologies. In this regard, two distinctive groups of students have been identified, who show differentiated self-regulated levels.

  1. Review of The Museum of the World [website

    Samantha Lash

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The British Museum, in partnership with the Google Cultural Institute, has developed a digital interface featuring selected objects from their collections: The Museum of the World. The mission of the project is to make knowledge and culture of the 'whole of humanity' available to all as a Museum of and for the World (MacGregor 2015. This impressive effort pushes the bounds of what digital heritage can be, but also raises important questions about the role of the museum, public interaction, and the presentation of world history. This article is a review of the digital interface: The Museum of the World.

  2. 75 FR 58433 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT

    2010-09-24

    .... Charles Lang and Mr. Platte Lyman donated the human remains to the Deseret Museum, Salt Lake City, UT... Saints in Salt Lake City, UT. The collection became known as the Lang-Lyman Collection, and was acquired... of human hair, 1 mug, 1 leather pouch, 1 piece of buckskin, 1 gourd container, 60 feathers, 1 bone...

  3. The ‘universal library’ returns in digital form

    Andy White

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with two contemporary technological developments both of which present a serious challenge to the dominance in literature and learning of the book in its codex form. While their earlier manifestations were not commercially successful, the most recent e-book readers (portable technological contraptions that have the capacity to store thousands of books that can be read electronically have been praised not only for their functionality but also for their aesthetic appeal. A related development has been the growth of large-scale digital libraries, the most prominent of which is the Google Books Library Project, launched in 2004 and now committed to the digitisation of around 15 million volumes or 4.5 billion pages in the following six years from some of the world’s leading academic libraries. The purpose of this paper is to explore these developments within the context of ancient and Enlightenment ideas about the ‘universal library’ which assert that the construction of such an institution is the most effective way of promoting universal knowledge. Rather than employing a kind of technological determinism that renders these technologies as merely points along an inexorable continuum of progress, it will be argued that they are the latest manifestation of an idea that long pre-dated digital technology. Over two millennia ago, the Ptolemies attempted to collect the entire corpus of literature in the Greek language as well as significant works in other languages. Many have argued that the institution that held these huge collections, the library at Alexandria, was effectively the world’s first universal library. Even though this library was eventually destroyed, the idea of universalism survived and flourished again during the European Enlightenment, through Diderot’s Encyclopédie project and the construction of national libraries and archives. Latterly, the creation of the World Wide Web is conceived of by some as the

  4. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    2001-12-01

    N° 73-2001 - Paris, 5 December 2001 The aim of AVO is to give astronomers instant access to the vast databanks now being built up by the world's observatories and forming what is in effect a "digital sky". Using AVO astronomers will be able, for example, to retrieve the elusive traces of the passage of an asteroid as it passes the Earth and so predict its future path and perhaps warn of a possible impact. When a giant star comes to the end of its life in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova, they will be able to access the digital sky and pinpoint the star shortly before it exploded, adding invaluable data to the study of the evolution of stars. Modern observatories observe the sky continuously and data accumulates remorselessly in the digital archives. The growth rate is impressive and many hundreds of terabytes of data -corresponding to many thousands of billions of pixels - are already available to scientists. The real sky is being digitally reconstructed in the databanks. The volume and complexity of data and information available to astronomers are overwhelming. Hence the problem of how astronomers can possibly manage, distribute and analyse this great wealth of data. The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory will enable them to meet the challenge and "put the Universe online". AVO is a three-year project, funded by the European Commission under its Research and Technological Development (RTD) scheme, to design and implement a virtual observatory for the European astronomical community. The Commission has awarded a contract valued at EUR 4m for the project, starting on 15 November. AVO will provide software tools to enable astronomers to access the multi-wavelength data archives over the Internet and so give them the capability to resolve fundamental questions about the Universe by probing the digital sky. Equivalent searches of the "real" sky would, in comparison, both be prohibitively costly and take far too long. Towards a Global Virtual Observatory The

  5. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  6. High-Speed Universal Frequency-to-Digital Converter for Quasi-Digital Sensors and Transducers

    Sergey Y. Yurish

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available New fast, accurate universal integrated frequency-to-digital converter (UFDC-1M-16 is described in the article. It is based on the novel patented modified method of the dependent count and has non-redundant conversion time from 6.25 ms to 6.25 ms for 1 to 0.001 % relative errors respectively, comparable with conversion time for successive-approximation and S-D ADC. The IC can work with different sensors, transducers and encoders, which have frequency, period, duty-cycle, PWM, phase shift, pulse number, etc. output.

  7. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  8. Universal Service in a Broader Perspective: The European Digital Divide

    Maria Concepcion GARCIA-JIMENEZ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring universal service is a top objective in many countries in order that all the citizens can have access basic communications services. Although the ICT equipment in households and its usage by individuals are essential prerequisites for benefiting from ICTs, the situation in the European Union is far from uniform. This article provides a description of the European information society development scenario using the values reached by the member states in a set of indicators selected for measuring said progress in households. Two tools are used for providing a broader perspective of the digital divide: a composite index and the cluster analysis. Below, a study is provided on what variables are relevant for interpreting the situation that is presented.

  9. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    2001-12-01

    Vast Databanks at the Astronomers' Fingertips Summary A new European initiative called the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) is being launched to provide astronomers with a breathtaking potential for new discoveries. It will enable them to seamlessly combine the data from both ground- and space-based telescopes which are making observations of the Universe across the whole range of wavelengths - from high-energy gamma rays through the ultraviolet and visible to the infrared and radio. The aim of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) project, which started on 15 November 2001, is to allow astronomers instant access to the vast databanks now being built up by the world's observatories and which are forming what is, in effect, a "digital sky" . Using the AVO, astronomers will, for example, be able to retrieve the elusive traces of the passage of an asteroid as it passes near the Earth and so enable them to predict its future path and perhaps warn of a possible impact. When a giant star comes to the end of its life in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova, they will be able to access the digital sky and pinpoint the star shortly before it exploded so adding invaluable data to the study of the evolution of stars. Background information on the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory is available in the Appendix. PR Photo 34a/01 : The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory - an artist's impression. The rapidly accumulating database ESO PR Photo 34a/01 ESO PR Photo 34a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 345 pix - 90k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 689 pix - 656k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2582 pix - 4.3M] ESO PR Photo 34a/01 shows an artist's impression of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory . Modern observatories observe the sky continuously and data accumulates remorselessly in the digital archives. The growth rate is impressive and many hundreds of terabytes of data - corresponding to many thousands of billions of pixels - are already available to scientists. The real sky is being

  10. Predicting Digital Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Chinese University Students

    He, Tao; Zhu, Chang; Questier, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Although the adoption of digital technology has gained considerable attention in higher education, currently research mainly focuses on implementation in formal learning contexts. Investigating what factors influence students' digital informal learning is still unclear and limited. To understand better university students' digital informal…

  11. Digital Debates. WebWise Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World Proceedings (10th, Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C, February 25-27, 2009)

    Zorich, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Debates typically invoke an image of individuals arguing over the merits of opposing viewpoints. However, the term has a softer, more deliberative sense that connotes reflection, discussion, and consideration. The 2009 WebWise conference, titled "Digital Debates," was conducted in this spirit, with panelists and attendees engaged in…

  12. Application of Digital Cybersecurity Approaches to University Management--VFU SMART STUDENT

    Nedyalkova, Anna; Bakardjieva, Teodora; Nedyalkov, Krasimir

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests digital approaches in university management. Digital transformation requires leadership that can maintain and balance competing interests from faculty, administrators, students and others. The team of Varna Free University designed a flexible proper solution VFU SMART STUDENT aiming at lower operating costs and better…

  13. Enhancing Science Literacy and Art History Engagement at Princeton Through Collaboration Between the University Art Museum and the Council on Science and Technology

    Riihimaki, C. A.; White, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of innovative science education for social science and humanities students is often under-appreciated by science departments, because these students typically do not take science courses beyond general education requirements, nor do they contribute to faculty research programs. However, these students are vitally important in society—for example as business leaders or consultants, and especially as voters. In these roles, they will be confronted with decisions related to science in their professional and personal lives. The Council on Science and Technology at Princeton University aims to fill this education gap by developing and supporting innovative programs that bring science to cross-disciplinary audiences. One of our most fruitful collaborations has been with the Princeton University Art Museum, which has an encyclopedic collection of over 92,000 works of art, ranging from antiquity to the contemporary. Our work includes 1) bringing introductory environmental science courses to the Museum to explore how original works of art of different ages can serve as paleo-environmental proxies, thereby providing a means for discussing broader concepts in development of proxies and validation of reconstructions; 2) sponsoring a panel aimed at the general public and composed of science faculty and art historians who discussed the scientific and art historical contexts behind Albert Bierstadt's Mount Adams, Washington, 1875 (oil on canvas, gift of Mrs. Jacob N. Beam, accession number y1940-430), including the landscape's subjects, materials, technique, and style; and 3) collaborating on an installation of photographs relevant to a freshman GIS course, with an essay about the artwork written by the students. This first-hand study of works of art encourages critical thinking and an empathetic approach to different historical periods and cultures, as well as to the environment. Our collaboration additionally provides an opportunity to engage more students in

  14. A digital platform for university education on geomorphosites

    Coratza, Paola; Reynard, Emmanuel; Cayla, Nathalie; Comanescu, Laura; Darbellay, Lucie; Giusti, Christian; Grecu, Florina; Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    The working group on Geomorphosites of the International Association of Geomorphologists (IAG) is active since 2001 and has developed research activities on issues related to the geomorphological heritage (geomorphosites) (Reynard and Coratza, 2013). In parallel to the research activities, several intensive courses for Ph.D. and Master students have been organized since 2006 in various universities (Lausanne, Lesvos, Minho, Savoie, Beni Mellal) and a textbook for students was edited in 2009 (Reynard et al., 2009). The platform INTERGEO is prepared as a way to disseminate knowledge on geomorphological heritage, in particular in universities of developing countries where access to scientific papers and textbooks is not easy. It aims at improving students' autonomy by the reduction of frontal teaching and increasing autonomous learning as well as promoting international interactions between students interested in geomorphosite topics. The course, developed with the Learning Management System Moodle, is a completely free-access course. It is divided into four parts: (1) Generalities - definitions, links with heritage and landscape studies, active geomorphosites, the IAG working group; (2) Methods - selection and assessment, mapping issues, geomorphosite visualization, technical and digital tools in geomorphosite studies; (3) Conservation and promotion - example of geomorphosite studies related to geoconservation, geoparks, protected areas, World Heritage Sites, geotourism and interpretation, and natural hazards; (4) Examples - cultural, karstic, coastal, mountainous, fluvial, volcanic and anthropogenic geomorphosites. Each chapter contains a short description, a list of references, selected publications, as well as other educational material, e.g. videos, virtual fieldtrips, etc. In particular, several videos allow presenting in a very dynamic way concepts and examples. The content of the course will evolve and will be completed in the future. Most of the content is

  15. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  16. DIGITAL BROADCASTING and INTERACTIVE TELEVISION in DISTANCE EDUCATION: Digital And Interactive Television Infrastructure Proposol for Anadolu University Open Education Faculty

    Reha Recep ERGUL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes and improvements in the communication and information technologies beginning from the midst of the 20th Century and continuing today require new methods, constructions, and arrangements in the production and distribution of information. While television having the ability of presenting complex or difficult to comprehend concepts, subjects, and experimental studies to learners from different points of view, supported by 2D or 3D graphics and animations with audio visual stimulators replaces its technology from analog to digital and towards digital-interactive, it has also begun to convert the broadcasting technology in Turkey in this direction. Therefore, television broadcast infrastructure of Anadolu University Open Education Faculty needs to be replaced with a digital and interactive one. This study contains basic concepts of digital and interactive broadcasting and the new improvements. Furthermore, it includes the approaches in the basis of why and how a digital television broadcasting infrastructure should be stablished.

  17. Museo reale e museo digitale: il caso del Museo Archeologico Regionale “A. Salinas” un anno dopo la riapertura / Real and digital museum: the case of the Museo Archeologico Regionale “A. Salinas” one year after its reopening

    Serena D'Orazio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available La riapertura del Museo Salinas, rimasto per anni inaccessibile a causa di un lungo restauro architettonico, ha rappresentato per la comunità e per l'istituzione stessa un momento di importante condivisione sociale. Accanto ai risultati raggiunti a museo "chiuso" in seguito all'adozione di una strategia di comunicazione capace di integrare l'attività sui canali social, l'adesione a campagne bottom-up per la valorizzazione digitale del patrimonio e la promozione di un ricco calendario di mostre ed eventi all’interno ed all’esterno dalla sede museale si affiancano ora grandi aspettative nei confronti di questa nuova realtà in cui i due sistemi - museo reale e museo digitale - hanno l'opportunità di interagire e comunicare. Questo contributo intende quindi analizzare, nell'ottica del miglioramento continuo, i risultati raggiunti dal museo a distanza di un anno dalla propria riapertura indagando sulle strategie adottate, sulla qualità dei servizi offerti e sulle opportunità ancora da sfruttare, dedicando particolare attenzione al tema dell'uso delle tecnologie digitali per la fruizione e la valorizzazione del patrimonio conservato. The reopening of the Museo Salinas, closed off for years due to a long architectural restoration, has represented a crucial moment of social sharing for both the community and the institution. Together with the results achieved as "closed" museum, thanks to the planning of a communication strategy aimed at introducing social channel activities, the adoption of a bottom-up campaign for cultural heritage digital evaluation and the promotion of a rich schedule of exhibitions and meetings outside of the museum, high expectations are present now for this new reality: two systems - the real museum and the digital museum - have the opportunity to interact and to communicate. The purpose of this paperwork is to analyze, for a continuous improvement, the achievements of the museum one year later the reopening by

  18. Technology Museums in Denmark

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...... within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus...

  19. New Designs in the Museums

    Nuri Özer Erbay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural structure of the museum shall be designed in an accessible way regarding safety. In these designs special needs of visitors shall be taken into consideration according to types thereof.  Architectural structure, topography and natural presence of the museum increase visitor accessibility.  Exhibition venue, showcases and platforms, staircases providing access to upstairs, stairs, slippery rugged surfaces and entrance and exit to the exhibition venue from the same door form inaccessible areas.   It mustn't be forgotten that special disabled visitors can create an unsafe environment for others. Existing designs in museums shall be redesigned to be made accessible by disabled persons.  Museum venues must be redesigned ad made accessible by disabled persons. All characteristics of visitors in museums should be taken into consideration and universal living spaces addressing integral attitude should be designed.  Museum environment designs with regard to visitor safety must be steady.  Ramps shouldn't be unnecessarily steep and slippery.  Floor tiles, carpets or other ground coatings must be attached each other in a safe way. Gaps in ground coating shouldn't exceed the radius of13 mm. Grounds with different colors should be used for highlighting the ground odds and drawing visitors' attention. A distinctive environment requirement should be provided for visitors especially who use walking sticks, crutches and wheelchairs and warning signs shouldn't be forgotten.

  20. Get the Digital Edge: linking students’ attitudes towards digital literacy and employability at the University of Westminster

    Emma Woods

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The University of Westminster is located in London and is celebrating 175 years as an educational institution this year. A key part of the University's vision is in "building the next generation of highly employable global citizens to shape the future" (University of Westminster, 2013. This vision inspired us to look at the digital literacy skills our students need in order to be highly employable. In Spring 2012, the Information Services department at the University of Westminster secured Jisc funding to run a one year project exploring students' attitudes towards digital literacy and its relationship to employability for our students. The work is being carried out by a project board and a delivery group, which include members of staff from across the University who have an active interest in this area. We named the Project "DigitISE" (Digital Information Skills for Employability and colleagues involved with the project take turns in writing for its blog http://blog.westminster.ac.uk/jisc-employability/blog/ A questionnaire was circulated to find out about students' attitudes towards digital literacy and this was followed up by some focus groups. The headline findings from the survey are that 87.6% of students love digital technology and 81.5% believe themselves to be digitally literate. Attitudes vary significantly between subject areas. For example, with regard to the statement that the digital literacy skills needed in the courses get more complex as students progress through the course, students from the Business School agreed significantly more with this than did students from the School of Law, Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages or Architecture. The focus groups have supported the questionnaire findings and highlighted that students are largely unaware of the training that is already available to them. Ideas of how to market future training more effectively will therefore be an important outcome of this work. A further focus group

  1. Global Digital Revolution and Africa: Transforming Nigerian Universities to World Class Institutions

    Isah, Emmanuel Aileonokhuoya; Ayeni, A. O.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the global digital revolution and the transformation of Nigerian universities. The study overviewed university developments world wide in line with what obtains in Nigeria. The study highlighted the several challenges that face Nigerian universities inclusive of poor funding, poor personnel and the poor exposure to global…

  2. Litteraturen og forfatteren på museum

    Lund, Niels Dichov

    2016-01-01

    to the digital society and virtual representation. The role and strength of the author/writer and the importance of place and space in the mediation of literature are enhanced as distinctive for these kinds of museums. It is concluded that the ongoing growth of literary museums is both a result of and an answer......The article discusses the connection between literature and museum and the role of museums for the preservation and engagement with literary heritage. Based on an overview of research in the field and a discussion of definitions, distinctions, typology, and current forms of institutions, new...... developments in literary theory, i.e. new book history and the literary studies’ theories of geographic place, but also concepts of materiality, presence, performance and literary scenes, are brought in to explain different connections between literature and the museum and the supposedly dialectic relation...

  3. Student Communication and Study Habits of First-Year University Students in the Digital Era

    Gallardo-Echenique, Eliana; Bullen, Mark; Marqués-Molías, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the study habits of-university students, their use digital technologies and how they communicate with each other and their professors. We conclude that most students feel comfortable with digital technologies and that they use social media for connecting and interacting with friends rather than for academic…

  4. 3D VISUALIZATION FOR VIRTUAL MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

    M. Skamantzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  5. Digital assessment in higher education: Promoting universal usability through requirements specification and universal design quality (UD-Q) reviews

    Begnum, Miriam E. Nes; Foss-Pedersen, Rikke Julie

    2017-01-01

    Statistics show there is a clear relationship between higher education and employment in Norway, especially for people with disabilities. The use of digital assessment solutions is increasing in Norwegian higher education. The overall goal of this study is therefore to highlight the potential for improvement of current practices related to universal design, both for providers of digital assessment solutions and for higher education institutions. Based on a case study of practices in Norwegian...

  6. [Engineering education reform plan created by Prof. Dr. Shimizu and establishment of Nagoya Municipal Science Museum--regarding cooperative education between universities and industries in Japan after the Second World War].

    Mabuchi, Koichi

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an account of Prof. Dr. Kinji Shimizu, the first president of Nagoya Institute of Technology, and his establishment of Nagoya Municipal Science Museum. After graduating from the Electrical Engineering Department of Kyoto Imperial University in 1923, Shimizu was impressed by the German Museum in Munich during his stay there as a student in 1932. It's the first time that he learned the education in cooperation with industries. Just after the Second World War, he became director general of the Ministry of Education. However, new education system given by the United States focused not on developing practical ability but on gaining the basic knowledge, which is contrary to what he expected. Then, he contributed to the establishment of the Japanese Society for Engineering Education, besides working as the president of Nagoya Institute of Technology in the earlier 1950s. His idea was supported by industries for the economic growth. Throughout his career, Prof. Dr. Shimizu was convinced that practical engineering education would benefit Japan, and wanted to introduce cooperative education between universities and industries, along the lines of the same system in Germany and the United States. With this vision he founded Nagoya Municipal Science Museum in cooperation with local industries and local government as his final achievement. The museum was completed in 1964.

  7. Virtualization of Universities Digital Media and the Organization of Higher Education Institutions

    Pfeffer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to shape conceptual tools to understand the impact of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) on the organization of universities. Traditional research-based universities, the most typical representatives of the higher education system, find themselves challenged by the speed and the wide range of technical innovations, but also by a vast array of implicit assumptions and explicit promises associated with the distribution of digital media.  The author observes that as universities increasingly use digital media (computers and the Internet) to accomplish their tasks, a transformation takes place in an evolutionary rather than in a revolutionary way.  Using the University of Klagenfurt as an in-depth case study, he explores such dynamic issues as how digital media affect the practice of research, the preservation and dissemination of knowledge (for example, through publishing and archiving), and delivery of education at universities.  More broadly, he considers iss...

  8. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  9. Physics in the Art Museum

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  10. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  11. Italian University Students and Digital Technologies: Some Results from a Field Research

    Ferri, Paolo; Cavalli, Nicola; Costa, Elisabetta; Mangiatordi, Andrea; Mizzella, Stefano; Pozzali, Andrea; Scenini, Francesca

    Developments in information and communication technologies have raised the issue of how a kind of intergenerational digital divide can take place between "digital natives" and "digital immigrants". This can in turn have important consequences for the organization of educative systems. In this paper we present the result of a research performed during the course of 2008 to study how university students in Italy make use of digital technologies. The methodology was based on a mix of quantitative and qualitative approaches. A survey research was done, on a sample of 1186 students of the University of Milan-Bicocca, based on a questionnaire administrated through the Intranet of the University. A series of focus groups and in depth interviews with students, parents, and new media experts was furthermore performed. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong intergenerational divide. The implications of the results for the future organization of educative systems are discussed in the paper.

  12. iMuseumA: An Agent-Based Context-Aware Intelligent Museum System

    Inmaculada Ayala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, museums provide their visitors with interactive tour guide applications that can be installed in mobile devices and provide timely tailor-made multimedia information about exhibits on display. In this paper, we argue that mobile devices not only could provide help to visitors, but also to museum staff. Our goal is to integrate, within the same system, multimedia tour guides with the management facilities required by museums. In this paper, we present iMuseumA (intelligent museum with agents, a mobile-based solution to customize visits and perform context-aware management tasks. iMuseumA follows an agent-based approach, which makes it possible to interact easily with the museum environment and make decisions based on its current status. This system is currently deployed in the Museum of Informatics at the Informatics School of the University of Málaga, and its main contributions are: (i a mobile application that provides management facilities to museum staff by means of sensing and processing environmental data; (ii providing an integrated solution for visitors, tour guides and museum staff that allows coordination and communication enrichment among different groups of users; (iii using and benefiting from group communication for heterogeneous groups of users that can be created on demand.

  13. Shifting gears higher - digital slides in graduate education - 4 years experience at Semmelweis University

    Molnár Béla

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spreading of whole slide imaging or digital slide systems in pathology as an innovative technique seems to be unstoppable. Successful introduction of digital slides in education has played a crucial role to reach this level of acceptance. Practically speaking there is no university institute where digital materials are not built into pathology education. At the 1st. Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University optical microscopes have been replaced and for four years only digital slides have been used in education. The aim of this paper is to summarize our experiences gathered with the installation of a fully digitized histology lab for graduate education. Methods We have installed a digital histology lab with 40 PCs, two slide servers - one for internal use and one with external internet access. We have digitized hundreds of slides and after 4 years we use a set of 126 slides during the pathology course. A Student satisfaction questionnaire and a Tutor satisfaction questionnaire have been designed, both to be completed voluntarily to have feed back from the users. The page load statistics of the external slide server were evaluated. Results The digital histology lab served ~900 students and ~1600 hours of histology practice. The questionnaires revealed high satisfaction with digital slides. The results also emphasize the importance of the tutors' attitude towards digital microscopy as a factor influencing the students' satisfaction. The constantly growing number of page downloads from the external server confirms this satisfaction and the acceptance of digital slides. Conclusions We are confident, and have showed as well, that digital slides have got numerous advantages over optical slides and are more suitable in education.

  14. An Evaluation of the Informedia Digital Video Library System at the Open University.

    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes; Van der Zwan, Robert; DiPaolo, Terry; Evers, Vanessa; Clarke, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    Reports on an Open University evaluation study of the Informedia Digital Video Library System developed at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Findings indicate that there is definite potential for using the system, provided that certain modifications can be made. Results also confirm findings of the Informedia team at CMU that the content of video…

  15. Writing Programs as Distributed Networks: A Materialist Approach to University-Community Digital Media Literacy

    Comstock, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses how community-university digital media literacy projects are redefining literacy, literate practices, and institutions. Using Actor-Network Theory (ANT), which emphasizes the organizing process itself, I analyze the shifting definitions of literacy within one particular university-community collaboration. My analysis…

  16. Doing the Right Thing: One University's Approach to Digital Accessibility

    Sieben-Schneider, Jill A.; Hamilton-Brodie, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the approach employed by one university to address a complaint filed by students with disabilities with the Department of Justice (DOJ) regarding the inaccessibility of information and communication technology (ICT). Prior to the DOJ complaint, the university did not have a process in place to address ICT accessibility.…

  17. Usability of PDF based Digital Textbooks to the Physically Disabled University Student.

    Oku, Hidehisa; Matsubara, Kayoko; Booka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Digital textbooks have been expected for providing multimedia information that the print textbooks could not handle. The original digital textbook can be fabricated relatively easily by using Epub or DAISY. Print textbooks are, however, employed as textbooks in the most of lectures in universities. Therefore, it is considered necessary to convert the content of the print textbook to the digital textbook simply and in a short time. In this paper, the digital textbook using PDF files of the print textbook was suggested as one of simple and practical solution to provide an alternative textbook for the physically disabled university student who has difficulty handling the print textbook. Then usability of the suggested method was evaluated experimentally from the point of workload. Result of the experiment indicates that the digital textbook fabricated as the alternative one for the print textbook by the suggested method has a potential to reduce workload for the physically disabled university students. In addition, the digital textbook with larger LCD display needs less workload than the print textbook. Then, there are not so much difference in the workload between the print book which is smaller than the print textbook and the digital book made from the print book.

  18. A Digital Library Example in the Digital Age: İstanbul Bilgi University Library and e-Resources

    Banu Elçi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the ongoing of the traditional library and service concept alteration to the library and service concept of the digital age and refers to an instance as İstanbul Bilgi University Library and e-Resources that pioneers technological advances and digital applications to be integrated into the library field. In this sense it involves services, developments, applications and projects provided by Bilgi Libraries.This article also accounts for a number of works which integrated digital resources and applications and social network interactions of the internet and the web of the digital age and how they are adjusted to the library area.In this context, it refers to an evolvement of a different approach of libraries and enhacements diverged from customary and adopted library service concepts and reveals through the medium of samples from İstanbul Bilgi University Library and e-Resources.

  19. The convergence of the aspects of digital inclusion: experience in the domain of a university

    Barbara Coelho Neves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article brings results of a case study applied with survey, seeking to analyze the aspects of the digital inclusion through the users of Tabuleiro Digital public Internet access point of the College of Education of the Federal University of Bahia - FACED/ UFBA. The main objective study was intended to investigate the type of digital inclusion, promoted by this Project, in accordance with perspective of the literature present. The specific objectives indicate the characteristics of the profile from the users; types of applications used and purpose of the Internet confrontation with levels of education and social. In this way, the information society and digital inclusion are contextualized; also the aspects of the inclusion of the Tabuleiro are demonstrated and discussed. Finally, with the analysis, was evidenced that the type of digital inclusion of the Project is induced (technique.

  20. Museums and Their Functions.

    Osborne, Harold

    1985-01-01

    Historical background concerning the nature and function of museums is provided, and the aesthetic functions of museums are discussed. The first major aesthetic function of museums is to preserve the artistic heritage of mankind and to make it widely available. The second major function is patronage. (RM)

  1. Museums and Their Enemies.

    Haskell, Francis

    1985-01-01

    Since the eighteenth century, both artists and art historians have received educational benefits from public art museums. The main function of public museums, however, has usually been the improvement or refinement of public taste. But in addition to education and pleasure, another museum objective is that of moral improvement. (RM)

  2. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  3. Attitudes towards digital gap among university students, and its relationship with educational progress and socioeconomic status

    Z Derikvandi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Digital gap may exist in national scale, among organizations and other groups of society, since it is an indicative of inequality in information technology ground and communication. This study aims to investigate the attitude towards digital gap among students, and its relationship with educational progress and socio-economic  status (SES of university students at Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross sectional analytic study. students were randomly selected according to multistage cluster method. The tools for collecting data were Davis (1989 questionnaire on attitude towards internet, and  a researcher made questionnaire. The formal validity of the questionnaires is confirmed by a panel of experts, Cronbach's alpha's coefficient was also calculated. Pearson coefficient were calculated andindependent T- test was used for analyzing the data. Result: The analysis of data indicates that there is a meaningful relationship between the attitude towards digital gap and educational progress, and also SES of the students. Furthermore, there was adifferences between the attitudes of males (48.7 and felames (46.5 toward digital gap (p=0.01. Conclusion:There is an attitude towards digital gap in university students. Interventions are needed to close the digital gaps in studnets.

  4. GuidosToolbox: universal digital image object analysis

    Peter Vogt; Kurt Riitters

    2017-01-01

    The increased availability of mapped environmental data calls for better tools to analyze the spatial characteristics and information contained in those maps. Publicly available, userfriendly and universal tools are needed to foster the interdisciplinary development and application of methodologies for the extraction of image object information properties contained in...

  5. The digitization of the Wundt estate at Leipzig University.

    Meyer, Till; Mädebach, Andreas; Schröger, Erich

    2017-08-01

    Wilhelm M. Wundt (1832-1920) was one of the most important German scholars of the 19th and early 20th centuries and famously founded the first institute for experimental psychology in Leipzig in 1879. Wundt's institute established a teaching and research facility that attracted a large number of students from all over the world and contributed greatly to the development of modern psychology. Until now, the relatively poor indexing and documentation as well as the difficulty in accessing the Wundt estate has prevented a widespread and comprehensive investigation and consideration of these documents. The digitization project described in this article has rectified these problems and will hopefully provide a valuable source for students and researchers interested in Wundt's work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Exploring Digital Health Use and Opinions of University Students: Field Survey Study.

    Montagni, Ilaria; Cariou, Tanguy; Feuillet, Tiphaine; Langlois, Emmanuel; Tzourio, Christophe

    2018-03-15

    During university, students face some potentially serious health risks, and their lifestyle can have a direct effect on health and health behaviors later in life. Concurrently, university students are digital natives having easy access to the internet and new technologies. Digital health interventions offer promising new opportunities for health promotion, disease prevention, and care in this specific population. The description of the current use of and opinions on digital health among university students can inform future digital health strategies and interventions within university settings. The aim of this exploratory study was to report on university students' use and opinions regarding information and communication technologies for health and well-being, taking into account sociodemographic and self-rated general and mental health correlates. This field survey was conducted from March to April 2017. An informed consent form and a paper questionnaire were given to students aged 18 to 24 years in 4 university campuses in Bordeaux, France. The survey was formulated in 3 sections: (1) sociodemographic characteristics and self-rated general and mental health, (2) information about the use of digital health, and (3) opinions about digital health. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of independence. A total of 59.8% (303/507 females) students completed the questionnaire. Concerning digital health use, 34.9% (174/498) had at least 1 health app mostly for physical activity (49.4%, 86/174) and general health monitoring (41.4%, 72/174,), but only 3.9% (20/507) of students had a wearable device. Almost all (94.8%, 450/476) had searched for Web-based health-related information at least once in the last 12 months. The most sought health-related topics were nutrition (68.1%, 324/476); pain and illnesses (64.5%, 307/476); and stress, anxiety, or depression (51.1%, 243/476). Although Wikipedia (79.7%, 357/448) and general health websites (349/448, 77

  7. Exploring Digital Health Use and Opinions of University Students: Field Survey Study

    Cariou, Tanguy; Feuillet, Tiphaine; Langlois, Emmanuel; Tzourio, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Background During university, students face some potentially serious health risks, and their lifestyle can have a direct effect on health and health behaviors later in life. Concurrently, university students are digital natives having easy access to the internet and new technologies. Digital health interventions offer promising new opportunities for health promotion, disease prevention, and care in this specific population. The description of the current use of and opinions on digital health among university students can inform future digital health strategies and interventions within university settings. Objective The aim of this exploratory study was to report on university students’ use and opinions regarding information and communication technologies for health and well-being, taking into account sociodemographic and self-rated general and mental health correlates. Methods This field survey was conducted from March to April 2017. An informed consent form and a paper questionnaire were given to students aged 18 to 24 years in 4 university campuses in Bordeaux, France. The survey was formulated in 3 sections: (1) sociodemographic characteristics and self-rated general and mental health, (2) information about the use of digital health, and (3) opinions about digital health. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of independence. Results A total of 59.8% (303/507 females) students completed the questionnaire. Concerning digital health use, 34.9% (174/498) had at least 1 health app mostly for physical activity (49.4%, 86/174) and general health monitoring (41.4%, 72/174,), but only 3.9% (20/507) of students had a wearable device. Almost all (94.8%, 450/476) had searched for Web-based health-related information at least once in the last 12 months. The most sought health-related topics were nutrition (68.1%, 324/476); pain and illnesses (64.5%, 307/476); and stress, anxiety, or depression (51.1%, 243/476). Although Wikipedia (79.7%, 357/448) and

  8. Teens, New Media and Contemporary Art: Expanding Authority in the Museum Context

    Hill, Ryan; Douillette, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the impact of technology on contemporary art museums using case studies of teen media programs from the Hirshhorn Museum and the ICA Boston. Teens, as "digital natives," help to define the use of technology in museums. Responding to their needs opens up an institutional dialogue concerning issues of expertise,…

  9. The Usage Analysis of Databases at Ankara University Digital Library

    Sacit Arslantekin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The development in information and communication technologies has changed and improved resources and services diversity in libraries. These changes continue to develop rapidly throughout the world. As for our country, remarkable developments, especially in university and special libraries, in this field are worth consideration. In order to take benefit of the existing and forthcoming developments in the field of electronic libraries the databases used by clients should be well-demonstrated and followed closely. The providing wide use of electronic databases leads to increasing the productivity of scientific and social information that that is the ultimate goal. The article points out electronic resources management and the effect of consortia developments in the field first, and then evaluates the results of the survey on the use of electronic libraries assessment questionnaires by faculty members at Ankara University.

  10. Digitizing migration heritage

    Marselis, Randi

    2011-01-01

    Museums are increasingly digitizing their collections and making them available to the public on-line. Creating such digital resources may become means for social inclusion. For museums that acknowledge migration history and cultures of ethnic minority groups as important subjects in multiethnic...

  11. Emerging digital technologies come into the University: AR and VR

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of emerging technologies have been approaching university education in the last decade as it had not happened in previous times. Many of these technologies can be considered as disruptive, since they are transforming and improving the training scenarios. Among the technologies that are taking greater momentum and importance we find augmented reality and virtual reality, as evidenced by various reports Horizon and Edutrens. Although the research on the integration of these technologies is in an early stage, we can affirm that those carried out so far demonstrate the great benefits they incorporate into the teaching-learning process. Among these contributions we can highlight the improvement of the motivation, the satisfaction and the performance of the students. In this article we will cover the current state of the University regarding ICT integration, focusing on the technologies that have been bursting with greater force in recent times. In addition, we will focus on two of the technologies “augmented reality and virtual reality” that are experiencing more impact in recent years, showing evidences and mentioning their implementation in the university environment.

  12. Differences in basic digital competences between male and female university students of Social Sciences in Spain

    Esteban Vázquez-Cano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article analyses the differences in basic digital competences of male and female university students on Social Education, Social Work and Pedagogy courses. The study of gender differences in university students’ acquisition of digital competence has considerable didactic and strategic consequences for the development of these skills. The study was carried out at two public universities in Spain (UNED – the National Distance-Learning University, and the Universidad Pablo de Olavide on a sample of 923 students, who responded to a questionnaire entitled “University Students’ Basic Digital Competences 2.0” (COBADI – registered at the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office. The research applied a quantitative methodology based on a Bayesian approach using multinomial joint distribution as prior distribution. The use of Bayes factors also offers advantages with respect to the use of frequentist p-values, like the generation of information on the alternative hypothesis, that the evidence is not dependent on the sample size used. The results show that men have greater perceived competence in digital cartography and online presentations, whereas women prefer to request personal tutorials to resolve doubts about technology and have greater perceived competence in corporate emailing. There is also evidence that the men have greater perceived competence in developing “online presentations” than women do. Regarding to, “Interpersonal competences in the use of ICT at university”, we observed that the female students opted for personal sessions with tutors in greater numbers than the male students did.

  13. La historia del periodismo en el universo digital / The history of journalism in the digital universe

    Lorena Romero Domínguez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La digitalización es, pues, una necesidad ineludible en la actualidad para las instituciones públicas que pretendan poder competir con los proveedores de información en la red y mantener su estatus de instancias privilegiadas en la provisión de conocimiento de las sociedades. De este modo, las instituciones culturales se sienten conminadas a la digitalización de sus fondos, y a considerar esta técnica la panacea de sus problemas en la gestión y difusión de su riqueza documental, por la continua revalorización de esas fuentes que pueden ser empleadas en el ámbito de la enseñanza, del aprendizaje, de la investigación, de la documentación, y en el manejo de la gestión pública de los catálogos de datos. Este trabajo pretende adentrarnos en el campo de estudio del proceso de digitalización de una disciplina tradicional, la historia de la comunicación y del periodismo, su inmersión en el escenario digital, y, más concretamente, en el acercamiento y explotación realizado por los investigadores de los fondos digitales contenidos en las numerosas hemerotecas digitalizadas que están proliferando en Internet.Abstract: Digitisation is therefore an absolute necessity today for public institutions seeking to compete with providers of information on the network and maintain its status as privileged instances in the provision of knowledge societies. This way, cultural institutions feel the need for the digitization of their collections, and to consider this technology a panacea for their problems in the management and dissemination of its wealth of documents, the continued appreciation of the sources that can be used in the field of teaching, learning, research, documentation, and management of the public management of data catalogs. This paper aims to move into the field of study in the digitization process of a traditional discipline, the history of communication and journalism, his immersion in the digital arena and, more

  14. Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art across University Classrooms: Experiences from the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

    McGurk, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the varying applications of comics and cartoon art as primary resources and pedagogical tools within the university setting. Following some background information on cartoon art forms including early American newspaper comics, nineteenth century humor serials, political cartoons and manga, the article explores how…

  15. Le corps numérique des données The Digital Body of Data: the Transfer of Artefact Fact Sheets from the Museum of Man to the Musée du quai Branly

    Tiziana Nicoletta Beltrame

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Le transfert des collections extra-européennes du musée de l’Homme au musée du quai Branly implique le déplacement des informations documentaires sur les objets. Des différentes fiches en papier (de collection ou d’inventaire, descriptive de l’objet, méthodique créées et classées au sein des départements du musée de l’Homme, on passe à la fiche informatique « TMS objets » au musée du quai Branly. L’information ne change pas simplement de place et de matière, elle est reconfigurée dans de nouvelles articulations du savoir sur les collections. L’inventaire muséal est ici conçu comme le système qui matérialise un savoir structuré. Pour pouvoir analyser ce système, il faut mettre en relation les propriétés des documents et les modalités de leur classement dans un espace créé ad hoc. La matérialité des supports, les multiples possibilités de rangements et de création de liens (la mise en relations entre rubriques de la fiche informatique agissent sur le contenu des données et ouvrent ainsi de nouvelles voies pour la construction du savoir.The transfer of extra-European collections from the Museum of Man to the Musée du quai Branly involves the displacement of documentary information on the artefacts. The various paper files (on collections or inventory, descriptive of the object, methodological created and classified within different departments of the Museum of Man are being replaced by digital files, or “TMS objects”, at the Musée du quai Branly. The information is not simply changing its location and material, it is being reconfigured within new interconnections of knowledge on the collections. The museum inventory is here conceived as the system that materialises a structured knowledge. To be able to analyse this system, it is necessary to link the documents’ properties to the methods used to classify them in an ad hoc space. The materiality of the media, the multiple possibilities for

  16. "Scientific peep show": the human body in contemporary science museums.

    Canadelli, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The essay focuses on the discourse about the human body developed by contemporary science museums with educational and instructive purposes directed at the general public. These museums aim mostly at mediating concepts such as health and prevention. The current scenario is linked with two examples of past museums: the popular anatomical museums which emerged during the 19th century and the health museums thrived between 1910 and 1940. On the museological path about the human body self-care we went from the emotionally involving anatomical Venuses to the inexpressive Transparent Man, from anatomical specimens of ill organs and deformed subjects to the mechanical and electronic models of the healthy body. Today the body is made transparent by the new medical diagnostics and by the latest discoveries of endoscopy. The way museums and science centers presently display the human body involves computers, 3D animation, digital technologies, hands-on models of large size human parts.

  17. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  18. Digital phonocardiographic experiments and signal processing in multidisciplinary fields of university education

    Nagy, Tamás; Vadai, Gergely; Gingl, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    Modern measurement of physical signals is based on the use of sensors, electronic signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion and digital signal processing carried out by dedicated software. The same signal chain is used in many devices such as home appliances, automotive electronics, medical instruments, and smartphones. Teaching the theoretical, experimental, and signal processing background must be an essential part of improving the standard of higher education, and it fits well to the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of physics and engineering too. In this paper, we show how digital phonocardiography can be used in university education as a universal, highly scalable, exciting, and inspiring laboratory practice and as a demonstration at various levels and complexity. We have developed open-source software templates in modern programming languages to support immediate use and to serve as a basis of further modifications using personal computers, tablets, and smartphones. (paper)

  19. Digital phonocardiographic experiments and signal processing in multidisciplinary fields of university education

    Nagy, Tamás; Vadai, Gergely; Gingl, Zoltán

    2017-09-01

    Modern measurement of physical signals is based on the use of sensors, electronic signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion and digital signal processing carried out by dedicated software. The same signal chain is used in many devices such as home appliances, automotive electronics, medical instruments, and smartphones. Teaching the theoretical, experimental, and signal processing background must be an essential part of improving the standard of higher education, and it fits well to the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of physics and engineering too. In this paper, we show how digital phonocardiography can be used in university education as a universal, highly scalable, exciting, and inspiring laboratory practice and as a demonstration at various levels and complexity. We have developed open-source software templates in modern programming languages to support immediate use and to serve as a basis of further modifications using personal computers, tablets, and smartphones.

  20. Perceptions of Library Staff Regarding Challenges of Developing Digital Libraries: The Case of an Iranian University

    Mohsenzadeh, Faranak; Isfandyari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present research aims to identify the difficulties and obstacles for developing digital libraries in the seven regional branches of Islamic Azad University (IAU), Iran, and to study the status of librarians' skills and education programmes at these institutions. Design/methodology/approach: The 40 individuals working in the regional…

  1. Michigan State University Extension Educators' Perceptions of the Use of Digital Technology in Their Work

    Wells, Elizabeth Chase

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined Michigan State University Extension educators' perceptions of the use of digital technology in their work. It used a mixed method of research which included a mailed survey and interviews of selected respondents. A census survey using Dillman's Total Design method was sent to 290 field staff of Michigan State…

  2. Understanding University Students' Thoughts and Practices about Digital Citizenship: A Mixed Methods Study

    Kara, Nuri

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate university students' thoughts and practices concerning digital citizenship. An explanatory mixed methods design was used, and it involved collecting qualitative data after a quantitative phase in order to follow up on the quantitative data in more depth. In the first quantitative phase of the study, a…

  3. Developing digital technologies for university mathematics by applying participatory design methods

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our research efforts to develop digital technologies for undergraduate university mathematics. We employ participatory design methods in order to involve teachers and students in the design of such technologies. The results of the first round of our design are included...

  4. Student Digital Piracy in the Florida State University System: An Exploratory Study on Its Infrastructural Effects

    Reiss, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Digital piracy is a problem that may never disappear from society. Through readily available resources such as those found in a university, students will always have access to illegal goods. While piracy is a global phenomenon, an institution's resources combined with the typical college student's lack of funds makes it more lucrative. Students…

  5. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Gorgels, P.; Rutledge, L.W.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how Semantic Web

  6. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from internation...

  7. Authentication at a small museum: the kindness of strangers

    Hyland, Douglas K. S.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last twenty years, I have served as curator and director of several small and medium size museums including the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama; the San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and most recently, the Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, Massachusetts. The largest budget approached three million dollars, minute in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the National Gallery. Our resources were limited and the demands of building maintenance, programs, acquisitions and conservation far outstripped the amount of money available to be spent. Each museum housed between five and thirty thousand art works and generally speaking the collections were eclectic. It is not unusual at these city museums to find extraordinary oddities ranging from the finest Wedgwood collection in the world in Birmingham to the most extensive group of Latin American folk art objects to be found anywhere in San Antonio. Each year museums of comparable size are offered thousands of art works on all shapes and sizes form all periods and cultures. Only rarely does the staff have the expertise to evaluate and determine the authenticity of the eclectic group of objects both in the collection and being offered. With few curators and in many cases even fewer local experts to call upon, the museum professional must be both bold and creative.

  8. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN UKRAINE: TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONDITIONS OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC ORDER

    Oleg Ye. Kaminskyi; Yulia O. Yereshko; Sergii O. Kyrychenko

    2018-01-01

    The article substantiates the role of the digital transformation of higher education in Ukraine in the era of the fourth industrial revolution. There was proven the need to develop the strategy of the university education digital transformation, as well as the formation of new information and communication competencies. According to the authors, the strategy of digital transformation of the university education system has to include the modernization of corporate IT architecture management, w...

  9. An annotated catalogue of Recent Pectinoidea (Mollusca, Pectinidae and Propeamussiidae) type material in the Museum of Natural History, Humboldt University, Berlin

    Dijkstra, H.H.; Köhler, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper lists 22 pectinoid types (21 primary and one secondary) and three potential syntypes in the Museum of Natural History (ZMB) in Berlin. Eight lectotypes are designated herein for the stabilization of taxonomic names: Pecten aequatorialis, Pecten australis, Pecten clathratus, Camptonectes

  10. The birds in the collection of the Zoological Museum of the University of Liège: diversity and interest, a first approach

    Loneux, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Most birds in the Liège Museum of Zoology have been collected during the 19th century. Between 1835 and 1871, Theodore Lacordaire acquired skins from South-East Asia through Francis Laporte Comte de Castelnau. Later, between 1872 and 1910, Edouard Van Beneden bought Belgian birds. At present, some

  11. Desigualdad digital en la universidad: usos de Internet en Ecuador Digital Divide in Universities: Internet Use in Ecuadorian Universities

    Juan Carlos Torres Díaz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Las tecnologías han transformado la educación superior impulsando cambios que han sido asimilados por la comunidad universitaria de distintas maneras. Como consecuencia, los estudiantes han presentado diversas formas y niveles de aprovechamiento de los recursos que nos ofrece Internet, delineándose brechas sutiles en la población universitaria. En este estudio se puntualizan algunas características de estas brechas; concretamente se analiza la incidencia de la variable ingresos del estudiante sobre los usos e intensidad de uso de las herramientas y recursos de Internet. Para lograrlo se clasificó a los estudiantes aplicando análisis factorial, complementado por análisis clúster para obtener perfiles de usuarios; estos perfiles se contrastaron con análisis discriminante y, finalmente, se aplicó chicuadrado para verificar la relación entre el nivel de ingresos y los perfiles de usuarios. Se determinaron tres perfiles con distintos niveles de las herramientas y recursos de Internet; y se comprobó estadísticamente la incidencia del nivel de ingresos en la conformación de estos perfiles. Se concluye que el nivel de ingreso incide mayormente en las variables que definen las posibilidades de acceso; el género tiene un comportamiento especial, puesto que, si bien el perfil más alto tiene el doble de proporción de hombres, las mujeres tienen un mejor desempeño en general.New technologies have transformed higher education whose application has implied changes at all levels. These changes have been assimilated by the university community in various ways. Subtle differences among university students have emerged; these differences determine that the resources the network offers have been used in different ways, thus creating gaps in the university population. This study seeks to determine the level of incidence of the variable of university students’ incomes on the uses and intensity of use of the Internet tools and resources. Students

  12. Evaluation and development of digital competence in future primary school teachers at the University of Murcia

    Isabel Gutiérrez Porlán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study carried out in the academic year 2014-2015 at the faculty of Education of the University of Murcia with first year degree students in Primary Education studying Research and ICT. The study started with the application of the DIGCOM questionnaire to analyze the digital competences of 134 students. The questionnaire served as an initial task to help students reflect on their digital competences. The subject was developed around tasks which adopted a transversal approach and used the nature of the contents itself to direct and improve students’ digital competencies. Finally, the initial questionnaire was reformulated and run in order to ascertain the students’ self-perception of their improvement in these competencies through the tasks they had performed. Below we present the tasks carried out, the organization of each subject and the most relevant data regarding the self-perception of digital competencies of the future primary school teachers enrolled at the University of Murcia. The data reveal, on the one hand, that the students participating consider themselves to be competent in the most basic aspects of digital competencies and, on the other, their perception that the work done in the subject has helped them quite a lot in improving their competencies.

  13. A forgotten collection: the Libyan ethnobotanical exhibits (1912-14 by A. Trotter at the Museum O. Comes at the University Federico II in Naples, Italy

    De Natale Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ethnobotanical Collection from the Libyan territories of the botanist Alessandro Trotter is included in the Oratio Comes Botanical Museum at the Faculty of Agraria at the University Federico II in Naples. Trotter explored different territories of Libya, mainly Tripolitania, between 1912-1924, collecting plant specimens and the drugs most frequently sold in the markets. The Libyan herbarium currently includes over 2300 sheets of mounted and accessioned plants. The drugs, mostly acquired by Trotter from Tripolitanian markets, were identified and packed in 87 paper sheets or boxes. Trotter added ethnobotanical information for each species when available. Methods A database of the herbarium species and the drugs has been carried out, after a taxonomic update. Nomenclature has been revised according to the African flowering plants database and the World Checklist of selected plant families, and a comparison with currently available ethnopharmacological data from North African has been attempted. Results In this study, ethnopharmacological data related to about 80 species of flowering plants and to 4 lichens are presented. The plants are mainly from Mediterranean or Sub-Saharan habitats and belong to 37 different families; Lamiaceae was the most cited family, with 10 accessions. Generally, the aerial parts of the plants are the most frequently used (28 species, followed by leaves (15 species, flowers and seeds (9 species, fruits (7 species and hypogean organs (roots, rhizomes, tubers: 5 species. Plants were generally processed in very simple ways: infusion or decoction of the plants were prepared and orally administered or used for topical applications. A wide range of conditions was treated, ranging from mental disorders to skin affections. All the organs of human body are considered, but the pathologies of gastro-intestinal tract, respiratory system and those related to traumatic accidents were the most frequently mentioned

  14. Digital Entrepreneurships and Business Models Canvas: Applied Research for Communication University Students

    Jorge Montalvo-Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital economy requires other business models different to the ones present in the physical world; therefore, they should be studied from a particular perspective. In this research a variety of canvas formats or business model canvas are compared and analyzed. The entrepreneurial intention of Communication students from the University of Lima is also studied. The methodology included a survey among students and an educational experience within the subject: Advertising Creativity. The main result of this research is a proposal canvas to design digital entrepreneurships in Communication, whether commercial or social businesses.

  15. The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway, edited by Marta Weigle and Barbara A. Babcock. The Heard Museum, Pheonix (printed by The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, for The Heard Museum, 1996

    Douglas R. Givens

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the more colorful eras in American Southwestern archaelogy is reflected in The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway. Marta Weigle and Barbara A. Babcock, editors of the volume, have done a superb job weaving in early Southwestern archaeological activities with the role of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway in bring the American Southwest to those "east of the Mississippi River". Many early Southwestern archaeologists made their way throughout the Southwest on the Santa Fe Railway while the "outposts of civilization" that the Fred Harvey Company provided in many railroad stations served as a " bit of home" to the traveler. This book describes the collaboration of both Fred Harvey and the Santa Fe Railroad tourism in the American Southwest and provides an excellent look into the Native American artists and their comumnities which were transformed on a massive scale by the Fred Harvey Company as it bought, sold, and popularized Native American art. Also part of the volume is an excellent discussion of the network of major museums that hold art collections which were purchased through the Harvey Company's Indian Department.

  16. Carnegie Mellon University bioimaging day 2014: Challenges and opportunities in digital pathology.

    Rohde, Gustavo K; Ozolek, John A; Parwani, Anil V; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in digital imaging is impacting the practice of pathology. One of the key enabling technologies that is leading the way towards this transformation is the use of whole slide imaging (WSI) which allows glass slides to be converted into large image files that can be shared, stored, and analyzed rapidly. Many applications around this novel technology have evolved in the last decade including education, research and clinical applications. This publication highlights a collection of abstracts, each corresponding to a talk given at Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) Bioimaging Day 2014 co-sponsored by the Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology Departments at CMU. Topics related specifically to digital pathology are presented in this collection of abstracts. These include topics related to digital workflow implementation, imaging and artifacts, storage demands, and automated image analysis algorithms.

  17. Interactive Character as a Virtual Tour Guide to an Online Museum Exhibition.

    de Almeida, Pilar; Yokoi, Shigeki

    Online museums could benefit from digital "lifelike" characters in order to guide users to virtual tours and to customize the tour information to users' interests. Digital characters have been explored in online museum web sites with different degrees of interaction and modes of communication. Such research, however, does not explore…

  18. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    2011-03-15

    ...: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the definition of..., a copper pendant was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended...

  19. Corporate Training in Museums

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  20. READING HABITS IN DIGITAL ERA: A RESEARCH ON THE STUDENTS IN BORNEO UNIVERSITY

    Firima Zona Tanjung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore the current reading habits of university students. Moreover, it aims to determine the effects of widespread use of the internet and other digital resources in reading habits and to give some possible recommendation to improve students’ reading habits in the digital era. The research design was descriptive survey research. The instrument of the research was questionnaire, which is based on Akarsu and Dariyemez (2014 and Chauhan and Lal (2012. The participants of the research were 320 students studying in six majors in Faculty of Teachers Training and Education at Borneo University. They were selected through the cluster random sampling. The questionnaire involved six categories, namely demographic information, frequency of items read, contents of online reading, online activities, content first clicked when online, and techniques to develop reading habits. All research data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 22 program.

  1. Universal Michelson Gires-Tournois interferometer optical interleaver based on digital signal processing.

    Zhang, Juan; Yang, Xiaowei

    2010-03-01

    Optical interleavers based on Michelson Gires-Tournois interferometer (MGTI) with arbitrary cascaded reflectors for symmetrical or asymmetrical periodic frequency response with arbitrary duty cycles are defined as universal MGTI optical interleaver (UMGTIOI). It can significantly enhance flexibility and applicability of optical networks. A novel and simple method based on digital signal processing is proposed for the design of UMGTIOI. Different kinds of design examples are given to confirm effectiveness of the method.

  2. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people...... is identified. It is argued that, paradoxically, museums’ decisions to innovate by introducing new technologies, such as portable tablets, and new pedagogies to support them conflict with many young people’s traditional ideas of museums and learning. The assessment of the implications of museums’ integration...... of portable tablets indicates that in making pedagogical transformations to accommodate new technologies, museums risk opposing didactic intention if pedagogies do not sufficiently attend to young learners’ systemic expectations to learning and to their expectations to the digital experience influenced...

  3. I musei e la valutazione ANVUR della terza missione universitaria: un potenziale ancora inespresso/Museums and ANVUR evaluation of the third university mission: as yet an unexpressed potential

    Federica Maria Chiara Santagati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italia la valutazione ANVUR della terza missione dell’università, applicata ai beni culturali universitari – e quindi anche ai musei - ha avuto due fasi: 2004-2010, 2011-2014. Tale valutazione si è basata su criteri che mal si adattavano al settore beni culturali, perché lontani dai concetti di welfare culturale, di fruizione della cultura intesa come diritto dei cittadini e servizio irrinunciabile, e di status giuridico dei musei, da cui derivano atti normativi e precise pratiche gestionali. I parametri della valutazione non hanno rispettato «l’istituzione museo» cogliendone il valore di polo “culturale” (come invece il modello del museo didattico che ha avuto origine dalla rivoluzione francese testimonia da qualche secolo, né si è ritenuto opportuno soffermarsi sulle implicazioni dei sistemi museali degli atenei, né tanto meno si è fatto riferimento agli studi sui fruitori effettivi e potenziali dei musei, che invece tanto interesserebbero la terza missione. Ancora una volta, dunque, emergono fragilità del sistema di valutazione ANVUR, che sembra tuttora in fase di rodaggio e di modifica. Nel presente contributo si suggeriscono alcune linee interpretative di carattere museologico da seguire nel futuro per valutare i musei universitari, considerandoli nella loro complessità e in rapporto con la comunità sociale.     In Italy the evaluation made by ANVUR (Agenzia Nazionale di Valutazione del Sistema Universitario e della Ricerca [National Agency for Evaluation of the University and Research System] of the universities’ third mission applied to university cultural heritage, and thus also to museums, has had two phases (2004–2010, 2011–2014. This evaluation is based on criteria that are not very appropriate for the cultural heritage sector because they are distant from the concepts of cultural welfare, of use of culture as an indispensable right of the citizens and service, and of the juridical status of museums

  4. The first book museums in Italy

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  5. Digital Labour in the University: Understanding the Transformations of Academic Work in the UK

    Jamie Woodcock

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities have been the site of a variety of shifts and transformations in the previous few decades. Both the composition of students and academics are changing (to a lesser or greater extent, along with the ways in which teaching and research is supported, conducted, and delivered. The effects of neoliberalism, privatisation, precarious employment, debt, and digitalisation have been highlighted as important factors in understanding these changes. However, the ways in which these tendencies are expressed in universities – both in specific and general ways – remain fragmented and under-analysed. In particular, the role of academic labour processes, increasingly mediated through digital technology, remains in the background. There is a risk of viewing these transformations as abstracted, far removed from the day-to-day activities of academic labour on which universities rely. This article will therefore focus on connecting the broader changes in funding, organisation, and digital technology to the labour processes of academics. Rather than seeking a return to a romanticised pre-neoliberal university, this article explores the possibilities of resistance and alternatives to the university as it is now.

  6. The Universe of Digital Sky Surveys : Meeting to Honour the 70th Birthday of Massimo Capaccioli

    Longo, Giuseppe; Marconi, Marcella; Paolillo, Maurizio; Iodice, Enrichetta

    2016-01-01

    These are the proceedings of a meeting in honour of Massimo Capaccioli at the occasion of his 70th birthday. The conference aimed at summarizing the results from the main current and past digital sky survey projects and at discussing how these can be used to inspire ongoing projects and better plan the future ones. Over the last decades, digital sky surveys performed with dedicated telescopes and finely-tuned wide-field cameras, have revolutionized astronomy. They have become the main tool to investigate the nearby and far away universe, thus providing new insights in the understanding of the galaxy structure and assembly across time, the dark components of the universe, as well as the history of our own galaxy. They have also opened the time domain leading to a new understanding of the transient phenomena in the universe. By providing public access to top quality data, digital surveys have also changed the everyday practice of astronomers who have become less dependent on direct access to large observing ...

  7. Anniversary celebrations at the National Museum of History

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available December 21, 2013 we celebrated 30 years since the founding of the National Museum of History of Moldova. On this occasion the museum has organized several events. Program of the day began with a Round Table “Policies for conservation and restoration of the museum heritage in the Republic of Moldova”. Then, the general director of the museum Eugen Sava opened a solemn assembly in the museum’s Blue Room. During the meeting there were presented congratulatory words addressed to the participants, public figures, university professors, researchers, and museum professionals. Among the activities celebrating the establishment of this prestigious museum on December 21, 1983, there was held the presentation of the second volume of “Studies on Museology” published in Chisinau in 2013. This volume on different aspects of museum work brings knowledge and encourages activities, and practical use of its publication is undeniable. Written in a clear and sober style, it will take an important place among the works devoted to this field of science. The proceedings were inspired by respect for the museum and museology and are a continuation of the tradition of museological research in the National Museum of History of Moldova. In honor of the anniversary there was organized a temporary exhibition “National Museum of History of Moldova: A Brief Illustrated History” aimed to reflect the history of the museum and some parts of its activities during the 30 years by means of photos and documents. The exhibition was divided into several compartments: “Establishment of the Museum”, “The Museum Building” “Exhibition Activities”, “Educational Activities”, “Promotion of the Museum”, “Scientific Development of Cultural and Historical Heritage”, “The Museum’s Publications”. All the events organized on the occasion of the anniversary were attended by a large audience that through its presence and laudatory responses recognized and

  8. The Organization of Museums: Practical Advice. Museums and Monuments, IX.

    Adams, Philip R.; And Others

    This manual deals with the organization of museums. The manual includes 10 chapters written by different people involved in museum work in various parts of the world. Chapter I, The Museum and Its Functions, deals with such topics as definition, collecting, identifying, and recording. Chapter II considers the administration of museums. Chapter…

  9. El Museo de la Educación de la Universidad de La Laguna: Recordar el pasado para valorar el presente. // Education Museum of the University of La Laguna Remembering the past to value the present.

    Ana Vega Navarro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available (ES La creación del Museo de la Educación de La Universidad de La Laguna (MEDULL es la respuesta a la inquietud por recuperar, conservar y dar a conocer el patrimonio histórico educativo de Canarias. El MEDULL cuenta desde sus inicios con el apoyo del Vicerrectorado de Relaciones Universidad y Sociedad, que lo incorpora dentro de su organigrama como Aula Cultural, así como de la Dirección General de Patrimonio Histórico del Gobierno de Canarias. Su exposición permanente está ubicada en la Facultad de Educación. La exposición se organiza en torno a dos aulas (una de los años 40-50 y otra de los años 70 y permite a los visitantes conocer no sólo los materiales de enseñanza utilizados en esas décadas, sino también diferentes aspectos de la vida del alumnado y de los docentes. Las actividades del Museo forman parte de la formación del alumnado de la Facultad de Educación, y son el objeto de proyectos de trabajo del alumnado de Educación Primaria. y Secundaria que nos visita. // (EN The foundation of the Education Museum of La Laguna University (MEDULL is a response to the desire to recover, preserve and show the general public the educational heritage of the Canary Islands. The MEDULL has been supported from its beginnings by the Vice-Rector’s Office for University-Society relations, which has included the museum in its organizational chart as Cultural Classroom. The MEDULL is also supported by the General Directorate of Historical Heritage of the Canary Government. The permanent exhibition of the museum is in the Faculty of Education. The exhibition is organized around two classrooms (one from the 1940s and 1950s and the other from the 1970s and allows visitors not only to know the teaching materials used in those times, but also different aspects of the life of students and teachers. The activities of the museum are part of the training of the Faculty of Education students, and are the subject of work projects of the primary

  10. Replicas in Cultural Heritage: 3d Printing and the Museum Experience

    Ballarin, M.; Balletti, C.; Vernier, P.

    2018-05-01

    3D printing has seen a recent massive diffusion for several applications, not least the field of Cultural Heritage. Being used for different purposes, such as study, analysis, conservation or access in museum exhibitions, 3D printed replicas need to undergo a process of validation also in terms of metrical precision and accuracy. The Laboratory of Photogrammetry of Iuav University of Venice has started several collaborations with Italian museum institutions firstly for the digital acquisition and then for the physical reproduction of objects of historical and artistic interest. The aim of the research is to analyse the metric characteristics of the printed model in relation to the original data, and to optimize the process that from the survey leads to the physical representation of an object. In fact, this could be acquired through different methodologies that have different precisions (multi-image photogrammetry, TOF laser scanner, triangulation based laser scanner), and it always involves a long processing phase. It should not be forgotten that the digital data have to undergo a series of simplifications, which, on one hand, eliminate the noise introduced by the acquisition process, but on the other one, they can lead to discrepancies between the physical copy and the original geometry. In this paper we will show the results obtained on a small archaeological find that was acquired and reproduced for a museum exhibition intended for blind and partially sighted people.

  11. A comparative sociological study of peace museums and military museums

    Murakami, Toshifumi

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares peace museums and military museums in Japan and foreign countries. It analyses the features, social functions of both peace and military museums, and considers the social influence on both museums. A public relations facility of the Self Defense Forces is regarded as a military museum in Japan, so the development and contents of the exhibition of such public relations facilities are analyzed. A half of them were established in a period between 1964 and 1969. Three new larg...

  12. Digital Literacy Skills Among Librarians In University Libraries In The 21st Century In Edo And Delta States Nigeria

    Emiri; Ogochukwu T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Libraries all over the world have been faced with the evolving technological advancement globalization and digitization of information. These have led to library automation digital and virtual libraries. This paper discussed the contemporary digital literacy skills DLS among librarians in university libraries the 21st century in Edo and Delta States of Southern Nigeria. The study was guided by six objectives and research questions and one hypothesis. The design of the study is descri...

  13. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  14. Another New Museum?

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    city is at work in the planning of a new art museum in a medium-sized Swiss city. The analysis shows how the entrepreneurial rationale is contested and re-appropriated through the use of classic and situational modes to organize this cultural institution. The ways of imagining the museum are described...... as the effects of these three modes of ordering – entrepreneurial, classic, and situational – as well as their hybridization. The authors conclude that by attending to the multiple layers of urban life, which unfold in and around museums, we can imagine other ‘new museums’ than those of the entrepreneurial city....

  15. Streaming Audio and Video: New Challenges and Opportunities for Museums.

    Spadaccini, Jim

    Streaming audio and video present new challenges and opportunities for museums. Streaming media is easier to author and deliver to Internet audiences than ever before; digital video editing is commonplace now that the tools--computers, digital video cameras, and hard drives--are so affordable; the cost of serving video files across the Internet…

  16. Automated evaluation of annotators for museum collections using subjective login

    Ceolin, D.; Nottamkandath, A.; Fokkink, W.J.; Dimitrakos, Th.; Moona, R.; Patel, Dh.; Harrison McKnight, D.

    2012-01-01

    Museums are rapidly digitizing their collections, and face a huge challenge to annotate every digitized artifact in store. Therefore they are opening up their archives for receiving annotations from experts world-wide. This paper presents an architecture for choosing the most eligible set of

  17. Digitization

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2014-01-01

    what a concept of digital media might add to the understanding of processes of mediatization and what the concept of mediatization might add to the understanding of digital media. It is argued that digital media open an array of new trajectories in human communication, trajectories which were...

  18. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  19. Analysis of the crime scene model using three objects from the collection of the Hans Gross Museum of Criminology of the University of Graz.

    Elek, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    As part of the collection in the Hans Gross Museum of Criminology in Graz there are still three crime scene reliefs; two of which were made by Hans Gross himself. The practical purpose of these criminal landscape models is something one could speculate about, but such models may have been useful in two fields: in the criminal lab and in the courtroom. To see the reliefs in a scientific experimental context as well as under the aspects of artwork and topography is as essential as emphasizing their genuine military character.

  20. Cultural property, museums and Tourism: analysis of the public factor in the Museum of Caceres (Spain

    Javier Marcos Arévalo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work exposes the interim analysis of the results obtained so far on the ongoing research carried on over the Social Anthropology final Master´s degree project at the University of Extremadura entitled "Analysis of public factor at the Cáceres’ Museum". The research aims to establish a profile of each one of the Caceres Museum Visitors and also to aknowledge the perceptions, representation and the connection the Museum neighborhood residents have towards the institution with the idea of using this previously mentioned gathered information in order to contribute to the planification of activities and to generate links between the Museum and its public. In order to accomplish this objective, Anthropology own data recollection techniques such as the participant observation and surveys have been used at the first instance and in-depth interviews at the later stage.

  1. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  2. Museums of Poland: ways of exploiting the National Heritage

    Violeta Tipa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the fellowship Thesaurus Poloniae provided by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Poland and the International Cultural Centre Krakow I was able to visit a number of museums in the cities of Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Poznan. The innovative method of using audiovisual media has especially attracted my attention. Visiting Polish museums, I concluded that the country's history, its past hasn't remained in archives, in documents hidden from the public eye and accessible only to specialists in the field. By possibilities of museums upgraded the past comes alive as a page in the life of Poles. The national heritage, studied and carefully preserved, is passed on to the younger generation through the most advanced methods. Today, digital techniques increasingly penetrate into all spheres of art and culture. Museums also look for non-trivial ways to demonstrate the most valuable objects from their collections through the latest information methods. The use of audiovisual media in various forms is an ideal opportunity to immerse visitors in the distant past, help them survive dramatic historical events in a dynamic, penetrate the spirit of patriotism. The screen (monitor has become a traditional element in Polish museums and exhibition halls equipped with touch screens allowing guests to browse and receive a variety of available information in international communication languages (English, French, German and, of course, Polish. On the screens placed in the exhibition halls, documents are displayed non-stop either completely or in fragments, a visual picture sends visitors to real museum exhibits. Museums opened after 2000 are equipped with cinema halls (National Museum, The Warsaw Rising Museum and POLIN Museum, Rynek Underground Museum and Oscar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Krakowб etc., some of them are equipped for films in 3D, with panoramic projection. Expressive audiovisual entourage is created by playing light and shadow

  3. Climate Museum and Garden

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  4. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park... possession of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the... notice. One lot of stone, bone, and glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington...

  5. Becoming Digital: A Dutch Heritage Perspective

    Navarrete, T.

    2014-01-01

    Digitization of collections in Dutch museums can be traced back to 1969. Since then, significant resources have been allocated to digital activities. Results from the digitization trajectory analysis show that museums present a similar rate of adoption (and dissemination) for computers, the

  6. Discovering History in a Digital World: The Texas Story Project

    Munns, David

    2016-01-01

    New digital tools and technologies create an opportunity for history museums to personalize visitor experiences, reach new audiences, and increase their relevancy by including visitors' historical narratives in museum content and programming. By adapting to the shift in social narrative prompted by digital media advancements, museums are…

  7. An annotated catalogue of the type material of Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (Coleoptera) deposited in the Coleoptera collection of the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Ferreira, Vinicius De Souza

    2015-03-25

    The Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo (MZSP) houses one of the most important Coleoptera collections of Brazil and Neotropical Region with nearly 900,000 adult mounted material and about 1,500,000 specimens to be mounted. The superfamily Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (including Cantharoidea) comprises about 24,077 described species in 17 families. The MZSP owns type material of Brachypsectridae LeConte & Horn, 1883, Cantharidae, 1856 (1815), Cerophytidae Latreille, 1834, Elateridae Leach 1815, Eucnemidae Eschscholtz, 1829, Lampyridae Rafinesque, 1815, Lycidae Laporte, 1836, Phengodidae LeConte, 1861 and Rhinorhipidae Lawrence, 1988. This catalogue includes type material of 166 species distributed in 69 genera. Among 1,223 type specimens, are 86 holotypes, 1,133 paratypes, 2 allotypes, 1 lectotype and 1 paralectotype.

  8. Preparing collections for digitization

    Bulow, Anna E

    2010-01-01

    Most libraries, archives and museums are confronting the challenges of providing digital access to their collections. This guide offers guidance covering the end-to-end process of digitizing collections, from selecting records for digitization to choosing suppliers and equipment and dealing with documents that present individual problems.

  9. Digital Scholarly Publishing and Archiving Services by Academic Libraries: Case Study of the University of Patras

    Panos Georgiou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, dramatic changes in the electronic publishing landscape have created new roles and changed the traditional ones. Presently, some libraries have capitalised on their experience and knowledge in information technology and electronic publishing to undertake such activities, while at the same time they spearhead the campaign for Open Access spreading within academic communities. The Library & Information Centre (LIC of the University of Patras (UoP, Greece, has been playing an active role in promoting Open Access (OA in Greece. Since 2007, LIC has been experimenting with OA publishing practices and tools within the framework of various R&D projects. Two of the major results of these efforts are the ‘Pasithee’ e-publishing platform and the ‘Dexamene’ digital archive for Greek scholarly journals. Both platforms are based on OJS-Open Journal Systems e-publishing software. The two facilities were appropriately modified to meet the LIC’s publishing and archiving requirements respectively. Currently two journals are being hosted on each platform and all four are from the Humanities. The LIC is negotiating with more publishers and editorial teams to host their journals. In this article we focus on: - technical and managerial key issues of the development and operation phases, - services and procedures, - the business model, - technological, procedural and legal issues and problems that were encountered when working together with publishers, editors and authors, and - future plans for improving and upgrading our e-publishing services into an integrated institutional platform to cover all kinds of publications and data types (monographs, conference proceedings, teaching material, bulletins, magazines etc.. The article concludes with a succinct presentation of the Directory of Greek Digital Resources, a pilot infrastructure developed by the LIC which indexes and presents digital publishing initiatives in Greece and aims to

  10. Teaching science in museums

    Tran, Lynn Uyen

    Museums are free-choice, non-threatening, non-evaluative learning and teaching environments. They enable learners to revisit contents, authentic objects, and experiences at their own leisure as they continually build an understanding and appreciation of the concepts. Schools in America have used museums as resources to supplement their curriculum since the 19 th century. Field trip research is predominantly from the teachers' and students' perspectives, and draws attention to the importance for classroom teachers and students to prepare prior to field trips, have tasks, goals, and objectives during their time at the museum, and follow up afterwards. Meanwhile, museum educators' contributions to field trip experiences have been scantily addressed. These educators develop and implement programs intended to help students' explore science concepts and make sense of their experiences, and despite their limited time with students, studies show they can be memorable. First, field trips are a break in the usual routine, and thus have curiosity and attention attracting power. Second, classroom science teaching literature suggests teachers' teaching knowledge and goals can affect their behaviors, and in turn influence student learning. Third, classroom teachers are novices at planning and implementing field trip planners, and museum educators can share this responsibility. But little is reported on how the educators teach, what guides their instruction, how classroom teachers use these lessons, and what is gained from these lessons. This study investigates two of these inquiries. The following research questions guided this investigation. (1) How do educators teaching one-hour, one-time lessons in museums adapt their instruction to the students that they teach? (2) How do time limitations affect instruction? (3) How does perceived variability in entering student knowledge affect instruction? Four educators from two museums took part in this participant observation study to

  11. Nation Building at the Museum of Welsh Life

    Rhiannon Mason

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the representational problems inherent in one museum’s attempt to tell a ‘national story’. The museum in question started life as the ‘Welsh Folk Museum’ but in 1995 became the much broader ‘Museum of Welsh Life’. This article examines how and why this change occurred and the challenges produced by this shift in remit. The article also illustrates the processes of selection and revision which occur within museum representations and considers how these relate to competing versions of ‘the national story’ present within Wales. I argue that such revisions are inevitable in national museums which, by their very nature, aim to tell a universal story and that, as a consequence, these museums function both as a catalyst for discussion and a public forum within which debates over the accepted nature of national identity and history will occur.

  12. Digital Divide in Sub-Saharan African Universities: Recommendations and Monitoring

    Barry, Boubakar; /Assoc. Afr. Univ.; Chukwuma, Victor; /Olabisi Onabanjo U.; Petitdidier, Monique; /CEPT, Velizy; Cottrell, Les; /SLAC; Bartons, Charles; /Australian Natl. U., RSES

    2009-12-17

    The Digital Divide prevents Africa from taking advantages of new information technologies. One of the most urgent priorities is to bring the Internet in African Universities, Research, and Learning Centers to the level of other regions of the world. eGY-Africa, and the Sharing Knowledge Foundation are two bottom-up initiatives by scientists to secure better cyber-infrastructure and Internet facilities in Africa. Recommendations by the present scientific communities are being formulated at national, regional and international levels. The Internet capabilities are well documented at country level overall, but this is not the case at the University level. The snapshot of the Internet status in universities in 17 African countries, obtained by a questionnaire survey, is consistent with measures of Internet penetration in the corresponding country. The monitoring of Internet performance has been proposed to those African universities to provide an information base for arguing the need to improve the coverage for Africa. A pilot program is recommended that will start scientific collaboration with Europe in western Africa using ICT. The program will lay the foundations for the arrival of new technologies like Grids.

  13. Evaluation of a teaching strategy based on integration of clinical subjects, virtual autopsy, pathology museum, and digital microscopy for medical students.

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A; Raju, Sharat; Echeverri, Jorge H

    2014-01-01

    Learning pathology is fundamental for a successful medical practice. In recent years, medical education has undergone a profound transformation toward the development of an integrated curriculum incorporating both basic science and clinical material. Simultaneously, there has been a shift from a magisterial teaching approach to one centered around problem-based learning. Now-a-days, informatics tools are expected to help better implement these strategies. We applied and evaluated a new teaching method based on an active combination of clinical problems, gross pathology, histopathology, and autopsy pathology, all given through informatics tools, to teach a group of medical students at the Universidad de Santander, Colombia. Ninety-four medical students were followed in two consecutive semesters. Students were randomized to receive teaching either through traditional methodology or through the new integrated approach. There was no significant difference between the intervention group and the control group at baseline. At the end of the study, the scores in the intervention group were significantly higher compared to the control group (3.91/5.0 vs. 3.33/5.0, P = 0.0008). Students and tutors endorsed the benefits of the integrated approach. Participants were very satisfied with this training approach and rated the program an 8.7 out of 10, on average. This study confirms that an integrated curriculum utilizing informatics systems provides an excellent opportunity to associate pathology with clinical medicine early in training of medical students. This can be possible with the use of virtual microscopy and digital imaging.

  14. Museums USA: Art, History, Science, and Other Museums.

    National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC.

    The results and analysis of an earlier museum survey, presented in "Museum U.S.A.: Highlights" (ED 093 777), are given in this document. The purpose is to present a comprehensive picture of museums in the United States--their numbers and locations, types and functions, facilities and finances, personnel and trustees, and activities and attendance.…

  15. Traces of humanity: Echoes of social and cultural experience in physical objects and digital surrogates in the University of Victoria Libraries

    Robbyn Gordon Lanning

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between primary source materials and their digital surrogates warrant consideration about how different materials translate into digitized forms. Physical primary source materials found in library special collections and archives and their digital surrogates challenge the viewer to consider what these objects are communicating through their materiality or lack thereof. For example, how does a clay tablet represent itself digitally, as compared to a parchment manuscript, or a paper accounts book? What qualities, stories or narratives do these resources communicate in their original forms, as digital surrogates, or when engaged with together, and how do these differ? How do both physical and digital resources serve as archival objects with the ability to reflect our social and cultural experiences—and indeed our humanity—back to us? As more and more library and museum resources are digitized and made open to researchers, such questions must be addressed as the use and reuse of digital surrogates becomes increasingly complex as digital scholarship evolves.

  16. The Development of Digital Collections and Resources Organization Related Projects in Taiwan

    Hsueh-Hua Chen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Internet, digital libraries/museums have received worldwide attention and many developed countries are doing extensive researches on digital libraries/museums. In Taiwan, many institutions have digitized their rare collections. This paper introduces the recent development of digital projects in Taiwan, including: Digital Museum Project, National Digital Collection Project and National Culture Database Project, and also especially introduces some resources organization related projects. [Article content in Chinese

  17. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Mare Kõiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  18. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning: Options and Obstacles

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2017-06-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people's learning with portable tablets matches the intentions of the museums. By applying media and information literacy (MIL) components as analytical dimensions, a pattern of discrepancies between young people's expectations, their actual learning and the museums' approaches to framing such learning is identified. It is argued that, paradoxically, museums' decisions to innovate by introducing new technologies, such as portable tablets, and new pedagogies to support them conflict with many young people's traditional ideas of museums and learning. The assessment of the implications of museums' integration of portable tablets indicates that in making pedagogical transformations to accommodate new technologies, museums risk opposing didactic intention if pedagogies do not sufficiently attend to young learners' systemic expectations to learning and to their expectations to the digital experience influenced by their leisure use.

  19. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Mare Kõiva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  20. SEMIOTIC MODELS IN MUSEUM COMMUNICATION

    Plokhotnyuk Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a way of formalizing the description of various types of relations between the elements of museum communication based on the semiotic approach and the concepts introduced by F. de Saussure, C.S. Pierce and C.W. Morris. Semiotic models can be used to explain the specifics of museum communication for museum studies and as a methodological basis for developing various versions of databases or other software for museum affairs.

  1. "I love Skagen Museum"

    Laursen, Ditte; Hviid Mortensen, Christian; Olesen, Anne Rørbæk

    2017-01-01

    this gap by investigating empirically how one type of institution, namely museums, and their Facebook followers, actually communicate. Our approach is innovative in combining analytical tools from speech act theory and Conversation Analysis (CA) to a corpus of activities from the Facebook pages of nine...... Danish museums of different types and sizes collected during eight consecutive weeks in 2013. This approach enables us to both investigate communicative actions as isolated speech acts and the micromechanics of the interaction that potentially arise from these actions. Our findings indicate that certain...

  2. DIGITAL

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  3. The Role of Entrepreneurial Knowledge and Skills in Developing Digital Entrepreneurial Intentions in Public Universities in Hamedan Province

    Ahmad yaghoubi Farani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to extend the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB to more comprehensively explain the formation of students’ digital entrepreneurial intentions.In particular, the extended TPB incorporates two critical constructs, namely entrepreneurial knowledge and skills into the original TPB model.Data were collected from 150 computer science students from four public universities in Hamedan province. The results of regression analysis showed that there was asignificant relationship between motivational factors such as attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control and digital entrepreneurial intentions. Also perceived behavioral control played the strongest role in the determination of digital entrepreneurial intentions.Furthermore, the results illustrated that entrepreneurial knowledge and skills significantly relate to digital entrepreneurial intentions. Based on the knowledge gained in this study, some recommendation were offered for developing entrepreneurial culture, knowledge and skillsin order topromoting digital entrepreneurship.

  4. Is Museum Education "Rocket Science"?

    Dragotto, Erin; Minerva, Christine; Nichols, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The field of museum education has advanced and adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of audiences as determined by new research, national policy, and international events. Educators from Chicago's Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum provide insight into a (somewhat) typical museum education department, especially geared for readers…

  5. How to Visit a Museum.

    Rebetez, Pierre

    The primary aim of this study is to encourage schools and museums to unite their efforts to further the use of the museum for teaching purposes and to promote the full development of creative faculties. The educational function of the museum is explored in consideration of the thirteen to eighteen year old age group. A recurring theme throughout…

  6. Digital curation and online resources: digital scanning of surgical tools at the royal college of physicians and surgeons of Glasgow for an open university learning resource.

    Earley, Kirsty; Livingstone, Daniel; Rea, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Collection preservation is essential for the cultural status of any city. However, presenting a collection publicly risks damage. Recently this drawback has been overcome by digital curation. Described here is a method of digitisation using photogrammetry and virtual reality software. Items were selected from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow archives, and implemented into an online learning module for the Open University. Images were processed via Agisoft Photoscan, Autodesk Memento, and Garden Gnome Object 2VR. Although problems arose due to specularity, 2VR digital models were developed for online viewing. Future research must minimise the difficulty of digitising specular objects.

  7. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN UKRAINE: TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONDITIONS OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC ORDER

    Oleg Ye. Kaminskyi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the role of the digital transformation of higher education in Ukraine in the era of the fourth industrial revolution. There was proven the need to develop the strategy of the university education digital transformation, as well as the formation of new information and communication competencies. According to the authors, the strategy of digital transformation of the university education system has to include the modernization of corporate IT architecture management, which should be implemented as a cloud-based platform. The authors analysed the main possible directions of the educational services transformation and the accompanying business processes. The use of blockchain technology for the educational content management module construction is proposed. The integration of the educational content management modules of different Ukrainian universities should become the basis for creating a global cloud-based platform for higher education.

  8. Do Gender and Age Affect the Level of Digital Competence? A Study with University Students

    Marcos CABEZAS GONZÁLEZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT and their implementation at the global level have led to significant changes in different areas, especially institutional ones. This article presents the results of a research study whose purpose was to learn the level of digital competence of university students of education and to verify whether the variables of gender and age have any influence on it. A quantitative methodology was used, with a non-experimental, descriptive and inferential method, and the digital questionnaire was employed as an instrument for collecting information on the dimensions of knowledge and management of ICTs as well as attitudes towards them. The data were analysed based on a comparison of means, using non-parametric tests. The results show that the sample studied self-evaluated negatively their knowledge of ICT concepts, considered positive their management of devices, tools and services, and showed a very positive attitude toward technology. Regarding the variables studied, significant differences were found in favour of men in relation to knowledge and management, and in favour of older subjects with regard to attitude.

  9. First year university student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting

    Amy Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The engagement of students is one of the most pressing issues facing higher education in the 21st century. Around the world, participation rates in tertiary education are on the rise and one of the key challenges facing educators is finding ways to engage these students. We present the results of a project that assesses the impact of an engagement strategy in which a cohort of students entering their first year of university (1 establish and maintain a clear goal of their ideal future career and (2 make use of a web-based digital curation tool to research and present their findings. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy, which could arguably be applied to a broad range of disciplines given that the majority of students today are technologically literate.

  10. The long-term preservation of the digital heritage: the case of universities institutional repositories

    Luciana Duranti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available L'articolo affronta le tematiche legate ai problemi della conservazione a lungo termine del contenuto degli archivi digitali. Il materiale d'archivio richiede un'attenzione speciale ad aspetti quali la credibilità, il valore giuridico, i diritti morali e legali e la privacy. La necessità di assicurare accessibilità e integrità ai dati informatici è tuttavia una problematica che attraversa tutti i campi dell'informatizzazione ed è strettamente legata a fattori come la frequente duplicazione e la corretta scelta dei metadadi. Attraverso l'analisi del caso di studio rappresentato da cIRcle, l'istitutional digital repository della University of British Columbia (UBC, il contributo mostra problemi, rischi e soluzioni utili nella gestione di un archivio digitale, mostrando che l'esperienza degli archivisti può essere utile per sviluppare sistemi legati a depositi di informazione non prettamente archivistici.

  11. University Mentoring with the Support of a Digital Pen and Hypermedia Resources

    Manuel Francisco Aguilar Tamayo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematizes face-to-face tutoring experience and the use of technologies to make audio and written recordings of tutorial sessions with undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students available online. One hundred and three tutorial sessions with 26 students and a single tutor are analyzed; the sessions were recorded by means of a digital pen that recorded sound and writing synchronously. By means of this analysis students’ issues and problems were identified and a model for connecting teaching strategy and the production of hypermedia resources is presented. We contend that it is important to create learning resources to accompany the educational process of tutees. In conclusion the study presents a model for organizing and supporting university level tutoring.

  12. Myths, Mummies and Museums.

    Norby, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Greek mythology, Egyptian mummies, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City are the focus of a one-semester course given at the Sea Girt (New Jersey) Elementary School. It is an interdisciplinary program wherein students (grade 8) study ancient civilizations and do projects related to their studies. (KC)

  13. The influence of institutional measures and technological proficiency on university teaching through digital platforms

    Tirado, Ramón

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to empirically test the theoretical model that explains the influence of primary and secondary factors on the integration of digital platforms in university teaching. A sample of 495 teachers from universities in Andalusia completed an online questionnaire that analysed the functions of usage, the digital materials used, the didactic and technological competence of the teaching staff, the support measures adopted by the institutions and the effect on teaching of platform use. Prior factor analysis and the application of the Amos program enabled us to develop a structural equation model to corroborate the indirect influence of the support measures and institutional recognition on teachers in their use of the platforms, and the direct influence of the teachers’ technological proficiency. Este estudio tiene como objetivo poner a prueba empíricamente el modelo teórico que explica la influencia de los factores de primer y segundo orden sobre la integración de las plataformas digitales en la docencia universitaria. Para ello, sobre una muestra de 495 profesores universitarios andaluces, se aplica un cuestionario online que analiza las funciones de uso, materiales digitales utilizados, competencia didáctica y tecnológica del profesorado, medidas de impulso institucionales, y efectos didácticos del uso. El análisis factorial previo y la aplicación del programa Amos permite la elaboración un modelo de ecuación estructural que corrobora la influencia indirecta de las medidas de apoyo y el reconocimiento institucional sobre los efectos didácticos del uso de plataformas, así como la influencia directa de la competencia tecnológica del profesorado.

  14. IBA in the museum

    Menu, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Research Laboratory of the Museums of France (LRMF) has been a part of the Louvre Museum since 1931. At the beginning, paintings were only examined by means of optical microscopy, under UV or IR light, or by X-ray radiography. With the development of archaeometry in the early 1960s, different spectrometric techniques have been applied to the analysis of works of art and archaeological objects: UV spectrometry, XRF, and even SEM coupled to an X-ray Si(Li) detector. Crystalline objects were investigated with XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR); organic matter with gas chromatography, FTIR, UV and visible spectrophotometry. Thus the principal aim of the LRMF is to characterize the materials and the techniques involved in the creation of art and archaeological objects, for example, methods of production, provenance studies, authentication, and conservation. (The problem of dating is for the time being only a minor subject of research at the LRMF). Because of the valuable nature of such objects, nondestructive methods of analysis have been developed, and consequently the results have to be more and more accurate to answer the questions put to us by the art historian. Moreover, the works of art must stay inside the security area of the museum. Therefore, it was decided in 1982 to install within the Louvre an accelerator dedicated solely to museum problems. The installation of AGLAE, begun in 1984, has now been completed. The accelerator system, a Pelletron 6SDH2 from NEC, was rendered operational in June 1988. A general consensus with regard to the applications of the ion beam techniques in art and archaeology was arrived at during the International Workshop held in Pont-a-Mousson, France in 1985, which brought together museum scientists as well as IBA physicists who had applied these techniques to archaeology, geology and metallurgy. (orig./WL)

  15. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  16. University energy management improvement on basis of standards and digital technologies

    Novikova Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays to implement the energy management system it is important to fulfill not only the legal requirements but also to follow the set of recommendations prepared by international and national management standards. The purpose of this article is to prepare the concept and methodology for the optimization and improvement of the energy management system (EMS for Universities with implementation of legal requirements and recommendations from international and national management standards with the help of digital technologies. During the research the systematic analysis, complex approach, logical sampling and analogy were used. It is shown that this process should be done with the help of the process-based approach, in accordance with ISO 9001, and energy management ISO 50001. The authors developed the structure of the basic standard of energy management: "Guidelines for the energy management system". It is proved that the involvement of the technical senior students in the project of EMS improvement allows to expand their competencies for new technics and technologies. Cloud service Bitrix24 was chosen for IT-support of the project. During the study, a list of characteristics was used as a basis for creating a query to the technology department of the university. DBMS Microsoft Access was chosen for its creation. In addition, the possible results of initiating a single database containing all the information needed for accounting and control of energy supply were listed. Moreover, the possibility of automated energy management system implementation and its results were considered. The required actions described in this research can be implemented in any University, that will extend energy management to any University worldwide.

  17. The movable digital planetary from the Cruzeiro do Sul University as a distributing agent of astronomy

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2012-10-01

    The Movable Digital Planetary from the Cruzeiro do Sul University has been working in order to publicize and to popularize Astronomy, in particular among students and teachers of Primary (EF) and Medium (EM) Education in municipal and state schools of the City of São Paulo, but also for the general public at large. The aim of this paper is to show and publicize the activities already undertaken by this planetary. In 2010, several presentations were recorded, such as: for the School Cruzeiro do Sul, in São Miguel Paulista, serving 161 children in the EF; Eighth Symposium on Education, Cruzeiro do Sul University, 75 students; NGO Educational Project Capuano, Anália Franco, 30 adults: Fair Student Guide in Shopping Center Norte, 455 people; NGO Association for Charitable Paulista, Burgo Paulista, 70 children; Workshop of Advanced Computing and Informatics, Cruzeiro do Sul University, 37 students; Day of Social Responsibility, Social Work in Don Bosco, Itaquera, 133 people! . In 2011 the presentations took place during the XIII Regional Meeting of Astronomy Education at Cruzeiro do Sul University, serving 112 teachers; College Cruzeiro do Sul, São Miguel Paulista, 356 children of the EF; College Brasilia from São Paulo, Anália Franco, 102 children in the EF and for the Scout Group Caramuru, São Paulo, 104 children. The applied methodology in all presentations consisted of the exhibition of two videos about Astronomy with a subsequent discussion about the presented issues. Previous surveys have shown a great interest in the majority of participants in wanting to learn more about the subject, which clearly explains the importance of education in non-formal places for the teaching of Astronomy

  18. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...... to their eligibility for funding and it is indeed an economic rather than a cultural issue. Though, modern art museums’ sustainability relies not only in developing economic and environmental strategies but mostly in creating cultural policies that favor art museums in accomplishing same tasks but from different...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  19. THE ROLE OF DIGITAL MARKETING IN UNIVERSITY SPORT: AN OVERVIEW STUDY OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION IN CROATIA

    Antun Biloš

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of student sport activities within the structure of academic development is arguably significant. However, university sport is one of the elements of academic development that is not represented adequately as a research subject on a global scale in both scientific and professional environments alike. Along with the global growth of university level education based on the rise of student mobility across countries and continents, and the strong global ICT development, a new perspective on university sport can be observed and several implications analyzed. The focus of this paper is set on the communication capabilities of the internet as a digital medium that can be used as a means of fostering student sport and related activities while taking into account the characteristics and behavioral components of the student population. The primary research was conducted on a sample of students of Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek. The research provided several interesting implications on student behavior regarding the general information collection and consumption, as well as information about student sport activities on the university level. The paper provides a brief sport marketing literature review and suggests several important guidelines for further research. The assumption that the internet is a key element in the marketing potential of student sport was confirmed. Comparative analysis of digital marketing activities of benchmark universities has been conducted in order to determine suggestions on creating and/or improving digital marketing tools such as web site, social network presence and mobile application for reaching marketing potential of university sport.

  20. Digital Literacy Skills Among Librarians In University Libraries In The 21st Century In Edo And Delta States Nigeria

    Emiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Libraries all over the world have been faced with the evolving technological advancement globalization and digitization of information. These have led to library automation digital and virtual libraries. This paper discussed the contemporary digital literacy skills DLS among librarians in university libraries the 21st century in Edo and Delta States of Southern Nigeria. The study was guided by six objectives and research questions and one hypothesis. The design of the study is descriptive survey and the population consists of all librarians from university libraries in the aforementioned states in Nigeria. The instrument used to generate data is the questionnaire and the date generated was analyzed using simple percentages and frequency count for research questions and SPSS version 14.0. The findings show that electronic mailing social networking use of PDAs mobile phones and internet surfing are the major DLS amongst librarians. It was also discovered that librarians acquired DLS through colleagues assistance trial and error IT programmes and formal education while librarians level of use of DLS is low amongst other findings. Researcher recommends that management of university libraries should provide training for librarians so as to help update their knowledge in application of digital skills and digital skill competence should be giving more attention during recruitment of librarians amongst others.

  1. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    , and authorized visiting scholars. All these people can potentially take advantage of their position, or to be exploited by a clever attacker on the outside or inside using social engineering. After discussing where museum security is headed with several people involved in the field, the consensus seems to be that it is going to be completely digital at the behest of companies designing new security products. By this I mean that nearly every security sensor and alarm is being designed so that it is compatible or adaptable to Cat 5/6 Ethernet cable. Museum security sensors are usually connected to the network infrastructure, which then gets tied back to a server monitoring the security sensors. This approach should make us feel uneasy. This is security that rides on top of technology that time and time again has proven to be highly vulnerable, and very often implemented by closed source vendors who do not release details of their code or hardware because of it being proprietary. Being proprietary is not consistent with having good security.

  2. Cultivating personalized museum tours online and on-site

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; van Sambeek, R.; Schuurmans, Y.; Aroyo, L.M.; Schreiber, G.; Gorgels, P.

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 — the perceived second generation of the World Wide Web that aims to improve collaboration, sharing of information and interoperability — enables increasing access to digital collections of museums. The expectation is that more and more people will spend time preparing their visit before

  3. Digital Divide in the Utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Counsellor Education in Nigerian Universities

    Eyo, Mfon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated digital divide in the utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in counsellor education in Nigerian universities. It had two research questions and two hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance. It adopted a survey design and used ICT Utilization Questionnaire (IUQ) in gathering data from the…

  4. Editorial volume 3 - issue 1: Wishes and hopes for the digital university.

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2007-12-01

    issue. They suggest that letting university teachers study online would be a valuable exercise before letting them organize and run online learning themselves. Their paper reveals how teachers reflect on being students themselves when they learn how to study online. This is in a profound way an essential step in making colleagues critical about e-learning. Kristen Snyder coins the term “digital culture” as a key term in understanding the “information age”. She proposes that technology in human communication is a part of the communication act and therefore a part of the process of creating meaning. Her aim is to develop an awareness of the implications for behavior, norms and values, and how meaning making is integral to understanding the digital culture. She addresses in many respect the concerns voiced by Douglas Kellner (above. In developing a digital culture within the university, we can already trace significant differences between student cohorts. A general feeling is that mature students are less confident with ICT and its associated soft- and hardware than the youngest students arriving directly from upper secondary education. In a journal addressing lifelong learning, Håvard Skaar’s contribution suggests it is interesting to understand children’s learning processes from an early stage in the area of ICT. The article focuses on how boys and girls express themselves differently when using multimedia. Finally, Gunilla Jedeskog, who has followed the implementation of ICT in Swedish schools for more than two decades, makes an analysis of policy documents that guided this development. She addresses ownership of the process, and how it was interpreted. She finds that implementation was anything but a streamlined process, in many ways similar to the process in higher education, and that it changed focus over time. References:Burbules, N. C. og Callister, T. A.jr. (2000 Watch IT. The Risks and Promises of Information Technologies for Education. Boulder, Col

  5. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...... and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...

  6. British Museum paintings

    Edmonds, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Frances Edmonds is one of a group of artists selected for the show ‘Territories’ taking place at Galerie Windkracht 13 in Den Helder, Holland this July 2012. This exhibition is curated by Sharon Beavan and Gethin Evans. The artists represented work across the boundaries of two and three-dimensional and time based form. The brief – to interrogate and explore the notion of territories. Frances will be showing several paintings from the British Museum series, based on imagery collected ...

  7. RESOURCE CENTRE AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

    ciunl ictlt.P cnnipc;. Material from other museums. Worksheets, activity books, guides, pamp~lets and other educational material from museums 1n Southern. Africa and overseas are kept in the museum education section of the Resource Centre. General infonnation on museums and museum technology are also collected.

  8. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws inspiration from Edward Said's orientalism, and examines how the three National Museums of Singapore - the Singapore History Museum, the Singapore Art Museum and the Asian Civilizations Museums - are orientalized. The process is mediated through the museums' close links to touris...

  9. Digital archives. Alcune note

    Francesca Zanella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available MoRE is a digital native museum where projects of artworks are exposed, and also a digital archive where documents about art projectsare collected. MoRE is a multi-layered platform where artists, curators, art historians confront each other collecting art projects, organizing their documentation and defining tools for the communication and surveys on the public. In this paper some critical referencesare identified, that constitute a model for the project as they reflect on the impact of the digital dimension on the transformation of the museum and archive.

  10. Virtual Museums for Landscape Valorization and Communication

    Pietroni, E.

    2017-08-01

    Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional "sensing" and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities' cultural patterns, their sense of "belonging". In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or "monographic", representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  11. University digital libraries in Spain and TIC as paradigms of the information needs for teachers and students

    Carlos Oliva Marañón

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The university digital libraries have experienced an improvement in recent years, allowing easy retrieval of information in different media. The objectives of this research are to verify the suitability of online catalogs to meet the information needs of teachers and students in the area of Library and Information by evaluating a sample of 23 University digital libraries, and raise the necessary improvements. The results verify the suitability of online catalogs to solve the information needs of teachers, researchers and students, being the University libraries of Barcelona, Granada and Sevilla the most relevant in the area of documentation, as well as the professionalism of librarians to heed the needs of users. Among other improvements, raised teacher education and students in using electronic resources and the creation of online help to improve user interfaces-Web in order to retrieve information quickly and efficiently.

  12. Can museums survive the postmodern?

    Suzanne Keene

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although archaeologists regard museums as vital repositories of important research materials, museum professionals take a broader view of their role in not only preserving natural and cultural heritage but also of how they could or should be presented, or interpreted, to the public. In this personal view, issues of what museums should be, or seek to be, in a postmodern world are explored.

  13. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  14. Hospital information systems: experience at the fully digitized Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Hwang, Hee; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-08-01

    The different levels of health information technology (IT) adoption and its integration into hospital workflow can affect the maximization of the benefits of using of health IT. We aimed at sharing our experiences and the journey to the successful adoption of health IT over 13 years at a tertiary university hospital in South Korea. The integrated system of comprehensive applications for direct care, support care, and smart care has been implemented with the latest IT and a rich user information platform, achieving the fully digitized hospital. The users experience design methodology, barcode and radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies, smartphone and mobile technologies, and data analytics were integrated into hospital workflow. Applications for user-centered electronic medical record (EMR) and clinical decision support (CDS), closed loop medication administration (CLMA), mobile EMR and dashboard system for care coordination, clinical data warehouse (CDW) system, and patient engagement solutions were designed and developed to improve quality of care, work efficiency, and patient safety. We believe that comprehensive electronic health record systems and patient-centered smart hospital applications will go a long way in ensuring seamless patient care and experience.

  15. A basis of common approach to the development of universal steganalysis methods for digital images

    Alla А. Kobozeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new common approach to the organization of steganalysis in digital images is developed. New features of formal parameters defining the image are identified, theoretically grounded and practically tested. For the first time characteristics of mutual disposition of the left and right singular vectors corresponding to the largest singular value of the matrix (block of matrix of an image and the vector composed of the singular values obtained as a result of normal singular decomposition of the matrix (block matrix are obtained. It is shown that for the majority of the blocks of the original image (regardless of the storage format — lossy, lossless the angle between the left (right singular vector and the vector composed of singular numbers is determined by the angle between the n-optimal vector and the standard space basis of the corresponding dimension. It is shown that the discovered feature is violated for the mentioned formal parameters in the disturbed image. This is an indicator of integrity violation, particularly steganotransformation, and it can be used to develop new universal steganalysis methods and algorithms. Their efficiency does not depend on the specifics of steganoalgorithm used for insertion of additional information.

  16. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale | Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale

    NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Visit Admissions Hours & Admission Policies & Accessibility Airports Shop & Dine About the Café & Store Store Café Menu Art Exhibitions Currently on View Thursday 2-for-1 specials on wine and craft beer in the Museum Café, and hands-on art projects for all

  17. Museums as Spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    Sattrup, Lise; Lejsgaard Christensen, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums.......Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums....

  18. Medical instruments in museums

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  19. Reflexões sobre o patrimônio digital a partir da experiência do projeto Arquigrafia │ Digital heritage: reflections on the Arquigrafia project

    Artur Simões Rozestraten

    2015-05-01

    ABSTRACT This paper  proposes a critical reflection on documental and technological challenges regarding conservation, digitization, cataloguing and web dissemination of images in the experience of the Arquigrafia multidisciplinary project (www.arquigrafia.org.br. Arquigrafia is a collaborative web image sharing environment open to photographic institutional archives and users' private collections. The need to organize and share this information set, as well as the specificities of descriptive and thematic representation for effective retrieval of this digital heritage are also presented. Besides the issues issues related to the financing of digitization projects of collections and the preservation of documents and digital files, this article discuss the need to establish a public policy that incorporates the latest standards and the most appropriate methodology for the treatment, organization and retrieval information concerning the digital heritage that has been produced by Brazilian public institutions such as university libraries, archives and museums. Keywords: Image; Digital Heritage; Collaborative Environment; Web.

  20. National Museum of Military History

    A Nicolaides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractions such as military history museums which exhibit a wide range of important historical artefacts are fundamental sub-elements in any tourism systems, and yet their study suffers from lack of theoretical depth. Military history is an integral element of the history of any nation and countless varieties of tourists both local and international, visit military museums whenever the opportunity presents itself because museums are generally stimulating places of interest. This article focuses predominantly on international tourists visiting the Ditsong National Museum of Military History. In addition to the interest that such museums generate, they play a key role as the organizational foundation stones of modernity. It is via their many interesting exhibits that museums enlighten us about the past that intrinsically highlights its distance from the present era. Museums also selectively reconstitute aspects of history and in so doing alienate many artefacts from their original context and yet manage to impart deep understanding of events that shaped the modern world. Museums of all types thus impart knowledge and have a wide range of tales to tell concerning the many and diverse assortments of objects they hold. National pride is an obvious reason for having a military museum where the comprehensive display of military equipment is exceptionally unique while exhibition halls also offer an educational narrative of a nation’s history. What is also of interest to many visitors is the type of research that is carried out in a multiplicity of ways. The huge global growth in tourism in recent years has contributed to many museums radically altering their exhibits in both content and manner of exhibition. This is significant given the reciprocal impact that museums and tourism have on one another. The attractions in museums are regarded by many to be central to the tourism process and these are very often the main reason for many tourists visiting

  1. Digital teaching file. Concept, implementation, and experiences in a university setting

    Trumm, C.; Wirth, S.; Treitl, M.; Lucke, A.; Kuettner, B.; Pander, E.; Clevert, D.-A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M.; Dugas, M.

    2005-01-01

    Film-based teaching files require a substantial investment in human, logistic, and financial resources. The combination of computer and network technology facilitates the workflow integration of distributing radiologic teaching cases within an institution (intranet) or via the World Wide Web (Internet). A digital teaching file (DTF) should include the following basic functions: image import from different sources and of different formats, editing of imported images, uniform case classification, quality control (peer review), a controlled access of different user groups (in-house and external), and an efficient retrieval strategy. The portable network graphics image format (PNG) is especially suitable for DTFs because of several features: pixel support, 2D-interlacing, gamma correction, and lossless compression. The American College of Radiology (ACR) ''Index for Radiological Diagnoses'' is hierarchically organized and thus an ideal classification system for a DTF. Computer-based training (CBT) in radiology is described in numerous publications, from supplementing traditional learning methods to certified education via the Internet. Attractiveness of a CBT application can be increased by integration of graphical and interactive elements but makes workflow integration of daily case input more difficult. Our DTF was built with established Internet instruments and integrated into a heterogeneous PACS/RIS environment. It facilitates a quick transfer (DICOM S end) of selected images at the time of interpretation to the DTF and access to the DTF application at any time anywhere within the university hospital intranet employing a standard web browser. A DTF is a small but important building block in an institutional strategy of knowledge management. (orig.) [de

  2. Cultural mediation in museums

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  3. The Virtual Museum of the Tiber Valley Project

    Antonia Arnoldus Huyzendveld

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the Virtual Museum of the Tiber Valley project is the creation of an integrated digital system for the knowledge, valorisation and communication of the cultural landscape, archaeological and naturalistic sites along the Tiber Valley, in the Sabina area between Monte Soratte and the ancient city of Lucus Feroniae (Capena. Virtual reality applications, multimedia contents, together with a web site, are under construction and they will be accessed inside the museums of the territory and in a central museum in Rome. The different stages of work will cover the building of a geo-spatial archaeological database, the reconstruction of the ancient potential landscape and the creation of virtual models of the major archaeological sites. This paper will focus on the methodologies used and on present and future results.

  4. Augmenting the agora: Media and civic engagement in museums

    Rikke Haller Baggesen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mirroring digital culture developments in society at large, museums are increasingly incorporating social media platforms and formats into their communication practices. More than merely providing additional channels of communication, this development is invested with an understanding of social media as integral to the ongoing democratisation of the museum. The confluences of new media affordances with New Museology objectives along with the underpinning of the aforementioned understanding is discussed in this article. The article will argue that development in this area is not only driven by solid results and public demand but also by collective assumptions and associations as well as by a political need for institutions to justify their relevance in society. In conclusion, the article suggests that, while the integration of social media communication may serve to market the museum as inclusive, it may also simply pay lip service to genuine civic engagement and democratic exchanges with the public.

  5. A University Library Creates a Digital Repository for Documenting and Disseminating Community Engagement

    Miller, William A.; Billings, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Digital repositories are new tools for documenting the accumulated scholarly work produced at academic institutions and disseminating that material broadly via the internet. Digital repositories support all file types and can be adapted to meet the custom design specifications of individual institutions. A section for community engagement…

  6. Appreciation of Authenticity Promotes Curiosity: Implications for Object-Based Learning in Museums

    Bunce, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Museum professionals suppose that interacting with authentic objects promotes curiosity and engagement, but this has not been tested. In this research, children and adults visiting the Oxford University Museum of Natural History were shown a taxidermied rabbit or rabbit skeleton. They were asked "Is it real?," "Why?" and were…

  7. 76 FR 58031 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

  8. Factors Influencing Museum Sustainability and Indicators for Museum Sustainability Measurement

    Izabela Luiza Pop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the factors upon which museum sustainability depends and the way in which this can be measured. Methodologically, we applied a qualitative research approach, using semi-structured interviews with experts from the Romanian museum sector, complemented by an in-depth study of the literature in this field. Results indicated that any objective measuring of sustainability must take into account the size of a museum’s collections and its organizational structure. It was also found that museum type can affect sustainability via its competitive advantage. However, the sustainability of a museum is not strictly determined by these factors, but also by the management and marketing strategies applied. Based on analysis of literature- and respondent-based factors influencing sustainability, this article proposes a set of 33 indicators that can be used by museums to measure their sustainability, as well as a model that enables evaluation of the sustainability levels of various museums comparatively, regardless of their type, size or importance (e.g., national, regional and local. The results obtained are useful both from a theoretical point of view, given that there are few writings on this topic, and from a practical point of view, as they provide a basis for a clear, objective model of museum sustainability measurement.

  9. Muzejní marketing: komunikační aktivity Victoria and Albert Museum v Londýně v akademickém roce 2011/2012

    Freitagová, Martina

    2013-01-01

    After an extensive museum boom in the 1980s and 1990s marked by the construction of numerous new museums, there is now a growing debate about selling museum items and even a complete closure of some institutions. Also the function attributed to art in the museum context has changed the purpose of these institutions in society. Museums turned into socializing platforms and their collections became subjects of universal conversations. Their role has been fully reoriented towards serving the pub...

  10. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  11. Fusion of Library, Archive, Museum, Publisher (LAMP: the NTNU Library Experience

    Ke, Hao-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs has garnered attention in recent years. Extending the tendency further, National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU fuses the library, archive, museum, and publisher (LAMP functionality together in its library. This article elaborates on the LAMP practices of the NTNU Library, which indicates that without creating new units in a university, its library can play a good role of curating invaluable university assets.

  12. The Conference in the Moscow Kremlin State Museums “Historical Weapons in Museums and Private Collections”

    Sergey P. Orlenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In November 2016 in the Moscow Kremlin State Historical and Cultural Museum and Heritage Site in the framework of events dedicated to the 210th anniversary of the Armoury Chamber museum, an international conference “Historical weapons in museums and private collections”. This scientific forum continued the tradition of conferences held in the Moscow Kremlin Museums in 1999-2007. The participants of this forum discussed a number of priority topics for the studies of the weapon collection history in the Kremlin. These topics were relevant to the national and world studies of weaponology as a whole. In addition to general issues of the history of arms and armour, a number of reports were devoted to the functioning of the historical centers of arms production, weapons collections in Russia and abroad, particular items, as well as the activities of gunsmiths, designers of weapons. The conference was attended by representatives of more than 20 Russian and foreign museums, 14 academic and university research centers and institutions, private collectors and lovers of ancient weapons. During the three days of the conference 36 reports were presented and discussed. Organizers of the conference highlighted a number of reports including new attributions of the items from the Kremlin collections. The conference program is available on the official website of the Moscow Kremlin State Museums. The conference results were published as a collection of proceedings. The weaponology forum in the Kremlin will be held annually. The Moscow Kremlin Museums invite researchers of historical weapons, museum employees and collectors to the active cooperation.

  13. Tribus digitales en las aulas universitarias Digital Tribes in the University Classrooms

    Andrés Palacios Picos

    2010-03-01

    believe, and that they give rise to many different situations that characterize university teaching and learning practice. Using the ratings of three Likert questionnaires on information processing and communication in three different environments (Moodle, Tuenti and the classroom itself, and applying multivariate techniques (factor analysis and cluster analysis, we have found four clusters: pro-ICT students, anti-ICT students, listless student and neutral student. The presence of such segments of students allows us to conclude that, although computers are nowadays taken for granted in Higher Education classrooms, we are perhaps overestimating both the real impact of ICT on teaching and students’ digital competencies, and that this false perception of reality benefits technology vendors but not methodological and pedagogic innovation, which can only be achieved through the necessary reflection on education matters from educational principles.

  14. Pedagogy and Practice in Museum Online Learning

    Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    How best might museums harness the interactive capabilities of online environments to provide active teaching and learning experiences for diverse learners and communities? How can museums engage learners in ways that encourage them to visit the museum in person and/or further explore online resources? What should be the role of the museum in…

  15. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  16. Locally-sourced: How climate science can collaborate with arts & humanities museums to achieve widespread public trust and communication

    Walker, C. G.

    2017-12-01

    Local history, art and culture museums have a large role to play in climate science communication. Unfortunately, in our current society, scientific evidence and logic is not universally accepted as truth. These messages can be dispersed through trusted institutional allies like humanities and arts museums. There are many reasons for scientific institutions to work with humanities and arts museums of all sizes, especially local museums that have personal, trusted relationships with their communities. First, museums (by definition) are public educators; the work that they do is to disperse challenging information in an understandable way to a wide array of audiences. Museums are located in every state, with over 35,000 museums in the nation; 26% of those are located in rural areas. These museums serve every demographic and age range, inspiring even those with difficulty accepting climate change information to act. Second, in a recent public opinion survey commissioned by the American Alliance of Museums, museums - especially history museums - are considered the most trustworthy source of information in America, rated higher than newspapers, nonprofit researchers, the U.S. government, or academic researchers. Scientific institutions must collaborate with local museums to improve science communication going forward. Not only will important climate and sustainability research be dispersed via trusted sources, but the public will engage with this information in large numbers. In 2012 alone, over 850 million people visited museums - more than the attendance for all major league sports and theme parks combined. A recent impact study shows that history and art museums, especially, are not seen as "having a political agenda," with over 78% of the public seeing these museums as trusted institutions. There are many ways in which the scientific community can collaborate with "the arts." This presentation will speak to the larger benefit of working with sister arts & humanities

  17. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  18. VIRTUAL MUSEUMS FOR LANDSCAPE VALORIZATION AND COMMUNICATION

    E. Pietroni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional “sensing” and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities’ cultural patterns, their sense of “belonging”. In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or “monographic”, representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  19. Development of a Virtual Museum Including a 4d Presentation of Building History in Virtual Reality

    Kersten, T. P.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Deggim, S.

    2017-02-01

    In the last two decades the definition of the term "virtual museum" changed due to rapid technological developments. Using today's available 3D technologies a virtual museum is no longer just a presentation of collections on the Internet or a virtual tour of an exhibition using panoramic photography. On one hand, a virtual museum should enhance a museum visitor's experience by providing access to additional materials for review and knowledge deepening either before or after the real visit. On the other hand, a virtual museum should also be used as teaching material in the context of museum education. The laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has developed a virtual museum (VM) of the museum "Alt-Segeberger Bürgerhaus", a historic town house. The VM offers two options for visitors wishing to explore the museum without travelling to the city of Bad Segeberg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Option a, an interactive computer-based, tour for visitors to explore the exhibition and to collect information of interest or option b, to immerse into virtual reality in 3D with the HTC Vive Virtual Reality System.

  20. Why we need to find time for digital humanities: presenting a new partnership model at the University of Sussex

    Jane Harvell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing that academic libraries should develop and nurture strong, mutually beneficial relationships with researchers in digital humanities, the authors believe it is strategically important to invest time and resources exploring ideas and partnering with academic colleagues on projects. This approach can provide many unforeseen benefits to both the Library service and to the workforce. The article is based on our experience as Core Associates of the Sussex Humanities Lab at the University of Sussex. It outlines the impact this collaboration has had, including influencing working practices and culture within the Library, involvement in research bids, informing the development of new services, and addressing library questions using digital humanities methods. Most importantly, it exemplifies a new model of the librarian as equal partner in the research process.

  1. The National Cryptologic Museum Library

    2010-09-01

    telegrams. Modern communications and encryption methods have made them obsolete and mainly of historical interest. The library is also home to a...interpretations. Cross References The National Cryptologic Museum Library Eugene Becker Last year, a widely published German technical author, Klaus...Schmeh, e-mailed the library of the National Cryptologic Museum from his home in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. He needed information for an article on the

  2. Carnegie Mellon University bioimaging day 2014: Challenges and opportunities in digital pathology

    Gustavo K Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in digital imaging is impacting the practice of pathology. One of the key enabling technologies that is leading the way towards this transformation is the use of whole slide imaging (WSI which allows glass slides to be converted into large image files that can be shared, stored, and analyzed rapidly. Many applications around this novel technology have evolved in the last decade including education, research and clinical applications. This publication highlights a collection of abstracts, each corresponding to a talk given at Carnegie Mellon University′s (CMU Bioimaging Day 2014 co-sponsored by the Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology Departments at CMU. Topics related specifically to digital pathology are presented in this collection of abstracts. These include topics related to digital workflow implementation, imaging and artifacts, storage demands, and automated image analysis algorithms.

  3. Adding Value to the University of Oklahoma Libraries History of Science Collections through Digital Enhancement

    Maura Valentino

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus of digital collections has been and continues to be on rare and unique materials, including monographs.   A monograph may be made even rarer and more valuable by virtue of hand written marginalia.   Using technology to enhance scans of unique books and make previously unreadable marginalia readable increases the value of a digital object to researchers.  This article describes a case study of enhancing the marginalia in a rare book by Copernicus.

  4. The Role of Contextualism in Architectural Design of Museums

    Muhammad Ali Tabarsa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The early generator tool designs of architects in the design process are architectural context and design data, and they define the main approach of the design; this approach has led to extensive expressions of design options and ultimately they are followed by more successful assessment of solutions and more complete design. The study implements descriptive and historical analysis (using the data of ancient city and define a new set for reviving the identity and analyzing the new process. There is no doubt that the museum as a cultural institution in community is vital because the culture of a society is a general concept and it includes all the spiritual values of that community. Thus, culture is the heritage of every people, which is taken from his or her predecessors, and it has been changed and shifted to the next generation. Whenever a decision is taken to build a museum the preliminary basic problem that must be dealt with is choosing the location, a place with various facilities and each one of them need to be examined carefully. Now we should decide whether it should be in the downtown or in the suburb. But with the gradual speed increase and ease of use of public and private vehicles to get from one place to another, it was realized that a location of a museum in a downtown is not a priority anymore. A museum should be accessible from all parts of the city by public transport, and possibly by walking, and as much as possible they should be in the vicinity of schools, colleges, universities and libraries. Today, museums are seen as cultural centers more than past. But it should be noted that not only students visit them, but people who have different socio-economic background visit them. Visiting of museums are more likely if the museum is close and accessible, and coming these kinds of people even for spending their free time is an education hobby.

  5. Evaluasi Tingkat Kesiapan Organisasi dalam Rangka Preservasi Digital (Studi Kasus Pada Unit Repositori Flinders Academic Commons Of Flinders University Library (FACFUL, Adelaide, Australia Selatan

    Rattahpinnusa Haresariu Handisa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan mengidentifikasi tingkat kesiapan lembaga repositori dalam rangka preservasi digital pada Flinders Academic Commons Flinders University Library (FACFUL dan mengidentifikasi faktor-faktor yang berpengaruh terhadap tingkat kesiapan organisasi. Terdapat tiga aspek yang diteliti meliputi: kesiapan infrastruktur, kesiapan teknologi serta sumber daya yang dibutuhkan bagi preservasi digital. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode studi kasus dengan  intesity sampel. Adapun instrumen pengumpulan data menggunakan Cornell University Survey of Institutional Readiness Checklist. Selanjutnya, tehnik pengambilan data menggunakan tehnik wawancara dengan Ms. Liz-Walkley Hall selaku pustakawati yang bertanggung jawab terhadap unit repositori digital FACFUL. Adapun informasi penunjang diperoleh melalui studi kepustakaan merujuk pada website Perpustakaan Universitas  Flinders. Data yang terkumpul dianalisis secara deskriptif menggunakan indikator kesiapan organisasi Cornel University Model. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa unit repositori pada FACFUL kurang siap dalam menjalankan preservasi digital. Tingkat kesiapan organisasi Perpustakaan Universitas  Flinders dalam pelestarian digital berapa pada level terbawah yakni Acknowledgement . Pada tingkat tersebut, Perpustakaan Flinders masih dalam tahap pengembangan kesadaran tentang pentingnya preservasi digital. Selanjutnya, faktor-faktor yang mempengaruhi rendahnya tingkat kesiapan organisasi tersebut adalah tidak adanya pernyataan pentingya preservasi digital pada kebijakan pengembangan koleksi; keterbatasan pendanaan dan keterbatasan sumber daya manusia yang kompeten dalam preservasi digital. Penelitian ini merekomendasikan Perpustakaan Universitas Flinders untuk  melakukan uji kelayakan bagi preservasi digital. Salah satu model bisnis yang sesuai dengan kondisi Perpustakaan Universitas  Flinders adalah Meta Archive Model (MAM. Model tersebut berbasis komunitas bagi preservasi digital

  6. Digital preservation of cultural and scientific heritage: involving university students to raise awareness of its importance

    Paula Redweik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is a relevant issue in contemporary society. While its preservation is a challenge, its dissemination, can contribute for an economic balance between costs and benefits.  Scientific  heritage  can  be  considered  as  a  special domain  of  cultural  heritage, not yet sought  by  the  mass  tourism, but worth being preserved as the roots of today’s knowledge.  Considering  that  university  students  of  engineering  and computer  science traditionally  do  not  address cultural or scientific heritage issues in their syllabus, and that they constitute a layer of young citizens that will come to be influential  in  the  future  of  society,  an  effort  was  undertaken  to  focus  on  this  theme  in  disciplines  of  different  courses, allying  the  learning  of  technical  skills  with  the  natural  interest  of  younger  people  for  3D  and  animation  for  the  profit  of heritage. The goal was to raise the awareness of this particular group to the importance of maintaining heritage issues, in particular,  in  a  virtual  way,  both  for  documentation  and  for  divulgating  their  existence.  Raising  funds  for  buildings’ restoration, attracting the public to visit buildings and collections that are outside the usual tourism routes, contributing to revenue  generation,  or  allowing  virtual  visits  of  not  accessible  issues,  complementing  physical  visits  on  site,  were  the general  aims of  the  proposed  projects.  A survey was undertaken under the participating students to evaluate how the projects influenced their attitude towards heritage. The obtained feedback was very positive: 76% agreed that the project alerted them for the importance of preserving historical and cultural heritage, while 72% considered it was interesting that the topic of digital cultural heritage was used for the assessments of

  7. Digital substraction angiography (DSA) in a universal radiodiagnostic room with a novel multi-pulse high-frequency generator

    Ellegast, H.H.; Kloss, R.; Mayr, H.; Ammann, E.; Kuehnel, W.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1985-01-01

    Application of digital subtraction angiography in a universal radiodiagnostic room can be implemented rapidly and reliably. The number of examinations could be increased without negative effects to conventional operations in this room. At optimum radiation hygiene and high-degree operational safety, the multipulse high-frequency generator with its DSA parameter automatic system guarantees a reproducibly good image quality equalling that of a special DSA facility. In this way, the examination room constitutes an economic solution for small-sized hospitals without any special angiography room, too. (orig.) [de

  8. Investigating the Learning Challenges Presented by Digital Technologies to the College of Education in Kuwait University

    Aldhafeeri, Fayiz; Male, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    There is now widespread recognition that digital technologies, particularly portable hand held devices capable of Internet connection, present opportunities and challenges to the way in which student learning is organized in schools, colleges and institutions of higher education in the 21st Century. Traxler, "Journal of the Research Centre…

  9. Open Access, Open Source and Digital Libraries: A Current Trend in University Libraries around the World

    Krishnamurthy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the open access and open source movement in the digital library world. Design/methodology/approach: A review of key developments in the open access and open source movement is provided. Findings: Open source software and open access to research findings are of great use to scholars in developing…

  10. Effects of Digital Story on Academic Achievement, Learning Motivation and Retention among University Students

    Aktas, Elif; Yurt, Serap Uzuner

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the learning environment where digital stories are used as a learning material on the motivation, academic success, retention, and students' opinions. The study was carried out with mixed method which is a combination of quantitative and qualitative research approach. The study was implemented…

  11. The Effect of Digital Publishing on Technical Services in University Libraries

    Hunter, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has brought enormous changes in scholarly communication, leading many libraries to undertake large-scale digital publishing initiatives. However, no study has investigated how technical services departments are changing to support these new services. Using change management as a theoretical framework, the investigator uses content…

  12. Investigating the ICT Use and Needs of "Digital Natives" in Learning English at a Taiwanese University

    Ko, Chao-Jung; Thang, Siew Ming; Ou, Shu-chen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports key findings of a study which investigated the use of technology by 569 "digital natives" students for English Language learning and recreational purposes. Their views on the applicability of technological tools such as Facebook, blogging and Skype for English Language teaching and learning were also investigated.…

  13. Contributions of a Science Museum for the Initial Training

    Azizi Manuel Tempesta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some results obtained in a master’s research which aimed to evaluate what are the contributions that the acting as Physical monitor in a Science Museum has for the initial training and the beginning of the teaching career. Basing our analysis, we have adopted as theoretical assumptions the Teachers Knowledge and the Training Needs. We interviewed a group of ten teachers who played the function of Physics mediator in the Interdisciplinary Dynamic Museum (MUDI of the State University of Maringá, and submit to the Textual Analysis Discursive process. The results allowed us to realize that the contributions go beyond the expected, revealing the great potential of the Science museums of as an aid to initial training, contributing to the development of competencies and abilities that today is required of the teacher, and them providing experiences load which otherwise would not be reached.

  14. Treasure Transformers: Novel Interpretative Installations for the National Palace Museum

    Hsieh, Chun-Ko; Liu, I.-Ling; Lin, Quo-Ping; Chan, Li-Wen; Hsiao, Chuan-Heng; Hung, Yi-Ping

    Museums have missions to increase accessibility and share cultural assets to the public. The National Palace Museum intends to be a pioneer of utilizing novel interpretative installations to reach more diverse and potential audiences, and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) technology has been selected as the new interpretative approach. The pilot project in partnership with the National Taiwan University has successfully completed four interactive installations. To consider the different nature of collections, the four systems designed against different interpretation strategies are uPoster, i-m-Top, Magic Crystal Ball and Virtual Panel. To assess the feasibility of the project, the interactive installations were exhibited at the Taipei World Trade Center in 2008. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the "Treasure Transformers" exhibition, design principles, and effectiveness of installations from the evaluation. It is our ambition that the contributions will propose innovative media approaches in museum settings.

  15. Implementation of accessible tourism concept at museums in Jakarta

    Wiastuti, R. D.; Adiati, M. P.; Lestari, N. S.

    2018-03-01

    Accessibility, sustainability and equitable participation by all makeup what is known as Tourism for All. Tourism product must be designed for all people despite the age, gender and ability as one of the requirements to comply the accessible tourism concept. Museum as one of the elements of tourism chain must adhere to accessible tourism concept thus able to be enjoyed for everyone regardless of one’s abilities. The aim of this study is to identify the implementation of accessible tourism concept at the museum in Jakarta and to provide practical accessibility- improvement measures for the museum in Jakarta towards accessible tourism concept. This research is qualitative- explorative research. Jakarta Tourism Board website was used as the main reference to obtain which museum that was selected. Primary data collect from direct field observations and interview. The results outline museum implementation of accessible tourism that classified into five criteria; information, transport, common requirements, universal design, and accessibility. The implication of this study provides recommendations to enhance museums’ accessibility performance expected to be in line with accessible tourism concept.

  16. Museums as spaces and times for learning and social participation.

    César M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A museum is valued according to its collections, communication and knowledge exchange with visitors (Primo, 1999. Museums should be in dialogue with the public, contributing to their development (Skramstad, 2004 and collective memory (Wertsch, 2004. Social interactions and working in participants’ zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1934/1962 play an important role in non-formal learning opportunities that take place at museums. The National Museum of Natural History and Science (Lisbon University offers weekly holiday programmes for children and teenagers, aiming at developing scientific literacy in intercultural and inclusive spaces and times, facilitating knowledge appropriation and social participation. We studied these programmes, assuming an interpretive approach (Denzin, 2002 and developing an intrinsic case study (Stake, 1995. The main participants were these children and teenagers, their parents, and museum educational agents. Data collecting instruments included observation, interviews, questionnaires, children and teenagers’ protocols and tasks inspired in projective techniques. Data treatment and analysis was based on a narrative content analysis (Clandinin & Connelly, 1998 from which inductive categories emerged (Hamido & César, 2009. Some examples illuminate participants’ expectancies, their engagement in activities, and the contributions of social interactions and non-formal education to the development of scientific literacy.

  17. A Mobile Music Museum Experience for Children

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Helleberg; Knudsen, Aske Sønderby; Wilmot, Thomas Michael

    2015-01-01

    An interactive music instrument museum experience for children of 10-12 years is presented. Equipped with tablet devices, the children are sent on a treasure hunt where participants have to identify musical instruments by listening to samples; when the right instrument is located, a challenge...... of playing an application on the tablet is initiated. This application is an interactive digital representation of the found instrument, mimicking some of its key playing techniques, using a simplified scrolling-on-screen musical notation. A qualitative evaluation of the application using observations while...... interacting with the application and a focus group interview with school children revealed that the children were more engaged when playing with the interactive application than when only watching a music video....

  18. Young people’s own museum views

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortenesen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning-making practi......Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning...

  19. Museopathy: Exploring the Healing Potential of Handling Museum Objects

    Helen Chatterjee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To coincide with emerging arts and health practices, University College London Museums & Collections and University College London Hospitals Arts partnered to create a pilot project, entitled “Heritage in Hospitals”, which sought to assess whether handling museum objects has a positive impact on patient wellbeing. Quantitative data from 32 sessions conducted with patients in May through July (inclusive of 2008 demonstrated, on average, an increase in self-reported measures of life satisfaction and health status after handling museum objects. Constant comparative analysis of the qualitative data collected from the sessions revealed two major recurring themes: “impersonal/educational” and “personal/reminiscence”. The first theme included instances where handling museum objects allowed patients to access truths about the objects ascertainable solely through touch (such as gauging weight, texture, temperature, and spatial relation to the body, to verify what was seen, to facilitate an intimate and imaginative connection with the museum objects and their origins, to investigate and explore the objects, to permit an interaction with the “rare” and “museum-worthy”, and to assist with aesthetic appreciation. The second theme illustrated the project’s potential to assist with counselling on issues of illness, death, loss and mourning, and to help restore dignity, respect and a sense of identity (particularly among elderly patients by providing a springboard for reminiscing and the telling of life stories in a highly institutionalized setting. This paper contextualizes the project, explores the implications of the project’s methodology and its findings, and provides questions for future research.

  20. Comprehension of texts in Digital Format versus Printed Texts and Self-Regulated Learning in University Students

    Paula Gabriela Flores-Carrasco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims (1 to describe the levels of self-regulation and reading comprehension of scientific expository texts; (2 to establish the relationship between self-regulation and reading comprehension; and (3 to compare the performance in comprehension when the printed media (paper or digital media (computer is used. A quasi-experimental, quantitative, descriptive and correlative design was implemented. The sample was composed of 55 university students from four careers of Education; they were in 1st and 3rd year of study at a regional university of the Council of Rectors of Chilean Universities. Three measuring instruments were used: a questionnaire of self-regulated learning and two comprehension tests based on the understanding of Parodi’s (2005 assessment model. The implementation was made in two consecutive moments; first, the self-questionnaire; then, the tests for reading comprehension in both media. With the data obtained, statistical tests of variance, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation, and means comparison with Bruner and Munzel and U-Mann Whitney’s tests were calculated. In conclusion, and different from the initial statement, it was obtained that university students have an adequate level of self-regulation and low reading comprehension in both data, even the scores are relatively lower in digital data. In both data the output is inverse to the complexity of the questions. Between 1st and 3rd year, there is no increase either in the self-regulation or in reading comprehension; but, exceptionally, the career of Primary General Education specialist on Language and History did. There is a strong relationship between reading comprehension in printed media and self-regulation (ARATEX. The support does not affect reading comprehension, but individual reading skills of the subjects do. A competent reader will have similar performance in both reading supports.

  1. [The collections of the museum and archives of the German Society of Urology. Reflections on objects in the museum].

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2012-09-01

    Objects in a museum that were used by urologists are part of the history of urology. If we know how to look at them they can be sources for a better understanding of the history of urology. In a museum visitors are confronted with objects during exhibitions which are the stage on which one possible interpretation of the history of urology is displayed. Objects have become"carriers of symbols" between the past and present (Pomian). Collections from medical societies which are not connected with a university or another public institution cannot be legitimized on the basis of the argument of conserving historical heritage only. The museum itself with its many tasks and as a classical site of scientific communication should be seen as a topic of scientific interest.

  2. Carnegie Mellon University bioimaging day 2014: Challenges and opportunities in digital pathology

    Gustavo K Rohde; John A Ozolek; Anil V Parwani; Liron Pantanowitz

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in digital imaging is impacting the practice of pathology. One of the key enabling technologies that is leading the way towards this transformation is the use of whole slide imaging (WSI) which allows glass slides to be converted into large image files that can be shared, stored, and analyzed rapidly. Many applications around this novel technology have evolved in the last decade including education, research and clinical applications. This publication highlights a collection o...

  3. Low Phase Noise Universal Microwave Oscillator for Analog and Digital Devices, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An inherently rugged Universal Oscillator (UO) is needed to enable a superior class of configurable communications for NASA applications. The requirements are a low...

  4. The Digital Archiving of Endangered Language Oral Traditions: Kaipuleohone at the University of Hawai‘i and C’ek’aedi Hwnax in Alaska

    Andrea L. Berez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay compares and contrasts two small-scale digital endangered language archives with regard to their relevance for oral tradition research. The first is a university-based archive curated at the University of Hawai‘i, which is designed to house endangered language materials arising from the fieldwork of university researchers. The second is an indigenously-administered archive in rural Alaska that serves the language maintenance needs of the Ahtna Athabaskan Alaska Native community.

  5. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    aspects this value brings in management. However, art museums have left beside the analysis of sustainability in regards to their cultural policies and internal managerial organization. Though European museums have proposed sustainability strategies in the collection management (brand franchising...

  6. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  7. MUSEUMS, MARKETING, TOURISM AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT. THE BRITISH MUSEUM – A SUCCESSFUL MODEL FOR ROMANIAN MUSEUMS

    Răzvan-Andrei CORBOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of cultural influence upon the modern societycombined with the increasing role of tourism in the economic life of cities, ledto the development of the “emblem museums”. The “emblem museum”usually becomes a touristic attraction objective that must be visited bytourists from a city, and by taking the decision of prolonging their staying inthat city, the tourists will increase the amount of money they spend in thatlocation. The “emblem museums” represent a way to develop urban tourism,gain competitive advantage and attract new sources of income for the city`seconomy. A recent study showed that 3 out of 10 tourists visited London forits museums. One of them is the British Museum, which, in 2010 was on the2nd place in the top10 world`s most visited museums. This study aims topresent the British Museum from the mix marketing perspective, from thevisitor’s point of view, and to present some of the good practices this giant isusing to attract more visitors and to maintain its competitive advantage,practices which may be used by Romanian museums in order to increase thevisitors number and to obtain a better position in the economy life ofRomanian cities.

  8. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  9. Digital Image Correlation of Concrete Slab at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pham, Binh T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kyle, Neal [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Some degradation mechanisms of concrete manifest themselves via swelling or by other shape deformation of the concrete. Specifically, degradation of concrete structure damaged by ASR is viewed as one of the dominant factors impacting the structural integrity of aging nuclear power plants. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Number of nondestructive examination techniques (i.e., thermography, digital image correlation, mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance (DIC) acoustic spectroscopy, and vibro-acoustic modulation) is used to detect the damage caused by ASR. DIC techniques have been increasing in popularity, especially in micro- and nano-scale mechanical testing applications due to its relative ease of implementation and use. Advances in computer technology and digital cameras help this method moving forward. To ensure the best outcome of the DIC system, important factors in the experiment are identified. They include standoff distance, speckle size, speckle pattern, and durable paint. These optimal experimental options are selected basing on a thorough investigation. The resulting DIC deformation map indicates that this technique can be used to generate data related to degradation assessment of concrete structure damaged by the impact of ASR.

  10. Digital Image Correlation of Concrete Slab at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Pham, Binh T.; Kyle, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Some degradation mechanisms of concrete manifest themselves via swelling or by other shape deformation of the concrete. Specifically, degradation of concrete structure damaged by ASR is viewed as one of the dominant factors impacting the structural integrity of aging nuclear power plants. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Number of nondestructive examination techniques (i.e., thermography, digital image correlation, mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance (DIC) acoustic spectroscopy, and vibro-acoustic modulation) is used to detect the damage caused by ASR. DIC techniques have been increasing in popularity, especially in micro- and nano-scale mechanical testing applications due to its relative ease of implementation and use. Advances in computer technology and digital cameras help this method moving forward. To ensure the best outcome of the DIC system, important factors in the experiment are identified. They include standoff distance, speckle size, speckle pattern, and durable paint. These optimal experimental options are selected basing on a thorough investigation. The resulting DIC deformation map indicates that this technique can be used to generate data related to degradation assessment of concrete structure damaged by the impact of ASR.

  11. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection on...

  12. Adult Education in Museums and Public Libraries.

    Miller, Harry G.

    Both museums and public libraries are available sources of education for adults. Besides their traditional functions of collecting and preserving items from human artistic or scientific history, museums have taken on a more active role in educating the public, particularly adults. Some educational services provided by museums are dioramas, period…

  13. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  14. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  15. Museums in Cultural Tourism in Poland

    Krakowiak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the museums, their potential and their significance for cultural tourism in Poland. Its aims are achieved through a presentation of registered national museums, ‘monuments of history’, museum buildings and the cultural activities undertaken by these institutions

  16. 75 FR 58424 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    2010-09-24

    ... Museum of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture), University of...

  17. Why Does the Buddha Have Long Ears? A North Carolina Museum Educator Invites Students To Explore Religious Diversity through Art.

    Bullard, Sara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Five Faiths Project, a children's program of storytelling, photography workshops, museum exhibits, classroom projects, and community performances developed by the curator of education of the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina. Activities, which have focused on Hinduism and Judaism so far, will eventually explore…

  18. [The German Museum for the History of Medicine: a museum tour from the perspective of urology].

    Ruisinger, M M

    2012-08-01

    In 1973, Germany's first museum of the history of medicine was founded in the former anatomical theatre of Ingolstadt University. Today, the baroque building with its beautiful medical garden is one of the attractions of the old city of Ingolstadt. The paper gives a round tour through the permanent exhibition, the medical technology wing and the herbal garden. The emphasis is put on those objects and plants which have a connection to the history of urology, from a "ladies urinal" to the world's first ESWL apparatus.

  19. Teaching and Learning about Universal Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law: Digital Resources and Global Expectations

    Blanchard, Rosemary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Today's education for civic engagement requires a global dimension. To live responsibly in their own communities, young people need to situate their personal and local interests in the context of their global interconnections. Bridging the personal, local, and global begins with an awareness of the universal aspirations for dignity and human…

  20. RODERIC, University of Valencia's Digital Repository for Education, Research and Culture

    Mª Francisca Abad García

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan las principales características de RODERIC, acrónimo con el que se designa al repositorio de acceso abierto de la Universitat de Valencia y que significa Repositori d’ Objectes Digitals per al Ensenyament la Recerca i la Cultura, haciendo así alusión a los tipos de contenidos que se difundirán a través del mismo al mismo tiempo que se rinde homenaje al Papa Roderic Borgia quien en 1501 concedió la bula papal que permitió la creación de la Universitat de València. Se introducen así mismo los aspectos esenciales del movimiento de acceso abierto en el que se fundamenta el desarrollo de este tipo de infraestructuras.

  1. 3D laser scanning and modelling of the Dhow heritage for the Qatar National Museum

    Wetherelt, A.; Cooper, J. P.; Zazzaro, C.

    2014-08-01

    Curating boats can be difficult. They are complex structures, often demanding to conserve whether in or out of the water; they are usually large, difficult to move on land, and demanding of gallery space. Communicating life on board to a visiting public in the terra firma context of a museum can be difficult. Boats in their native environment are inherently dynamic artifacts. In a museum they can be static and divorced from the maritime context that might inspire engagement. New technologies offer new approaches to these problems. 3D laser scanning and digital modeling offers museums a multifaceted means of recording, monitoring, studying and communicating watercraft in their care. In this paper we describe the application of 3D laser scanning and subsequent digital modeling. Laser scans were further developed using computer-generated imagery (CGI) modeling techniques to produce photorealistic 3D digital models for development into interactive, media-based museum displays. The scans were also used to generate 2D naval lines and orthographic drawings as a lasting curatorial record of the dhows held by the National Museum of Qatar.

  2. Virtual in Real. Interactive Solutions for Learning and Communication in the National Archaeological Museum of Marche

    Clini, P.; Nespeca, R.; Ruggeri, L.

    2017-05-01

    Today the ICTs are favourable additions to museum exhibitions. This work aims to realize an innovative system of digital exploitation of artefacts in the National Archaeological Museum of Marche (MANaM), in order to create a shared museum that will improve the knowledge of cultural contents through the paradigm "learning by interacting" and "edutainment". The main novelty is the implementation of stand-alone multimedia installations for digital artefacts that combine real and virtual scenarios in order to enrich the experience, the knowledge and the multi-sensory perception. A Digital Library (DL) is created using Close Range Photogrammetry (CRP) techniques applied to 21 archaeological artefacts belonging to different categories. Enriched with other data (texts, images, multimedia), all 3D models flow into the cloud data server from which are recalled in the individual exhibitions. In particular, we have chosen three types of technological solutions: VISUAL, TACTILE, SPATIAL. All the solutions take into account the possibility of group interaction, allowing the participation of the interaction to an appropriate number of users. Sharing the experience enables greater involvement, generating communicative effectiveness much higher than it would get from a lonely visit. From the "Museum Visitors Behaviour Analysis" we obtain a survey about users' needs and efficiency of the interactive solutions. The main result of this work is the educational impact in terms of increase in visitors, specially students, learning increase of historical and cultural content, greater user involvement during the visit to the museum.

  3. Air Pollution in Museum Buildings

    Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main air pollutants relevant for preservation of cultural heritage objects. Air pollutants may originate from outdoor or indoor sources. Indoor sources include the emission of corrosive vapors from construction materials used for museum display settings. Air pollution may...

  4. A Day at the Museum

    Curriculum Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Field trips are not just for the school year. End the year right by encouraging parents and caregivers to continue working children's brains throughout the summer months. For example, the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) recommends taking children of all ages--preschoolers, children, tweens and teens--to museums. Whether it is a two-hour…

  5. Museums? Evidence from two Countries

    Azilah Kasim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence on Young Adults’ motivations for visiting and not visiting museums. Using purposive sampling, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to respondents in Kedah, Malaysia and Eskisehir, Turkey. Both Kedah and Eskisehir share one similarity – they both have many museums. The findings revealed that in both study contexts, young people tended to visit museums for practical reasons such as to help them prepare homework or a project. They also visit for intrinsic reasons such as to satisfy their curiosity. Both samples also illustrate Davies (2001 contention that awareness is an important precursor to potential visits. On the other hand, both samples are different in reasons for not visiting. While young people in Eskisehir cite emotional reasons for deciding not to visit, young people in Kedah offered more practical ones such as lack of time and interest, or more interested in other activities. The study findings are useful for understanding reasons behind the generally low museum visits among youth. Several managerial implications of the study were also proposed.

  6. An Experiment in Museum Instruction.

    Bloomberg, Marguerite

    Various lesson plans for museum instruction were tested on fifth grade children of fair and high intelligence in an attempt to improve upon the "accepted method" of teaching, which was thought to be better suited to the child of low intelligence than to his abler classmates. The lesson plans tested were: (1) the accepted method…

  7. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    Bjerregaard, Peter

    on the agency of objects that assert that ‘art objects' (in a wide definition of the concept) are not simply materialisation of culture or identity, but deliberate attempts to change the social world. Furthermore, empirical examples of community ownership, and reinterpretation of museum collections may cause...

  8. Queensland Museum Online Learning Resources

    Bauer, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluates three online educational resources on the Queensland Museum website in terms of their use of ICTs in science education; how they relate to the Queensland Middle School Science Curriculum and the Senior Biology, Marine Studies, Science 21 syllabuses; their visual appeal and level of student engagement; the appropriateness of…

  9. A Day at the Museums

    Hubel, Joy Alter

    2009-01-01

    The school field trip, once a supporting player in a well-rounded education, is slowly becoming endangered. Widespread budget cuts have made happily anticipated class trips to museums, zoos, and other cultural destinations increasingly scarce. A librarian may be able to rescue the field trip from extinction by transforming the school building into…

  10. Turning microscopy in the medical curriculum digital: Experiences from the faculty of health and medical sciences at University of Copenhagen

    Ben Vainer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Familiarity with the structure and composition of normal tissue and an understanding of the changes that occur during disease is pivotal to the study of the human body. For decades, microscope slides have been central to teaching pathology in medical courses and related subjects at the University of Copenhagen. Students had to learn how to use a microscope and envisage three-dimensional processes that occur in the body from two-dimensional glass slides. Here, we describe how a PathXL virtual microscopy system for teaching pathology and histology at the Faculty has recently been implemented, from an administrative, an economic, and a teaching perspective. This fully automatic digital microscopy system has been received positively by both teachers and students, and a decision was made to convert all courses involving microscopy to the virtual microscopy format. As a result, conventional analog microscopy will be phased out from the fall of 2016.

  11. News Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

    2009-09-01

    Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

  12. Digital identifiers as permanent unique registers for researchers in the university context

    Luisa F. Acosta-Ortega

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the use of Internet and the web allows a wide access to a greater warehouse of information sources in thousand of journals and publications, nets of almost unlimited number of people, computers and opportunities for learning and research without precedents. That makes the correct identification and recovery of scientific production of researchers very difficult. For that reason, during the last years different attemps of different organizations have been made to create a permanent unique register for authors, which permits to identify their articles wherever they are placed and without taking into account the specificity in the author’s name, publishing and  processing practices In data base,  and different bibliographic description styles as well. ORCID (Openn Researcher and Contribution ID is an identifier with the greatest posibilities of becoming universal to achieve visibility and positioning of Latin-American universities in the present international context.

  13. Measurement Invariance of the Digital Natives Assessment Scale across Gender in a Sample of Turkish University Students

    Ursavas, Ömer Faruk; Kabakçi Yurdakul, Isil; Türk, Mesut; Mcilroy, David

    2016-01-01

    With reference to the digital natives' debate, there is a gap on digital natives' characteristics. To fill this gap, the Digital Natives Assessment Scale was developed to measure students' assessment of the degree to which they perceived themselves to possess the attributes of digital natives. The scale was developed within the Turkish language…

  14. Analisa Minat Wisata Museum Kota Bandung

    Ani Solihat

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum is a collection of historical objects as evidence that should be known by the public, especially the new generation as a study of the history. In Bandung there are a number of museums including the Geology Museum, Asian-African Museum, Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Museum, Post Museum, Sri Baduga Museum, and Barli Museum. All six of the museum managed by the government and private parties. Until now the interest of tourists who come to the city of Bandung is just shopping, dining and tours of the city, it is not significant to the interests wisatawa education at the museum in the city of Bandung. Since 2014 Bandung many improvements done in various places, such as parks, Square Bandung, street like Braga as one of the attractions of the past, Dago, including the Asian-African region serve as a place Asian-African Conference ke- 50, it is one of the magnets increase the tourists to visit the city of Bandung. Increasing the tourists should have a great potential for the government of Bandung in increasing interest in the visit to the museum as a means of travel and history education. The purpose of this study was to identify how big tourist interest in visiting Bandung museums. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative method, while respondents in this study is that Bandung tourists, which is in the area of shopping area, culinary tours, and city tours. The results showed that the interest  Bandung tourists is very low in visiting the museum in the Bandung city.  Keyword : Tourism, Consumer Interest, Museum Tours

  15. Conversation in the museum: experiments in dynamic hypermedia with the intelligent labelling explorer

    Oberlander, Jon; O'donnell, Mick; Mellish, Chris; Knott, Alistair

    1998-01-01

    We outline experience with the Intelligent Labelling Explorer, a dynamic hypertext system developed at the University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with the National Museums of Scotland. First, we indicate a number of ways in which labels on museum objects ought to be tuned to take into account types of visit, the interests of visitors, and their evolving knowledge during a visit. Secondly, we sketch the general architecture of our system, and then focus on the conversational effects which t...

  16. La Biblioteca Digital como concepto: Realiad, Utopía e índice de contemporaneidad

    Mendez, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Thourough reflection around the new approach to the concept of "Digital Library". The author concludes that after all the European Digital Library initiative and real development, digital libraries are more and more digital and less and less library. The chapter makes a review of the author's previous thinking and comes up with a new interesting approach to the Digital library like a series of digital information systems and services, ranging from Digital Archives, Digital Museums and digital...

  17. The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge

    Pippard, Brian

    The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

  18. Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

  19. Digital Natives: Creating Emergent Exhibitions through Digital Technologies

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2011-01-01

    . In this way, digital technology can contribute to the creation of emergent exhibitions in which the exhibition is created in dialogue between audiences and the museum. We present experiences from a current research project, the Digital Natives exhibition, in which digital technology was designed......Digital Technology can support the creation of dialogical spaces in the museum, both playful and reflective, that allow audiences to engage in the ongoing construction and reproduction of cultural heritage creating novel connections between self and others and between past, present and future...... as an integral part of the exhibition to encourage dialogue between audiences and the exhibition materials and thereby investigate how the exhibition emerge as a result of this dialogic co-construction inside the exhibition space. In short, the opportunities offered by digital technologies prompts us to consider...

  20. Final report on a pilot academic e-books project at Keio University Libraries : Potential for the scholarly use of digitized academic books

    Shimada, Takashi

    This article reports on the results and significance of a pilot academic e-books project carried out at the Keio University Libraries for fiscal 2010 to 2012 to assess the viability of a new model of the libraries providing all the campuses with accesses to Japanese academic books digitized jointly with academic publishers and cooperative firms. It focuses on the experimental use of digitized books, highlighting the students’ attitudes and expectations towards e-books as found from surveys. Some major findings include the following. Users have a strong demand for digitized readings that are rather lookup-oriented than learning-oriented, with greater value placed on the functionalities of federated full-text searching, reading on a screen, and accessing the desired chapter direct from table of contents. They also want an online space in which to manage different forms of digitized learning resources. We investigated the potential of e-books and new type of textbooks as educational infrastructures based on the results of experiment. Japan’s university libraries should need to engage actively in the mass digitization of academic books to be adaptive to the change in the ways research, study and teaching are conducted. We plan to start a joint experiment with other university libraries to develop a practical model for the use of e-books.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe

    Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; van den Bosch, Remco; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Delgado Carigi, Maria Leticia; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrera, Ricardo; Chanover, Nancy J.; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Chiappini, Cristina; Doohyun Choi, Peter; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Garrido Cuadra, Daniel; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; Dell'Agli, Flavia; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fuentes, Carla E.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Gonzalez Hernández, Jonay I.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Lee, Youngbae; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Lian, Jianhui; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Liu, Chao; de Icaza Lizaola, Miguel Angel C.; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Deconto Machado, Alice; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Medina Peña, Nicolás; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Alonso Palicio, Pedro; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, D. S.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; da Silva Schimoia, Jaderson; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu

    2017-07-01

    We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median z˜ 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between z˜ 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGNs and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5 m Sloan Foundation Telescope at the Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in 2016 July.

  2. Survey of best practices in digital image collection management, 2016 edition

    2016-01-01

    The study presents data and commentary from 55 institutions that manage digital image collections, including museums, historical societies, botanic gardens, churches colleges and universities, government agencies and others. The study looks at a broad range of issues in cataloging, findability, marketing, revenue generation, technology use, rights, digitization, staffing, budgets, access, preservation, image collection building and many other issues of interest to administrators of large digital image collections. Just a few of the report's many findings are that: Only 9.1% of the institutions sampled acquire images from imaging vendors; mostly this was done by college and university collections in the United States; 10% of the institutions sampled had annual revenues from image sales and licensing that exceeded 50,000; No organization in the sample chose outsourced vendor scanning as their primary means of building their collections though 14.55% chose it second and 12.73% ranked it third; 43.64% of those s...

  3. Digitising photographs for small museums and historical societies

    Holley, Rose

    2005-01-01

    Many small museums and historical societies have recently embarked on digitisation projects, or are investigating how they can make a start. Most commonly these projects involve digitisation of photographs or negatives. This paper gives a general overview of why we might want to do this, the benefits, the issues, and some tips for starting. A case study of a photograph digitisation project that was carried out at the University of Auckland is then described in detail.

  4. Museum as spacecraft: a building in virtual space

    Aguilera, Julieta C.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents several immersion and interaction related visualizations that engage visitors in the context of an astronomy museum in order to help them build a mental model of the building as a whole, corresponding to the body of a spacecraft, and its parts considered individually, corresponding to the knowledge articulated from different scales in the Universe. Aspects of embodiment are utilized to find parallels with current trans-disciplinary theoretical developments in media arts.

  5. Testing the Andrews Framework of Strategy Formulation and Implementation: Case Study of the University of Cape Coast Digital Library in Ghana

    Nesba Yaa Anima Adzobu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how strategy formulation and implementation processes used by the University of Cape Coast (UCC in building its digital collections compare with the Andrew’s strategic formulation and implementation theoretical framework. Theory-testing case study methodology was used. The data collection instruments were the key informant interview technique and document reviews. During the formulation phase, two aspects (resources and aspirations of senior management were emergent. During the implementation phase, five aspects (achieving results, processes and behaviour, standards, motivation, personal were emergent. All other elements of building the UCC digital collections were planned during both the formulation and implementation phases. Although the emphasis on students and learning is laudable and apt, there seems to be lack of focus on research support beyond digital collection building, despite the fact that research excellence is one of the UCC’s key priorities. Opportunities exist for improving feedback mechanisms between the users, digital library staff and the university management; and inclusion of social media tools in the digital library project. Since only the experience of a single institution of higher learning is considered, it cannot be definitively stated that strategy formulation and implementation will be similar in every institutional context. However, the results provide a basis for academic digital libraries to draw lessons from this case. In African public universities, there is little earlier research on strategy formulation and implementation in digital library management. Strategy formulation and implementation is a critical issue for higher education academic libraries especially in developing countries like Ghana, due to limited financial resources and the rapid change in the information environment during the last several decades.

  6. Journalism and Mass Communication Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions: Saying Goodbye to the Digital Divide

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2013-01-01

    The digital divide has been described as the distance or gap in access to information based on race, ethnicity, income, education and geographical location. This study examined how freshmen and first-semester journalism and mass communications students at five Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs] have been able to bridge the…

  7. Social Media Contribution to the Promotion of Digital Citizenship among Female Students at Imam Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University in Riyadh

    Alharbi, Wafa Owaydhah; Alturki, Khaled Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the degree of social media contribution to reinforcing digital citizenship meaning from the viewpoint of female students at Imam Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University in Riyadh. The study was an attempt to answer the following two questions in order to achieve the objectives of the study: To which extent does SnapChat…

  8. The Virtual Museum for Meteorites

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Meteorites play a fundamental role in education and outreach, as these samples of extraterrestrial materials are very valuable tools to promote the public's interest in Astronomy and Planetary Sciences. Thus, for instance, meteorite exhibitions reveal the interest and fascination of students, educators and even researchers for these peculiar rocks and how these can provide information to explain many fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of our Solar System. However, despite the efforts of private collectors, museums and other institutions to organize meteorite exhibitions, the reach of these is usually limited. But this issue can be addressed thanks to new technologies related to the Internet. In fact we can take advantage of HTML and related technologies to overcome local boundaries and open the possibility of offering these exhibitions for a global audience. With this aim a Virtual Museum for Meteorites has been created and a description of this web-based tool is given here.

  9. Do hospital physicians really want to go digital? Acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system in a university hospital

    Duyck, P.; Pynoo, B.; Devolder, P.; Voet, T.; Adang, L.; Vercruysse, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: radiology departments are making the transition from analog film to digital images by means of PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System). It is critical for the hospital that its physicians adopt and accept the new digital work method regarding radiological information. The aim of this study is to investigate hospital physicians' acceptance of PACS using questionnaires pre- and post-implementation and to identify main influencing factors. Materials and methods: the study was conducted in an 1169 bed university hospital. The UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology) questionnaire was administered at two times: one month pre-implementation (T1) and 1.5 years post-implementation (T2) of PACS, targeting all hospital physicians with the exemption of radiologists. The UTAUT scales (Behavioral Intention BI; Facilitating Conditions FC; Effort Expectancy EE; Performance Expectancy PE; Anxiety ANX; Social Influence SI; System Use USE; Attitude toward technology ATT; Self-Efficacy SE) were used to assess questions regarding: (a) PACS' usefulness, (b) PACS' ease of learning/using, (c) PACS support availability, (d) the perceived pressure to use PACS, (e) physicians' attitude towards PACS and (f) physicians' intention to use and actual use of PACS. Results: at T1 scale ratings were positive toward the PACS implementation. The ratings on all scales with the exception of self-efficacy improved at T2. Regression analysis revealed that the key factor for intention to use PACS at T1 was the usefulness of PACS, while the availability and awareness of support was its most important predictor at T2. Overall, PE was the best predictor of BI, but all four UTAUT-determinants (PE, FC, EE and SI) were salient for its prediction. Variance explained in BI ranged from 31 to 37% while variance explained in USE was very low (3%). (orig.)

  10. Links between Libraries and Museums: a Case Study of Library-Museum Collaboration at the Hong Kong Maritime Museum

    Patrick Lo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Established in 2005, the Hong Kong Maritime Museum (HKMM is a relatively new private museum that aims to collect all forms of materials related to the development of boats, ships, maritime exploration and trade, and naval warfare on the South China coast, as well as its adjacent seas.  The Museum not only serves as a unique platform for teaching and learning of the local heritage in Hong Kong, it also contributes greatly to the promotion of community engagement and social connections.  The HKMM is also equipped with its own museum library, and it is called the CSSC (China State Shipbuilding Corporation Maritime Heritage Resource Centre.  In addition to supporting various research activities carried out by the Museum, this Resource Centre also serves as a central, and yet comprehensive repository for publications, and other archival documents on maritime heritage and history related to Southeastern China.  This paper aims to compare the distinctive operational practices, and user needs between museums and libraries.  It also examines the benefits and challenges of museum-library collaborations in the new knowledge-driven society.  This paper features an interview with Kitty But (Librarian, CSSC Maritime Heritage Resource Centre, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum and Robert Trio (Project Officer for Technology, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum, and in which they discussed their professional experiences in the fields of audience education; the implementation of different new technologies associated with the museum and library services; and various collaborative initiatives carried out between the Museum and the Resource Centre.  Upcoming challenges and opportunities faced by both the Museum and Resource Centre are also discussed in this paper.

  11. 76 FR 52017 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Sustainability of Digitized...

    2011-08-19

    ..., Proposed Collection: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections AGENCY: Institute of Museum and... national needs for and trends in museum, library, and information services; measure and report on the...: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections. OMB Number: To be determined. Agency Number: 3137. Frequency...

  12. Museum professionals meet at CERN

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, CERN organised a day of meetings attended by professionals from French and Swiss science museums. The poster for the Einstein exhibition that will open in Bern on 16 June 2005. Around thirty professionals from science museums, as well as representatives of France's Office de Coopération et d'Information Muséographiques (OCIM) and the Suisse Romande Réseau Science et Cité, congregated at CERN on 10th February with the purpose, among other things, of exchanging ideas and information on proposed exhibitions for the World Year of Physics. "We thought that it would be a good idea to start the World Year of Physics with a meeting at CERN that could provide inspiration for future exhibitions", explains Emma Sanders, Head of the Visits Service and Microcosm. Many scientific museums are trying to improve the way they cover contemporary science, and CERN is an ideal place to observe science in the making. Other goals of the meeting were to strengthen links between French and...

  13. Archaeology, museums and virtual reality

    Laia Pujol

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the idea that the virtual archaeological reconstructions seen in museums cannot be considered Virtual Reality (VR as they are based on an artistic conception of the discipline. The cause is to be found in the origins of Archaeology, which began in the 18th century and was closely linked to the History of Art. In the era of New Technologies, this concept has become both the cause and the consequence: determining the characteristics of VR from within the discipline, whilst simultaneously reinforcing the virtual reconstructions.To assess the relationship between VR and Archaeology, we must first establish a definition of Virtual Reality. Subsequently, we can take a brief look at the history so as to be able to understand the evolution of Archaeology and museums. This leads us to the analysis of some examples of VR in museums, from which we can gain conclusions on the current use of VR. Finally, we look at the possibilities for VR in terms of publicising Archaeology.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; O' Connell, Ross [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong; Schlegel, David; Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94702 (United States); Ross, Ashley [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Hirata, Christopher; Huff, Eric; Weinberg, David [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Strauss, Michael; Bahcall, Neta [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie, E-mail: shirleyh@andrew.cmu.edu [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0∼ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h{sup −3} Gpc{sup 3}. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ∼ 25% over a bin width of δ{sub l} ∼ 10−15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0ℓ ∼ 2−3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of f{sub NL} = −113{sup +154}{sub −154} (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be

  15. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    and history museums. There is considerable potential in the development of experiences and in the communication of information customized to visitors in the museum apart from personally held information devices. The paper will present background research for developing solutions to a new media museum......The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...... primarily appeal to a strong individualised experience where the visitor views a PDA or similar, rather than experience the atmosphere and interaction of the room. In this context, there are several examples from practice and in the research literature of IT-systems for science centres, art museums...

  16. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  17. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Baum, Rob

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American) knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and...

  18. A model for a PC-based, universal-format, multimedia digitization system: moving beyond the scanner.

    McEachen, James C; Cusack, Thomas J; McEachen, John C

    2003-08-01

    Digitizing images for use in case presentations based on hardcopy films, slides, photographs, negatives, books, and videos can present a challenging task. Scanners and digital cameras have become standard tools of the trade. Unfortunately, use of these devices to digitize multiple images in many different media formats can be a time-consuming and in some cases unachievable process. The authors' goal was to create a PC-based solution for digitizing multiple media formats in a timely fashion while maintaining adequate image presentation quality. The authors' PC-based solution makes use of off-the-shelf hardware applications to include a digital document camera (DDC), VHS video player, and video-editing kit. With the assistance of five staff radiologists, the authors examined the quality of multiple image types digitized with this equipment. The authors also quantified the speed of digitization of various types of media using the DDC and video-editing kit. With regard to image quality, the five staff radiologists rated the digitized angiography, CT, and MR images as adequate to excellent for use in teaching files and case presentations. With regard to digitized plain films, the average rating was adequate. As for performance, the authors recognized a 68% improvement in the time required to digitize hardcopy films using the DDC instead of a professional quality scanner. The PC-based solution provides a means for digitizing multiple images from many different types of media in a timely fashion while maintaining adequate image presentation quality.

  19. The Women’s Museum in Denmark

    Ipsen, Merete

    2010-01-01

    The Women’s Museum in Denmark isa nationally accredited museum which explores women’s cultural history by linking the historical to the contemporary. The museum started as a grass root movement in the 1980s. Today the museum welcomes you to 1200 square meters of exhibitions. The exhibitions comprise a general history about women’s lives from prehistoric to present time where women are subject in the history, and a general history about the change in childhood with focus on gender. Add to this...

  20. Museums and the Representation of War

    Jay Winter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Museums are the cathedrals of the twenty-first century, in that they have filled the void left by the conventional churches as a site in which mixed populations of different faiths or no faith at all, of different origins and beliefs, confront and meditate on sacred themes – sacrifice, death, mourning, evil, brotherhood, dignity, transcendence.1 War not only belongs in museums; war dominates museum space in much of the public representation of history and will continue to do so. That being so, it is the task of war museums to persuade visitors to pose the question: how can war be represented? While there is no adequate answer to this question, museum professionals must try to answer it anyway with a large dose of humility. By avoiding the didactic mode, that is, that they know the answer and will present it to the visitors, they can perform a major public service. By admitting the magnitude of the problems inherent in trying to represent war, and through it, trying to represent the pain of others, museum directors and designers fulfil a critical social task. Knowing about war is the business of an informed citizenship, and museums are those sites where moral questions are posed, questions inevitably raised about war, questions about sacrifice, suffering, brotherhood, courage, love, recovery, transcendence. Museums enable visitors to pose these enduring questions, by converting war time into museum space.

  1. A rationale for a museum of health

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The museum of health is a place that presents health science and human body and any other subjects that can affect human health. In this museum visitors can learn the mechanisms and functions of human body and learn how to protect and take care of their bodies. They can also learn several diseases and their consequences on human body and how to fight against them. This museum is a big step for improvement of general society health level by increasing society’s health knowledge. In this article structure, departments and also benefits of the health museum are evaluated.

  2. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences.

  3. Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions.

    Camic, Paul M; Chatterjee, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of public health programmes are based in schools, places of employment and in community settings. Likewise, nearly all health-care interventions occur in clinics and hospitals. An underdeveloped area for public health-related planning that carries international implications is the cultural heritage sector, and specifically museums and art galleries. This paper presents a rationale for the use of museums and art galleries as sites for public health interventions and health promotion programmes through discussing the social role of these organisations in the health and well-being of the communities they serve. Recent research from several countries is reviewed and integrated into a proposed framework for future collaboration between cultural heritage, health-care and university sectors to further advance research, policy development and evidence-based practice.

  4. Indigenous Peoples: Local Impacts of International Rights. Valedictory Lecture Leiden University

    Persoon, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Valedictory lecture given by Prof.dr. Gerard A. Persoon Professor of Environment and Development and in particular Indigenous Peoples in Southeast Asia at Leiden University on Monday, October 23 2017Museum Volkenkunde / Ethnographic Museum

  5. Indigenous Peoples : Local Impacts of International Rights. Valedictory Lecture Leiden University

    Persoon, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Valedictory lecture given by Prof.dr. Gerard A. Persoon Professor of Environment and Development and in particular Indigenous Peoples in Southeast Asia at Leiden University on Monday, October 23 2017Museum Volkenkunde / Ethnographic Museum

  6. Visitor Evaluation: An Exploratory Study for the USAF Museum

    Wosilius, William

    1997-01-01

    .... Constructs in the questionnaire included: motivation for visiting, evaluation of the museum experience, transportation issues, general awareness of museum services, and demographic information...

  7. On the Brain Basis of Digital Daze in Millennial Minds: Rejoinder to "Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development: The Neuroscience of the University Classroom"

    Brown, Timothy T.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue, Cavanaugh, Giapponi, and Golden (2016) have discussed the new prominent role of digital devices in the lives of students; the possible impact of these widely-used technologies on developing, learning minds; and the relevance of new cognitive neuroscience research and technologies for better understanding the potential effects of…

  8. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  9. Raising private investment funds for museums

    van der Burg, Tsjalle; Dolfsma, W.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors propose the notion of an "arts fund", a publicly traded investment fund for the purpose of acquiring increasingly costly art works to be displayed in museums. Public as well as private museums stand to benefit greatly from such an approach to financially supporting the arts. A

  10. environmental education and culture history museums

    Zulu Cultural Museum has been built and where a large collection of indigenous regional cultural material is housed. Ondini today is a declared monument within the museum estate of 200 ha of thornvel d savannah, and is located 8 km outside the KwaZulu capital of. Ulundi on the through route to the Umfolozi Game.

  11. History of Science and Science Museums

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  12. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  13. Digital delicacies

    Holley, Rose

    2001-01-01

    This presentation outlines the purpose and work of the newly appointed Digital Projects Librarian at the University of Auckland. It gives a brief overview of what digitisation is, the benefits, the stages of a digitisation project and also samples of interesting international digitisation projects and new University of Auckland Library Digitisation projects.

  14. Museo de Historia de la Farmacia de Sevilla. Una colección universitaria docente y de divulgación científica. Museum of History of the Pharmacy of Seville. A university collection teaching and scientific dissemination.

    Rocio Ruiz Altaba

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available (ES El Museo recrea una farmacia de finales del siglo XIX y principios de XX. La exposición está ideada para que sea comprensible a todos los niveles. Busca una misión comunicadora, educadora y constructora de conocimientos, además, se trabaja en las funciones inherentes a cualquier colección museográfica como son la conservación, gestión y difusión del patrimonio expuesto. Como colección universitaria, se imparten en él seminarios obligatorios para los estudiantes de Historia de la Farmacia. Se creó para ser un instrumento de aprendizaje, investigación y difusión cultural. (EN The Museum recreates a pharmacy of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The exhibition is designed to be understandable at all levels. The mission is to educate society. We work in the functions of any museographic collection such as the conservation, management and dissemination of the exposed heritage. History of Pharmacy classes are given. It was created to be an instrument of learning, research and cultural diffusion.

  15. Playful Learning Culture in the Museum

    Marchetti, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    not undergone much investigation. This study was conducted in cooperation with two historical museums, these being the Transport Museum in Coventry, England and The Viking Museum in Ribe, Denmark. A new learning platform called MicroCulture has been created, aimed at eliciting a sociocultural understanding......Museum learning culture is going through a paradigmatic change. Two main positions are dominant: the modernist, emphasizing the need for assessment and uniform learning outcomes, and the postmodern, encouraging dialogue and multiple learning outcomes. A critical factor is the potential contribution...... of history in young visitors. This study indicates that museum learning culture could be enriched by the introduction of mediated play as a resource for conceptual thinking and social interaction....

  16. A Social Media Framework of Cultural Museums

    Gökçe ÖZDEMİR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums are regarded as cultural products and the core attractions of a destination that offer cultural, historical and artistic possessions for locals as well as tourists. Technological developments in communication have also contributed to the museum pre-, onsite and postexperience of visitors. Thereby, social media enables the museums to extend their networks also on an international basis with up-to-date and credible information about current researches, special events, new exhibitions, excavations in process, and promotional activities. In this sense, this study demonstrates how social media is used by the museums through a research about the Facebook accounts of 10 well-known international museums. Thus, a 32-category framework is created based on the performances of each social media account eventually, this research provides insights into creation of an effective social media account with the emphasis on certain categories’ role to draw and maintain the interest of followers.

  17. Museum Ullen Sentalu dalam Perspektif Seni Budaya

    Doro Daniwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Museum merupakan tempat yang sering tidak bisa dilewatkan oleh wisatawan guna memuaskan rasa ingin tahu tentang keunikan dari sebuah kota tujuan wisata. Museum juga sering dikunjungi oleh baik para ilmuwan maupun para akademisi yang melakukan studi/riset/kajian tentang hal-hal yang memiliki nilai-nilai keunikan historis, arkeologis, estetis dan termasuk semua hal yang bernuansa memorabilia dan nostalgia. Ullen Sentalu merupakan museum yang agak unik karena di samping lokasinya yang agak jauh dari hingar bingar kesibukan kota, namun keberadaannya merupakan kebutuhan seni budaya perkotaan. Keunikan dari museum ini terletak pada nilai koleksi artefak-artefaknya yang menghadirkan khusus tentang benda-benda kewanitaan yang bernuansa warisan budaya monarki Mataram Lama yang berbeda dengan koleksi museum lainnya di tanah air.   Museum is a place where tourists are unable to easily neglect for satisfying their curiousity about the uniqueness found in the tourism destination cities.The museum is also commonly visited by artists, academicians, and scientists for their research and studies of variety subjects which discuss the values of historical, archeological, and aesthetic uniqueness, and any subjects that are concerned with those of memorabilia and nostalgic evidence. Ullen Sentalu museum is rather unique when we see the location in the ’remote’ area which is far from the frenetic bustle of the city yet its existence constitutes the needs of urban culture. The uniqueness of this museum lies on the value of artefacts collections which particularly bring the feminine objects nuenced the cultural heritage of the Old Mataram monarchy which are completely different from other museum collections in the country.

  18. SEPHIROT: Scenario for Universe-Creation AUTOMATICALLY from Digits On-Average Euler-Bernoulli-Kummer-Riemann-Newcomb-Poincare-Weyl-Benford-Kac-Raimi-Hill-Antonoff-Siegel ``Digit-Physics'' Logarithm-Law: ``It's a Jack-in-the-Box Universe'': EMET/TRUTH!!!

    Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Young, Frederic; Wignall, Janis

    2013-04-01

    SEPHIROT: Siegel[http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/1553]: Ten-[0->9]-Digits; Average Log-Law SCALE-Invariance; Utter-Simplicity: ``Complexity'' (vs. ``Complicatedness''); Zipf-law/Hyperbolicity/ Inevitability SCENARIO AUTOMATICALLY CREATES & EVOLVES a UNIVERSE: inflation, a big-bang, bosons(E)->Mellin-(c2)-tranform->fermions(m), hidden-dark-energy(HDE), hidden-dark-matter (HDM), cosmic-microwave-background(CMB), supersymmetry(SUSY), PURPOSELY NO: theories,models,mechanisms,processes, parameters,assumptions,WHATSOEVER: It's a ``Jack-in-the-Box'' Universe!!!: ONLY VIA: Newcomb [Am.J.Math.4(1),39(1881)]QUANTUM-discovery!!!-Benford-Siegel-Antonoff[AMS.Joint-Mtg.(02)-Abs.#973-60-124!!!] inversion to ONLY BEQS with d=0 BEC: ``Digit-Physics''!; Log fixed-point invariance(s): [base=units=SCALE] of digits classic (not classical!) average [CAUSING] log statistical-correlations =log(1+1/d), with physics-crucial d=0 BEC singularity/pole, permits SEPHIROT!!!: ``digits are quanta are bosons because bosons are and always were digits!!!'': Digits = Bosons with d=0 BEC(!!!) & expansion to Zipf-law Hyperbolicity INEVITABILITY CMB!

  19. Traveling Exhibitions as Sites for Informal Learning: Assessing Different Strategies with Field Trips to Traveling Exhibitions at Non-Museum Sites

    Harker, Richard J. W.; Badger, James

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the use of different pedagogical techniques to create an intellectually engaging experience for middle school students who visited a traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at a non-museum host site: the University of North Georgia Dahlonega's Library and Technology Center. The findings of this…

  20. Unlikely cryptfellows: hospitality, difference, and spectrality at the 9/11 Museum

    Lindsay Anne Balfour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a reading of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum to suggest that the encounter with strangers or strangeness is at the core of cultural and commemorative production in the aftermath of a terrorist attack. Specifically, I engage the museum as a text that has significant implications on how we approach the philosophy of hospitality in a time of terror. I argue that the ways in which objects and artifacts exist in relation to one another in the museum act out hospitality in ways that are both unexpected and unintended. For example, while human remains are stored on site, they are only referred to through symbolic art and digital displays that act as a kind of sleight of hand. In particular, I take up the inclusion of a brick from Osama Bin Laden's Abbottabad compound in Pakistan that has been incorporated into the museum in a fashion that is carefully orchestrated and framed. The brick, however, exceeds the frame in which it is permitted to be included in the exhibit; its visuality and materiality defy—and even contradict—the expected narrative of the museum. The brick appears as juxtaposed next to a Navy SEAL uniform and is meant to draw attention toward the distinction between terrorist and national hero, yet as a physical presence in the museum, it retains a sense of both vulnerability and affect as it bears striking resemblance to the bedrock of the towers themselves. Ultimately, I suggest that while the disjunctures between artifacts may seem initially jarring—these are items, after all, that are meant to produce very different material and mediatized effects; they offer a working-through of a hospitality that is crucial to the museum and all culture produced in response to the attacks.

  1. Kastenhof - museum in Landau. Kastenhof - Museum in Landau

    Anon,

    1991-08-01

    When modifying the box-type court to a subsidiary museum of the prehistoric national compilation of Munich with multiple-purpose hall and a little restaurant, a considerable expenditure with regard to the preservation of monuments had to be done in order to uncover and keep the old built volumes. A low-temperature heating system as well as low-temperature oil/gas boiler were applied as heating system. The heating is realized via floor heating, plate heat exchanger for avoiding corrossions, hot-air heating, heating units and fan convectors. For energy saving an air-to-water heat pump was applied which can be used alternatively for heating or cooling. In addition, energy distribution and system control are treated by means of flowsheets. (BWI).

  2. Analysis of an Unusual Mirror in a 16th-Century Painting: A Museum Exercise for Physics Students

    Swaminathan, Sudha; Lamelas, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Physics students at Worcester State University visit the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) at the end of a special 100-level course called Physics in Art. The students have studied geometrical optics, and they have been introduced to concepts in atomic physics. The purpose of the museum tour is to show how physics-based techniques can be used in a nontraditional lab setting. Other examples of the use of museum-based art in physics instruction include analyses of Pointillism and image resolution, and of reflections in soap bubbles in 17- and 18th-century paintings.

  3. Museums and geographies of (national power

    Gavrilović Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises a discussion about the relation of museums and (national politics, primarily about the concept of 'apolitcism' of museum work, the idea that is spread among many museum workers as reality. I analyze the process of appearing of big museums in Europe and Serbia, as well as the aims of their work, in order to show that museums - from the very beginning of their appearing - function as means for consolidating national borders (outer and inner, teaching about patriotism. I also analyze the influence of German romanticism, that created the illusion of 'apoliticism' of the culture in general, as well as of museums. The change of attitude towards the state-as-nation in contemporary European community means also the change of museologic activities that should take part in the constitution of Europeism/European identity as meta-nation. That change has not still come to museums in Serbia, which points to the fact that society has not changed yet in the direction of appropriating of European values.

  4. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Rob Baum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and the L.A. Riots of 1991, with references to other cultural catastrophes. While these projects are different, they are not opposed; both museums locate the American perspective of events and their meanings at the forefront. American holocaust museums seem to challenge spaces between memory and its direction, vision and revision. Within the gruesome context of holocaust portrayal, interrogate the valences of memory’s play and expose American holocaust museums as theatres of pornographic memory. The seduction of feeling does not invite change so much as purgation, what Aristotle identified as catharsis — an emotional and physical release, unfortunately replicating the seductive techniques used by Goebbels for the glorification of Hitler. Through manipulation of viewers as automatic audiences, these museums function as centres for pathos I question the policy and polity of presenting genocide as an entertainment leading to catharsis, recognizing that the final act of purgation is all too easily negation.

  5. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    2012-04-19

    ... Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  6. Blind MuseumTourer: A System for Self-Guided Tours in Museums and Blind Indoor Navigation

    Apostolos Meliones

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Notably valuable efforts have focused on helping people with special needs. In this work, we build upon the experience from the BlindHelper smartphone outdoor pedestrian navigation app and present Blind MuseumTourer, a system for indoor interactive autonomous navigation for blind and visually impaired persons and groups (e.g., pupils, which has primarily addressed blind or visually impaired (BVI accessibility and self-guided tours in museums. A pilot prototype has been developed and is currently under evaluation at the Tactual Museum with the collaboration of the Lighthouse for the Blind of Greece. This paper describes the functionality of the application and evaluates candidate indoor location determination technologies, such as wireless local area network (WLAN and surface-mounted assistive tactile route indications combined with Bluetooth low energy (BLE beacons and inertial dead-reckoning functionality, to come up with a reliable and highly accurate indoor positioning system adopting the latter solution. The developed concepts, including map matching, a key concept for indoor navigation, apply in a similar way to other indoor guidance use cases involving complex indoor places, such as in hospitals, shopping malls, airports, train stations, public and municipality buildings, office buildings, university buildings, hotel resorts, passenger ships, etc. The presented Android application is effectively a Blind IndoorGuide system for accurate and reliable blind indoor navigation.

  7. Museum Studies: Connecting the Elementary and Secondary Experience

    Martin, Kachina; Yoder, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Museum studies will certainly reinforce students' appreciation of art history and art production. A student's understanding of a museum's function will deepen with each museum visit. Students will recognize that a museum can be organized around materials and kinds of art, periods of art history and cultures, and the works of an individual artist.…

  8. Museums And Young People: The Heritage Of Pride | Onyebinama ...

    This paper discusses the origin of museum, its brief history in Nigeria , its meaning, types, need for museums and the relationship between museums and libraries. It specifically addresses the issue of young people and museum which is the heritage of their pride. The paper also discusses factors/problems which may ...

  9. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  10. The Onomastic Octopus. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 3.

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Activities and information needs in museums and a project undertaken by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum to develop systematic solutions to problems in cataloging museum collections are described. Museum activities are grouped in three categories: (1) initial--acquisition, accession, registration, identification, and restoration; (2)…

  11. The Future of Museums and Libraries: A Discussion Guide

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is committed to bringing together museums and libraries across the country for conversations dedicated to developing a better understanding of the roles of libraries and museums as providers of public service to communities. The Future of Libraries and Museums in the 21st Century Planning…

  12. The artificial organ museum in Cleveland (1979-1999) moved to Houston, Texas, and named in 2002 as the ICMT Museum for Artificial Organs.

    Nosé, Yukihiko

    2003-09-01

    The artificial organ museum established in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1979 organized by the International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation (ICAOT), was moved to Houston, Texas, in 1999. The museum with expanded and renewed artificial organ exhibits was officially opened on the 8th and 9th of November, 2002, at the Cullen Pavilion of the original Memorial Hermann Hospital. This building is the oldest in the Texas Medical Center, which was built in 1922. The ICMT (International Center for Medical Technologies) Museum for Artificial Organs (Museum) was completed after phase I, II, and III expansions of the exhibit booths, which were made over the last two years. Approximately 250 historically important and currently widely used artificial organs are exhibited in the Museum. The official opening of the Museum was coordinated with the "Symposium on Artificial Organs: Past, Present, and Future" during two days in November. There were approximately 225 participants at these events, and approximately 40 pioneers and clinical experts in the development and practice of various types of artificial organs contributed. During these programs, a proposal to maintain human resources in addition to artificial organ hardware and software was made in addition to the Museum. This new organization would be called the International Academy of Artificial Organ Pioneers (Academy). All contributors to the symposium were invited to be members of the Academy. The attendants of the symposium accepted this proposal unanimously. An additional 40 individuals, who were recognized as contributors to artificial organ technologies, were later added to the original Academy members. Later, the effective utilization of the Museum and Academy was encompassed in the International Faculty for Health and Medical Technologies (Faculty), a new addition to the activities of the ICMT. Dr. Michael DeBakey was elected as Dean of the Faculty. This is considered a "university without walls," a "university

  13. When Forgetting Becomes Digital

    Marton, Attila; Kallinikos, Jannis

    The structure of social memory is in a process of significant change as social operations of forgetting and remembering are increasingly written in IT and mediated in digital media. Based on an in-depth case study about the digitalization of memory institutions (libraries, archives, museums......), the paper demonstrates the emergence of a digital social memory structure that stores data as a means of forgetting. Building on such a concept, we explain the shifting structure of social memory from pre-defined, taxonomic order to algorithmic computation of artefacts and ordering. Finally, we draw...... implications from our study with regards to core organizational concepts of institutions and platforms as well as broader categories of information infrastructures and a sociology of digital knowledge....

  14. Classrooms as ‘safe houses’? The ethical and emotional implications of digital storytelling in a university writing classroom

    Kristian D Stewart

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a digital storytelling praxis within a higher education classroom located outside of Metro Detroit in the United States. Drawing on Zembylas’s (2006, 2008) scholarship on emotion in the production of knowledge and the teacher’s role, adjacent to literature surrounding personal writing and safe houses for learning, an investigation of student perceptions of digital storytelling within a writing classroom took place during the 2016 and 2017 academic years. Dat...

  15. Classrooms as ‘safe houses’? The ethical and emotional implications of digital storytelling in a university writing classroom

    Kristian D Stewart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of a digital storytelling praxis within a higher education classroom located outside of Metro Detroit in the United States. Drawing on Zembylas’s (2006, 2008 scholarship on emotion in the production of knowledge and the teacher’s role, adjacent to literature surrounding personal writing and safe houses for learning, an investigation of student perceptions of digital storytelling within a writing classroom took place during the 2016 and 2017 academic years. Data highlights the students’ interest for the emotionally-driven course content digital storytelling encourages, as it taught students how to insert genre conventions into their own writing. Digital storytelling, according to the students, also supplied a means for students to develop relationships with their peers as many students felt isolated on this largely commuter campus. Students additionally viewed the curriculum as promoting ‘real world’ skills they could transfer outside of the classroom and into their lives. However, to craft digital stories, data revealed how students turned toward sharing personal (and or traumatic narratives. This can be problematic in terms of emotional safety if students are made to feel they must leverage emotions for grades and are then forced to broadcast their digital stories in a public forum. To lessen these concerns, strategies for implementing digital storytelling into the curriculum are provided. Lastly, the author concludes that educating students within a Trump presidency requires a different pedagogical approach. Assignments such as digital storytelling that merge the scholarly and the personal, alongside nurturing empathy, open dialogue, and building relationships might offer a direction forward.

  16. The Hybrid Museum: Hybrid Economies of Meaning

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2013-01-01

    Social media has created new ways of communicating and has brought about a new distinctive ethos. New literacies are not simply about new technology but also about this new ethos. Many museums are embracing this ethos by what is often called participatory practices. From a sociocultural perspective...... this article shows that there are two different museum mindsets where the second mindset leans towards participatory practices. It is shown how a museum can support a hybrid economy of meaning that builds on both a user generated economy of meaning and an institutional economy of meaning and adds value to both...

  17. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts... Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  18. New initiatives in the Netherlands Open Air Museum: how an early open air museum keeps up with the times

    de Jong, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands Open Air Museum in Arnhem is one of the oldest open air museums of Europe. From the 1990s the staff has been engaged in an intense process of fundamentally changing the museum. The major step was to redefine the museum’s institutional identity. We believed that a good museum not only

  19. 75 FR 8139 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    2010-02-23

    ... policies with respect to the duties, powers, and authorities related to Museum and Library Services. If you... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  20. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    Arta Moro Sundjaja; Ford Lumban Gaol; Sri Bramantoro Abdinagoro; Bahtiar S. Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebo...

  1. Museum, exhibition, object : artefactual narratives and their dilemmas in the National Museum of Scotland

    Bucciantini, Alima Maria

    2009-01-01

    National museums are spaces where stories of the past are told through the display and interpretation of material culture. The narratives that are created in this way reflect the ways in which the nation wants to be seen at that particular moment, and are often embedded in the larger political and social contexts of that time. This thesis looks at the National Museum of Scotland as having three levels of narrative: that of the museum as a physical space and national institution...

  2. Experiencing memory museums in Berlin. The Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin

    Ana Souto

    2018-01-01

    This article explores memory studies from the audience’s perspective, focusing on the perception of Holocaust narratives in two museums in Berlin. This research builds on and contributes to a number of emerging issues on memory studies, tourism perception and museum design: the debate on experiential authenticity, Dark Tourism, as well as the analysis of memory studies from the perspective of the user. The main data facilitating the analysis is based on responses shared on TripAdvisor; the ca...

  3. Using digital game-based technologies in a system of studying russian as aforeign language in modern university

    A. V. Matokhina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the State Educational Standard of the Russian Federation, the main objectives of teaching Russian as a foreign language are training communication and independent working skills, learning neutral and scientific styles of speech, motivating to study at Russian universities, preparing to pass certification and qualification examinations, adapting to live in Russia, etc. One of the promising trends in teaching foreign languages is the use of educational computer games. By now, digital gamebased technologies for studying Russian as a foreignlanguage have been implemented in a number of desktop and mobile applications, however, they are all intended for teaching Russian language as a discipline, and are not focused on adapting international students who have come to a new language environment. In this article, a learning game is presentedfor studying Russian as a foreign language with immersing a user into a virtual language environment in different life situations. The game includes seven game levels; each level consists of several sections, devoted to a specific real life situation with a set of assignments of increasing complexity for writing or translating some words, phrases or sentences. For each type of assignment a template with empty text fields is used, for importing files with corresponding data and their on-screen display special functions are implemented. Such approach allows to use the same template several times for the same type of assignment or to load different files for filling out the assignment text fields, depending on the number of player’s attempts. The database of tasks, level scripts and graphical content for each section are developed. Each level is matched with a game character, accompanying the player and helping him to complete the assignments. The player can choose a character, andchoose any section of the level. The assignments are stored in a coded format, for uploading files with data matched to

  4. Educational tools in the Museum of Rocks and Minerals

    de Brito Barreto, S.; Ribeiro Sales, E.; de Lima Correia, A. Maria; Lima, M. Abreu e.; Bretas Bittar, S. Maria

    2012-04-01

    The Museum of Rocks and Minerals is a small museum which belongs to the Department of Geology of the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil. It was founded in the 1950's and its main exhibits are samples of scarns and pegmatites from the Northeast of Brazil, especially from the Borborema Pegmatitic Region. This museum has been visited by a wide variety of people, but mainly students from private and state schools on scheduled visits. Over the years museum staff felt the necessity to develop some mediating tools to develop a relationship between exhibits and visitors. Due to a lack of technical staff and finance to create interactive exhibits as well as space limitations, the museum decided to produce some games such as memory games, puzzles and dominoes. These fifteen games deal with different subjects of geosciences, especially those more interesting for children. The subjects chosen were: minerals, industrial minerals, gems, dimension stones, rock cycle, fossils, dinosaur footprints (Ichnofossils), wood fossils, Mohs scale. The games were created by the authors, and undergraduate students were responsible for researching concepts and images. Each game presents a concept and images related to it. The interns are undergraduate students of geology and mining engineering and this experience gives them an opportunity to review and improve some concepts and discuss what is important such as pedagogical actions in museums and geology teaching. To give an example, the subject of the industry mineral was treated using two games - a memory game and a puzzle. The first one shows images of minerals related each one to an industrial product and in the second, children can see different parts of a house labeled with the minerals used in the production of that space. Another interesting example is the puzzle about dinosaur footprints that uses an image of a dinosaur footprint, part of the paleontological collection of the Departament, and a representative ichnofossil from the

  5. Experiencing memory museums in Berlin. The Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin

    Ana Souto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores memory studies from the audience’s perspective, focusing on the perception of Holocaust narratives in two museums in Berlin. This research builds on and contributes to a number of emerging issues on memory studies, tourism perception and museum design: the debate on experiential authenticity, Dark Tourism, as well as the analysis of memory studies from the perspective of the user. The main data facilitating the analysis is based on responses shared on TripAdvisor; the case studies being the Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin. The analysis of these museums, focusing on their narratives, design features and comments from visitors, will highlight a potential shift from the traditional object-focused museum, to a phenomenological subject-focused one. It will be argued, then, that the understanding and consumption of authenticity encompasses a very flexible definition, not only based on the nature of the objects exhibited, but on the production of authentic experiences.

  6. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    Arta Moro Sundjaja

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebook group managed by museums or communities. Based on the demographic profile of respondent, the researchers discover that the respondents are highly educated, work as employees or student, and allocate more than Rp500.000,00 per month for traveling expense. Based on social media behavior of the respondents, the respondents are active using Facebook and not aware of the presence of museum in social media. The respondents require museum information, social interaction, and entertainment on Facebook fan page of the museum. Therefore, museum managers must maintain the content quality and perceived usefulness in delivering the information through Facebook. The involvement of cultural community can help people to get honest information about museum through credible opinion from the respondents.

  7. Improving The Function of The Prabu Geusan Ulun Museum in Sumedang Regency as A Tourist A!raction for His- torical and Cultural Education

    Deni Hermawan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The museum of Prabu Geusan Ulun Sumedang has been in existence since 1950. How- ever, its existence has not been recognized widely among members of society, including among Sumedang community. To solve the problem, it is important to do some efforts for improving the a#raction of the museum by increasing its functions, not only as a place of storing ancient objects, but also as a tourist destination for history and cultural educations. To obtain this goal, a qualitative research has been conducted, in which its collecting data was undertaken directly in the field by observations, interviews, and documentation with a digital camera. From the research, it can be concluded that improving the functions of the Prabu Geusan Ulun museum as a tourist a#raction is need to be done by developing the supporting system of the museum. These include providing several media such as booklets and website, making labels for the museum objects, and developing museum activities. All of these activities lead to the ability of the museum as a tourist destination of history and culture educations.   Keywords: Prabu Geusan Ulun museum, educational tourism, history, and culture

  8. A Checklist of Legal Considerations for Museums.

    Weil, Stephen E.

    1980-01-01

    A checklist for museum compliance with federal, state, and local laws covers administrative organization, general endowment and restricted funds, trustees, staffing and employment practices, volunteers, acquisition and disposition, exhibition programs, visitors and membership, auxiliary activities, building, and miscellaneous regulations. (MSE)

  9. The Lenin Museum in the School

    Seinenskii, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    New developments in the work practices of school Lenin halls and museums are observed. Emphasis is increasingly on the integration of these centers for ideological and political indoctrination and the educational process. (KM)

  10. Influencia de la combinación de marketing digital y marketing tradicional en el comportamiento de las ventas empresariales. Caso: música digital Universal Music Ecuador

    Díaz Zárate, Paola Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Las ventas del formato físico de música se han reducido en Ecuador por falta de control de la piratería y elevados precios de venta al público, provocando la reducción de tiendas discos y el fortalecimiento de la ilegalidad. El lanzamiento de tiendas digitales legales de música en el país representa una oportunidad para las compañías discográficas de impulsar el consumo de música digital, destacando iTunes como la plataforma de mayor difusión y penetración, frente a la cual ninguna compañía h...

  11. Presenting the invisible and unfathomable: Virtual museum and augmented reality of the Neolithic site in Bylany, Czech Republic

    Květina, Petr; Unger, Jiří; Vavrečka, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2015), s. 3-22 ISSN 0323-1267 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF12P01OVV032 Keywords : digital heritage management * virtual museum * augmented reality * Neolithic * community engagement Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  12. 78 FR 11680 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    2013-02-19

    ... (616) 929-1801. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native...?), KY.'' Digital images of the object were reviewed by the Chickasaw Nation Preservation and...

  13. Getting from A to B to C-ollaborative Innovative Design Utopia at the Museum?

    Rørbæk, Anne

    The paper focuses on boundary crossing collaboration for developing digital communication technology as a means to innovate the museum experience. A qualitative longitudinal case study of the collaboration between an art museum and a digital design company in Denmark is presented. Diversity...... is conceptualized as key in the process under study, as the promoter of creative and innovative outcomes. It is argued that the acceptance of and dialogue between contrasting positions has an essential role in extending the scope of group creativity. To show this, a cartographic micro-analytical approach called...... a ‘temporal positional map’ is developed. In this analytical framework, the focus is not on persons and outcomes as such, but on the lives of positions. It thereby serves as a tool to get a deeper understanding of some of the magical complexity of the role of diversity in collaborative processes. The paper...

  14. Reviews Book: Marie Curie: A Biography Book: Fast Car Physics Book: Beautiful Invisible Equipment: Fun Fly Stick Science Kit Book: Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You Book: Chaos: The Science of Predictable Random Motion Book: Seven Wonders of the Universe Book: Special Relativity Equipment: LabVIEWTM 2009 Education Edition Places to Visit: Edison and Ford Winter Estates Places to Visit: The Computer History Museum Web Watch

    2011-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND Fun Fly Stick Science Kit Fun fly stick introduces electrostatics to youngsters Special Relativity Text makes a useful addition to the study of relativity as an undergraduate LabVIEWTM 2009 Education Edition LabVIEW sets industry standard for gathering and analysing data, signal processing, instrumentation design and control, and automation and robotics Edison and Ford Winter Estates Thomas Edison's home is open to the public The Computer History Museum Take a walk through technology history at this computer museum WORTH A LOOK Fast Car Physics Book races through physics Beautiful Invisible The main subject of this book is theoretical physics Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You A guide to physics on the large and small scale Chaos: The Science of Predictable Random Motion Book explores the mathematics behind chaotic behaviour Seven Wonders of the Universe A textual trip through the wonderful universe HANDLE WITH CARE Marie Curie: A Biography Book fails to capture Curie's science WEB WATCH Web clips to liven up science lessons

  15. The role of digital sample information within the digital geoscience infrastructure: a pragmatic approach

    Howe, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Much of the digital geological information on the composition, properties and dynamics of the subsurface is based ultimately on physical samples, many of which are archived to provide a basis for the information. Online metadata catalogues of these collections have now been available for many years. Many of these are institutional and tightly focussed, with UK examples including the British Geological Survey's (BGS) palaeontological samples database, PalaeoSaurus (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/palaeosaurus/), and mineralogical and petrological sample database, Britrocks (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/data/britrocks.html) . There are now a growing number of international sample metadata databases, including The Palaeobiology Database (http://paleobiodb.org/) and SESAR, the IGSN (International Geo Sample Number) database (http://www.geosamples.org/catalogsearch/ ). More recently the emphasis has moved beyond metadata (locality, identification, age, citations, etc) to digital imagery, with the intention of providing the user with at least enough information to determine whether viewing the sample would be worthwhile. Recent BGS examples include high resolution (e.g. 7216 x 5412 pixel) hydrocarbon well core images (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/data/offshoreWells/wells.cfc?method=searchWells) , high resolution rock thin section images (e.g. http://www.largeimages.bgs.ac.uk/iip/britrocks.html?id=290000/291739 ) and building stone images (http://geoscenic.bgs.ac.uk/asset-bank/action/browseItems?categoryId=1547&categoryTypeId=1) . This has been developed further with high resolution stereo images. The Jisc funded GB3D type fossils online project delivers these as red-cyan anaglyphs (http://www.3d-fossils.ac.uk/). More innovatively, the GB3D type fossils project has laser scanned several thousand type fossils and the resulting 3d-digital models are now being delivered through the online portal. Importantly, this project also represents collaboration between the BGS, Oxford and Cambridge Universities

  16. Radiation preservation of cultural and museum objects

    Urban, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilities are summed up of using ionizing radiation for the treatment of museum collections, namely the biocidal effect of radiation on living organisms. An approximate assessment is made of the extent of damage to art and book collections by biological pests. Radiation preservation is compared with conventional methods which are unsatisfactory, because they do not affect deeper layers of materials. Experience is summed up with the use of radiation preservation in the Central Bohemian Museum in Roztoky. (J.C.)

  17. Instruction and Delight: Some Observations for Museums.

    King, Margaret J.

    This paper assesses the work of artist-creator Walt Disney as a model for museum educators to draw the public into its work. Disney Land and Disney World are viewed as monuments of U.S. life and imagination, a living museum that attracts 40 million U.S. visitors per year. The paper describes what should be a partnership among the image-making,…

  18. Museums as a mirror of society

    Clercq, Steven de

    2005-01-01

    Following the Darwinian approach, which describes a form in nature as the functional adaptation to its environment at a given time, I will explore the development of museums and collections of science as an expression of their function in historical and social context. This approach allows us to establish a classification of scientific museums where features like owner, user, role and use of the object and its social, cultural and intellectual environment act as discriminating factors. This a...

  19. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias

    Oostra, R. J.; Baljet, B.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital

  20. Exhibiting the past: Caspar Reuvens and the museums of antiquities in Europe, 1800-1840

    Hoijtink, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the first decades of the 19th century the exhibition of antiquity in museums reflected a universal history of civilization, in which the idea of cross-cultural influences dominated. Hindu-buddhist civilization of 13th century Java was easily connected to that of classical Greece, and Indian

  1. An Evaluation of a Teacher Training Program at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    DeBerry, LaMonnia Edge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the effects of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's work in partnering with professors from universities across the United States during a 1-year collaborative partnership through an educational program referred to as Belfer First Step Holocaust Institute for Teacher Educators (BFS…

  2. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    2012-02-06

    ... Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that...

  3. Ethics. An approach to understanding museums

    Ignacio Fernández del Amo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of modern museums emerged in the second half of the Eighteenth Century with a clear ideology and ways of seeing the world and a particular set of skills with which to go about curating. As happens with human beings, this genetic code strongly determined museums' future development. This is why many of our museums present themselves as the unquestionable heirs of the encyclopedic knowledge that the philosophers of the Enlightenment pursued. Since they were first established they have based their authority on the mastery of knowledge and have developed a story of the world through a scientific mode of interpreting reality. This paper has two objectives: firstly, to analyze the nature of the museum as a technology of modernity and how they are employed as instruments of legitimation of liberal states; secondly, to show how ethics can help museums to adopt a new role in the knowledge society, by questioning the ideological foundations of the Western paradigm. It does this through an interdisciplinary analysis, combining the voices of philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, and museum curators and concludes with a proposal on how to apply such thinking to the Latin American cultural environment.

  4. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  5. Mobile museology:An exploration of fashionable museums, mobilisation, and trans-museal mediation

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2015-01-01

    Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mo...

  6. Beyond mere information provisioning: a handheld museum guide based on social activities and playful learning

    SCHROYEN, Jolien; GABRIELS, Kris; TEUNKENS, Daniel; ROBERT, Karel; LUYTEN, Kris; CONINX, Karin

    2007-01-01

    During a museum visit, social interaction can improve intellectual, social, personal and cultural development. With the advances in technology, the use of personal mobile handheld devices – such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) – that replace the traditional paper guidebooks is becoming a common sight at various heritage sites all over the world. This technology often leads to problems such as isolating visitors from their companions and distracting visitors away from their surroundings....

  7. MONITORING THE DETERIORATION OF STONE AT MINDENER MUSEUM'S LAPIDARIUM

    G. Pomaska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mindener Museum's Lapidarium incorporates a collection of stone work like reliefs, sculptures and inscriptions from different time epochs as advices of the city's history. These gems must be protected against environmental influences and deterioration. In advance of the measures a 3D reconstruction and detailed documentation has to be taken. The framework to establish hard- and software must match the museum's infrastructure. Two major question will be answered. Are low-cost scanning devices like depth cameras and digital of the shelf cameras suitable for the data acquisition? Does the functionality of open source and freeware covers the demand on investigation and analysis in this application? The working chain described in this contribution covers the structure from motion method and the reconstruction with RGB-D cameras. Mesh processing such as cleaning, smoothing, poisson surface reconstruction and texturing will be accomplished with MeshLab. Data acquisition and modelling continues in structure analysis. Therefore the focus lies as well on latest software developments related to 3D printing technologies. Repairing and finishing of meshes is a task for MeshMixer. Netfabb as a tool for positioning, dimensioning and slicing enables virtual handling of the items. On the Sketchfab web site one can publish and share 3D objects with integration into web pages supported by WebGL. Finally if a prototype is needed, the mesh can be uploaded to a 3D printing device provided by an online service.

  8. The medical collections at the University of Glasgow.

    Reilly, Maggie; McDonald, Stuart W

    2009-01-01

    The medical and other collections in the University of Glasgow have at their core the generous bequest of Dr William Hunter (1718 - 1783), a local man who rose to become an internationally renowned anatomist and obstetrician. The University does not have a Medical Museum as such but an Anatomy Museum, a Zoology Museum, a Pathology Collection, medical displays in the main halls of the Hunterian Museum in the Gilbert Scott Building and a rich collection of antiquarian medical books and archives as well as contemporary libraries. The Hunterian Collection, since its inauguration at the University of Glasgow in 1807, has engendered a spirit of diversity and scholarship that embraces many disciplines across the campus. The Hunterian Museum was the first public museum in Scotland and service to the local, national and international communities and response to their academic needs is very much at heart of its function today.

  9. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  10. Paradigma Baru Dalam Museum Seni dan Budaya Jawa Ullen Sentalu

    Amarena Nediari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the museum building as  conservation collection of historic objects often give the impression that the museum is an ancient building, dark and disheveled. While the new paradigm in the management of the museum is a museum not only as a place to store historical objects, but need to present the collection in an attractive package so that visitors interested in coming back again to the museum. Museum of art and culture of Java Ullen Sentalu, in Kaliurang has provided a new insight to the culture, especially Javanese culture in the family palace of Yogyakarta and Solo Palace. The main attraction of this Sentalu Ullen is to deliver information about the historic collection from the family palace is presented as a whole, so that leaves a deep impression for visitors. This museum has given the world a new concept in museums in Indonesia, which certainly can be applied to other museums in Indonesia.  

  11. Bringing the Digital World to Students: Partnering with the University Communications Office to Provide Social Media Experiential Learning Projects

    Childers, Courtney C.; Levenshus, Abbey B.

    2016-01-01

    The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications recognizes the importance of a curriculum that prepares students "to apply current tools and technologies appropriate for the communications professions in which they work, and to understand the digital world" (ACEJMC, n.d.). Infusing experiential learning into…

  12. In Search of Museum Professional Knowledge Base: Mapping the Professional Knowledge Debate onto Museum Work

    Tlili, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Museum professionalism remains an unexplored area in museum studies, particularly with regard to what is arguably the core generic question of a "sui generis" professional knowledge base, and its necessary and sufficient conditions. The need to examine this question becomes all the more important with the increasing expansion of the…

  13. "In and against the Museum": The Contested Spaces of Museum Education for Adults

    Grek, Sotiria

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on museum and gallery education for adults in Dundee, Scotland. Dundee has recently experienced a shift from being mainly working class to an educational, cultural and tourist centre. Hence, an interesting field for the examination of the educational policies and practices of the city museums/galleries and the different fashions…

  14. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  15. Museums, minorities and recognition: memories of North Africa in contemporary France

    Mary Stevens

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article uses a case study from the Musée dauphinois in Grenoble, France to explore the way museums are called upon to act as ‘authorities of recognition’ for minority communities. Studies of public recognition have often focused on political and legal measures, such as reparations, rather than considering questions of public representation. In satisfying demands for recognition on the part of minority groups do museums contribute to social cohesion or do they generate competition between groups that may heighten existing tensions? This question is particularly pertinent in the French case where the philosophy of republican universalism traditionally discourages acknowledgement of group identities. Drawing on work on recognition by Feuchtwang and Dufoix this article argues that a more complex model of recognition needs to be elaborated for museums in order to take into account the multiple actors involved in the development and reception of exhibitions.

  16. Basque Museum of the History of Medicine: conservation of heritage, teaching and research.

    Erkoreka, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The Basque Museum of the History of Medicine was founded in 1982 to preserve the historic memory of medicine in the Basque Country and conserve its scientific heritage. Its permanent exposition comprises approx. 6,000 medical objects of the 19th and 20th centuries arranged, thematically in 24 rooms devoted to different medical specialities: folk medicine, unconventional medicine, pharmacy, weights and measures, asepsis and antisepsis, microscopes, laboratory material, X-rays, obstetrics and gynaecology, surgery, anesthesia, endoscope, odontology, cardiology, ophthalmology, electrotherapy, pathological anatomy and natural sciences. Temporary exhibitions are also held. The Museum is located on the university campus (UPV/EHU) and is important in the training of students in the Faculty of Medicine and the students coming from other faculties. Teaching and research constitute two of the pillars of the Museum that are complemented with publications and the organization of conferences, lectures and other activities.

  17. Digital radiography

    Rath, M.; Lissner, J.; Rienmueller, R.; Haendle, J.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1984-01-01

    Using a prototype of an electronic, universal examination unit equipped with a special X-ray TV installation, spotfilm exposures and digital angiographies with high spatial resolution and wide-range contrast could be made in the clinic for the first time. With transvenous contrast medium injection, the clinical results of digital angiography show excellent image quality in the region of the carotids and renal arteries as well as the arteries of the extremities. The electronic series exposures have an image quality almost comparable to the quality obtained with cutfilm changers in conventional angiography. There are certain limitations due to the input field of 25 cm X-ray image intensified used. In respect of the digital angiography imaging technique, the electronic universal unit is fully suitable for clinical application. (orig.) [de

  18. Heading for a better understanding of outreach in the digital age: a ...

    In this digital era, museums and archival institutions are increasingly encouraged to exploit Web 2.0 technologies to reach out to their potential clientele. The use of the social media space provides both museums and archival institutions with the opportunity to strengthen relations with the existing clientele and ...

  19. [Harmful biological agents at museum workposts].

    Skóra, Justyna; Zduniak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata; Rembisz, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of microbiological contamination of air and surfaces in museum premises with various collection specificities. In addition, the criteria for selecting indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts are proposed. The analysis of microbial contamination was carried out in 14 museum premises (storehouses, restoration workshops, exhibition hall). Microbiological air purity was measured with a MAS-100 Eco Air Sampler. Surface samples were collected using contact plates RODAC Envirocheck. Biochemical API tests were used to identify bacteria and yeasts. Fungi were diagnosed with taxonomic keys, based on macro- and microscopic mycelia assessment. The levels of microbiological contamination in museums varied and ranged from 2.1 x 10(2) to 7.0 x 10(3) cfu/m3 in the air and from 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.7 x 10(4) cfu/100 cm2 on surfaces. The dominant microorganisms were fungi, which accounted respectively for 18-98% and 23-100% of all isolates from tested sites and surfaces. It was found that the amount of fungi in the indoor air of the Museum of Archeology and Ethnography and the Museum of Independence Traditions equaled respectively 4.2 x 10(2) cfu/m3 and 1.4 x 10(4) cfu/m3, which means that they exceeded the recommended reference value of 2.0 x 10(2) cfu/m3. Having analyzed the frequency of strain isolation, the source of microorganisms and the hazard to human health, 10 fungal species were isolated, which may be regarded as indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts. They are: Aspergillus (A. niger, A. versicolor), Cladosporium (C. herbarum, C. macrocarpum), Penicillium (P. carneum, P. digitatum, P. italicum, P. paneum, P. polonicum), Rhizopus nigricans.

  20. Aprendiendo a ser mujer en la España del siglo XX: una mirada desde el Museo Pedagógico de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación de la Universidad de Sevilla. // Learning to be a woman in the twentieth century Spain: a look from the Pedagogical Museum of the Faculty of Education at the University of Sevilla

    María José Rebollo Espinosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available (ES La experiencia reseñada fue una iniciativa del Museo Pedagógico de la Facultad de CC. De la Educación de la Universidad de Sevilla, financiada por la Unidad de Igualdad de dicha Universidad e incluida en el programa de actividades didácticas que éste viene desarrollando desde sus inicios. Pensada para un variado público, su objetivo principal ha sido dar a conocer, de forma atractiva y reflexiva, la historia de la educación de las mujeres españolas del siglo XX, desde una perspectiva no victimista. El formato elegido fue el de una muestra expositiva combinada con un ciclo de conferencias, y rematada con una evaluación participativa y experiencial, lo que le proporcionó una mayor efectividad formativa. Su éxito ha asegurado la continuidad del proyecto para el curso próximo. // (EN The experience was an initiative outlined the Pedagogical Museum of the Faculty of Educational Sciences of the University of Seville, funded by the Equality Unit of the University and included in the program of educational activities it has developed since its inception. Designed for a diverse audience, its main aim has been to publicize, attractive and thoughtful way, the history of education of Spanish women of the twentieth century, from a non- victimization perspective. The format chosen was that of an exhibition shows combined with a series of lectures, and topped with a participatory and experiential evaluation, which provided increased training effectiveness. Its success has ensured the continuity of the project for next year.