WorldWideScience

Sample records for university computing laboratory

  1. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  2. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Anton du, E-mail: anton2@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Roux, Stephan Gerhard le, E-mail: lerouxsg@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Guelpa, Anina, E-mail: aninag@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory’s first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  3. Visual interaction: models, systems, prototypes. The Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome La Sapienza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, Paolo; Cinque, Luigi; De Marsico, Maria; Levialdi, Stefano; Panizzi, Emanuele

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on the research activities performed by the Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome, La Sapienza, during the last 5 years. Such work, essentially is based on the study of humancomputer interaction, spans from metamodels of interaction down to prototypes of interactive systems for both synchronous multimedia communication and groupwork, annotation systems for web pages, also encompassing theoretical and practical issues of visual languages and environments also including pattern recognition algorithms. Some applications are also considered like e-learning and collaborative work.

  4. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  5. Locking Editor A Utility For Protecting Software Exercises In The Computer Laboratory Of AMA University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Grafilon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The student of AMA University persistence in computing which has the keys to providing their talent needed to fill the computer laboratory in the computing professions. A range of factors can affect a students decision to remain in a computing major or change to another major if ever they feel that computing education is difficult. This has to describe the activities in computer laboratory specifically exercises machine problems and computing case studies interacting different application programs as the basis of their skills and knowledge in programming capability. The nature of those activities addresses by using of IDE as open source in all programming applications which may result of specific intervention such as using the editor to create a source file the code blocks comments and program statements are entered and the file saved. In case there are no corrective actions taken as the editor does not know this is supposed to be a source file as opposed to notes for class. If working in a position-dependent language like Java the developer would have to be very careful about indenting. The file has to be saved with the correct file extension and in a directory where the compiler can find it. Each source file has to be compiled separately if the program has a few source files they all have to be named separately in the compiler. When invoking the compiler it has to be directed to look in the correct directory for the source files and where the output files should be stored. If there is an error in the source file the compiler will output messages and fail to complete. For any errors the developer goes back and edits the source file working from line numbers and compiler messages to fix the problems and these steps continue until all the source files compile without errors. When linking each object file is specified as being part of the build. Again the locations for the object files and executable are given. There may be errors at this point

  6. The Role of Computer-Based Educational Laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, S.A.; Kosilov, A.N.; Chernov, E.V.; Vygovskiy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized Educational and research laboratory 'Reactor physics, control and safe operation of WWER type NPP’ is based on the computer simulator of WWER -1000 and offers the real-time monitoring of data available to the WWER -1000 NPP control room operators, and provides a possibility to investigate reactor behavior in normal and abnormal situations. The laboratory supports interactive technologies and team-based activities that enable students to build their knowledge through required gateway courses and explore problems relevant to real life situations

  7. Computational universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svozil, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Suspicions that the world might be some sort of a machine or algorithm existing 'in the mind' of some symbolic number cruncher have lingered from antiquity. Although popular at times, the most radical forms of this idea never reached mainstream. Modern developments in physics and computer science have lent support to the thesis, but empirical evidence is needed before it can begin to replace our contemporary world view

  8. Universities and National Laboratories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    knowledge, etc. in the curriculum of the Institute of Technology at Kharagpur. The. University of ... Nothing can be farther from reality. If the powers that can ... have moved and mixed and have had my being in the student community. I claim that.

  9. The Computational Sensorimotor Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Computational Sensorimotor Systems Lab focuses on the exploration, analysis, modeling and implementation of biological sensorimotor systems for both scientific...

  10. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  11. How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas, Kim

    2005-01-01

    How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

  12. Courant Mathematics and Computing Laboratory, New York University. Progress report No. 54, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Work is reported in the following areas: applied mathematics (computational fluid dynamics, numerical analysis), computational magnetohydrodynamics, computational physics and chemistry (materials science, quantum many-body systems, chemistry), computer science (CIMS PL/I, Version II; distributed systems and resource sharing, computer design - PUMA; SETL; algorithmic combinatorics), systems programing and user services. The relationship to other projects, list of seminars, and list of publications are also included. The research descriptions are administrative in nature, usually less than a page in length

  13. Oklahoma's Mobile Computer Graphics Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Gerald R.

    This Computer Graphics Laboratory houses an IBM 1130 computer, U.C.C. plotter, printer, card reader, two key punch machines, and seminar-type classroom furniture. A "General Drafting Graphics System" (GDGS) is used, based on repetitive use of basic coordinate and plot generating commands. The system is used by 12 institutions of higher education…

  14. Progress report No. 53, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977. [Courant Mathematics and Computing Laboratory, New York University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Work in the following areas is considered in this annual report: applied mathematics (partial differential equations) in computational fluid dynamics, numerical analysis, etc.; computational physics and chemistry (partial differential equations); programing languages and compilers and other applications of computer science; and network access methods and applications of the ARPA network. Also discussed is the relation of work done at the Courant Institute to other projects, systems programing and user services, seminars, and publications. Individual reports are a paragraph or so in length. Completed work is reported in the appropriate publications. (RWR)

  15. MUSICAL-COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY: THE LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with musically-computer technology in the educational system on example of the Educational and Methodical Laboratory Music & Computer Technologies at the Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, St. Petersburg. Interdisciplinary field of professional activities relates to the creation and application of specialized music software and hardware tools and the knowledges in music and informatics. A realization of the concept of musical-computer education in preparing music teachers is through basic educational programs of vocational training, supplementary education, professional development of teachers and methodical support via Internet. In addition, the laboratory Music & Computer Technologies engaged in scientific activity: it is, above all, specialized researches in the field of pedagogy and international conferences.

  16. Portuguese Universities Sharing Remote Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a pedagogical assignment based on a cooperative work involving teachers/students from two Portuguese universities. As it happens one is the oldest in the country – University of Coimbra (UC - and the other the largest - University of Porto (UP, about 120 km apart. The authors, believing in the relevance of Information and Communication Technologies (ITs in teaching/learning methodologies and in cooperative teaching methods worked together to plan this pedagogical experience and to run it in a one semester course. Students from UC have been introduced to the remote lab at UP and got the first contact with the remote experiments using easily available sound and image resources based on Skype and an IP camera for better image quality. This first contact has been conducted by the first author at UP with support of the second author at UC. The work will describe briefly the remote experiments used, their inclusion in the course at UC, the associated assessment criteria and, finally, student comments.

  17. Mathematics and Computer Science | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extreme Computing Data-Intensive Science Applied Mathematics Science & Engineering Applications Software Extreme Computing Data-Intensive Science Applied Mathematics Science & Engineering Opportunities For Employees Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory Mathematics and Computer Science Tools

  18. Computer system architecture for laboratory automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penney, B.K.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the various approaches that may be taken to provide computing resources for laboratory automation. Three distinct approaches are identified, the single dedicated small computer, shared use of a larger computer, and a distributed approach in which resources are provided by a number of computers, linked together, and working in some cooperative way. The significance of the microprocessor in laboratory automation is discussed, and it is shown that it is not simply a cheap replacement of the minicomputer. (Auth.)

  19. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  20. The Development of University Computing in Sweden 1965-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrand, Ingemar

    In 1965-70 the government agency, Statskontoret, set up five university computing centers, as service bureaux financed by grants earmarked for computer use. The centers were well equipped and staffed and caused a surge in computer use. When the yearly flow of grant money stagnated at 25 million Swedish crowns, the centers had to find external income to survive and acquire time-sharing. But the charging system led to the computers not being fully used. The computer scientists lacked equipment for laboratory use. The centers were decentralized and the earmarking abolished. Eventually they got new tasks like running computers owned by the departments, and serving the university administration.

  1. Polarized targets at triangle universities nuclear laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, M.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Gould, C.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Haase, D.G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Huffman, P.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Keith, C.D. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Roberson, N.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wilburn, W.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A summary of the polarized and aligned nuclear targets which have been constructed and used at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory is given. Statically polarized targets, typically operating at a temperature of 12 mK and a magnetic field of 7 T, have provided significant nuclear polarization in {sup 1}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 27}Al, {sup 93}Nb and {sup 165}Ho. A rotating, aligned {sup 165}Ho target is also in use. A {sup 3}He melting curve thermometer has been developed for use in statically polarized targets. A dynamically polarized proton target is under construction. ((orig.))

  2. VirTUal remoTe labORatories managEment System (TUTORES): Using Cloud Computing to Acquire University Practical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Agustín C.; Ros, Salvador; Hernández, Roberto; Robles-Gómez, Antonio; Tobarra, Llanos; Tolbaños Granjo, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of practical laboratories is a key in engineering education in order to provide our students with the resources needed to acquire practical skills. This is specially true in the case of distance education, where no physical interactions between lecturers and students take place, so virtual or remote laboratories must be used. UNED has…

  3. Kansas State University accelerator laboratory upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, P.

    1989-01-01

    The J.R. Macdonald Laboratory is undergoing a major upgrade of its facilities and capabilities. The laboratory is dedicated to the study of ion-atom collisions using highly charged ions from accelerators and/or ion sources. The mainstay of the laboratory over the last two decades has been a 6 MV tandem accelerator. It has been used to produce one- to a few-MeV/u highly charged ions for studying high energy atomic collisions, and to produce recoil ions from ocllisions with projectile ions for studying low energy atomic collisions. In order to enhance the capabilities of studying atomic collisions in these two energy regimes, we are constructing a superconducting LINAC booster to the tandem, and a stand-alone CRYEBIS source. The project, which is funded by the US Department of Energy, began in May 1985 with a May 1989 completion schedule. The upgrade includes a building addition, funded by the State of Kansas, to house the new facilities. The LINAC consists of a time-superbunching module, followed by three large cryostat modules each containing four superconducting resonators, and followed by an energy-rebunching module. The resonators are the split-ring superconducting Nb type designed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory, and are presently being tested at KSU. The CRYEBIS source, which consists of a 1 m long 5 T superconducting solenoid with a high degree of straightness, is in the final stages of assembly. We have in operation a new computer network for data acquisition and analysis. A progress report on the status of the upgrade is presented. (orig.)

  4. A CAMAC-based laboratory computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    A CAMAC-based laboratory computer network is described by sharing a common mass memory this offers distinct advantages over slow and core-consuming single-processor installations. A fast compiler-BASIC, with extensions for CAMAC and real-time, provides a convenient means for interactive experiment control

  5. Undergraduate Skills Laboratories at Sonoma State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amandeep; Zack, K.; Mills, H.; Cunningham, B.; Jackowski, S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the current economic climate, funding sources for many laboratory courses have been cut from university budgets. However, it is still necessary for undergraduates to master laboratory skills to be prepared and competitive applicants when entering the professional world and/or graduate school. In this context, student-led programs may be able to compensate for this lack of formal instruction and reinforce concepts from lecture by applying research techniques to develop hands-on comprehension. The Sonoma State University Chapter of Society of Physics Students has established a peer-led skills lab to teach research techniques in the fields of astronomy and physics. The goal is to alleviate the pressures of both independently learning and efficiently applying techniques to junior and senior-level research projects. These skill labs are especially valuable for nontraditional students who, due to work or family duties, may not get a chance to fully commit to research projects. For example, a topic such as Arduino programming has a multitude of applications in both astronomy and physics, but is not taught in traditional university courses. Although some programming and electronics skills are taught in (separate) classes, they are usually not applied to actual research projects, which combined expertise is needed. For example, in astronomy, there are many situations involving programming telescopes and taking data with electronic cameras. Often students will carry out research using these tools but when something goes wrong, the students will not have the skills to trouble shoot and fix the system. Another astronomical topic to be taught in the skills labs is the analysis of astronomical data, including running remote telescopes, analyzing photometric variability, and understanding the concepts of star magnitudes, flat fields, and biases. These workshops provide a setting in which the student teacher may strengthen his or her understanding of the topic by presenting

  6. Computer technology forecasting at the National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Office of ADP Management organized a group of scientists and computer professionals, mostly from their own national laboratories, to prepare an annually updated technology forecast to accompany the Department's five-year ADP Plan. The activities of the task force were originally reported in an informal presentation made at the ACM Conference in 1978. This presentation represents an update of that report. It also deals with the process of applying the results obtained at a particular computing center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Computer technology forecasting is a difficult and hazardous endeavor, but it can reap considerable advantage. The forecast performed on an industry-wide basis can be applied to the particular needs of a given installation, and thus give installation managers considerable guidance in planning. A beneficial side effect of this process is that it forces installation managers, who might otherwise tend to preoccupy themselves with immediate problems, to focus on longer term goals and means to their ends

  7. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...

  8. SALE: Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, D.J.; Bush, W.J.; Dolan, C.A.

    1976-09-01

    The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program implements an industry-wide quality control and evaluation system aimed at identifying and reducing analytical chemical measurement errors. Samples of well-characterized materials are distributed to laboratory participants at periodic intervals for determination of uranium or plutonium concentration and isotopic distributions. The results of these determinations are statistically-evaluated, and each participant is informed of the accuracy and precision of his results in a timely manner. The SALE computer code which produces the report is designed to facilitate rapid transmission of this information in order that meaningful quality control will be provided. Various statistical techniques comprise the output of the SALE computer code. Assuming an unbalanced nested design, an analysis of variance is performed in subroutine NEST resulting in a test of significance for time and analyst effects. A trend test is performed in subroutine TREND. Microfilm plots are obtained from subroutine CUMPLT. Within-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in the main program or subroutine VAREST, and between-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in SBLV. Other statistical tests are also performed. Up to 1,500 pieces of data for each nuclear material sampled by 75 (or fewer) laboratories may be analyzed with this code. The input deck necessary to run the program is shown, and input parameters are discussed in detail. Printed output and microfilm plot output are described. Output from a typical SALE run is included as a sample problem

  9. Vanderbilt University: Campus Computing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Despite the decentralized nature of computing at Vanderbilt, there is significant evidence of cooperation and use of each other's resources by the various computing entities. Planning for computing occurs in every school and department. Caravan, a campus-wide network, is described. (MLW)

  10. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

  11. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  12. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Larsen, Erik

    The ‘CIA-CT comparison - Inter laboratory comparison on industrial Computed Tomography” is organized by DTU Department of Mechanical Engineering within the Danish project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning - CIA-CT”. The project is co-financed by the Danish Ministry of Science......, Technology and Innovation. The comparison aims to collect information about measurement performance in state-of the-art industrial CT (Computed Tomography) scanning. Since CT scanning has entered the field of manufacturing and coordinate metrology, evaluation of uncertainty of measurement with assessment...

  13. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995

  14. Computer Application Systems at the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazewicz, Mieczyslaw

    1979-01-01

    The results of the WASC Project at the Technical University of Wroclaw have confirmed the possibility of constructing informatic systems based on the recognized size and specifics of user's needs (needs of the university) and provided some solutions to the problem of collaboration of computer systems at remote universities. (Author/CMV)

  15. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  16. Creating and Using a Computer Networking and Systems Administration Laboratory Built under Relaxed Financial Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Michael P.; Mullins, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Computer Science Department at Slippery Rock University created a laboratory for its Computer Networks and System Administration and Security courses under relaxed financial constraints. This paper describes the department's experience designing and using this laboratory, including lessons learned and descriptions of some student projects…

  17. Universal quantum computation with metaplectic anyons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Shawn X., E-mail: xingshan@math.ucsb.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wang, Zhenghan, E-mail: zhenghwa@math.ucsb.edu, E-mail: zhenghwa@microsoft.com [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Microsoft Research Station Q, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We show that braidings of the metaplectic anyons X{sub ϵ} in SO(3){sub 2} = SU(2){sub 4} with their total charge equal to the metaplectic mode Y supplemented with projective measurements of the total charge of two metaplectic anyons are universal for quantum computation. We conjecture that similar universal anyonic computing models can be constructed for all metaplectic anyon systems SO(p){sub 2} for any odd prime p ≥ 5. In order to prove universality, we find new conceptually appealing universal gate sets for qutrits and qupits.

  18. Leveraging Existing Laboratory Capacity towards Universal Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequately equipped clinical laboratories should provide early warning signals of health risks. The Assessment categorized the laboratories at three levels relating to the type of facility, these being hospital, health center and health post. This study used results from the SARA to determine the ability to make timely diagnosis ...

  19. Learning Universal Computations with Spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Uhlmann, Marvin; Kappen, Hilbert J.; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Providing the neurobiological basis of information processing in higher animals, spiking neural networks must be able to learn a variety of complicated computations, including the generation of appropriate, possibly delayed reactions to inputs and the self-sustained generation of complex activity patterns, e.g. for locomotion. Many such computations require previous building of intrinsic world models. Here we show how spiking neural networks may solve these different tasks. Firstly, we derive constraints under which classes of spiking neural networks lend themselves to substrates of powerful general purpose computing. The networks contain dendritic or synaptic nonlinearities and have a constrained connectivity. We then combine such networks with learning rules for outputs or recurrent connections. We show that this allows to learn even difficult benchmark tasks such as the self-sustained generation of desired low-dimensional chaotic dynamics or memory-dependent computations. Furthermore, we show how spiking networks can build models of external world systems and use the acquired knowledge to control them. PMID:27309381

  20. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Brown, N.A.; Babcock, R.C.; Martono, H.; Carey, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Brown, Nathan A.; Babcock, R. Chris; Martono, Hendy; Carey, David C.

    1997-01-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab

  2. Leveraging Existing Laboratory Capacity towards Universal Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The provision of quality health care is influenced by ... Laboratory support is urgently needed to enhance service delivery in the ... Information generated through ... professionals using simple rapid technology have been adopted.

  3. The University as an Open Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Donald L.; Ford, Ralph M.; Payne, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities are two of the most formidable resources a country has to reinvent and grow its economy. This is the second of two papers that outlines a process of building and strengthening research universities that enhances regional technology development and facilitates flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. In the…

  4. Construction of a universal quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, M. A.; Smekal, Lorenz von

    2009-01-01

    We construct a universal quantum computer following Deutsch's original proposal of a universal quantum Turing machine (UQTM). Like Deutsch's UQTM, our machine can emulate any classical Turing machine and can execute any algorithm that can be implemented in the quantum gate array framework but under the control of a quantum program, and hence is universal. We present the architecture of the machine, which consists of a memory tape and a processor and describe the observables that comprise the registers of the processor and the instruction set, which includes a set of operations that can approximate any unitary operation to any desired accuracy and hence is quantum computationally universal. We present the unitary evolution operators that act on the machine to achieve universal computation and discuss each of them in detail and specify and discuss explicit program halting and concatenation schemes. We define and describe a set of primitive programs in order to demonstrate the universal nature of the machine. These primitive programs facilitate the implementation of more complex algorithms and we demonstrate their use by presenting a program that computes the NAND function, thereby also showing that the machine can compute any classically computable function.

  5. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-01-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  6. Antimatter in the universe and laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgov A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible signatures which may indicate an existence of antimatter in the Galaxy and in the early universe are reviewed. A model which could give rise to abundant antimatter in the Galaxy is considered.

  7. Antimatter in the universe and laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Possible signatures which may indicate an existence of antimatter in the Galaxy and in the early universe are reviewed. A model which could give rise to abundant antimatter in the Galaxy is considered.

  8. Universal blind quantum computation for hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Liang; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    As progress on the development of building quantum computer continues to advance, first-generation practical quantum computers will be available for ordinary users in the cloud style similar to IBM's Quantum Experience nowadays. Clients can remotely access the quantum servers using some simple devices. In such a situation, it is of prime importance to keep the security of the client's information. Blind quantum computation protocols enable a client with limited quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to a quantum server without leaking any privacy. To date, blind quantum computation has been considered only for an individual quantum system. However, practical universal quantum computer is likely to be a hybrid system. Here, we take the first step to construct a framework of blind quantum computation for the hybrid system, which provides a more feasible way for scalable blind quantum computation.

  9. Remote Laboratories: Bridging University to Secondary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horácio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available e-lab is a remote laboratory infrastructure powered by a software framework that allows the operation and data retrieve from a remote apparatus. In this demonstration we will present the e-lab interface properties and its modus operandi, giving as well some topics of complimentary software use for data interpretation and analysis.

  10. University of Maryland MRSEC - Facilities: Keck Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    operation. This site remains as a history of the center, but will not be actively maintained. University of . Crystals are made up of layers, or "planes" of atoms, perfectly stacked in an ordered pattern . Because this surface has been cut at a slight angle to the crystal planes, it appears "stepped"

  11. chemical safety in laboratories of african universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    Universities in Africa are in need of chemical safety and security facilities, ... In March 2009, fifty one 4th year undergraduate students (graduating class) of .... manufacturing industries, and many of them are concerned primarily ... advancement of chemistry world wide to do their best both to push the African chemistry.

  12. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, A. M.

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to "perform many computations simultaneously" except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of parallel universes. Rather, entanglement makes available types of computation processes which, while not exponentially larger than classical ones, are unavailable to classical systems. The essence of quantum computation is that it uses entanglement to generate and manipulate a physical representation of the correlations between logical entities, without the need to completely represent the logical entities themselves.

  13. Computer-aided design and modeling of nickel dithiolene near-infrared dyes. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Student research reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsello, S.

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in computational chemistry have made it feasible to design many types of molecules and predict their properties theoretically. The author applied these techniques to the design of organometallic transition-metal dyes absorbing in the near-infrared region of the spectrum which possess the combination of a large molar extinction coefficient, good chemical and thermal stability, and a high solubility in liquid crystal (LC) hosts. These properties are required for the dye to function as a near-infrared (IR) attenuator in a liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) device that will be used as a beam diagnostic on the 60-beam OMEGA solid-state Nd:glass laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Using commercially available software, both the absorption spectra and solubility characteristics of bis[1,2-di-(p-n alkoxyphenyl)ethane-1,2-dithione] nickel dye complexes were modeled in an isotropic host (cyclohexane) and, in most cases, excellent agreement was found with experimental data. Two additional compounds utilizing the same nickel dithiolene core but with alkylthio and phenylalkylthio terminal groups have been designed and show excellent potential to produce dramatic improvements in both solubility and optical density (absorbance) in liquid crystalline hosts. Based upon my work, a new dye not previously reported, 2(C 4 S)2(C 4 SPh)DTNi, has been proposed to satisfy the LCPDI device requirements. The nickel dithiolene dyes may also find important applications in other technology areas such as near-IR photography and laser-based near-IR communications

  14. Annual Report 2002 of Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Annual Report of Warsaw University Heavy Ion Laboratory is the overview of the Laboratory and assembly of scientific activities of the team especially in the range of instrumental development, experiments and experimental set-ups and experiments using outside facilities of Warsaw Cyclotron

  15. Designing a hands-on brain computer interface laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Long, Laura Kathleen; Mesgarani, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Devices and systems that interact with the brain have become a growing field of research and development in recent years. Engineering students are well positioned to contribute to both hardware development and signal analysis techniques in this field. However, this area has been left out of most engineering curricula. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) based brain computer interface (BCI) laboratory course to educate students through hands-on experiments. The course is offered jointly by the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science Departments of Columbia University in the City of New York and is open to senior undergraduate and graduate students. The course provides an effective introduction to the experimental design, neuroscience concepts, data analysis techniques, and technical skills required in the field of BCI.

  16. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  17. The Mars Simulation Laboratory, University of Aarhus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrison, J. P.; Field, D.; Finster, K.; Lomstein, B. Aa.; Nørnberg, P.; Ramsing, N. B.; Uggerhøj, E.

    2001-08-01

    Present day Mars presents an extremely hostile environment to organic material. The average temperature is low (-50C), the atmospheric pressure is also low (7mbar) and there is little water over most of the planet. Chemically the surface is extremely oxidising and no signs of organic material have been detected. There is also a strong component of ultra violet radiation in the Martian sun light, lethal to most organisms. At Aarhus University we have constructed a Mars simulation environment which reproduces the physical, chemical and mineralogical conditions on Mars. It is hoped to set limits on where organic matter (or even life) might exist on Mars, for example at some depth under the surface, beneath the polar ice or within rocks. It is also possible to adjust the conditions in the simulation to investigate the most extreme environments in which organisms can be preserved or still function.

  18. Automata, universality, computation tribute to Maurice Margenstern

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is an intellectually stimulating excursion into mathematical machines and structures capable for a universal computation. World top experts in computer science and mathematics overview exciting and intriguing topics of logical theory of monoids, geometry of Gauss word, philosophy of mathematics in computer science, asynchronous and parallel P-systems, decidability in cellular automata, splicing systems, reversible Turing machines, information flows in two-way finite automata, prime generators in automaton arrays, Grossone and Turing machines, automaton models of atomic lattices. The book is  full of visually attractive examples of mathematical machines, open problems and challenges for future research. Those interested in the advancement of a theory of computation, philosophy of mathematics, future and emergent computing paradigms, architectures and implementations will find the book vital for their research and development.

  19. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  20. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  1. Microcosm: Mysteries of the Universe and of computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In the first week of December, two new exhibitions open in Microcosm: "Mysteries of the Universe" and "Computing@CERN". Ever wondered why the Universe is habitable? How many dimensions there are? Or indeed, where matter comes from? In Microcosm's new "Mysteries of the Universe" exhibition 20 CERN researchers reveal the question that intrigues them the most and why they find the search for answers so fascinating. The exhibition consists of 20 stories, told by the researchers themselves in one of 4 languages (English, French, German or Italian). Through their tales, the visitor can discover the essence of CERN - a curiosity to understand the mechanisms of a universe full of surprises, where many fundamental questions remain unresolved. With their diverse nationalities and experience, the participants reveal not only the variety of physics research underway at CERN, but also the experiments yet to come and indeed an element of the international collaboration so essential to the laboratory. In the words of on...

  2. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific

  3. Radiation monitoring programme in a university hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillander, M.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki is the only institute teaching radiochemistry at the university level in Finland. The research programme of the Deparment must therefore include the uses of radiation and radionuclides in many branches of science. The students must receive adequate instruction in radiation protection for safe work in laboratories. This also has the educational benefit that the radiochemists will subsequently be able to observe the necessary safety precautions when employing ionizing radiation professionally. The Department of Radiochemistry consists of the following laboratories: a radiotracer laboratory, a neutron/electron and a gamma irradiation laboratory, an environmental low activity level laboratory, a whole-body counting laboratory, a reactor chemistry laboratory and a waste-treatment facility. The radiation protection organization of the Department is presented. Various methods of monitoring, including advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the reactor chemistry laboratory where transuranic elements are utilized. These elements are highly radiotoxic and their monitoring in most cases requires destructive analysis. Different methods of determining external and internal doses are evaluated with regard to sensitivity and accuracy. Detection limits for radionuclides utilized in the laboratory are presented for different measurement systems, including non-destructive monitoring, spectrometry after chemical analysis, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry using a CsI-NaI scintillation detector. The guidelines laid down in the IAEA Safety Series Manuals are discussed in the light of practical experience. (author)

  4. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  5. Computer Networking Laboratory for Undergraduate Computer Technology Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naghedolfeizi, Masoud

    2000-01-01

    ...) To improve the quality of education in the existing courses related to computer networks and data communications as well as other computer science courses such programming languages and computer...

  6. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,” last accessed March 10, 2013, http://www.wpafb.af.mil/ library /factsheets...as CRAs and CTAs, could enable collaboration through university consortia designed to support DOD laboratory research. Such alliances would have the...university consortia , may be able to leverage partnerships that meet their collaborative research needs. 5. Increased Patent Filing Fees when Partnering

  7. Designing with computers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonas, J.S.

    1974-10-01

    The application of digital computers to the solution of engineering problems relating to accelerator design was explored. The existing computer hardware and software available for direct communication between the engineer and the computer are described, and some examples of useful programs are outlined, showing the ease of their use and the method of communication between machine and designer. An effort is made to convince engineers that they can communicate with the computer in ordinary English and mathematics, rather than in intermediate artificial languages. (U.S.)

  8. Building a Laboratory: the Work of Global University Rankers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Miguel Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ’, and more relevant products. The metaphor allows us to understand the changeability of rankings and highlights that the process of making rankings can be influenced by the different audiences they are aimed at. University leaders are not passive players in the recognition of expertise in higher education...... evaluation. I present some of the ways in which these leaders are part of the process from the lesser known point-of-view of the ranking organisations. I propose three questions: 1) Can the university ranker be thought of as a ‘laboratory’? 2) How does the university ranking laboratory produce its ‘science...

  9. Accelerator facility in a small laboratory of a private university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, Masakazu

    2005-01-01

    Washio laboratory in Waseda University started the project team in 1999 and finished tests of all machines in 2000. High brilliant soft X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering and the pico-second pulse radiolysis system were developed. The time profile of creation of hydrated electron was obtained by the system in 2003. Determination of accelerator spec and cooperation of University, and set up of accelerator, preparation of research group, cooperation with KEK, student training, beam experiments, experiments and future is stated. This system was constructed and operated by many students in his laboratory, and supported by many members of KEK-ATF, Waseda University, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., High Technology Research Center Project of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Japan Society for the Promotion Science. (S.Y.)

  10. Controlling Laboratory Processes From A Personal Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.; Mackin, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program provides natural-language process control from IBM PC or compatible computer. Sets up process-control system that either runs without operator or run by workers who have limited programming skills. Includes three smaller programs. Two of them, written in FORTRAN 77, record data and control research processes. Third program, written in Pascal, generates FORTRAN subroutines used by other two programs to identify user commands with device-driving routines written by user. Also includes set of input data allowing user to define user commands to be executed by computer. Requires personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Also requires FORTRAN 77 compiler and device drivers written by user.

  11. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  12. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-01-01

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity

  13. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvali, Gia [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Gomez, Cesar [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC; Luest, Dieter [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Omar, Yasser [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico; Richter, Benedikt [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    2017-01-15

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. McMaster University: College and University Computing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The computing and information services (CIS) organization includes administrative computing, academic computing, and networking and has three divisions: computing services, development services, and information services. Other computing activities include Health Sciences, Humanities Computing Center, and Department of Computer Science and Systems.…

  15. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Lagana

    Full Text Available We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  16. Heavy Ion Laboratory - Warsaw University - Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, L.; Zielinska, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Heavy Ion Laboratory (HIL) of the Warsaw University in year of 2003 are described. The report is divided into four parts: Laboratory Overview, Experiments and Experimental Set-ups, Experiments using outside facilities and General information on HIL activities which contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the HIL as well as external ones, the list of published papers and conference contributions. A summary of the (HIL) activities is briefly presented in ''Introduction'' written by HIL director prof. J. Jastrzebski

  17. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  18. Universities and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Engineering Education is being significantly challenged in the United States. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is is needed to deal with many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the University and National Laboratory Communities cooperate to address these issues. The Universities must increasingly identify challenges facing nuclear power that demand innovative solutions and pursue them. To be drawn into the technology the best students must see a future, a need and identify challenges that they can meet. The University community can provide that vision with help from the National Laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this

  19. A university hot laboratory for teaching and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.; Miettinen, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    In small countries which have limited material and capital resources there is more need for studying and teaching reactor chemistry in universities than there is in countries with special nuclear research and training centres. A new 150-m 2 laboratory of reactor chemistry was added to the premises of the Department of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, in October 1975. It contains a hot area with low-pressure air-conditioning, a sanitary room, a low-activity area, and an office area. The main instrument is a mass-spectrometer MI-1309 equipped with an ion counter which is particularly useful for plutonium analysis. The laboratory can handle samples up-to 10Ci gamma-acitivity - which equals one pellet of a fuel rod - in a sealed lead cell which has an interchangeable box for alpha-active work. Pretreated samples are submitted to chemical separations in glove-boxes. Samples for alpha and mass spectroscopy are also prepared in glove-boxes. Also the laboratory is provided with fume hoods suitable for building lead shields. Radiation protection and special features typical to the university environment are discussed. Methods for verfication of contamination and protection against internal and external contamination are applied. These include air monitoring, analysis of excreta, and whole-body counting. (author)

  20. Computer assisted instruction in the general chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Jerry C.

    This dissertation examines current applications concerning the use of computer technology to enhance instruction in the general chemistry laboratory. The dissertation critiques widely-used educational software, and explores examples of multimedia presentations such as those used in beginning chemistry laboratory courses at undergraduate and community colleges. The dissertation describes a prototype compact disc (CD) used to (a) introduce the general chemistry laboratory, (b) familiarize students with using chemistry laboratory equipment, (c) introduce laboratory safety practices, and (d) provide approved techniques for maintaining a laboratory notebook. Upon completing the CD portion of the pre-lab, students are linked to individual self-help (WebCT) quizzes covering the information provided on the CD. The CD is designed to improve student understanding of basic concepts, techniques, and procedures used in the general chemistry laboratory.

  1. Managing Laboratory Data Using Cloud Computing as an Organizational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Pence, Harry E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant difficulties encountered when directing undergraduate research and developing new laboratory experiments is how to efficiently manage the data generated by a number of students. Cloud computing, where both software and computer files reside online, offers a solution to this data-management problem and allows researchers…

  2. Scientific Computing Strategic Plan for the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiting, Eric Todd

    2015-01-01

    Scientific computing is a critical foundation of modern science. Without innovations in the field of computational science, the essential missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) would go unrealized. Taking a leadership role in such innovations is Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) challenge and charge, and is central to INL's ongoing success. Computing is an essential part of INL's future. DOE science and technology missions rely firmly on computing capabilities in various forms. Modeling and simulation, fueled by innovations in computational science and validated through experiment, are a critical foundation of science and engineering. Big data analytics from an increasing number of widely varied sources is opening new windows of insight and discovery. Computing is a critical tool in education, science, engineering, and experiments. Advanced computing capabilities in the form of people, tools, computers, and facilities, will position INL competitively to deliver results and solutions on important national science and engineering challenges. A computing strategy must include much more than simply computers. The foundational enabling component of computing at many DOE national laboratories is the combination of a showcase like data center facility coupled with a very capable supercomputer. In addition, network connectivity, disk storage systems, and visualization hardware are critical and generally tightly coupled to the computer system and co located in the same facility. The existence of these resources in a single data center facility opens the doors to many opportunities that would not otherwise be possible.

  3. Local computer network of the JINR Neutron Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimenkov, A.V.; Vagov, V.A.; Vajdkhadze, F.

    1988-01-01

    New high-speed local computer network, where intelligent network adapter (NA) is used as hardware base, is developed in the JINR Neutron Physics Laboratory to increase operation efficiency and data transfer rate. NA consists of computer bus interface, cable former, microcomputer segment designed for both program realization of channel-level protocol and organization of bidirectional transfer of information through direct access channel between monochannel and computer memory with or witout buffering in NA operation memory device

  4. Industry and Academic Consortium for Computer Based Subsurface Geology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. L.; Nunn, J. A.; Sears, S. O.

    2008-12-01

    Twenty two licenses for Petrel Software acquired through a grant from Schlumberger are being used to redesign the laboratory portion of Subsurface Geology at Louisiana State University. The course redesign is a cooperative effort between LSU's Geology and Geophysics and Petroleum Engineering Departments and Schlumberger's Technical Training Division. In spring 2008, two laboratory sections were taught with 22 students in each section. The class contained geology majors, petroleum engineering majors, and geology graduate students. Limited enrollments and 3 hour labs make it possible to incorporate hands-on visualization, animation, manipulation of data and images, and access to geological data available online. 24/7 access to the laboratory and step by step instructions for Petrel exercises strongly promoted peer instruction and individual learning. Goals of the course redesign include: enhancing visualization of earth materials; strengthening student's ability to acquire, manage, and interpret multifaceted geological information; fostering critical thinking, the scientific method; improving student communication skills; providing cross training between geologists and engineers and increasing the quantity, quality, and diversity of students pursuing Earth Science and Petroleum Engineering careers. IT resources available in the laboratory provide students with sophisticated visualization tools, allowing them to switch between 2-D and 3-D reconstructions more seamlessly, and enabling them to manipulate larger integrated data-sets, thus permitting more time for critical thinking and hypothesis testing. IT resources also enable faculty and students to simultaneously work with the software to visually interrogate a 3D data set and immediately test hypothesis formulated in class. Preliminary evaluation of class results indicate that students found MS-Windows based Petrel easy to learn. By the end of the semester, students were able to not only map horizons and faults

  5. The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieker, T.P.; Hubbard, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory provides a wide q-range, 3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -1 , for the structural analysis of materials on length scales from a few angstrom to ∼0.1 μm. The wide q-range is accomplished by combining data from a Bonse-Hart spectrometer (3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -2 Angstrom -1 ) and a 5 m pinhole (3x10 -3 Angstrom -1 -1 ) instrument. Automation of the data acquisition systems along with a variety of sample environments and sample changers yields flexible, high throughput instruments. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. Computer-based nuclear radiation detection and instrumentation teaching laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.H.; He, Q.

    1993-01-01

    The integration of computers into the University of Florida's Nuclear Engineering Sciences teaching laboratories is based on the innovative use of MacIntosh 2 microcomputers, IEEE-488 (GPIB) communication and control bus system and protocol, compatible modular nuclear instrumentation (NIM) and test equipment, LabVIEW graphics and applications software, with locally prepared, interactive, menu-driven, HyperCard based multi-exercise laboratory instruction sets and procedures. Results thus far have been highly successful with the majority of the laboratory exercises having been implemented

  7. Neutron radiography at the University of Michigan's Phoenix Memorial Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, J.T.; Elam, S.; Koblish, T.; Lee, P.; McAuliffe, D.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time neutron radiography (RTNR) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool for nondestructive testing and basic research with a wide variety of applications. The Phoenix Memorial Laboratory (PML) at the University of Michigan has developed an RTNR facility and has been using this facility to study several phenomena of interest to researchers in many areas. These phenomena include imaging of the internal fluid flow in gas turbine engine nozzles and coking and debris deposition in several gas turbine nozzles. This paper presents a summary of the technique and facilities involved in these applications

  8. Student teaching and research laboratory focusing on brain-computer interface paradigms--A creative environment for computer science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an applied concept of a brain-computer interface (BCI) student research laboratory (BCI-LAB) at the Life Science Center of TARA, University of Tsukuba, Japan. Several successful case studies of the student projects are reviewed together with the BCI Research Award 2014 winner case. The BCI-LAB design and project-based teaching philosophy is also explained. Future teaching and research directions summarize the review.

  9. The LLNL Multiuser Tandem Laboratory computer-controlled radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homann, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Physics Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently constructed a Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (MTL) to perform a variety of basic and applied measurement programs. The laboratory and its research equipment were constructed with support from a consortium of LLNL Divisions, Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, and the University of California. Primary design goals for the facility were inexpensive construction and operation, high beam quality at a large number of experimental stations, and versatility in adapting to new experimental needs. To accomplish these goals, our main design decisions were to place the accelerator in an unshielded structure, to make use of reconfigured cyclotrons as effective switching magnets, and to rely on computer control systems for both radiological protection and highly reproducible and well-characterized accelerator operation. This paper addresses the radiological control computer system

  10. Scientific Computers at the Helsinki University of Technology during the Post Pioneering Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Panu; Andersin, Hans

    The paper describes the process leading from the pioneering phase when the university was free to develop and build its own computers through the period when the university was dependent on cooperation with the local computer companies to the stage when a bureaucratic state organization took over the power to decide on acquiring computing equipment to the universities. This stage ended in the late 1970s when computing power gradually became a commodity that the individual laboratories and research projects could acquire just like any resource. This development paralleled the situation in many other countries and universities as well. We have chosen the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) as a case to illustrate this development process, which for the researchers was very annoying and frustrating when it happened.

  11. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    OpenAIRE

    Steane, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to ``perform many computations simultaneously'' except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of ...

  12. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is the progress report of the research activities in the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies during the period from April, 1980, to March, 1981. The activities were carried out by the OULNS staffs and also by outsiders at the OULNS. In this period, the X-ray astrophysics group, the radiation physics group and the high energy physics group joined the OULNS. The main accelerators in the OULNS are a 110 cm variable energy cyclotron and a 4.7 MeV Van de Graaff machine. The detailed experimental studies on inbeam e-gamma spectroscopy and beta-decay were carried out at two accelerator laboratories. The radiochemistry facility and a mass spectrometer were fully used. The research activities extended to high energy physics by utilizing national facilities, such as a 230 cm cyclotron in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics and a proton synchrotron in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The theoretical studies on elementary particles and nuclear physics were carried out also. It is important that the facilities in the OULNS were used by the outsiders in Osaka University, such as solid state physics group and particle-induced X-ray group. The activities of the divisions of cyclotron, Van de Graaff, high energy physics, accelerator development and nuclear instrumentation, mass spectroscopy, radioisotope, solid state and theoretical physics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Dose measurements in laboratory of Physics department, University of Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Maria Mohammed

    1999-05-01

    Personal monitoring in University of Khartoum is being conducted using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The purpose of the study is to measure the dose of radiation in laboratory of Physics in physics department. TL phosphors LiF: Mg, Ti (card) and LiF Mg, Cu, P (GR-200) and mini-rad dosimeter are used to measure the dose in laboratory. The total dose for students form the laboratory bu using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter was found to be 2.2μ sv/year. 2.5 μ sv/year and 2.6 μ sv respectively, and for the teacher about 4.0 μ sv/year, 5.8 μ sv/year and 13.6 μ sv/year respectively, and for the dose near junk room about 3.9 μ sv/year, 2.9 μ sv/year and 2.8 μ sv/year by using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter respectively. There is just a background radiation in the main library and the applied nuclear.(Author)

  14. An Easily Assembled Laboratory Exercise in Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylott, Elliot; Klepetka, Ryan; Dunlap, Justin C.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a laboratory activity in computed tomography (CT) primarily composed of a photogate and a rotary motion sensor that can be assembled quickly and partially automates data collection and analysis. We use an enclosure made with a light filter that is largely opaque in the visible spectrum but mostly transparent to the near…

  15. A note on simulated annealing to computer laboratory scheduling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concepts, principles and implementation of simulated Annealing as a modem heuristic technique is presented. Simulated Annealing algorithm is used in solving real life problem of Computer Laboratory scheduling in order to maximize the use of scarce and insufficient resources. KEY WORDS: Simulated Annealing ...

  16. Fundamentals of universality in one-way quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nest, M van den; Duer, W; Miyake, A; Briegel, H J

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we build a framework allowing for a systematic investigation of the fundamental issue: 'Which quantum states serve as universal resources for measurement-based (one-way) quantum computation?' We start our study by re-examining what is exactly meant by 'universality' in quantum computation, and what the implications are for universal one-way quantum computation. Given the framework of a measurement-based quantum computer, where quantum information is processed by local operations only, we find that the most general universal one-way quantum computer is one which is capable of accepting arbitrary classical inputs and producing arbitrary quantum outputs-we refer to this property as CQ-universality. We then show that a systematic study of CQ-universality in one-way quantum computation is possible by identifying entanglement features that are required to be present in every universal resource. In particular, we find that a large class of entanglement measures must reach its supremum on every universal resource. These insights are used to identify several families of states as being not universal, such as one-dimensional (1D) cluster states, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, W states, and ground states of non-critical 1D spin systems. Our criteria are strengthened by considering the efficiency of a quantum computation, and we find that entanglement measures must obey a certain scaling law with the system size for all efficient universal resources. This again leads to examples of non-universal resources, such as, e.g. ground states of critical 1D spin systems. On the other hand, we provide several examples of efficient universal resources, namely graph states corresponding to hexagonal, triangular and Kagome lattices. Finally, we consider the more general notion of encoded CQ-universality, where quantum outputs are allowed to be produced in an encoded form. Again we provide entanglement-based criteria for encoded universality. Moreover, we present a

  17. Laboratory Works Designed for Developing Student Motivation in Computer Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Ogrutan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of the current difficulties related to maintaining the students’ interest and to stimulate their motivation for learning, the authors have developed a range of new laboratory exercises intended for first-year students in Computer Science as well as for engineering students after completion of at least one course in computers. The educational goal of the herein proposed laboratory exercises is to enhance the students’ motivation and creative thinking by organizing a relaxed yet competitive learning environment. The authors have developed a device including LEDs and switches, which is connected to a computer. By using assembly language, commands can be issued to flash several LEDs and read the states of the switches. The effectiveness of this idea was confirmed by a statistical study.

  18. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters

  19. Establishing Good Laboratory Practice at Small Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meryl Bornstein-Forst

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Good Laboratory Practice (GLP and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs provide guidelines for proper operation of equipment, maintenance and sanitation, reporting structures, and related activities. These practices are routinely employed at large academic and research-based institutions. However, they are often overlooked or omitted at smaller colleges and universities where staff and resources are limited. Incorrect assumptions and presumed responsibilities can lead to safety hazards, damage to equipment, loss of infrastructure, and confusion regarding operations and oversight. This report addresses the development of the “who, what, when, how, and where” policies and SOPs that constitute GLP. Once established and utilized by all departmental members, these structures ensure that academic and research-related activities are conducted safely and efficiently.

  20. Effects of Students' Pre- and Post-Laboratory Concept Maps on Students' Attitudes toward Chemistry Laboratory in University General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ziya; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Dogan, Alev

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scientific discussions based on student-constructed pre- and post-laboratory concept maps on students' attitudes toward chemistry laboratory in the university general chemistry. As part of instruction, during the first four laboratory sessions, students were taught how to construct and…

  1. Kyushu University Tandem Accelerator Laboratory report, 1988-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Kenshi; Morinobu, Shunpei

    1991-03-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the first beam was obtained from the Kyushu University tandem accelerator. Although the laboratory has achieved successful scientific results, the performance of the accelerator has been on a decline mainly due to the aging. In the last two and a half years, the tandem accelerator has suffered from the fall of terminal voltage to around 8 MV. However, the experimental studies in the laboratory have been active. The utilization of the polarized beams of protons and deuterons to study the scattering of the p+d system, the use of heavy ion beam for the systematic search for the molecular resonance in relatively heavy systems and for the study on reaction mechanism, the use of both light and heavy ion beams for the studies on nuclear engineering, material science and geological science and so on were carried out. The gamma ray spectroscopic study on the state near yrast line was largely hampered by the accelerator troubles, instead, the collaboration with the Niels Bohr Institute provided a wonderful research ground for the studies. (K.I.)

  2. Science and production laboratories: integration between the industry and universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, A.N.; Sivokon', V.P.; Rakitin, I.D.

    2010-01-01

    Industry laboratories provide students with an opportunity to resolve real serious tasks and be exposed to a wide range of professional activities. Staffing in the Russian nuclear industry is a serious concern. There is a shortage of experienced specialists, and it is impossible to train a replacement for them quickly. Creation of a true professional is a long and thorough process, whereby the amount of knowledge and experience very slowly transforms into quality of performance. The authors underline that the teacher of a modern technical university should not and must not act as a middle man between the textbook and the students. The teacher must instead become a holder of the latest technological knowledge, which he will pass to students during lessons. The authors report on the ERGOLAB, a problematic science and research laboratory for ergonomic research and development in the nuclear field. Ergonomic support is one of the more important factors in the prevention of human errors, maintenance of professional health and improvement of performance efficiency [ru

  3. Evolution of a Computer-Based Testing Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Patrick; Caldwell, Richard; Ellis, Taylor

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, faced with increasing growth in technology-based and large-enrollment courses, the College of Business Administration at the University of Central Florida opened a computer-based testing lab to facilitate administration of course examinations. Patrick Moskal, Richard Caldwell, and Taylor Ellis describe the development and evolution of the…

  4. The Physics Multimedia Laboratory at Arkansas State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustich, Andrew

    1997-11-01

    With the help of an NSF-ILI grant, we have revamped our introductory calculus-based sequence. The course now meets six hours per week entirely in the laboratory without traditional lectures. Multimedia computers together with MBL probes and software provide a hands-on interactive curriculum that actively engages students throughout the class period. An innovative web-based individualized homework service provides for a meaningful homework component to the course and gives students immediate feedback on their solutions. We discuss impementation of this new course and results from its first offering. We will also discuss some of the problems associated with faculty attitudes and plans for conversion of the algebra-based sequence to a similar format.

  5. BUSEFL: The Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contos, A.R.; Sanchez, L.A.; Jorgensen, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    BUSEFL (Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory) is a comprehensive, integrated project to address the issues and implications of space weather forecasting. An important goal of the BUSEFL mission is to serve as a testing ground for space weather algorithms and operational procedures. One such algorithm is the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSFM), which may be implemented in possible future space weather prediction centers. Boston University Student-satellite for Applications and Training (BUSAT), the satellite component of BUSEFL, will incorporate four experiments designed to measure (1) the earth close-quote s magnetic field, (2) distribution of energetic electrons trapped in the earth close-quote s radiation belts, (3) the mass and charge composition of the ion fluxes along the magnetic field lines and (4) the auroral forms at the foot of the field line in the auroral zones. Data from these experiments will be integrated into a ground system to evaluate space weather prediction codes. Data from the BUSEFL mission will be available to the scientific community and the public through media such as the World Wide Web (WWW). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. The molecular universe: from astronomy to laboratory astrophysics and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Molecules are found in a wide range of astronomical environments, fromour Solar System to distant starburst galaxies at the highest redshifts. Thanks to the opening up of the infrared and (sub)millimeter wavelength regime, culminating with Herschel and ALMA, more than 180 different species have now been found throughout the various stages of stellar birth and death: diffuse and dense interstellar clouds, protostars and disks, the envelopes of evolved stars and planetary nebulae, and exo-planetary atmospheres. Molecules and solid-state features are now also routinely detected in the interstellar medium of external galaxies, near and far.There are many motivations for studying this molecular universe. From the chemical perspective, interstellar space provides a unique laboratory to study basic molecular processes under very different conditions from those normally found in a laboratory on Earth. For astronomers, molecules are unique probes of the many environments where they are found, providing information on density, temperature, dynamics, ionization fractions and magnetic fields. Molecules also play an important role in the cooling of clouds allowing them to collapse, including the formation of the very first stars and galaxies. Finally, the molecular composition is sensitive to the history of the material, and ultimately provides critical information on our origins.This talk will summarize a number of recent observational highlights and provide examples of cases where the availability of new laboratory data proved crucial in the analysis. This includes basic data such as spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients, but also an improved understanding of photoprocesses in the gaseous and solid state. Much of the chemistry in star- and planet-forming regions is now thought to be driven by gas-grain chemistry rather than pure gas-phase chemistry, and a few examples of the close link between models and laboratory experiments will be given. In spite of lingering

  7. Evaluating laboratory key performance using quality indicators in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Chemistry Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mostafa M; Zaki, Adel; Hossam, Nermine; Aboul-Ela, Yasmin

    2014-12-01

    The performance of clinical laboratories plays a fundamental role in the quality and effectiveness of healthcare. To evaluate the laboratory performance in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Laboratories using key quality indicators and to compare the performance before and after an improvement plan based on ISO 15189 standards. The study was carried out on inpatient samples for a period of 7 months that was divided into three phases: phase I included data collection for evaluation of the existing process before improvement (March-May 2012); an intermediate phase, which included corrective, preventive action, quality initiative and steps for improvement (June 2012); and phase II, which included data collection for evaluation of the process after improvement (July 2012-September 2012). In terms of the preanalytical indicators, incomplete request forms in phase I showed that the total number of received requests were 31 944, with a percentage of defected request of 33.66%; whereas in phase II, there was a significant reduction in all defected request items (Plaboratories.

  8. Computer anxiety among university and college students majoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined computer anxiety among university and college of education Physical and Health Education (PHE) majors. The influence of personal characteristics of gender, age and experience of PHE majors on computer anxiety level were analysed. The Computer Anxiety Scale (CAS) developed by Marcoulides ...

  9. Computer Literacy among University Academic Staff: The Case of IIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Majid

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of computing skills of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM faculty members. A questionnaire was used to elicit information regarding computer literacy from a sample of 114 faculty members. The study shows that the level of computer literacy among IIUM faculty members is quite low: most of them have been using computers for word processing only. Other computer applications are being used by a limited number of academic staff. Irrespective of the existing level of computer literacy, almost all academic staff showed interest in attending computer courses.

  10. Laboratory Sequence in Computational Methods for Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jason A.; Wiser, Dawn C.

    2003-07-01

    A four-exercise laboratory sequence for introductory chemistry integrating hands-on, student-centered experience with computer modeling has been designed and implemented. The progression builds from exploration of molecular shapes to intermolecular forces and the impact of those forces on chemical separations made with gas chromatography and distillation. The sequence ends with an exploration of molecular orbitals. The students use the computers as a tool; they build the molecules, submit the calculations, and interpret the results. Because of the construction of the sequence and its placement spanning the semester break, good laboratory notebook practices are reinforced and the continuity of course content and methods between semesters is emphasized. The inclusion of these techniques in the first year of chemistry has had a positive impact on student perceptions and student learning.

  11. Economic impact of university veterinary diagnostic laboratories: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lee L; Hayes, Dermot J; Holtkamp, Derald J; Swenson, David A

    2018-03-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories (VDLs) play a significant role in the prevention and mitigation of endemic animal diseases and serve an important role in surveillance of, and the response to, outbreaks of transboundary and emerging animal diseases. They also allow for business continuity in livestock operations and help improve human health. Despite these critical societal roles, there is no academic literature on the economic impact of VDLs. We present a case study on the economic impact of the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ISUVDL). We use economic contribution analysis coupled with a stakeholder survey to estimate the impact. Results suggest that the ISUVDL is responsible for $2,162.46 million in direct output, $2,832.45 million in total output, $1,158.19 million in total value added, and $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years. In an animal health emergency this increases to $8,446.21 million in direct output, $11,063.06 million in total output, $4,523.70 million in total value added, and $124.15 million in state taxes. The ISUVDL receives $4 million annually as a direct state government appropriation for operating purposes. The $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years and the $124.15 million in state taxes in an animal health emergency equates to a 795% and 3104% return on investment, respectively. Estimates of the economic impact of the ISUVDL provide information to scientists, administrators, and policymakers regarding the efficacy and return on investment of VDLs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical cosmology: Revealing the universe using computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrella, J.; Matzner, R.A.; Tolman, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors present two research projects which study the evolution of different periods in the history of the universe using numerical simulations. The first investigates the synthesis of light elements in an inhomogeneous early universe dominated by shocks and non-linear gravitational waves. The second follows the evolution of large scale structures during the later history of the universe and calculates their effect on the 3K background radiation. Their simulations are carried out using modern supercomputers and make heavy use of multidimensional color graphics, including film to elucidate the results. Both projects provide the authors the opportunity to do experiments in cosmology and assess their results against fundamental cosmological observations

  13. Computer Mediated Communication and University International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nancy; Lo, Yen-Hai; Hou, Feng-Heiung; Chou, Tsai-Sheng; Chen, Chin-Hung; Chen, Chao-Chien; Chen, Wen-Chiang; Chen, Yen-Chuan; Wang, Shih-Jen; Huang, Shih-Yu; Lii, Jong-Yiing

    2002-01-01

    The design for this preliminary study was based on the experiences of the international students and faculty members of a small southwest university being surveyed and interviewed. The data collection procedure blends qualitative and quantitative data. A strong consensus was found that supports the study's premise that there is an association…

  14. Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgstahler, Sheryl

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD), a concept that grew from the field of architecture, has recently emerged as a paradigm for designing instructional methods, curriculum, and assessments that are welcoming and accessible to students with a wide range of characteristics, including those related to race, ethnicity, native language, gender, age, and disability.…

  15. Discovery Mondays: 'The Grid: a universal computer'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    How can one store and analyse the 15 million billion pieces of data that the LHC will produce each year with a computer that isn't the size of a sky-scraper? The IT experts have found the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers in the world by putting them together on one network and making them work like a single computer achieving a power that has not yet been matched. The Grid, inspired from the Web, already exists - in fact, several of them exist in the field of science. The European EGEE project, led by CERN, contributes not only to the study of particle physics but to medical research as well, notably in the study of malaria and avian flu. The next Discovery Monday invites you to explore this futuristic computing technology. The 'Grid Masters' of CERN have prepared lively animations to help you understand how the Grid works. Children can practice saving the planet on the Grid video game. You will also discover other applications such as UNOSAT, a United Nations...

  16. Learning and the cooperative computational universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaans, P.; Adriaans, P.; van Benthem, J.

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 1956, a number of scientists gathered at the Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Their goal was to study human intelligence with the help of computers. Their central hypothesis was: "that every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so

  17. Report on Computing and Networking in the Space Science Laboratory by the SSL Computer Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Science Laboratory (SSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center is a multiprogram facility. Scientific research is conducted in four discipline areas: earth science and applications, solar-terrestrial physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Representatives from each of these discipline areas participate in a Laboratory computer requirements committee, which developed this document. The purpose is to establish and discuss Laboratory objectives for computing and networking in support of science. The purpose is also to lay the foundation for a collective, multiprogram approach to providing these services. Special recognition is given to the importance of the national and international efforts of our research communities toward the development of interoperable, network-based computer applications.

  18. The University in the Cloud Computing.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Nuño, Ana Isabel; Martín Gascueña, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    With the advancement of Information and Communication Technology ICT which favors increasingly fast, easy, and accessible communication for all and which can reach large groups of people, there have been changes, in recent years in our society that have modified the way we interact, communicate and transmit information. Access to this, it is possible, not only through computers situated in a fixed location, but new mobile devices make it available, wherever the user happens to be located. Now...

  19. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of the original MUSIQC proposal was to construct and demonstrate a modular and universally- expandable ion...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation, scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  20. Cloud Computing Adoption Model for Universities to Increase ICT Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiya Okai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world especially those in developing countries are faced with the problem of delivering the level of information and communications technology (ICT needed to facilitate teaching, learning, research, and development activities ideal in a typical university, which is needed to meet educational needs in-line with advancement in technology and the growing dependence on IT. This is mainly due to the high cost involved in providing and maintaining the needed hardware and software. A technology such as cloud computing that delivers on demand provisioning of IT resources on a pay per use basis can be used to address this problem. Cloud computing promises better delivery of IT services as well as availability whenever and wherever needed at reduced costs with users paying only as much as they consume through the services of cloud service providers. The cloud technology reduces complexity while increasing speed and quality of IT services provided; however, despite these benefits the challenges that come with its adoption have left many sectors especially the higher education skeptical in committing to this technology. This article identifies the reasons for the slow rate of adoption of cloud computing at university level, discusses the challenges faced and proposes a cloud computing adoption model that contains strategic guidelines to overcome the major challenges identified and a roadmap for the successful adoption of cloud computing by universities. The model was tested in one of the universities and found to be both useful and appropriate for adopting cloud computing at university level.

  1. Daytime Utilization of a University Observatory for Laboratory Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    Scheduling convenience provides a strong incentive to fully explore effective utilization of educational observatories during daylight hours. I present two compelling daytime student activities that I developed at the Observatory at Fayetteville State University. My Introductory Astronomy Laboratory classes pursue these as separate investigations. My Physical Science classes complete both in a single lab period of 110 minutes duration. Both of these activities are also appropriate for High School student investigators, and could be used as demonstrations for younger students. Daylight Observation of Venus. With a clear sky, and when its elongation exceeds ~20˚, Venus is readily apparent in the daytime sky once a telescope is pointed at it. This is accomplished either with a digital pointing system, or with setting circles on a polar-aligned mount using the Sun to initialize the RA circle. Using the telescope pointing as a reference, it is also possible under optimal circumstances for students to see Venus in the daytime sky with naked eyes. Students are asked to write about the circumstances that made it possible to see Venus. Educational utilization of daytime observations of the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and the brightest stars are also discussed. Using a CCD Camera to Determine the Temperature of a Sunspot. After my students view the Sun with Eclipse Glasses and in projection using a 3-inch refractor, they analyze a CCD image of a sunspot (which they obtain if possible) to determine the ratio of its surface intensity relative to the normal solar surface. They then use the Stefan-Boltzmann law (usually with some coaching) to determine the sunspot temperature given the nominal surface temperature of the Sun. Appropriate safety precautions are presented given the hazards of magnified sunlight. Mitigation of dome seeing during daylight hours is discussed.

  2. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.; Fulton, B.

    1996-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has for over 40 years supported a broad program of experimental physics research. Some highlights of the research activities during the past year are given. Work continues at a rapid pace toward completion of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in January 1997. Following four years of planning and development, installation of the acrylic vessel began last July and is now 50% complete, with final completion scheduled for September. The Russian-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) has completed a successful 51 Cr neutrino source experiment. The first data from 8 B decay have been taken in the Mass-8 CVC/Second Class Current study. The analysis of the measured barrier distributions for Ca-induced fission of prolate 192 Os and oblate 194 Pt has been completed. In a collaboration with a group from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre they have shown that fission anisotropies at energies well above the barrier are not influenced by the mass asymmetry of the entrance channel relative to the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry. They also have preliminary evidence at higher bombarding energy that noncompound nucleus fission scales with the mean square angular momentum, in contrast to previous suggestions. The authors have measured proton and alpha particle emission spectra from the decay of A ∼ 200 compound nuclei at excitation energies of 50--100 MeV, and used these measurements to infer the nuclear temperature. The investigations of multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry have led to a new algorithm for putting Bose-Einstein and Coulomb correlations of up to 6th order into Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-relativistic collision events, and to a new fast algorithm for extracting event temperatures

  3. Computational geomechanics and applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguello, Jose Guadalupe Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multi-program national laboratory in the business of national security, whose primary mission is nuclear weapons (NW). It is a prime contractor to the USDOE, operating under the NNSA and is one of the three NW national laboratories. It has a long history of involvement in the area of geomechanics, starting with the some of the earliest weapons tests at Nevada. Projects in which geomechanics support (in general) and computational geomechanics support (in particular) are at the forefront at Sandia, range from those associated with civilian programs to those in the defense programs. SNL has had significant involvement and participation in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (low-level defense nuclear waste), the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly proposed for commercial spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste), and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (the nation's emergency petroleum store). In addition, numerous industrial partners seek-out our computational/geomechanics expertise, and there are efforts in compressed air and natural gas storage, as well as in CO 2 Sequestration. Likewise, there have also been collaborative past efforts in the areas of compactable reservoir response, the response of salt structures associated with reservoirs, and basin modeling for the Oil and Gas industry. There are also efforts on the defense front, ranging from assessment of vulnerability of infrastructure to defeat of hardened targets, which require an understanding and application of computational geomechanics. Several examples from some of these areas will be described and discussed to give the audience a flavor of the type of work currently being performed at Sandia in the general area of geomechanics.

  4. The magic of universal quantum computing with permutations

    OpenAIRE

    Planat, Michel; Rukhsan-Ul-Haq

    2017-01-01

    The role of permutation gates for universal quantum computing is investigated. The \\lq magic' of computation is clarified in the permutation gates, their eigenstates, the Wootters discrete Wigner function and state-dependent contextuality (following many contributions on this subject). A first classification of main types of resulting magic states in low dimensions $d \\le 9$ is performed.

  5. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  6. The Magic of Universal Quantum Computing with Permutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Planat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of permutation gates for universal quantum computing is investigated. The “magic” of computation is clarified in the permutation gates, their eigenstates, the Wootters discrete Wigner function, and state-dependent contextuality (following many contributions on this subject. A first classification of a few types of resulting magic states in low dimensions d≤9 is performed.

  7. MIT Laboratory for Computer Science Progress Report 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    partment, April 1987 TR-388 hirsch, D.E. An Expert System for Diagnosing Gait in Cerebral Palsy Patients, S.M. The~is, EE & CS Department, May 1987 276... games -space wars and computer chess. These early developments laid the foundation for the Laboratory’s work in the 1970’s on knowledge-based systems-for...domains and has seriously impaired th,- ability of developers to maintain them [264]. In response to these inadequacies, researchers turned in the early

  8. Applications of industrial computed tomography at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, R.P.; Morris, R.A.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    A research and development program was begun three years ago at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to study nonmedical applications of computed tomography. This program had several goals. The first goal was to develop the necessary reconstruction algorithms to accurately reconstruct cross sections of nonmedical industrial objects. The second goal was to be able to perform extensive tomographic simulations to determine the efficacy of tomographic reconstruction with a variety of hardware configurations. The final goal was to construct an inexpensive industrial prototype scanner with a high degree of design flexibility. The implementation of these program goals is described

  9. Computer-assisted estimating for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spooner, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    An analysis is made of the cost estimating system currently in use at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and the benefits of computer assistance are evaluated. A computer-assisted estimating system (CAE) is proposed for LASL. CAE can decrease turnaround and provide more flexible response to management requests for cost information and analyses. It can enhance value optimization at the design stage, improve cost control and change-order justification, and widen the use of cost information in the design process. CAE costs are not well defined at this time although they appear to break even with present operations. It is recommended that a CAE system description be submitted for contractor consideration and bid while LASL system development continues concurrently

  10. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGINEER: FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER INTEGRATED LABORATORY WORKSHOP ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor S. Chernetskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the category «technological competence» and the definition of its components according to the educational process. A structural and functional model of technological competence of future engineers through forms, means, methods and technologies of computer oriented laboratory work. Selected blocks and elements of the model in the course of a typical student laboratory work on the course of general physics. We consider the possibility of using some type of digital labs «Phywe», «Fourier» and modern electronic media (flash books to optimize laboratory work at the Technical University. The analysis of the future research of structural elements model of technological competence.

  11. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-01-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and ...

  12. Cloud Computing and Some Scenarios for its Application in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Selcukcan Erol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology and a new trend. In recent years most of organisations start to choose their cloud models. The educational institutions, especially universities, cannot ignore the huge amount of benefits that cloud computing may bring them. In this paper, we are explaining in details the concept of cloud computing, its models and usage areas, its working principle, its advantages and disadvantages. We specifically focus on its importance for universities by giving examples for its implementation in e-Learning.

  13. Origins of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hartmann, William K.

    2014-11-01

    The roots of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) extend deep into the rich fabric of G. P. Kuiper’s view of the Earth as a planet and planetary systems as expected companions to most stars, as well as the post-war emergent technology of infrared detectors suitable for astronomy. These concepts and events began with Kuiper’s theoretical work at Yerkes Observatory on the origin of the Solar System, his discovery of two planetary satellites and observational work with his near-infrared spectrometer on the then-new McDonald 82-inch telescope in the mid- to late-1940s. A grant for the production of a photographic atlas of the Moon in the mid-1950s enabled him to assemble the best existing images of the Moon and acquire new photographs. This brought E. A. Whitaker and D. W. G. Arthur to Yerkes. Others who joined in the lunar work were geologist Carl S. Huzzen and grad student E. P. Moore, as well as undergrad summer students A. B. Binder and D. P. Cruikshank (both in 1958). The Atlas was published in 1959, and work began on an orthographic lunar atlas. Kuiper’s view of planetary science as an interdisciplinary enterprise encompassing astronomy, geology, and atmospheric physics inspired his vision of a research institution and an academic curriculum tuned to the combination of all the scientific disciplines embraced in a comprehensive study of the planets. Arrangements were made with the University of Arizona (UA) to establish LPL in affiliation with the widely recognized Inst. of Atmospheric Physics. Kuiper moved to the UA in late 1960, taking the lunar experts, graduate student T. C. Owen (planetary atmospheres), and associate B. M. Middlehurst along. G. van Biesbroeck also joined the migration to Tucson; Binder and Cruikshank followed along as new grad students. Astronomy grad student W. K. Hartmann came into the academic program at UA and the research group at LPL in 1961. Senior faculty affiliating with LPL in the earliest years were T. Gehrels, A. B

  14. A universal open-source Electronic Laboratory Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegele, Catherine; Bouchereau, Baptiste; Robinot, Nivonirina; McKay, James; Damiecki, Philippe; Alteyrac, Lucile

    2013-07-01

    Laboratory notebooks remain crucial to the activities of research communities. With the increase in generation of electronic data within both wet and dry analytical laboratories and new technologies providing more efficient means of communication, Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELN) offer equivalent record keeping to paper-based laboratory notebooks (PLN). They additionally allow more efficient mechanisms for data sharing and retrieval, which explains the growing number of commercial ELNs available varying in size and scope but all are increasingly accepted and used by the scientific community. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) having already an LIMS and a Biobank Management System for respectively laboratory workflows and sample management, we have developed a free multidisciplinary ELN specifically dedicated to work notes that will be flexible enough to accommodate different types of data. Information for installation of our freeware ELN with source codes customizations are detailed in supplementary data. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  16. Using Cluster Analysis to Characterize Meaningful Learning in a First-Year University Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was designed to measure students' cognitive and affective learning in the university chemistry laboratory. The MLLI was administered at the beginning and the end of the first semester to first-year university chemistry students to measure their expectations and experiences for learning in…

  17. A Low-Cost Computer-Controlled Arduino-Based Educational Laboratory System for Teaching the Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadou, K.; Yiasemides, K.; Trougkakos, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, fully computer-controlled, Arduino-based, educational laboratory (SolarInsight) to be used in undergraduate university courses concerned with electrical engineering and physics. The major goal of the system is to provide students with the necessary instrumentation, software tools and methodology in order to learn fundamental…

  18. Lower Secondary School Students' Attitudes Toward Computer-Supported Laboratory Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Špernjak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Science teaching laboratory work is recognized as one of the cornerstones. In school science laboratory work computers can be used as computer supported laboratory (real and as virtual laboratory. In the first case “real” laboratories involve bench top experiments utilizing data acquisition systems while “virtual” laboratory entails interactive simulations and animations. Lower secondary school students in age between 11 and 15 performed three laboratory exercises (Activity of yeast, Gas exchange in breathing, Heart rate as classic, computer-supported and virtual laboratory. As a result of testing we know that all three methods are suitable even for younger students. When they were asked which method they liked the most, their first choice was computer-supported laboratory, followed by classic laboratory, and virtual laboratory at the end. Additionally recognized weak and strong sides of used methods are discussed.

  19. The universal computer the road from Leibniz to Turing

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The breathtakingly rapid pace of change in computing makes it easy to overlook the pioneers who began it all. Written by Martin Davis, respected logician and researcher in the theory of computation, The Universal Computer: The Road from Leibniz to Turing explores the fascinating lives, ideas, and discoveries of seven remarkable mathematicians. It tells the stories of the unsung heroes of the computer age -- the logicians. The story begins with Leibniz in the 17th century and then focuses on Boole, Frege, Cantor, Hilbert, and Godel, before turning to Turing. Turing's analysis of algorithmic pro

  20. Research on the Teaching System of the University Computer Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inonal students, the teaching contents, classification, hierarchical teaching methods with the combination of professional level training, as well as for top-notch students after class to promote comprehensive training methods for different students, establish online Q & A, test platform, to strengthen the integration professional education and computer education and training system of college computer basic course of study and exploration, and the popularization and application of the basic programming course, promote the cultivation of university students in the computer foundation, thinking methods and innovative practice ability, achieve the goal of individualized educ the College of computer basic course teaching, the specific circumstances of the need for students, professiation.

  1. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  2. Google+ as a Tool for Use in Cooperative Laboratory Activities between Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Ortiz, Joan; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Martinez Miralles, Jordi Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The following is a proposal for collaboration between universities with the aim to improve curricula that require laboratory activities. A methodology is suggested to implement an innovative educational project involving the exchange of laboratory activities. The exchange of laboratory activities can be carried out on different levels of…

  3. The Laboratory for School Science at the University of Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Svein

    1976-01-01

    Describes the purposes of the Center for Science Education at the University of Oslo as follows: to give help and advice to acting teachers; to make the staff at the university more aware of the needs and problems of the schools. Outlines the activities involved in fulfilling these purposes. (GS)

  4. Cane Toad or Computer Mouse? Real and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Exercises in Physiology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jan; Veenstra, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Traditional practical classes in many countries are being rationalised to reduce costs. The challenge for university educators is to provide students with the opportunity to reinforce theoretical concepts by running something other than a traditional practical program. One alternative is to replace wet labs with comparable computer simulations.…

  5. The communication of laboratory investigations by university entrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bob; Kaunda, Loveness; Allie, Saalih; Buffler, Andy; Lubben, Fred

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to analyse the ways in which unversity entrant science students carry out and communicate experimental activities and to identify a model to explain characteristic communication practices. The study was prompted by a need to inform the development of an introductory laboratory course. The students studied shared an educational background characterised by a lack of experience with laboratory work and scientific writing. Seven groups of three students were studied. The investigative strategies of these groups were observed. Laboratory reports were used to identify the ways in which students communicated these strategies. Data are presented that show a discrepancy between the strategies used and those reported. The results suggest that: (i) students' perceptions of the purpose of a laboratory task influence their decisions on what to report; (ii) understandings of laboratory procedures greatly influence their decision on what to report and on how much detail to include in a report and; (iii) knowledge of discourse rules contributes to effective reporting. It is concluded that students' communication of an investigation results from the differential operation of various perceptual filters that determine both the procedural and discourse elements of their reports. It is recommended that the communication of science should be taught explicitly and alongside the procedures and concepts of science.

  6. Continuous-Time Symmetric Hopfield Nets are Computationally Universal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří; Orponen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2003), s. 693-733 ISSN 0899-7667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA ČR GA201/02/1456 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : continuous-time Hopfield network * Liapunov function * analog computation * computational power * Turing universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2003

  7. Willow Run Laboratories: Separating from the University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John

    1972-01-01

    Outlines the reasons for, and the problems involved in, separation of a research center from the University of Michigan in order to become an independent research organization contracting for private and military research. (AL)

  8. An inexpensive modification of the laboratory computer display changes emergency physicians' work habits and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinakis, Harry A; Zwemer, Frank L

    2003-02-01

    Little is known about how the availability of laboratory data affects emergency physicians' practice habits and satisfaction. We modified our clinical information system to display laboratory test status with continuous updates, similar to an airport arrival display. The objective of this study was to determine whether the laboratory test status display altered emergency physicians' work habits and increased satisfaction compared with the time period before implementation of laboratory test status. A retrospective analysis was performed of emergency physicians' actual use of the clinical information system before and after implementation of the laboratory test status display. Emergency physicians were retrospectively surveyed regarding the effect of laboratory test status display on their practice habits and clinical information system use. Survey responses were matched with actual use of the clinical information system. Data were analyzed by using dependent t tests and Pearson correlation coefficients. The study was conducted at a university hospital. Clinical information system use by 46 emergency physicians was analyzed. Twenty-five surveys were returned (71.4% of available emergency physicians). All emergency physicians perceived fewer clinical information system log ons per day after laboratory test status display. The actual average decrease was 19%. Emergency physicians who reported the greatest decrease in log ons per day tended to have the greatest actual decrease (r =-0.36). There was no significant correlation between actual and perceived total time logged on (r =0.08). In regard to effect on emergency physicians' practice habits, 95% reported increased efficiency, 80% reported improved satisfaction with data access, and 65% reported improved communication with patients. An inexpensive computer modification, laboratory test status display, significantly increased subjective efficiency, changed work habits, and improved satisfaction regarding data access

  9. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  10. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: astrophysics; giant resonances; heavy ion induced reactions; fundamental symmetries; nuclear reaction -- polarization; medium energy reactions; accelerator mass spectroscopy; research by outside users; van de Graaff and ion sources; computer systems; instrumentation; and booster linac

  11. From Cookbook to Collaborative: Transforming a University Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Sherry S.

    2009-01-01

    As described in "How People Learn," "Developing Biological Literacy," and by the Commission on Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences during the 1960s and early 1970s, laboratories should promote guided-inquiries or investigations, and not simply consist of cookbook or verification activities. However, the only word that could describe…

  12. Methodological Potential of Computer Experiment in Teaching Mathematics at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kequan; Sokolova, Anna Nikolaevna; Vlasova, Vera K.

    2017-01-01

    The study is relevant due to the opportunity of increasing efficiency of teaching mathematics at university through integration of students of computer experiment conducted with the use of IT in this process. The problem of there search is defined by a contradiction between great potential opportunities of mathematics experiment for motivating and…

  13. Cloud Computing E-Communication Services in the University Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Ron; Halilovic, Branka

    2017-01-01

    The use of cloud computing services has grown dramatically in post-secondary institutions in the last decade. In particular, universities have been attracted to the low-cost and flexibility of acquiring cloud software services from Google, Microsoft and others, to implement e-mail, calendar and document management and other basic office software.…

  14. Computation of Universal Objects for Distributions Over Co-Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik Densing; Topsøe, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    for the model or, equivalently, the corresponding universal code, can be determined exactly via an algorithm of low complexity. Natural relations to problems on the computation of capacity and on the determination of information projections are established. More surprisingly, a direct connection to a problem...

  15. The University of Michigan's Computer-Aided Engineering Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, D. E.; Olsen, Leslie A.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Computer-Aided Engineering Network (CAEN) of the University of Michigan. Describes its arrangement of workstations, communication networks, and servers. Outlines the factors considered in hardware and software decision making. Reviews the program's impact on students. (ML)

  16. Computing, Environment and Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Research Divisions BIOBiosciences CPSComputational Science DSLData Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Biosciences Division Environmental Science Division Mathematics and Computer Science Division Facilities and Institutes Argonne Leadership Computing Facility News Events About

  17. Musculoskeletal Problems Associated with University Students Computer Users: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhadani PB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have examined the prevalence and correlates of musculoskeletal problems among university students, scanty information exists in South African context. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, causes and consequences of musculoskeletal problems among University of Venda students’ computer users. This cross-sectional study involved 694 university students at the University of Venda. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on the sociodemographic characteristics, problems associated with computer users, and causes of musculoskeletal problems associated with computer users. The majority (84.6% of the participants use computer for internet, wording processing (20.3%, and games (18.7%. The students reported neck pain when using computer (52.3%; shoulder (47.0%, finger (45.0%, lower back (43.1%, general body pain (42.9%, elbow (36.2%, wrist (33.7%, hip and foot (29.1% and knee (26.2%. Reported causes of musculoskeletal pains associated with computer usage were: sitting position, low chair, a lot of time spent on computer, uncomfortable laboratory chairs, and stressfulness. Eye problems (51.9%, muscle cramp (344.0%, headache (45.3%, blurred vision (38.0%, feeling of illness (39.9% and missed lectures (29.1% were consequences of musculoskeletal problems linked to computer use. The majority of students reported having mild pain (43.7%, moderate (24.2%, and severe (8.4% pains. Years of computer use were significantly associated with neck, shoulder and wrist pain. Using computer for internet was significantly associated with neck pain (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.93; games: neck (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.85 and hip/foot (OR=0.60; CI 95% 0.40-0.92, programming for elbow (OR= 1.78; CI 95% 1.10-2.94 and wrist (OR=2.25; CI 95% 1.36-3.73, while word processing was significantly associated with lower back (OR=1.45; CI 95% 1.03-2.04. Undergraduate study had a significant association with elbow pain (OR=2

  18. Computing the universe: how large-scale simulations illuminate galaxies and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Brian

    2015-04-01

    High-performance and large-scale computing is absolutely to understanding astronomical objects such as stars, galaxies, and the cosmic web. This is because these are structures that operate on physical, temporal, and energy scales that cannot be reasonably approximated in the laboratory, and whose complexity and nonlinearity often defies analytic modeling. In this talk, I show how the growth of computing platforms over time has facilitated our understanding of astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, focusing primarily on galaxies and large-scale structure in the Universe.

  19. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  20. An Overview of the Computational Physics and Methods Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Randal Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-22

    CCS Division was formed to strengthen the visibility and impact of computer science and computational physics research on strategic directions for the Laboratory. Both computer science and computational science are now central to scientific discovery and innovation. They have become indispensable tools for all other scientific missions at the Laboratory. CCS Division forms a bridge between external partners and Laboratory programs, bringing new ideas and technologies to bear on today’s important problems and attracting high-quality technical staff members to the Laboratory. The Computational Physics and Methods Group CCS-2 conducts methods research and develops scientific software aimed at the latest and emerging HPC systems.

  1. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems

  2. [University of Washington Nuclear Physics Laboratory] annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report contains brief papers on the following topics: giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei; nucleus-nucleus reactions; astrophysics; polarization; fundamental symmetries and interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; medium energy interactions; instrumentation; accelerators and ion sources; and computer systems

  3. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  4. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, John G.; Ramirez, Maria G.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  5. Design, implementation and security of a typical educational laboratory computer network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pokorný

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer network used for laboratory training and for different types of network and security experiments represents a special environment where hazardous activities take place, which may not affect any production system or network. It is common that students need to have administrator privileges in this case which makes the overall security and maintenance of such a network a difficult task. We present our solution which has proved its usability for more than three years. First of all, four user requirements on the laboratory network are defined (access to educational network devices, to laboratory services, to the Internet, and administrator privileges of the end hosts, and four essential security rules are stipulated (enforceable end host security, controlled network access, level of network access according to the user privilege level, and rules for hazardous experiments, which protect the rest of the laboratory infrastructure as well as the outer university network and the Internet. The main part of the paper is dedicated to a design and implementation of these usability and security rules. We present a physical diagram of a typical laboratory network based on multiple circuits connecting end hosts to different networks, and a layout of rack devices. After that, a topological diagram of the network is described which is based on different VLANs and port-based access control using the IEEE 802.1x/EAP-TLS/RADIUS authentication to achieve defined level of network access. In the second part of the paper, the latest innovation of our network is presented that covers a transition to the system virtualization at the end host devices – inspiration came from a similar solution deployed at the Department of Telecommunications at Brno University of Technology. This improvement enables a greater flexibility in the end hosts maintenance and a simultaneous network access to the educational devices as well as to the Internet. In the end, a vision of a

  6. Nonuniform code concatenation for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikahd, Eesa; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saheb Zamani, Morteza

    2017-09-01

    Using transversal gates is a straightforward and efficient technique for fault-tolerant quantum computing. Since transversal gates alone cannot be computationally universal, they must be combined with other approaches such as magic state distillation, code switching, or code concatenation to achieve universality. In this paper we propose an alternative approach for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing, mainly based on the code concatenation approach proposed in [T. Jochym-O'Connor and R. Laflamme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 010505 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.010505], but in a nonuniform fashion. The proposed approach is described based on nonuniform concatenation of the 7-qubit Steane code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, as well as the 5-qubit code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, which lead to two 49-qubit and 47-qubit codes, respectively. These codes can correct any arbitrary single physical error with the ability to perform a universal set of fault-tolerant gates, without using magic state distillation.

  7. Computer network access to scientific information systems for minority universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Wakim, Nagi T.

    1993-08-01

    The evolution of computer networking technology has lead to the establishment of a massive networking infrastructure which interconnects various types of computing resources at many government, academic, and corporate institutions. A large segment of this infrastructure has been developed to facilitate information exchange and resource sharing within the scientific community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports both the development and the application of computer networks which provide its community with access to many valuable multi-disciplinary scientific information systems and on-line databases. Recognizing the need to extend the benefits of this advanced networking technology to the under-represented community, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in the Space Data and Computing Division at the Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program: a major networking and education initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Universities (MUs). In this paper, we will briefly explain the various components of the MU-SPIN Program while highlighting how, by providing access to scientific information systems and on-line data, it promotes a higher level of collaboration among faculty and students and NASA scientists.

  8. Reactor laboratory course for students majoring in nuclear engineering with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Shiroya, S.; Kanda, K.

    1996-01-01

    With the use of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities (Hokkaido University, Tohoku University, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokai University, Nagoya University, Osaka University, Kobe University of Mercantile Marine and Kyushu University) in addition to a reactor laboratory course of undergraduate level for Kyoto University. These courses are opened for three weeks (two weeks for the joint course and one week for the undergraduate course) to students majoring in nuclear engineering and a total of 1,360 students have taken the course in the last 21 years. The joint course has been institutionalized with the background that it is extremely difficult for a single university in Japan to have her own research or training reactor. By their effort, the united faculty team of the joint course have succeeded in giving an effective, unique one-week course, taking advantage of their collaboration. Last year, an enquete (questionnaire survey) was conducted to survey the needs for the educational experiments of graduate level and precious data have been obtained for promoting reactor laboratory courses. (author)

  9. Laboratory report on RF superconductivity at Peking University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kui, Zhao; Baocheng, Zhang; Lifang, Wang; Jin, Yu; Rongli, Geng; Genfa, Wu; Tong, Wang; Jinhu, Song; Chia-erh, Chen

    1996-01-01

    The activities on RF superconductivity at Peking University in the past two years are reported. Two 1.5 GHz Nb cavities were successfully fabricated using Chinese Nb sheets in 1994. One of the cavities has been measured, and the results are given. A laser driven DC electron gun has been designed and constructed which is the pre-testing device of photo-electron gun using superconducting cavity. A series of experiments on the cathode and cavity will be performed in the near future. Two superconducting accelerating devices are being considered for two projects in China. (R.P.)

  10. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  11. University Physics Students' Ideas of Thermal Radiation Expressed in Open Laboratory Activities Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Melander, Emil; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Background: University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation and a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations. Purpose: The purpose of the…

  12. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, for fiscal 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication is the progress report of the research activities carried out by the members of the Osaka University Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (OULNS) in fiscal year 1995. Some groups carried out their experimental researches using the major research facilities at the OULNS, that include 4.75 MV Van de Graaff, a mass spectrograph, and an M360 Computer. Other groups intensively carried out all or part of their researches outside Osaka University including the facilities in foreign countries. In short the reader will enjoy a whole spectrum of research fields studied by nuclear and particle techniques. To expand and enrich the studies in the interdisciplinary region between nuclear physics and solid state physics investigated by use of nuclear technologies, especially by use of unstable nuclear beams, OULNS is now planning a small Radioactive-Nuclear-Beam Facility which consists of an AVF cyclotron of K = 30 with high intensity beams of light ions and a post accelerator, a radio-frequency-quadrupole accelerator (RFQ). (J.P.N.)

  13. Clifford algebras, noncommutative tori and universal quantum computers

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasov, Alexander Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Recently author suggested [quant-ph/0010071] an application of Clifford algebras for construction of a "compiler" for universal binary quantum computer together with later development [quant-ph/0012009] of the similar idea for a non-binary base. The non-binary case is related with application of some extension of idea of Clifford algebras. It is noncommutative torus defined by polynomial algebraic relations of order l. For l=2 it coincides with definition of Clifford algebra. Here is presente...

  14. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  15. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summerizes the research and educational activities at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The Laboratory holds four main facilities, which are Yayoi reactor, an electron accelerator, fusion blanket research facility, and heavy ion irradiation research facility. And they are open to the researchers both inside and outside the University. The application of the facilities are described. The activities and achievements of the Laboratory staffs, and theses for graduate, master, and doctor degrees are also summerized. (J.P.N.)

  16. University of South Carolina Aiken Biofuels Laboratory in Aiken, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Piskorska, Magdalena [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Biological production of hydrogen has been investigated over the past 30 years with the ultimate goal of providing a clean, carbon-neutral fuel. However, based on an extensive literature search and the recommendations of several recent DOE- and DOD-sponsored expert review panels it is obvious that an important element of this research has been largely overlooked - the physiology and diversity of naturally occurring, H2-producing bacteria. The main objective of this project was to develop a technique to extensively screen nitrogen fixing bacteria isolated from unique environments suspected of H2 production. Those showing H2-producing activity were tested on latex based mats, which could provide active centers of fuel cells. Specific objectives of the project were to establish a biofuels laboratory at the Aiken County Center for Hydrogen Research, where the following activities were persued.1) Develop a semi-automated apparatus to screen hundreds of bacteria in a short time; 2) Identify bacteria capable of producing hydrogen at rates sufficiently high to power a fuel cell. 3) Embed specific bacteria with high hydrogen production potentials into latex mats that can be incorporated in fuel cells applicable to a variety of industrial settings. During this project we developed screening techniques which include colorimetric and gas chromatographic assays for hydrogen production by bacterial isolates. Isolates were characterized both metabolically and genetically and preserved for future use. Isolates found to produce significant amounts of hydrogen were screened for activity under various environments. Potential isolates were then embedded in latex coatings and assayed for hydrogen production under different environmental conditions

  17. University of South Carolina Aiken Biofuels Laboratory in Aiken, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Biological production of hydrogen has been investigated over the past 30 years with the ultimate goal of providing a clean, carbon-neutral fuel. However, based on an extensive literature search and the recommendations of several recent DOE- and DOD-sponsored expert review panels it is obvious that an important element of this research has been largely overlooked - the physiology and diversity of naturally occurring, H2-producing bacteria. The main objective of this project was to develop a technique to extensively screen nitrogen fixing bacteria isolated from unique environments suspected of H2 production. Those showing H2-producing activity were tested on latex based mats, which could provide active centers of fuel cells. Specific objectives of the project were to establish a biofuels laboratory at the Aiken County Center for Hydrogen Research, where the following activities were persued.1) Develop a semi-automated apparatus to screen hundreds of bacteria in a short time; 2) Identify bacteria capable of producing hydrogen at rates sufficiently high to power a fuel cell. 3) Embed specific bacteria with high hydrogen production potentials into latex mats that can be incorporated in fuel cells applicable to a variety of industrial settings. During this project we developed screening techniques which include colorimetric and gas chromatographic assays for hydrogen production by bacterial isolates. Isolates were characterized both metabolically and genetically and preserved for future use. Isolates found to produce significant amounts of hydrogen were screened for activity under various environments. Potential isolates were then embedded in latex coatings and assayed for hydrogen production under different environmental conditions

  18. Communication and computing technology in biocontainment laboratories using the NEIDL as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John; Hardcastle, Kath

    2014-07-01

    The National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), Boston University, is a globally unique biocontainment research facility housing biosafety level 2 (BSL-2), BSL-3, and BSL-4 laboratories. Located in the BioSquare area at the University's Medical Campus, it is part of a national network of secure facilities constructed to study infectious diseases of major public health concern. The NEIDL allows for basic, translational, and clinical phases of research to be carried out in a single facility with the overall goal of accelerating understanding, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases. The NEIDL will also act as a center of excellence providing training and education in all aspects of biocontainment research. Within every detail of NEIDL operations is a primary emphasis on safety and security. The ultramodern NEIDL has required a new approach to communications technology solutions in order to ensure safety and security and meet the needs of investigators working in this complex building. This article discusses the implementation of secure wireless networks and private cloud computing to promote operational efficiency, biosecurity, and biosafety with additional energy-saving advantages. The utilization of a dedicated data center, virtualized servers, virtualized desktop integration, multichannel secure wireless networks, and a NEIDL-dedicated Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) network are all discussed. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  20. ROLE OF COMPUTER ORIENTED LABORATORY TRAINING COURSE IN PHYSICS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF KEY COMPETENCES OF FUTURE ENGINEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Slipukhina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the features of the core competencies, which are formed in the course study of Physics at the Technical University are described. Some features and examples of the use of computer-oriented laboratory work for the formation of technological competencies engineering students are highlighted. Definitely possible elements of interactive content notebook integrated with software analysis of the experimental data.

  1. THE EMPLOYMENT OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES IN LABORATORY COURSE ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla M. Nakonechna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present paper considers the questions on development of conceptually new virtual physical laboratory, the employment of which into secondary education schools will allow to check the theoretical knowledge of students before laboratory work and to acquire the modern methods and skills of experiment.

  2. SEED: A Suite of Instructional Laboratories for Computer Security Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenliang; Wang, Ronghua

    2008-01-01

    The security and assurance of our computing infrastructure has become a national priority. To address this priority, higher education has gradually incorporated the principles of computer and information security into the mainstream undergraduate and graduate computer science curricula. To achieve effective education, learning security principles…

  3. Payroll. Computer Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Karen; And Others

    This is one of a series of computer modules designed for use by secondary students who have access to a computer. The module, designed to help students understand various aspects of payroll calculation, includes a statement of objectives, a time schedule, a list of materials, an outline for each section, and several computer programs. (MK)

  4. Restructuring the CS 1 classroom: Examining the effect of open laboratory-based classes vs. closed laboratory-based classes on Computer Science 1 students' achievement and attitudes toward computers and computer courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jean Foster

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of classroom restructuring involving computer laboratories on student achievement and student attitudes toward computers and computer courses. The effects of the targeted student attributes of gender, previous programming experience, math background, and learning style were also examined. The open lab-based class structure consisted of a traditional lecture class with a separate, unscheduled lab component in which lab assignments were completed outside of class; the closed lab-based class structure integrated a lab component within the lecture class so that half the class was reserved for lecture and half the class was reserved for students to complete lab assignments by working cooperatively with each other and under the supervision and guidance of the instructor. The sample consisted of 71 students enrolled in four intact classes of Computer Science I during the fall and spring semesters of the 2006--2007 school year at two southern universities: two classes were held in the fall (one at each university) and two classes were held in the spring (one at each university). A counterbalanced repeated measures design was used in which all students experienced both class structures for half of each semester. The order of control and treatment was rotated among the four classes. All students received the same amount of class and instructor time. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) via a multiple regression strategy was used to test the study's hypotheses. Although the overall MANOVA model was statistically significant, independent follow-up univariate analyses relative to each dependent measure found that the only significant research factor was math background: Students whose mathematics background was at the level of Calculus I or higher had significantly higher student achievement than students whose mathematics background was less than Calculus I. The results suggest that classroom structures that

  5. Enhancing laboratory activity with computer-based tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ritchie

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available In a degree course in electronic engineering, great importance is attached to laboratory work, in which students have the opportunity to develop their creative skills in a practical environment. For example, in the first year of the course they are expected to design and test some basic circuits using data available on the characteristics of the semiconductor devices to be used. Many of the students cannot be prepared sufficiently for this activity by attendance at lectures, in which basic principles are expounded to large classes. Firstyear students have widely differing knowledge, experience and ability in circuit design. Therefore, without individual tuition many of them are insufficiently prepared for their laboratory work. Weaker students often neglect to study the laboratory documentation thoroughly in advance and they make poor progress in the laboratory.

  6. Cumulative hierarchies and computability over universes of sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Cantone

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Various metamathematical investigations, beginning with Fraenkel’s historical proof of the independence of the axiom of choice, called for suitable definitions of hierarchical universes of sets. This led to the discovery of such important cumulative structures as the one singled out by von Neumann (generally taken as the universe of all sets and Godel’s universe of the so-called constructibles. Variants of those are exploited occasionally in studies concerning the foundations of analysis (according to Abraham Robinson’s approach, or concerning non-well-founded sets. We hence offer a systematic presentation of these many structures, partly motivated by their relevance and pervasiveness in mathematics. As we report, numerous properties of hierarchy-related notions such as rank, have been verified with the assistance of the ÆtnaNova proof-checker.Through SETL and Maple implementations of procedures which effectively handle the Ackermann’s hereditarily finite sets, we illustrate a particularly significant case among those in which the entities which form a universe of sets can be algorithmically constructed and manipulated; hereby, the fruitful bearing on pure mathematics of cumulative set hierarchies ramifies into the realms of theoretical computer science and algorithmics.

  7. Universal quantum computation with temporal-mode bilayer square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Yokoyama, Shota; Furusawa, Akira; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an experimental design for universal continuous-variable quantum computation that incorporates recent innovations in linear-optics-based continuous-variable cluster state generation and cubic-phase gate teleportation. The first ingredient is a protocol for generating the bilayer-square-lattice cluster state (a universal resource state) with temporal modes of light. With this state, measurement-based implementation of Gaussian unitary gates requires only homodyne detection. Second, we describe a measurement device that implements an adaptive cubic-phase gate, up to a random phase-space displacement. It requires a two-step sequence of homodyne measurements and consumes a (non-Gaussian) cubic-phase state.

  8. Data Sets, Ensemble Cloud Computing, and the University Library (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plale, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The environmental researcher at the public university has new resources at their disposal to aid in research and publishing. Cloud computing provides compute cycles on demand for analysis and modeling scenarios. Cloud computing is attractive for e-Science because of the ease with which cores can be accessed on demand, and because the virtual machine implementation that underlies cloud computing reduces the cost of porting a numeric or analysis code to a new platform. At the university, many libraries at larger universities are developing the e-Science skills to serve as repositories of record for publishable data sets. But these are confusing times for the publication of data sets from environmental research. The large publishers of scientific literature are advocating a process whereby data sets are tightly tied to a publication. In other words, a paper published in the scientific literature that gives results based on data, must have an associated data set accessible that backs up the results. This approach supports reproducibility of results in that publishers maintain a repository for the papers they publish, and the data sets that the papers used. Does such a solution that maps one data set (or subset) to one paper fit the needs of the environmental researcher who among other things uses complex models, mines longitudinal data bases, and generates observational results? The second school of thought has emerged out of NSF, NOAA, and NASA funded efforts over time: data sets exist coherent at a location, such as occurs at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). But when a collection is coherent, reproducibility of individual results is more challenging. We argue for a third complementary option: the university repository as a location for data sets produced as a result of university-based research. This location for a repository relies on the expertise developing in the university libraries across the country, and leverages tools, such as are being developed

  9. The use of computers in a materials science laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to make available a method of easily recording the microstructure of a sample by means of a computer. The method requires a minimum investment and little or no instruction on the operation of a computer. An outline of the setup involving a black and white TV camera, a digitizer control box, a metallurgical microscope and a computer screen, printer, and keyboard is shown.

  10. Universal immunogenicity validation and assessment during early biotherapeutic development to support a green laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Ami C; Zhou, Lei; Jawa, Vibha

    2013-10-01

    Immunogenicity support during nonclinical biotherapeutic development can be resource intensive if supported by conventional methodologies. A universal indirect species-specific immunoassay can eliminate the need for biotherapeutic-specific anti-drug antibody immunoassays without compromising quality. By implementing the R's of sustainability (reduce, reuse, rethink), conservation of resources and greener laboratory practices were achieved in this study. Statistical analysis across four biotherapeutics supported identification of consistent product performance standards (cut points, sensitivity and reference limits) and a streamlined universal anti-drug antibody immunoassay method implementation strategy. We propose an efficient, fit-for-purpose, scientifically and statistically supported nonclinical immunogenicity assessment strategy. Utilization of a universal method and streamlined validation, while retaining comparability to conventional immunoassays and meeting the industry recommended standards, provides environmental credits in the scientific laboratory. Collectively, individual reductions in critical material consumption, energy usage, waste and non-environment friendly consumables, such as plastic and paper, support a greener laboratory environment.

  11. Six networks on a universal neuromorphic computing substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas ePfeil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.

  12. Six networks on a universal neuromorphic computing substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Thomas; Grübl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Müller, Eric; Müller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A; Schmuker, Michael; Brüderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.

  13. Roads towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Earl T.; Terhal, Barbara M.; Vuillot, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    A practical quantum computer must not merely store information, but also process it. To prevent errors introduced by noise from multiplying and spreading, a fault-tolerant computational architecture is required. Current experiments are taking the first steps toward noise-resilient logical qubits. But to convert these quantum devices from memories to processors, it is necessary to specify how a universal set of gates is performed on them. The leading proposals for doing so, such as magic-state distillation and colour-code techniques, have high resource demands. Alternative schemes, such as those that use high-dimensional quantum codes in a modular architecture, have potential benefits, but need to be explored further.

  14. Computer soundcard as an AC signal generator and oscilloscope for the physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinlapanuntakul, Jinda; Kijamnajsuk, Puchong; Jetjamnong, Chanthawut; Chotikaprakhan, Sutharat

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop both an AC signal generator and a dual-channel oscilloscope based on standard personal computer equipped with sound card as parts of the laboratory of the fundamental physics and the introduction to electronics classes. The setup turns the computer into the two channel measured device which can provides sample rate, simultaneous sampling, frequency range, filters and others essential capabilities required to perform amplitude, phase and frequency measurements of AC signal. The AC signal also generate from the same computer sound card output simultaneously in any waveform such as sine, square, triangle, saw-toothed pulsed, swept sine and white noise etc. These can convert an inexpensive PC sound card into powerful device, which allows the students to measure physical phenomena with their own PCs either at home or at university attendance. A graphic user interface software was developed for control and analysis, including facilities for data recording, signal processing and real time measurement display. The result is expanded utility of self-learning for the students in the field of electronics both AC and DC circuits, including the sound and vibration experiments.

  15. Improved dissection efficiency in the human gross anatomy laboratory by the integration of computers and modern technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Rustin E; Aschenbrenner, John E; Wordinger, Robert J; Roque, Rouel S; Sheedlo, Harold J

    2004-05-01

    The need to increase the efficiency of dissection in the gross anatomy laboratory has been the driving force behind the technologic changes we have recently implemented. With the introduction of an integrated systems-based medical curriculum and a reduction in laboratory teaching hours, anatomy faculty at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) developed a computer-based dissection manual to adjust to these curricular changes and time constraints. At each cadaver workstation, Apple iMac computers were added and a new dissection manual, running in a browser-based format, was installed. Within the text of the manual, anatomical structures required for dissection were linked to digital images from prosected materials; in addition, for each body system, the dissection manual included images from cross sections, radiographs, CT scans, and histology. Although we have placed a high priority on computerization of the anatomy laboratory, we remain strong advocates of the importance of cadaver dissection. It is our belief that the utilization of computers for dissection is a natural evolution of technology and fosters creative teaching strategies adapted for anatomy laboratories in the 21st century. Our strategy has significantly enhanced the independence and proficiency of our students, the efficiency of their dissection time, and the quality of laboratory instruction by the faculty. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry

  17. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  18. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with c...

  19. Broad scope educational role of a midsize university reactor NAA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Broad scope educational activities at the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory (NAAL) associated with the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) have been implemented to serve a deserve and multidisciplinary academic clientele to meet a wide spectrum of educational needs for students at all academic levels. Educational usage of the complementary laboratory facilities is described and the importance of such academic experimental experience is emphasized for developing and maintaining a cadre of professionals in the analytical applications of nuclear energy. The synergistic operation of the NAAL and the reactor at the University of Florida to serve as a model worthy of emulation for other similar facilities is emphasized. (author)

  20. Accelerator Laboratory of the University and the Technical University of Munich. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korschinek, G.; Lutter, R.; Riess, F.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at the named laboratory together with a list of publications and reports. The abstracts concern experiments on nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy, atomic physics, accelerator mass spectroscopy with heavy ions, and applications of nuclear techniques, theoretical work on nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, atomic physics, and astrophysics, developments of accelerators and radiation instrumentation, as well as data processing. (HSI)

  1. The development of computer industry and applications of its relevant techniques in nuclear research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Guiliang

    1988-01-01

    The increasing needs for computers in the area of nuclear science and technology are described. The current status of commerical availabe computer products of different scale in world market are briefly reviewed. A survey of some noticeable techniques is given from the view point of computer applications in nuclear science research laboratories

  2. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure

  3. A Computer-Assisted Laboratory Sequence for Petroleum Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, David N.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a competitive oil-play game for petroleum geology students. It is accompanied by a computer program written in interactive Fortran. The program, however, is not essential, but useful for adding more interest. (SA)

  4. Efficient universal quantum channel simulation in IBM's cloud quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Xin, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-07-01

    The study of quantum channels is an important field and promises a wide range of applications, because any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel that transforms an initial state into a final state. Inspired by the method of performing non-unitary operators by the linear combination of unitary operations, we proposed a quantum algorithm for the simulation of the universal single-qubit channel, described by a convex combination of "quasi-extreme" channels corresponding to four Kraus operators, and is scalable to arbitrary higher dimension. We demonstrated the whole algorithm experimentally using the universal IBM cloud-based quantum computer and studied the properties of different qubit quantum channels. We illustrated the quantum capacity of the general qubit quantum channels, which quantifies the amount of quantum information that can be protected. The behavior of quantum capacity in different channels revealed which types of noise processes can support information transmission, and which types are too destructive to protect information. There was a general agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experiments, which strongly supports our method. By realizing the arbitrary qubit channel, this work provides a universally- accepted way to explore various properties of quantum channels and novel prospect for quantum communication.

  5. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ(2 ) Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2018-04-01

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized—using only linear optics and χ(2 ) (three-wave mixing) interactions—in any (n +1 )-dimensional qudit basis of the n -pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ(2 ) Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u (3 ) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ(2 ) interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ(2 ) interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  6. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ^{(2)} Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2018-04-20

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized-using only linear optics and χ^{(2)} (three-wave mixing) interactions-in any (n+1)-dimensional qudit basis of the n-pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ^{(2)} Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u(3) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ^{(2)} interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ^{(2)} interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  7. Availability and Overlap of Quality Computer Science Journal Holdings in Selected University Libraries in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Zainab, A.N.; Ng, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    The study reveals the availability status of quality journals in the field of computer science held in the libraries of the University of Malaya, (UM), University of Science Malaysia (USM), University of Technology Malaysia (UTM), National University of Malaysia (UKM) and University Putra Malaysia (UPM). These universities are selected since they offer degree programmes in computer science. The study also investigates the degree of overlaps and unique titles in the five libraries. The Univers...

  8. North Carolina State University Nuclear Structure Research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagondollar, L.W.; Waltner, A.W.; Mitchell, G.E.; Tilley, D.R.; Gould, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is presented of nuclear structure research completed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab for the period 9/1/74 to 8/31/75. Included are abstracts and titles for studies of electromagnetic transitions in low-medium mass nuclei, high resolution studies, accelerator induced x-ray investigations, and energy related neutron and charged particle cross section measurements. (U.S.)

  9. Annual report 1991 of Munich University and Technical University Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The experimental work in the Accelerator Laboratory contains investigations of nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, studies of atom physics and the application of nuclear physics methods in physics and in interdisciplinary research. These applications are acceleration mass spectrometry to detect traces of radio-isotopes and material analysis with particle beams. The development of apparatus in the fields of accelereator construction, ion sources and targets are at the heart of the laboratory and help to establish its reputation. They are of the greatest importance for the education of students. The development stage for the superconducting post-accelerator TRITRON is complete and prototypes of the magnets and resonators were successfully tested and operated. The mass-production of all the components is under way or already finished. The standard injector for the tandem axxelerator and an injector for accelerator mass spectroscopy with stable isotopes are being newly designed. The experimental work is supplemented by the calculations of our theoretical collagues of core reaction mechanisms, core de-excitation and the Cerenkov radiation of core structures and transition strengths, by relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations and by star model calculations. (orig.) [de

  10. Safety leadership in the teaching laboratories of electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih

    2008-01-01

    Safety has always been one of the principal goals in teaching laboratories. Laboratories cannot serve their educational purpose when accidents occur. The leadership of department heads has a major impact on laboratory safety, so this study discusses the factors affecting safety leadership in teaching laboratories. This study uses a mail survey to explore the perceived safety leadership in electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese universities. An exploratory factor analysis shows that there are three main components of safety leadership, as measured on a safety leadership scale: safety controlling, safety coaching, and safety caring. The descriptive statistics also reveals that among faculty, the perception of department heads' safety leadership is in general positive. A two-way MANOVA shows that there are interaction effects on safety leadership between university size and instructor age; there are also interaction effects between presence of a safety committee and faculty gender and faculty age. It is therefore necessary to assess organizational factors when determining whether individual factors are the cause of differing perceptions among faculty members. The author also presents advice on improving safety leadership for department heads at small universities and at universities without safety committees.

  11. Risk assessment and quality improvement of liquid waste management in Taiwan University chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Chung; Chen, Ming-Shu

    2018-01-01

    The policy of establishing new universities across Taiwan has led to an increase in the number of universities, and many schools have constructed new laboratories to meet students' academic needs. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of laboratory accidents from the liquid waste in universities. Therefore, how to build a safety system for laboratory liquid waste disposal has become an important issue in the environmental protection, safety, and hygiene of all universities. This study identifies the risk factors of liquid waste disposal and presents an agenda for practices to laboratory managers. An expert questionnaire is adopted to probe into the risk priority procedures of liquid waste disposal; then, the fuzzy theory-based FMEA method and the traditional FMEA method are employed to analyze and improve the procedures for liquid waste disposal. According to the research results, the fuzzy FMEA method is the most effective, and the top 10 potential disabling factors are prioritized for improvement according to the risk priority number (RNP), including "Unclear classification", "Gathering liquid waste without a funnel or a drain pan", "Lack of a clearance and transport contract", "Liquid waste spill during delivery", "Spill over", "Decentralized storage", "Calculating weight in the wrong way", "Compatibility between the container material and the liquid waste", "Lack of dumping and disposal tools", and "Lack of a clear labels for liquid waste containers". After tracking improvements, the overall improvement rate rose to 60.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laborato...

  13. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Kyoto University for fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1993 academic/fiscal year (April, 1993 - March, 1994). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  14. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  15. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1992 academic/fiscal year (April, 1992 - March, 1993). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Computer Use and Vision.Related Problems Among University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Related Problems Among University Students In Ajman, United Arab Emirate. ... of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of ... prevalence of vision related problems was noted among university students.

  17. Efficient universal computing architectures for decoding neural activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available The ability to decode neural activity into meaningful control signals for prosthetic devices is critical to the development of clinically useful brain- machine interfaces (BMIs. Such systems require input from tens to hundreds of brain-implanted recording electrodes in order to deliver robust and accurate performance; in serving that primary function they should also minimize power dissipation in order to avoid damaging neural tissue; and they should transmit data wirelessly in order to minimize the risk of infection associated with chronic, transcutaneous implants. Electronic architectures for brain- machine interfaces must therefore minimize size and power consumption, while maximizing the ability to compress data to be transmitted over limited-bandwidth wireless channels. Here we present a system of extremely low computational complexity, designed for real-time decoding of neural signals, and suited for highly scalable implantable systems. Our programmable architecture is an explicit implementation of a universal computing machine emulating the dynamics of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons; it requires no arithmetic operations except for counting, and decodes neural signals using only computationally inexpensive logic operations. The simplicity of this architecture does not compromise its ability to compress raw neural data by factors greater than [Formula: see text]. We describe a set of decoding algorithms based on this computational architecture, one designed to operate within an implanted system, minimizing its power consumption and data transmission bandwidth; and a complementary set of algorithms for learning, programming the decoder, and postprocessing the decoded output, designed to operate in an external, nonimplanted unit. The implementation of the implantable portion is estimated to require fewer than 5000 operations per second. A proof-of-concept, 32-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA implementation of this portion

  18. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff

  19. The development of remote teaching laboratory access software for multi-slice computed optical tomography for use in undergraduate nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, T.J.; Nichita, E., E-mail: Terry.Price@gmail.com [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Internet-based laboratory exercises were developed for a course on biomedical imaging at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. These exercises used a multi-slice computed optical tomography machine named DeskCAT to instruct students on the principals of computed tomography. User management software was developed which enabled course instructors to quickly set up a computer to accept a series of scheduled remote user connections for a classroom. Laboratory exercises using the DeskCAT machine were developed to be conducted remotely. (author)

  20. The development of remote teaching laboratory access software for multi-slice computed optical tomography for use in undergraduate nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.J.; Nichita, E.

    2013-01-01

    Internet-based laboratory exercises were developed for a course on biomedical imaging at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. These exercises used a multi-slice computed optical tomography machine named DeskCAT to instruct students on the principals of computed tomography. User management software was developed which enabled course instructors to quickly set up a computer to accept a series of scheduled remote user connections for a classroom. Laboratory exercises using the DeskCAT machine were developed to be conducted remotely. (author)

  1. Automatic Grading of 3D Computer Animation Laboratory Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Carlevaris, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a delicate task in the overall teaching process because it may require significant time and may be prone to subjectivity. Subjectivity is especially true for disciplines in which perceptual factors play a key role in the evaluation. In previous decades, computer-based assessment techniques were developed to address the…

  2. Promoting ergonomics in Algeria: activities of "the research and training laboratory" in the University of Oran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarki, Bouhafs; El-Bachir, Tebboune Cheikh

    2012-01-01

    The growing need in Algeria to develop ergonomics knowledge and practice in industry was behind the initiative to develop a training and research project within the ergonomics laboratory at Oran University. Since 2005 the laboratory team is running an academic option master in work design and ergonomics. The evaluation of the academic master in 2010 revealed the acute need of the local industry for professional competences in ergonomic and work psychology. A professional training master program in "ergonomics & work psychology" was then developed in partnership with local industry, five European Universities and six Universities from three Maghreb countries. Research projects were initiated around the two training programs, in conjunction with a number of ergonomics dissemination and promotion activities. Preliminary results of the project are presented and discussed in relation to the local context, and in the light of similar cases in Industrially Developing Countries.

  3. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  4. Programming a massively parallel, computation universal system: static behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1986-01-01

    In previous work by the authors, the ''optimum finding'' properties of Hopfield neural nets were applied to the nets themselves to create a ''neural compiler.'' This was done in such a way that the problem of programming the attractors of one neural net (called the Slave net) was expressed as an optimization problem that was in turn solved by a second neural net (the Master net). In this series of papers that approach is extended to programming nets that contain interneurons (sometimes called ''hidden neurons''), and thus deals with nets capable of universal computation. 22 refs.

  5. Personal computer versus personal computer/mobile device combination users' preclinical laboratory e-learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yamaga, Yoshiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between personal computer (PC)/mobile device combination and PC-only user patterns. We analyzed access frequency and time spent on a complete denture preclinical website in order to maximize website effectiveness. Fourth-year undergraduate students (N=41) in the preclinical complete denture laboratory course were invited to participate in this survey during the final week of the course to track login data. Students accessed video demonstrations and quizzes via our e-learning site/course program, and were instructed to view online demonstrations before classes. When the course concluded, participating students filled out a questionnaire about the program, their opinions, and devices they had used to access the site. Combination user access was significantly more frequent than PC-only during supplementary learning time, indicating that students with mobile devices studied during lunch breaks and before morning classes. Most students had favorable opinions of the e-learning site, but a few combination users commented that some videos were too long and that descriptive answers were difficult on smartphones. These results imply that mobile devices' increased accessibility encouraged learning by enabling more efficient time use between classes. They also suggest that e-learning system improvements should cater to mobile device users by reducing video length and including more short-answer questions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B. (CLS-CI)

    2011-05-13

    Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

  7. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R., E-mail: holt@queensu.ca, E-mail: daymond@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  8. Computer Use and Vision-Related Problems Among University Students In Ajman, United Arab Emirate

    OpenAIRE

    Shantakumari, N; Eldeeb, R; Sreedharan, J; Gopal, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: The extensive use of computers as medium of teaching and learning in universities necessitates introspection into the extent of computer related health disorders among student population. Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the pattern of computer usage and related visual problems, among University students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of Science and Technology we...

  9. Lab4CE: a Remote Laboratory for Computer Education

    OpenAIRE

    Broisin , Julien; Venant , Rémi; Vidal , Philippe

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Remote practical activities have been demonstrated to be efficient when learners come to acquire inquiry skills. In computer science education, virtualization technologies are gaining popularity as this technological advance enables instructors to implement realistic practical learning activities, and learners to engage in authentic and problem-based learning. However, virtualization solutions have not been designed especially for education and do not address any pedag...

  10. Selection and implementation of a laboratory computer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, V A; McMaster, R; Dillon, T; Mayall, B

    1995-07-01

    The process of selection of a pathology computer system has become increasingly complex as there are an increasing number of facilities that must be provided and stringent performance requirements under heavy computing loads from both human users and machine inputs. Furthermore, the continuing advances in software and hardware technology provide more options and innovative new ways of tackling problems. These factors taken together pose a difficult and complex set of decisions and choices for the system analyst and designer. The selection process followed by the Microbiology Department at Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital included examination of existing systems, development of a functional specification followed by a formal tender process. The successful tenderer was then selected using predefined evaluation criteria. The successful tenderer was a software development company that developed and supplied a system based on a distributed network using a SUN computer as the main processor. The software was written using Informix running on the UNIX operating system. This represents one of the first microbiology systems developed using a commercial relational database and fourth generation language. The advantages of this approach are discussed.

  11. Completeness of classical spin models and universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De las Cuevas, Gemma; Dür, Wolfgang; Briegel, Hans J; Van den Nest, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We study mappings between different classical spin systems that leave the partition function invariant. As recently shown in Van den Nest et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 110501), the partition function of the 2D square lattice Ising model in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field can specialize to the partition function of any Ising system on an arbitrary graph. In this sense the 2D Ising model is said to be 'complete'. However, in order to obtain the above result, the coupling strengths on the 2D lattice must assume complex values, and thus do not allow for a physical interpretation. Here we show how a complete model with real—and, hence, 'physical'—couplings can be obtained if the 3D Ising model is considered. We furthermore show how to map general q-state systems with possibly many-body interactions to the 2D Ising model with complex parameters, and give completeness results for these models with real parameters. We also demonstrate that the computational overhead in these constructions is in all relevant cases polynomial. These results are proved by invoking a recently found cross-connection between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, where partition functions are expressed as quantum mechanical amplitudes. Within this framework, there exists a natural correspondence between many-body quantum states that allow for universal quantum computation via local measurements only, and complete classical spin systems

  12. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.; Tewari, Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10 -3 to 10 -4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  13. Annual Report FY2011: Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2011-12-21

    This project is aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an open laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) thermochemical methods for the deconstruction of lignin. Highlights from these activities include a detailed study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of microalgae (Scenedesmus sp.) and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  14. Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2013-03-29

    This project was aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an “open” laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) the development of methods for the analysis of lignin and its deconstruction products. Highlights from these activities include the development of catalysts for the upgrading of lipids to hydrocarbons by means of decarboxylation/decarbonylation (deCOx), a study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of algae (Scenedesmus), and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  15. Algerian EFL University Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Bouchefra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of training and absence of facilities are clearly apparent, stakeholders’ attitudes are a decisive aspect that needs to be mapped out if we are to alter the current situation. Thus, the present work aims at investigating EFL university teachers’ attitudes towards CALL at Djilali Liabes University (western Algeria. The current work is a cross-sectional descriptive study that explores teachers’ attitudes across the three domains (affective, cognitive, and behavioural and investigates other related aspects that may help indicate teachers’ likelihood to adopt CALL in the future. The results are promising as the investigated population not only demonstrated a clearly positive attitude towards CALL but also manifested a number of signs that indicate their likelihood to adopt CALL in the future if circumstances are favourable.

  16. Computer-based laboratory simulation: evaluations of student perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norrie S. Edward

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experimentation in engineering is an essential part of the three main components in an engineer's formation. The theoretical constructs and models are imparted in lectures and tutorials. Workshop hands-on activity allows the student to acquire an understanding of the interaction of design and manufacture, and the constraints both impose. Characteristics of plant are investigated through experiment, and this aids the learner's understanding of the limitation of models in predicting performance. The learner also gains an appreciation of the nature of errors and of the construction of plant. But while the oil industry has brought prosperity to the North- East, it has also brought unique educational demands: the working arrangements place severe restrictions on part-time student attendance. Technicians work a block of two to four weeks offshore, followed by a similar period of leave. Different companies have different arrangements, and shift-change days.

  17. EXPERIENCE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF VIRTUAL LABORATORIES ON THE BASIS OF TECHNOLOGIES OF CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Oleksyuk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigated the concept of «virtual laboratory». This paper describes models of deploying of cloud technologies in IT infrastructure. The hybrid model is most recent for higher educational institution. The author suggests private cloud platforms to deploying the virtual laboratory. This paper describes the experience of the deployment enterprise cloud in IT infrastructure of Department of Physics and Mathematics of Ternopil V. Hnatyuk National Pedagogical University. The object of the research are virtual laboratories as components of IT infrastructure of higher education. The subject of the research are clouds as base of deployment of the virtual laboratories. Conclusions. The use of cloud technologies in the development virtual laboratories of the is an actual and need of the development. The hybrid model is the most appropriate in the deployment of cloud infrastructure of higher educational institution. It is reasonable to use the private (Cloudstack, Eucalyptus, OpenStack cloud platform in the universities.

  18. Experience with an accrediated INAA service laboratory at a University - will research be next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    1993-01-01

    Quality assurance, total quality management, and accreditation are the recognizable attributes of an attitude and consideration of a work process that is being introduced to industry, utilities, and (industrial) laboratories. International reference documents-the International Standard Organization (ISO)- IEC guides - have been developed to harmonize the ways of implementing and evaluating QA practices in connection with accreditation. The life-styles of working under quality practices and working at a university demonstrate a large contrast. Many of the basic principles of quality practices, such as full documentation, written procedures and instructions, and careful consideration of the conditions under which work will be performed, are characteristically absent at universities. Universities nowadays also have a mission to teach quality practices to the present and future generations of scientists. Within a few years, society may call for academics who are not only knowledgeable on the principles of quality practices but who also have been educated, trained, and practiced in such an environment. Conflicts will be avoided when such academics occupy leading positions in organizations that already use quality practices or when they become responsible for the introduction of quality practices. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory and associated analysis systems at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology has been reorganized and brought into accord with the requirements of EN45001 and ISO guide 25. After an audit by the official accreditation body in the Netherlands, STERLAB, the laboratory received its accreditation in early 1993, making it the first accredited laboratory of both kinds (university and instrumental (INAA)) in the Netherlands and possibly in the world

  19. An approach to quality and performance control in a computer-assisted clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrill, P E; Frazer, S C

    1979-01-01

    A locally developed, computer-based clinical chemistry laboratory system has been in operation since 1970. This utilises a Digital Equipment Co Ltd PDP 12 and an interconnected PDP 8/F computer. Details are presented of the performance and quality control techniques incorporated into the system. Laboratory performance is assessed through analysis of results from fixed-level control sera as well as from cumulative sum methods. At a simple level the presentation may be considered purely indicative, while at a more sophisticated level statistical concepts have been introduced to aid the laboratory controller in decision-making processes. PMID:438340

  20. A User Assessment of Workspaces in Selected Music Education Computer Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badolato, Michael Jeremy

    A study of 120 students selected from the user populations of four music education computer laboratories was conducted to determine the applicability of current ergonomic and environmental design guidelines in satisfying the needs of users of educational computing workspaces. Eleven categories of workspace factors were organized into a…

  1. Computer vision syndrome and ergonomic practices among undergraduate university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowatt, Lizette; Gordon, Carron; Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra; Jones, Thaon

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of computer vision syndrome (CVS) and ergonomic practices among students in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at The University of the West Indies (UWI), Jamaica. A cross-sectional study was done with a self-administered questionnaire. Four hundred and nine students participated; 78% were females. The mean age was 21.6 years. Neck pain (75.1%), eye strain (67%), shoulder pain (65.5%) and eye burn (61.9%) were the most common CVS symptoms. Dry eyes (26.2%), double vision (28.9%) and blurred vision (51.6%) were the least commonly experienced symptoms. Eye burning (P = .001), eye strain (P = .041) and neck pain (P = .023) were significantly related to level of viewing. Moderate eye burning (55.1%) and double vision (56%) occurred in those who used handheld devices (P = .001 and .007, respectively). Moderate blurred vision was reported in 52% who looked down at the device compared with 14.8% who held it at an angle. Severe eye strain occurred in 63% of those who looked down at a device compared with 21% who kept the device at eye level. Shoulder pain was not related to pattern of use. Ocular symptoms and neck pain were less likely if the device was held just below eye level. There is a high prevalence of Symptoms of CVS amongst university students which could be reduced, in particular neck pain and eye strain and burning, with improved ergonomic practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A Cryogenic Detector Characterization Facility in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at the Technical University of Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenkämper, A.; Defay, X.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Kinast, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Lindner, E.; Mancuso, M.; Mondragón, E.; Münster, A.; Ortmann, T.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S.; Strauss, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Physics Department of the Technical University of Munich operates a shallow underground detector laboratory in Garching, Germany. It provides ˜ 160 {m^2} of laboratory space which is shielded from cosmic radiation by ˜ 6 m of gravel and soil, corresponding to a shielding of ˜ 15 {m.w.e.} . The laboratory also houses a cleanroom equipped with work- and wetbenches, a chemical fumehood as well as a spin-coater and a mask-aligner for photolithographic processing of semiconductor detectors. Furthermore, the shallow underground laboratory runs two high-purity germanium detector screening stations, a liquid argon cryostat and a ^3 He-^4 He dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of ≤ 12-14 mK . The infrastructure provided by the shallow laboratory is particularly relevant for the characterization of CaWO_4 target crystals for the CRESST-III experiment, detector fabrication and assembly for rare event searches. Future applications of the laboratory include detector development in the framework of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments (ν -cleus) and studying its potential as a site to search for MeV-scale dark matter with gram-scale cryogenic detectors.

  3. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  4. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University multispectral sensor and data fusion laboratory: a model for distributed research and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Sonya A. H.; Henderson, Troy; Ison, David

    2017-05-01

    The miniaturization of unmanned systems and spacecraft, as well as computing and sensor technologies, has opened new opportunities in the areas of remote sensing and multi-sensor data fusion for a variety of applications. Remote sensing and data fusion historically have been the purview of large government organizations, such as the Department of Defense (DoD), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) due to the high cost and complexity of developing, fielding, and operating such systems. However, miniaturized computers with high capacity processing capabilities, small and affordable sensors, and emerging, commercially available platforms such as UAS and CubeSats to carry such sensors, have allowed for a vast range of novel applications. In order to leverage these developments, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) has developed an advanced sensor and data fusion laboratory to research component capabilities and their employment on a wide-range of autonomous, robotic, and transportation systems. This lab is unique in several ways, for example, it provides a traditional campus laboratory for students and faculty to model and test sensors in a range of scenarios, process multi-sensor data sets (both simulated and experimental), and analyze results. Moreover, such allows for "virtual" modeling, testing, and teaching capability reaching beyond the physical confines of the facility for use among ERAU Worldwide students and faculty located around the globe. Although other institutions such as Georgia Institute of Technology, Lockheed Martin, University of Dayton, and University of Central Florida have optical sensor laboratories, the ERAU virtual concept is the first such lab to expand to multispectral sensors and data fusion, while focusing on the data collection and data products and not on the manufacturing aspect. Further, the initiative is a unique effort among Embry-Riddle faculty to develop multi

  5. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1992 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that are, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of research by using respective research facilities have been summarized in separate reports. The course of the management and operation of each research facility is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation these of teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. (J.P.N.)

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, 'Yayoi', electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, `Yayoi`, electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  8. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report is the summary of the research and education activities, the state of operating research facilities and others in fiscal year 1994 in this Research Laboratory. In this Research Laboratory, there are four main installations, namely the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron linear accelerator, the basic experiment facility for the design of nuclear fusion reactor blanket and the heavy irradiation research facility. The former two are put to the joint utilization by all Japanese universities, the blanket is to that within Faculty of Engineering, and the HIT is to that within this university. The fast neutron science research facility, the installation of which was approved in 1993 as the ancillary equipment of the Yayoi, has been put to the joint utilization for all Japan, and achieved good results. In this report, the management and operation of these main installations, research activities, the publication of research papers,graduation and degree theses, the publication of research papers, graduation and degree theses, the events in the Laboratory for one year, the list of the visitors to the Laboratory, the list of the records of official trips to foreign countries and others, and the list of UTNL reports are described. (K.I.)

  9. Robotics as an integration subject in the computer science university studies. The experience of the University of Almeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Berenguel Soria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a global view of the role of robotics in computer science studies, mainly in university degrees. The main motivation of the use of robotics in these studies deals with the following issues: robotics permits to put in practice many computer science fundamental topics, it is a multidisciplinary area which allows to complete the basic knowledge of any computer science student, it facilitates the practice and learning of basic competences of any engineer (for instance, teamwork, and there is a wide market looking for people with robotics knowledge. These ideas are discussed from our own experience in the University of Almeria acquired through the studies of Computer Science Technical Engineering, Computer Science Engineering, Computer Science Degree and Computer Science Postgraduate.

  10. Universal fault-tolerant adiabatic quantum computing with quantum dots or donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Andrew

    I will present a conceptual design for an adiabatic quantum computer that can achieve arbitrarily accurate universal fault-tolerant quantum computations with a constant energy gap and nearest-neighbor interactions. This machine can run any quantum algorithm known today or discovered in the future, in principle. The key theoretical idea is adiabatic deformation of degenerate ground spaces formed by topological quantum error-correcting codes. An open problem with the design is making the four-body interactions and measurements it uses more technologically accessible. I will present some partial solutions, including one in which interactions between quantum dots or donors in a two-dimensional array can emulate the desired interactions in second-order perturbation theory. I will conclude with some open problems, including the challenge of reformulating Kitaev's gadget perturbation theory technique so that it preserves fault tolerance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  12. Use Of Computer Among Library Staff In Four Universities Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern Nigeria. Survey research was adopted with population of 151 Library staff and a random sample size of 120 staff in four (4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern ...

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in Pathology Laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, A A; Ojule, A C

    2005-12-01

    To assess current knowledge, attitudes and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in pathology laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in view of perceived inadequacies in safety practices in clinical laboratories in developing countries. Sixty (60) self- administered questionnaires were distributed to all cadres of staff in four (4) different laboratories (Chemical Pathology, Haematology, Blood bank and Medical Microbiology) at the Hospital. Gross deficiencies were found in the knowledge, attitudes and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory staff in areas of use of personal protective equipment, specimen collection and processing, centrifuge--related hazards, infective hazards waste disposal and provision and use of First Aid Kits. Issues pertaining to laboratory safety are not yet given adequate attention by both employers and employees in developing countries in this ear of resurgence of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Band C, is emphasized.

  14. From customer satisfaction survey to corrective actions in laboratory services in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula I; Kouri, Timo T; Pakarinen, Arto J

    2006-12-01

    To find out the satisfaction of clinical units with laboratory services in a university hospital, to point out the most important problems and defects in services, to carry out corrective actions, and thereafter to identify the possible changes in satisfaction. and Senior physicians and nurses-in-charge of the clinical units at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Customer satisfaction survey using a questionnaire was carried out in 2001, indicating the essential aspects of laboratory services. Customer-specific problems were clarified, corrective actions were performed, and the survey was repeated in 2004. In 2001, the highest dissatisfaction rates were recorded for computerized test requesting and reporting, turnaround times of tests, and the schedule of phlebotomy rounds. The old laboratory information system was not amenable to major improvements, and it was renewed in 2004-05. Several clinical units perceived turnaround times to be long, because the tests were ordered as routine despite emergency needs. Instructions about stat requesting were given to these units. However, no changes were evident in the satisfaction level in the 2004 survey. Following negotiations with the clinics, phlebotomy rounds were re-scheduled. This resulted in a distinct increase in satisfaction in 2004. Satisfaction survey is a screening tool that identifies topics of dissatisfaction. Without further clarifications, it is not possible to find out the specific problems of customers and to undertake targeted corrective actions. Customer-specific corrections are rarely seen as improvements in overall satisfaction rates.

  15. Computer Based Learning in an Undergraduate Physics Laboratory: Interfacing and Instrument Control Using Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J. S.; Glover, P. M.; Moseley, W.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the recent changes to the curriculum of the second year practical laboratory course in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. In particular, we describe how Matlab has been implemented as a teaching tool and discuss both its pedagogical advantages and disadvantages in teaching undergraduate…

  16. Aerosol in selected laboratories at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains the results of a study into mass concentration of the dispersed aerosol fraction with the aerodynamic diameter of up to 2.5 and 10 micrometers. The study was conducted during classes with students participating in them in two laboratories located at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology as well as outdoor outside the building. It was demonstrated that the values of the mass concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 measured in the laboratories differ considerably from the levels measured in the ambient air in the outdoor areas surrounding the faculty building. It was concluded that the diversity of PM2.5/PM10 ratio was greater in the laboratories. Direct correlation was not established between the concentrations of the particular PM fractions in the two investigated environments. It was demonstrated that there is a statistically significant relation between the concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 and the number of people present in the laboratory. The conducted cluster analysis led to the detection of the existence of dominant structures determining air quality parameters. For the analyzed case, endogenic factors are responsible for the aerosanitary condition. The study demonstrated that the evaluation of air quality needs to be performed individually for the specific rooms.

  17. EMERGING SCOPE OF MEDICAL LABORATORIES SYSTEMS USING CLOUD COMPUTING FROM END-USER PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    RAFİ, Zeeshan; DAĞ, Hasan; AYDIN, Mehmet N.

    2016-01-01

    In today’s world the rapid and reliable information extraction has become everybody’s need. Cloud computing is one of the emerging technology solutions to answer this query. This technology is providing many opportunities to the users in different terms to produce rapid and cost effective solution. This study helps in understanding the scope of the cloud computing as a solution in the field of medical laboratory systems. A study has been conducted to determine the need of the services require...

  18. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering - a model for university-national laboratory collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analyses using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE's program of Grants, fellowships and studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia's national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost-effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described

  19. Making Stuff Outreach at the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ament, Katherine; Karsjen, Steven; Leshem-Ackerman, Adah; King, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa was a coalition partner for outreach activities connected with NOVA's Making Stuff television series on PBS. Volunteers affiliated with the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, with backgrounds in materials science, took part in activities including a science-themed Family Night at a local mall, Science Cafes at the Science Center of Iowa, teacher workshops, demonstrations at science nights in elementary and middle schools, and various other events. We describe a selection of the activities and present a summary of their outcomes and extent of their impact on Ames, Des Moines and the surrounding communities in Iowa. In Part 2, results of a volunteer attitude survey are presented, which shed some light on the volunteer experience and show how the volunteers participation in outreach activities has affected their views of materials education.

  20. A DOE University-national laboratory waste-management education and research consortium (WERC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhada, R.K.; Morgan, J.D.; Townsend, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results and current status of a consortium of three universities and two national laboratories working closely with industry for an Education and Research program on waste-management and environmental restoration. The program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has been in effect for 18 months and has achieved significant progress towards establishing: undergraduate, graduate and associate degree programs involving environmental management, interactive TV courses from the consortium members transmitted throughout the United States, Mexico ampersand Canada, a satellite TV network, a professional development teleconference series, research programs at the leading edge of technology training multi-disciplinary students, research laboratories for analyses, testing, and student training, technology transfer programs, including a TV series on research applications, outreach programs, including pre-college and minority education, community monitoring

  1. A new IBA-AMS laboratory at the Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Kúš, Peter; Holý, Karol; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Breier, Robert; Staníček, Jaroslav; Šivo, Alexander; Richtáriková, Marta; Kováčik, Andrej; Szarka, Ján; Steier, Peter; Priller, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    A Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) has been established at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a tandem laboratory designed for Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), Ion Beam Modification (IBM) of materials and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The main equipment of the laboratory, i.e. Alphatross and MC-SNICS ion sources, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and analyzers of accelerated ions are described. Optimization of ion beam characteristics for different ion sources with gas and solid targets, for transmission of accelerated ions with different energy and charge state, for different parameters of the high-energy ion analyzers, as well as first AMS results are presented. The scientific program of the CENTA will be devoted mainly to nuclear, environmental, life and material sciences.

  2. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  3. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  4. Recent developments at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motokawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Miura, S.; Awaji, S.; Nojiri, H.; Mogi, I.; Mitsudo, S.; Sakon, T.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments and experiments performed at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University are described. We have (1) hybrid magnets which produce high fields up to 31.1 T, (2) liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets up to 11 T which are available continuously for more than a year, (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet, (4) pulsed field magnets up to 40 T by a 100 kJ bank and (5) repeating pulsed field systems up to 25 T, synchronized with a pulsed neutron source

  5. Astronomy Laboratory Exercise on Olbers’ Paradox and the Age of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Kelsey Samantha; Edwards, Charlotte; Overduin, James; Storrs, Alex

    2018-01-01

    We describe the development of a new laboratory exercise for undergraduate introductory astronomy courses. Students begin by estimating the intensity of the extragalactic background light using a simple Newtonian cosmological model that agrees with recent measurements to within a factor of two. They then use the 0.5m Towson University telescope to image a dark patch of sky such as the Hubble Deep Field near or during new Moon, and compare the intensity actually observed with that predicted. This comparison leads to a new appreciation of foreground contributions such as light pollution, airglow, zodiacal light, starlight and others. Students pick up important skills in uncertainty analysis and astronomical unit conversion. But the most valuable aspect of the exercise in our view is that it enables students to draw a direct connection between the evidence of their own eyes and the age of the Universe.

  6. Teaching introductory computer security at a Department of Defense university

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    1997-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Center for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Studies and Research (NPS CISR) has developed an instructional program in computer security. Its objective is to insure that students not only understand practical aspects of computer security associated with current technology, but also learn the fundamental principles that can be applied to the development of systems for which high confidence in policy enforcement can be achieved. Introduction to Computer Sec...

  7. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Based Laboratory Practical Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandole, Y. B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective evaluation of educational software is a key issue for successful introduction of advanced tools in the curriculum. This paper details to developing and evaluating a tool for computer assisted learning of science laboratory courses. The process was based on the generic instructional system design model. Various categories of educational…

  8. The establishment of the Blacknest seismological database on the Rutherford Laboratory system 360/195 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blamey, C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to assess the problems which might arise from monitoring a comprehensive test ban treaty by seismological methods, an experimental monitoring operation is being conducted. This work has involved the establishment of a database on the Rutherford Laboratory 360/195 system computer. The database can be accessed in the UK over the public telephone network and in the USA via ARPANET. (author)

  9. Laboratory and exterior decay of wood plastic composite boards: voids analysis and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Sun; Rebecca E. Ibach; Meghan Faillace; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie A. Glaeser; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    After exposure in the field and laboratory soil block culture testing, the void content of wood–plastic composite (WPC) decking boards was compared to unexposed samples. A void volume analysis was conducted based on calculations of sample density and from micro-computed tomography (microCT) data. It was found that reference WPC contains voids of different sizes from...

  10. Multi-scale data visualization for computational astrophysics and climate dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Sean; Daniel, Jamison R; Gao, Jinzhu; Ostrouchov, George; Toedte, Ross J; Wang, Chaoli

    2006-01-01

    Computational astrophysics and climate dynamics are two principal application foci at the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We identify a dataset frontier that is shared by several SciDAC computational science domains and present an exploration of traditional production visualization techniques enhanced with new enabling research technologies such as advanced parallel occlusion culling and high resolution small multiples statistical analysis. In collaboration with our research partners, these techniques will allow the visual exploration of a new generation of peta-scale datasets that cross this data frontier along all axes

  11. GeoBrain Computational Cyber-laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M.; di, L.

    2009-12-01

    Computational approaches (e.g., computer-based data visualization, analysis and modeling) are critical for conducting increasingly data-intensive Earth science (ES) studies to understand functions and changes of the Earth system. However, currently Earth scientists, educators, and students have met two major barriers that prevent them from being effectively using computational approaches in their learning, research and application activities. The two barriers are: 1) difficulties in finding, obtaining, and using multi-source ES data; and 2) lack of analytic functions and computing resources (e.g., analysis software, computing models, and high performance computing systems) to analyze the data. Taking advantages of recent advances in cyberinfrastructure, Web service, and geospatial interoperability technologies, GeoBrain, a project funded by NASA, has developed a prototype computational cyber-laboratory to effectively remove the two barriers. The cyber-laboratory makes ES data and computational resources at large organizations in distributed locations available to and easily usable by the Earth science community through 1) enabling seamless discovery, access and retrieval of distributed data, 2) federating and enhancing data discovery with a catalogue federation service and a semantically-augmented catalogue service, 3) customizing data access and retrieval at user request with interoperable, personalized, and on-demand data access and services, 4) automating or semi-automating multi-source geospatial data integration, 5) developing a large number of analytic functions as value-added, interoperable, and dynamically chainable geospatial Web services and deploying them in high-performance computing facilities, 6) enabling the online geospatial process modeling and execution, and 7) building a user-friendly extensible web portal for users to access the cyber-laboratory resources. Users can interactively discover the needed data and perform on-demand data analysis and

  12. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  13. Teaching Concept Mapping and University Level Study Strategies Using Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulecky, Larry; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assesses the utility and effectiveness of three interactive computer programs and associated print materials in instructing and modeling for undergraduates how to comprehend and reconceptualize scientific textbook material. Finds that "how to" reading strategies can be taught via computer and transferred to new material. (RS)

  14. 2016 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runnels, Scott Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bachrach, Harrison Ian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carlson, Nils [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Collier, Angela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dumas, William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fankell, Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ferris, Natalie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Francisco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffith, Alec [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guston, Brandon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kenyon, Connor [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Benson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mookerjee, Adaleena [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkinson, Christian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Peck, Hailee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Peters, Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poondla, Yasvanth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rogers, Brandon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shaffer, Nathaniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trettel, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valaitis, Sonata Mae [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venzke, Joel Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Black, Mason [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Demircan, Samet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holladay, Robert Tyler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it.

  15. 2015 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runnels, Scott Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caldwell, Wendy [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Brown, Barton Jed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pederson, Clark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Justin [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Burrill, Daniel [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Feinblum, David [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Hyde, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Levick, Nathan [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lyngaas, Isaac [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Maeng, Brad [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Reed, Richard LeRoy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarno-Smith, Lois [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Shohet, Gil [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Skarda, Jinhie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Josey [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Zeppetello, Lucas [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Grossman-Ponemon, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Bottini, Joseph Larkin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Loudon, Tyson Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); VanGessel, Francis Gilbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nagaraj, Sriram [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Price, Jacob [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it. This report includes both the background for the program and the reports from the students.

  16. Approaching Gender Parity: Women in Computer Science at Afghanistan's Kabul University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, Jandelyn

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the representation of women in computer science at the tertiary level through data collected about undergraduate computer science education at Kabul University in Afghanistan. Previous studies have theorized reasons for underrepresentation of women in computer science, and while many of these reasons are indeed present in…

  17. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  18. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In this annual report, the activities of research and education and the state of operation of the research facilities in this Laboratory in fiscal year 1990 are summarized. There are four large research facilities in this Laboratory, that is, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linear accelerator, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment device and the heavy ion irradiation research facility. Those are used to execute research and education in the wide fields of atomic energy engineering, and put to the common utilization by universities in whole Japan. The results of the research with these facilities have been reported in the separate reports. The research aims at developing the most advanced and new fields in nuclear reactor engineering, and includes the engineering of the first wall and the fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors, electromagnetic structure engineering, AI and robotics, quantum beam engineering, the design of new type reactors, the basic process of radiochemistry and so on. The report on the course of the large scale facilities, research activities, the publication of research, education and the events in the Laboratory in the year are described. (K.I.)

  19. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  20. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1991 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that is, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of the research by using respective research facilities were summarized in separate reports. In this annual report, the course of the management and operation of respective research facilities is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of the teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. In the research, those on first wall engineering for fusion reactors, fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, AI and robotics, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on are included. (K.I.)

  1. Safety in Academic Chemistry Laboratories: Volume 1. Accident Prevention for College and University Students, 7th Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This book contains volume 1 of 2 and describes safety guidelines for academic chemistry laboratories to prevent accidents for college and university students. Contents include: (1) "Your Responsibility for Accident Prevention"; (2) "Guide to Chemical Hazards"; (3) "Recommended Laboratory Techniques"; and (4) "Safety Equipment and Emergency…

  2. The Importance of a Laboratory Section on Student Learning Outcomes in a University Introductory Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcino, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory sections of university Earth science courses provide hands-on, inquiry-based activities for students in support of lecture and discussion. Here, I compare student conceptual knowledge outcomes of laboratory sections by administering an independent concept inventory at the beginning and end of two courses: one that had a lecture and a…

  3. Improving Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Education via a Laboratory Course on Air Pollution: One University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrikas, Achilleas; Parkosidis, Ioannis; Psomiadis, Ploutarchos; Stoumpa, Artemisia; Chalkidis, Anthimos; Mavrikaki, Evangelia; Skordoulis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of the "Air Pollution Course", an environmental science laboratory course developed at the Science Education Laboratory of the Faculty of Primary Education, University of Athens, as well as the findings resulting from its implementation by pre-service elementary teachers. The course proposed in this…

  4. Exploring the Universe with WISE and Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    WISE is a recently-completed astronomical survey mission that has imaged the entire sky in four infrared wavelength bands. The large quantity of science images returned consists of 2,776,922 individual snapshots in various locations in each band which, along with ancillary data, totals around 110TB of raw, uncompressed data. Making the most use of this data requires advanced computing resources. I will discuss some initial attempts in the use of cloud computing to make this large problem tractable.

  5. Safety climate in university and college laboratories: impact of organizational and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih; Liu, Chi-Wei; Lu, Mu-Chen

    2007-01-01

    Universities and colleges serve to be institutions of education excellence; however, problems in the areas of occupational safety may undermine such goals. Occupational safety must be the concern of every employee in the organization, regardless of job position. Safety climate surveys have been suggested as important tools for measuring the effectiveness and improvement direction of safety programs. Thus, this study aims to investigate the influence of organizational and individual factors on safety climate in university and college laboratories. Employees at 100 universities and colleges in Taiwan were mailed a self-administered questionnaire survey; the response rate was 78%. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that organizational category of ownership, the presence of a safety manager and safety committee, gender, age, title, accident experience, and safety training significantly affected the climate. Among them, accident experience and safety training affected the climate with practical significance. The authors recommend that managers should address important factors affecting safety issues and then create a positive climate by enforcing continuous improvements.

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes research and educational activities, operation status of the research facilities of the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo on fiscal year 1996. This facility has four major research facilities such as fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', electron Linac, fundamental experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and high fluence irradiation facility(HIT). Education and research activities are conducted in a wide fields of nuclear engineering using these facilities. The former two facilities are available for various studies by universities all over Japan, facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design is utilized for research within the Faculty of Engineering and HIT is used for the research within the University of Tokyo. The facility established a plan to reorganized into a nation wide research collaboration center in fiscal year 1995 and after further discussion of a future program it is decided to hold 'Nuclear energy symposium' periodically after fiscal year 1997 as a part of the activity for appealing the research results to the public. (G.K.)

  7. QCD phase transition in the laboratory and in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Bikash

    1998-01-01

    It is expected that two nuclei colliding at ultra-relativistic energies (∼ 200 GeV/nucleon or more) may lead to hadronic matter go through a phase transition to its fundamental constituents, quarks and gluons, usually referred to as quark gluon plasma (QGP). Somewhat analogously, the universe, as per conventional wisdom should have consisted of quarks, gluons, leptons and photons, a microsecond after the Big Bang. The experience and wisdom, expected from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the laboratory and anticipated to facilitate our understanding of the quark-hadron phase transition. Indeed what possible footprints of that primordial epoch can be traced in today's cosmos is one of the interesting and intriguing questions. In this paper, the following areas will be focused: the issue of successive thermal and chemical equilibrium scenarios; a detailed study of hot hadronic matter and its implication on the thermal model; and finally, the surviving quark nuggets beyond a critical baryon content, and, nuggets being possible candidates for baryonic dark matter in the universe, a much more straightforward candidate than illusive actions or SUSY particles. It is our considered view that quark hadron phase transition in the microsecond universe is a thriving area of research and lot more can be understood and known from this primordial event. (author)

  8. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  9. Applications of hybrid and digital computation methods in aerospace-related sciences and engineering. [problem solving methods at the University of Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. J.; Motard, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The computing equipment in the engineering systems simulation laboratory of the Houston University Cullen College of Engineering is described and its advantages are summarized. The application of computer techniques in aerospace-related research psychology and in chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, and mechanical engineering is described in abstracts of 84 individual projects and in reprints of published reports. Research supports programs in acoustics, energy technology, systems engineering, and environment management as well as aerospace engineering.

  10. Inter laboratory comparison on Computed Tomography for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Christensen, Lars Bager; Cantatore, Angela

    2014-01-01

    An intercomparison on X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial...

  11. FORTRAN computer programs to process Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    FORTRAN computer programs have been written to read, edit, and reformat the hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data produced by Savannah River Laboratory for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The data are presorted by Savannah River Laboratory into stream sediment, ground water, and stream water for each 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Extraneous information is eliminated, and missing analyses are assigned a specific value (-99999.0). Negative analyses are below the detection limit; the absolute value of a negative analysis is assumed to be the detection limit

  12. Computer simulation of laboratory leaching and washing of tank waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, C.D.; MacLean, G.T.; Landeene, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The process simulator ESP (Environmental Simulation Program) was used to simulate laboratory caustic leaching and washing of core samples from Tanks B-110, C-109, and C-112. The results of the laboratory tests and the computer simulations are compared. The results from both, agreed reasonably well for elements contained in solid phases included in the ESP Public data bank. The use of the GEOCHEM data bank and/or a custom Hanford Data bank should improve the agreement, making ESP a useful process simulator for aqueous based processing

  13. A computer program for controlling a university radioactive material inventory: From confusion to computer to control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, D.B.; Riches, C.G.; O'Brian, M.J.; Riordan, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington is a large user of radioactive material. Over 250 authorized programs are working in over 600 labs with nearly 3500 orders of radioactive material per year. The state license sets limits on the total amount of material on campus. There are also limits on sewer disposal. To meet these needs it is necessary to know the amount of material on campus at any time. A computer program was developed which covered many aspects of the radiation safety record needs including inventory control. Inventory is now managed by tracking each order from purchase to disposal. A screen menu as part of the interactive program allows immediate and detailed information about the inventory at time of purchase approval and delivery. Because of this system our knowledge and control of radionuclide work on campus has increased dramatically. A description of how this system is used during ordering, delivery and disposal will be given. Details on the methods to check limits are included along with a summary of the reports made possible by the current data files

  14. Profile of central research and application laboratory of Aǧrı İbrahim Çeçen University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoǧlu, Emir Alper; Kurt, Murat; Tabay, Dilruba

    2016-04-01

    Aǧrı İbrahim Çeçen University built a central research and application laboratory (CRAL) in the east of Turkey. The CRAL possesses 7 research and analysis laboratories, 12 experts and researchers, 8 standard rooms for guest researchers, a restaurant, a conference hall, a meeting room, a prey room and a computer laboratory. The CRAL aims certain collaborations between researchers, experts, clinicians and educators in the areas of biotechnology, bioimagining, food safety & quality, omic sciences such as genomics, proteomics and metallomics. It also intends to develop sustainable solutions in agriculture and animal husbandry, promote public health quality, collect scientific knowledge and keep it for future generations, contribute scientific awareness of all stratums of society, provide consulting for small initiatives and industries. It has been collaborated several scientific foundations since 2011.

  15. Profile of central research and application laboratory of Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Türkoğlu, Emir Alper, E-mail: eaturkoglu@yandex.com [Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Ağrı (Turkey); Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Central Research and Application Laboratory, Ağrı (Turkey); Kurt, Murat, E-mail: muratkurt60@hotmail.com; Tabay, Dilruba, E-mail: dtabay@agri.edu.tr [Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Central Research and Application Laboratory, Ağrı (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University built a central research and application laboratory (CRAL) in the east of Turkey. The CRAL possesses 7 research and analysis laboratories, 12 experts and researchers, 8 standard rooms for guest researchers, a restaurant, a conference hall, a meeting room, a prey room and a computer laboratory. The CRAL aims certain collaborations between researchers, experts, clinicians and educators in the areas of biotechnology, bioimagining, food safety & quality, omic sciences such as genomics, proteomics and metallomics. It also intends to develop sustainable solutions in agriculture and animal husbandry, promote public health quality, collect scientific knowledge and keep it for future generations, contribute scientific awareness of all stratums of society, provide consulting for small initiatives and industries. It has been collaborated several scientific foundations since 2011.

  16. Profile of central research and application laboratory of Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Türkoğlu, Emir Alper; Kurt, Murat; Tabay, Dilruba

    2016-01-01

    Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University built a central research and application laboratory (CRAL) in the east of Turkey. The CRAL possesses 7 research and analysis laboratories, 12 experts and researchers, 8 standard rooms for guest researchers, a restaurant, a conference hall, a meeting room, a prey room and a computer laboratory. The CRAL aims certain collaborations between researchers, experts, clinicians and educators in the areas of biotechnology, bioimagining, food safety & quality, omic sciences such as genomics, proteomics and metallomics. It also intends to develop sustainable solutions in agriculture and animal husbandry, promote public health quality, collect scientific knowledge and keep it for future generations, contribute scientific awareness of all stratums of society, provide consulting for small initiatives and industries. It has been collaborated several scientific foundations since 2011.

  17. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R ampersand D) in the nation''s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R ampersand D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together

  18. Application node system image manager subsystem within a distributed function laboratory computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.; Beck, R.D.

    1978-10-01

    A computer system to control and acquire data from one x-ray diffraction, five neutron scattering, and four neutron diffraction experiments located at the Brookhaven National Laboratory High Flux Beam Reactor has operated in a routine manner for over three years. The computer system is configured as a network of computer processors with the processor interconnections assuming a star-like structure. At the points of the star are the ten experiment control-data acquisition computers, referred to as application nodes. At the center of the star is a shared service node which supplies a set of shared services utilized by all of the application nodes. A program development node occupies one additional point of the star. The design and implementation of a network subsystem to support development and execution of operating systems for the application nodes is described. 6 figures, 1 table

  19. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  20. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  1. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Rasmussen, J J; Westergaard, C M [eds.

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  2. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  3. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2009-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  4. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  5. Computer Use and Vision‑Related Problems Among University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and adjusted OR was calculated using the multiple logistic regression. Results: The ... Nearly 72% of students reported frequent interruption of computer work. Headache ... procedure (non-probability sampling) recruiting 250 .... Table 1: Percentage distribution of visual problems among different genders and ethnic groups.

  6. Computer Self-Efficacy of University Faculty in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hanadi Kassem

    2008-01-01

    Faculty use of technology is a critical issue in higher education; administrators and students are expecting faculty instruction to incorporate technology in classroom and distance education. Competition is demanding technologically proficient graduates for schools and colleges. Research indicates that computer self-efficacy (CSE) may be one…

  7. Routine operation of an Elliott 903 computer in a clinical chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, L. G.; Simpson, D.

    1973-01-01

    Experience gained in the last four years concerning the capabilities and limitations of an 8K Elliott 903 (18-bit word) computer with magnetic tape backing store in the routine operation of a clinical chemistry laboratory is described. Designed as a total system, routine operation has latterly had to be confined to data acquisition and process control functions, due primarily to limitations imposed by the choice of hardware early in the project. In this final report of a partially successful experiment the opportunity is taken to review mistakes made, especially at the start of the project, to warn potential computer users of pitfalls to be avoided. PMID:4580240

  8. QA Programme of the TLD laboratory of the University of Costa Rica: IEC 61066 testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Patricia; Porras Chaverria, Mariela

    2008-01-01

    The Thermoluminescence Personal Dosimetry Laboratory of the University of Costa Rica provides dose measurements for around 90% of occupational radiation workers in the country. The assessment of doses to workers routinely exposed to external sources of radiation constitutes an integral part of any radiation protection programme and helps national authorities to ensure acceptably safe and satisfactory radiological conditions in workplaces. Harshaw Readers Model 4000 and 4500, dosimeter holders Type 8814 with TLD-100 in 0110 cards and loose TLD-100 chips are used to monitor personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) and Hp(0.07). In order to provide a reliable measurement of the operational quantities, a study was undertaken to verify the fulfillment of international requirements in our system (Model 4500 with cards) against the Thermoluminescence dosimetry systems for personal and environmental monitoring CEI IEC 61066 (1991 -2012). The type tests performed were nine in total: batch homogeneity, reproducibility, linearity, detection threshold, effect of climate conditions on reader, effect of light exposure on dosimeters, isotropy, transient voltage and dropping on dosimeters. A Cesium-137 source was used to irradiate the dosimeters and all procedures follow the indications given on the standard. Results showed that all IEC criteria were met by our Laboratory. Acceptable uncertainties were also studied under the ICRP recommendations; the analysis of the Trumpet Curve was done with satisfactory results (for doses above 0.5 mSv; quotient of measure to real dose less than 3%). For purposes of accreditation (ISO/IEC 17025:2005) and performance testing this work is very relevant since the University of Costa Rica wants to establish a solid individual monitoring programme for external radiation exposure that will provide users, registrants, licensees and regulatory bodies with information that can be used for the optimization of protection and dose limitation of Costa Rican workers

  9. On-line computer system applied in a nuclear chemistry laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banasik, Z.; Kierzek, J.; Parus, J.; Zoltowski, T.; Zalewski, J.

    1980-01-01

    A PDP-11/45 based computer system used in a radioanalytical chemical laboratory is described. It is mainly concerned with spectrometry of ionizing radiation and remote measurement of physico-chemical properties. The objectives in mind when constructing the hardware inter-connections and developing the software of the system were to minimize the work of the electronics and computer personnel and to provide maximum flexibility for the users. For the hardware interfacing, 3 categories of equipment are used: - LPS-11 Laboratory Peripheral System - CAMAC system with CA11F-P controller - interfaces from instrument manufacturers. Flexible operation has been achieved by using a 3-level programming structure: - data transfer by assembly language programs - data formatting using bit operations in FORTRAN - data evaluation by procedures written in FORTRAN. (Auth.)

  10. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  11. Strengthening LLNL Missions through Laboratory Directed Research and Development in High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    High performance computing (HPC) has been a defining strength of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since its founding. Livermore scientists have designed and used some of the world’s most powerful computers to drive breakthroughs in nearly every mission area. Today, the Laboratory is recognized as a world leader in the application of HPC to complex science, technology, and engineering challenges. Most importantly, HPC has been integral to the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Stockpile Stewardship Program—designed to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of our nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. A critical factor behind Lawrence Livermore’s preeminence in HPC is the ongoing investments made by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program in cutting-edge concepts to enable efficient utilization of these powerful machines. Congress established the LDRD Program in 1991 to maintain the technical vitality of the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories. Since then, LDRD has been, and continues to be, an essential tool for exploring anticipated needs that lie beyond the planning horizon of our programs and for attracting the next generation of talented visionaries. Through LDRD, Livermore researchers can examine future challenges, propose and explore innovative solutions, and deliver creative approaches to support our missions. The present scientific and technical strengths of the Laboratory are, in large part, a product of past LDRD investments in HPC. Here, we provide seven examples of LDRD projects from the past decade that have played a critical role in building LLNL’s HPC, computer science, mathematics, and data science research capabilities, and describe how they have impacted LLNL’s mission.

  12. Health centres' view of the services provided by a university hospital laboratory: Use of satisfaction surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula; Kouri, Timo; Pakarinen, Arto

    2010-01-01

    Customer orientation has gained increasing attention in healthcare. A customer satisfaction survey is one way to raise areas and topics for quality improvement. However, it seems that customer satisfaction surveys have not resulted in quality improvement in healthcare. This article reports how the authors' university hospital laboratory has used customer satisfaction surveys targeted at the health centres in their hospital district. Closed-ended statements of the questionnaire were planned to cover the essential aspects of laboratory services. In addition, an open-ended question asked what was considered to be the most important problem in services. The questionnaires were sent to the medical directors of the health centres. The open-ended question proved to be very useful because the responses specified the main problems in service. Based on the responses, selected dissatisfied customers were contacted to specify their responses and possible corrective actions were taken. It is concluded that a satisfaction survey can be used as a screening tool to identify topics of dissatisfaction. In addition, further clarifications with selected customers are needed to specify the causes for their dissatisfaction and to undertake proper corrective actions. PMID:20205616

  13. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 30 June 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is on data analysis of OTEC core unit condenser tests, and is supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The second is on the current status of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va., and is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division. The third is on utilization of landfill methane and is supported by Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Transaction processing in the common node of a distributed function laboratory computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.; Dimmler, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A computer network architecture consisting of a common node processor for managing peripherals and files and a number of private node processors for laboratory experiment control is briefly reviewed. Central to the problem of private node-common node communication is the concept of a transaction. The collection of procedures and the data structure associated with a transaction are described. The common node properties assigned to a transaction and procedures required for its complete processing are discussed. (U.S.)

  15. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  16. Uncertainty Analysis of Resistance Tests in Ata Nutku Ship Model Testing Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihad DELEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some systematical resistance tests, where were performed in Ata Nutku Ship Model Testing Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU, have been included in order to determine the uncertainties. Experiments which are conducted in the framework of mathematical and physical rules for the solution of engineering problems, measurements, calculations include uncertainty. To question the reliability of the obtained values, the existing uncertainties should be expressed as quantities. The uncertainty of a measurement system is not known if the results do not carry a universal value. On the other hand, resistance is one of the most important parameters that should be considered in the process of ship design. Ship resistance during the design phase of a ship cannot be determined precisely and reliably due to the uncertainty resources in determining the resistance value that are taken into account. This case may cause negative effects to provide the required specifications in the latter design steps. The uncertainty arising from the resistance test has been estimated and compared for a displacement type ship and high speed marine vehicles according to ITTC 2002 and ITTC 2014 regulations which are related to the uncertainty analysis methods. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of both ITTC uncertainty analysis methods have been discussed.

  17. A new ion-beam laboratory for materials research at the Slovak University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Pavol; Dobrovodský, Jozef; Vaňa, Dušan; Beňo, Matúš; Závacká, Anna; Muška, Martin; Halgaš, Radoslav; Minárik, Stanislav; Riedlmajer, Róbert

    2017-10-01

    An ion beam laboratory (IBL) for materials research has been commissioned recently at the Slovak University of Technology within the University Science Park CAMBO located in Trnava. The facility will support research in the field of materials science, physical engineering and nanotechnology. Ion-beam materials modification (IBMM) as well as ion-beam analysis (IBA) are covered and deliverable ion energies are in the range from tens of keV up to tens of MeV. Two systems have been put into operation. First, a high current version of the HVEE 6 MV Tandetron electrostatic tandem accelerator with duoplasmatron and cesium sputtering ion sources, equipped with two end-stations: a high-energy ion implantation and IBA end-station which includes RBS, PIXE and ERDA analytical systems. Second, a 500 kV implanter equipped with a Bernas type ion source and two experimental wafer processing end-stations. The facility itself, operational experience and first IBMM and IBA experiments are presented together with near-future plans and ongoing development of the IBL.

  18. Carbon Stock in Integrated Field Laboratory Faculty of Agriculture University of Lampung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Sukri Banuwa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the amount of carbon stock and CO2 plant uptake in the Integrated Field Laboratory (IFL Faculty of Agriculture University of Lampung. The research was conducted from April to November 2015. The study was arranged in a completely randomized block design (CRBD, consisting of five land units as treatment with four replications for each treatment. Biomass of woody plants was estimated using allometric equation, biomass of understorey plants was estimated using plant dry weight equation, and organic C content in plants and soils were analyzed using a Walkey and Black method. The results showed that land unit consisting of densely woody plants significantly affects total biomass of woody plants, organic C content in woody plants and total carbon content (above and below ground. The highest amount of woody plant biomass was observed in land unit 5, i.e. 1,196.88 Mg ha-1, and above ground total carbon was 437.19 Mg ha-1. IFL Faculty of Agriculture University of Lampung has a total carbon stock of 2,051.90 Mg and capacity to take up total CO2 of 6,656.88 Mg.

  19. Computer-based medical education in Benha University, Egypt: knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayomy, Hanaa; El Awadi, Mona; El Araby, Eman; Abed, Hala A

    2016-12-01

    Computer-assisted medical education has been developed to enhance learning and enable high-quality medical care. This study aimed to assess computer knowledge and attitude toward the inclusion of computers in medical education among second-year medical students in Benha Faculty of Medicine, Egypt, to identify limitations, and obtain suggestions for successful computer-based learning. This was a one-group pre-post-test study, which was carried out on second-year students in Benha Faculty of Medicine. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to compare students' knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions toward computer usage in medical education before and after the computer course to evaluate the change in students' responses. The majority of students were familiar with use of the mouse and keyboard, basic word processing, internet and web searching, and e-mail both before and after the computer course. The proportion of students who were familiar with software programs other than the word processing and trouble-shoot software/hardware was significantly higher after the course (Pcomputer (P=0.008), the inclusion of computer skills course in medical education, downloading lecture handouts, and computer-based exams (Pcomputers limited the inclusion of computer in medical education (Pcomputer labs, lack of Information Technology staff mentoring, large number of students, unclear course outline, and lack of internet access were more frequently reported before the course (Pcomputer labs, inviting Information Technology staff to support computer teaching, and the availability of free Wi-Fi internet access covering several areas in the university campus; all would support computer-assisted medical education. Medical students in Benha University are computer literate, which allows for computer-based medical education. Staff training, provision of computer labs, and internet access are essential requirements for enhancing computer usage in medical

  20. Asking the next generation: the implementation of pre-university students’ ideas about physics laboratory preparation exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnett, K.; Bartlett, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    It was planned to introduce online pre-laboratory session activities to a first-year undergraduate physics laboratory course to encourage a minimum level of student preparation for experiments outside the laboratory environment. A group of 16 and 17 year old laboratory work-experience students were tasked to define and design a pre-laboratory activity based on experiments that they had been undertaking. This informed the structure, content and aims of the activities introduced to a first year physics undergraduate laboratory course, with the particular focus on practising the data handling. An implementation study showed how students could try to optimise high grades, rather than gain efficiency-enhancing experience if careful controls were not put in place by assessors. However, the work demonstrated that pre-university and first-year physics students can take an active role in developing scaffolding activities that can help to improve the performance of those that follow their footsteps.

  1. Computer Mediated Communication for Social and Academic Purposes: Profiles of Use and University Students' Gratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrocharidou, Anatoli; Efthymiou, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    The present study approaches the Internet as a social space, where university students make use of computer mediated communication (CMC) applications, i.e. e-mail, instant messaging and social network sites, in order to satisfy social and academic needs. We focus on university students, because they represent one of the most avid groups of CMC…

  2. Resourse Allocation and Pricing Principles for a University Computer Centre. Working Paper Series Number 6819.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possen, Uri M.; And Others

    As an introduction, this paper presents a statement of the objectives of the university computing center (UCC) from the viewpoint of the university, the government, the typical user, and the UCC itself. The operating and financial structure of a UCC are described. Three main types of budgeting schemes are discussed: time allocation, pseudo-dollar,…

  3. Factors Affecting University Students' Intention to Use Cloud Computing in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, Khalid Ali; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Nassar, Bilal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors affecting students' intention to use cloud computing in the Jordanian universities. To achieve this purpose, a quantitative research approach which is a survey-based was deployed. Around 400 questionnaires were distributed randomly to Information Technology (IT) students at four universities in…

  4. A universal quantum module for quantum communication, computation, and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Michael; Lo Piparo, Nicolò; Trupke, Michael; Schmiedmayer, Jorg; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we describe a simple module that could be ubiquitous for quantum information based applications. The basic modules comprises a single NV- center in diamond embedded in an optical cavity, where the cavity mediates interactions between photons and the electron spin (enabling entanglement distribution and efficient readout), while the nuclear spins constitutes a long-lived quantum memories capable of storing and processing quantum information. We discuss how a network of connected modules can be used for distributed metrology, communication and computation applications. Finally, we investigate the possible use of alternative diamond centers (SiV/GeV) within the module and illustrate potential advantages.

  5. Computing Services Planning, Downsizing, and Organization at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrametti, Monica

    1993-01-01

    In a six-month period, the University of Alberta (Canada) campus computing services department formulated a strategic plan, and downsized and reorganized to meet financial constraints and respond to changing technology, especially distributed computing. The new department is organized to react more effectively to trends in technology and user…

  6. Evaluating the Implementation of International Computing Curricular in African Universities: A Design-Reality Gap Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasuki, Salihu Ibrahim; Ogedebe, Peter; Kanya, Rislana Abdulazeez; Ndume, Hauwa; Makinde, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Efforts are been made by Universities in developing countries to ensure that it's graduate are not left behind in the competitive global information society; thus have adopted international computing curricular for their computing degree programs. However, adopting these international curricula seem to be very challenging for developing countries…

  7. UCODE, a computer code for universal inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, E.P.; Hill, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the US Geological Survey computer program UCODE, which was developed in collaboration with the US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station and the International Ground Water Modeling Center of the Colorado School of Mines. UCODE performs inverse modeling, posed as a parameter-estimation problem, using nonlinear regression. Any application model or set of models can be used; the only requirement is that they have numerical (ASCII or text only) input and output files and that the numbers in these files have sufficient significant digits. Application models can include preprocessors and postprocessors as well as models related to the processes of interest (physical, chemical and so on), making UCODE extremely powerful for model calibration. Estimated parameters can be defined flexibly with user-specified functions. Observations to be matched in the regression can be any quantity for which a simulated equivalent value can be produced, thus simulated equivalent values are calculated using values that appear in the application model output files and can be manipulated with additive and multiplicative functions, if necessary. Prior, or direct, information on estimated parameters also can be included in the regression. The nonlinear regression problem is solved by minimizing a weighted least-squares objective function with respect to the parameter values using a modified Gauss-Newton method. Sensitivities needed for the method are calculated approximately by forward or central differences and problems and solutions related to this approximation are discussed. Statistics are calculated and printed for use in (1) diagnosing inadequate data or identifying parameters that probably cannot be estimated with the available data, (2) evaluating estimated parameter values, (3) evaluating the model representation of the actual processes and (4) quantifying the uncertainty of model simulated values. UCODE is intended for use on any computer operating

  8. COMPUTER-BASED SYSTEMS OF PHYSICAL EXPERIMENT IN INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Slipukhina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The self-study activity of students is an important form of educational process under the conditions of rapid changes of technologies. Ability and readiness of future engineers for independent education is one of their key competences. Investigation of modern methods of planning, organization and control of independent cognitive activity of students while studying physics as effective means of complex forming of their professional qualities is the object of the research. Methods: We analyse the curricula of some engineering specialities in leading technical universities, existent methods and forms of organization of students’ self-study, and own pedagogical experience. Results: Based on the theoretical analysis of existing methods of students’ self-study, it was found that a systematizing factor of appropriate educational technology is the problem focused cognitive tasks. They have to be implemented by application of the modern technological devices integrated with a computer-based experiment. We define the aim of individual or group laboratory works; the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge and skills of students are rationalized; timing and form of presentation of the results are clarified after individual and group consulting. The details of preparatory, searching-organizational, operational, and control stages in organization of students’ self-study with the use of computer oriented physical experiment are specified, these details differ depending on the didactic purpose, form of organization and students’ individuality. Discussion: The research theoretical aspect confirms the determining role of subject-subject cooperation in forming of competences of independent learning of the future engineers. Basic practical achievements of the research consist of improving methods of using of digital learning systems, creation of textbooks that promote consultative and guiding role for the educational process, working-out of

  9. Faculty Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Instruction at the University of Gaziantep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Yalçın TILFARLIOĞLU

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinstruction at University of Gaziantep, Turkey in a multifaceted way. Additionally, ittries to determine underlying factors that shape these attitudes. After a pilot study, thequestionnaire was applied to a sample population of 145 faculty that were chosenrandomly. The results revealed that faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinsruction are positive. Age, sex, teaching experience, level of proficiency in Englishand computer usage skills have no or little effects over these attitudes.According to theresults of the study, faculty who have prior knowledge on computers expose ratherpositive attitudes towards computers in education.Another important outcome of thestudy is the existence of a gender gap in terms of computer assisted instruction.Althoughthere seems to be no difference between male and female faculty concerning theirbackground education regarding computers, male faculty feel confident about thematter, whereas female faculty feel uncomfortable about using computers in theirlessons.

  10. General Motors and the University of Michigan smart materials and structures collaborative research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Shaw, John; Johnson, Nancy L.; Browne, Alan L.; Alexander, Paul W.; Mankame, Nilesh D.

    2007-04-01

    The field of Smart Materials and Structures is evolving from high-end, one-of-a-kind products for medical, military and aerospace applications to the point of viability for mainstream affordable high volume products for automotive applications. For the automotive industry, there are significant potential benefits to be realized including reduction in vehicle mass, added functionality and design flexibility and decrease in component size and cost. To further accelerate the path from basic research and development to launched competitive products, General Motors (GM) has teamed with the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM) to establish a $2.9 Million Collaborative Research Laboratory (CRL) in Smart Materials and Structures. Researchers at both GM and UM are working closely together to create leap-frog technologies which start at conceptualization and proceed all the way through demonstration and handoff to product teams, thereby bridging the traditional technology gap between industry and academia. In addition to Smart Device Technology Innovation, other thrust areas in the CRL include Smart Material Maturity with a basic research focus on overcoming material issues that form roadblocks to commercialism and Mechamatronic System Design Methodology with an applied focus on development tools (synthesis and analysis) to aid the engineer in application of smart materials to system engineering. This CRL is a global effort with partners across the nation and world from GM's Global Research Network such as HRL Laboratories in California and GM's India Science Lab in Bangalore, India. This paper provides an overview of this new CRL and gives examples of several of the projects underway.

  11. A Description of the Computer Assisted Assessment Program in University Elementary Algebra at Norfolk State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald L.; Myers, Shadana; Earl, Archie W., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    Many colleges and universities today are faced with the problem of low student academic achievement in math. Some of them are trying to improve student academic achievement through the use of technology. Their proposed solution is to teach children how to use the technological tools available to them and integrate that technology into the…

  12. Plans for an on-line computer at the Finnish TRIGA Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junttila, J.; Tamminen, A.; Palmgren, A.

    1970-01-01

    Full text: The future plans at the Helsinki Triga reactor include an on-line computer system. The project is in its pre-planning stage, and if the financing can be arranged, the instancing is preliminarily scheduled to start in 1972. We estimate the probability of getting a computer to be 90%. The tasks of the system would be the monitoring and control of reactor power level and other operating conditions, and, on the other hand, data acquisition, analysis and apparatus control in different reactor laboratory experiments. These include the neutron diffractometer, the cold neutron facility and neutron TOF-measurements, gamma-spectroscopy, reactor noise measurements, and neutron activation analysis. It is our intention to purchase a medium-sized computer which is presently being developed by the Finnish company Oy Stroemberg Ab. This computer has been constructed by using the time sharing principle. Consequently, background jobs like testing of new programs, off-line calculations etc., can be executed simultaneously with the actual data taking and control operations. The interfering of programs with each other is prevented by dividing the programs in protected segments. Different kinds of devices and functions can be added to the basic control processing unit, e.g. an automatic interrupt unit with up to 128 priority levels, a fast floating point arithmetic unit, and the control of a direct memory access channel. An additional fact, which makes this particular computer attractive to us, is that we wish to have the manufacturer's support in designing our special applications. The initial system cost of about 120.000 US$ is considered justified for three reasons of about equal importance: 1. The operation and utilization of our reactor will become more efficient. 2. All people involved in the project will learn how to handle a rather complicated-computerization project. 3. The Finnish Government can support the development of this computer by ordering one or two

  13. The Trope Tank: A Laboratory with Material Resources for Creative Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Montfort

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2014v10n2p53 Principles for organizing and making use of a laboratory with material computing resources are articulated. This laboratory, the Trope Tank, is a facility for teaching, research, and creative collaboration and offers hardware (in working condition and set up for use from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, including videogame systems, home computers, and an arcade cabinet. To aid in investigating the material history of texts, the lab has a small 19th century letterpress, a typewriter, a print terminal, and dot-matrix printers. Other resources include controllers, peripherals, manuals, books, and software on physical media. These resources are used for teaching, loaned for local exhibitions and presentations, and accessed by researchers and artists. The space is primarily a laboratory (rather than a library, studio, or museum, so materials are organized by platform and intended use. Textual information about the historical contexts of the available systems, and resources are set up to allow easy operation, and even casual use, by researchers, teachers, students, and artists.

  14. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  15. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Annual report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985-86. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm 3 ) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology

  16. Approaching gender parity: Women in computer science at Afghanistan's Kabul University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, Jandelyn

    This study explores the representation of women in computer science at the tertiary level through data collected about undergraduate computer science education at Kabul University in Afghanistan. Previous studies have theorized reasons for underrepresentation of women in computer science, and while many of these reasons are indeed present in Afghanistan, they appear to hinder advancement to degree to a lesser extent. Women comprise at least 36% of each graduating class from KU's Computer Science Department; however, in 2007 women were 25% of the university population. In the US, women comprise over 50% of university populations while only graduating on average 25% women in undergraduate computer science programs. Representation of women in computer science in the US is 50% below the university rate, but at KU, it is 50% above the university rate. This mixed methods study of KU was conducted in the following three stages: setting up focus groups with women computer science students, distributing surveys to all students in the CS department, and conducting a series of 22 individual interviews with fourth year CS students. The analysis of the data collected and its comparison to literature on university/department retention in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics gender representation and on women's education in underdeveloped Islamic countries illuminates KU's uncharacteristic representation of women in its Computer Science Department. The retention of women in STEM through the education pipeline has several characteristics in Afghanistan that differ from countries often studied in available literature. Few Afghan students have computers in their home and few have training beyond secretarial applications before considering studying CS at university. University students in Afghanistan are selected based on placement exams and are then assigned to an area of study, and financially supported throughout their academic career, resulting in a low attrition rate

  17. Enhancing instruction in Fuels and Combustion Laboratory via a developed computer-assisted program for establishing efficient coal-diesel oil mixture (CDOM) fuel proportions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglaya, A.B. [La Salle University, Manila (Philippines). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the relevance of digital computation in Fuels and Combustion Laboratory experiments used by the senior students of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, De La Salle University-Manila, Philippines. One of the students' experiments involved the determination of the most efficient CDOM fuel proportion as alternative fuel to diesel oil for steam generators and other industrial applications. Theoretical calculations show that it requires tedious and repetitive computations. A computer-assisted program was developed to lessen the time-consuming activities. The formulation of algorithms were based on the system of equations of the heat interaction between the CDOM fuel, combustion air and products of combustion and by applying the principles of mass and energy equations (or the First Law of Thermodynamics) for reacting systems were utilized. The developed computer-assisted program output verified alternative fuel selected through actual experimentation.

  18. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  19. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, July-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 September 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), reports on neotectonic investigations of the Manhattan Prong. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR&D funds. The second concerns OTEC pilot plant performance calculations, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The third, describing a study of landfill methane recovery, is supported by the National Park Service.

  20. Upgrade of a radiation measurement laboratory course at the University of Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, L.M.; Bolch, W.E.; Wagner, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The open-quotes Nuclear Radiation Detection and Instrumentation Laboratoryclose quotes course at the University of Florida provides health physics students with virtually their only hands-on exposure to the radiation measurement equipment used in professional practice. To better prepare students for employment, the course is currently under revision, with implementation of the revised course scheduled for fall semester 1996. The primary goal is to improve student understanding of the inherent strengths and limitations of various gas-filled, scintillation, and semiconductor detectors. A secondary goal is to improve student writing skills. To devise lab exercises that meet these goals, a six-step method for systematic laboratory course improvement was developed and used to guide the revision process. First, course objectives were delineated. Second, obstacles to achieving these course objectives were candidly assessed. Third, the course objectives were prioritized to ensure that the most important ones were met within the given time and equipment constraints. Fourth, performance-based learning objectives were written for each exercise. Fifth, exercises were developed that enable students to achieve the learning objectives specified. Sixth, when the revised course is implemented, its teaching effectiveness will be measured and steps will be taken to improve further. Course revision is nearly complete, and the new exercises promise to significantly improve both student technical knowledge and communication skill

  1. Intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in a university hospital parasitology laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Taş Cengiz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present the prevalence of intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in Yüzüncü Yıl University Medical Faculty Parasitology Laboratory. Methods: The study was performed in 2008, and a total of 5985 stool samples were examined. Stool samples were examined with native-Lugol, sedimentation, flotation, trichrome staining and modified acid-fast staining methods. The stool samples of patient suspected to have Entamoeba histolytica/E.dispar infection were stained by trichrome staining method and evaluated by ELISA method for the antigen. ELISA method was used to confirm the results of Fasciola hepatica positive patients in stool examination. Results: In this study intestinal parasites were identified in 29.6% out of the 5985 people. In the study Giardia intestinalis (9.4%, plenty Blastocystis hominis (5.5%, Hymenolepis nana (1.7%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1.2%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.2%; in the stool examination, F.hepatica (0.1%, Cyclospora cayetanensis (0.1%, E.histolytica/E.dispar (0.06%, Taenia saginata (0.05%, Dicrocoelium dendriticum (0.05%, Trichuris trichiura (0.03% and Cryptosporidium spp. (0.02%, pathogenic parasites, were detected. Conclusion: In the study it is also understood that pathogenic intestinal parasites have still been reported at high rates and the problem of parasitosis continues in Van Province.

  2. Characterization of the Shielded Neutron Source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Chad; Finch, Sean; Howell, Calvin; Malone, Ron; Tornow, Wernew

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory rebuilt its shielded neutron source (SNS) with the goal of improving neutron beam collimation and reducing neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds. Neutrons are produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and then collimated by heavy shielding to form a beam. The SNS has the ability to produce both a rectangular and circular neutron beam through use of two collimators with different beam apertures. Our work characterized both the neutron beam profiles as well as the neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds at various locations around the SNS. This characterization was performed to provide researchers who use the SNS with beam parameters necessary to plan and conduct an experiment. Vertical and horizontal beam profiles were measured at two different distances from the neutron production cell by scanning a small plastic scintillator across the face of the beam at various energies for each collimator. Background neutron and gamma-ray intensities were measured using time-of-flight techniques at 10 MeV and 16 MeV with the rectangular collimator. We present results on the position and size of neutron beam as well as on the structure and magnitude of the backgrounds.

  3. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entingh, Daniel J.

    1980-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/DGE), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division.

  4. University of Colorado at Boulder Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental work carried out between October 1, 1990, the closing of our Progress Report, and August 14, 1991 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contract DE-FG02-ER40269 with the United States Department of Energy. This contract supports broadly based experimental work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The program includes pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF and LAMPF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF. The first results of spin-transfer observables in the isovector (rvec p,rvec n) reaction are included in this report. Our data confirm the tentative result from (rvec p,rvec p') reactions that the nuclear isovector spin response shows neither longitudinal enhancement nor transverse queching. Our program in quasifree scattering of high energy pions shows solid evidence of isoscalar enhancement of the nuclear nonspin response. We include several comparisons of the quasifree scattering of different probes. Results from our efforts in the design of accelerator RF cavities are also included in this report

  5. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined

  6. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined.

  7. A low-cost computer-controlled Arduino-based educational laboratory system for teaching the fundamentals of photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariadou, K; Yiasemides, K; Trougkakos, N

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, fully computer-controlled, Arduino-based, educational laboratory (SolarInsight) to be used in undergraduate university courses concerned with electrical engineering and physics. The major goal of the system is to provide students with the necessary instrumentation, software tools and methodology in order to learn fundamental concepts of semiconductor physics by exploring the process of an experimental physics inquiry. The system runs under the Windows operating system and is composed of a data acquisition/control board, a power supply and processing boards, sensing elements, a graphical user interface and data analysis software. The data acquisition/control board is based on the Arduino open source electronics prototyping platform. The graphical user interface and communication with the Arduino are developed in C number sign and C++ programming languages respectively, by using IDE Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Professional, which is freely available to students. Finally, the data analysis is performed by using the open source, object-oriented framework ROOT. Currently the system supports five teaching activities, each one corresponding to an independent tab in the user interface. SolarInsight has been partially developed in the context of a diploma thesis conducted within the Technological Educational Institute of Piraeus under the co-supervision of the Physics and Electronic Computer Systems departments’ academic staff. (paper)

  8. A low-cost computer-controlled Arduino-based educational laboratory system for teaching the fundamentals of photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachariadou, K; Yiasemides, K; Trougkakos, N [Technological Educational Institute of Piraeus, P Ralli and Thivon 250, 12244 Egaleo (Greece)

    2012-11-15

    We present a low-cost, fully computer-controlled, Arduino-based, educational laboratory (SolarInsight) to be used in undergraduate university courses concerned with electrical engineering and physics. The major goal of the system is to provide students with the necessary instrumentation, software tools and methodology in order to learn fundamental concepts of semiconductor physics by exploring the process of an experimental physics inquiry. The system runs under the Windows operating system and is composed of a data acquisition/control board, a power supply and processing boards, sensing elements, a graphical user interface and data analysis software. The data acquisition/control board is based on the Arduino open source electronics prototyping platform. The graphical user interface and communication with the Arduino are developed in C number sign and C++ programming languages respectively, by using IDE Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Professional, which is freely available to students. Finally, the data analysis is performed by using the open source, object-oriented framework ROOT. Currently the system supports five teaching activities, each one corresponding to an independent tab in the user interface. SolarInsight has been partially developed in the context of a diploma thesis conducted within the Technological Educational Institute of Piraeus under the co-supervision of the Physics and Electronic Computer Systems departments' academic staff. (paper)

  9. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, R T; Wroath, P D [eds.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts are summarized in the areas of: cosmic research; solar and interplanetary research; space plasma science; atmospheric research; distributed computing systems; industrial robotics; software engineering; advanced computer networking (Project UNIVERSE); computing applications in engineering; pattern analysis; electron beam lithography; radio research; applied superconductivity; particle physics; neutron beam research; laser research; and computing facilities and operations. Laboratory resources are summarized, and publications and reports resulting from the work reported for the year are listed, as well as lectures and meetings. (LEW)

  10. The Dewey School as Triumph, Tragedy, and Misunderstood: Exploring the Myths and Historiography of the University of Chicago Laboratory School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallace, Thomas; Fantozzi, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the last century, perhaps no school in American history has been studied more than John Dewey's Laboratory School at the University of Chicago (1896-1904). Scholars have published dozens of articles, books, essays, and assessments of a school that existed for only seven and a half years. Purpose/Objective/Research…

  11. Universal resources for approximate and stochastic measurement-based quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Caterina E.; Piani, Marco; Miyake, Akimasa; Van den Nest, Maarten; Duer, Wolfgang; Briegel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate which quantum states can serve as universal resources for approximate and stochastic measurement-based quantum computation in the sense that any quantum state can be generated from a given resource by means of single-qubit (local) operations assisted by classical communication. More precisely, we consider the approximate and stochastic generation of states, resulting, for example, from a restriction to finite measurement settings or from possible imperfections in the resources or local operations. We show that entanglement-based criteria for universality obtained in M. Van den Nest et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 204 (2007)] for the exact, deterministic case can be lifted to the much more general approximate, stochastic case. This allows us to move from the idealized situation (exact, deterministic universality) considered in previous works to the practically relevant context of nonperfect state preparation. We find that any entanglement measure fulfilling some basic requirements needs to reach its maximum value on some element of an approximate, stochastic universal family of resource states, as the resource size grows. This allows us to rule out various families of states as being approximate, stochastic universal. We prove that approximate, stochastic universality is in general a weaker requirement than deterministic, exact universality and provide resources that are efficient approximate universal, but not exact deterministic universal. We also study the robustness of universal resources for measurement-based quantum computation under realistic assumptions about the (imperfect) generation and manipulation of entangled states, giving an explicit expression for the impact that errors made in the preparation of the resource have on the possibility to use it for universal approximate and stochastic state preparation. Finally, we discuss the relation between our entanglement-based criteria and recent results regarding the uselessness of states with a high

  12. Incorporating the International Polar Year Into Introductory Geology Laboratories at Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S. A.; Wilson, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) provides an excellent opportunity for highlighting polar research in education. The ultimate goal of our outreach and education program is to develop a series of modules that are focused on societally-relevant topics being investigated in Antarctic earth science, while teaching basic geologic concepts that are standard elements of school curricula. For example, we envision a university-level, undergraduate, introductory earth science class with the entire semester/quarter laboratory program focused on polar earth science research during the period of the International Polar Year. To attain this goal, a series of modules will be developed, including inquiry-based exercises founded on imagery (video, digital photos, digital core scans), GIS data layers, maps, and data sets available from OSU research groups. Modules that highlight polar research are also suitable for the K-12 audience. Scaleable/grade appropriate modules that use some of the same data sets as the undergraduate modules can be outlined for elementary through high school earth science classes. An initial module is being developed that focuses on paleoclimate data. The module provides a hands-on investigation of the climate history archived in both ice cores and sedimentary rock cores in order to understand time scales, drivers, and processes of global climate change. The paleoclimate module also demonstrates the types of polar research that are ongoing at OSU, allowing students to observe what research the faculty are undertaking in their respective fields. This will link faculty research with student education in the classroom, enhancing learning outcomes. Finally, this module will provide a direct link to U.S. Antarctic Program research related to the International Polar Year, when new ice and sedimentary rock cores will be obtained and analyzed. As a result of this laboratory exercise, the students will be able to: (1) Define an ice core and a sedimentary rock core

  13. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in 30 P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized γ-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary

  14. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  15. A novel single neuron perceptron with universal approximation and XOR computation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ehsan; Akbarzadeh-T, M-R

    2014-01-01

    We propose a biologically motivated brain-inspired single neuron perceptron (SNP) with universal approximation and XOR computation properties. This computational model extends the input pattern and is based on the excitatory and inhibitory learning rules inspired from neural connections in the human brain's nervous system. The resulting architecture of SNP can be trained by supervised excitatory and inhibitory online learning rules. The main features of proposed single layer perceptron are universal approximation property and low computational complexity. The method is tested on 6 UCI (University of California, Irvine) pattern recognition and classification datasets. Various comparisons with multilayer perceptron (MLP) with gradient decent backpropagation (GDBP) learning algorithm indicate the superiority of the approach in terms of higher accuracy, lower time, and spatial complexity, as well as faster training. Hence, we believe the proposed approach can be generally applicable to various problems such as in pattern recognition and classification.

  16. Computer use and vision-related problems among university students in ajman, United arab emirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumari, N; Eldeeb, R; Sreedharan, J; Gopal, K

    2014-03-01

    The extensive use of computers as medium of teaching and learning in universities necessitates introspection into the extent of computer related health disorders among student population. This study was undertaken to assess the pattern of computer usage and related visual problems, among University students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. A total of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of Science and Technology were recruited into this study. Demographic characteristics, pattern of usage of computers and associated visual symptoms were recorded in a validated self-administered questionnaire. Chi-square test was used to determine the significance of the observed differences between the variables. The level of statistical significance was at P computer users were headache - 53.3% (251/471), burning sensation in the eyes - 54.8% (258/471) and tired eyes - 48% (226/471). Female students were found to be at a higher risk. Nearly 72% of students reported frequent interruption of computer work. Headache caused interruption of work in 43.85% (110/168) of the students while tired eyes caused interruption of work in 43.5% (98/168) of the students. When the screen was viewed at distance more than 50 cm, the prevalence of headaches decreased by 38% (50-100 cm - OR: 0.62, 95% of the confidence interval [CI]: 0.42-0.92). Prevalence of tired eyes increased by 89% when screen filters were not used (OR: 1.894, 95% CI: 1.065-3.368). High prevalence of vision related problems was noted among university students. Sustained periods of close screen work without screen filters were found to be associated with occurrence of the symptoms and increased interruptions of work of the students. There is a need to increase the ergonomic awareness among students and corrective measures need to be implemented to reduce the impact of computer related vision problems.

  17. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the π beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of π-γ angular correlations, low energy π-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies

  18. Laboratory and space experiments as a key to the plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1993-08-01

    Almost all of the known matter in our universe is in the state of plasma. Because of the complexity of the plasma state, a reliable understanding has to be built on empirical knowledge, since theoretical models easily become misleading unless guided by experiment or observation. Cosmical plasmas cover a vast range of densities and temperatures, but in important respects they can be classified into three main categories: high, medium, and low density plasmas. The ability of a plasma to carry electric current is very different in different kinds of plasma, varying from high density plasmas, where the ordinary Ohms law applies to low density plasmas, where no local macroscopic relation needs to exist between electric field and current density. According to classical formulas, the electrical conductivity of many plasmas should be practically infinite. But on the basis of laboratory experiments and in situ measurements in space we now know that in important cases the plasmas ability to carry electric current can be reduced by many powers of ten, and even collisionless plasmas may support significant magnetic-field aligned electric fields. A small number of processes responsible for this have been identified. They include anomalous resistivity, magnetic mirror effect and electric double layers. One of the consequences is possible violation of the frozen field condition, which greatly simplifies the analysis but can be dangerously misleading. Another is the possibility of extremely efficient release of magnetically stored energy. Cosmical plasmas have a strong tendency to form filamentary and cellular structures, which complicates their theoretical description by making homogeneous models inappropriate. In situ observations in the Earths magnetosphere have revealed completely unexpected and still not fully understood chemical separation processes that are likely to be important also in astrophysical plasmas. 108 refs

  19. Universal continuous-variable quantum computation: Requirement of optical nonlinearity for photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2002-01-01

    Although universal continuous-variable quantum computation cannot be achieved via linear optics (including squeezing), homodyne detection, and feed-forward, inclusion of ideal photon-counting measurements overcomes this obstacle. These measurements are sometimes described by arrays of beam splitters to distribute the photons across several modes. We show that such a scheme cannot be used to implement ideal photon counting and that such measurements necessarily involve nonlinear evolution. However, this requirement of nonlinearity can be moved ''off-line,'' thereby permitting universal continuous-variable quantum computation with linear optics

  20. Characterization of Aerodynamic Interactions with the Mars Science Laboratory Reaction Control System Using Computation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; VanNorman, John; Rhode, Matthew; Paulson, John

    2013-01-01

    On August 5 , 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule successfully entered Mars' atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater. The capsule used a reaction control system (RCS) consisting of four pairs of hydrazine thrusters to fly a guided entry. The RCS provided bank control to fly along a flight path commanded by an onboard computer and also damped unwanted rates due to atmospheric disturbances and any dynamic instabilities of the capsule. A preliminary assessment of the MSL's flight data from entry showed that the capsule flew much as predicted. This paper will describe how the MSL aerodynamics team used engineering analyses, computational codes and wind tunnel testing in concert to develop the RCS system and certify it for flight. Over the course of MSL's development, the RCS configuration underwent a number of design iterations to accommodate mechanical constraints, aeroheating concerns and excessive aero/RCS interactions. A brief overview of the MSL RCS configuration design evolution is provided. Then, a brief description is presented of how the computational predictions of RCS jet interactions were validated. The primary work to certify that the RCS interactions were acceptable for flight was centered on validating computational predictions at hypersonic speeds. A comparison of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions to wind tunnel force and moment data gathered in the NASA Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel was the lynch pin to validating the CFD codes used to predict aero/RCS interactions. Using the CFD predictions and experimental data, an interaction model was developed for Monte Carlo analyses using 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation. The interaction model used in the flight simulation is presented.

  1. From black holes to baby universes: Exploring the possibility of creating a cosmos in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoldi, S.; Merali, Z.; Guendelman, E.I.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the essential features of baby-universe production, starting from a description of black holes and wormholes, in terms of the causal structure of spacetime, and following a qualitative review of the connection between vacuum decay and inflation in early universe cosmology. Related open questions are also addressed, especially in connection with the possibility that baby universes could be formed within our present universe — either in a future particle accelerator, or spontaneously.

  2. Computational Cosmology: from the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Anninos

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark--hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on thosecalculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  3. Computational Cosmology: from the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anninos Peter

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations (and numerical methods applied to specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  4. Computational Cosmology: From the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations (and numerical methods applied to specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  5. Restructuring of University Laboratories within the Scope of Occupational Health and Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Ordu, Kamil Musa; Çivi Bilir, Gülçin

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory safety is major of importance tooccupational health and safety, which manages, and responds to all issues andconcerns surrounding physical, biological, ergonomic, electrical, chemical, andother standard operating procedures. In this work, laboratory design and equipment,which are arranged according to precautions that are taken against to allhazards regarding to work environment or personal expose at the workenvironments in laboratories that are already exist or will be established...

  6. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report - TUNL XXIV, 1 July 1984-31 August 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Research programs of the Triangle Nuclear Laboratory are discussed. These studies are based on reactions induced by polarized beam, protons, deuterons and neutrons. Individual programs are cataloged separately

  7. Survey of Education, Engineering, and Information Technology Students Knowledge of Green Computing in Nigerian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudeen Ahmed Shittu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer system is growing rapidly and there is growing concern on the environmental hazard associated with its use. Thus, the need for every user’s to possess the knowledge of using computer in an environmental friendly manner.  This study therefore, investigated the knowledge of green computing possessed by university students in Nigeria. To achieve this, survey method was employed to carry out the study. The study involved students from three schools (Computer Science, Engineering, and Education. Purposive sampling method was used to draw three hundred (300 respondents that volunteer to answer the questionnaire administered for gathering the data of the study. The instrument used was adapted but modify and subjected to pilot testing to ascertain its validity and internal consistency. The reliability of the instrument showed a .75 Cronbach alpha level.  The first research question was answer with descriptive statistic (perecentage.  T-test and ANOVA was used to answer question two and three. The findings showed that the students do not possess adequate knowledge on conscious use of computing system. Also, the study showed that there is no significant difference in the green computing knowledge possesses among male and female as well as among student from the three schools. Based on these findings, the study suggested among other an aggressive campaign on green computing among university communities.

  8. Large Data at Small Universities: Astronomical processing using a computer classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Nathaniel James; Clarkson, William I.; Fluharty, Bill; Belanger, Zach; Dage, Kristen

    2016-06-01

    The use of large computing clusters for astronomy research is becoming more commonplace as datasets expand, but access to these required resources is sometimes difficult for research groups working at smaller Universities. As an alternative to purchasing processing time on an off-site computing cluster, or purchasing dedicated hardware, we show how one can easily build a crude on-site cluster by utilizing idle cycles on instructional computers in computer-lab classrooms. Since these computers are maintained as part of the educational mission of the University, the resource impact on the investigator is generally low.By using open source Python routines, it is possible to have a large number of desktop computers working together via a local network to sort through large data sets. By running traditional analysis routines in an “embarrassingly parallel” manner, gains in speed are accomplished without requiring the investigator to learn how to write routines using highly specialized methodology. We demonstrate this concept here applied to 1. photometry of large-format images and 2. Statistical significance-tests for X-ray lightcurve analysis. In these scenarios, we see a speed-up factor which scales almost linearly with the number of cores in the cluster. Additionally, we show that the usage of the cluster does not severely limit performance for a local user, and indeed the processing can be performed while the computers are in use for classroom purposes.

  9. Computer-Based Legal Education at the University of Illinois: A Report of Two Years' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, Peter B.; Morgan, Thomas D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes experimentation with the Plato IV computer-assisted method of teaching law at the University of Illinois College of Law: development and testing of programs for teaching Future Interests and Offer and Acceptance, and law-related work currently being done on Plato. Potential, limitations, and student enthusiasm are summarized. (JT)

  10. Students' Viewpoint of Computer Game for Training in Indonesian Universities and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudin, Didin; Hasegawa, Shinobu; Kamaludin, Apep

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the survey--conducted in Indonesian universities (UNIV) and high schools (HS)--whose concern is to examine preferences and influences of computer game for training. Comparing the students' viewpoint between both educational levels could determine which educational level would satisfy the need of MAGNITUDE--mobile serious game…

  11. Teaching Computer Languages and Elementary Theory for Mixed Audiences at University Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical issues of computer science are traditionally taught in a way that presupposes a solid mathematical background and are usually considered more or less unaccessible for students without this. An effective methodology is described which has been developed for a target group of university...... into a learning-by-doing approach having the students to develop such descriptions themselves from an informal introduction....

  12. Teaching Computer Languages and Elementary Theory for Mixed Audiences at University Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    Theoretical issues of computer science are traditionally taught in a way that presupposes a solid mathematical background and are usually considered more or less unaccessible for students without this. An effective methodology is described which has been developed for a target group of university...... into a learning-by-doing approach having the students to develop such descriptions themselves from an informal introduction....

  13. Computing Camps for Girls : A First-Time Experience at the University of Limerick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInerney, Clare; Lamprecht, A.L.; Margaria, Tiziana

    2018-01-01

    Increasing the number of females in ICT-related university courses has been a major concern for several years. In 2015, we offered a girls-only computing summer camp for the first time, as a new component in our education and outreach activities to foster students’ interest in our discipline. In

  14. Mapping University Students' Epistemic Framing of Computational Physics Using Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Madelen

    2012-01-01

    Solving physics problem in university physics education using a computational approach requires knowledge and skills in several domains, for example, physics, mathematics, programming, and modeling. These competences are in turn related to students' beliefs about the domains as well as about learning. These knowledge and beliefs components are…

  15. The effectiveness of remedial computer use for mathematics in a university setting (Botswana)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.; Pilon, J.; Pilon, Jacqueline; Janssen Reinen, I.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of the effects of the Mathematics and Science Computer Assisted Remedial Teaching (MASCART) software on students from the Pre-Entry Science Course at the University of Botswana. A general significant improvement of basic algebra knowledge and skills could be

  16. Computer Cataloging of Electronic Journals in Unstable Aggregator Databases: The Hong Kong Baptist University Library Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiu-On; Leung, Shirley W.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of aggregator databases focuses on a project at the Hong Kong Baptist University library to integrate full-text electronic journal titles from three unstable aggregator databases into its online public access catalog (OPAC). Explains the development of the electronic journal computer program (EJCOP) to generate MARC records for…

  17. Assessing the Use of Smartphone in the University General Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Zhao; Sun, Jiajun; Xu, Chong; Huan, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, smartphone was used to alter the traditional procedure by involving students in active learning experiences prior to the laboratory meeting. The researcher surveyed students' view on the effect of using smartphone to enhance learning in the general physics laboratory. The use of smartphone was evaluated by having 120 students who…

  18. The use of computer-aided learning in chemistry laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Brian Robert Tracy

    This research involves developing and implementing computer software for chemistry laboratory instruction. The specific goal is to design the software and investigate whether it can be used to introduce concepts and laboratory procedures without a lecture format. This would allow students to conduct an experiment even though they may not have been introduced to the chemical concept in their lecture course. This would also allow for another type of interaction for those students who respond more positively to a visual approach to instruction. The first module developed was devoted to using computer software to help introduce students to the concepts related to thin-layer chromatography and setting up and running an experiment. This was achieved through the use of digitized pictures and digitized video clips along with written information. A review quiz was used to help reinforce the learned information. The second module was devoted to the concept of the "dry lab". This module presented students with relevant information regarding the chemical concepts and then showed them the outcome of mixing solutions. By these observations, they were to determine the composition of unknown solutions based on provided descriptions and comparison with their written observations. The third piece of the software designed was a computer game. This program followed the first two modules in providing information the students were to learn. The difference here, though, was incorporating a game scenario for students to use to help reinforce the learning. Students were then assessed to see how much information they retained after playing the game. In each of the three cases, a control group exposed to the traditional lecture format was used. Their results were compared to the experimental group using the computer modules. Based upon the findings, it can be concluded that using technology to aid in the instructional process is definitely of benefit and students were more successful in

  19. Computer vision syndrome: a study of knowledge and practices in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S C; Low, C K; Lim, Y P; Low, L L; Mardina, F; Nursaleha, M P

    2013-01-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a condition in which a person experiences one or more of eye symptoms as a result of prolonged working on a computer. To determine the prevalence of CVS symptoms, knowledge and practices of computer use in students studying in different universities in Malaysia, and to evaluate the association of various factors in computer use with the occurrence of symptoms. In a cross sectional, questionnaire survey study, data was collected in college students regarding the demography, use of spectacles, duration of daily continuous use of computer, symptoms of CVS, preventive measures taken to reduce the symptoms, use of radiation filter on the computer screen, and lighting in the room. A total of 795 students, aged between 18 and 25 years, from five universities in Malaysia were surveyed. The prevalence of symptoms of CVS (one or more) was found to be 89.9%; the most disturbing symptom was headache (19.7%) followed by eye strain (16.4%). Students who used computer for more than 2 hours per day experienced significantly more symptoms of CVS (p=0.0001). Looking at far objects in-between the work was significantly (p=0.0008) associated with less frequency of CVS symptoms. The use of radiation filter on the screen (p=0.6777) did not help in reducing the CVS symptoms. Ninety percent of university students in Malaysia experienced symptoms related to CVS, which was seen more often in those who used computer for more than 2 hours continuously per day. © NEPjOPH.

  20. The Impact Of Using Computer Software On Vocabulary Learning Of Iranian EFL University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, using computer is common in all fields. Education is not an exception. In fact, this approach of technology has been using increasingly in language classrooms. We have witnessed there are more and more language teachers are using computers in their classrooms. This research study investigates the impact of using computer   on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL university students. To this end, a sample of 40 university students in Islamic Azad University, Larestan branch were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. Prior the treatment and to catch the initial deferences between the participants, all the students sat for a pre-test that was an Oxford Placement Test. Then the students were received the treatment for 10 weeks. The students in the experimental group were taught by computer software for vocabulary learning while the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning. After the treatment, all the students sat for a post-test. The statistical analysis through running Independent-Sample T-tests revealed thatthe students in the experimental group who used the computer software for vocabulary learning performed better than the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning.

  1. Computer Network Availability at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM: Measurement and Perception; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, SPENCER D.; TOLENDINO, LAWRENCE F.

    1999-01-01

    The desire to provide a measure of computer network availability at Sandia National Laboratories has existed for along time. Several attempts were made to build this measure by accurately recording network failures, identifying the type of network element involved, the root cause of the problem, and the time to repair the fault. Recognizing the limitations of available methods, it became obvious that another approach of determining network availability had to be defined. The chosen concept involved the periodic sampling of network services and applications from various network locations. A measure of ''network'' availability was then calculated based on the ratio of polling success to failure. The effort required to gather the information and produce a useful metric is not prohibitive and the information gained has verified long held feelings regarding network performance with real data

  2. Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code: a compartmental pathways computer model of contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Root, R.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code has been used since 1978 for environmental pathway analysis of potential migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals. The DOSTOMAN work is reviewed including a summary of historical use of compartmental models, the mathematical basis for the DOSTOMAN code, examples of exact analytical solutions for simple matrices, methods for numerical solution of complex matrices, and mathematical validation/calibration of the SRL code. The review includes the methodology for application to nuclear and hazardous chemical waste disposal, examples of use of the model in contaminant transport and pathway analysis, a user's guide for computer implementation, peer review of the code, and use of DOSTOMAN at other Department of Energy sites. 22 refs., 3 figs

  3. A synthetic computational environment: To control the spread of respiratory infections in a virtual university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuanzheng; Chen, Bin; liu, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang; Song, Hongbin; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Individual-based computational environment provides an effective solution to study complex social events by reconstructing scenarios. Challenges remain in reconstructing the virtual scenarios and reproducing the complex evolution. In this paper, we propose a framework to reconstruct a synthetic computational environment, reproduce the epidemic outbreak, and evaluate management interventions in a virtual university. The reconstructed computational environment includes 4 fundamental components: the synthetic population, behavior algorithms, multiple social networks, and geographic campus environment. In the virtual university, influenza H1N1 transmission experiments are conducted, and gradually enhanced interventions are evaluated and compared quantitatively. The experiment results indicate that the reconstructed virtual environment provides a solution to reproduce complex emergencies and evaluate policies to be executed in the real world.

  4. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009....

  5. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008....

  6. Comparison of semen quality between university-based and private assisted reproductive technology laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S; Khan, Omar; Sønksen, Jens

    2018-01-01

    laboratory, the first at each laboratory was selected for analysis. Comparison of major semen parameters was performed using descriptive statistics and Bland-Altman plots, with differences tested using Wilcoxon-signed rank test. RESULTS: Twenty-eight men aged 33 ± 5 (mean ± SD) years were included......OBJECTIVE: Obtaining a semen analysis (SA) is an essential step in evaluating infertile men. Despite using standardized procedures for analysis semen quality in the same individual often varies on repeated tests. The objective of this study was to investigate inter-laboratory variation in semen...

  7. Implementation of a rapid HIT immunoassay at a university hospital - Retrospective analysis of HIT laboratory orders in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anne; Heimerl, Susanne; Oertli, Linnéa; Wilczek, Wolf; Greinacher, Andreas; Spannagl, Michael; Herr, Wolfgang; Hart, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare cause of thrombocytopenia and a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction. Clinical overdiagnosis of HIT results in costly laboratory tests and anticoagulation. Criteria and algorithms for diagnosis are established, but their translation into clinical practice is still challenging. In a retrospective approach we studied all HIT related laboratory test requests within four years and evaluated data before (1st period, 24month) and after (2nd period, 24month) replacing particle gel immunoassay (PaGIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). HIT was confirmed by heparin-induced platelet activation (HIPA) test. Clinical pretest probability for HIT using an implemented simplified 4Ts score and platelet count were evaluated. Costs for laboratory tests and alternative anticoagulation were calculated. In 1850 patients with suspected HIT, 2327 laboratory orders were performed. In 87.2% of these orders an intermediate/high simplified 4Ts score was found. Thrombocytopenia was present in 87.1%. After replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA the number of immunological and functional laboratory tests was reduced by 38.2%. The number of positive HIT immunoassays declined from 22.6% to 6.0%, while the number of positive HIPA tests among positive immunological tests increased by 19%. Altogether, acute HIT was confirmed in 59 patients. A decline in the use of alternative anticoagulants was observed in the 2nd period. Our study shows that in a university hospital setting HIT is well-known, but diagnosis requires a precise laboratory confirmation. Replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA did not influence laboratory order behavior but results in reduced overall costs for laboratory diagnostics and alternative anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Three-year customer satisfaction survey in laboratory medicine in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siqi; Duan, Yifei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Yongmei

    2018-04-25

    Customer satisfaction is a key quality indicator of laboratory service. Patients and physicians are the ultimate customers in medical laboratory, and their opinions are essential components in developing a customer-oriented laboratory. A longitudinal investigation of customer satisfaction was conducted through questionnaires. We designed two different questionnaires and selected 1200 customers (600 outpatients and 600 physicians) to assess customer satisfaction every other year from 2012 to 2016. Items with scores satisfaction in 2014 was better, which illustrated our strategy was effective. However, some items remained to be less than 4, so we repeated the survey after modifying questionnaires in 2016. However, the general satisfaction points of the physicians and patients reduced in 2016, which reminded us of some influential factors we had neglected. By using dynamic survey of satisfaction, we can continuously find deficiencies in our laboratory services and take suitable corrective actions, thereby improving our service quality.

  9. Laboratory Performance of Universal Adhesive Systems for Luting CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Fabiana; Cardenas, Andres Millan; Gutierrez, Mario Felipe; Malaquias, Pâmela; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of several universal adhesive systems applied on five different indirect restorative materials. Five CAD/CAM materials were selected: 1) indirect resin composite (LAV); 2) feldspathic glass ceramic (VTR); 3) leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (EMP); 4) lithium disilicate ceramic (EMX); 5) yttrium-stabilized zirconium dioxide (CZI). For each material, 15 blocks were cut into 4 rectangular sections (6 × 6 × 6 mm) (n = 60 per group), and processed as recommended by the respective manufacturer. For each indirect material, the following adhesive systems were applied according to the respective manufacturer's instructions: 1) AdheSE Universal [ADU]; 2) All-Bond Universal (ABU); 3) Ambar Universal (AMB); 4) Clearfil Universal (CFU); 5) Futurabond U (FBU); 6) One Coat 7 Universal (OCU); 7) Peak Universal Bond (PUB); 8) Prime&Bond Elect (PBE); 9) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU); 10) Xeno Select (XEN, negative control). After the application of the adhesive system, cylinder-shaped transparent matrices were filled with a dual-curing resin cement (NX3) and light cured. Specimens were stored in water (37°C for 24 h) and tested in shear mode at 1.0 mm/min (mSBS). The failure pattern and μSBS were statistically evaluated (a = 0.05). LAV, VTR, and EMP showed a greater number of cohesive fractures than EMX and CZI (p materials. There was a wide variability in mean μSBS when different universal adhesives were applied to the several CAD/CAM indirect materials. Most universal adhesives bonded well to air-abraded zirconia.

  10. Estimating Turaev-Viro three-manifold invariants is universal for quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagic, Gorjan; Reichardt, Ben W.; Jordan, Stephen P.; Koenig, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Turaev-Viro invariants are scalar topological invariants of compact, orientable 3-manifolds. We give a quantum algorithm for additively approximating Turaev-Viro invariants of a manifold presented by a Heegaard splitting. The algorithm is motivated by the relationship between topological quantum computers and (2+1)-dimensional topological quantum field theories. Its accuracy is shown to be nontrivial, as the same algorithm, after efficient classical preprocessing, can solve any problem efficiently decidable by a quantum computer. Thus approximating certain Turaev-Viro invariants of manifolds presented by Heegaard splittings is a universal problem for quantum computation. This establishes a relation between the task of distinguishing nonhomeomorphic 3-manifolds and the power of a general quantum computer.

  11. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altic, Nick A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  12. Report on application results of the nuclear reactor in Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. April 1994 - March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is on researching action state, application state, management state, and others of 1994 fiscal year at the Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. The experimental reactor has been used for the studies such as application of neutron radioactivity analysis to multi fields, application of fission and alpha track method to age determination and metallurgy, hot atom chemistry, neutron radiation effect on semiconductors and others, nuclear data measurement, organism, materials and products using neutron radiography, and development and application to inspection of radiation detectors such as neutron detector. This report was a report shown as a shape of research results of actions of the researchers. And, another report of colaborate research results using the Rikkyo University reactor was also published from the Atomic Energy Center, the University of Tokyo begun since April, 1974. (G.K.)

  13. Assessment of neck pain and cervical mobility among female computer workers at Hail University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Walaa S; Hamza, Hayat H; ElSais, Walaa M

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of neck pain among computer workers at Hail University, Saudi Arabia and to compare the cervical range of motion (ROM) of female computer workers suffering from neck pain to the cervical ROM of healthy female computer workers. One hundred and seventy-six female volunteers between 20 and 46 years of age were investigated. Fifty-six of these volunteers were staff members, 22 were administrators and 98 were students. The Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) instrument was used to measure the ROM of the cervical spine. A questionnaire was used to assess participants for the presence of neck pain. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, and the level of significant was set at p pain (75%) among computer workers at Hail University, particularly among students. There were significant differences in cervical lateral flexion, rotation to the right side and protraction range between the pain and pain-free groups. Our results demonstrated that cervical ROM measurements, particularly cervical lateral flexion, rotation and protraction, could be useful for predicting changes in head and neck posture after long-term computer work.

  14. Let´s go the University Laboratory: a successful collaborative experience

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Ferri, Carmen; Pérez Rodríguez, Jorge; Espinosa Tomás, Julián; Hernández Poveda, Consuelo; Mas Candela, David; Miret Marí, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    In order to encourage high school students to be interested in Physics and Optics, the Technological and Educational Innovation group “Teaching in Optics and Vision Sciences” (DOCIVIS) has been working closely with numerous secondary schools within the territory covered by the University of Alicante (UA) for four years. The collaboration is framed within the UA’s Research Networks, that are directed to preparation sections to entrance University. The main objective is to promote the coordinat...

  15. Does the Beach-Spawning Grunion Eat Its Own Eggs? Eighth Graders Use Inquiry-Based Investigation to Collect Real Data in a University Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, J. William; Martinez, Kimberly M.; Higgins, Benjamin A.; Horn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative effort between a junior high school and a nearby university allowed 40 eighth-grade honors students to engage in a scientific investigation within a university laboratory. These students, with their science teachers and university researchers, gathered data on egg cannibalism in a beach-spawning fish and thereby contributed to an…

  16. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Annual report, 1 September 1981-1 October 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagondollar, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    The varied research programs described reflect a decision by TUNL to devote its major resources to the study of the multiple facets of nuclear structure which can be probed through light ion induced nuclear reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. We also continue a major commitment to the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program to produce controlled thermonuclear fusion. The major accelerator facilities of the laboratory include a model FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 15 MeV fixed energy negative ion cyclotron injector. The laboratory has two additional single ended Van de Graaff accelerators with terminal energies of 4 MV and 3 MV, respectively

  17. Hybrid magic state distillation for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wenqiang; Yu, Yafei; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Jingfu; Li, Jun; Li, Zhaokai; Suter, Dieter; Zhou, Xianyi; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    A set of stabilizer operations augmented by some special initial states known as 'magic states', gives the possibility of universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. However, magic state preparation inevitably involves nonideal operations that introduce noise. The most common method to eliminate the noise is magic state distillation (MSD) by stabilizer operations. Here we propose a hybrid MSD protocol by connecting a four-qubit H-type MSD with a five-qubit T-type MSD, in order to overcome s...

  18. Affordable mobile robotic platforms for teaching computer science at African universities

    OpenAIRE

    Gyebi, Ernest; Hanheide, Marc; Cielniak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Educational robotics can play a key role in addressing some of the challenges faced by higher education in Africa. One of the major obstacles preventing a wider adoption of initiatives involving educational robotics in this part of the world is lack of robots that would be affordable by African institutions. In this paper, we present a survey and analysis of currently available affordable mobile robots and their suitability for teaching computer science at African universities. To this end, w...

  19. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report, 1 January 1980-31 December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Research is described for: neutron cross section experiments; neutron polarization studies; high resolution elastic and inelastic scattering studies; charged particle experiments with polarized beams; radioactive capture reactions; accelerator based atomic physics; instrumentation; computer related development; and nuclear theory and phenomenology

  20. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, for fiscal 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report presents the research activities carried out by the members of the Laboratory and the users of the facilities. The major facilities of the Laboratory are a 110 cm variable energy cyclotron and a 4.7 MeV Van de Graaff. The cyclotron division has made extensive studies on nuclear physics, such as the pre-equilibrium process of neutron emission, inelastic proton scattering, He-3 induced reactions, and polarization experiments. The Van de Graaff division reports about the works on hyperfine interaction, mirror beta-decay, heavy element ion source, and nuclear spin alignment. Model magnet study on the future project has also been developed at the Laboratory. Other divisions of the Laboratory are the mass spectroscopy division, the radioisotope division, and the theoretical physics division. The works of the mass spectroscopy division concern the on-line mass separation of radioisotopes, the field desorption of mass spectra, and instrumentation. The works of the radioisotope division spread widely on the field of nuclear chemistry. At the end of this report, various works, which have been made by the theoretical physics division, are introduced. (Kato, T.)

  1. Audio-Tutorial Versus Conventional Lecture-Laboratory Instruction in a University Animal Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsey, Robert E.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze two methods of instruction used in an animal biology course. One group of students, the experimental group, was taught using an audio-tutorial program, and another group, the control group, was taught using the conventional lecture-laboratory method. Pretest and posttest data were collected from achievement…

  2. CLINIC-LABORATORY DESIGN BASED ON FUNCTION AND PHILOSOPHY AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HANLEY, T.D.; STEER, M.D.

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES THE DESIGN OF A NEW CLINIC AND LABORATORY FOR SPEECH AND HEARING TO ACCOMMODATE THE THREE BASIC PROGRAMS OF--(1) CLINICAL TRAINING OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT MAJORS, (2) SERVICES MADE AVAILABLE TO THE SPEECH AND HEARING HANDICAPPED, AND (3) RESEARCH IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY, AUDIOLOGY, PSYCHO-ACOUSTICS, AND…

  3. LABORATORY PROCESS CONTROLLER USING NATURAL LANGUAGE COMMANDS FROM A PERSONAL COMPUTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.

    1994-01-01

    The complex environment of the typical research laboratory requires flexible process control. This program provides natural language process control from an IBM PC or compatible machine. Sometimes process control schedules require changes frequently, even several times per day. These changes may include adding, deleting, and rearranging steps in a process. This program sets up a process control system that can either run without an operator, or be run by workers with limited programming skills. The software system includes three programs. Two of the programs, written in FORTRAN77, record data and control research processes. The third program, written in Pascal, generates the FORTRAN subroutines used by the other two programs to identify the user commands with the user-written device drivers. The software system also includes an input data set which allows the user to define the user commands which are to be executed by the computer. To set the system up the operator writes device driver routines for all of the controlled devices. Once set up, this system requires only an input file containing natural language command lines which tell the system what to do and when to do it. The operator can make up custom commands for operating and taking data from external research equipment at any time of the day or night without the operator in attendance. This process control system requires a personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. The program requires a FORTRAN77 compiler and user-written device drivers. This program was developed in 1989 and has a memory requirement of about 62 Kbytes.

  4. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei 30 P and 34 Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using 166 Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented

  5. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  6. Experience of computer technology usage within university training for future specialists of nuclear power plants under «the university-enterprise» program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.K.; Vol'man, M.A.; Zhuravleva, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the aspects of training program for future specialists of nuclear power plants. This program is realized at NPP Department of Ivanovo State University and Kalinin NPP. The usage of computer and simulation modeling at the university are the main components of this concept [ru

  7. Growing a garden without water: Graduate teaching assistants in introductory science laboratories at a doctoral/research university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Julie A.; Kurdziel, Josepha P.; Roehrig, Gillian H.; Turner, Jessica

    2004-03-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in the sciences are a common feature of U.S. universities that have a prominent mission of research. During the past 2 decades, increased attention has been paid to the professional development of GTAs as instructors. As a result, universities have created training programs to assist GTAs in selecting instructional methods, curricular formats, and assessments when they serve as laboratory, lecture, or discussion group instructors. Unfortunately, few studies explore the educational and instructional environment of GTAs in these reformed settings. This study was conducted to address this specific need. As a constructivist inquiry, qualitative methods were used to collect and analyze the data to elucidate the educational and instructional environment of science GTAs at a doctoral/research university in which various training programs existed. We found that GTAs worked autonomously, that traditional practices and curricula existed in laboratories, and that instructors frequently held limited views of undergraduates' abilities and motivation. Findings in this initial study about GTAs suggest that developers of GTA training programs draw on the literature regarding science teacher education, and that reward systems be instituted that recognize faculty and staff for their participation in GTA training programs.

  8. Chapter 2. The University as a Living Laboratory for Climate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew St. Clair

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The story of the University of California’s institutional goal of de-carbonization by 2025, already years in the making, was a key feature of a systemwide Summit on carbon neutrality and climate mitigation in the Fall of 2015. This report, commissioned by the Summit, represents a unique multi-campus, interdisciplinary collaboration, an attempt by one university system to harness its diverse intellectual resources to address the crisis of global climate disruption. This chapter puts the Bending the Curve report into the context of the University of California’s (UC carbon neutrality and sustainability initiatives and offers one example of how a large organization can become a “living laboratory”— a research, teaching and learning, and innovation testbed—for climate solutions.

  9. From Three-Photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger States to Ballistic Universal Quantum Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-Segovia, Mercedes; Shadbolt, Pete; Browne, Dan E; Rudolph, Terry

    2015-07-10

    Single photons, manipulated using integrated linear optics, constitute a promising platform for universal quantum computation. A series of increasingly efficient proposals have shown linear-optical quantum computing to be formally scalable. However, existing schemes typically require extensive adaptive switching, which is experimentally challenging and noisy, thousands of photon sources per renormalized qubit, and/or large quantum memories for repeat-until-success strategies. Our work overcomes all these problems. We present a scheme to construct a cluster state universal for quantum computation, which uses no adaptive switching, no large memories, and which is at least an order of magnitude more resource efficient than previous passive schemes. Unlike previous proposals, it is constructed entirely from loss-detecting gates and offers a robustness to photon loss. Even without the use of an active loss-tolerant encoding, our scheme naturally tolerates a total loss rate ∼1.6% in the photons detected in the gates. This scheme uses only 3 Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states as a resource, together with a passive linear-optical network. We fully describe and model the iterative process of cluster generation, including photon loss and gate failure. This demonstrates that building a linear-optical quantum computer needs to be less challenging than previously thought.

  10. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bernard H. IV; Ebert, David

    1988-01-01

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  11. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exact gate sequences for universal quantum computation using the XY interaction alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempe, J.; Whaley, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous publication [J. Kempe et al., Quantum Computation and Information (Rinton Press, Princeton, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, special issue, p. 33] we showed that it is possible to implement universal quantum computation with the anisotropic XY-Heisenberg exchange acting as a single interaction. To achieve this we used encodings of the states of the computation into a larger Hilbert space. This proof is nonconstructive, however, and did not explicitly give the trade-offs in time that are required to implement encoded single-qubit operations and encoded two-qubit gates. Here we explicitly give the gate sequences needed to simulate these operations on encoded qubits and qutrits (three-level systems) and analyze the trade-offs involved. We also propose a possible layout for the qubits in a triangular arrangement

  13. Rotavirus Infection in the Auckland Region After the Implementation of Universal Infant Rotavirus Vaccination: Impact on Hospitalizations and Laboratory Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Gary N; Taylor, Susan L; Drinković, Dragana; Roberts, Sally A; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Best, Emma J

    2018-01-01

    In July 2014, New Zealand introduced universal infant vaccination with RotaTeq (Merk & Co.) administered as 3 doses at 6 weeks, 3 and 5 months of age. We sought to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccination on gastroenteritis (GE) hospitalizations in the greater Auckland region and analyze changes in rotavirus testing in the period around vaccine introduction. Hospitalizations, laboratory testing rates and methods were compared between the pre-vaccine period (2009-2013), post-vaccine period (January 2015 to December 2015) and year of vaccine introduction (2014). There was a 68% decline in rotavirus hospitalizations of children Auckland region. However, continued rotavirus testing at pre-vaccine rates risks generating false positive results. Laboratories and clinicians should consider reviewing their testing algorithms before vaccine introduction.

  14. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three Nuclear Engineering Department classes make use of the reactor. Forty-eight students enrolled in NE 231 participated in a two-hour laboratory session introducing students to rector behavior characteristics. Twelve hours of reactor operating time were devoted to this session. NE 427 was offeed in the fall semester and had an enrollment of sixteen. Several NE 427 experiments use materials that are activated in the reactor. One experiment entitled Radiation Survey requires that students make measurements of radiation levels in and around the reactor laboratory. The irradiations in support of NE 427 and the radiation survey take place during normal isotope production runs, so no reactor time is specifically devoted to NE 427. The enrollment in NE 428 was twenty-four, as it was offered in both semesters

  15. Modernization of physical protection educational laboratories in the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Krasnoborodko, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-proliferation of nuclear materials includes, in addition to accounting and control, the Physical Protection (PP) of one. The paper considers the experience by MEPhI in application the practical educational in the area of PP technical systems. The following aspects are discussed in the paper: specific features graduate program in nuclear security area; overview of the practical course curricula in the special laboratory.

  16. Assessment of the Results from Conducted Experimental Training in Computer Networks and Communications in the Laboratory Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencho Stoitsov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a conducted educational research, related to the use of virtual models and appropriate software in order to acquire practical knowledge and skills in laboratory work in the subject "Computer Networks and Communications" (CNC at the FMI at PU "Paisii Hilendarski".

  17. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  18. Computing and information services at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory - A management approach to a diversity of needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felberg, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a research and development organization with about 5,000 employees, presents a complicated set of requirements for an institutional system of computing and informational services. The approach taken by JPL in meeting this challenge is one of controlled flexibility. A central communications network is provided, together with selected computing facilities for common use. At the same time, staff members are given considerable discretion in choosing the mini- and microcomputers that they believe will best serve their needs. Consultation services, computer education, and other support functions are also provided.

  19. A study of the National Physical Laboratory microdosimetry research programme in collaboration with the University of Leeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H.G.

    1987-11-01

    A study of the present programme of work carried out by the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Leeds, has been carried out. The study is based on the use of the tissue-equivalent proportional counter in microdosimetic techniques in radiation protection for monoenergetic neutrons or reference radionuclide neutron sources. This report comments on the programme as a whole and provides recommendations for future research work, taking into account the research programmes carried out at other institutions. It also attempts to summarise the present state of knowledge and experience associated with the application of this technique to radiation fields met in routine radiation protection. (author)

  20. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the research 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in the fiscal year 1992. The Yayoi was operated smoothly through the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized and the related themes reached 23 cases. The research themes of the linac count up to 17, after its reconstruction to be twin-linac. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the 16 reports of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1992 are collected. (J.P.N.)

  1. Reactor laboratory course for Korean under-graduate students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students has been carried out at Kyoto University Critical Assembly of Japan. This course has been launched from fiscal year 2003 and has been founded by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government. Since then, the total number of 43 Korean under-graduate students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of 6 universities in all over the Korea, has been taken part in this course. The reactor physics experiments have been performed in this course, such as Approach to criticality, Control rod calibration, Measurement of neutron flux and power calibration, and Educational reactor operation. As technical tour of Japan, nuclear site tour has been taken during their stay in Japan, such as PWR, FBR, nuclear fuel company and some institutes

  2. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report: TUNL XX, January 1-September 1, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: neutron cross section experiments neutron polarization studies high resolution studies, charged particle experiments with polarized beams, radiative capture reactions, accelerator based atomic physics accelerator development and instrumentation, and computer related development. Technical publications authored by staff members are listed

  3. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    In this annual report, the activities of research and education, the state of operation of research facilities and others in fiscal year 1993 are summarized. Four main research facilities are the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron linear accelerator, the basic experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and the heavy irradiation research facility. The reactor and the accelerator are for the joint utilization by all universities in Japan, the blanket is used by the Faculty of Engineering, and the HIT is for the joint utilization in University of Tokyo. In fiscal year 1993, the installation of the fast neutron science research facility was approved. In this annual report, the management and operation of the above research facilities are described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of teachers, are summarized. (K.I.)

  4. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report 14 February 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab

  5. Recent progresses in ion beam analysis of aerosol at tandetron laboratory of Beijing Normal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangfu; Lu Yongfang; Zhu Guanghua

    2007-01-01

    PIXE analysis of aerosol samples for measuring concentrations of elements with Z>12 is one of major applications at the GIC4117 Tandetron in Beijing Normal University. In order to measure H, C, N and O concentration in aerosol samples, proton non-Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (PNBS) and proton elastic scattering analysis(PESA) were employed with two Au(Si) surface barrier detectors at angles of 160 degree and 40 degree in the PIXE chamber. (authors)

  6. University of Wisconsin, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Annual report, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  7. Conversion and improvement of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D to the NMFECC CDC 7600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, T.C.

    1980-06-01

    The implementation of a version of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D on the CDC 7600 at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center is reported. A new iteration technique that greatly increases the probability of convergence and reduces computation time by about 30% for calculations with nonlinear, ferromagnetic materials is included. The use of GFUN3D on the NMFE network is discussed, and suggestions for future work are presented. Appendix A consists of revisions to the GFUN3D User Guide (published by Rutherford Laboratory( that are necessary to use this version. Appendix B contains input and output for some sample calculations. Appendix C is a detailed discussion of the old and new iteration techniques

  8. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  9. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  10. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89)

  11. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory: Annual report, TUNL XXV, 1 September 1985-31 August 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The varied research programs described in this report reflect a decision to devote major resources to the study of the multiple facets of nuclear structure which can be probed through light-ion and neutron induced nuclear reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. A major commitment continues towards the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution proton beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program for the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion

  12. Evaluation of an LED Retrofit Project at Princeton University's Carl Icahn Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murphy, Arthur [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Perrin, Tess [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    At Princeton University’s Carl Icahn Laboratory, DOE’s Commercial Buildings Integration Program documented the implementation of LED retrofit products for recessed troffers, linear cove lighting, and downlights – as part of Princeton’s first building-wide interior LED project. The conversion to LED enables more extensive use of lighting controls to tailor the lighting to the task and limit the operating hours based on occupancy, and the estimated energy savings including controls is 62% compared to the incumbent system.

  13. Innovation in engineering education through computer assisted learning and virtual university model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, A.; Raicu, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the most important aspects of innovation in Engineering Education using Computer Assisted Learning. The authors propose to increase the quality of Engineering Education programs of study at European standards. The use of computer assisted learning methodologies in all studies is becoming an important resource in Higher Education. We intend to improve the concept of e-Learning using virtual terminals, online support and assisting special training through live seminars and interactive labs to develop a virtual university model. We intend to encourage computer assisted learning and innovation as sources of competitive advantage, to permit vision and learning analysis, identifies new sources of technology and ideas. Our work is based on our university datasets collected during last fifteen years using several e-Learning systems. In Constanta Maritime University (CMU), using eLearning and Knowledge Management Services (KMS) is very important and we apply it effectively to achieve strategic objectives, such as collaboration, sharing and good practice. We have experience in this field since 2000 year using Moodle as KMS in our university. The term KMS can be associated to Open Source Software, Open Standards, Open Protocols and Open Knowledge licenses, initiatives and policies. In CMU Virtual Campus we have today over 12500 active users. Another experience of the authors is the implementation of MariTrainer Wiki educational platform based on Dokeos and DekiWiki under MARICOMP and MEP Leonardo da Vinci Project. We'll also present in this paper a case study under EU funded project POSDRU, where the authors implemented other educational platform in Technological High Schools from Romania used over 1000 teachers. Based on large datasets the study tries to improve the concept of e-Learning teaching using the revolutionary technologies. The new concept present in this paper is that the teaching and learning will be interactive and live. The new and modern

  14. Computerized Laboratories in an Undergraduate Psychology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, Mary M.

    A computer project sponsored by a National Science Foundation grant was completed in the psychology department at Loyola University. The purpose of the project was to upgrade existing laboratory equipment in both the operant learning and sensation/perception laboratories, to provide equipment for a cognition laboratory, and to allow increased and…

  15. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  16. Universal quantum computing using (Zd) 3 symmetry-protected topologically ordered states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanzhu; Prakash, Abhishodh; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2018-02-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation describes a scheme where entanglement of resource states is utilized to simulate arbitrary quantum gates via local measurements. Recent works suggest that symmetry-protected topologically nontrivial, short-ranged entangled states are promising candidates for such a resource. Miller and Miyake [npj Quantum Inf. 2, 16036 (2016), 10.1038/npjqi.2016.36] recently constructed a particular Z2×Z2×Z2 symmetry-protected topological state on the Union Jack lattice and established its quantum-computational universality. However, they suggested that the same construction on the triangular lattice might not lead to a universal resource. Instead of qubits, we generalize the construction to qudits and show that the resulting (d -1 ) qudit nontrivial Zd×Zd×Zd symmetry-protected topological states are universal on the triangular lattice, for d being a prime number greater than 2. The same construction also holds for other 3-colorable lattices, including the Union Jack lattice.

  17. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report: TUNL XVI, 1 January 1977--31 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A summary of research is presented on nuclear physics. Included in the studies are neutron and fission physics, neutron polarization studies, high resolution studies, gamma ray spectroscopy, charged-particle reactions with polarized beams, radiative capture reactions, atomic collision physics, heavy ion physics, the development of facilities, ion source development, accelerator development and instrumentation computer-related development, and nuclear theory and phenomenology. A list of publications is included

  18. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report-TUNL XVIII, 1 January-31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Activities during the year 1979 are reported in the following categories: neutron cross section experiments, neutron polarization studies, high-resolution studies, charged-particle reactions with polarized beams, radiative capture reactions, atomic physics, other experiments, work done elsewhere by TUNL personnel, applications, ion source development, accelerator development and instrumentation, computer-related development, ad nuclear theory and phenomenology. Appendixes give lists of journal publications, talks, etc. Twelve of the contributions to this annual report have been abstracted and indexed individually

  19. [Survivability of Candida fungi and workpost safety in the university mycological laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejdys, Elzbieta

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the security for persons using the laboratory for research purposes it was decided to determine the influence of the number of employees and the time of their work on the survivability and vitality of Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. tropicalis. Working time and the number of people in the room were monitored. Temperature and air relative humidity were checked. Every two weeks the vitality and survivability of fungi were assessed with the technique of intravital coloring in methylene blue. During the observation of the examined species no 100% mortality was noted. After half a year of observation, the percentage of living cells in the smear did not exceed 10%. The greatest fluctuations in the survivability and its lowest value (5%) were found in C. albicans in the drop. The mortality rate in similar trials did not exceed 30% in C. dubliniensis and C. tropicalis isolates. To secure the protection of employees one should limit the number of people entering the laboratory, use face masks, refresh archival isolate, and monitor hygiene procedures twice a year, depending on the frequency of changing objects and research team.

  20. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Indicators of computer skill use among university students. Educational and social implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Pilar QUICIOS GARCÍA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article divulges the findings of the preliminary study for Research Project SEJ 2004-06803 I+D. It provides indicators of the use of the computer skills developed by two groups of Spanish university students. It then indicates the training the sample groups under study declared necessary in order to gain autonomy in their use of computer skills. The sample groups analyzed were two groups of students enrolled in the first year of the audiovisual communication curriculum and the third year of the journalism curriculum at the Complutensian University of Madrid. Each group was made up of 60 students who answered a quantitative questionnaire (Likert scale and a series of questions requiring qualitative answers. One finding was that age is not a telling factor in the use of computer skills, nor is the curriculum a student has chosen to follow. The declared educational needs include systematic instruction in tools and educational training that places limits on the relational use of virtual tools.

  2. Computer and laboratory simulation in the teaching of neonatal nursing: innovation and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Aredes, Natália Del' Angelo; Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Batalha, Luís Manuel da Cunha; Apóstolo, Jorge Manuel Amado; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2016-10-10

    to evaluate the cognitive learning of nursing students in neonatal clinical evaluation from a blended course with the use of computer and laboratory simulation; to compare the cognitive learning of students in a control and experimental group testing the laboratory simulation; and to assess the extracurricular blended course offered on the clinical assessment of preterm infants, according to the students. a quasi-experimental study with 14 Portuguese students, containing pretest, midterm test and post-test. The technologies offered in the course were serious game e-Baby, instructional software of semiology and semiotechnique, and laboratory simulation. Data collection tools developed for this study were used for the course evaluation and characterization of the students. Nonparametric statistics were used: Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon. the use of validated digital technologies and laboratory simulation demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) in the learning of the participants. The course was evaluated as very satisfactory for them. The laboratory simulation alone did not represent a significant difference in the learning. the cognitive learning of participants increased significantly. The use of technology can be partly responsible for the course success, showing it to be an important teaching tool for innovation and motivation of learning in healthcare. avaliar a aprendizagem cognitiva de estudantes de enfermagem na avaliação clínica neonatal a partir de um curso semipresencial com uso de simulação por computador e em laboratório; comparar a aprendizagem cognitiva dos estudantes em grupo controle e experimental ao testar a simulação em laboratório; e avaliar o curso semipresencial extracurricular oferecido sobre avaliação clínica do bebê pré-termo, segundo os estudantes. estudo quase-experimental com 14 estudantes portugueses contendo pré-teste, teste intermediário e pós-teste. As tecnologias oferecidas no curso foram serious

  3. Personality Questionnaires as a Basis for Improvement of University Courses in Applied Computer Science and Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivančević

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we lay the foundation for an adaptation of the teaching process to the personality traits and academic performance of the university students enrolled in applied computer science and informatics (ACSI. We discuss how such an adaptation could be supported by an analytical software solution and present the initial version of this solution. In the form of a case study, we discuss the scores from a personality questionnaire that was administered to a group of university students enrolled in an introductory programming course at the Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Serbia. During a non-mandatory workshop on programming, the participants completed the 48-item short-scale Eysenck Personality Questionnaire–Revised (EPQ– R. By using various exploratory and analytical techniques, we inspect the student EPQ–R scores and elaborate on the specificities of the participating student group. As part of our efforts to understand the broader relevance of different student personality traits in an academic environment, we also discuss how the EPQ–R scores of students could provide information valuable to the process of improving student learning and performance in university courses in ACSI.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL ACTIVITIES AT THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY NEES TSUNAMI RESEARCH FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Yim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A diverse series of research projects have taken place or are underway at the NEES Tsunami Research Facility at Oregon State University. Projects range from the simulation of the processes and effects of tsunamis generated by sub-aerial and submarine landslides (NEESR, Georgia Tech., model comparisons of tsunami wave effects on bottom profiles and scouring (NEESR, Princeton University, model comparisons of wave induced motions on rigid and free bodies (Shared-Use, Cornell, numerical model simulations and testing of breaking waves and inundation over topography (NEESR, TAMU, structural testing and development of standards for tsunami engineering and design (NEESR, University of Hawaii, and wave loads on coastal bridge structures (non-NEES, to upgrading the two-dimensional wave generator of the Large Wave Flume. A NEESR payload project (Colorado State University was undertaken that seeks to improve the understanding of the stresses from wave loading and run-up on residential structures. Advanced computational tools for coupling fluid-structure interaction including turbulence, contact and impact are being developed to assist with the design of experiments and complement parametric studies. These projects will contribute towards understanding the physical processes that occur during earthquake generated tsunamis including structural stress, debris flow and scour, inundation and overland flow, and landslide generated tsunamis. Analytical and numerical model development and comparisons with the experimental results give engineers additional predictive tools to assist in the development of robust structures as well as identification of hazard zones and formulation of hazard plans.

  5. Computer Animations as Astronomy Educational Tool: Immanuel Kant and the Island Universes Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, M.; Park, D.; Zumaeta, J.; Simonian, V.; Levitin, S.; Sullivan, A.; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.

    2008-11-01

    Development of astronomy is based on well defined, watershed moments when an individual or a group of individuals make a discovery or a measurement that expand, and sometimes dramatically improve our knowledge of the Universe. The purpose of the Scientific Visualization project at Cal State Los Angeles is to bring these moments to life with the use of computer animations, the medium of the 21st century that appeals to the generations which grew up in Internet age. Our first story describes Immanuel Kant's remarkable the Island Universes hypothesis. Using elementary principles of then new Newtonian mechanics, Kant made bold and ultimately correct interpretation of the Milky Way and the objects that we now call galaxies.

  6. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

  7. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site

  8. University of Missouri research reactor exhaust ventilation/laboratory fume hood upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; McCracken, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) facility is located in Research Park, 1 mile south of the Columbia campus. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-and-graphite-reflected core, serviced by six radial beam tubes for research, and has sample irradiation facilities in both a flux trap and in the graphite region. The reactor operates at full power 150 h/week, 52 week/yr, making it one of the best operating schedules and the most extensively used of any university research reactor. This extensive utilization includes many programs, such as radioisotope applications, neutron activation analysis, etc., that depend heavily on fume hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells that put a tremendous demand on the exhaust system. The exhaust system is required to be operable whenever the reactor is operating and must have the capability of being operated from an emergency electrical generator on loss of site electrical power. The originally installed exhaust ventilation system was below needed capacity and, with increased program requirements and system age, the necessity to upgrade the system was paramount. The challenge was to complete the upgrade construction while continuing to operate the reactor and maintain all the other ongoing programs, rather than take the easy way of an extended shutdown. This paper discusses how MURR met this challenge and solved these problems, problems that are similarly experienced by almost all research reactors to some degree when major work is required on critical systems

  9. Development of the University of Washington Biofuels and Biobased Chemicals Process Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Richard [University of Washington

    2014-02-04

    The funding from this research grant enabled us to design and build a bioconversion steam explosion reactor and ancillary equipment such as a high pressure boiler and a fermenter to support the bioconversion process research. This equipment has been in constant use since its installation in 2012. Following are research projects that it has supported: • Investigation of novel chip production method in biofuels production • Investigation of biomass refining following steam explosion • Several studies on use of different biomass feedstocks • Investigation of biomass moisture content on pretreatment efficacy. • Development of novel instruments for biorefinery process control Having this equipment was also instrumental in the University of Washington receiving a $40 million grant from the US Department of Agriculture for biofuels development as well as several other smaller grants. The research that is being done with the equipment from this grant will facilitate the establishment of a biofuels industry in the Pacific Northwest and enable the University of Washington to launch a substantial biofuels and bio-based product research program.

  10. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report: TUNL, XV. 1 January 1976 -- 31 December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-01

    Brief reports of research are presented under the following categories: neutron and fission physics, neutron polarization studies, high-resolution studies, gamma ray spectroscopy, charged-particle reactions with polarized beams, radiative capture reactions, atomic collision physics, heavy-ion reactions, applications, ion source development, accelerator development and instrumentation, computer-related developments, and nuclear theory and phenomenology. Although some data are furnished, many of these partial-page summaries are simply abstracts of published papers. Lists of publications, talks, personnel, etc., are included. (RWR)

  11. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report: TUNL, XV. 1 January 1976--31 December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Brief reports of research are presented under the following categories: neutron and fission physics, neutron polarization studies, high-resolution studies, gamma ray spectroscopy, charged-particle reactions with polarized beams, radiative capture reactions, atomic collision physics, heavy-ion reactions, applications, ion source development, accelerator development and instrumentation, computer-related developments, and nuclear theory and phenomenology. Although some data are furnished, many of these partial-page summaries are simply abstracts of published papers. Lists of publications, talks, personnel, etc., are included

  12. A University of Greenwich Case Study of Cloud Computing – Education as a Service

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Victor; Wills, Gary

    2013-01-01

    This chapter proposes a new Supply Chain Business Model in the Education domain and demonstrates how Education as a Service (EaaS) can be delivered. The implementation at the University of Greenwich (UoG) is used as a case study. Cloud computing business models are classified into eight Business Models; this classification is essential to the development of EaaS. A pair of the Hexagon Models are used to review Cloud projects against success criteria; one Hexagon Model focuses on Business Mode...

  13. Phase transitions enable computational universality in neuristor-based cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Matthew D; Stanley Williams, R

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Mott memristors, two-terminal devices that exhibit threshold switching via an insulator to conductor phase transition, can serve as the active components necessary to build a neuristor, a biomimetic threshold spiking device. Here we extend those results to demonstrate, in simulation, neuristor-based circuits capable of performing general Boolean logic operations. We additionally show that these components can be used to construct a one-dimensional cellular automaton, rule 137, previously proven to be universal. This proof-of-principle shows that localized phase transitions can perform spiking computation, which is of particular interest for neuromorphic hardware. (paper)

  14. Teaching Computer Languages and Elementary Theory for Mixed Audiences at University Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical issues of computer science are traditionally taught in a way that presupposes a solid mathematical background and are usually considered more or less unaccessible for students without this. An effective methodology is described which has been developed for a target group of university...... into a learning-by-doing approach having the students to develop such descriptions themselves from an informal introduction....... students with different backgrounds such as natural science or humanities. It has been developed for a course that integrates theoretical material on computer languages and abstract machines with practical programming techniques. Prolog used as meta-language for describing language issues is the central...... instrument in the approach: Formal descriptions become running prototypes that are easy and appealing to test and modify, and can be extended into analyzers, interpreters, and tools such as tracers and debuggers. Experience shows a high learning curve, especially when the principles are extended...

  15. Further Evidence in Support of the Universal Nilpotent Grammatical Computational Paradigm of Quantum Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Further evidence is presented in favour of the computational paradigm, conceived and constructed by Rowlands and Diaz, as detailed in Rowlands' book Zero to Infinity (2007), and in particular the authors' paper 'The Grammatical Universe: the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement'. The paradigm, which has isomorphic group and algebraic quantum mechanical language interpretations, not only predicts the well-established facts of quantum physics, the periodic table, chemistry / valence and of molecular biology, whose understanding it extends; it also provides an elegant, simple solution to the unresolved quantum measurement problem. In this fundamental paradigm, all the computational constructs / predictions that emerge, follow from the simple fact, that, as in quantum mechanics, the wave function is defined only up to an arbitrary fixed phase. This fixed phase provides a simple physical understanding of the quantum vacuum in quantum field theory, where only relative phases, known to be able to encode 3+1 relativistic space-time geometries, can be measured. It is the arbitrary fixed measurement standard, against which everything that follows is to be measured, even though the standard itself cannot be, since nothing exists against which to measure it. The standard, as an arbitrary fixed reference phase, functions as the holographic basis for a self-organized universal quantum process of emergent novel fermion states of matter where, following each emergence, the arbitrary standard is re-fixed anew so as to provide a complete history / holographic record or hologram of the current fixed past, advancing an unending irreversible evolution, such as is the evidence of our senses. The fermion states, in accord with the Pauli exclusion principle, each correspond to a unique nilpotent symbol in the infinite alphabet (which specifies the grammar in this nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) paradigm); and the alphabet, as Hill and Rowlands

  16. Computer aided instruction. Preliminary experience in the Radiological Sciences Institute of the University of Milan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardani, G.; Bertoli, M.A.; Bellomi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Computerised instruction means teaching by computer using a program that alternates information with self-checking multiple choice questions. This system was used to create a fully computerized lesson on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer which was then tested on a small group of madical students attending the Radiology School of the Milan University Institute of Radiological Sciences. At the end of the test, the students were asked to complete a questionnaire which was then analysed. The computer lesson consisted of 66 text messages and 21 self-checking questions. It aroused considerable interest, though the most common reason was curiosity about a novel system. The degree of fatigue caused was modest despite the fact that the computer lesson was at least as demanding as a traditional lesson, if not more so. The level of learning was considered high and optimised by the use of self-checking questions that were considered an essential element. However no student agreed to sit an official examination, even interactively, using the computer

  17. A new high current laboratory and pulsed homopolar generator power supply at the University of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, J. E.; Aanstoos, T. A.

    1984-03-01

    The University of Texas at Austin is constructing a facility for research in pulse power technology for the Center for Electromechanics at the Balcones Research Center. The facility, designed to support high-current experiments, will be powered by six homopolar generators, each rated at 10 MJ and arranged to allow matching the requirements of resistive and inductive loads at various voltage and current combinations. Topics covered include the high bay, the power supply configuration and parameters, the speed and field control, and the magnetic circuit. Also considered are the removable air-cooled brushes, the water-cooled field coils, the hydraulic motor sizing and direct coupling, the low-impedance removable field coils, and the hydrostatic bearing design.

  18. Cosmology in the laboratory: An analogy between hyperbolic metamaterials and the Milne universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, David; Moraes, Fernando; Fumeron, Sébastien; Berche, Bertrand

    2017-11-01

    This article shows that the compactified Milne universe geometry, a toy model for the big crunch/big bang transition, can be realized in hyperbolic metamaterials, a new class of nanoengineered systems which have recently found its way as an experimental playground for cosmological ideas. On one side, Klein-Gordon particles, as well as tachyons, are used as probes of the Milne geometry. On the other side, the propagation of light in two versions of a liquid crystal-based metamaterial provides the analogy. It is shown that ray and wave optics in the metamaterial mimic, respectively, the classical trajectories and wave function propagation, of the Milne probes, leading to the exciting perspective of realizing experimental tests of particle tunneling through the cosmic singularity, for instance.

  19. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  20. Energy Saving Separations Technologies for the Petroleum Industry: An Industry-University-National Laboratory Research Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, John R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Way, J. Douglas

    2003-03-28

    This project works to develop technologies capable of replacing traditional energy-intensive distillations so that a 20% improvement in energy efficiency can be realized. Consistent with the DOE sponsored report, Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry, the approach undertaken is to develop and implement entirely new technology to replace existing energy intensive practices. The project directly addresses the top priority issue of developing membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project is organized to rapidly and effectively advance the state-of-the-art in membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project team includes ChevronTexaco and BP, major industrial petroleum refiners, who will lead the effort by providing matching resources and real world management perspective. Academic expertise in separation sciences and polymer materials found in the Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining Department of the Colorado School of Mines is used to invent, develop, and test new membrane materials. Additional expertise and special facilities available at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are also exploited in order to effectively meet the goals of the project. The proposed project is truly unique in terms of the strength of the team it brings to bear on the development and commercialization of the proposed technologies.

  1. Computer-assisted enzyme immunoassays and simplified immunofluorescence assays: applications for the diagnostic laboratory and the veterinarian's office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R H; Downing, D R; Lynch, T J

    1982-11-15

    A computer-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system, based on kinetics of the reaction between substrate and enzyme molecules, was developed for testing large numbers of sera in laboratory applications. Systematic and random errors associated with conventional ELISA technique were identified leading to results formulated on a statistically validated, objective, and standardized basis. In a parallel development, an inexpensive system for field and veterinary office applications contained many of the qualities of the computer-assisted ELISA. This system uses a fluorogenic indicator (rather than the enzyme-substrate interaction) in a rapid test (15 to 20 minutes' duration) which promises broad application in serodiagnosis.

  2. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The authors concluded their program to establish the trends of isospin mixing in nuclei ranging from 12 C to 40 Ca. This program revealed a systematic variation in the proton reduced widths from one A = 4N nucleus to the next as T = 0 nuclei were bombarded by protons and T = 3/2 states were populated in the compound system. In few-body physics, their program of studies of D-state properties of light nuclei ( 3 H, 3 He, and 4 He) resulted in precise determinations of the η parameters for 3 He and 3 H which agreed well with theoretical predictions and served as an important constraint on theoretical calculations. The D 2 parameter determination for 4 He, carried out in collaboration with researchers at Munich and Lisbon, was not as precise but did indicate that 4 He has significant deformation. A program was initiated during this period to measure the ratio of asymptotic D- to S-state normalization constant (η) for 6 Li at Florida State University using the ( 6 Li,d) reaction. They determined that the η parameter for 6 Li is extremely small, contrary to expectations

  3. Radiation chemistry at the Metallurgical Laboratory, Manhattan Project, University of Chicago (1942-1947) and the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (1947-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.

    1989-01-01

    The events in radiation chemistry which occurred in the Manhattan Project Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory during World War II are reviewed. Research programmes from then until the present day are presented, with emphasis on pulse radiolysis studies. (UK)

  4. Natural and laboratory compaction bands in porous carbonates: a three-dimensional characterization using synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilona, A.; Arzilli, F.; Mancini, L.; Emanuele, T.

    2014-12-01

    Porous carbonates form important reservoirs for water and hydrocarbons. The fluid flow properties of carbonate reservoirs may be affected by post-depositional processes (e.g., mechanical and chemical), which need to be quantified. Field-based studies described bed-parallel compaction bands (CBs) within carbonates with a wide range of porosities. These burial-related structures accommodate volumetric strain by grain rotation, translation, pore collapse and pressure solution. Recently, the same structures have been reproduced for the first time in the laboratory by performing triaxial compaction experiments on porous grainstones. These laboratory studies characterized and compared the microstructures of natural and laboratory CBs, but no analysis of pore connectivity has been performed. In this paper, we use an innovative approach to characterize the pore networks (e.g. porosity, connectivity) of natural and laboratory CBs and compare them with the host rock one. We collected the data using the synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography technique at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste Laboratory (Italy). Quantitative analyses of the samples were performed with the Pore3D software library. The porosity was calculated from segmented 3D images of pristine and deformed carbonates. A process of skeletonization was then applied to quantify the number of connected pores within the rock volume. The analysis of the skeleton allowed us to highlight the differences between natural and laboratory CBs, and to investigate how pore connectivity evolves as a function of different deformation pathways. Both pore volume and connectivity are reduced within the CBs respect to the pristine rock and the natural CB has a lower porosity with respect to the laboratory one. The grain contacts in the natural CB are welded, whereas in the laboratory one they have more irregular shapes and grain crushing is the predominant process.

  5. The role of the Oregon State University Endophyte Service Laboratory in diagnosing clinical cases of endophyte toxicoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A Morrie; Blythe, Linda L; Duringer, Jennifer M

    2014-07-30

    The Oregon State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agricultural Sciences instituted the Endophyte Service Laboratory to aid in diagnosing toxicity problems associated with cool-season grasses in livestock. The endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophalum) present in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) produces ergopeptine alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the molecule used to determine exposure and toxicity thresholds for the vasoconstrictive conditions "fescue foot" and "summer slump". Another vasoconstrictive syndrome, "ergotism," is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, and its primary toxin, ergotamine. "Ryegrass staggers" is a neurological condition that affects livestock consuming endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with high levels of lolitrem B. HPLC-fluorescent analytical methods for these mycotoxins are described and were used to determine threshold levels of toxicity for ergovaline and lolitrem B in cattle, sheep, horses, and camels. In addition, six clinical cases in cattle are presented to illustrate diagnosis of these three diseases.

  6. Essay of accelerator R and D in a small laboratory of a university. Prototype of IHQ linac 1985-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    This is a series of stories on developing particle accelerators employing new acceleration principles at a university laboratory. In this paper the design, the cold-model test, the fabrication and the acceleration test of a linear accelerator (linac) of 'IHQ' type are described. The word IHQ is coined by combining 'Inter-digital H' and 'Radio-Frequency Quadrupole', which are the words for types of linacs. The linac of IHQ type can accelerate particles with rather low injection energy and can perform a high acceleration efficiency. In the acceleration test, the proton beam from an RFQ linac with an energy of 0.8MeV was injected to the IHQ linac and accelerated up to 2 MeV as designed. The effective shunt impedance of the accelerator structure was measured to be as high as 132MΩ/m as expected. (K.Y.)

  7. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's facilities in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the research 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in the fiscal year 1993. In this report, the gists of 15 researches which were carried out on pile of the Yayoi, 9 researches off pile of the Yayoi and 14 researches by using the linear accelerator are collected. In addition, the 13 reports of Yayoi Study Meeting held in fiscal year 1993 are collected. Moreover, the list of the events carried out in the facility in fiscal year 1993, the registers of names of various committees, and the register of the names of persons who were in charge of joint utilization experiments in fiscal year 1993 are attached. (K.I.)

  8. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in fiscal year 1991. The Yayoi was operated smoothly throughout the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized, and the related themes reached 21 cases. After the linear accelerator was reconstructed as the twin linac, the joint utilization was resumed in October, 1989, and the number of research themes, was 15 cases. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the reports of 15 cases of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1991 are collected. (K.I.)

  9. Building leadership among laboratory-based and clinical and translational researchers: the University of California, San Francisco experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wides, Cynthia; Mertz, Elizabeth; Lindstaedt, Bill; Brown, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    In 2005 the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) implemented the Scientific Leadership and Management (SLM) course, a 2-day leadership training program to assist laboratory-based postdoctoral scholars in their transition to independent researchers managing their own research programs. In 2011, the course was expanded to clinical and translational junior faculty and fellows. The course enrollment was increased from approximate 100 to 123 participants at the same time. Based on course evaluations, the number and percent of women participants appears to have increased over time from 40% (n = 33) in 2007 to 53% (n = 58) in 2011. Course evaluations also indicated that participants found the course to be relevant and valuable in their transition to academic leadership. This paper describes the background, structure, and content of the SLM and reports on participant evaluations of the course offerings from 2007 through 2011. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline 'all-DT' NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ∼1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

  11. University Students Use of Computers and Mobile Devices for Learning and Their Reading Speed on Different Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Bongeka

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at the investigation of mobile device and computer use at a higher learning institution. The goal was to determine the current use of computers and mobile devices for learning and the students' reading speed on different platforms. The research was contextualised in a sample of students at the University of South Africa.…

  12. Using Computers for Intervention and Remediation of Severely Reading-Impaired Children in a University Literacy Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Reuber, Kristin; Damon, Corrine J.

    A study investigated software choices of graduate-level clinicians in a university reading clinic to determine computer use and effectiveness in literacy instruction. The clinic involved students of varying ability, ages 7-12, using 24 Power Macintosh computers equipped with "ClarisWorks,""Kid Pix,""Student Writing…

  13. Computation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Phase-VI rotor in pitch motion during standstill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades have been performed for stand still conditions with moderate success by among others the present authors. In the present work, numerical investigations are performed to illustrate the possibilities...... detached-eddy simulation computations. The investigation indicates that detailed information and fair agreement with measurements can be obtained.Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  14. Environmental Waste Management in a School Hospital and in a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Lusa Manfredini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and professional activities developed in a Hospital School and a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a university can generate parallel, chemical residues from various degrees of angerousness, which may require physical treatment and / or suitable chemical, before being sent to final destination. The General Hospital (GH generates monthly 10 L of xylenes and 50 L of glutaraldehyde to provide ass instance to their patients. Already the Laboratory of Human Anatomy of University de Caxias do Sul (AL-UCS uses more than 10,000 liters for preserving corpses in tanks. The present study aims to analyze the chemical waste management of the GH and the AL-UCS and propose techniques for recovery and reuse of chemicals formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and xylenes, minimizing the impacts generated by the use, often indispensable and sometimes questionable, of such waste. So far two sets of samples were collected (in March and April 2013 of xylene, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde in the GH and also at the AL-UCS and it is intended to repeat the collections with monthly periodicity, in the next two semesters. Partial results show that, comparing the relationship of area and the medium areas of the chromatographic (in µV.s of patterns with compounds of interest, an increase in the percentage of formaldehyde relative to the samples in standard formalin (121.84% may be due to contamination with organic compounds with a retention time close to the compound of interest, the xylene was little degradation in the samples, indicating that this compound can be reused in the common procedures of healthcare institutions, with respect to glutaraldehyde significant degradation was observed for the compound in samples represents only 61.88% of the chromatographic peak area of the standard, therefore the reuse of these compounds may require the use of purification methods such as simple distillation and fractional distillation

  15. Pain, Work-related Characteristics, and Psychosocial Factors among Computer Workers at a University Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira; Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; Ribeiro da Silva, Dalila Terrinha; Vigário Dos Santos, Patrícia

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Complaint of pain is common in computer workers, encouraging the investigation of pain-related workplace factors. This study investigated the relationship among work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors, and pain among computer workers from a university center. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects (median age, 32.0 years; interquartile range, 26.8-34.5 years) were subjected to measurement of bioelectrical impedance; photogrammetry; workplace measurements; and pain complaint, quality of life, and motivation questionnaires. [Results] The low back was the most prevalent region of complaint (76.9%). The number of body regions for which subjects complained of pain was greater in the no rest breaks group, which also presented higher prevalences of neck (62.5%) and low back (100%) pain. There were also observed associations between neck complaint and quality of life; neck complaint and head protrusion; wrist complaint and shoulder angle; and use of a chair back and thoracic pain. [Conclusion] Complaint of pain was associated with no short rest breaks, no use of a chair back, poor quality of life, high head protrusion, and shoulder angle while using the mouse of a computer.

  16. Self-perceived intrinsic and extrinsic differences between Information Systems and Computer Science university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Strong arguments exist that the sub-disciplines of Information Systems (IS and Computer Science (CS can be meaningfully distinguished, and the literature indicates that teams in which there are variety of personalities and divergent career interests are more likely to successfully complete computing projects. This paper set out to identify differences in terms of personality and career objectives between those entering universities with the intention of pursuing a career in CS and those intending to study IS. First-year students from South African tertiary institutions in 2010 and 2012 were studied in terms of self-reported personality factors (using the Five Factor Model as frame of analysis as well as perceived environmental factors associated with career choice. Surprisingly, the only persistent significant difference found was that IS students consider well-paid employment as soon as possible after graduating to be more important than CS students do. In terms of the other factors studied no significant differences were found to occur in both years for which data was analysed. Hence, the result show that combining data collected from the students studying different sub-disciplines of computing is justified for research that specifically studies personality or factors such as interest, self-efficacy, career outcomes and how the career choice impacts on quality of life. At a practical level, the findings inform efforts in attracting, retaining and teaching students in these sub-disciplines.

  17. Structuring a risk-based bioassay program for uranium usage in university laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Johnne Talia

    Bioassay programs are integral in a radiation safety program. They are used as a method of determining whether individuals working with radioactive material have been exposed and have received a resulting dose. For radionuclides that are not found in nature, determining an exposure is straightforward. However, for a naturally occurring radionuclide like uranium, it is not as straightforward to determine whether a dose is the result of an occupational exposure. The purpose of this project is to address this issue within the University of Nevada, Las Vegas's (UNLV) bioassay program. This project consisted of two components that studied the effectiveness of a bioassay program in determining the dose for an acute inhalation of uranium. The first component of the plan addresses the creation of excretion curves, utilizing MATLAB that would allow UNLV to be able to determine at what time an inhalation dose can be attributed to. The excretion curves were based on the ICRP 30 lung model, as well as the Annual Limit Intake (ALI) values located in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 10CFR20 which is based on ICRP 30 (International Commission on Radiological Protection). The excretion curves would allow UNLV to be able to conduct in-house investigations of inhalation doses without solely depending on outside investigations and sources. The second component of the project focused on the creation of a risk based bioassay program to be utilized by UNLV that would take into account bioassay frequency that depended on the individual. Determining the risk based bioassay program required the use of baseline variance in order to minimize the investigation of false positives among those individuals who undergo bioassays for uranium work. The proposed program was compared against an evaluation limit of 10 mrem per quarter, an investigational limit of 125 mrem per quarter, and the federal/state requirement of 1.25 rem per quarter. It was determined that a bioassay program whose bioassay

  18. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use

  19. Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O ampersand M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts

  20. Computer mapping software and geographic data base development: Oak Ridge National Laboratory user experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honea, B.; Johnson, P.

    1978-01-01

    As users of computer display tools, our opinion is that the researcher's needs should guide and direct the computer scientist's development of mapping software and data bases. Computer graphic techniques developed for the sake of the computer graphics community tend to be esoteric and rarely suitable for user problems. Two types of users exist for computer graphic tools: the researcher who is generally satisfied with abstract but accurate displays for analysis purposes and the decision maker who requires synoptic and easily comprehended displays relevant to the issues he or she must address. Computer mapping software and data bases should be developed for the user in a generalized and standardized format for ease in transferring and to facilitate the linking or merging with larger analysis systems. Maximum utility of computer mapping tools is accomplished when linked to geographic information and analysis systems. Computer graphic techniques have varying degrees of utility depending upon whether they are used for data validation, analysis procedures or presenting research results

  1. In the physics class: university physics students' enactment of class and gender in the context of laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Anna T.

    2014-06-01

    This article explores how the doing of social class and gender can intersect with the learning of science, through case studies of two male, working-class university students' constitutions of identities as physics students. In doing so, I challenge the taken-for-granted notion that male physics students have an unproblematic relation to their chosen discipline, and nuance the picture of how working-class students relate to higher education by the explicit focus on one disciplinary culture. Working from the perspective of situated learning theory, the interviews with the two male students were analysed for how they negotiated the practice of the physics student laboratory and their own classed and gendered participation in this practice. By drawing on the heterogeneity of the practice of physics the two students were able to use the practical and technological aspects of physics as a gateway into the discipline. However, this is not to say that their participation in physics was completely frictionless. The students were both engaged in a continuous negotiation of how skills they had learned to value in the background may or may not be compatible with the ones they perceived to be valued in the university physicist community.

  2. University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. Report NPL-845

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1978 to October 31, 1979, under contract EY-76-C-02-0535.A003 between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. Experimental studies of light ion-induced reactions were performed with the AVF cyclotron, which continues each year to produce beams of yet higher quality. Charged-particle studies continued to emphasize use of the high-resolution spectrometer system, but some return to broad-range spectroscopic studies using solid state detectors also occurred. Neutron time-of-flight experiments used 9-meter and 30-meter flight paths. Neutron-gamma ray coincidence studies developed into a new and promising field. The new PDP 11/34 data acquisition system was of great value in allowing such multiparameter experiments. Smaller programs in nuclear astrophysics, plasma diagnostic development, and medical physics were also undertaken. Research activities based at other accelerators grew. Studies of future directions for light-ion accelerators, including work on intense pulsed ion sources, orbit dynamics, and storage rings, were greatly enlarged. 19 of the articles in this report were abstracted and indexed individually. Lists of publications and personnel conclude this report

  3. Somatic disorders and ergonomic considerations in computer use among the employees of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Tirgar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Purpose: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and computer work are common in majority of the society and both show an increasing trend. This study was conducted to survey on Somatic disorders, MSDs frequency and ergonomic considerations awareness regarding computer use among the employees of Babol University of Medical Sciences (North of Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 128 administrative staff of medical, dental and paramedical faculties in 2012. The samples were collected by simple method the data were gathered by means of a tailor-made data collection sheet that consisted of 5 open and 13 closed-ended questions. The data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistical indexes. Results: According to our data, the mean age of employees was 38.16±7.78 years, 55.5% were females and 63.3% were in bachelor’s degree. More than fifty percent of the samples spend 2 hours or more on their computer a day. Seventy two percent of the staff reported experiencing one or more MSDs symptoms and less than 10% of them were aware of ergonomic considerations in this regard. Chi-square test result showed that a significant statistical difference between MSDs with duration of using computer. (p<0.05 Conclusion: Our results indicated that more than fifty percent of the administrative staff complains of MSDs, most of them were unaware of ergonomics considerations, and many of the employees were eager to learn about the related subject. So, ergonomic interventions and training courses to prevent MSDs are recommended.

  4. Laboratory-based educational and outreach activities in the framework of a CAREER award at the University of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Stable Isotope Laboratory at the University of Oregon has been used as a learning and outreach center in the framework of the 09 award entitled "Stable isotope insights into large-volume volcanic eruptions". The PI and other members of the group have actively recruitted undergraduate students, summer session and catalytic outreach undergraduates, and hosted international students, visitors, and collaborators from Russia, Iceland, France, the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. We also integrated closely with the Oregon-wide summer program that brings community college students to the University of Oregon for 2.5 months summer research residence (UCORE). In total we gave supervised five undergraduate students and three UCORE students. Additionally, we recruited undergraduates from U of Chicago, Colorado and Pomona Colleges to spend summers in the lab and in the field. In conjunction with the NSF funded PIRE program, two female graduate and one female undergraduate students participated in fieldwork in Kamchatka, and three Kamchatka undergraduates, and one Moscow graduate student visited the University Oregon. Students performed their own projects or Senior Theses and reported their results locally and at AGU conferences. We developed a management structure in which graduate students, a postdoc, and lab technician co-supervised students and visitors and this exposed them into the supervisory roles, contributed to the project progress, and liberated PI from micromanagement duties. The talk will present our experience with this management concept of a lab-based-learning initiative, which defines roles for each member of the lab. Our outreach activities included public lectures at community colleges by PI and a graduate student, and the topical Penrose conference co-organized by the PI, which attracted many students and visitors who collected their data in the lab. PI has introduced a voluntary fieldtrip as a part of his Volcanoes and Earthquake large enrollment class

  5. Enabling three-dimensional densitometric measurements using laboratory source X-ray micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, M. J.; Fowler, R.; Courtois, L.; Nonni, S.; Zuddas, F.; Atwood, R. C.; Davis, G. R.; Lee, P. D.

    2018-01-01

    We present new software allowing significantly improved quantitative mapping of the three-dimensional density distribution of objects using laboratory source polychromatic X-rays via a beam characterisation approach (c.f. filtering or comparison to phantoms). One key advantage is that a precise representation of the specimen material is not required. The method exploits well-established, widely available, non-destructive and increasingly accessible laboratory-source X-ray tomography. Beam characterisation is performed in two stages: (1) projection data are collected through a range of known materials utilising a novel hardware design integrated into the rotation stage; and (2) a Python code optimises a spectral response model of the system. We provide hardware designs for use with a rotation stage able to be tilted, yet the concept is easily adaptable to virtually any laboratory system and sample, and implicitly corrects the image artefact known as beam hardening.

  6. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit and leads to significant reductions of the computation time. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code class. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the camb code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the Cl 's are easy to identify inside the code.

  7. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit and leads to significant reductions of the computation time. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code class. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the camb code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the C ℓ  's are easy to identify inside the code

  8. Computer Sciences Applied to Management at Open University of Catalonia: Development of Competences of Teamworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, Carlos Cabañero; López, Enric Serradell

    Teamwork is considered one of the most important professional skills in today's business environment. More specifically, the collaborative work between professionals and information technology managers from various functional areas is a strategic key in competitive business. Several university-level programs are focusing on developing these skills. This article presents the case of the course Computer Science Applied to Management (hereafter CSAM) that has been designed with the objective to develop the ability to work cooperatively in interdisciplinary teams. For their design and development have been addressed to the key elements of efficiency that appear in the literature, most notably the establishment of shared objectives and a feedback system, the management of the harmony of the team, their level of autonomy, independence, diversity and level of supervision. The final result is a subject in which, through a working virtual platform, interdisciplinary teams solve a problem raised by a case study.

  9. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  10. Logical and physical resource management in the common node of a distributed function laboratory computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A scheme for managing resources required for transaction processing in the common node of a distributed function computer system has been given. The scheme has been found to be satisfactory for all common node services provided so far

  11. Computer Graphics Research Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report Number 49, July-September 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-22

    20 Texture Sampling and Strength Guided Motion: Jeffry S. Nimeroff 23 21 Radiosity : Min-Zhi Shao 24 22 Blended Shape Primitives: Douglas DeCarlo 25 23...placement. "* Extensions of radiosity rendering. "* A discussion of blended shape primitives and the applications in computer vision and computer...user. Radiosity : An improved version of the radiosity renderer is included. This version uses a fast over- relaxation progressive refinement algorithm

  12. Computational Chemistry Laboratory: Calculating the Energy Content of Food Applied to a Real-Life Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiric, Dora; Tribe, Lorena; Soriano, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory, students calculated the nutritional value of common foods to assess the energy content needed to answer an everyday life application; for example, how many kilometers can an average person run with the energy provided by 100 g (3.5 oz) of beef? The optimized geometries and the formation enthalpies of the nutritional components…

  13. Paradigms and laboratories in the core computer science curriculum: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Hertzberger, L.O.

    1995-01-01

    Recent issues of the bulletin of the ACM SIGCSE have been scrutinised to find evidence that the use of laboratory sessions and different programming paradigms improve learning difficult concepts and techniques, such as recursion and problemsolving. Many authors in the surveyed literature be- lieve

  14. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational…

  15. The growth of language: Universal Grammar, experience, and principles of computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles; Crain, Stephen; Berwick, Robert C; Chomsky, Noam; Bolhuis, Johan J

    2017-10-01

    Human infants develop language remarkably rapidly and without overt instruction. We argue that the distinctive ontogenesis of child language arises from the interplay of three factors: domain-specific principles of language (Universal Grammar), external experience, and properties of non-linguistic domains of cognition including general learning mechanisms and principles of efficient computation. We review developmental evidence that children make use of hierarchically composed structures ('Merge') from the earliest stages and at all levels of linguistic organization. At the same time, longitudinal trajectories of development show sensitivity to the quantity of specific patterns in the input, which suggests the use of probabilistic processes as well as inductive learning mechanisms that are suitable for the psychological constraints on language acquisition. By considering the place of language in human biology and evolution, we propose an approach that integrates principles from Universal Grammar and constraints from other domains of cognition. We outline some initial results of this approach as well as challenges for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping university students’ epistemic framing of computational physics using network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelen Bodin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving physics problem in university physics education using a computational approach requires knowledge and skills in several domains, for example, physics, mathematics, programming, and modeling. These competences are in turn related to students’ beliefs about the domains as well as about learning. These knowledge and beliefs components are referred to here as epistemic elements, which together represent the students’ epistemic framing of the situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate university physics students’ epistemic framing when solving and visualizing a physics problem using a particle-spring model system. Students’ epistemic framings are analyzed before and after the task using a network analysis approach on interview transcripts, producing visual representations as epistemic networks. The results show that students change their epistemic framing from a modeling task, with expectancies about learning programming, to a physics task, in which they are challenged to use physics principles and conservation laws in order to troubleshoot and understand their simulations. This implies that the task, even though it is not introducing any new physics, helps the students to develop a more coherent view of the importance of using physics principles in problem solving. The network analysis method used in this study is shown to give intelligible representations of the students’ epistemic framing and is proposed as a useful method of analysis of textual data.

  17. A Computational Unification of Scientific Law:. Spelling out a Universal Semantics for Physical Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The principal criteria Cn (n = 1 to 23) and grammatical production rules are set out of a universal computational rewrite language spelling out a semantic description of an emergent, self-organizing architecture for the cosmos. These language productions already predicate: (1) Einstein's conservation law of energy, momentum and mass and, subsequently, (2) with respect to gauge invariant relativistic space time (both Lorentz special & Einstein general); (3) Standard Model elementary particle physics; (4) the periodic table of the elements & chemical valence; and (5) the molecular biological basis of the DNA / RNA genetic code; so enabling the Cybernetic Machine specialist Groups Mission Statement premise;** (6) that natural semantic language thinking at the higher level of the self-organized emergent chemical molecular complexity of the human brain (only surpassed by that of the cosmos itself!) would be realized (7) by this same universal semantic language via (8) an architecture of a conscious human brain/mind and self which, it predicates consists of its neural / glia and microtubule substrates respectively, so as to endow it with; (9) the intelligent semantic capability to be able to specify, symbolize, spell out and understand the cosmos that conceived it; and (10) provide a quantum physical explanation of consciousness and of how (11) the dichotomy between first person subjectivity and third person objectivity or `hard problem' is resolved.

  18. Comparing the use of computer-supported collaboration tools among university students with different life circumstances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miikka J. Eriksson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of higher education students who integrate learning with various life circumstances such as employment or raising children is increasing. This study aims to compare whether and what kinds of differences exist between the perceived use of synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication tools among university students with children or in full-time employment and students without these commitments. The data were collected in a Finnish University by the means of an online questionnaire. The results indicate that students with multiple commitments were using more virtual learning environments and less instant messaging (IM especially when communicating with their peers. The low level of IM might be an indication of not being able to or not wanting to create close ties with their peer students. The practical implication of the study is that pedagogical choices should support different kinds of learning strategies. Students with multiple commitments, and especially students with children, should be encouraged and assisted to create stronger ties with their peers, if they are willing to do so.

  19. Dynamically protected cat-qubits: a new paradigm for universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Leghtas, Zaki; Albert, Victor V; Touzard, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Jiang, Liang; Devoret, Michel H

    2014-01-01

    We present a new hardware-efficient paradigm for universal quantum computation which is based on encoding, protecting and manipulating quantum information in a quantum harmonic oscillator. This proposal exploits multi-photon driven dissipative processes to encode quantum information in logical bases composed of Schrödinger cat states. More precisely, we consider two schemes. In a first scheme, a two-photon driven dissipative process is used to stabilize a logical qubit basis of two-component Schrödinger cat states. While such a scheme ensures a protection of the logical qubit against the photon dephasing errors, the prominent error channel of single-photon loss induces bit-flip type errors that cannot be corrected. Therefore, we consider a second scheme based on a four-photon driven dissipative process which leads to the choice of four-component Schrödinger cat states as the logical qubit. Such a logical qubit can be protected against single-photon loss by continuous photon number parity measurements. Next, applying some specific Hamiltonians, we provide a set of universal quantum gates on the encoded qubits of each of the two schemes. In particular, we illustrate how these operations can be rendered fault-tolerant with respect to various decoherence channels of participating quantum systems. Finally, we also propose experimental schemes based on quantum superconducting circuits and inspired by methods used in Josephson parametric amplification, which should allow one to achieve these driven dissipative processes along with the Hamiltonians ensuring the universal operations in an efficient manner

  20. Dynamically protected cat-qubits: a new paradigm for universal quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Leghtas, Zaki; Albert, Victor V.; Touzard, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Jiang, Liang; Devoret, Michel H.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new hardware-efficient paradigm for universal quantum computation which is based on encoding, protecting and manipulating quantum information in a quantum harmonic oscillator. This proposal exploits multi-photon driven dissipative processes to encode quantum information in logical bases composed of Schrödinger cat states. More precisely, we consider two schemes. In a first scheme, a two-photon driven dissipative process is used to stabilize a logical qubit basis of two-component Schrödinger cat states. While such a scheme ensures a protection of the logical qubit against the photon dephasing errors, the prominent error channel of single-photon loss induces bit-flip type errors that cannot be corrected. Therefore, we consider a second scheme based on a four-photon driven dissipative process which leads to the choice of four-component Schrödinger cat states as the logical qubit. Such a logical qubit can be protected against single-photon loss by continuous photon number parity measurements. Next, applying some specific Hamiltonians, we provide a set of universal quantum gates on the encoded qubits of each of the two schemes. In particular, we illustrate how these operations can be rendered fault-tolerant with respect to various decoherence channels of participating quantum systems. Finally, we also propose experimental schemes based on quantum superconducting circuits and inspired by methods used in Josephson parametric amplification, which should allow one to achieve these driven dissipative processes along with the Hamiltonians ensuring the universal operations in an efficient manner.