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Sample records for university computer graphics

  1. Mathematics for computer graphics

    Vince, John

    2006-01-01

    Helps you understand the mathematical ideas used in computer animation, virtual reality, CAD, and other areas of computer graphics. This work also helps you to rediscover the mathematical techniques required to solve problems and design computer programs for computer graphic applications

  2. The computer graphics metafile

    Henderson, LR; Shepherd, B; Arnold, D B

    1990-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Metafile deals with the Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) standard and covers topics ranging from the structure and contents of a metafile to CGM functionality, metafile elements, and real-world applications of CGM. Binary Encoding, Character Encoding, application profiles, and implementations are also discussed. This book is comprised of 18 chapters divided into five sections and begins with an overview of the CGM standard and how it can meet some of the requirements for storage of graphical data within a graphics system or application environment. The reader is then intr

  3. The computer graphics interface

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  4. Computer graphics at VAX JINR

    Balashov, V.K.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the software for computer graphics at VAX JINR is described. It consists of graphical packages GKS, WAND and a set graphicals packages for High Energy Physics application designed at CERN. 17 refs.; 1 tab

  5. Mathematical structures for computer graphics

    Janke, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the mathematics behind the modeling and rendering of computer graphics scenes Mathematical Structures for Computer Graphics presents an accessible and intuitive approach to the mathematical ideas and techniques necessary for two- and three-dimensional computer graphics. Focusing on the significant mathematical results, the book establishes key algorithms used to build complex graphics scenes. Written for readers with various levels of mathematical background, the book develops a solid foundation for graphics techniques and fills in relevant grap

  6. Career Opportunities in Computer Graphics.

    Langer, Victor

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the impact of computer graphics on industrial productivity. Details the computer graphics technician curriculum at Milwaukee Area Technical College and the cooperative efforts of business and industry to fund and equip the program. (SK)

  7. Computer graphics in engineering education

    Rogers, David F

    2013-01-01

    Computer Graphics in Engineering Education discusses the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) as an instructional material in engineering education. Each of the nine chapters of this book covers topics and cites examples that are relevant to the relationship of CAD-CAM with engineering education. The first chapter discusses the use of computer graphics in the U.S. Naval Academy, while Chapter 2 covers key issues in instructional computer graphics. This book then discusses low-cost computer graphics in engineering education. Chapter 4 discusses the uniform b

  8. Computer graphics and research projects

    Ingtrakul, P.

    1994-01-01

    This report was prepared as an account of scientific visualization tools and application tools for scientists and engineers. It is provided a set of tools to create pictures and to interact with them in natural ways. It applied many techniques of computer graphics and computer animation through a number of full-color presentations as computer animated commercials, 3D computer graphics, dynamic and environmental simulations, scientific modeling and visualization, physically based modelling, and beavioral, skelatal, dynamics, and particle animation. It took in depth at original hardware and limitations of existing PC graphics adapters contain syste m performance, especially with graphics intensive application programs and user interfaces

  9. Oklahoma's Mobile Computer Graphics Laboratory.

    McClain, Gerald R.

    This Computer Graphics Laboratory houses an IBM 1130 computer, U.C.C. plotter, printer, card reader, two key punch machines, and seminar-type classroom furniture. A "General Drafting Graphics System" (GDGS) is used, based on repetitive use of basic coordinate and plot generating commands. The system is used by 12 institutions of higher education…

  10. Flowfield computer graphics

    Desautel, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research include supporting the Aerothermodynamics Branch's research by developing graphical visualization tools for both the branch's adaptive grid code and flow field ray tracing code. The completed research for the reporting period includes development of a graphical user interface (GUI) and its implementation into the NAS Flowfield Analysis Software Tool kit (FAST), for both the adaptive grid code (SAGE) and the flow field ray tracing code (CISS).

  11. On the Role of Computer Graphics in Engineering Design Graphics Courses.

    Pleck, Michael H.

    The implementation of two- and three-dimensional computer graphics in a freshmen engineering design course at the university level is described. An assessment of the capabilities and limitations of computer graphics is made, along with a presentation of the fundamental role which computer graphics plays in engineering design instruction.…

  12. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  13. Fractal geometry and computer graphics

    Sakas, Georgios; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Englert, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry has become popular in the last 15 years, its applications can be found in technology, science, or even arts. Fractal methods and formalism are seen today as a general, abstract, but nevertheless practical instrument for the description of nature in a wide sense. But it was Computer Graphics which made possible the increasing popularity of fractals several years ago, and long after their mathematical formulation. The two disciplines are tightly linked. The book contains the scientificcontributions presented in an international workshop in the "Computer Graphics Center" in Darmstadt, Germany. The target of the workshop was to present the wide spectrum of interrelationships and interactions between Fractal Geometry and Computer Graphics. The topics vary from fundamentals and new theoretical results to various applications and systems development. All contributions are original, unpublished papers.The presentations have been discussed in two working groups; the discussion results, together with a...

  14. Interactive Computer Graphics

    Kenwright, David

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace data analysis tools that significantly reduce the time and effort needed to analyze large-scale computational fluid dynamics simulations have emerged this year. The current approach for most postprocessing and visualization work is to explore the 3D flow simulations with one of a dozen or so interactive tools. While effective for analyzing small data sets, this approach becomes extremely time consuming when working with data sets larger than one gigabyte. An active area of research this year has been the development of data mining tools that automatically search through gigabyte data sets and extract the salient features with little or no human intervention. With these so-called feature extraction tools, engineers are spared the tedious task of manually exploring huge amounts of data to find the important flow phenomena. The software tools identify features such as vortex cores, shocks, separation and attachment lines, recirculation bubbles, and boundary layers. Some of these features can be extracted in a few seconds; others take minutes to hours on extremely large data sets. The analysis can be performed off-line in a batch process, either during or following the supercomputer simulations. These computations have to be performed only once, because the feature extraction programs search the entire data set and find every occurrence of the phenomena being sought. Because the important questions about the data are being answered automatically, interactivity is less critical than it is with traditional approaches.

  15. Computer Graphics Instruction in VizClass

    Grimes, Douglas; Warschauer, Mark; Hutchinson, Tara; Kuester, Falko

    2005-01-01

    "VizClass" is a university classroom environment designed to offer students in computer graphics and engineering courses up-to-date visualization technologies. Three digital whiteboards and a three-dimensional stereoscopic display provide complementary display surfaces. Input devices include touchscreens on the digital whiteboards, remote…

  16. Fluid simulation for computer graphics

    Bridson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Animating fluids like water, smoke, and fire using physics-based simulation is increasingly important in visual effects, in particular in movies, like The Day After Tomorrow, and in computer games. This book provides a practical introduction to fluid simulation for graphics. The focus is on animating fully three-dimensional incompressible flow, from understanding the math and the algorithms to the actual implementation.

  17. Data structures, computer graphics, and pattern recognition

    Klinger, A; Kunii, T L

    1977-01-01

    Data Structures, Computer Graphics, and Pattern Recognition focuses on the computer graphics and pattern recognition applications of data structures methodology.This book presents design related principles and research aspects of the computer graphics, system design, data management, and pattern recognition tasks. The topics include the data structure design, concise structuring of geometric data for computer aided design, and data structures for pattern recognition algorithms. The survey of data structures for computer graphics systems, application of relational data structures in computer gr

  18. Computer Graphics and Administrative Decision-Making.

    Yost, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Reduction in prices now makes it possible for almost any institution to use computer graphics for administrative decision making and research. Current and potential uses of computer graphics in these two areas are discussed. (JN)

  19. Computer Graphics for Multimedia and Hypermedia Development.

    Mohler, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses several theoretical and technical aspects of computer-graphics development that are useful for creating hypermedia and multimedia materials. Topics addressed include primary bitmap attributes in computer graphics, the jigsaw principle, and raster layering. (MSE)

  20. Computer graphics from basic to application

    Kim, Do Hyeong; Mun, Sung Min

    1998-04-01

    This book mentions conception of computer graphics, background history, necessity and applied field like construction design, image processing, auto mobile design, fashion design and TV broadcast, basic principle of computer, computer graphics hardware, computer graphics software such as adobe illustrator tool box and adobe photo shop, quarkXpress like introduction, application and operating circumstance, 3D graphics with summary, difference of versions of 3D studio and system, and Auto CAD application.

  1. Computer graphics from basic to application

    Kim, Do Hyeong; Mun, Sung Min

    1998-04-15

    This book mentions conception of computer graphics, background history, necessity and applied field like construction design, image processing, auto mobile design, fashion design and TV broadcast, basic principle of computer, computer graphics hardware, computer graphics software such as adobe illustrator tool box and adobe photo shop, quarkXpress like introduction, application and operating circumstance, 3D graphics with summary, difference of versions of 3D studio and system, and Auto CAD application.

  2. Collection Of Software For Computer Graphics

    Hibbard, Eric A.; Makatura, George

    1990-01-01

    Ames Research Graphics System (ARCGRAPH) collection of software libraries and software utilities assisting researchers in generating, manipulating, and visualizing graphical data. Defines metafile format containing device-independent graphical data. File format used with various computer-graphics-manipulation and -animation software packages at Ames, including SURF (COSMIC Program ARC-12381) and GAS (COSMIC Program ARC-12379). Consists of two-stage "pipeline" used to put out graphical primitives. ARCGRAPH libraries developed on VAX computer running VMS.

  3. Wang Tiles in Computer Graphics

    Lagae, Ares

    2009-01-01

    Many complex signals in computer graphics, such as point distributions and textures, cannot be efficiently synthesized and stored. This book presents tile-based methods based on Wang tiles and corner tiles to solve both these problems. Instead of synthesizing a complex signal when needed, the signal is synthesized beforehand over a small set of Wang tiles or corner tiles. Arbitrary large amounts of that signal can then efficiently be generated when needed by generating a stochastic tiling, and storing only a small set of tiles reduces storage requirements. A tile-based method for generating a

  4. Identification of computer graphics objects

    Rossinskyi Yu.M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the use of computer graphics methods in problems of creating drawings, charts, drafting, etc. The widespread use of these methods requires the development of efficient algorithms for the identification of objects of drawings. The article analyzes the model-making algorithms for this problem and considered the possibility of reducing the time using graphics editing operations. Editing results in such operations as copying, moving and deleting objects specified images. These operations allow the use of a reliable identification of images of objects methods. For information on the composition of the image of the object along with information about the identity and the color should include information about the spatial location and other characteristics of the object (the thickness and style of contour lines, fill style, and so on. In order to enable the pixel image analysis to structure the information it is necessary to enable the initial code image objects color. The article shows the results of the implementation of the algorithm of encoding object identifiers. To simplify the process of building drawings of any kind, and reduce time-consuming, method of drawing objects identification is proposed based on the use as the ID information of the object color.

  5. ElectroEncephaloGraphics: Making waves in computer graphics research.

    Mustafa, Maryam; Magnor, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a novel modality for investigating perceptual graphics problems. Until recently, EEG has predominantly been used for clinical diagnosis, in psychology, and by the brain-computer-interface community. Researchers are extending it to help understand the perception of visual output from graphics applications and to create approaches based on direct neural feedback. Researchers have applied EEG to graphics to determine perceived image and video quality by detecting typical rendering artifacts, to evaluate visualization effectiveness by calculating the cognitive load, and to automatically optimize rendering parameters for images and videos on the basis of implicit neural feedback.

  6. Computer graphics in heat-transfer simulations

    Hamlin, G.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Computer graphics can be very useful in the setup of heat transfer simulations and in the display of the results of such simulations. The potential use of recently available low-cost graphics devices in the setup of such simulations has not been fully exploited. Several types of graphics devices and their potential usefulness are discussed, and some configurations of graphics equipment are presented in the low-, medium-, and high-price ranges

  7. Practical algorithms for 3D computer graphics

    Ferguson, R Stuart

    2013-01-01

    ""A valuable book to accompany any course that mixes the theory and practice of 3D graphics. The book's web site has many useful programs and code samples.""-Karen Rafferty, Queen's University, Belfast""The topics covered by this book are backed by the OpenFX modeling and animation software. This is a big plus in that it provides a practical perspective and encourages experimentation. … [This] will offer students a more interesting and hands-on learning experience, especially for those wishing to pursue a career in computer game development.""-Naganand Madhavapeddy, GameDeveloper>

  8. Computer Series, 3: Computer Graphics for Chemical Education.

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the current scene in computer graphics from the point of view of a chemistry educator. Discusses the scope of current applications of computer graphics in chemical education, and provides information about hardware and software systems to promote communication with vendors of computer graphics equipment. (HM)

  9. Computer communications and graphics for clinical radiology

    Rhodes, M.L.; Azzawi, Y.; Tivattanasuk, E.S.; Pang, A.T.; Ly, K.; Panicker, H.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics has many forms. When applied in medicine, it can range from simple two dimensional charts and graphs to rendering of three-dimensional scenes. Computer graphic displays of molecular or large anatomic structures have been used to great advantage by numerous medical researchers. In addition, graphic presentations can be dynamic where displays are controlled by physician-user commands, or the presentations can be static, where views are recorded in discrete frames for later distribution or permanent archival. In medicine both interactive and static forms of computer graphics have their proper place in the effective delivery of health care. Computer graphics, however, changes constantly in the area of software techniques, hardware improvements and its clinical application. What may be medically appropriate today in the use of computer graphics can soon become inadequate and well behind the new advances that so quickly follow. In this paper the key feature of computer communication is discussed that aids in the clinical utility of computer graphics in medicine. It is distribution. Distribution in terms of instantaneous computer graphic software updates and more importantly, distribution of meaningful three-dimensional presentations to referring physicians. Physicians who, working in their private offices, have no routine access to medical work stations. In this environment three dimensional presentations of anatomy are static in nature, but must deliver realistic views of critical structures. This paper outlines how computer communication provides the essential ingredient to the provision of this service. As an illustration, the electronic distribution of software to generate three dimensional views of complex anatomoic structures is discussed. Sample views are included

  10. DDP-516 Computer Graphics System Capabilities

    1972-06-01

    This report describes the capabilities of the DDP-516 Computer Graphics System. One objective of this report is to acquaint DOT management and project planners with the system's current capabilities, applications hardware and software. The Appendix i...

  11. Computer graphics in reactor safety analysis

    Fiala, C.; Kulak, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a family of three computer graphics codes designed to assist the analyst in three areas: the modelling of complex three-dimensional finite element models of reactor structures; the interpretation of computational results; and the reporting of the results of numerical simulations. The purpose and key features of each code are presented. The graphics output used in actual safety analysis are used to illustrate the capabilities of each code. 5 refs., 10 figs

  12. Light reflection models for computer graphics.

    Greenberg, D P

    1989-04-14

    During the past 20 years, computer graphic techniques for simulating the reflection of light have progressed so that today images of photorealistic quality can be produced. Early algorithms considered direct lighting only, but global illumination phenomena with indirect lighting, surface interreflections, and shadows can now be modeled with ray tracing, radiosity, and Monte Carlo simulations. This article describes the historical development of computer graphic algorithms for light reflection and pictorially illustrates what will be commonly available in the near future.

  13. Spectra processing with computer graphics

    Kruse, H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of processng gamma-ray spectra in rock analysis is described. The peak search was performed by applying a cross-correlation function. The experimental data were approximated by an analytical function represented by the sum of a polynomial and a multiple peak function. The latter is Gaussian, joined with the low-energy side by an exponential. A modified Gauss-Newton algorithm is applied for the purpose of fitting the data to the function. The processing of the values derived from a lunar sample demonstrates the effect of different choices of polynomial orders for approximating the background for various fitting intervals. Observations on applications of interactive graphics are presented. 3 figures, 1 table

  14. Codesign Analysis of a Computer Graphics Application

    Madsen, Jan; Brage, Jens P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a codesign case study where a computer graphics application is examined with the intention to speed up its execution. The application is specified as a C program, and is characterized by the lack of a simple compute-intensive kernel. The hardware/software partitioning is based...

  15. A Codesign Case Study in Computer Graphics

    Brage, Jens P.; Madsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes a codesign case study where a computer graphics application is examined with the intention to speed up its execution. The application is specified as a C program, and is characterized by the lack of a simple compute-intensive kernel. The hardware/software partitioning is based...

  16. CT applications of medical computer graphics

    Rhodes, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Few applications of computer graphics show as much promise and early success as that for CT. Unlike electron microscopy, ultrasound, business, military, and animation applications, CT image data are inherently digital. CT pictures can be processed directly by programs well established in the fields of computer graphics and digital image processing. Methods for reformatting digital pictures, enhancing structure shape, reducing image noise, and rendering three-dimensional (3D) scenes of anatomic structures have all become routine at many CT centers. In this chapter, the authors provide a brief introduction to computer graphics terms and techniques commonly applied to CT pictures and, when appropriate, to those showing promise for magnetic resonance images. Topics discussed here are image-processing options that are applied to digital images already constructed. In the final portion of this chapter techniques for ''slicing'' CT image data are presented, and geometric principles that describe the specification of oblique and curved images are outlined. Clinical examples are included

  17. Computer graphics aid mission operations. [NASA missions

    Jeletic, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The application of computer graphics techniques in NASA space missions is reviewed. Telemetric monitoring of the Space Shuttle and its components is discussed, noting the use of computer graphics for real-time visualization problems in the retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission. The use of the world map display for determining a spacecraft's location above the earth and the problem of verifying the relative position and orientation of spacecraft to celestial bodies are examined. The Flight Dynamics/STS Three-dimensional Monitoring System and the Trajectroy Computations and Orbital Products System world map display are described, emphasizing Space Shuttle applications. Also, consideration is given to the development of monitoring systems such as the Shuttle Payloads Mission Monitoring System and the Attitude Heads-Up Display and the use of the NASA-Goddard Two-dimensional Graphics Monitoring System during Shuttle missions and to support the Hubble Space Telescope.

  18. Design and Curriculum Considerations for a Computer Graphics Program in the Arts.

    Leeman, Ruedy W.

    This history and state-of-the-art review of computer graphics describes computer graphics programs and proposed programs at Sheridan College (Canada), the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Oregon, Northern Illinois University, and Ohio State University. These programs are discussed in terms of their philosophy, curriculum, student…

  19. A "Service-Learning Approach" to Teaching Computer Graphics

    Hutzel, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The author taught a computer graphics course through a service-learning framework to undergraduate and graduate students in the spring of 2003 at Florida State University (FSU). The students in this course participated in learning a software program along with youths from a neighboring, low-income, primarily African-American community. Together,…

  20. General-Purpose Software For Computer Graphics

    Rogers, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Device Independent Graphics Library (NASADIG) is general-purpose computer-graphics package for computer-based engineering and management applications which gives opportunity to translate data into effective graphical displays for presentation. Features include two- and three-dimensional plotting, spline and polynomial interpolation, control of blanking of areas, multiple log and/or linear axes, control of legends and text, control of thicknesses of curves, and multiple text fonts. Included are subroutines for definition of areas and axes of plots; setup and display of text; blanking of areas; setup of style, interpolation, and plotting of lines; control of patterns and of shading of colors; control of legends, blocks of text, and characters; initialization of devices; and setting of mixed alphabets. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Interactive computer graphics applications for compressible aerodynamics

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Three computer applications have been developed to solve inviscid compressible fluids problems using interactive computer graphics. The first application is a compressible flow calculator which solves for isentropic flow, normal shocks, and oblique shocks or centered expansions produced by two dimensional ramps. The second application couples the solutions generated by the first application to a more graphical presentation of the results to produce a desk top simulator of three compressible flow problems: 1) flow past a single compression ramp; 2) flow past two ramps in series; and 3) flow past two opposed ramps. The third application extends the results of the second to produce a design tool which solves for the flow through supersonic external or mixed compression inlets. The applications were originally developed to run on SGI or IBM workstations running GL graphics. They are currently being extended to solve additional types of flow problems and modified to operate on any X-based workstation.

  2. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  3. Computer graphic display of cardiac CT scans

    Palmer, R.; Carlsson, E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve spatial conception and quantitative assessment of the cardiac structures based on cardiac computed tomography, methods for computer graphic display were developed. Excised hearts and living dogs with myocardial infarctions were subjected to CT scanning. The data on the scanner tapes were processed to provide isodensity plots, linear section plots, time-weighted integrated isodensity plots as well as topographical density displays and three-dimensional spatial reconstructions of single and multi-layer scans. (orig.)

  4. RXY/DRXY-a postprocessing graphical system for scientific computation

    Jin Qijie

    1990-01-01

    Scientific computing require computer graphical function for its visualization. The developing objects and functions of a postprocessing graphical system for scientific computation are described, and also briefly described its implementation

  5. Computer-graphic visualization of dynamics

    Stewart, H.B.

    1986-01-01

    As engineered systems become increasingly sophisticated and complex, questions of efficiency, reliability, and safety demand the application of more powerful methods of analysis. One indication of this is the accelerating trend away from purely static or quasi-steady system modeling toward models that include essentially dynamic behavior. It is here that the qualitative ideas of nonlinear dynamics, dealing as they do with the most typical behavior in real dynamical systems, can be expected to play an increasingly prominent role. As part of a continuing investigation of the most important low-order differential equations, an interactive computer graphics environment has been created for the study of systems in three-dimensional phase space. This environment makes available the basic control of both numerical simulation and graphic visualization by a specially designed menu system. A key ingredient in this environment is the possibility of graphic communication not only from machine to man, but also from man to machine. Thus to specify the starting point for a numerical integration, for example, the user points to a location in phase space on the screen of the graphics terminal (using crosshairs or a mouse and cursor), bypassing the necessity to give numerical values of the phase-space coordinates. By devising a flexible computer interface which implements conceptual approaches to phase-space analysis of dynamical systems, significant advances in understanding of prototypical differential equations have been achieved

  6. Identification of Learning Processes by Means of Computer Graphics.

    Sorensen, Birgitte Holm

    1993-01-01

    Describes a development project for the use of computer graphics and video in connection with an inservice training course for primary education teachers in Denmark. Topics addressed include research approaches to computers; computer graphics in learning processes; activities relating to computer graphics; the role of the teacher; and student…

  7. Introductory Tiling Theory for Computer Graphics

    Kaplan, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Tiling theory is an elegant branch of mathematics that has applications in several areas of computer science. The most immediate application area is graphics, where tiling theory has been used in the contexts of texture generation, sampling theory, remeshing, and of course the generation of decorative patterns. The combination of a solid theoretical base (complete with tantalizing open problems), practical algorithmic techniques, and exciting applications make tiling theory a worthwhile area of study for practitioners and students in computer science. This synthesis lecture introduces the math

  8. Computer graphics in piping structural engineering

    Revesz, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics in piping structural engineering is gaining in popularity. The large number of systems, the growing complexity of the load cases and structure models require human assimilation of large amounts of data. An effort has been made to enlighten evaluation of numerical data and visualize as much of it as possible, thus eliminating a source of error and accelerating analysis/reporting. The product of this effort is PAID, the Piping Analysis and Interactive Design software. While developing PAID, interest has been focused on the acceleration of the work done mainly by PIPESTRESS. Some installed and tested capabilities of PAID are presented in this paper. Examples are given from the graphic output in report form and the conversation necessary to get such is demonstrated. (orig.)

  9. Computational universes

    Svozil, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Suspicions that the world might be some sort of a machine or algorithm existing 'in the mind' of some symbolic number cruncher have lingered from antiquity. Although popular at times, the most radical forms of this idea never reached mainstream. Modern developments in physics and computer science have lent support to the thesis, but empirical evidence is needed before it can begin to replace our contemporary world view

  10. Interactive computer graphics for stereotactic neurosurgery

    Goodman, J.H.; Davis, J.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer (IBM PC/AT) system has been developed to incorporate multiple image sources for stereotactic neurosurgery. Hard copy data is calibrated and captured with a video camera and frame grabber. Line contours are generated automatically on the basis of gray scale density or digitized manually. Interactive computer graphics provide a format with acceptable speed and accuracy for stereotactic neurosurgery. The ability to dimensionally integrate existing image data from multiple sources for target selection makes preoperative scans and scanner compatible head holders unnecessary. The system description and examples of use for brain tumor biopsy and brachytherapy ware presented

  11. When Do Computer Graphics Contribute to Early Literacy Learning?

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Cotter, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    Notes that new literacies use computer graphics to tell a story, demonstrate a theory, or support a definition. Offers a functionality framework for assessing the value of computer graphics for early literacy learning. Provides ideas for determining the value of CD-ROM software and websites. Concludes that graphics that give text meaning or…

  12. Wide-angle display developments by computer graphics

    Fetter, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Computer graphics can now expand its new subset, wide-angle projection, to be as significant a generic capability as computer graphics itself. Some prior work in computer graphics is presented which leads to an attractive further subset of wide-angle projection, called hemispheric projection, to be a major communication media. Hemispheric film systems have long been present and such computer graphics systems are in use in simulators. This is the leading edge of capabilities which should ultimately be as ubiquitous as CRTs (cathode-ray tubes). These assertions are not from degrees in science or only from a degree in graphic design, but in a history of computer graphics innovations, laying groundwork by demonstration. The author believes that it is timely to look at several development strategies, since hemispheric projection is now at a point comparable to the early stages of computer graphics, requiring similar patterns of development again.

  13. SPACEBAR: Kinematic design by computer graphics

    Ricci, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interactive graphics computer program SPACEBAR, conceived to reduce the time and complexity associated with the development of kinematic mechanisms on the design board, was described. This program allows the direct design and analysis of mechanisms right at the terminal screen. All input variables, including linkage geometry, stiffness, and applied loading conditions, can be fed into or changed at the terminal and may be displayed in three dimensions. All mechanism configurations can be cycled through their range of travel and viewed in their various geometric positions. Output data includes geometric positioning in orthogonal coordinates of each node point in the mechanism, velocity and acceleration of the node points, and internal loads and displacements of the node points and linkages. All analysis calculations take at most a few seconds to complete. Output data can be viewed at the scope and also printed at the discretion of the user.

  14. Optical design teaching by computing graphic methods

    Vazquez-Molini, D.; Muñoz-Luna, J.; Fernandez-Balbuena, A. A.; Garcia-Botella, A.; Belloni, P.; Alda, J.

    2012-10-01

    One of the key challenges in the teaching of Optics is that students need to know not only the math of the optical design, but also, and more important, to grasp and understand the optics in a three-dimensional space. Having a clear image of the problem to solve is the first step in order to begin to solve that problem. Therefore to achieve that the students not only must know the equation of refraction law but they have also to understand how the main parameters of this law are interacting among them. This should be a major goal in the teaching course. Optical graphic methods are a valuable tool in this way since they have the advantage of visual information and the accuracy of a computer calculation.

  15. Computer and computer graphics support for the ALARA program

    Paine, D.; Hall, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed which support three aspects of the ALARA program at Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO): 1) Setting annual dose and skin contamination goals, 2) Analyzing trends in operational organizations' dose, numbers of skin contaminations, or radiation occurrences, and 3) Presenting graphic displays to enhance worker safety awareness. Programs have been written which search dosemetry files and produce histograms of annual occupational exposure and skin contamination histories utilizing the DISSPLA software or a desk top color graphics terminal. These programs and associated graphics are used to assemble dose and skin contamination information in a summary format so that ALARA teams can assess the past year's performance and establish reduction goals for the coming year. In addition, the graphics provide a management tool for recognizing desirable or undesirable trends in an organization's occupational dose or number of skin contaminations. Desk top graphics capabilities have been used to display safety-related data to enhance management review and worker awareness of radiological and industrial safety conditions in the work area. The following graphs are prepared on a monthly basis: 1) Numbers of skin contaminations company wide and for specific operating organizations within the company, 2) Numbers of radiation occurrences, 3) Dose histories for specific operational organizations, 4) Numbers of OSHA recordable incidents, 5) OSHA recordable incident rates and severity levels and 6) Lost workday cases

  16. A High Performance VLSI Computer Architecture For Computer Graphics

    Chin, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Wen-Tai

    1988-10-01

    A VLSI computer architecture, consisting of multiple processors, is presented in this paper to satisfy the modern computer graphics demands, e.g. high resolution, realistic animation, real-time display etc.. All processors share a global memory which are partitioned into multiple banks. Through a crossbar network, data from one memory bank can be broadcasted to many processors. Processors are physically interconnected through a hyper-crossbar network (a crossbar-like network). By programming the network, the topology of communication links among processors can be reconfigurated to satisfy specific dataflows of different applications. Each processor consists of a controller, arithmetic operators, local memory, a local crossbar network, and I/O ports to communicate with other processors, memory banks, and a system controller. Operations in each processor are characterized into two modes, i.e. object domain and space domain, to fully utilize the data-independency characteristics of graphics processing. Special graphics features such as 3D-to-2D conversion, shadow generation, texturing, and reflection, can be easily handled. With the current high density interconnection (MI) technology, it is feasible to implement a 64-processor system to achieve 2.5 billion operations per second, a performance needed in most advanced graphics applications.

  17. VTGRAPH:Computer graphics program using ReGIS mode

    Benamar, M.A.; Benouali, N.; Tchantchane, A.; Azbouche, A.; Tobbeche, S. Centre de Developpement des Techniques Nucleaires, Laboratoire des Techniques Nucleaires, Algiers

    1993-02-01

    A computer graphics program has been developed for plotting spectra generated from different nuclear analysis techniques and discrete data for the VT240 graphics and compatible IBM PC using ST240 configuration. We have used the Remote Graphics Instruction Set (ReGIS) commands

  18. Advanced Certification Program for Computer Graphic Specialists. Final Performance Report.

    Parkland Coll., Champaign, IL.

    A pioneer program in computer graphics was implemented at Parkland College (Illinois) to meet the demand for specialized technicians to visualize data generated on high performance computers. In summer 1989, 23 students were accepted into the pilot program. Courses included C programming, calculus and analytic geometry, computer graphics, and…

  19. General aviation design synthesis utilizing interactive computer graphics

    Galloway, T. L.; Smith, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Interactive computer graphics is a fast growing area of computer application, due to such factors as substantial cost reductions in hardware, general availability of software, and expanded data communication networks. In addition to allowing faster and more meaningful input/output, computer graphics permits the use of data in graphic form to carry out parametric studies for configuration selection and for assessing the impact of advanced technologies on general aviation designs. The incorporation of interactive computer graphics into a NASA developed general aviation synthesis program is described, and the potential uses of the synthesis program in preliminary design are demonstrated.

  20. Graphic design of Japanese university symbols

    Vorobyeva T. U.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available this article uses a semiotic and visual-cultural analysis of the Japanese leading universities branding. It is shown that the design of a corporate style of universities in Japan has historical roots and serves as the basis of the brand of the university as well as Japan in whole.

  1. Computer graphics application in the engineering design integration system

    Glatt, C. R.; Abel, R. W.; Hirsch, G. N.; Alford, G. E.; Colquitt, W. N.; Stewart, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The computer graphics aspect of the Engineering Design Integration (EDIN) system and its application to design problems were discussed. Three basic types of computer graphics may be used with the EDIN system for the evaluation of aerospace vehicles preliminary designs: offline graphics systems using vellum-inking or photographic processes, online graphics systems characterized by direct coupled low cost storage tube terminals with limited interactive capabilities, and a minicomputer based refresh terminal offering highly interactive capabilities. The offline line systems are characterized by high quality (resolution better than 0.254 mm) and slow turnaround (one to four days). The online systems are characterized by low cost, instant visualization of the computer results, slow line speed (300 BAUD), poor hard copy, and the early limitations on vector graphic input capabilities. The recent acquisition of the Adage 330 Graphic Display system has greatly enhanced the potential for interactive computer aided design.

  2. Advanced computer graphics techniques as applied to the nuclear industry

    Thomas, J.J.; Koontz, A.S.

    1985-08-01

    Computer graphics is a rapidly advancing technological area in computer science. This is being motivated by increased hardware capability coupled with reduced hardware costs. This paper will cover six topics in computer graphics, with examples forecasting how each of these capabilities could be used in the nuclear industry. These topics are: (1) Image Realism with Surfaces and Transparency; (2) Computer Graphics Motion; (3) Graphics Resolution Issues and Examples; (4) Iconic Interaction; (5) Graphic Workstations; and (6) Data Fusion - illustrating data coming from numerous sources, for display through high dimensional, greater than 3-D, graphics. All topics will be discussed using extensive examples with slides, video tapes, and movies. Illustrations have been omitted from the paper due to the complexity of color reproduction. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. The graphics future in scientific applications-trends and developments in computer graphics

    Enderle, G

    1982-01-01

    Computer graphics methods and tools are being used to a great extent in scientific research. The future development in this area will be influenced both by new hardware developments and by software advances. On the hardware sector, the development of the raster technology will lead to the increased use of colour workstations with more local processing power. Colour hardcopy devices for creating plots, slides, or movies will be available at a lower price than today. The first real 3D-workstations will appear on the marketplace. One of the main activities on the software sector is the standardization of computer graphics systems, graphical files, and device interfaces. This will lead to more portable graphical application programs and to a common base for computer graphics education.

  4. Graphical User Interface Programming in Introductory Computer Science.

    Skolnick, Michael M.; Spooner, David L.

    Modern computing systems exploit graphical user interfaces for interaction with users; as a result, introductory computer science courses must begin to teach the principles underlying such interfaces. This paper presents an approach to graphical user interface (GUI) implementation that is simple enough for beginning students to understand, yet…

  5. Computer Graphics for Student Engagement in Science Learning.

    Cifuentes, Lauren; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan Jane

    2001-01-01

    Discusses student use of computer graphics software and presents documentation from a visualization workshop designed to help learners use computer graphics to construct meaning while they studied science concepts. Describes problems and benefits when delivering visualization workshops in the natural setting of a middle school. (Author/LRW)

  6. An integrated introduction to computer graphics and geometric modeling

    Goldman, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    … this book may be the first book on geometric modelling that also covers computer graphics. In addition, it may be the first book on computer graphics that integrates a thorough introduction to 'freedom' curves and surfaces and to the mathematical foundations for computer graphics. … the book is well suited for an undergraduate course. … The entire book is very well presented and obviously written by a distinguished and creative researcher and educator. It certainly is a textbook I would recommend. …-Computer-Aided Design, 42, 2010… Many books concentrate on computer programming and soon beco

  7. The complete guide to blender graphics computer modeling and animation

    Blain, John M

    2014-01-01

    Smoothly Leads Users into the Subject of Computer Graphics through the Blender GUIBlender, the free and open source 3D computer modeling and animation program, allows users to create and animate models and figures in scenes, compile feature movies, and interact with the models and create video games. Reflecting the latest version of Blender, The Complete Guide to Blender Graphics: Computer Modeling & Animation, 2nd Edition helps beginners learn the basics of computer animation using this versatile graphics program. This edition incorporates many new features of Blender, including developments

  8. Trends in Continuity and Interpolation for Computer Graphics.

    Gonzalez Garcia, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    In every computer graphics oriented application today, it is a common practice to texture 3D models as a way to obtain realistic material. As part of this process, mesh texturing, deformation, and visualization are all key parts of the computer graphics field. This PhD dissertation was completed in the context of these three important and related fields in computer graphics. The article presents techniques that improve on existing state-of-the-art approaches related to continuity and interpolation in texture space (texturing), object space (deformation), and screen space (rendering).

  9. Design for scalability in 3D computer graphics architectures

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes useful methods and techniques for designing scalable hybrid parallel rendering architectures for 3D computer graphics. Various techniques for utilizing parallelism in a pipelines system are analyzed. During the Ph.D study a prototype 3D graphics architecture named Hybris has...

  10. Computer graphics as an information means for power plants

    Kollmannsberger, J.; Pfadler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Computer-aided graphics have proved increasingly successful as a help in process control in large plants. The specific requirements for the system and the methods of planning and achieving graphic systems in powerstation control rooms are described. Experience from operation is evaluated from completed plants. (orig.) [de

  11. Learning with Interactive Computer Graphics in the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Mattingly, William; Roberts, Joshua; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Instruction of neuroanatomy depends on graphical representation and extended self-study. As a consequence, computer-based learning environments that incorporate interactive graphics should facilitate instruction in this area. The present study evaluated such a system in the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. The system used the method of…

  12. Computer graphics visions and challenges: a European perspective.

    Encarnação, José L

    2006-01-01

    I have briefly described important visions and challenges in computer graphics. They are a personal and therefore subjective selection. But most of these issues have to be addressed and solved--no matter if we call them visions or challenges or something else--if we want to make and further develop computer graphics into a key enabling technology for our IT-based society.

  13. Operational computer graphics in the flight dynamics environment

    Jeletic, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Flight Dynamics Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Goddard Space Flight Center has incorporated computer graphics technology into its operational environment. In an attempt to increase the effectiveness and productivity of the Division, computer graphics software systems have been developed that display spacecraft tracking and telemetry data in 2-d and 3-d graphic formats that are more comprehensible than the alphanumeric tables of the past. These systems vary in functionality from real-time mission monitoring system, to mission planning utilities, to system development tools. Here, the capabilities and architecture of these systems are discussed.

  14. Application of Computer Graphics to Graphing in Algebra and Trigonometry. Final Report.

    Morris, J. Richard

    This project was designed to improve the graphing competency of students in elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and trigonometry courses at Virginia Commonwealth University. Computer graphics programs were designed using an Apple II Plus computer and implemented using Pascal. The software package is interactive and gives students control…

  15. Graphics processing units in bioinformatics, computational biology and systems biology.

    Nobile, Marco S; Cazzaniga, Paolo; Tangherloni, Andrea; Besozzi, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    Several studies in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Systems Biology rely on the definition of physico-chemical or mathematical models of biological systems at different scales and levels of complexity, ranging from the interaction of atoms in single molecules up to genome-wide interaction networks. Traditional computational methods and software tools developed in these research fields share a common trait: they can be computationally demanding on Central Processing Units (CPUs), therefore limiting their applicability in many circumstances. To overcome this issue, general-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are gaining an increasing attention by the scientific community, as they can considerably reduce the running time required by standard CPU-based software, and allow more intensive investigations of biological systems. In this review, we present a collection of GPU tools recently developed to perform computational analyses in life science disciplines, emphasizing the advantages and the drawbacks in the use of these parallel architectures. The complete list of GPU-powered tools here reviewed is available at http://bit.ly/gputools. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Three Dimensional Computer Graphics Federates for the 2012 Smackdown Simulation

    Fordyce, Crystal; Govindaiah, Swetha; Muratet, Sean; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Schricker, Bradley C.

    2012-01-01

    The Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO) Smackdown is a two-year old annual event held at the 2012 Spring Simulation Interoperability Workshop (SIW). A primary objective of the Smackdown event is to provide college students with hands-on experience in developing distributed simulations using High Level Architecture (HLA). Participating for the second time, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) deployed four federates, two federates simulated a communications server and a lunar communications satellite with a radio. The other two federates generated 3D computer graphics displays for the communication satellite constellation and for the surface based lunar resupply mission. Using the Light-Weight Java Graphics Library, the satellite display federate presented a lunar-texture mapped sphere of the moon and four Telemetry Data Relay Satellites (TDRS), which received object attributes from the lunar communications satellite federate to drive their motion. The surface mission display federate was an enhanced version of the federate developed by ForwardSim, Inc. for the 2011 Smackdown simulation. Enhancements included a dead-reckoning algorithm and a visual indication of which communication satellite was in line of sight of Hadley Rille. This paper concentrates on these two federates by describing the functions, algorithms, HLA object attributes received from other federates, development experiences and recommendations for future, participating Smackdown teams.

  17. A Symbolic and Graphical Computer Representation of Dynamical Systems

    Gould, Laurence I.

    2005-04-01

    AUTONO is a Macsyma/Maxima program, designed at the University of Hartford, for solving autonomous systems of differential equations as well as for relating Lagrangians and Hamiltonians to their associated dynamical equations. AUTONO can be used in a number of fields to decipher a variety of complex dynamical systems with ease, producing their Lagrangian and Hamiltonian equations in seconds. These equations can then be incorporated into VisSim, a modeling and simulation program, which yields graphical representations of motion in a given system through easily chosen input parameters. The program, along with the VisSim differential-equations graphical package, allows for resolution and easy understanding of complex problems in a relatively short time; thus enabling quicker and more advanced computing of dynamical systems on any number of platforms---from a network of sensors on a space probe, to the behavior of neural networks, to the effects of an electromagnetic field on components in a dynamical system. A flowchart of AUTONO, along with some simple applications and VisSim output, will be shown.

  18. The feasibility of using computer graphics in environmental evaluations : interim report, documenting historic site locations using computer graphics.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a method for locating historic site information using a computer graphics program. If adopted for use by the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation, this method should significantly reduce the time now required to de...

  19. GRAPHIC COMPETENCE AS A COMPONENT OF TRAINING FUTURE ENGINEERING TEACHERS OF COMPUTER PROFILE

    Yuliya Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analysis the system of professional training of future engineering teachers of computer type at the pedagogical universities, including graphical content preparation. It is established that the modernization of this system of training engineering teachers of computer profile is extremely important because of increasing demands for total graphics education, which in terms of mass communication, the need to compress a significant amount of information and opportunities provided by new information technologies, becomes so important as second literacy. The article reveals the essential characteristics of the concept of graphic competence as important component of the modernization of the education system, and an attempt to find promising ways of further work to effective solving of the issue of formation of graphic competence of engineering teachers of computer profile.

  20. COMPUTER GRAPHICS IN ENGINEERING GRAPHICS DEPARTMENT OF MOSCOW AVIATION INSTITUTE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Ludmila P. Bobrik; Leonid V. Markin

    2013-01-01

    Current state of technical universities students’ engineering grounding and “Engineering graphics” course place in MAI are analyzed in this paper. Also bachelor degree problems and experience of creation of issuing specialty based on «Engineering graphics» department are considered. 

  1. COMPUTER GRAPHICS IN ENGINEERING GRAPHICS DEPARTMENT OF MOSCOW AVIATION INSTITUTE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Ludmila P. Bobrik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current state of technical universities students’ engineering grounding and “Engineering graphics” course place in MAI are analyzed in this paper. Also bachelor degree problems and experience of creation of issuing specialty based on «Engineering graphics» department are considered. 

  2. Using Computer Graphics in the 90's.

    Towne, Violet A.

    Computer-Aided Design, a hands-on program for public school teachers, was first offered in the summer of 1987 as an outgrowth of a 1986 robotics training program. Area technology teachers needed computer-aided design (CAD) training because of a New York State Education system transition from the industrial arts curriculum to a new curriculum in…

  3. Robustness, Diagnostics, Computing and Graphics in Statistics

    1990-01-01

    seto his collection at nuformation. ruciL.ong suggestions for reducing this burden to Washington iieadcuarters Services . Directorate or information...Lewis Cornell University Keaing Lu Georgia Institute of Technology Mary Silber UC, Berkeley Matthew W. Stafford Loyola University Mary Lou Zeeman UC...wavefronts in excitable media are determined by the manner of recovery to the rest state. The distance between a pair of wavefronts tends to lock at one of

  4. Individual Stochastic Screening for the Development of Computer Graphics

    Maja Turčić¹*

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of new tools and media, art and design have developed into digital computer-generated works. This article presents a sequence of creating art graphics because their original authors have not published the procedures. The goal is to discover the mathematics of an image and the programming libretto with the purpose of organizing a structural base of computer graphics. We will elaborate the procedures used to produce graphics known throughout the history of art, but that are nowadays also found in design and security graphics. The results are closely related graphics obtained by changing parameters that initiate them. The aim is to control the graphics, i.e. to use controlled stochastic to achieve desired solutions. Since the artists from the past have never published the procedures of screening methods, their ideas have remained “only” the works of art. In this article we will present the development of the algorithm that, more or less successfully, simulates those screening solutions. It has been proven that mathematically defined graphical elements serve as screening elements. New technological and mathematical solutions are introduced in the reproduction with individual screening elements to be used in printing.

  5. Integration of rocket turbine design and analysis through computer graphics

    Hsu, Wayne; Boynton, Jim

    1988-01-01

    An interactive approach with engineering computer graphics is used to integrate the design and analysis processes of a rocket engine turbine into a progressive and iterative design procedure. The processes are interconnected through pre- and postprocessors. The graphics are used to generate the blade profiles, their stacking, finite element generation, and analysis presentation through color graphics. Steps of the design process discussed include pitch-line design, axisymmetric hub-to-tip meridional design, and quasi-three-dimensional analysis. The viscous two- and three-dimensional analysis codes are executed after acceptable designs are achieved and estimates of initial losses are confirmed.

  6. Integrating user studies into computer graphics-related courses.

    Santos, B S; Dias, P; Silva, S; Ferreira, C; Madeira, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents computer graphics. Computer graphics and visualization are essentially about producing images for a target audience, be it the millions watching a new CG-animated movie or the small group of researchers trying to gain insight into the large amount of numerical data resulting from a scientific experiment. To ascertain the final images' effectiveness for their intended audience or the designed visualizations' accuracy and expressiveness, formal user studies are often essential. In human-computer interaction (HCI), such user studies play a similar fundamental role in evaluating the usability and applicability of interaction methods and metaphors for the various devices and software systems we use.

  7. Iconographic dental typography. A dental character font for computer graphics.

    McCormack, J

    1991-06-08

    The recent massive increase in available memory for microcomputers now allows multiple font faces to be stored in computer RAM memory for instant access to the screen and for printed output. Fonts can be constructed in which the characters are not just letters or numbers, but are miniature graphic icons--in this instance pictures of teeth. When printed on an appropriate laser printer, this produces printed graphics of publishing quality.

  8. Application of computer graphics to regional trunk road network planning

    M Odani

    1992-01-01

    The author attempts to demonstrate the use of computer graphics to provide an efficient and effective visual presentation method for tranbsprtation planning. First, the basic concept of the visual presentation method of planning is explained and the required hardware is introduced. The information presented graphically by the proposed method is then shown for each step in the process of regional trunk road network planning in the Keihanshin Metropolitan Area of Japan: analysis of the traffic-...

  9. CADRIGS--computer aided design reliability interactive graphics system

    Kwik, R.J.; Polizzi, L.M.; Sticco, S.; Gerrard, P.B.; Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Phillips, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated reliability analysis program combining graphic representation of fault trees, automated data base loadings and reference, and automated construction of reliability code input files was developed. The functional specifications for CADRIGS, the computer aided design reliability interactive graphics system, are presented. Previously developed fault tree segments used in auxiliary feedwater system safety analysis were constructed on CADRIGS and, when combined, yielded results identical to those resulting from manual input to the same reliability codes

  10. Computer graphic of LHC in the tunnel

    1996-01-01

    A computer-generated image of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN in the tunnel originally built for the LEP accelerator that was closed in 2000. The cross-section of an LHC superconducting dipole magnet is also seen.

  11. Time-of-Flight Cameras in Computer Graphics

    Kolb, Andreas; Barth, Erhardt; Koch, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Computer Graphics, Computer Vision and Human Machine Interaction (HMI). These technologies are starting to have an impact on research and commercial applications. The upcoming generation of ToF sensors, however, will be even more powerful and will have the potential to become “ubiquitous real-time geometry...

  12. Time-of-Flight Sensors in Computer Graphics

    Kolb, Andreas; Barth, Erhardt; Koch, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    , including Computer Graphics, Computer Vision and Man Machine Interaction (MMI). These technologies are starting to have an impact on research and commercial applications. The upcoming generation of ToF sensors, however, will be even more powerful and will have the potential to become “ubiquitous real...

  13. The Use of Computer Graphics in the Design Process.

    Palazzi, Maria

    This master's thesis examines applications of computer technology to the field of industrial design and ways in which technology can transform the traditional process. Following a statement of the problem, the history and applications of the fields of computer graphics and industrial design are reviewed. The traditional industrial design process…

  14. DACIA LOGAN LIVE AXLE OPTIMISATION USING COMPUTER GRAPHICS

    KIRALY Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some contributions to the calculus and optimisation of a live axle used at Dacia Logan using computer graphics software for creating the model and afterwards using FEA evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the optimisation. Thus using specialized computer software, a simulation is made and the results were compared to the measured real prototype.

  15. Computer Art--A New Tool in Advertising Graphics.

    Wassmuth, Birgit L.

    Using computers to produce art began with scientists, mathematicians, and individuals with strong technical backgrounds who used the graphic material as visualizations of data in technical fields. People are using computer art in advertising, as well as in painting; sculpture; music; textile, product, industrial, and interior design; architecture;…

  16. Methods for teaching geometric modelling and computer graphics

    Rotkov, S.I.; Faitel`son, Yu. Ts.

    1992-05-01

    This paper considers methods for teaching the methods and algorithms of geometric modelling and computer graphics to programmers, designers and users of CAD and computer-aided research systems. There is a bibliography that can be used to prepare lectures and practical classes. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Practical application of computer graphics in nuclear power plant engineering

    Machiba, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Hirobumi; Sasaki, Norio

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of a vast amount of equipment, piping, and so on, and six or seven years are required to complete the design and engineering from the initial planning stage to the time of commercial operation. Furthermore, operating plants must be continually maintained and improved for a long period. Computer graphics were first applied to the composite arrangement design of nuclear power plants in the form of 3-dimensional CAD. Subsequently, as the introduction of CAE has progressed, a huge assortment of information has been accumulated in database, and measures have been sought that would permit the convenient utilization of this information. Using computer graphics technologies, improvement of the interface between the user and such databases has recently been accomplished. In response to the growth in environmental consciousness, photo-realistic simulations for artistic design of the interior and overviews showing harmony with the surroundings have been achieved through the application of computer graphics. (author)

  18. Concurrent use of data base and graphics computer workstations to provide graphic access to large, complex data bases for robotics control of nuclear surveillance and maintenance

    Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.S.; Zhou, X.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Florida is part of a multiuniversity research effort, sponsored by the US Department of Energy which is under way to develop and deploy an advanced semi-autonomous robotic system for use in nuclear power stations. This paper reports on the development of the computer tools necessary to gain convenient graphic access to the intelligence implicit in a large complex data base such as that in a nuclear reactor plant. This program is integrated as a man/machine interface within the larger context of the total computerized robotic planning and control system. The portion of the project described here addresses the connection between the three-dimensional displays on an interactive graphic workstation and a data-base computer running a large data-base server program. Programming the two computers to work together to accept graphic queries and return answers on the graphic workstation is a key part of the interactive capability developed

  19. Universal computer interfaces

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  20. Simulation of Robot Kinematics Using Interactive Computer Graphics.

    Leu, M. C.; Mahajan, R.

    1984-01-01

    Development of a robot simulation program based on geometric transformation softwares available in most computer graphics systems and program features are described. The program can be extended to simulate robots coordinating with external devices (such as tools, fixtures, conveyors) using geometric transformations to describe the…

  1. GRAPHIC, time-sharing magnet design computer programs at Argonne

    Lari, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes three magnet design computer programs in use at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron of Argonne National Laboratory. These programs are used in the time sharing mode in conjunction with a Tektronix model 4012 graphic display terminal. The first program in called TRIM, the second MAGNET, and the third GFUN. (U.S.)

  2. A Complete Interactive Graphical Computer-Aided Instruction System.

    Abrams, Steven Selby

    The use of interactive graphics in computer-aided instruction systems is discussed with emphasis placed on two requirements of such a system. The first is the need to provide the teacher with a useful tool with which to design and modify teaching sessions tailored to the individual needs and capabilities of the students. The second is the…

  3. Interactive computer graphics for bio-stereochemical modelling

    Proc, Indian Acad. Sci., Vol. 87 A (Chem. Sci.), No. 4, April 1978, pp. 95-113, (e) printed in India. Interactive computer graphics for bio-stereochemical modelling. ROBERT REIN, SHLOMONIR, KAREN HAYDOCK and. ROBERTD MACELROY. Department of Experimental Pathology, Roswell Park Memorial Institute,. 666 Elm ...

  4. Visualization of Minkowski operations by computer graphics techniques

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Blaauwgeers, G.S.M.; Serra, J; Soille, P

    1994-01-01

    We consider the problem of visualizing 3D objects defined as a Minkowski addition or subtraction of elementary objects. It is shown that such visualizations can be obtained by using techniques from computer graphics such as ray tracing and Constructive Solid Geometry. Applications of the method are

  5. A computer graphics pilot project - Spacecraft mission support with an interactive graphics workstation

    Hagedorn, John; Ehrner, Marie-Jacqueline; Reese, Jodi; Chang, Kan; Tseng, Irene

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Computer Graphics Pilot Project was undertaken to enhance the quality control, productivity and efficiency of mission support operations at the Goddard Operations Support Computing Facility. The Project evolved into a set of demonstration programs for graphics intensive simulated control room operations, particularly in connection with the complex space missions that began in the 1980s. Complex mission mean more data. Graphic displays are a means to reduce the probabilities of operator errors. Workstations were selected with 1024 x 768 pixel color displays controlled by a custom VLSI chip coupled to an MC68010 chip running UNIX within a shell that permits operations through the medium of mouse-accessed pulldown window menus. The distributed workstations run off a host NAS 8040 computer. Applications of the system for tracking spacecraft orbits and monitoring Shuttle payload handling illustrate the system capabilities, noting the built-in capabilities of shifting the point of view and rotating and zooming in on three-dimensional views of spacecraft.

  6. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  7. Theory and practice of Auto CAD, computer graphics

    Hwang, Si Won; Choe, Hong Yeong; Shin, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ryong Cheol

    1990-08-01

    This book describes theory and practice of Auto CAD, computer graphics, which deals with peripheral of computer, occurrence of digital line by DDA, BRM, theory of conversion, data base and display and shape modeling. This book gives descriptions of outline of CAD system, Auto CAD, basic function practice, simple figure practice, the third angle projection drawing a little complex single object, machine drawing I, function practice of improved Auto CAD, edit, set up layer, and 3D, and 3D display function.

  8. Interactive simulation of nuclear power systems using a dedicated minicomputer - computer graphics facility

    Tye, C.; Sezgen, A.O.

    1980-01-01

    The design of control systems and operational procedures for large scale nuclear power plant poses a difficult optimization problem requiring a lot of computational effort. Plant dynamic simulation using digital minicomputers offers the prospect of relatively low cost computing and when combined with graphical input/output provides a powerful tool for studying such problems. The paper discusses the results obtained from a simulation study carried out at the Computer Graphics Unit of the University of Manchester using a typical station control model for an Advanced Gas Cooled reactor. Particular reference is placed on the use of computer graphics for information display, parameter and control system optimization and techniques for using graphical input for defining and/or modifying the control system topology. Experience gained from this study has shown that a relatively modest minicomputer system can be used for simulating large scale dynamic systems and that highly interactive computer graphics can be used to advantage to relieve the designer of many of the tedious aspects of simulation leaving him free to concentrate on the more creative aspects of his work. (author)

  9. Use of computer graphics simulation for teaching of flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    Baillie, J; Jowell, P; Evangelou, H; Bickel, W; Cotton, P

    1991-05-01

    The concept of simulation training in endoscopy is now well-established. The systems currently under development employ either computer graphics simulation or interactive video technology; each has its strengths and weaknesses. A flexible sigmoidoscopy training device has been designed which uses graphic routines--such as object oriented programming and double buffering--in entirely new ways. These programming techniques compensate for the limitations of currently available desk-top microcomputers. By boosting existing computer 'horsepower' with next generation coprocessors and sophisticated graphics tools such as intensity interpolation (Gouraud shading), the realism of computer simulation of flexible sigmoidoscopy is being greatly enhanced. The computer program has teaching and scoring capabilities, making it a truly interactive system. Use has been made of this ability to record, grade and store each trainee encounter in computer memory as part of a multi-center, prospective trial of simulation training being conducted currently in the USA. A new input device, a dummy endoscope, has been designed that allows application of variable resistance to the insertion tube. This greatly enhances tactile feedback, such as resistance during looping. If carefully designed trials show that computer simulation is an attractive and effective training tool, it is expected that this technology will evolve rapidly and be made widely available to trainee endoscopists.

  10. Graphics processor efficiency for realization of rapid tabular computations

    Dudnik, V.A.; Kudryavtsev, V.I.; Us, S.A.; Shestakov, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Capabilities of graphics processing units (GPU) and central processing units (CPU) have been investigated for realization of fast-calculation algorithms with the use of tabulated functions. The realization of tabulated functions is exemplified by the GPU/CPU architecture-based processors. Comparison is made between the operating efficiencies of GPU and CPU, employed for tabular calculations at different conditions of use. Recommendations are formulated for the use of graphical and central processors to speed up scientific and engineering computations through the use of tabulated functions

  11. Graphics and Visualization: Breaking New Frontiers (Introduction to the Special Theme Section on "Computer Graphics and Visualization")

    O'Sullivan, Carol; Scopigno, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    From the early graphical applications such as flight simulators, to today's stunning special effects in movies, computer graphics have had a significant impact upon the way computers have been used to represent and visualize the world. There are many big problems left to be solved, some of which are reflected in the following pages of this issue.

  12. Characterizing chemical systems with on-line computers and graphics

    Frazer, J.W.; Rigdon, L.P.; Brand, H.R.; Pomernacki, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Incorporating computers and graphics on-line to chemical experiments and processes opens up new opportunities for the study and control of complex systems. Systems having many variables can be characterized even when the variable interactions are nonlinear, and the system cannot a priori be represented by numerical methods and models. That is, large sets of accurate data can be rapidly acquired, then modeling and graphic techniques can be used to obtain partial interpretation plus design of further experimentation. The experimenter can thus comparatively quickly iterate between experimentation and modeling to obtain a final solution. We have designed and characterized a versatile computer-controlled apparatus for chemical research, which incorporates on-line instrumentation and graphics. It can be used to determine the mechanism of enzyme-induced reactions or to optimize analytical methods. The apparatus can also be operated as a pilot plant to design control strategies. On-line graphics were used to display conventional plots used by biochemists and three-dimensional response-surface plots

  13. Image processing and computer graphics in radiology. Pt. A

    Toennies, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The reports give a full review of all aspects of digital imaging in radiology which are of significance to image processing and the subsequent picture archiving and communication techniques. The review strongly clings to practice and illustrates the various contributions from specialized areas of the computer sciences, such as computer vision, computer graphics, database systems and information and communication systems, man-machine interactions and software engineering. Methods and models available are explained and assessed for their respective performance and value, and basic principles are briefly explained. (DG) [de

  14. Image processing and computer graphics in radiology. Pt. B

    Toennies, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The reports give a full review of all aspects of digital imaging in radiology which are of significance to image processing and the subsequent picture archiving and communication techniques. The review strongly clings to practice and illustrates the various contributions from specialized areas of the computer sciences, such as computer vision, computer graphics, database systems and information and communication systems, man-machine interactions and software engineering. Methods and models available are explained and assessed for their respective performance and value, and basic principles are briefly explained. (DG) [de

  15. Graphics processing unit based computation for NDE applications

    Nahas, C. A.; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2012-05-01

    Advances in parallel processing in recent years are helping to improve the cost of numerical simulation. Breakthroughs in Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) based computation now offer the prospect of further drastic improvements. The introduction of 'compute unified device architecture' (CUDA) by NVIDIA (the global technology company based in Santa Clara, California, USA) has made programming GPUs for general purpose computing accessible to the average programmer. Here we use CUDA to develop parallel finite difference schemes as applicable to two problems of interest to NDE community, namely heat diffusion and elastic wave propagation. The implementations are for two-dimensions. Performance improvement of the GPU implementation against serial CPU implementation is then discussed.

  16. Exploiting graphics processing units for computational biology and bioinformatics.

    Payne, Joshua L; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Moore, Jason H

    2010-09-01

    Advances in the video gaming industry have led to the production of low-cost, high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) that possess more memory bandwidth and computational capability than central processing units (CPUs), the standard workhorses of scientific computing. With the recent release of generalpurpose GPUs and NVIDIA's GPU programming language, CUDA, graphics engines are being adopted widely in scientific computing applications, particularly in the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics. The goal of this article is to concisely present an introduction to GPU hardware and programming, aimed at the computational biologist or bioinformaticist. To this end, we discuss the primary differences between GPU and CPU architecture, introduce the basics of the CUDA programming language, and discuss important CUDA programming practices, such as the proper use of coalesced reads, data types, and memory hierarchies. We highlight each of these topics in the context of computing the all-pairs distance between instances in a dataset, a common procedure in numerous disciplines of scientific computing. We conclude with a runtime analysis of the GPU and CPU implementations of the all-pairs distance calculation. We show our final GPU implementation to outperform the CPU implementation by a factor of 1700.

  17. Industrial application of a graphics computer-based training system

    Klemm, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Graphics Computer Based Training (GCBT) roles include drilling, tutoring, simulation and problem solving. Of these, Commonwealth Edison uses mainly tutoring, simulation and problem solving. These roles are not separate in any particular program. They are integrated to provide tutoring and part-task simulation, part-task simulation and problem solving, or problem solving tutoring. Commonwealth's Graphics Computer Based Training program was a result of over a year's worth of research and planning. The keys to the program are it's flexibility and control. Flexibility is maintained through stand alone units capable of program authoring and modification for plant/site specific users. Yet, the system has the capability to support up to 31 terminals with a 40 mb hard disk drive. Control of the GCBT program is accomplished through establishment of development priorities and a central development facility (Commonwealth Edison's Production Training Center)

  18. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    Rogers, S.E.; Buning, P.G.; Merritt, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of two distributed graphics programs used in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Both programs are interactive in nature. They run on a CRAY-2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software are from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. The supercomputer does all numerically intensive work and the workstation, as the front-end machine, allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written as a distributed program that computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in speed over that obtained using a single machine. By using these programs, one can learn quickly about complex features of a three-dimensional flow field. Some color results are presented

  19. Computing trends using graphic processor in high energy physics

    Niculescu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in Heavy Energy Physics is to make fast analysis of high amount of experimental and simulated data. At LHC-CERN one p-p event is approximate 1 Mb in size. The time taken to analyze the data and obtain fast results depends on high computational power. The main advantage of using GPU(Graphic Processor Unit) programming over traditional CPU one is that graphical cards bring a lot of computing power at a very low price. Today a huge number of application(scientific, financial etc) began to be ported or developed for GPU, including Monte Carlo tools or data analysis tools for High Energy Physics. In this paper, we'll present current status and trends in HEP using GPU.

  20. Visualising the scene: computer graphics and evidence presentation

    Noond, Jez; Schofield, Damian; March, Jack; Evison, Martin

    2002-01-01

    In the UK forensic animations are becoming an increasingly important visual aid in courtroom situations, where complex data relating to a sequence of events is being visualised before a general public who may have little or no understanding of established forensic procedure or methodology. This paper will introduce and discuss a spectrum of new technologies that utilise new developments in Computer Graphics (CG) and Virtual Reality (VR) for a range of incident investigation and presentation s...

  1. Television equipment for graphic data input into a computer

    Dement'ev, V.G.; Dudin, Yu.Yu.; Pendyur, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Television equipment made in CAMAC standard for graphic data input into a computer, in particular, of oscillograms from the screen of the storing oscillograph is described. Determination of point position is based on processing of video signal from telecamera viewing the oscillograph screen so that the line scanning is perpendicular to the orientation of oscillograph scan. The time of one point reading is approximately 20 ms

  2. Three-dimensional integrated CAE system applying computer graphic technique

    Kato, Toshisada; Tanaka, Kazuo; Akitomo, Norio; Obata, Tokayasu.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional CAE system for nuclear power plant design is presented. This system utilizes high-speed computer graphic techniques for the plant design review, and an integrated engineering database for handling the large amount of nuclear power plant engineering data in a unified data format. Applying this system makes it possible to construct a nuclear power plant using only computer data from the basic design phase to the manufacturing phase, and it increases the productivity and reliability of the nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. A computer graphics program system for protein structure representation.

    Ross, A M; Golub, E E

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a computer graphics program system for the schematic representation of several protein secondary structure analysis algorithms. The programs calculate the probability of occurrence of alpha-helix, beta-sheet and beta-turns by the method of Chou and Fasman and assign unique predicted structure to each residue using a novel conflict resolution algorithm based on maximum likelihood. A detailed structure map containing secondary structure, hydrophobicity, sequence identity, sequence numbering and the location of putative N-linked glycosylation sites is then produced. In addition, helical wheel diagrams and hydrophobic moment calculations can be performed to further analyze the properties of selected regions of the sequence. As they require only structure specification as input, the graphics programs can easily be adapted for use with other secondary structure prediction schemes. The use of these programs to analyze protein structure-function relationships is described and evaluated. PMID:2832829

  4. An overview of interactive computer graphics and its application to computer-aided engineering and design

    Van Dam, A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this brief birds-eye view of interactive graphics is to list the key ideas, and to show how one of the most important application areas, Computer Aided Engineering/Design takes advantage of it. (orig.)

  5. Implementing and Operating Computer Graphics in the Contemporary Chemistry Education

    Olga Popovska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology plays a crucial role in modern teaching, providing both, educators and students fundamental theoretical insights as well as supporting the interpretation of experimental data. In the long term it gives students a clear stake in their learning processes. Advancing in education furthermore largely depends on providing valuable experiences and tools throughout digital and computer literacy. Here and after, the computer’s benefit makes no exception in the chemistry as a science. The major part of computer revolutionizing in the chemistry laboratory is with the use of images, diagrams, molecular models, graphs and specialized chemistry programs. In the sense of this, the teacher provides more interactive classes and numerous dynamic teaching methods along with advanced technology. All things considered, the aim of this article is to implement interactive teaching methods of chemistry subjects using chemistry computer graphics. A group of students (n = 30 at the age of 18–20 were testing using methods such as brainstorming, demonstration, working in pairs, and writing laboratory notebooks. The results showed that demonstration is the most acceptable interactive method (95%. This article is expected to be of high value to teachers and researchers of chemistry, implementing interactive methods, and operating computer graphics.

  6. Form in the Natural Environment: Fractal Computer Graphics and Wassily Kandinsky.

    Geake, John; Porter, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Reports on study of use of fractal geometry in a computer graphics program to improve the perception of intermediate grade level students in their paintings. Finds that students are more likely to use changing shapes and colors after viewing slides of fractal computer graphics. Concludes that fractal computer graphics would make highly engaging…

  7. Incorporating modern OpenGL into computer graphics education.

    Reina, Guido; Muller, Thomas; Ertl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    University of Stuttgart educators have updated three computer science courses to incorporate forward-compatible OpenGL. To help students, they developed an educational framework that abstracts some of modern OpenGL's difficult aspects.

  8. Computer Graphics 2: More of the Best Computer Art and Design.

    1994

    This collection of computer generated images aims to present media tools and processes, stimulate ideas, and inspire artists and art students working in computer-related design. The images are representative of state-of-the-art editorial, broadcast, packaging, fine arts, and graphic techniques possible through computer generation. Each image is…

  9. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  10. Neurosurgical simulation by interactive computer graphics on iPad.

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Toki; Suematsu, Shinya; Gomyo, Miho; Noguchi, Akio; Nagane, Motoo; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Presurgical simulation before complicated neurosurgery is a state-of-the-art technique, and its usefulness has recently become well known. However, simulation requires complex image processing, which hinders its widespread application. We explored handling the results of interactive computer graphics on the iPad tablet, which can easily be controlled anywhere. Data from preneurosurgical simulations from 12 patients (4 men, 8 women) who underwent complex brain surgery were loaded onto an iPad. First, DICOM data were loaded using Amira visualization software to create interactive computer graphics, and ParaView, another free visualization software package, was used to convert the results of the simulation to be loaded using the free iPad software KiwiViewer. The interactive computer graphics created prior to neurosurgery were successfully displayed and smoothly controlled on the iPad in all patients. The number of elements ranged from 3 to 13 (mean 7). The mean original data size was 233 MB, which was reduced to 10.4 MB (4.4% of original size) after image processing by ParaView. This was increased to 46.6 MB (19.9%) after decompression in KiwiViewer. Controlling the magnification, transfer, rotation, and selection of translucence in 10 levels of each element were smoothly and easily performed using one or two fingers. The requisite skill to smoothly control the iPad software was acquired within 1.8 trials on average in 12 medical students and 6 neurosurgical residents. Using an iPad to handle the result of preneurosurgical simulation was extremely useful because it could easily be handled anywhere.

  11. 3D data processing with advanced computer graphics tools

    Zhang, Song; Ekstrand, Laura; Grieve, Taylor; Eisenmann, David J.; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2012-09-01

    Often, the 3-D raw data coming from an optical profilometer contains spiky noises and irregular grid, which make it difficult to analyze and difficult to store because of the enormously large size. This paper is to address these two issues for an optical profilometer by substantially reducing the spiky noise of the 3-D raw data from an optical profilometer, and by rapidly re-sampling the raw data into regular grids at any pixel size and any orientation with advanced computer graphics tools. Experimental results will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Light & Skin Interactions Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications

    Baranoski, Gladimir V G

    2010-01-01

    Light and Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal related works aimed at applications in life and health sciences. It then examines four exemplary modeling approaches as well as definitive algorithms that can be used to generate realistic images depicting skin appearance. An accompanying companion site also includes complete code and data sources for the BioSpec model, which is considered to be the

  13. STS-49 ASEM activities illustrated with PLAID computer graphics

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Methods (ASEM) activities are illustrated with PLAID computer graphics. Two extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) suited crewmembers work on multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (with legs attached) grappled by remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector and positioned in the over-the-nose location (above OV-105's crew compartment). This position has been designated as the assembly area for Space Station Freedom (SSF). This procedure will evaluate the ability to use the RMS to position MPESS carrier and EVA crewmembers forward and above the PLB.

  14. 3-D computer graphics based on integral photography.

    Naemura, T; Yoshida, T; Harashima, H

    2001-02-12

    Integral photography (IP), which is one of the ideal 3-D photographic technologies, can be regarded as a method of capturing and displaying light rays passing through a plane. The NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories have developed a real-time IP system using an HDTV camera and an optical fiber array. In this paper, the authors propose a method of synthesizing arbitrary views from IP images captured by the HDTV camera. This is a kind of image-based rendering system, founded on the 4-D data space Representation of light rays. Experimental results show the potential to improve the quality of images rendered by computer graphics techniques.

  15. A Theoretical Analysis of Learning with Graphics--Implications for Computer Graphics Design.

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan

    This paper reviews the literature pertinent to learning with graphics. The dual coding theory provides explanation about how graphics are stored and precessed in semantic memory. The level of processing theory suggests how graphics can be employed in learning to encourage deeper processing. In addition to dual coding theory and level of processing…

  16. [Application of three-dimensional computer graphics in oncology].

    Joyeux, H; Jaeger, M; Briand, D; Servois, V; Masson, B; Borianne, P; de Reffye, P

    1996-01-01

    Accurate 3D tumoral volume evaluation is now possible through the combined use and progress of computer graphics technics (3D reconstruction and visualization) and medical imagery (helicoidal TDM scanner). Specific organ and pathology oriented softwares can help answer rapidly to problems posed by oncologic praticians. A new decision support for diagnosis, therapy and follow-up is emerging. First results in liver tumors and hepatic regeneration macroscopic biometrics are presented. Tumoral or organ volumic index will be usable in the follow-up. TNM staging, external conformal radiotherapy for prostatic or brain tumors, drugs cytolytic effects evaluation will take great advantage of these technologies. 3D visualization and matching CT and MRI imagery can help computed assisted surgery.

  17. Realization of the Evristic Combination Methods by Means of Computer Graphics

    S. A. Novoselov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the ways of enhancing and stimulating the creative activity and initiative of pedagogic students – the prospective specialists called for educating and upbringing socially and professionally competent, originally thinking, versatile personalities. For developing their creative abilities the author recommends introducing the heuristic combination methods, applied for engineering creativity facilitation; associative-synectic technology; and computer graphics tools. The paper contains the comparative analysis of the main heuristic method operations and the computer graphics redactor in creating a visual composition. The examples of implementing the heuristic combination methods are described along with the extracts of the laboratory classes designed for creativity and its motivation developments. The approbation of the given method in the several universities confirms the prospects of enhancing the students’ learning and creative activities. 

  18. Engineering computer graphics in gas turbine engine design, analysis and manufacture

    Lopatka, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A time-sharing and computer graphics facility designed to provide effective interactive tools to a large number of engineering users with varied requirements was described. The application of computer graphics displays at several levels of hardware complexity and capability is discussed, with examples of graphics systems tracing gas turbine product development, beginning with preliminary design through manufacture. Highlights of an operating system stylized for interactive engineering graphics is described.

  19. STS-49 ASEM activity illustrated with PLAID computer graphics

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Methods (ASEM) activity is illustrated with PLAID computer graphics. An extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) suited crewmember, positioned on the remote manipulator system (RMS) manipulator foot restraint (MFR), grabs and maneuvers the multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) with truss assembly attached above OV-105's payload bay (PLB) using the steer wheel assembly. The MPESS/ASEM truss structure has been lifted out the sill-mounted payload retention latch assemblies (PRLAs) and will be repositioned in the PRLAs upon completion of handling procedures. Also seen in this illustration are the empty INTELSAT perigee stage cradle structure (aft PLB) and the capture bar grapple fixture stowed on the port side sill longeron.

  20. Development of a Traditional/Computer-aided Graphics Course for Engineering Technology.

    Anand, Vera B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a two-semester-hour freshman course in engineering graphics which uses both traditional and computerized instruction. Includes course description, computer graphics topics, and recommendations. Indicates that combining interactive graphics software with development of simple programs gave students a better foundation for upper-division…

  1. Integrated Graphics Operations and Analysis Lab Development of Advanced Computer Graphics Algorithms

    Wheaton, Ira M.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this project is to aid the IGOAL in researching and implementing algorithms for advanced computer graphics. First, this project focused on porting the current International Space Station (ISS) Xbox experience to the web. Previously, the ISS interior fly-around education and outreach experience only ran on an Xbox 360. One of the desires was to take this experience and make it into something that can be put on NASA s educational site for anyone to be able to access. The current code works in the Unity game engine which does have cross platform capability but is not 100% compatible. The tasks for an intern to complete this portion consisted of gaining familiarity with Unity and the current ISS Xbox code, porting the Xbox code to the web as is, and modifying the code to work well as a web application. In addition, a procedurally generated cloud algorithm will be developed. Currently, the clouds used in AGEA animations and the Xbox experiences are a texture map. The desire is to create a procedurally generated cloud algorithm to provide dynamically generated clouds for both AGEA animations and the Xbox experiences. This task consists of gaining familiarity with AGEA and the plug-in interface, developing the algorithm, creating an AGEA plug-in to implement the algorithm inside AGEA, and creating a Unity script to implement the algorithm for the Xbox. This portion of the project was unable to be completed in the time frame of the internship; however, the IGOAL will continue to work on it in the future.

  2. Interactive computer graphics displays for hierarchical data structures

    Cahn, D.F.; Murano, C.V.

    1980-05-01

    An interactive computer graphical display program was developed as an aid to user visualization and manipulation of hierarchically structured data systems such as thesauri. In the present configuration, a thesaurus term and its primary and secondary conceptual neighbors are presented to the user in tree graph form on a CRT; the user then designates, via light pen or keyboard, any of the neighbors as the next term of interest and receives a new display centered on this term. By successive specification of broader, narrower, and related terms, the user can course rapidly through the thesaurus space and refine his search file. At any stage, he deals with a term-centered, conceptually meaningful picture of a localized portion of the thesaurus, and is freed from the artificial difficulties of handling the traditional alphabetized thesaurus. Intentional limitation of the associative range of each display frame, and the use of color, case, and interconnecting vectors to encode relationships among terms, enhance interpretability of the display. Facile movement through the term space, provided by interactive computation, allows the display to remain simple, and is an essential element of the system. 3 figures

  3. Neurosurgical simulation and navigation with three-dimensional computer graphics.

    Hayashi, N; Endo, S; Shibata, T; Ikeda, H; Takaku, A

    1999-01-01

    We developed a pre-operative simulation and intra-operative navigation system with three-dimensional computer graphics (3D-CG). Because the 3D-CG created by the present system enables visualization of lesions via semitransparent imaging of the scalp surface and brain, the expected operative field could be visualized on the computer display pre-operatively. We used two different configurative navigators. One is assembled by an arciform arm and a laser pointer. The arciform arm consists of 3 joints mounted with rotary encoders forming an iso-center system. The distal end of the arm has a laser pointer, which has a CCD for measurement of the distance between the outlet of the laser beam, and the position illuminated by the laser pointer. Using this navigator, surgeons could accurately estimate the trajectory to the target lesion, and the boundaries of the lesion. Because the other navigator has six degrees of freedom and an interchangeable probe shaped like a bayonet on its tip, it can be used in deep structures through narrow openings. Our system proved efficient and yielded an unobstructed view of deep structures during microscopic neurosurgical procedures.

  4. A computer graphics system for visualizing spacecraft in orbit

    Eyles, Don E.

    1989-01-01

    To carry out unanticipated operations with resources already in space is part of the rationale for a permanently manned space station in Earth orbit. The astronauts aboard a space station will require an on-board, spatial display tool to assist the planning and rehearsal of upcoming operations. Such a tool can also help astronauts to monitor and control such operations as they occur, especially in cases where first-hand visibility is not possible. A computer graphics visualization system designed for such an application and currently implemented as part of a ground-based simulation is described. The visualization system presents to the user the spatial information available in the spacecraft's computers by drawing a dynamic picture containing the planet Earth, the Sun, a star field, and up to two spacecraft. The point of view within the picture can be controlled by the user to obtain a number of specific visualization functions. The elements of the display, the methods used to control the display's point of view, and some of the ways in which the system can be used are described.

  5. Computing Science and Statistics: Volume 24. Graphics and Visualization

    1993-03-20

    Models Mike West Institute of Statistics & Decision Sciences Duke University, Durham NC 27708, USA Abstract density estimation techniques. With an...ratio-of-uniforms halter, D. J., Best, N. G., McNeil, A. method. Statistics and Computing, 1, (in J., Sharples , L. D. and Kirby, A. J. press). (1992b...Dept of Act. Math & Stats Box 13040 SFA Riccarton Edinburgh, Scotland EH 14 4AS Nacognoches, TX 75962 mike @cara.ma.hw.ac.uk Allen McIntosh Michael T

  6. A sampler of useful computational tools for applied geometry, computer graphics, and image processing foundations for computer graphics, vision, and image processing

    Cohen-Or, Daniel; Ju, Tao; Mitra, Niloy J; Shamir, Ariel; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Zhang, Hao (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    A Sampler of Useful Computational Tools for Applied Geometry, Computer Graphics, and Image Processing shows how to use a collection of mathematical techniques to solve important problems in applied mathematics and computer science areas. The book discusses fundamental tools in analytical geometry and linear algebra. It covers a wide range of topics, from matrix decomposition to curvature analysis and principal component analysis to dimensionality reduction.Written by a team of highly respected professors, the book can be used in a one-semester, intermediate-level course in computer science. It

  7. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  8. A three-dimensional computer graphic imaging for neurosurgery

    Uchino, Masafumi; Onagi, Atsuo; Seiki, Yoshikatsu

    1987-01-01

    Information offered by conventional diagnostic tools for medical use, including X-ray films, CT, MRI, RI images and PET, are usually two-dimensional. However, the human body and pathological lesions are really extended in 3 dimensions. Interpreters have to reconstruct an imaginative, 3-dimensional configuration of lesions from 2-dimensional information on many films, according to their knowledge and experience. All this sometimes wastes a lot of time and gives rise to inconclusive discussion among interpreters. The advent and rapid progress of new computer graphic techniques, however, makes it possible to draw an apparent 3-dimensional image of a lesion on the basis of a 2-dimensional display; this is named a pseudo-3-dimensional image. After the region of interest of the CT-sliced image has been extracted by means of a semi-automatic contour extraction algorithm, multi-slice CT images are constructed by the voxel method. A 3-dimensional image is then generated by the use of the Z-buffer. Subsequently, transparent, semi-transparent, and color display are provided. This new method of display was used for CT-scan films of various intracerebral pathological lesions, including tumors, hematomas, and congenital anomalies: The benefits, prospects, and technical limits of this imaging technique for clinical use were discussed. (author)

  9. Artist Material BRDF Database for Computer Graphics Rendering

    Ashbaugh, Justin C.

    The primary goal of this thesis was to create a physical library of artist material samples. This collection provides necessary data for the development of a gonio-imaging system for use in museums to more accurately document their collections. A sample set was produced consisting of 25 panels and containing nearly 600 unique samples. Selected materials are representative of those commonly used by artists both past and present. These take into account the variability in visual appearance resulting from the materials and application techniques used. Five attributes of variability were identified including medium, color, substrate, application technique and overcoat. Combinations of these attributes were selected based on those commonly observed in museum collections and suggested by surveying experts in the field. For each sample material, image data is collected and used to measure an average bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The results are available as a public-domain image and optical database of artist materials at art-si.org. Additionally, the database includes specifications for each sample along with other information useful for computer graphics rendering such as the rectified sample images and normal maps.

  10. Using computer graphics to design Space Station Freedom viewing

    Goldsberry, Betty S.; Lippert, Buddy O.; Mckee, Sandra D.; Lewis, James L., Jr.; Mount, Francis E.

    1993-01-01

    Viewing requirements were identified early in the Space Station Freedom program for both direct viewing via windows and indirect viewing via cameras and closed-circuit television (CCTV). These requirements reside in NASA Program Definition and Requirements Document (PDRD), Section 3: Space Station Systems Requirements. Currently, analyses are addressing the feasibility of direct and indirect viewing. The goal of these analyses is to determine the optimum locations for the windows, cameras, and CCTV's in order to meet established requirements, to adequately support space station assembly, and to operate on-board equipment. PLAID, a three-dimensional computer graphics program developed at NASA JSC, was selected for use as the major tool in these analyses. PLAID provides the capability to simulate the assembly of the station as well as to examine operations as the station evolves. This program has been used successfully as a tool to analyze general viewing conditions for many Space Shuttle elements and can be used for virtually all Space Station components. Additionally, PLAID provides the ability to integrate an anthropometric scale-modeled human (representing a crew member) with interior and exterior architecture.

  11. The Aristotelian Rainbow: From Philosophy to Computer Graphics

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Christensen, Niels Jørgen; Falster, Peter

    2007-01-01

    in-depth, source-based historical study that pinpoints events with relevance for graphics in the development of theories of light. We also show that ancient mathematical models for light scattering phenomena may still find a use in the branch of realistic image synthesis concerned with real...... come from, but also for finding more mathematical and physical models that are useful in graphics....

  12. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  13. Graphic Organizers or Graphic Overviews? Presentation Order Effects with Computer-Based Text

    Shaw, Shana; Nihalani, Priya; Mayrath, Michael; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    It has long been assumed that graphic organizers (GOs) should be presented to students following text as an organizer, rather than preceding text as an overview. Robinson et al. ("Educational Technology Research & Development," 51(4), 25-41, 2003) challenged this assumption by finding support for GOs as an overview. The present study further…

  14. Interplay of Computer and Paper-Based Sketching in Graphic Design

    Pan, Rui; Kuo, Shih-Ping; Strobel, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate student designers' attitude and choices towards the use of computers and paper sketches when involved in a graphic design process. 65 computer graphic technology undergraduates participated in this research. A mixed method study with survey and in-depth interviews was applied to answer the research…

  15. Traditional Engineering Graphics versus Computer-Aided Drafting: A View from Academe.

    Foster, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Argues for a legitimate role of manually expressed engineering graphics within engineering education as a needed support for computer-assisted drafting work. Discusses what and how students should learn as well as trends in engineering graphics education. Compares and contrasts manual and computer drafting methods. (CW)

  16. The use of computer graphics in the visual analysis of the proposed Sunshine Ski Area expansion

    Mark Angelo

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the use of computer graphics in designing part of the Sunshine Ski Area in Banff National Park. The program used was capable of generating perspective landscape drawings from a number of different viewpoints. This allowed managers to predict, and subsequently reduce, the adverse visual impacts of ski-run development. Computer graphics have proven,...

  17. The Case for Teaching Computer Graphics with WebGL: A 25-Year Perspective.

    Angel, Ed

    2017-01-01

    OpenGL has been the standard API for teaching computer graphics. There are now multiple versions of the standard, including WebGL. which is the JavaScript implementation of OpenGL ES 2.0. The author argues that WebGL is the version best suited for an introductory course in computer graphics.

  18. Second Annual AEC Scientific Computer Information Exhange Meeting. Proceedings of the technical program theme: computer graphics

    Peskin,A.M.; Shimamoto, Y.

    1974-01-01

    The topic of computer graphics serves well to illustrate that AEC affiliated scientific computing installations are well represented in the forefront of computing science activities. The participant response to the technical program was overwhelming--both in number of contributions and quality of the work described. Session I, entitled Advanced Systems, contains presentations describing systems that contain features not generally found in graphics facilities. These features can be roughly classified as extensions of standard two-dimensional monochromatic imaging to higher dimensions including color and time as well as multidimensional metrics. Session II presents seven diverse applications ranging from high energy physics to medicine. Session III describes a number of important developments in establishing facilities, techniques and enhancements in the computer graphics area. Although an attempt was made to schedule as many of these worthwhile presentations as possible, it appeared impossible to do so given the scheduling constraints of the meeting. A number of prospective presenters 'came to the rescue' by graciously withdrawing from the sessions. Some of their abstracts have been included in the Proceedings.

  19. Computer graphic investigation on the epitaxial growth of superconductor films

    Miyamoto, A.; Iwamoto, S.; Inui, T.; Agusa, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mechanism of the epitaxial growth the oxide superconductor films has been investigated by using the computer graphics for the combination of orthorhombic Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x with substrate crystals such as SrTiO 3 MgO, and ZrO 2 . The (001) plane Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x with substrate crystals such as SrTiO 3 , MgO, and ZrO 2 . The (001) plane of Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x has been shown to fit the (100) plane of SrTiO 3 , MgO, and ZrO 2 . A crystallographic fit has also been proved between the (110) plane of Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x and the (110) plane of SrTiO 3 . These results are consistent with the experimental data about the epitaxial growth of the Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x films. Furthermore, detailed investigation of atomic arrangements has indicated some differences in the ionic interaction at the superconductor-substrate interface among SrTiO 3 , MgO, and ZrO 2 substrates. As for ZrO 2 (100) plane, for examples, ionic arrangements at the oxide layer is favorable only for the interaction with Y 3+ layer of Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x , while the Zr-O layer of ZrO 2 can interact with both Ba-O layer and Cu-O layer of Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-x

  20. VISUAL-GRAPHIC VECTORS IN THE BANK ADVERTISING UNIVERSE

    PREDICA Catalin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the form and typology of banking advertising universe. The aim is to highlight the specificity of advertisements of the banking system according to the elements and the geometric shapes that are used.

  1. VISUAL-GRAPHIC VECTORS IN THE BANK ADVERTISING UNIVERSE

    PREDICA Catalin

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the form and typology of banking advertising universe. The aim is to highlight the specificity of advertisements of the banking system according to the elements and the geometric shapes that are used.

  2. Andiamo, a Graphical User Interface for Ohio University's Hauser-Feshbach Implementation

    Brooks, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    First and foremost, I am not a physicist. I am an undergraduate computer science major/Japanese minor at Ohio University. However, I am working for Zach Meisel, in the Ohio University's physics department. This is the first software development project I've ever done. My charge is/was to create a graphical program that can be used to more easily set up Hauser-Feshbach equation input files. The input files are of the format expected by the Hauser-Feshbach 2002 code developed by a handful of people at the university. I regularly attend group meetings with Zach and his other subordinates, but these are mostly used as a way for us to discuss our progress and any troubles or roadblocks we may have encountered. I was encouraged to try to come with his group to this event because it could help expose me to the scientific culture of astrophysics research. While I know very little about particles and epic space events, my poster would be an informative and (hopefully) inspiring one that could help get other undergraduates interested in doing object oriented programming. This could be more exposure for them, as I believe a lot of physics majors only learn scripting languages.

  3. An application of interactive computer graphics technology to the design of dispersal mechanisms

    Richter, B. J.; Welch, B. H.

    1977-01-01

    Interactive computer graphics technology is combined with a general purpose mechanisms computer code to study the operational behavior of three guided bomb dispersal mechanism designs. These studies illustrate the use of computer graphics techniques to discover operational anomalies, to assess the effectiveness of design improvements, to reduce the time and cost of the modeling effort, and to provide the mechanism designer with a visual understanding of the physical operation of such systems.

  4. The practical use of computer graphics techniques for site characterization

    Tencer, B.; Newell, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the approach utilized by Roy F. Weston, Inc. (WESTON) to analyze and characterize data relative to a specific site and the computerized graphical techniques developed to display site characterization data. These techniques reduce massive amounts of tabular data to a limited number of graphics easily understood by both the public and policy level decision makers. First, they describe the general design of the system; then the application of this system to a low level rad site followed by a description of an application to an uncontrolled hazardous waste site

  5. Interactive computer graphics and its role in control system design of large space structures

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to show the relevance of interactive computer graphics in the design of control systems to maintain attitude and shape of large space structures to accomplish the required mission objectives. The typical phases of control system design, starting from the physical model such as modeling the dynamics, modal analysis, and control system design methodology are reviewed and the need of the interactive computer graphics is demonstrated. Typical constituent parts of large space structures such as free-free beams and free-free plates are used to demonstrate the complexity of the control system design and the effectiveness of the interactive computer graphics.

  6. A 1.5 GFLOPS Reciprocal Unit for Computer Graphics

    Nannarelli, Alberto; Rasmussen, Morten Sleth; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2006-01-01

    The reciprocal operation 1/d is a frequent operation performed in graphics processors (GPUs). In this work, we present the design of a radix-16 reciprocal unit based on the algorithm combining the traditional digit-by-digit algorithm and the approximation of the reciprocal by one Newton-Raphson i...

  7. Toward a Singleton Undergraduate Computer Graphics Course in Small and Medium-Sized Colleges

    Shesh, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of a single undergraduate computer graphics course over five semesters, driven by a primary question: if one could offer only one undergraduate course in graphics, what would it include? This constraint is relevant to many small and medium-sized colleges that lack resources, adequate expertise, and enrollment…

  8. A study of computer graphics technology in application of communication resource management

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Fei

    2017-08-01

    With the development of computer technology, computer graphics technology has been widely used. Especially, the success of object-oriented technology and multimedia technology promotes the development of graphics technology in the computer software system. Therefore, the computer graphics theory and application technology have become an important topic in the field of computer, while the computer graphics technology becomes more and more extensive in various fields of application. In recent years, with the development of social economy, especially the rapid development of information technology, the traditional way of communication resource management cannot effectively meet the needs of resource management. In this case, the current communication resource management is still using the original management tools and management methods, resource management equipment management and maintenance, which brought a lot of problems. It is very difficult for non-professionals to understand the equipment and the situation in communication resource management. Resource utilization is relatively low, and managers cannot quickly and accurately understand the resource conditions. Aimed at the above problems, this paper proposes to introduce computer graphics technology into the communication resource management. The introduction of computer graphics not only makes communication resource management more vivid, but also reduces the cost of resource management and improves work efficiency.

  9. University rankings in computer science

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  10. Decision making in water resource planning: Models and computer graphics

    Fedra, K; Carlsen, A J [ed.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes some basic concepts of simulation-based decision support systems for water resources management and the role of symbolic, graphics-based user interfaces. Designed to allow direct and easy access to advanced methods of analysis and decision support for a broad and heterogeneous group of users, these systems combine data base management, system simulation, operations research techniques such as optimization, interactive data analysis, elements of advanced decision technology, and artificial intelligence, with a friendly and conversational, symbolic display oriented user interface. Important features of the interface are the use of several parallel or alternative styles of interaction and display, indlucing colour graphics and natural language. Combining quantitative numerical methods with qualitative and heuristic approaches, and giving the user direct and interactive control over the systems function, human knowledge, experience and judgement are integrated with formal approaches into a tightly coupled man-machine system through an intelligent and easily accessible user interface. 4 drawings, 42 references.

  11. Microcomputer Simulated CAD for Engineering Graphics.

    Huggins, David L.; Myers, Roy E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a simulated computer-aided-graphics (CAD) program at The Pennsylvania State University. Rationale for the program, facilities, microcomputer equipment (Apple) used, and development of a software package for simulating applied engineering graphics are considered. (JN)

  12. Faith-Learning Interaction in Graphic Design Courses in Protestant Evangelical Colleges and Universities

    Bower, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Integration or connectedness between faith and learning is a core aim of Protestant evangelical colleges and universities. It is pursued in a number of different ways in the academic programs of these institutions, even in commercially oriented courses that they offer, such as graphic design. However, the different ways that practical and…

  13. Attention and visual memory in visualization and computer graphics.

    Healey, Christopher G; Enns, James T

    2012-07-01

    A fundamental goal of visualization is to produce images of data that support visual analysis, exploration, and discovery of novel insights. An important consideration during visualization design is the role of human visual perception. How we "see" details in an image can directly impact a viewer's efficiency and effectiveness. This paper surveys research on attention and visual perception, with a specific focus on results that have direct relevance to visualization and visual analytics. We discuss theories of low-level visual perception, then show how these findings form a foundation for more recent work on visual memory and visual attention. We conclude with a brief overview of how knowledge of visual attention and visual memory is being applied in visualization and graphics. We also discuss how challenges in visualization are motivating research in psychophysics.

  14. Computational Representation of Situation Awareness with Graphical Expressions

    Yim, Hobin; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Training is also frequently listed in general applications of SA evaluation. Unfortunately, almost of all methods are either subjective or qualitative, and often time consuming. Since the problems indicate, the core matter of using SA in training is the lack of well-developed or robust measurement tools. Therefore, an intuitive and easy handling SA measurement tool for NPP operators was developed based on the Petri-net and Bayesian inference. Measuring SA using Bayesian theory has been controversy, so sets of simulation training conducted by real NPP operators were video recorded for validation of the tool. There have been many attempts to understand cognitive processes in operators. Describing operator's SA is considered as one of the most plausible ways of such endeavors. Operator's cognitive activities in training can be a barometer of operator's unknown behavior in real situations. Knowing what the operator is thinking is important for better results of upcoming training. To give trainers an intuition that how well operators cope with dynamic situations, the quantitative tool to estimate SA named Corsage was proposed. Corsage gives reasonable clues why the operator behaves in a certain way by showing possible changes in a quantitative and graphical manner. Especially, a graphical comparison between referential information processing flow and operator's real information processing flow can offer trainers a detailed insight. In short, despite the incredulous opinion on measuring human cognition with probability, the result showed a positive view of applicability of Bayesian inference to SA measurement. The next step of the research will be improvement in responsiveness to 'rare but important' information.

  15. Computational Representation of Situation Awareness with Graphical Expressions

    Yim, Hobin; Seong, Poonghyun

    2013-01-01

    Training is also frequently listed in general applications of SA evaluation. Unfortunately, almost of all methods are either subjective or qualitative, and often time consuming. Since the problems indicate, the core matter of using SA in training is the lack of well-developed or robust measurement tools. Therefore, an intuitive and easy handling SA measurement tool for NPP operators was developed based on the Petri-net and Bayesian inference. Measuring SA using Bayesian theory has been controversy, so sets of simulation training conducted by real NPP operators were video recorded for validation of the tool. There have been many attempts to understand cognitive processes in operators. Describing operator's SA is considered as one of the most plausible ways of such endeavors. Operator's cognitive activities in training can be a barometer of operator's unknown behavior in real situations. Knowing what the operator is thinking is important for better results of upcoming training. To give trainers an intuition that how well operators cope with dynamic situations, the quantitative tool to estimate SA named Corsage was proposed. Corsage gives reasonable clues why the operator behaves in a certain way by showing possible changes in a quantitative and graphical manner. Especially, a graphical comparison between referential information processing flow and operator's real information processing flow can offer trainers a detailed insight. In short, despite the incredulous opinion on measuring human cognition with probability, the result showed a positive view of applicability of Bayesian inference to SA measurement. The next step of the research will be improvement in responsiveness to 'rare but important' information

  16. X based interactive computer graphics applications for aerodynamic design and education

    Benson, Thomas J.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    1995-01-01

    Six computer applications packages have been developed to solve a variety of aerodynamic problems in an interactive environment on a single workstation. The packages perform classical one dimensional analysis under the control of a graphical user interface and can be used for preliminary design or educational purposes. The programs were originally developed on a Silicon Graphics workstation and used the GL version of the FORMS library as the graphical user interface. These programs have recently been converted to the XFORMS library of X based graphics widgets and have been tested on SGI, IBM, Sun, HP and PC-Lunix computers. The paper will show results from the new VU-DUCT program as a prime example. VU-DUCT has been developed as an educational package for the study of subsonic open and closed loop wind tunnels.

  17. A Graphical User Interface for the Computational Fluid Dynamics Software OpenFOAM

    Melbø, Henrik Kaald

    2014-01-01

    A graphical user interface for the computational fluid dynamics software OpenFOAM has been constructed. OpenFOAM is a open source and powerful numerical software, but has much to be wanted in the field of user friendliness. In this thesis the basic operation of OpenFOAM will be introduced and the thesis will emerge in a graphical user interface written in PyQt. The graphical user interface will make the use of OpenFOAM simpler, and hopefully make this powerful tool more available for the gene...

  18. Stereotactic biopsy aided by a computer graphics workstation: experience with 200 consecutive cases.

    Ulm, A J; Bova, F J; Friedman, W A

    2001-12-01

    The advent of modern computer technology has made it possible to examine not just the target point, but the entire trajectory in planning for stereotactic biopsies. Two hundred consecutive biopsies were performed by one surgeon, utilizing a computer graphics workstation. The target point, entry point, and complete trajectory were carefully scrutinized and adjusted to minimize potential complications. Pathologically abnormal tissue was obtained in 197 cases (98.5%). There was no mortality in this series. Symptomatic hemorrhages occurred in 4 cases (2%). Computer graphics workstations facilitate safe and effective biopsies in virtually any brain area.

  19. Application of computer graphics in the design of custom orthopedic implants.

    Bechtold, J E

    1986-10-01

    Implementation of newly developed computer modelling techniques and computer graphics displays and software have greatly aided the orthopedic design engineer and physician in creating a custom implant with good anatomic conformity in a short turnaround time. Further advances in computerized design and manufacturing will continue to simplify the development of custom prostheses and enlarge their niche in the joint replacement market.

  20. On the computation of well-structured graphic representations in architectural design

    Achten, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Architects intensively use graphic representations to communicate their design ideas for themselves, between professionals, and others. The design drawing therefore, is an important medium to establish design support by means of computers. In order to make drawings accessible for computers, it is

  1. Effects of Computer Graphics Types and Epistemological Beliefs on Students' Learning of Mathematical Concepts.

    Lin, Chi-Hui

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that determined the implications of computer graphics types and epistemological beliefs with regard to the design of computer-based mathematical concept learning with elementary school students in Taiwan. Discusses the factor structure of the epistemological belief questionnaire, student performance, and students' attitudes…

  2. oRGB: a practical opponent color space for computer graphics.

    Bratkova, Margarita; Boulos, Solomon; Shirley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Designed for computer graphics, oRGB is a new color model based on opponent color theory. It works well for both HSV-style color selection and computational applications such as color transfer. oRGB also enables new applications such as a quantitative cool-to-warm metric, intuitive color manipulation and variations, and simple gamut mapping.

  3. Desktop computer graphics for RMS/payload handling flight design

    Homan, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program, the Multi-Adaptive Drawings, Renderings and Similitudes (MADRAS) program, is discussed. The modeling program, written for a desktop computer system (the Hewlett-Packard 9845/C), is written in BASIC and uses modular construction of objects while generating both wire-frame and hidden-line drawings from any viewpoint. The dimensions and placement of objects are user definable. Once the hidden-line calculations are made for a particular viewpoint, the viewpoint may be rotated in pan, tilt, and roll without further hidden-line calculations. The use and results of this program are discussed.

  4. Graphical Visualization on Computational Simulation Using Shared Memory

    Lima, A B; Correa, Eberth

    2014-01-01

    The Shared Memory technique is a powerful tool for parallelizing computer codes. In particular it can be used to visualize the results ''on the fly'' without stop running the simulation. In this presentation we discuss and show how to use the technique conjugated with a visualization code using openGL

  5. 1 COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND SPECIAL EFFECTS: A CREATIVE ...

    Microsoft

    2012-07-01

    Jul 1, 2012 ... entire digital effects and animation industry are still in their infancy in Nigeria. Igbo .... studios around the country opened for business. .... creativity, ideas, innovation and a coordinated strategic plan” in the industry.12 ... Hundreds of computer animators, model makers, explosives experts, puppeteers and.

  6. Computing Science and Statistics. Volume 24. Graphics and Visualization

    1993-03-01

    Mike West Institute of Statistics & Decision Sciences Duke University, Durham NC 27708, USA Abstract density estimation techniques. With an importance...in J., Sharples , L. D. and Kirby, A. J. press). (1992b) Modelling complexity: applica- Wakefield J. C., Smith, A. F. M., Racine- tions of Gibbs...Math & Stats Box 13040 SFA Riccarton Edinburgh, Scotland EH 14 4AS Nacognoches, TX 75962 mike @cara.ma.hw.ac.uk Allen McIntosh Michael T. Longnecker

  7. Three dimensional reconstruction of fossils with X-ray CT and computer graphics

    Hamada, Takashi; Tateno, Satoko (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences); Suzuki, Naoki

    1991-12-01

    We have developed a method for three dimensional (3D) visualization of fossils such as trilobites and ammonites by non-destructive measurement and computer graphics. The imaging techniques in the medical sciences are applied for fossils by us to have quantitative data analyses on the structural and functional features of some extinct creatures. These methods are composed of a high resolutional X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) and computer graphics. We are able to observe not only outer shape but also inner structure of fossils as a 3D image by this method. Consequently, the shape and volume are measurable on these 3D image quantitatively. In addition to that, it is able to reconstruct an ideal figure from the deformed fossils by graphical treatments of the data. Such a 3D reconstruction method is useful to obtain a new information from the paleontological standpoint. (author).

  8. Identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics based on statistical and textural features.

    Peng, Fei; Li, Jiao-ting; Long, Min

    2015-03-01

    To discriminate the acquisition pipelines of digital images, a novel scheme for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics is proposed based on statistical and textural features. First, the differences between them are investigated from the view of statistics and texture, and 31 dimensions of feature are acquired for identification. Then, LIBSVM is used for the classification. Finally, the experimental results are presented. The results show that it can achieve an identification accuracy of 97.89% for computer-generated graphics, and an identification accuracy of 97.75% for natural images. The analyses also demonstrate the proposed method has excellent performance, compared with some existing methods based only on statistical features or other features. The method has a great potential to be implemented for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Three dimensional reconstruction of fossils with X-ray CT and computer graphics

    Hamada, Takashi; Tateno, Satoko; Suzuki, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a method for three dimensional (3D) visualization of fossils such as trilobites and ammonites by non-destructive measurement and computer graphics. The imaging techniques in the medical sciences are applied for fossils by us to have quantitative data analyses on the structural and functional features of some extinct creatures. These methods are composed of a high resolutional X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) and computer graphics. We are able to observe not only outer shape but also inner structure of fossils as a 3D image by this method. Consequently, the shape and volume are measurable on these 3D image quantitatively. In addition to that, it is able to reconstruct an ideal figure from the deformed fossils by graphical treatments of the data. Such a 3D reconstruction method is useful to obtain a new information from the paleontological standpoint. (author)

  10. Specifying colours for colour vision testing using computer graphics.

    Toufeeq, A

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a novel test of colour vision using a standard personal computer, which is simple and reliable to perform. Twenty healthy individuals with normal colour vision and 10 healthy individuals with a red/green colour defect were tested binocularly at 13 selected points in the CIE (Commission International d'Eclairage, 1931) chromaticity triangle, representing the gamut of a computer monitor, where the x, y coordinates of the primary colour phosphors were known. The mean results from individuals with normal colour vision were compared to those with defective colour vision. Of the 13 points tested, five demonstrated consistently high sensitivity in detecting colour defects. The test may provide a convenient method for classifying colour vision abnormalities.

  11. Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics Brain-Mapping Project

    1988-03-24

    1975-76, one of these brains was hand digitized. It was then reconstructed three dimensionally, using an Evans and Sutherland Picture System 2. This...Yakovlev Collection, we use the Evans and Sutherland Picture System 2 which we have been employing for this purpose for a dozen years. Its virtue is...careful, experimentally designed new protocol (See Figure 20). Most of these heads were imaged with Computed Tomography, thanks to Clint Stiles of Picker

  12. COMPUTER GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION, IN TREBLE ORTHOGONAL PROJECTION, OF A POINT

    SLONOVSCHI Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the stages of understanding and study, by students, of descriptive geometry, the treble orthogonal projection of a point, creates problems in the situations in that one or more descriptive coordinates are zero. Starting from these considerations the authors have created an original computer program which offers to the students the possibility to easily understanding of the way in which a point is represented, in draught, in the treble orthogonal projection whatever which are its values of the descriptive coordinates.

  13. Geometric computations with interval and new robust methods applications in computer graphics, GIS and computational geometry

    Ratschek, H

    2003-01-01

    This undergraduate and postgraduate text will familiarise readers with interval arithmetic and related tools to gain reliable and validated results and logically correct decisions for a variety of geometric computations plus the means for alleviating the effects of the errors. It also considers computations on geometric point-sets, which are neither robust nor reliable in processing with standard methods. The authors provide two effective tools for obtaining correct results: (a) interval arithmetic, and (b) ESSA the new powerful algorithm which improves many geometric computations and makes th

  14. Development of a graphical interface computer code for reactor fuel reloading optimization

    Do Quang Binh; Nguyen Phuoc Lan; Bui Xuan Huy

    2007-01-01

    This report represents the results of the project performed in 2007. The aim of this project is to develop a graphical interface computer code that allows refueling engineers to design fuel reloading patterns for research reactor using simulated graphical model of reactor core. Besides, this code can perform refueling optimization calculations based on genetic algorithms as well as simulated annealing. The computer code was verified based on a sample problem, which relies on operational and experimental data of Dalat research reactor. This code can play a significant role in in-core fuel management practice at nuclear research reactor centers and in training. (author)

  15. A 3D computer graphics approach to brachytherapy planning.

    Weichert, Frank; Wawro, Martin; Wilke, Carsten

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) can significantly reduce the risk of restenosis after interventional treatment of stenotic arteries, if planned and applied correctly. In order to facilitate computer-based IVB planning, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the stenotic artery based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) sequences is desirable. For this purpose, the frames of the IVUS sequence are properly aligned in space, possible gaps inbetween the IVUS frames are filled by interpolation with radial basis functions known from scattered data interpolation. The alignment procedure uses additional information which is obtained from biplane X-ray angiography performed simultaneously during the capturing of the IVUS sequence. After IVUS images and biplane angiography data are acquired from the patient, the vessel-wall borders and the IVUS catheter are detected by an active contour algorithm. Next, the twist (relative orientation) between adjacent IVUS frames is determined by a sequential triangulation method. The absolute orientation of each frame is established by a stochastic analysis based on anatomical landmarks. Finally, the reconstructed 3D vessel model is visualized by methods of combined volume and polygon rendering. The reconstruction is then used for the computation of the radiation-distribution within the tissue, emitted from a beta-radiation source. All these steps are performed during the percutaneous intervention.

  16. Computer Graphic Representation of Remote Environment Using Position Tactile Sensors.

    1981-08-01

    IA(16) AM7 DIMENSION IO )SB(2) ,IBUF(125,IPOT (10),Ms (1O),IPARAM (6) COMMON /DMABUF/ IDtM(2298),ADAT(51,3),BRP(36,3), 1 IcON(90 2),IEBRC(50,2) ,IFC...COMMON /DMABUF/IDUMV(3700) ,M100,3) COMMON /TVEC/ TLX (8),TY(8),TZ(8) Al =M (M2, 1 )-M (ml , I1 A2=M(M2,2)-M(’I1 ,2) A3 =M (M2, 3) -M (,M 13) Bl =lM(M...Institute Dr. M. Montemerlo and State University Thman Factors & Simulation 130 Whittemore Hall Technology, RTE-6 Blacksburg, VA 24061 NASA HQS

  17. [Possibilities of computer graphics simulation in orthopedic surgery].

    Kessler, P; Wiltfang, J; Teschner, M; Girod, B; Neukam, F W

    2000-11-01

    In addition to standard X-rays, photographic documentation, cephalometric and model analysis, a computer-aided, three-dimensional (3D) simulation system has been developed in close cooperation with the Institute of Communications of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. With this simulation system a photorealistic prediction of the expected soft tissue changes can be made. Prerequisites are a 3D reconstruction of the facial skeleton and a 3D laser scan of the face. After data reduction, the two data sets can be matched. Cutting planes enable the transposition of bony segments. The laser scan of the facial surface is combined with the underlying bone via a five-layered soft tissue model to convert bone movements on the soft tissue cover realistically. Further research is necessary to replace the virtual subcutaneous soft tissue model by correct, topographic tissue anatomy.

  18. Interactive virtual simulation using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression surgery.

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Yajima, Naoki; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the authors' advanced presurgical interactive virtual simulation technique using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The authors performed interactive virtual simulation prior to surgery in 26 patients with trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm. The 3D computer graphics models for interactive virtual simulation were composed of the brainstem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, vessels, and skull individually created by the image analysis, including segmentation, surface rendering, and data fusion for data collected by 3-T MRI and 64-row multidetector CT systems. Interactive virtual simulation was performed by employing novel computer-aided design software with manipulation of a haptic device to imitate the surgical procedures of bone drilling and retraction of the cerebellum. The findings were compared with intraoperative findings. In all patients, interactive virtual simulation provided detailed and realistic surgical perspectives, of sufficient quality, representing the lateral suboccipital route. The causes of trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm determined by observing 3D computer graphics models were concordant with those identified intraoperatively in 25 (96%) of 26 patients, which was a significantly higher rate than the 73% concordance rate (concordance in 19 of 26 patients) obtained by review of 2D images only (p computer graphics model provided a realistic environment for performing virtual simulations prior to MVD surgery and enabled us to ascertain complex microsurgical anatomy.

  19. Three dimensional reconstruction of computed tomographic images by computer graphics method

    Kashiwagi, Toru; Kimura, Kazufumi.

    1986-01-01

    A three dimensional computer reconstruction system for CT images has been developed in a commonly used radionuclide data processing system using a computer graphics technique. The three dimensional model was constructed from organ surface information of CT images (slice thickness: 5 or 10 mm). Surface contours of the organs were extracted manually from a set of parallel transverse CT slices in serial order and stored in the computer memory. Interpolation was made between a set of the extracted contours by cubic spline functions, then three dimensional models were reconstructed. The three dimensional images were displayed as a wire-frame and/or solid models on the color CRT. Solid model images were obtained as follows. The organ surface constructed from contours was divided into many triangular patches. The intensity of light to each patch was calculated from the direction of incident light, eye position and the normal to the triangular patch. Firstly, this system was applied to the liver phantom. Reconstructed images of the liver phantom were coincident with the actual object. This system also has been applied to human various organs such as brain, lung, liver, etc. The anatomical organ surface was realistically viewed from any direction. The images made us more easily understand the location and configuration of organs in vivo than original CT images. Furthermore, spacial relationship among organs and/or lesions was clearly obtained by superimposition of wire-frame and/or different colored solid models. Therefore, it is expected that this system is clinically useful for evaluating the patho-morphological changes in broad perspective. (author)

  20. Illustrator's view of more-effective technical communication through computer graphics

    DeGasperi, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The need for dynamic and well-designed presentations is critical for effective technical communication. Computer graphics as an art media tool for the illustrator often surpasses other available media. After the speed of the computer, its capability to produce an increible range of complex color schemes makes it such an invaluable aid. However, it is evident that this medium is frequently not used to its fullest capacity in the field of technical communication. This is because of the lack of well-designed visual presentations. In particular, this situation is often caused by the improper use of color, the lack of contrast, and visual continuity. Improving the state-of-the-art in the area of visual presentations is achievable by including graphic design techniques, a common-reference language, and by improving versatility in graphics programs and software packages

  1. Some research advances in computer graphics that will enhance applications to engineering design

    Allan, J. J., III

    1975-01-01

    Research in man/machine interactions and graphics hardware/software that will enhance applications to engineering design was described. Research aspects of executive systems, command languages, and networking used in the computer applications laboratory are mentioned. Finally, a few areas where little or no research is being done were identified.

  2. Computer Graphics Orientation and Training in a Corporate/Production Environment.

    McDevitt, Marsha Jean

    This master's thesis provides an overview of a computer graphics production environment and proposes a realistic approach to orientation and on-going training for employees working within a fast-paced production schedule. Problems involved in meeting the training needs of employees are briefly discussed in the first chapter, while the second…

  3. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  4. Distinguishing Computer-Generated Graphics from Natural Images Based on Sensor Pattern Noise and Deep Learning

    Ye Yao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer-generated graphics (CGs are images generated by computer software. The rapid development of computer graphics technologies has made it easier to generate photorealistic computer graphics, and these graphics are quite difficult to distinguish from natural images (NIs with the naked eye. In this paper, we propose a method based on sensor pattern noise (SPN and deep learning to distinguish CGs from NIs. Before being fed into our convolutional neural network (CNN-based model, these images—CGs and NIs—are clipped into image patches. Furthermore, three high-pass filters (HPFs are used to remove low-frequency signals, which represent the image content. These filters are also used to reveal the residual signal as well as SPN introduced by the digital camera device. Different from the traditional methods of distinguishing CGs from NIs, the proposed method utilizes a five-layer CNN to classify the input image patches. Based on the classification results of the image patches, we deploy a majority vote scheme to obtain the classification results for the full-size images. The experiments have demonstrated that (1 the proposed method with three HPFs can achieve better results than that with only one HPF or no HPF and that (2 the proposed method with three HPFs achieves 100% accuracy, although the NIs undergo a JPEG compression with a quality factor of 75.

  5. Quantitative study of late injury in the irradiated mouse lung using computer graphics

    Tanabe, Masahiro; Furuse, Takeshi; Rapachietta, D.R.; Kallman, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    It is reported that quantitative histological analysis using current imaging technology and computer graphics is useful in studying late injury in the irradiated lung (with and without added chemotherapy), and that it correlated closely with results of the functional breathing rate test. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig

  6. Role of computer graphics in space telerobotics - Preview and predictive displays

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Venema, Steven; Kim, Won S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computer graphics in space telerobotics research and development work is briefly reviewed and illustrated by specific examples implemented in real time operation. The applications are discussed under the following four major categories: preview displays, predictive displays, sensor data displays, and control system status displays.

  7. Prediction of surgical view of neurovascular decompression using interactive computer graphics.

    Kin, Taichi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kyousuke; Aoki, Shigeki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Saito, Nobuhito

    2009-07-01

    To assess the value of an interactive visualization method for detecting the offending vessels in neurovascular compression syndrome in patients with facial spasm and trigeminal neuralgia. Computer graphics models are created by fusion of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition and magnetic resonance angiography. High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition were performed preoperatively in 17 patients with neurovascular compression syndromes (facial spasm, n = 10; trigeminal neuralgia, n = 7) using a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Computer graphics models were created with computer software and observed interactively for detection of offending vessels by rotation, enlargement, reduction, and retraction on a graphic workstation. Two-dimensional images were reviewed by 2 radiologists blinded to the clinical details, and 2 neurosurgeons predicted the offending vessel with the interactive visualization method before surgery. Predictions from the 2 imaging approaches were compared with surgical findings. The vessels identified during surgery were assumed to be the true offending vessels. Offending vessels were identified correctly in 16 of 17 patients (94%) using the interactive visualization method and in 10 of 17 patients using 2-dimensional images. These data demonstrated a significant difference (P = 0.015 by Fisher's exact method). The interactive visualization method data corresponded well with surgical findings (surgical field, offending vessels, and nerves). Virtual reality 3-dimensional computer graphics using fusion magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition may be helpful for preoperative simulation.

  8. A study of kinematic cues and anticipatory performance in tennis using computational manipulation and computer graphics.

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Kusubori, Seiji; Ishii, Motonobu

    2011-09-01

    Computer graphics of digital human models can be used to display human motions as visual stimuli. This study presents our technique for manipulating human motion with a forward kinematics calculation without violating anatomical constraints. A motion modulation of the upper extremity was conducted by proportionally modulating the anatomical joint angular velocity calculated by motion analysis. The effect of this manipulation was examined in a tennis situation--that is, the receiver's performance of predicting ball direction when viewing a digital model of the server's motion derived by modulating the angular velocities of the forearm or that of the elbow during the forward swing. The results showed that the faster the server's forearm pronated, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the left side of the serve box. In contrast, the faster the server's elbow extended, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the right. This suggests that tennis players are sensitive to the motion modulation of their opponent's racket-arm.

  9. A computer graphics display technique for the examination of aircraft design data

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics technique has been developed for quickly sorting and interpreting large amounts of aerodynamic data. It utilizes a graphic representation rather than numbers. The geometry package represents the vehicle as a set of panels. These panels are ordered in groups of ascending values (e.g., equilibrium temperatures). The groups are then displayed successively on a CRT building up to the complete vehicle. A zoom feature allows for displaying only the panels with values between certain limits. The addition of color allows a one-time display thus eliminating the need for a display build up.

  10. The use of computer graphics to assist in-reactor operations

    Smith, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    A number of complex inspection and repair tasks have been carried out inside Nuclear Electric's gas cooled reactors using multi-link manipulators. The paper describes how computer graphics are integrated into the manipulator system and perform a key role during many phases of a project. Graphics simulation is used to assist with conceptual design, detailed path planning, rehearsals, quality assurance, demonstrations and, critically, as an on-line tool to assist the real-time operation of the equipment whilst performing complex in-reactor tasks. The techniques used are illustrated by recent examples of use to assist the inspection and repair of in-reactor components. (Author)

  11. A new strategic neurosurgical planning tool for brainstem cavernous malformations using interactive computer graphics with multimodal fusion images.

    Kin, Taichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Shojima, Masaaki; Tanaka, Minoru; Ino, Kenji; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the authors used preoperative simulation employing 3D computer graphics (interactive computer graphics) to fuse all imaging data for brainstem cavernous malformations. The authors evaluated whether interactive computer graphics or 2D imaging correlated better with the actual operative field, particularly in identifying a developmental venous anomaly (DVA). The study population consisted of 10 patients scheduled for surgical treatment of brainstem cavernous malformations. Data from preoperative imaging (MRI, CT, and 3D rotational angiography) were automatically fused using a normalized mutual information method, and then reconstructed by a hybrid method combining surface rendering and volume rendering methods. With surface rendering, multimodality and multithreshold techniques for 1 tissue were applied. The completed interactive computer graphics were used for simulation of surgical approaches and assumed surgical fields. Preoperative diagnostic rates for a DVA associated with brainstem cavernous malformation were compared between conventional 2D imaging and interactive computer graphics employing receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The time required for reconstruction of 3D images was 3-6 hours for interactive computer graphics. Observation in interactive mode required approximately 15 minutes. Detailed anatomical information for operative procedures, from the craniotomy to microsurgical operations, could be visualized and simulated three-dimensionally as 1 computer graphic using interactive computer graphics. Virtual surgical views were consistent with actual operative views. This technique was very useful for examining various surgical approaches. Mean (±SEM) area under the ROC curve for rate of DVA diagnosis was significantly better for interactive computer graphics (1.000±0.000) than for 2D imaging (0.766±0.091; pcomputer graphics than with 2D images. Interactive computer graphics was also useful in helping to plan the surgical

  12. The effectiveness of an interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics model for medical education.

    Battulga, Bayanmunkh; Konishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoko; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2012-07-09

    Medical students often have difficulty achieving a conceptual understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy, such as bone alignment, muscles, and complex movements, from 2-dimensional (2D) images. To this end, animated and interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) can provide better visual information to users. In medical fields, research on the advantages of 3DCG in medical education is relatively new. To determine the educational effectiveness of interactive 3DCG. We divided 100 participants (27 men, mean (SD) age 17.9 (0.6) years, and 73 women, mean (SD) age 18.1 (1.1) years) from the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM) into 3DCG (n = 50) and textbook-only (control) (n = 50) groups. The control group used a textbook and 2D images, while the 3DCG group was trained to use the interactive 3DCG shoulder model in addition to a textbook. We conducted a questionnaire survey via an encrypted satellite network between HSUM and Tokushima University. The questionnaire was scored on a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree (score 1) to strongly agree (score 5). Interactive 3DCG was effective in undergraduate medical education. Specifically, there was a significant difference in mean (SD) scores between the 3DCG and control groups in their response to questionnaire items regarding content (4.26 (0.69) vs 3.85 (0.68), P = .001) and teaching methods (4.33 (0.65) vs 3.74 (0.79), P < .001), but no significant difference in the Web category. Participants also provided meaningful comments on the advantages of interactive 3DCG. Interactive 3DCG materials have positive effects on medical education when properly integrated into conventional education. In particular, our results suggest that interactive 3DCG is more efficient than textbooks alone in medical education and can motivate students to understand complex anatomical structures.

  13. Mathematics of shape description a morphological approach to image processing and computer graphics

    Ghosh, Pijush K

    2009-01-01

    Image processing problems are often not well defined because real images are contaminated with noise and other uncertain factors. In Mathematics of Shape Description, the authors take a mathematical approach to address these problems using the morphological and set-theoretic approach to image processing and computer graphics by presenting a simple shape model using two basic shape operators called Minkowski addition and decomposition. This book is ideal for professional researchers and engineers in Information Processing, Image Measurement, Shape Description, Shape Representation and Computer Graphics. Post-graduate and advanced undergraduate students in pure and applied mathematics, computer sciences, robotics and engineering will also benefit from this book.  Key FeaturesExplains the fundamental and advanced relationships between algebraic system and shape description through the set-theoretic approachPromotes interaction of image processing geochronology and mathematics in the field of algebraic geometryP...

  14. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  15. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions

    CAVALCANTI Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  16. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions.

    Cavalcanti, M G; Ruprecht, A; Vannier, M W

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT) reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  17. Lighting and Graphics Effects for Real-Time Visualization of the Universe

    Ekelin, Jonna; Fernqvist, Lena

    2006-01-01

    This work has been performed at SCISS AB, a company situated in Norrk öping and whose business lies in developing platforms for graphics visualization. SCISS's main software product, UniView, is a fully interactive system allowing the user to explore all parts of the observable universe, from rocks on the surface of a planet to galaxies and quasars in outer space. It is used mainly for astronomical and scientic presentation. The aim of this work has been to enhance the visual appearance of li...

  18. Vanderbilt University: Campus Computing Environment.

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Despite the decentralized nature of computing at Vanderbilt, there is significant evidence of cooperation and use of each other's resources by the various computing entities. Planning for computing occurs in every school and department. Caravan, a campus-wide network, is described. (MLW)

  19. A computer graphics based model for scattering from objects of arbitrary shapes in the optical region

    Goel, Narendra S.; Rozehnal, Ivan; Thompson, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A computer-graphics-based model, named DIANA, is presented for generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating bidirectional reflectances and scattering from them, in the visible and infrared region. The computer generation is based on a modified Lindenmayer system approach which makes it possible to generate objects of arbitrary shapes and to simulate their growth, dynamics, and movement. Rendering techniques are used to display an object on a computer screen with appropriate shading and shadowing and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants.

  20. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. III: graphical simulation and monitoring of treatment delivery

    Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Safe and efficient delivery of radiotherapy using computer-controlled machines requires new procedures to design and verify the actual delivery of these treatments. Graphical simulation and monitoring techniques for treatment delivery have been developed for this purpose. Methods and Materials: A graphics-based simulator of the treatment machine and a set of procedures for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts are used to simulate machine motions, detect collisions, and monitor machine positions during treatment. The treatment delivery simulator is composed of four components: a three-dimensional dynamic model of the treatment machine; a motion simulation and collision detection algorithm, user-interface widgets that mimic the treatment machine's control and readout devices; and an icon-based interface for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts. These components are used in a stand-alone fashion for interactive treatment delivery planning and integrated with a machine control system for treatment implementation and monitoring. Results: A graphics-based treatment delivery simulator and a set of procedures for planning and monitoring computer-controlled treatment delivery have been developed and implemented as part of a comprehensive computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. To date, these techniques have been used to design and help monitor computer-controlled treatments on a radiotherapy machine for more than 200 patients. Examples using these techniques for treatment delivery planning and on-line monitoring of machine motions during therapy are described. Conclusion: A system that provides interactive graphics-based tools for defining the sequence of machine motions, simulating treatment delivery including collision detection, and presenting the therapists with continual visual feedback from the treatment machine has been successfully implemented for routine clinical use as part of an overall system for computer

  1. Applications of computer-graphics animation for motion-perception research

    Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using computer animated stimuli in studying motion perception are presented and discussed. Most current programs of motion perception research could not be pursued without the use of computer graphics animation. Computer generated displays afford latitudes of freedom and control that are almost impossible to attain through conventional methods. There are, however, limitations to this presentational medium. At present, computer generated displays present simplified approximations of the dynamics in natural events. Very little is known about how the differences between natural events and computer simulations influence perceptual processing. In practice, the differences are assumed to be irrelevant to the questions under study, and that findings with computer generated stimuli will generalize to natural events.

  2. On line and on paper: Visual representations, visual culture, and computer graphics in design engineering

    Henderson, K.

    1991-01-01

    The research presented examines the visual communication practices of engineers and the impact of the implementation of computer graphics on their visual culture. The study is based on participant observation of day-to-day practices in two contemporary industrial settings among engineers engaged in the actual process of designing new pieces of technology. In addition, over thirty interviews were conducted at other industrial sites to confirm that the findings were not an isolated phenomenon. The data show that there is no one best way' to use a computer graphics system, but rather that use is site specific and firms and individuals engage in mixed paper and electronic practices as well as differential use of electronic options to get the job done. This research illustrates that rigid models which assume a linear theory of innovation, projecting a straight-forward process from idea, to drawing, to prototype, to production, are seriously misguided.

  3. Performance evaluation of throughput computing workloads using multi-core processors and graphics processors

    Dave, Gaurav P.; Sureshkumar, N.; Blessy Trencia Lincy, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    Current trend in processor manufacturing focuses on multi-core architectures rather than increasing the clock speed for performance improvement. Graphic processors have become as commodity hardware for providing fast co-processing in computer systems. Developments in IoT, social networking web applications, big data created huge demand for data processing activities and such kind of throughput intensive applications inherently contains data level parallelism which is more suited for SIMD architecture based GPU. This paper reviews the architectural aspects of multi/many core processors and graphics processors. Different case studies are taken to compare performance of throughput computing applications using shared memory programming in OpenMP and CUDA API based programming.

  4. Recent advances in transient imaging: A computer graphics and vision perspective

    Adrian Jarabo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient imaging has recently made a huge impact in the computer graphics and computer vision fields. By capturing, reconstructing, or simulating light transport at extreme temporal resolutions, researchers have proposed novel techniques to show movies of light in motion, see around corners, detect objects in highly-scattering media, or infer material properties from a distance, to name a few. The key idea is to leverage the wealth of information in the temporal domain at the pico or nanosecond resolution, information usually lost during the capture-time temporal integration. This paper presents recent advances in this field of transient imaging from a graphics and vision perspective, including capture techniques, analysis, applications and simulation. Keywords: Transient imaging, Ultrafast imaging, Time-of-flight

  5. Future Directions in Computer Graphics and Visualization: From CG&A's Editorial Board

    Encarnacao, L. M.; Chuang, Yung-Yu; Stork, Andre; Kasik, David; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Avila, Lisa; Kohlhammer, Jorn; LaViola, Joseph; Tory, Melanie; Dill, John; Domik, Gitta; Owen, G. Scott; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-01

    With many new members joining the CG&A editorial board over the past year, and with a renewed commitment to not only document the state of the art in computer graphics research and applications but to anticipate and where possible foster future areas of scientific discourse and industrial practice, we asked editorial and advisory council members about where they see their fields of expertise going. The answers compiled here aren’t meant to be all encompassing or deterministic when it comes to the opportunities computer graphics and interactive visualization hold for the future. Instead, we aim to accomplish two things: give a more in-depth introduction of members of the editorial board to the CG&A readership and encourage cross-disciplinary discourse toward approaching, complementing, or disputing the visions laid out in this compilation.

  6. Hypertext and three-dimensional computer graphics in an all digital PC-based CAI workstation.

    Schwarz, D. L.; Wind, G. G.

    1991-01-01

    In the past several years there has been an enormous increase in the number of computer-assisted instructional (CAI) applications. Many medical educators and physicians have recognized the power and utility of hypertext. Some developers have incorporated simple diagrams, scanned monochrome graphics or still frame photographs from a laser disc or CD-ROM into their hypertext applications. These technologies have greatly increased the role of the microcomputer in education and training. There still remain numerous applications for these tools which are yet to be explored. One of these exciting areas involves the use of three-dimensional computer graphics. An all digital platform increases application portability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1807767

  7. Three-dimensional range data compression using computer graphics rendering pipeline.

    Zhang, Song

    2012-06-20

    This paper presents the idea of naturally encoding three-dimensional (3D) range data into regular two-dimensional (2D) images utilizing computer graphics rendering pipeline. The computer graphics pipeline provides a means to sample 3D geometry data into regular 2D images, and also to retrieve the depth information for each sampled pixel. The depth information for each pixel is further encoded into red, green, and blue color channels of regular 2D images. The 2D images can further be compressed with existing 2D image compression techniques. By this novel means, 3D geometry data obtained by 3D range scanners can be instantaneously compressed into 2D images, providing a novel way of storing 3D range data into its 2D counterparts. We will present experimental results to verify the performance of this proposed technique.

  8. Computer Application Systems at the University.

    Bazewicz, Mieczyslaw

    1979-01-01

    The results of the WASC Project at the Technical University of Wroclaw have confirmed the possibility of constructing informatic systems based on the recognized size and specifics of user's needs (needs of the university) and provided some solutions to the problem of collaboration of computer systems at remote universities. (Author/CMV)

  9. Three dimensional analysis of coelacanth body structure by computer graphics and X-ray CT images

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hamada, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional imaging processes were applied for the structural and functional analyses of the modern coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae). Visualization of the obtained images is performed with computer graphics on the basis of serial images by an X-ray CT scanning method. Reconstruction of three dimensional images of the body structure of coelacanth using the volume rendering and surface rendering methods provides us various information about external and internal shapes of this exquisite fish. (author)

  10. Mental vision: a computer graphics platform for virtual reality, science and education

    Peternier, Achille

    2009-01-01

    Despite the wide amount of computer graphics frameworks and solutions available for virtual reality, it is still difficult to find a perfect one fitting at the same time the many constraints of research and educational contexts. Advanced functionalities and user-friendliness, rendering speed and portability, or scalability and image quality are opposite characteristics rarely found into a same approach. Furthermore, fruition of virtual reality specific devices like CAVEs or wearable systems i...

  11. Computer graphics testbed to simulate and test vision systems for space applications

    Cheatham, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial intelligence concepts are applied to robotics. Artificial neural networks, expert systems and laser imaging techniques for autonomous space robots are being studied. A computer graphics laser range finder simulator developed by Wu has been used by Weiland and Norwood to study use of artificial neural networks for path planning and obstacle avoidance. Interest is expressed in applications of CLIPS, NETS, and Fuzzy Control. These applications are applied to robot navigation.

  12. The use of 3D computer graphics in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal vascular malformations.

    Takai, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Iijima, Akira; Shojima, Masaaki; Nishido, Hajime; Saito, Nobuhito

    2011-12-01

    Digital subtraction (DS) angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Recently, multidetectorrow spiral CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiography have been introduced as screening examinations before DS angiography. These methods, however, do not always determine the accurate location of an arteriovenous shunt because the resulting images lack information about the spinal cord or the dura mater. Between April 2009 and December 2010, 13 patients underwent imaging evaluations for spinal vascular malformations at the authors' university hospital. This group included 8 patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), 3 with perimedullary AVFs, and 2 with intramedullary arteriovenous malformations. Using data from these patients, the authors attempted to develop 3D computer graphics (CG) based upon the fusion of 3D rotational angiography and postmyelographic CT. They subsequently verified the accuracy of this imaging method. Ten of these 13 patients underwent surgical treatment for their lesions (11 AVFs), and for these 11 lesions the authors compared the diagnoses obtained using 3D CG with those obtained using conventional DS angiography. In all 13 cases, 3D CG images of the spinal lesions were successfully developed using the patients' actual data. Four (36%) of 11 AVFs were correctly identified using DS angiography, whereas 10 (91%) were correctly identified using 3D CG. Results from 3D CG of spinal AVFs corresponded well with operative findings, and 3D CG was significantly better than conventional DS angiography at predicting AVF location (p = 0.024, Fisher exact test). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case series in which 3D CG of spinal vascular malformations was used to provide simultaneous, stereoscopic visualization of the spinal vascular system, spinal cord, dura mater, and bone. The 3D CG method provides precise visual images for the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions.

  13. R graphics

    Murrell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    R is revolutionizing the world of statistical computing. Powerful, flexible, and best of all free, R is now the program of choice for tens of thousands of statisticians. Destined to become an instant classic, R Graphics presents the first complete, authoritative exposition on the R graphical system. Paul Murrell, widely known as the leading expert on R graphics, has developed an in-depth resource that takes nothing for granted and helps both neophyte and seasoned users master the intricacies of R graphics. After an introductory overview of R graphics facilities, the presentation first focuses

  14. A Parallel Implementation of a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Method on Graphics Hardware Using the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    Wong Unhong; Wong Honcheng; Tang Zesheng

    2010-01-01

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), which is a class of meshfree particle methods (MPMs), has a wide range of applications from micro-scale to macro-scale as well as from discrete systems to continuum systems. Graphics hardware, originally designed for computer graphics, now provide unprecedented computational power for scientific computation. Particle system needs a huge amount of computations in physical simulation. In this paper, an efficient parallel implementation of a SPH method on graphics hardware using the Compute Unified Device Architecture is developed for fluid simulation. Comparing to the corresponding CPU implementation, our experimental results show that the new approach allows significant speedups of fluid simulation through handling huge amount of computations in parallel on graphics hardware.

  15. Computation of large covariance matrices by SAMMY on graphical processing units and multicore CPUs

    Arbanas, G.; Dunn, M.E.; Wiarda, D., E-mail: arbanasg@ornl.gov, E-mail: dunnme@ornl.gov, E-mail: wiardada@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Computational power of Graphical Processing Units and multicore CPUs was harnessed by the nuclear data evaluation code SAMMY to speed up computations of large Resonance Parameter Covariance Matrices (RPCMs). This was accomplished by linking SAMMY to vendor-optimized implementations of the matrix-matrix multiplication subroutine of the Basic Linear Algebra Library to compute the most time-consuming step. The {sup 235}U RPCM computed previously using a triple-nested loop was re-computed using the NVIDIA implementation of the subroutine on a single Tesla Fermi Graphical Processing Unit, and also using the Intel's Math Kernel Library implementation on two different multicore CPU systems. A multiplication of two matrices of dimensions 16,000×20,000 that had previously taken days, took approximately one minute on the GPU. Comparable performance was achieved on a dual six-core CPU system. The magnitude of the speed-up suggests that these, or similar, combinations of hardware and libraries may be useful for large matrix operations in SAMMY. Uniform interfaces of standard linear algebra libraries make them a promising candidate for a programming framework of a new generation of SAMMY for the emerging heterogeneous computing platforms. (author)

  16. Computation of large covariance matrices by SAMMY on graphical processing units and multicore CPUs

    Arbanas, G.; Dunn, M.E.; Wiarda, D.

    2011-01-01

    Computational power of Graphical Processing Units and multicore CPUs was harnessed by the nuclear data evaluation code SAMMY to speed up computations of large Resonance Parameter Covariance Matrices (RPCMs). This was accomplished by linking SAMMY to vendor-optimized implementations of the matrix-matrix multiplication subroutine of the Basic Linear Algebra Library to compute the most time-consuming step. The 235 U RPCM computed previously using a triple-nested loop was re-computed using the NVIDIA implementation of the subroutine on a single Tesla Fermi Graphical Processing Unit, and also using the Intel's Math Kernel Library implementation on two different multicore CPU systems. A multiplication of two matrices of dimensions 16,000×20,000 that had previously taken days, took approximately one minute on the GPU. Comparable performance was achieved on a dual six-core CPU system. The magnitude of the speed-up suggests that these, or similar, combinations of hardware and libraries may be useful for large matrix operations in SAMMY. Uniform interfaces of standard linear algebra libraries make them a promising candidate for a programming framework of a new generation of SAMMY for the emerging heterogeneous computing platforms. (author)

  17. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  18. PHREEQCI; a graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC

    Charlton, Scott R.; Macklin, Clifford L.; Parkhurst, David L.

    1997-01-01

    PhreeqcI is a Windows-based graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC. PhreeqcI provides the capability to generate and edit input data files, run simulations, and view text files containing simulation results, all within the framework of a single interface. PHREEQC is a multipurpose geochemical program that can perform speciation, inverse, reaction-path, and 1D advective reaction-transport modeling. Interactive access to all of the capabilities of PHREEQC is available with PhreeqcI. The interface is written in Visual Basic and will run on personal computers under the Windows(3.1), Windows95, and WindowsNT operating systems.

  19. Nuclear plant operations, maintenance, and configuration management using three-dimensional computer graphics and databases

    Tutos, N.C.; Reinschmidt, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation has developed the Plant Digital Model concept as a new approach to Configuration Mnagement of nuclear power plants. The Plant Digital Model development is a step-by-step process, based on existing manual procedures and computer applications, and is fully controllable by the plant managers and engineers. The Plant Digital Model is based on IBM computer graphics and relational database management systems, and therefore can be easily integrated with existing plant databases and corporate management-information systems

  20. The effects of 3D interactive animated graphics on student learning and attitudes in computer-based instruction

    Moon, Hye Sun

    Visuals are most extensively used as instructional tools in education to present spatially-based information. Recent computer technology allows the generation of 3D animated visuals to extend the presentation in computer-based instruction. Animated visuals in 3D representation not only possess motivational value that promotes positive attitudes toward instruction but also facilitate learning when the subject matter requires dynamic motion and 3D visual cue. In this study, three questions are explored: (1) how 3D graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with 2D graphics; (2) how animated graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with static graphics; and (3) whether the use of 3D graphics, when they are supported by interactive animation, is the most effective visual cues to improve learning and to develop positive attitudes. A total of 145 eighth-grade students participated in a 2 x 2 factorial design study. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of four computer-based instructions: 2D static; 2D animated; 3D static; and 3D animated. The results indicated that: (1) Students in the 3D graphic condition exhibited more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the 2D graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of 3D graphic condition and that of 2D graphic condition. However, students in the 3D graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the 2D graphic condition. (2) Students in the animated graphic condition exhibited slightly more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the static graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of animated graphic condition and that of static graphic condition. However, students in the animated graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the static graphic condition. (3) Students in the 3D animated graphic condition

  1. Universal quantum computation with metaplectic anyons

    Cui, Shawn X., E-mail: xingshan@math.ucsb.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wang, Zhenghan, E-mail: zhenghwa@math.ucsb.edu, E-mail: zhenghwa@microsoft.com [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Microsoft Research Station Q, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We show that braidings of the metaplectic anyons X{sub ϵ} in SO(3){sub 2} = SU(2){sub 4} with their total charge equal to the metaplectic mode Y supplemented with projective measurements of the total charge of two metaplectic anyons are universal for quantum computation. We conjecture that similar universal anyonic computing models can be constructed for all metaplectic anyon systems SO(p){sub 2} for any odd prime p ≥ 5. In order to prove universality, we find new conceptually appealing universal gate sets for qutrits and qupits.

  2. Numerical cosmology: Revealing the universe using computers

    Centrella, J.; Matzner, R.A.; Tolman, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors present two research projects which study the evolution of different periods in the history of the universe using numerical simulations. The first investigates the synthesis of light elements in an inhomogeneous early universe dominated by shocks and non-linear gravitational waves. The second follows the evolution of large scale structures during the later history of the universe and calculates their effect on the 3K background radiation. Their simulations are carried out using modern supercomputers and make heavy use of multidimensional color graphics, including film to elucidate the results. Both projects provide the authors the opportunity to do experiments in cosmology and assess their results against fundamental cosmological observations

  3. Learning Universal Computations with Spikes

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Uhlmann, Marvin; Kappen, Hilbert J.; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Providing the neurobiological basis of information processing in higher animals, spiking neural networks must be able to learn a variety of complicated computations, including the generation of appropriate, possibly delayed reactions to inputs and the self-sustained generation of complex activity patterns, e.g. for locomotion. Many such computations require previous building of intrinsic world models. Here we show how spiking neural networks may solve these different tasks. Firstly, we derive constraints under which classes of spiking neural networks lend themselves to substrates of powerful general purpose computing. The networks contain dendritic or synaptic nonlinearities and have a constrained connectivity. We then combine such networks with learning rules for outputs or recurrent connections. We show that this allows to learn even difficult benchmark tasks such as the self-sustained generation of desired low-dimensional chaotic dynamics or memory-dependent computations. Furthermore, we show how spiking networks can build models of external world systems and use the acquired knowledge to control them. PMID:27309381

  4. Structural zooming research and development of an interactive computer graphical interface for stress analysis of cracks

    Gerstle, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Engineering problems sometimes involve the numerical solution of boundary value problems over domains containing geometric feature with widely varying scales. Often, a detailed solution is required at one or more of these features. Small details in large structures may have profound effects upon global performance. Conversely, large-scale conditions may effect local performance. Many man-hours and CPU-hours are currently spent in modeling such problems. With the structural zooming technique, it is now possible to design an integrated program which allows the analyst to interactively focus upon a small region of interest, to modify the local geometry, and then to obtain highly accurate responses in that region which reflect both the properties of the overall structure and the local detail. A boundary integral equation analysis program, called BOAST, was recently developed for the stress analysis of cracks. This program can accurately analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture mechanics problems with far less computational effort than existing finite element codes. An interactive computer graphical interface to BOAST was written. The graphical interface would have several requirements: it would be menu-driven, with mouse input; all aspects of input would be entered graphically; the results of a BOAST analysis would be displayed pictorially but also the user would be able to probe interactively to get numerical values of displacement and stress at desired locations within the analysis domain; the entire procedure would be integrated into a single, easy to use package; and it would be written using calls to the graphic package called HOOPS. The program is nearing completion. All of the preprocessing features are working satisfactorily and were debugged. The postprocessing features are under development, and rudimentary postprocessing should be available by the end of the summer. The program was developed and run on a VAX workstation, and must be ported to the SUN

  5. High performance graphics processor based computed tomography reconstruction algorithms for nuclear and other large scale applications.

    Jimenez, Edward S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Orr, Laurel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a fast computed tomography (CT) reconstruction algorithm based on graphics processing units (GPU) that achieves significant improvement over traditional central processing unit (CPU) based implementations. The main challenge in developing a CT algorithm that is capable of handling very large datasets is parallelizing the algorithm in such a way that data transfer does not hinder performance of the reconstruction algorithm. General Purpose Graphics Processing (GPGPU) is a new technology that the Science and Technology (S&T) community is starting to adopt in many fields where CPU-based computing is the norm. GPGPU programming requires a new approach to algorithm development that utilizes massively multi-threaded environments. Multi-threaded algorithms in general are difficult to optimize since performance bottlenecks occur that are non-existent in single-threaded algorithms such as memory latencies. If an efficient GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm can be developed; computational times could be improved by a factor of 20. Additionally, cost benefits will be realized as commodity graphics hardware could potentially replace expensive supercomputers and high-end workstations. This project will take advantage of the CUDA programming environment and attempt to parallelize the task in such a way that multiple slices of the reconstruction volume are computed simultaneously. This work will also take advantage of the GPU memory by utilizing asynchronous memory transfers, GPU texture memory, and (when possible) pinned host memory so that the memory transfer bottleneck inherent to GPGPU is amortized. Additionally, this work will take advantage of GPU-specific hardware (i.e. fast texture memory, pixel-pipelines, hardware interpolators, and varying memory hierarchy) that will allow for additional performance improvements.

  6. Construction of a universal quantum computer

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, M. A.; Smekal, Lorenz von

    2009-01-01

    We construct a universal quantum computer following Deutsch's original proposal of a universal quantum Turing machine (UQTM). Like Deutsch's UQTM, our machine can emulate any classical Turing machine and can execute any algorithm that can be implemented in the quantum gate array framework but under the control of a quantum program, and hence is universal. We present the architecture of the machine, which consists of a memory tape and a processor and describe the observables that comprise the registers of the processor and the instruction set, which includes a set of operations that can approximate any unitary operation to any desired accuracy and hence is quantum computationally universal. We present the unitary evolution operators that act on the machine to achieve universal computation and discuss each of them in detail and specify and discuss explicit program halting and concatenation schemes. We define and describe a set of primitive programs in order to demonstrate the universal nature of the machine. These primitive programs facilitate the implementation of more complex algorithms and we demonstrate their use by presenting a program that computes the NAND function, thereby also showing that the machine can compute any classically computable function.

  7. Understanding the Graphical Challenges Faced by Vision-Impaired Students in Australian Universities

    Butler, Matthew; Holloway, Leona; Marriott, Kim; Goncu, Cagatay

    2017-01-01

    Information graphics such as plots, maps, plans, charts, tables and diagrams form an integral part of the student learning experience in many disciplines. However, for a vision impaired student accessing such graphical materials can be problematic. This research seeks to understand the current state of accessible graphics provision in Australian…

  8. Positioning graphical objects on computer screens: a three-phase model.

    Pastel, Robert

    2011-02-01

    This experiment identifies and models phases during the positioning of graphical objects (called cursors in this article) on computer displays. The human computer-interaction community has traditionally used Fitts' law to model selection in graphical user interfaces, whereas human factors experiments have found the single-component Fitts' law inadequate to model positioning of real objects. Participants (N=145) repeatedly positioned variably sized square cursors within variably sized rectangular targets using computer mice. The times for the cursor to just touch the target, for the cursor to enter the target, and for participants to indicate positioning completion were observed. The positioning tolerances were varied from very precise and difficult to imprecise and easy. The time for the cursor to touch the target was proportional to the initial cursor-target distance. The time for the cursor to completely enter the target after touching was proportional to the logarithms of cursor size divided by target tolerances. The time for participants to indicate positioning after entering was inversely proportional to the tolerance. A three-phase model defined by regions--distant, proximate, and inside the target--was proposed and could model the positioning tasks. The three-phase model provides a framework for ergonomists to evaluate new positioning techniques and can explain their deficiencies. The model provides a means to analyze tasks and enhance interaction during positioning.

  9. Universal blind quantum computation for hybrid system

    Huang, He-Liang; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    As progress on the development of building quantum computer continues to advance, first-generation practical quantum computers will be available for ordinary users in the cloud style similar to IBM's Quantum Experience nowadays. Clients can remotely access the quantum servers using some simple devices. In such a situation, it is of prime importance to keep the security of the client's information. Blind quantum computation protocols enable a client with limited quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to a quantum server without leaking any privacy. To date, blind quantum computation has been considered only for an individual quantum system. However, practical universal quantum computer is likely to be a hybrid system. Here, we take the first step to construct a framework of blind quantum computation for the hybrid system, which provides a more feasible way for scalable blind quantum computation.

  10. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  11. Seismic-load-induced human errors and countermeasures using computer graphics in plant-operator communication

    Hara, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    This paper remarks the importance of seismic load-induced human errors in plant operation by delineating the characteristics of the task performance of human beings under seismic loads. It focuses on man-machine communication via multidimensional data like that conventionally displayed on large panels in a plant control room. It demonstrates a countermeasure to human errors using a computer graphics technique that conveys the global state of the plant operation to operators through cartoon-like, colored graphs in the form of faces that, with different facial expressions, show the plant safety status. (orig.)

  12. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    Steane, A. M.

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to "perform many computations simultaneously" except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of parallel universes. Rather, entanglement makes available types of computation processes which, while not exponentially larger than classical ones, are unavailable to classical systems. The essence of quantum computation is that it uses entanglement to generate and manipulate a physical representation of the correlations between logical entities, without the need to completely represent the logical entities themselves.

  13. Computer graphics of SEM images facilitate recognition of chromosome position in isolated human metaphase plates.

    Hodge, L D; Barrett, J M; Welter, D A

    1995-04-01

    There is general agreement that at the time of mitosis chromosomes occupy precise positions and that these positions likely affect subsequent nuclear function in interphase. However, before such ideas can be investigated in human cells, it is necessary to determine first the precise position of each chromosome with regard to its neighbors. It has occurred to us that stereo images, produced by scanning electron microscopy, of isolated metaphase plates could form the basis whereby these positions could be ascertained. In this paper we describe a computer graphic technique that permits us to keep track of individual chromosomes in a metaphase plate and to compare chromosome positions in different metaphase plates. Moreover, the computer graphics provide permanent, easily manipulated, rapid recall of stored chromosome profiles. These advantages are demonstrated by a comparison of the relative position of group A-specific and groups D- and G-specific chromosomes to the full complement of chromosomes in metaphase plates isolated from a nearly triploid human-derived cell (HeLa S3) to a hypo-diploid human fetal lung cell.

  14. Really Large Scale Computer Graphic Projection Using Lasers and Laser Substitutes

    Rother, Paul

    1989-07-01

    This paper reflects on past laser projects to display vector scanned computer graphic images onto very large and irregular surfaces. Since the availability of microprocessors and high powered visible lasers, very large scale computer graphics projection have become a reality. Due to the independence from a focusing lens, lasers easily project onto distant and irregular surfaces and have been used for amusement parks, theatrical performances, concert performances, industrial trade shows and dance clubs. Lasers have been used to project onto mountains, buildings, 360° globes, clouds of smoke and water. These methods have proven successful in installations at: Epcot Theme Park in Florida; Stone Mountain Park in Georgia; 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles; hundreds of Corporate trade shows and thousands of musical performances. Using new ColorRayTM technology, the use of costly and fragile lasers is no longer necessary. Utilizing fiber optic technology, the functionality of lasers can be duplicated for new and exciting projection possibilities. The use of ColorRayTM technology has enjoyed worldwide recognition in conjunction with Pink Floyd and George Michaels' world wide tours.

  15. Shaded computer graphic techniques for visualizing and interpreting analytic fluid flow models

    Parke, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical models which predict the behavior of fluid flow in different experiments are simulated using digital computers. The simulations predict values of parameters of the fluid flow (pressure, temperature and velocity vector) at many points in the fluid. Visualization of the spatial variation in the value of these parameters is important to comprehend and check the data generated, to identify the regions of interest in the flow, and for effectively communicating information about the flow to others. The state of the art imaging techniques developed in the field of three dimensional shaded computer graphics is applied to visualization of fluid flow. Use of an imaging technique known as 'SCAN' for visualizing fluid flow, is studied and the results are presented.

  16. CREW CHIEF: A computer graphics simulation of an aircraft maintenance technician

    Aume, Nilss M.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 35 percent of the lifetime cost of a military system is spent for maintenance. Excessive repair time is caused by not considering maintenance during design. Problems are usually discovered only after a mock-up has been constructed, when it is too late to make changes. CREW CHIEF will reduce the incidence of such problems by catching design defects in the early design stages. CREW CHIEF is a computer graphic human factors evaluation system interfaced to commercial computer aided design (CAD) systems. It creates a three dimensional man model, either male or female, large or small, with various types of clothing and in several postures. It can perform analyses for physical accessibility, strength capability with tools, visual access, and strength capability for manual materials handling. The designer would produce a drawing on his CAD system and introduce CREW CHIEF in it. CREW CHIEF's analyses would then indicate places where problems could be foreseen and corrected before the design is frozen.

  17. REDUCED DATA FOR CURVE MODELING – APPLICATIONS IN GRAPHICS, COMPUTER VISION AND PHYSICS

    Małgorzata Janik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the problem of modeling curves in Rn via interpolation without a priori specified interpolation knots. We discuss two approaches to estimate the missing knots for non-parametric data (i.e. collection of points. The first approach (uniform evaluation is based on blind guess in which knots are chosen uniformly. The second approach (cumulative chord parameterization incorporates the geometry of the distribution of data points. More precisely, the difference is equal to the Euclidean distance between data points qi+1 and qi. The second method partially compensates for the loss of the information carried by the reduced data. We also present the application of the above schemes for fitting non-parametric data in computer graphics (light-source motion rendering, in computer vision (image segmentation and in physics (high velocity particles trajectory modeling. Though experiments are conducted for points in R2 and R3 the entire method is equally applicable in Rn.

  18. Difficulties of Student Teachers in the Engineering Graphics and Design Course at a South African University: Snapshot on Sectional Drawing

    Makgato, Moses; Khoza, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    Engineering Graphics and Design (EGD) is a university course that teaches a medium of communication in the form of drawings. This study was undertaken to investigate factors associated with the difficulties experienced by student teachers in the sectional drawing component of the EGD course. Purposive sampling was used to select 40 students…

  19. Development of point Kernel radiation shielding analysis computer program implementing recent nuclear data and graphic user interfaces

    Kang, S.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for safe and efficient use of radiation and radioactive work activity along with shielding analysis as a result the number of nuclear and conventional facilities using radiation or radioisotope rises. Most Korean industries and research institutes including Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) have been using foreign computer programs for radiation shielding analysis. Korean nuclear regulations have introduced new laws regarding the dose limits and radiological guides as prescribed in the ICRP 60. Thus, the radiation facilities should be designed and operated to comply with these new regulations. In addition, the previous point kernel shielding computer code utilizes antiquated nuclear data (mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc) which were developed in 1950∼1960. Subsequently, the various nuclear data such mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc. have been updated during the past few decades. KOPEC's strategic directive is to become a self-sufficient and independent nuclear design technology company, thus KOPEC decided to develop a new radiation shielding computer program that included the latest regulatory requirements and updated nuclear data. This new code was designed by KOPEC with developmental cooperation with Hanyang University, Department of Nuclear Engineering. VisualShield is designed with a graphical user interface to allow even users unfamiliar to radiation shielding theory to proficiently prepare input data sets and analyzing output results

  20. Development of the operator training system using computer graphics. Pt. 2. Operator behavior CG system and its applications

    Sasou, Kunihide; Ebisu, Mitsuhiro; Takano, Kenichi; Watabe, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    In training, it has been important to show good performance of operators dealing with abnormal operating; condition simulated by a training simulator. Video-taping of the scenario-based performance by instructors of a training center is the most common way. However, it is difficult for the experienced instructors to show good performance due to the stress of being video-taped. Therefore, the authors developed a system named Operator Behavior Computer Graphic System (OBCGS) to computer-graphically show the behavior of operators. The input data of this system are data on operation, watching, walking and utterances with time, objects of operation and watching, contents of their behavior, etc. The system temporally uses the output data of Man Machine Simulator developed by CRIEPI. OBCGS has 3 kinds of user interfaces. The first one computer-graphically shows 3 operators and one shift supervisor behaving in the control room from a bird's eye viewpoint. The second one has multi windows to show details of computer graphics of operators and control panels. The last one shows the history of operations, warnings and utterance. The system shows reasonable computer graphics in quality from the viewpoint of showing good performance of operations. This report also describes how to use the OBCGS and ways of application to the operator training. (author)

  1. Automata, universality, computation tribute to Maurice Margenstern

    2015-01-01

    This book is an intellectually stimulating excursion into mathematical machines and structures capable for a universal computation. World top experts in computer science and mathematics overview exciting and intriguing topics of logical theory of monoids, geometry of Gauss word, philosophy of mathematics in computer science, asynchronous and parallel P-systems, decidability in cellular automata, splicing systems, reversible Turing machines, information flows in two-way finite automata, prime generators in automaton arrays, Grossone and Turing machines, automaton models of atomic lattices. The book is  full of visually attractive examples of mathematical machines, open problems and challenges for future research. Those interested in the advancement of a theory of computation, philosophy of mathematics, future and emergent computing paradigms, architectures and implementations will find the book vital for their research and development.

  2. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  3. Glossiness of Colored Papers based on Computer Graphics Model and Its Measuring Method

    Aida, Teizo

    In the case of colored papers, the color of surface effects strongly upon the gloss of its paper. The new glossiness for such a colored paper is suggested in this paper. First, using the Achromatic and Chromatic Munsell colored chips, the author obtained experimental equation which represents the relation between lightness V ( or V and saturation C ) and psychological glossiness Gph of these chips. Then, the author defined a new glossiness G for the colored papers, based on the above mentioned experimental equations Gph and Cook-Torrance's reflection model which are widely used in the filed of Computer Graphics. This new glossiness is shown to be nearly proportional to the psychological glossiness Gph. The measuring system for the new glossiness G is furthermore descrived. The measuring time for one specimen is within 1 minute.

  4. The use of computer-generated color graphic images for transient thermal analysis. [for hypersonic aircraft

    Edwards, C. L. W.; Meissner, F. T.; Hall, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Color computer graphics techniques were investigated as a means of rapidly scanning and interpreting large sets of transient heating data. The data presented were generated to support the conceptual design of a heat-sink thermal protection system (TPS) for a hypersonic research airplane. Color-coded vector and raster displays of the numerical geometry used in the heating calculations were employed to analyze skin thicknesses and surface temperatures of the heat-sink TPS under a variety of trajectory flight profiles. Both vector and raster displays proved to be effective means for rapidly identifying heat-sink mass concentrations, regions of high heating, and potentially adverse thermal gradients. The color-coded (raster) surface displays are a very efficient means for displaying surface-temperature and heating histories, and thereby the more stringent design requirements can quickly be identified. The related hardware and software developments required to implement both the vector and the raster displays for this application are also discussed.

  5. Discriminating between photorealistic computer graphics and natural images using fractal geometry

    PAN Feng; CHEN JiongBin; HUANG JiWu

    2009-01-01

    Rendering technology in computer graphics (CG) Is now capable of producing highly photorealistlc Images, giving rise to the problem of how to identify CG Images from natural images. Some methods were proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we give a novel method from a new point of view of Image perception. Although the photorealisUc CG images are very similar to natural images, they are surrealistic and smoother than natural images, thus leading to the difference in perception. A part of features are derived from fractal dimension to capture the difference In color perception between CG images and natural Images, and several generalized dimensions are used as the rest features to capture difference in coarseness. The effect of these features is verified by experiments. The average accuracy is over 91.2%.

  6. Simulation of Specular Surface Imaging Based on Computer Graphics: Application on a Vision Inspection System

    Seulin Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at detecting surface defects on reflecting industrial parts. A machine vision system, performing the detection of geometric aspect surface defects, is completely described. The revealing of defects is realized by a particular lighting device. It has been carefully designed to ensure the imaging of defects. The lighting system simplifies a lot the image processing for defect segmentation and so a real-time inspection of reflective products is possible. To bring help in the conception of imaging conditions, a complete simulation is proposed. The simulation, based on computer graphics, enables the rendering of realistic images. Simulation provides here a very efficient way to perform tests compared to the numerous attempts of manual experiments.

  7. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments.

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  8. Development of Point Kernel Shielding Analysis Computer Program Implementing Recent Nuclear Data and Graphic User Interfaces

    Kang, Sang Ho; Lee, Seung Gi; Chung, Chan Young; Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Jai Ki

    2001-01-01

    In order to comply with revised national regulationson radiological protection and to implement recent nuclear data and dose conversion factors, KOPEC developed a new point kernel gamma and beta ray shielding analysis computer program. This new code, named VisualShield, adopted mass attenuation coefficient and buildup factors from recent ANSI/ANS standards and flux-to-dose conversion factors from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 74 for estimation of effective/equivalent dose recommended in ICRP 60. VisualShield utilizes graphical user interfaces and 3-D visualization of the geometric configuration for preparing input data sets and analyzing results, which leads users to error free processing with visual effects. Code validation and data analysis were performed by comparing the results of various calculations to the data outputs of previous programs such as MCNP 4B, ISOSHLD-II, QAD-CGGP, etc

  9. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  10. uPy: a ubiquitous computer graphics Python API with Biological Modeling Applications

    Autin, L.; Johnson, G.; Hake, J.; Olson, A.; Sanner, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe uPy, an extension module for the Python programming language that provides a uniform abstraction of the APIs of several 3D computer graphics programs called hosts, including: Blender, Maya, Cinema4D, and DejaVu. A plugin written with uPy is a unique piece of code that will run in all uPy-supported hosts. We demonstrate the creation of complex plug-ins for molecular/cellular modeling and visualization and discuss how uPy can more generally simplify programming for many types of projects (not solely science applications) intended for multi-host distribution. uPy is available at http://upy.scripps.edu PMID:24806987

  11. Generating high gray-level resolution monochrome displays with conventional computer graphics cards and color monitors.

    Li, Xiangrui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xu, Pengjing; Jin, Jianzhong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2003-11-30

    Display systems based on conventional computer graphics cards are capable of generating images with about 8-bit luminance resolution. However, most vision experiments require more than 12 bits of luminance resolution. Pelli and Zhang [Spatial Vis. 10 (1997) 443] described a video attenuator for generating high luminance resolution displays on a monochrome monitor, or for driving just the green gun of a color monitor. Here we show how to achieve a white display by adding video amplifiers to duplicate the monochrome signal to drive all three guns of any color monitor. Because of the lack of the availability of high quality monochrome monitors, our method provides an inexpensive way to achieve high-resolution monochromatic displays using conventional, easy-to-get equipment. We describe the design principles, test results, and a few additional functionalities.

  12. Utero-fetal unit and pregnant woman modeling using a computer graphics approach for dosimetry studies.

    Anquez, Jérémie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Bibin, Lazar; Angelini, Elsa; Bloch, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Potential sanitary effects related to electromagnetic fields exposure raise public concerns, especially for fetuses during pregnancy. Human fetus exposure can only be assessed through simulated dosimetry studies, performed on anthropomorphic models of pregnant women. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to generate a set of detailed utero-fetal unit (UFU) 3D models during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy, based on segmented 3D ultrasound and MRI data. UFU models are built using recent geometry processing methods derived from mesh-based computer graphics techniques and embedded in a synthetic woman body. Nine pregnant woman models have been generated using this approach and validated by obstetricians, for anatomical accuracy and representativeness.

  13. Computing the Density Matrix in Electronic Structure Theory on Graphics Processing Units.

    Cawkwell, M J; Sanville, E J; Mniszewski, S M; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-11-13

    The self-consistent solution of a Schrödinger-like equation for the density matrix is a critical and computationally demanding step in quantum-based models of interatomic bonding. This step was tackled historically via the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. We have investigated the performance and accuracy of the second-order spectral projection (SP2) algorithm for the computation of the density matrix via a recursive expansion of the Fermi operator in a series of generalized matrix-matrix multiplications. We demonstrate that owing to its simplicity, the SP2 algorithm [Niklasson, A. M. N. Phys. Rev. B2002, 66, 155115] is exceptionally well suited to implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs). The performance in double and single precision arithmetic of a hybrid GPU/central processing unit (CPU) and full GPU implementation of the SP2 algorithm exceed those of a CPU-only implementation of the SP2 algorithm and traditional matrix diagonalization when the dimensions of the matrices exceed about 2000 × 2000. Padding schemes for arrays allocated in the GPU memory that optimize the performance of the CUBLAS implementations of the level 3 BLAS DGEMM and SGEMM subroutines for generalized matrix-matrix multiplications are described in detail. The analysis of the relative performance of the hybrid CPU/GPU and full GPU implementations indicate that the transfer of arrays between the GPU and CPU constitutes only a small fraction of the total computation time. The errors measured in the self-consistent density matrices computed using the SP2 algorithm are generally smaller than those measured in matrices computed via diagonalization. Furthermore, the errors in the density matrices computed using the SP2 algorithm do not exhibit any dependence of system size, whereas the errors increase linearly with the number of orbitals when diagonalization is employed.

  14. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  15. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  16. Utilizing General Purpose Graphics Processing Units to Improve Performance of Computer Modelling and Visualization

    Monk, J.; Zhu, Y.; Koons, P. O.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    With the introduction of the G8X series of cards by nVidia an architecture called CUDA was released, virtually all subsequent video cards have had CUDA support. With this new architecture nVidia provided extensions for C/C++ that create an Application Programming Interface (API) allowing code to be executed on the GPU. Since then the concept of GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit) has been growing, this is the concept that the GPU is very good a algebra and running things in parallel so we should take use of that power for other applications. This is highly appealing in the area of geodynamic modeling, as multiple parallel solutions of the same differential equations at different points in space leads to a large speedup in simulation speed. Another benefit of CUDA is a programmatic method of transferring large amounts of data between the computer's main memory and the dedicated GPU memory located on the video card. In addition to being able to compute and render on the video card, the CUDA framework allows for a large speedup in the situation, such as with a tiled display wall, where the rendered pixels are to be displayed in a different location than where they are rendered. A CUDA extension for VirtualGL was developed allowing for faster read back at high resolutions. This paper examines several aspects of rendering OpenGL graphics on large displays using VirtualGL and VNC. It demonstrates how performance can be significantly improved in rendering on a tiled monitor wall. We present a CUDA enhanced version of VirtualGL as well as the advantages to having multiple VNC servers. It will discuss restrictions caused by read back and blitting rates and how they are affected by different sizes of virtual displays being rendered.

  17. Graphic Design for the Computer Age; Visual Communication for all Media.

    Hamilton, Edward A.

    Because of the rapid pace of today's world, graphic designs which communicate at a glance are needed in all information areas. The essays in this book deal with various aspects of graphic design. These brief essays, each illustrated with graphics, concern the following topics: a short history of visual communication, information design, the merits…

  18. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  19. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task.

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson N S; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like 'Face in a Crowd' task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the 'Crowd') using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a 'Crowd Off' condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet computers.

  20. Application of computer generated color graphic techniques to the processing and display of three dimensional fluid dynamic data

    Anderson, B. H.; Putt, C. W.; Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Color coding techniques used in the processing of remote sensing imagery were adapted and applied to the fluid dynamics problems associated with turbofan mixer nozzles. The computer generated color graphics were found to be useful in reconstructing the measured flow field from low resolution experimental data to give more physical meaning to this information and in scanning and interpreting the large volume of computer generated data from the three dimensional viscous computer code used in the analysis.

  1. Real-time computation of parameter fitting and image reconstruction using graphical processing units

    Locans, Uldis; Adelmann, Andreas; Suter, Andreas; Fischer, Jannis; Lustermann, Werner; Dissertori, Günther; Wang, Qiulin

    2017-06-01

    In recent years graphical processing units (GPUs) have become a powerful tool in scientific computing. Their potential to speed up highly parallel applications brings the power of high performance computing to a wider range of users. However, programming these devices and integrating their use in existing applications is still a challenging task. In this paper we examined the potential of GPUs for two different applications. The first application, created at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), is used for parameter fitting during data analysis of μSR (muon spin rotation, relaxation and resonance) experiments. The second application, developed at ETH, is used for PET (Positron Emission Tomography) image reconstruction and analysis. Applications currently in use were examined to identify parts of the algorithms in need of optimization. Efficient GPU kernels were created in order to allow applications to use a GPU, to speed up the previously identified parts. Benchmarking tests were performed in order to measure the achieved speedup. During this work, we focused on single GPU systems to show that real time data analysis of these problems can be achieved without the need for large computing clusters. The results show that the currently used application for parameter fitting, which uses OpenMP to parallelize calculations over multiple CPU cores, can be accelerated around 40 times through the use of a GPU. The speedup may vary depending on the size and complexity of the problem. For PET image analysis, the obtained speedups of the GPU version were more than × 40 larger compared to a single core CPU implementation. The achieved results show that it is possible to improve the execution time by orders of magnitude.

  2. The Effects of Computer Graphic Organizers on the Persuasive Writing of Hispanic Middle School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Unzueta, Caridad H.; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design investigated the effects of computer graphic organizers on the persuasive composition writing skills of four Hispanic students with specific learning disabilities. Participants reviewed the elements of persuasive writing and then developed compositions using a word processing program. Baseline planning was done with a…

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING TOOLS IN THE PROCESS OF FORMATION OF GRAPHIC COMPETENCE OF THE FUTURE BACHELOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Kateryna P. Osadcha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some aspects of the formation of future bachelor's graphic competence in computer sciences while teaching the fundamentals for working with three-dimensional modelling means. The analysis, classification and systematization of three-dimensional modelling means are given. The aim of research consists in investigating the set of instruments and classification of three-dimensional modelling means and correlation of skills, which are being formed, concerning inquired ones at the labour market in order to use them further in the process of forming graphic competence during training future bachelors in computer sciences. The peculiarities of the process of forming future bachelor's graphic competence in computer sciences by means of revealing, analyzing and systematizing three-dimensional modelling means and types of three-dimensional graphics at present stage of the development of informational technologies are traced a line round. The result of the research is a soft-ware choice in three-dimensional modelling for the process of training future bachelors in computer sciences.

  4. Interactive computer graphics displays for hierarchical data structures. [Description of THESGRAF, in FORTRAN IV for CDC and IBM computers

    Cahn, D.F.; Murano, C.V.

    1980-05-01

    An interactive computer graphical display program was developed as an aid to user visualization and manipulation of hierarchically structured data systems such as thesauri. In the present configuration, a thesaurus term and its primary and secondary conceptual neighbors are presented to the user in tree graph form on a CRT; the user then designates, via light pen or keyboard, any of the neighbors as the next term of interest and receives a new display centered on this term. By successive specification of broader, narrower, and related terms, the user can course rapidly through the thesaurus space and refine his search file. At any stage, he deals with a term-centered, conceptually meaningful picture of a localized portion of the thesaurus, and is freed from the artificial difficulties of handling the traditional alphabetized thesaurus. Intentional limitation of the associative range of each display frame, and the use of color, case, and interconnecting vectors to encode relationships among terms, enhance interpretability of the display. Facile movement through the term space, provided by interactive computation, allows the display to remain simple, and is an essential element of the system. 3 figures.

  5. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  6. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  7. Dynamic 3-D computer graphics for designing a diagnostic tool for patients with schizophrenia.

    Farkas, Attila; Papathomas, Thomas V; Silverstein, Steven M; Kourtev, Hristiyan; Papayanopoulos, John F

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a novel procedure that uses dynamic 3-D computer graphics as a diagnostic tool for assessing disease severity in schizophrenia patients, based on their reduced influence of top-down cognitive processes in interpreting bottom-up sensory input. Our procedure uses the hollow-mask illusion, in which the concave side of the mask is misperceived as convex, because familiarity with convex faces dominates sensory cues signaling a concave mask. It is known that schizophrenia patients resist this illusion and their resistance increases with illness severity. Our method uses virtual masks rendered with two competing textures: (a) realistic features that enhance the illusion; (b) random-dot visual noise that reduces the illusion. We control the relative weights of the two textures to obtain psychometric functions for controls and patients and assess illness severity. The primary novelty is the use of a rotating mask that is easy to implement on a wide variety of portable devices and avoids the use of elaborate stereoscopic devices that have been used in the past. Thus our method, which can also be used to assess the efficacy of treatments, provides clinicians the advantage to bring the test to the patient's own environment, instead of having to bring patients to the clinic.

  8. Three-dimensional demonstration of liver and spleen by computer graphics technique

    Kashiwagi, Toru; Azuma, Masayoshi; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Ishizu, Hiromi; Mitsutani, Natsuki; Koizumi, Takao; Takayama, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional demonstration system of the liver and spleen has been developed using computer graphics technique. Three-dimensional models were constructed from CT images of the organ surface. The three-dimensional images were displayed as wire-frame and/or solid models on the color CRT. The anatomical surface of the liver and spleen was realistically viewed from any direction. In liver cirrhosis, atrophy of the right lobe, hypertrophy of the left lobe and splenomegaly were displayed vividly. The liver and hepatoma were displayed as wire-frame and solid models respectively on the same image. This combined display clarified the intrahepatic location of hepatoma together with configuration of liver and hepatoma. Furthermore, superimposed display of three dimensional models and celiac angiogram enabled us to understand the location and configuration of lesions more easily than the original CT data or angiogram alone. Therefore, it is expected that this system is clinically useful for noninvasive evaluation of patho-morphological changes of the liver and spleen. (author)

  9. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  10. Production of graphic symbol sentences by individuals with aphasia: efficacy of a computer-based augmentative and alternative communication intervention.

    Koul, Rajinder; Corwin, Melinda; Hayes, Summer

    2005-01-01

    The study employed a single-subject multiple baseline design to examine the ability of 9 individuals with severe Broca's aphasia or global aphasia to produce graphic symbol sentences of varying syntactical complexity using a software program that turns a computer into a speech output communication device. The sentences ranged in complexity from simple two-word phrases to those with morphological inflections, transformations, and relative clauses. Overall, results indicated that individuals with aphasia are able to access, manipulate, and combine graphic symbols to produce phrases and sentences of varying degrees of syntactical complexity. The findings are discussed in terms of the clinical and public policy implications.

  11. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-01-01

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity

  12. Guide to making time-lapse graphics using the facilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center

    Munro, J.K. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The advent of large, fast computers has opened the way to modeling more complex physical processes and to handling very large quantities of experimental data. The amount of information that can be processed in a short period of time is so great that use of graphical displays assumes greater importance as a means of displaying this information. Information from dynamical processes can be displayed conveniently by use of animated graphics. This guide presents the basic techniques for generating black and white animated graphics, with consideration of aesthetic, mechanical, and computational problems. The guide is intended for use by someone who wants to make movies on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) CDC-7600. Problems encountered by a geographically remote user are given particular attention. Detailed information is given that will allow a remote user to do some file checking and diagnosis before giving graphics files to the system for processing into film in order to spot problems without having to wait for film to be delivered. Source listings of some useful software are given in appendices along with descriptions of how to use it. 3 figures, 5 tables

  13. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    Dvali, Gia [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Gomez, Cesar [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC; Luest, Dieter [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Omar, Yasser [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico; Richter, Benedikt [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    2017-01-15

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Graphic notation

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Graphic notation is taught to music therapy students at Aalborg University in both simple and elaborate forms. This is a method of depicting music visually, and notations may serve as memory aids, as aids for analysis and reflection, and for communication purposes such as supervision or within...

  15. McMaster University: College and University Computing Environment.

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The computing and information services (CIS) organization includes administrative computing, academic computing, and networking and has three divisions: computing services, development services, and information services. Other computing activities include Health Sciences, Humanities Computing Center, and Department of Computer Science and Systems.…

  16. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Antonio A Lagana

    Full Text Available We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  17. Computer graphics for quality control in the INAA of geological samples

    Grossman, J.N.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    A data reduction system for the routine instrumental activation analysis of samples is described, with particular emphasis on interactive graphics capabilities for evaluating analytical quality. Graphics procedures were developed to interactively control the analysis of selected photopeaks during spectral analysis, and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. Graphics algorithms are also used to compare the data on reference samples with accepted values, to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systematic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. (author)

  18. Computer graphics for quality control in the INAA of geological samples

    Grossman, J.N.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    A data reduction system for the routine instrumental activation analysis of samples is described, with particular emphasis on interactive graphics capabilities for evaluating analytical quality. Graphics procedures have been developed to interactively control the analysis of selected photopeaks during spectral analysis, and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. Graphics algorithms are also used to compare the data on reference samples with accepted values, to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systematic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  19. POST-CASKETSS: a graphic computer program for thermal and structural analysis of nuclear fuel shipping casks

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1988-12-01

    A computer program POST-CASKETSS has been developed for the purpose of calculation result representation for thermal and structural analysis computer code system CASKETSS (CASKETSS means a modular code system for CASK Evaluation code system for Thermal and Structural Safety). Main features of POST-CASKETSS are as follows; (1) Function of calculation result representation for thermal and structural analysis computer programs is provided in the program. (2) Two and three dimensional graphic representation for finite element and finite difference programs are available in the program. (3) The capacity of graphics of geometry, temperature contor and temperature-time curve are provided for thermal analysis. (4) The capacity of graphics of geometry, deformation, stress contor, displacement-time curve, velocity-time curve, acceleration-time curve, stress-time curve, force-time curve and moment-time curve are provided for structural analysis. (5) This computer program operates both the time shearing system and the batch system. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method, input data and sample calculations are presented. (author)

  20. Computer-supported planning on graphic terminals in the staff divisions of hard coal mines. Rechnergestuetzte Planung an grafischen Arbeitsplaetzen in den Stabsstellen von Steinkohlenbergwerken

    Seeliger, A [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany)

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the planning activity in the planning department of German hard coal mines have shown that in some branches of the planning process productivity and creativity of the involved experts can be increased, potentials for rationalization be opened up and the cooperation between different engineering disciplines be improved by using computer network systems in combination with graphic systems. This paper reports about the computer-supported planning system 'Grube', which has been developed at the RWTH (technical university) Aachen, and its applications in mine surveying, electro-technical and mechanical planning as well as in the planning of ventilation systems and detailed mine planning. The software module GRUBE-W, which will be in future the centre of the working place for the mine ventilation planning of the Ruhrkohle AG, is discussed in detail. (orig.).

  1. Configurable software for satellite graphics

    Hartzman, P D

    1977-12-01

    An important goal in interactive computer graphics is to provide users with both quick system responses for basic graphics functions and enough computing power for complex calculations. One solution is to have a distributed graphics system in which a minicomputer and a powerful large computer share the work. The most versatile type of distributed system is an intelligent satellite system in which the minicomputer is programmable by the application user and can do most of the work while the large remote machine is used for difficult computations. At New York University, the hardware was configured from available equipment. The level of system intelligence resulted almost completely from software development. Unlike previous work with intelligent satellites, the resulting system had system control centered in the satellite. It also had the ability to reconfigure software during realtime operation. The design of the system was done at a very high level using set theoretic language. The specification clearly illustrated processor boundaries and interfaces. The high-level specification also produced a compact, machine-independent virtual graphics data structure for picture representation. The software was written in a systems implementation language; thus, only one set of programs was needed for both machines. A user can program both machines in a single language. Tests of the system with an application program indicate that is has very high potential. A major result of this work is the demonstration that a gigantic investment in new hardware is not necessary for computing facilities interested in graphics.

  2. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  3. Development of a Computer-aided Learning System for Graphical Analysis of Continuous-Time Control Systems

    J. F. Opadiji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the development and deployment process of a computer-aided learning tool which serves as a training aid for undergraduate control engineering courses. We show the process of algorithm construction and implementation of the software which is also aimed at teaching software development at undergraduate level. The scope of this project is limited to graphical analysis of continuous-time control systems.

  4. Fibre recruitment and shape changes of knee ligaments during motion: as revealed by a computer graphics-based model.

    Lu, T W; O'Connor, J J

    1996-01-01

    A computer graphics-based model of the knee ligaments in the sagittal plane was developed for the simulation and visualization of the shape changes and fibre recruitment process of the ligaments during motion under unloaded and loaded conditions. The cruciate and collateral ligaments were modelled as ordered arrays of fibres which link attachment areas on the tibia and femur. Fibres slacken and tighten as the ligament attachment areas on the bones rotate and translate relative to each other. A four-bar linkage, composed of the femur, tibia and selected isometric fibres of the two cruciates, was used to determine the motion of the femur relative to the tibia during passive (unloaded) movement. Fibres were assumed to slacken in a Euler buckling mode when the distances between their attachments are less than chosen reference lengths. The ligament shape changes and buckling patterns are demonstrated with computer graphics. When the tibia is translated anteriorly or posteriorly relative to the femur by muscle forces and external loads, some ligament fibres tighten and are recruited progressively to transmit increasing shear forces. The shape changes and fibre recruitment patterns predicted by the model compare well qualitatively with experimental results reported in the literature. The computer graphics approach provides insight into the micro behaviour of the knee ligaments. It may help to explain ligament injury mechanisms and provide useful information to guide the design of ligament replacements.

  5. [Hardware for graphics systems].

    Goetz, C

    1991-02-01

    In all personal computer applications, be it for private or professional use, the decision of which "brand" of computer to buy is of central importance. In the USA Apple computers are mainly used in universities, while in Europe computers of the so-called "industry standard" by IBM (or clones thereof) have been increasingly used for many years. Independently of any brand name considerations, the computer components purchased must meet the current (and projected) needs of the user. Graphic capabilities and standards, processor speed, the use of co-processors, as well as input and output devices such as "mouse", printers and scanners are discussed. This overview is meant to serve as a decision aid. Potential users are given a short but detailed summary of current technical features.

  6. Embedding Topical Elements of Parallel Programming, Computer Graphics, and Artificial Intelligence across the Undergraduate CS Required Courses

    James Wolfer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, topics such as parallel computing, computer graphics, and artificial intelligence have been taught as stand-alone courses in the computing curriculum. Often these are elective courses, limiting the material to the subset of students choosing to take the course. Recently there has been movement to distribute topics across the curriculum in order to ensure that all graduates have been exposed to concepts such as parallel computing. Previous work described an attempt to systematically weave a tapestry of topics into the undergraduate computing curriculum. This paper reviews that work and expands it with representative examples of assignments, demonstrations, and results as well as describing how the tools and examples deployed for these classes have a residual effect on classes such as Comptuer Literacy.

  7. Porting of the transfer-matrix method for multilayer thin-film computations on graphics processing units

    Limmer, Steffen; Fey, Dietmar

    2013-07-01

    Thin-film computations are often a time-consuming task during optical design. An efficient way to accelerate these computations with the help of graphics processing units (GPUs) is described. It turned out that significant speed-ups can be achieved. We investigate the circumstances under which the best speed-up values can be expected. Therefore we compare different GPUs among themselves and with a modern CPU. Furthermore, the effect of thickness modulation on the speed-up and the runtime behavior depending on the input data is examined.

  8. Introduction to programmable shader in real time 3D computer graphics

    Uemura, Syuhei; Kirii, Keisuke; Matsumura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Kenichiro

    2004-01-01

    Nevertheless the visualization of large-scale data had played the important role which influences informational usefulness in the basic field of science, the high-end graphics system or the exclusive system needed to be used. On the other hand, in recent years, the progress speed of the capability of the video game console or the graphics board for PC has a remarkable thing reflecting the expansion tendency of TV game market in and outside the country. Especially, the ''programmable shader'' technology in which the several graphics chip maker has started implementation is the innovative technology which can also be called change of generation of real-time 3D graphics, and the scope of the visual expression technique has spread greatly. However, it cannot say that the development/use environment of software which used programmable shader are fully generalized, and the present condition is that the grope of the applied technology to overly the ultra high-speed/quality visualization of large-scale data is not prograssing. We provide the outline of programmable shader technology and consider the possibility of the application to large-scale data visualization. (author)

  9. Topographic Information Requirements and Computer-Graphic Display Techniques for Nap-of-the-Earth Flight.

    1979-12-01

    of- at Battle Positions sight to target when unmask Concealment of Approach Map j Routes ! I i. 16 ... ’ FUNCTION: IASb SELECT AERIAL OBSERVATION...to select special overlays for temporary display and to remove them for clutter avoidance. In addition to these graphic presentation roles , the

  10. Implementing a low-latency parallel graphic equalizer with heterogeneous computing

    Norilo, Vesa; Verstraelen, Martinus Johannes Wilhelmina; Valimaki, Vesa; Svensson, Peter; Kristiansen, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a recently introduced parallel graphic equalizer (PGE) in a heterogeneous way. The control and audio signal processing parts of the PGE are distributed to a PC and to a signal processor, of WaveCore architecture, respectively. This arrangement is

  11. Factors Influencing the Effectiveness of Note Taking on Computer-Based Graphic Organizers

    Crooks, Steven M.; White, David R.; Barnard, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Previous research on graphic organizer (GO) note taking has shown that this method is most effective when the GO is presented to the student partially complete with provided notes. This study extended prior research by investigating the effects of provided note type (summary vs. verbatim) and GO bite size (large vs. small) on the transfer…

  12. Computer-Based Learning: Graphical Integration of Whole and Sectional Neuroanatomy Improves Long-Term Retention

    Naaz, Farah; Chariker, Julia H.; Pani, John R.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the hypothesis that instruction with graphically integrated representations of whole and sectional neuroanatomy is especially effective for learning to recognize neural structures in sectional imagery (such as magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Neuroanatomy was taught to two groups of participants using computer…

  13. Investigating the Impact of Computer Technology on the Teaching and Learning of Graphic Arts in Nigeria Osun State College of Education Ila-Orangun as a Case Study

    Abass, Bada Tayo

    2012-01-01

    This paper focused on the use of computer technology in the teaching and learning of graphic arts in Nigeria colleges of Education. Osun State Colleges of Education Ila-Orangun was used as a case study. The population of the study consisted of all Graphic students in Nigeria colleges of Education. 50 subjects were used for the study while…

  14. Interface and integration of a silicon graphics UNIX computer with the Encore based SCE SONGS 2/3 simulator

    Olmos, J.; Lio, P.; Chan, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    The SONGS Unit 2/3 simulator was originally implemented in 1983 on a Master/Slave 32/7780 Encore MPX platform by the Singer-Link Company. In 1986, a 32/9780 MPX Encore computer was incorporated into the simulator computer system to provide the additional CPU processing needed to install the PACE plant monitoring system and to enable the upgrade of the NSSS Simulation to the advanced RETACT/STK models. Since the spring of 1990, the SCE SONGS Nuclear Training Division simulator technical staff, in cooperation with Micro Simulation Inc., has undertaken a project to integrate a Silicon Graphics UNIX based computer with the Encore MPX SONGS 2/3 simulation computer system. In this paper the authors review the objectives, advantages to be gained, software and hardware approaches utilized, and the results so far achieved by the authors' project

  15. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    Steane, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to ``perform many computations simultaneously'' except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of ...

  16. CORDSPW - Windows computer program package for graphical interpretation of CORD-2 data

    Slavic, S.; Kromar, M.

    2007-01-01

    The CORD-2 package, developed at Jozef Stefan Institute, enables determination of the core power distribution and reactivity. Core distributions data generated during the calculation process are stored in CORlib files. CORDSP code, which is a part of the CORD-2 package, displays and compares data contained in CORlib files. Since it runs in the DOS environment, there are several limitations in the presentation of desired data. A CORDSPW package runs in the Windows environment and offers better graphical interpretation of the CORlib data. Core distributions can be displayed, compared, rewritten in the new files and sent to the printer. The user can select the appropriate display of the presented data such as core symmetry, colour and fonts. Core radial and axial distributions can be presented and compared. There are several options to store and print data. The user can choose between standard ASCII and graphical JPG format. (author)

  17. Tools for Reactive Distillation Column Design: Graphical and Stage-to-Stage Computation Methods

    Sanchez Daza, O.; Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Hostrup, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Based on the element mass balance concept, a graphical design method and a stage-to-stage multicomponent design method for reactive distillation columns have been developed. For distillation columns comprising reactive and non-reactive stages, a simple design strategy based on reactive and non......-reactive bubble point calculations is proposed. This strategy tracks the conversion and temperature between the feed and the end stages of the column. An illustrative example highlights the verification of the design strategy through rigorous simulation....

  18. Development of automation and robotics for space via computer graphic simulation methods

    Fernandez, Ken

    1988-01-01

    A robot simulation system, has been developed to perform automation and robotics system design studies. The system uses a procedure-oriented solid modeling language to produce a model of the robotic mechanism. The simulator generates the kinematics, inverse kinematics, dynamics, control, and real-time graphic simulations needed to evaluate the performance of the model. Simulation examples are presented, including simulation of the Space Station and the design of telerobotics for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle.

  19. Graphics gems II

    Arvo, James

    1991-01-01

    Graphics Gems II is a collection of articles shared by a diverse group of people that reflect ideas and approaches in graphics programming which can benefit other computer graphics programmers.This volume presents techniques for doing well-known graphics operations faster or easier. The book contains chapters devoted to topics on two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry and algorithms, image processing, frame buffer techniques, and ray tracing techniques. The radiosity approach, matrix techniques, and numerical and programming techniques are likewise discussed.Graphics artists and comput

  20. Instruction in Specialized Braille Codes, Abacus, and Tactile Graphics at Universities in the United States and Canada

    Rosenblum, L. Penny; Smith, Derrick

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study gathered data on methods and materials that are used to teach the Nemeth braille code, computer braille, foreign-language braille, and music braille in 26 university programs in the United States and Canada that prepare teachers of students with visual impairments. Information about instruction in the abacus and the…

  1. Three-dimensional display by computer graphics method of hepatocellular carcinoma using seen with the hepatic arteriogram

    Itsubo, Mariko; Kameda, Haruo; Suzuki, Naoki; Okamura, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    The method of three-dimensional display of hepatocellular carcinoma using conventional hepatic arteriogram by computer graphics method was newly exploited and applied in clinical use. Three-dimensional models were reconstructed from contour lines of tumors demonstrated as hypervascular lesions by hepatic arteriography. Although objects were limited by angiographic images in which tumors need to be demonstrated as nodules with hypervascularity, this method of three-dimensional display was not worse on accuracy than that using computed tomographic images. According to this method property of the tumor expressed by vascularity was demonstrated clear and in addition volume of the tumor was calculated easily. When the tumor arose in necrotic changes in which demonstrated as a vascular lesion by hepatic arteriography with reduction of size in usual by conservative treatment such as transcathter arterial embolization therapy, this three-dimensional display was able to demonstrate such changes clear. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility and clinical usefulness of three-dimensional display of hepatocellular carcinoma using hepatic arteriogram by computer graphics method. (author)

  2. Fundamentals of universality in one-way quantum computation

    Nest, M van den; Duer, W; Miyake, A; Briegel, H J

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we build a framework allowing for a systematic investigation of the fundamental issue: 'Which quantum states serve as universal resources for measurement-based (one-way) quantum computation?' We start our study by re-examining what is exactly meant by 'universality' in quantum computation, and what the implications are for universal one-way quantum computation. Given the framework of a measurement-based quantum computer, where quantum information is processed by local operations only, we find that the most general universal one-way quantum computer is one which is capable of accepting arbitrary classical inputs and producing arbitrary quantum outputs-we refer to this property as CQ-universality. We then show that a systematic study of CQ-universality in one-way quantum computation is possible by identifying entanglement features that are required to be present in every universal resource. In particular, we find that a large class of entanglement measures must reach its supremum on every universal resource. These insights are used to identify several families of states as being not universal, such as one-dimensional (1D) cluster states, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, W states, and ground states of non-critical 1D spin systems. Our criteria are strengthened by considering the efficiency of a quantum computation, and we find that entanglement measures must obey a certain scaling law with the system size for all efficient universal resources. This again leads to examples of non-universal resources, such as, e.g. ground states of critical 1D spin systems. On the other hand, we provide several examples of efficient universal resources, namely graph states corresponding to hexagonal, triangular and Kagome lattices. Finally, we consider the more general notion of encoded CQ-universality, where quantum outputs are allowed to be produced in an encoded form. Again we provide entanglement-based criteria for encoded universality. Moreover, we present a

  3. The Development of University Computing in Sweden 1965-1985

    Dahlstrand, Ingemar

    In 1965-70 the government agency, Statskontoret, set up five university computing centers, as service bureaux financed by grants earmarked for computer use. The centers were well equipped and staffed and caused a surge in computer use. When the yearly flow of grant money stagnated at 25 million Swedish crowns, the centers had to find external income to survive and acquire time-sharing. But the charging system led to the computers not being fully used. The computer scientists lacked equipment for laboratory use. The centers were decentralized and the earmarking abolished. Eventually they got new tasks like running computers owned by the departments, and serving the university administration.

  4. A projection graphic display for the computer aided analysis of bubble chamber images

    Solomos, E.

    1979-01-01

    A projection graphic display for aiding the analysis of bubble chamber photographs has been developed by the Instrumentation Group of EF Division at CERN. The display image is generated on a very high brightness cathode ray tube and projected on to the table of the scanning-measuring machines as a superposition to the image of the bubble chamber. The display can send messages to the operator and aid the measurement by indicating directly on the chamber image the tracks which are measured correctly or not. (orig.)

  5. 3D Graphical User Interface on Personal Computer using P5 Data Glove

    Ms Khyati r. Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents Essential Reality works on 3D HCI for changing 2D visual to 3D visual. The mouse is the critical interface to handle 3D graphical objects. Using data glove its possible to put it on like a normal glove and it then acts as an input device that senses finger movements and hand position and orientation (3 coordinates) in real time. The limitation of surface do not allow large no of windows and icons to be positioned on the screen. If more no of windows are forcibly open some ...

  6. Computer generated multi-color graphics in whole body gamma spectral analysis

    Phillips, W.G.; Curtis, S.P.; Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV)

    1984-01-01

    A medium resolution color graphics terminal (512 x 512 pixels) was appended to a computerized gamma spectrometer for the display of whole body counting data. The color display enhances the ability of a spectroscopist to identify at a glance multicolored spectral regions of interest immediate qualitative interpretation. Spectral data from subjects containing low concentrations of gamma emitters obtained by both NaI(T1) and phoswich detectors are viewed by the method. In addition, software generates a multispectral display by which the gross, background, and net spectra are displayed in color simultaneously on a single screen

  7. Man-Computer Symbiosis Through Interactive Graphics: A Survey and Identification of Critical Research Areas.

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this report was to determine the research areas that appear most critical to achieving man-computer symbiosis. An operational definition of man-computer symbiosis was developed by: (1) reviewing and summarizing what others have said about it, and (2) attempting to distinguish it from other types of man-computer relationships. From…

  8. Massively Parallel Signal Processing using the Graphics Processing Unit for Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface Feature Extraction.

    Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin C

    2009-01-01

    The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past 5 years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card [graphics processing unit (GPU)] was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI). The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter), followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a central processing unit-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels of 250 ms in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  9. Vortex particle method in parallel computations on graphical processing units used in study of the evolution of vortex structures

    Kudela, Henryk; Kosior, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and the mutual interaction among various types of vortical motions is a key ingredient in clarifying and controlling fluid motion. In the paper several different cases related to vortex tube interactions are presented. Due to problems with very long computation times on the single processor, the vortex-in-cell (VIC) method is implemented on the multicore architecture of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Numerical results of leapfrogging of two vortex rings for inviscid and viscous fluid are presented as test cases for the new multi-GPU implementation of the VIC method. Influence of the Reynolds number on the reconnection process is shown for two examples: antiparallel vortex tubes and orthogonally offset vortex tubes. Our aim is to show the great potential of the VIC method for solutions of three-dimensional flow problems and that the VIC method is very well suited for parallel computation. (paper)

  10. Computer anxiety among university and college students majoring ...

    This study examined computer anxiety among university and college of education Physical and Health Education (PHE) majors. The influence of personal characteristics of gender, age and experience of PHE majors on computer anxiety level were analysed. The Computer Anxiety Scale (CAS) developed by Marcoulides ...

  11. The Performance Improvement of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) Using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Computing

    2017-08-01

    used for its GPU computing capability during the experiment. It has Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU accelerators containing 32 GPU nodes consisting of 1024...cores. CUDA is a parallel computing platform and application programming interface (API) model that was created and designed by Nvidia to give direct...Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 1995:76:277–291, ISSN 0168-1923. 3. GPU vs. CPU? What is GPU computing? Santa Clara (CA): Nvidia Corporation; 2017

  12. Computer Literacy among University Academic Staff: The Case of IIUM

    Shaheen Majid

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of computing skills of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM faculty members. A questionnaire was used to elicit information regarding computer literacy from a sample of 114 faculty members. The study shows that the level of computer literacy among IIUM faculty members is quite low: most of them have been using computers for word processing only. Other computer applications are being used by a limited number of academic staff. Irrespective of the existing level of computer literacy, almost all academic staff showed interest in attending computer courses.

  13. Performance evaluation for volumetric segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using MATLAB and computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    Le, Anh H.; Park, Young W.; Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Liu, Brent J.

    2010-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disease affecting myelin pathways in the brain. Multiple lesions in the white matter can cause paralysis and severe motor disabilities of the affected patient. To solve the issue of inconsistency and user-dependency in manual lesion measurement of MRI, we have proposed a 3-D automated lesion quantification algorithm to enable objective and efficient lesion volume tracking. The computer-aided detection (CAD) of MS, written in MATLAB, utilizes K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method to compute the probability of lesions on a per-voxel basis. Despite the highly optimized algorithm of imaging processing that is used in CAD development, MS CAD integration and evaluation in clinical workflow is technically challenging due to the requirement of high computation rates and memory bandwidth in the recursive nature of the algorithm. In this paper, we present the development and evaluation of using a computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU) with MATLAB for segmentation of MS lesions. The paper investigates the utilization of a high-end GPU for parallel computing of KNN in the MATLAB environment to improve algorithm performance. The integration is accomplished using NVIDIA's CUDA developmental toolkit for MATLAB. The results of this study will validate the practicality and effectiveness of the prototype MS CAD in a clinical setting. The GPU method may allow MS CAD to rapidly integrate in an electronic patient record or any disease-centric health care system.

  14. Computer Mediated Communication and University International Students

    Robbins, Nancy; Lo, Yen-Hai; Hou, Feng-Heiung; Chou, Tsai-Sheng; Chen, Chin-Hung; Chen, Chao-Chien; Chen, Wen-Chiang; Chen, Yen-Chuan; Wang, Shih-Jen; Huang, Shih-Yu; Lii, Jong-Yiing

    2002-01-01

    The design for this preliminary study was based on the experiences of the international students and faculty members of a small southwest university being surveyed and interviewed. The data collection procedure blends qualitative and quantitative data. A strong consensus was found that supports the study's premise that there is an association…

  15. Universal Design: Implications for Computing Education

    Burgstahler, Sheryl

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD), a concept that grew from the field of architecture, has recently emerged as a paradigm for designing instructional methods, curriculum, and assessments that are welcoming and accessible to students with a wide range of characteristics, including those related to race, ethnicity, native language, gender, age, and disability.…

  16. Development of Graphical Solution for Computer-Assisted Fault Diagnosis: Preliminary Study

    Yoon, Han Bean; Yun, Seung Man; Han, Jong Chul

    2009-01-01

    We have developed software for converting the volumetric voxel data obtained from X-ray computed tomography(CT) into computer-aided design(CAD) data. The developed software can used for non-destructive testing and evaluation, reverse engineering, and rapid prototyping, etc. The main algorithms employed in the software are image reconstruction, volume rendering, segmentation, and mesh data generation. The feasibility of the developed software is demonstrated with the CT data of human maxilla and mandible bones

  17. Computer Graphics Research Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report Number 49, July-September 1993

    1993-11-22

    20 Texture Sampling and Strength Guided Motion: Jeffry S. Nimeroff 23 21 Radiosity : Min-Zhi Shao 24 22 Blended Shape Primitives: Douglas DeCarlo 25 23...placement. "* Extensions of radiosity rendering. "* A discussion of blended shape primitives and the applications in computer vision and computer...user. Radiosity : An improved version of the radiosity renderer is included. This version uses a fast over- relaxation progressive refinement algorithm

  18. Discovery Mondays: 'The Grid: a universal computer'

    2006-01-01

    How can one store and analyse the 15 million billion pieces of data that the LHC will produce each year with a computer that isn't the size of a sky-scraper? The IT experts have found the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers in the world by putting them together on one network and making them work like a single computer achieving a power that has not yet been matched. The Grid, inspired from the Web, already exists - in fact, several of them exist in the field of science. The European EGEE project, led by CERN, contributes not only to the study of particle physics but to medical research as well, notably in the study of malaria and avian flu. The next Discovery Monday invites you to explore this futuristic computing technology. The 'Grid Masters' of CERN have prepared lively animations to help you understand how the Grid works. Children can practice saving the planet on the Grid video game. You will also discover other applications such as UNOSAT, a United Nations...

  19. Learning and the cooperative computational universe

    Adriaans, P.; Adriaans, P.; van Benthem, J.

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 1956, a number of scientists gathered at the Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Their goal was to study human intelligence with the help of computers. Their central hypothesis was: "that every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so

  20. PRO/Mapper: a plotting program for the DEC PRO/300 personal computers utilizing the MAPPER graphics language

    Wachter, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    PRO/Mapper is an application for the Digital Equipment Corporation PRO/300 series of personal computers that facilitates the preparation of visuals such as graphs, charts, and maps in color or black and white. The user prepares an input data file containing English-language commands and writes it into a file using standard editor. PRO/Mapper then reads these files and draws graphs, maps, boxes, and complex line segments onto the computer screen. Axes, curves, and error bars may be plotted in graphical presentations. The commands of PRO/Mapper are a subset of the commands of the more sophisticated MAPPER program written for mainframe computers. The PRO/Mapper commands were chosen primarily for the production of linear graphs. Command files written for the PRO/300 are upward compatible with the Martin Marietta Energy Systems version of MAPPER and can be used to produce publication-quality slides, drawings, and maps on the various output devices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory mainframe computers

  1. Computer-aided digitization of graphical mass flow data from the 1/5-scale Mark I BWR pressure suppression experiment

    Holman, G.S.; McCauley, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    Periodically in the analysis of engineering data, it becomes necessary to use graphical output as the solitary source of accurate numerical data for use in subsequent calculations. Such was our experience in the extended analysis of data from the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment (PSE). The original numerical results of extensive computer calculations performed at the time of the actual PSE tests and required for the later extended analysis program had not been retained as archival records. We were, therefore, required to recover the previously calculated data, either by a complete recalculation or from available computer graphics records. Time constraints suggested recovery from the graphics records as the more viable approach. This report describes two different approaches to recovery of digital data from graphics records. One, combining hard and software techniques immediately available to us at LLL, proved to be inadequate for our purposes. The other approach required the development of pure software techniques that interfaced with LLL computer graphics to unpack digital coordinate information directly from graphics files. As a result of this effort, we were able to recover the required data with no significant loss in the accuracy of the original calculations

  2. Computer graphic displays for microscopists assisting in evaluating radiation-damaged cells

    Bartels, P.H.; Olson, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    Computer analysis of digitized images of cells and tissues has developed into a highly refined methodology. In particular, the nuclear chromatin has numerous features that allow reliable recognition and classification of cells. This was hardly a surprise to cytopathologists, since chromatin texture and staining properties have always provided valuable clues for visual diagnosis. However, two aspects of computer assessment came as a surprise. First, there was the consistency with which chromatin distribution patterns express the state of the cell, its differentiation, and the sensitivity with which a change in the cell's environment is reflected in the chromatin. Second, chromatin texture provides highly discriminating, objectively measurable features that are not perceived by human visual assessment. Numerous studies have shown that computer assessment is capable of making clear-cut discriminations in cases where human cytodiagnostic evaluation is not effective

  3. The University in the Cloud Computing.

    Gonzalo Nuño, Ana Isabel; Martín Gascueña, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    With the advancement of Information and Communication Technology ICT which favors increasingly fast, easy, and accessible communication for all and which can reach large groups of people, there have been changes, in recent years in our society that have modified the way we interact, communicate and transmit information. Access to this, it is possible, not only through computers situated in a fixed location, but new mobile devices make it available, wherever the user happens to be located. Now...

  4. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    2016-06-02

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of the original MUSIQC proposal was to construct and demonstrate a modular and universally- expandable ion...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation, scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  5. Rotational and Translational Components of Motion Parallax: Observers' Sensitivity and Implications for Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Montegut, Michael J.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1995-01-01

    The motion of objects during motion parallax can be decomposed into 2 observer-relative components: translation and rotation. The depth ratio of objects in the visual field is specified by the inverse ratio of their angular displacement (from translation) or equivalently by the inverse ratio of their rotations. Despite the equal mathematical status of these 2 information sources, it was predicted that observers would be far more sensitive to the translational than rotational component. Such a differential sensitivity is implicitly assumed by the computer graphics technique billboarding, in which 3-dimensional (3-D) objects are drawn as planar forms (i.e., billboards) maintained normal to the line of sight. In 3 experiments, observers were found to be consistently less sensitive to rotational anomalies. The implications of these findings for kinetic depth effect displays and billboarding techniques are discussed.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction of colorectal tumors from serial tissue sections by computer graphics: a preliminary study.

    Kikuchi, S; Matsuzaki, H; Kondo, K; Ohtani, Y; Ihara, A; Hiki, Y; Kakita, A; Kuwao, S

    2000-01-01

    We present herein the three-dimensional reconstruction of colorectal tumors, with particular reference to growth pattern into each layer of the colorectal wall, and measurement of tumor volume and surface area. Conventional tissue section images of colorectal tumors were analyzed using a computer graphics analysis program. The two-dimensional extent of invasion by each tumor into each layer of intestinal wall were determined from the images of each section. Based on data from multiple sections, tumor and surrounding normal tissue layers were reconstructed three-dimensionally, and volume and surface area of the tumors were determined. Using this technique, three-dimensional morphology of tumor and tumor progression into colorectal wall could be determined. Volume and surface area of the colon tumor were 4871 mm3 and 1741 mm2, respectively. Volume and surface area of the rectal tumor were 1090 mm3 and 877 mm2, respectively. This technique may provide a new approach for pathological analysis of colorectal carcinoma.

  7. Cloud Computing Adoption Model for Universities to Increase ICT Proficiency

    Safiya Okai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world especially those in developing countries are faced with the problem of delivering the level of information and communications technology (ICT needed to facilitate teaching, learning, research, and development activities ideal in a typical university, which is needed to meet educational needs in-line with advancement in technology and the growing dependence on IT. This is mainly due to the high cost involved in providing and maintaining the needed hardware and software. A technology such as cloud computing that delivers on demand provisioning of IT resources on a pay per use basis can be used to address this problem. Cloud computing promises better delivery of IT services as well as availability whenever and wherever needed at reduced costs with users paying only as much as they consume through the services of cloud service providers. The cloud technology reduces complexity while increasing speed and quality of IT services provided; however, despite these benefits the challenges that come with its adoption have left many sectors especially the higher education skeptical in committing to this technology. This article identifies the reasons for the slow rate of adoption of cloud computing at university level, discusses the challenges faced and proposes a cloud computing adoption model that contains strategic guidelines to overcome the major challenges identified and a roadmap for the successful adoption of cloud computing by universities. The model was tested in one of the universities and found to be both useful and appropriate for adopting cloud computing at university level.

  8. p88110: A Graphical Simulator for Computer Architecture and Organization Courses

    Garcia, M. I.; Rodriguez, S.; Perez, A.; Garcia, A.

    2009-01-01

    Studying fundamental Computer Architecture and Organization topics requires a significant amount of practical work if students are to acquire a good grasp of the theoretical concepts presented in classroom lectures or textbooks. The use of simulators is commonly adopted in order to reach this objective. However, as most of the available…

  9. Electromagnetic tracking of motion in the proximity of computer generated graphical stimuli: a tutorial.

    Schnabel, Ulf H; Hegenloh, Michael; Müller, Hermann J; Zehetleitner, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Electromagnetic motion-tracking systems have the advantage of capturing the tempo-spatial kinematics of movements independently of the visibility of the sensors. However, they are limited in that they cannot be used in the proximity of electromagnetic field sources, such as computer monitors. This prevents exploiting the tracking potential of the sensor system together with that of computer-generated visual stimulation. Here we present a solution for presenting computer-generated visual stimulation that does not distort the electromagnetic field required for precise motion tracking, by means of a back projection medium. In one experiment, we verify that cathode ray tube monitors, as well as thin-film-transistor monitors, distort electro-magnetic sensor signals even at a distance of 18 cm. Our back projection medium, by contrast, leads to no distortion of the motion-tracking signals even when the sensor is touching the medium. This novel solution permits combining the advantages of electromagnetic motion tracking with computer-generated visual stimulation.

  10. Reduction of computing time for seismic applications based on the Helmholtz equation by Graphics Processing Units

    Knibbe, H.P.

    2015-01-01

    The oil and gas industry makes use of computational intensive algorithms to provide an image of the subsurface. The image is obtained by sending wave energy into the subsurface and recording the signal required for a seismic wave to reflect back to the surface from the Earth interfaces that may have

  11. A development of a quantitative situation awareness measurement tool: Computational Representation of Situation Awareness with Graphical Expressions (CoRSAGE)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed quantitative situation awareness (SA) evaluation technique. • We developed a computer based SA evaluation tool for NPPs training environment. • We introduced three rules and components to express more human-like results. • We conducted three sets of training with real plant operators. • Results showed that the tool could reasonably represent operator’s SA. - Abstract: Operator performance measures are used for multiple purposes, such as control room design, human system interface (HSI) evaluation, training, and so on. Performance measures are often focused on results; however, especially for a training purpose – at least in a nuclear industry, more detailed descriptions about processes are required. Situation awareness (SA) measurements have directly/indirectly played as a complimentary measure and provided descriptive insights on how to improve performance of operators for the next training. Unfortunately, most of the well-developed SA measurement techniques, such as Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT) need an expert opinion which sometimes troubles easy spread of measurement’s application or usage. A quantitative SA measurement tool named Computational Representation of Situation Awareness with Graphical Expressions (CoRSAGE) is introduced to resolve some of these concerns. CoRSAGE is based on production rules to represent a human operator’s cognitive process of problem solving, and Bayesian inference to quantify it. Petri Net concept is also used for graphical expressions of SA flow. Three components – inference transition, volatile/non-volatile memory tokens – were newly developed to achieve required functions. Training data of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario for an emergency condition and an earthquake scenario for an abnormal condition by real plant operators were used to validate the tool. The validation result showed that CoRSAGE performed a reasonable match to other performance

  12. COGNITIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS AS A MEANS OF "SOFT" MODELING IN PROBLEMS OF RESTORATION OF FUNCTIONS OF TWO VARIABLES

    A.N. Khomchenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of bi-cubic interpolation on the final element of serendipity family. With cognitive-graphical analysis the rigid model of Ergatoudis, Irons and Zenkevich (1968 compared with alternative models, obtained by the methods: direct geometric design, a weighted averaging of the basis polynomials, systematic generation of bases (advanced Taylor procedure. The emphasis is placed on the phenomenon of "gravitational repulsion" (Zenkevich paradox. The causes of rising of inadequate physical spectra nodal loads on serendipity elements of higher orders are investigated. Soft modeling allows us to build a lot of serendipity elements of bicubic interpolation, and you do not even need to know the exact form of the rigid model. The different interpretations of integral characteristics of the basis polynomials: geometrical, physical, probability are offered. Under the soft model in the theory of interpolation of function of two variables implies the model amenable to change through the choice of basis. Such changes in the family of Lagrangian finite elements of higher orders are excluded (hard simulation. Standard models of serendipity family (Zenkevich were also tough. It was found that the "responsibility" for the rigidity of serendipity model rests on ruled surfaces (zero Gaussian curvature - conoids that predominate in the base set. Cognitive portraits zero lines of standard serendipity surfaces suggested that in order to "mitigate" of serendipity pattern conoid should better be replaced by surfaces of alternating Gaussian curvature. The article shows the alternative (soft bases of serendipity models. The work is devoted to solving scientific and technological problems aimed at the creation, dissemination and use of cognitive computer graphics in teaching and learning. The results are of interest to students of specialties: "Computer Science and Information Technologies", "System Analysis", "Software Engineering", as well as

  13. Computer graphics synthesis for inferring artist studio practice: an application to Diego Velázquez's Las Meninas[

    Stork, David G.; Furuichi, Yasuo

    2009-02-01

    Diego Velázquez's Las meninas (1656) has been called by some art experts "the most important painting of the 17th century," "a theology of painting," and even "the world's greatest painting"; it has been the subject of intensive study. The work depicts a complex scene in the Alcázar palace of King Philip IV of Spain, and includes mirror reflections of the king and queen, apparently standing in place of the viewer, as well as the artist himself standing before an enormous canvas on an easel. Nevertheless, questions remain about the studio and the proper viewing configuration: Is the artist looking toward the perspectivally correct position of the viewer in the museum space (center of projection), outside the picture space? Does the perspectivally correct position correspond to the locations of the king and queen seen reflected in the mirror? Is the bright illumination on the king and queen (as revealed in the mirror) consistent with the lighting in the tableau itself? We addressed these questions in a new way: by building a full computer graphics model of the figures and tableau as well as the viewer's space outside the painting. In our full model, the painting itself is represented as a translucent window onto which the picture space is projected toward the center of projection, that is, the viewer. Our geometric and (new) lighting evidence confirm Janson's and Snyder's contention that the plane mirror on the back wall reflects the other side of the large painting depicted within the tableau, not the king and queen themselves in the studio. We believe our computer graphics synthesis of both the tableau within the painting and the viewer's space in the real world is the first of its kind to address such problems in the history of art.

  14. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  15. EASI graphics - Version II

    Allensworth, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) is an analytical technique for measuring the effectiveness of physical protection systems. EASI Graphics is a computer graphics extension of EASI which provides a capability for performing sensitivity and trade-off analyses of the parameters of a physical protection system. This document reports on the implementation of the Version II of EASI Graphics and illustrates its application with some examples. 5 references, 15 figures, 6 tables

  16. Three-dimensional analysis and classification of arteries in the skin and subcutaneous adipofascial tissue by computer graphics imaging.

    Nakajima, H; Minabe, T; Imanishi, N

    1998-09-01

    To develop new types of surgical flaps that utilize portions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (e.g., a thin flap or an adipofascial flap), three-dimensional investigation of the vasculature in the skin and subcutaneous tissue has been anticipated. In the present study, total-body arterial injection and three-dimensional imaging of the arteries by computer graphics were performed. The full-thickness skin and subcutaneous adipofascial tissue samples, which were obtained from fresh human cadavers injected with radio-opaque medium, were divided into three distinct layers. Angiograms of each layer were introduced into a personal computer to construct three-dimensional images. On a computer monitor, each artery was shown color-coded according to the three portions: the deep adipofascial layer, superficial adipofascial layer, and dermis. Three-dimensional computerized images of each artery in the skin and subcutaneous tissue revealed the components of each vascular plexus and permitted their classification into six types. The distribution of types in the body correlated with the tissue mobility of each area. Clinically, appreciation of the three-dimensional structure of the arteries allowed the development of several new kinds of flaps.

  17. The magic of universal quantum computing with permutations

    Planat, Michel; Rukhsan-Ul-Haq

    2017-01-01

    The role of permutation gates for universal quantum computing is investigated. The \\lq magic' of computation is clarified in the permutation gates, their eigenstates, the Wootters discrete Wigner function and state-dependent contextuality (following many contributions on this subject). A first classification of main types of resulting magic states in low dimensions $d \\le 9$ is performed.

  18. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  19. The Magic of Universal Quantum Computing with Permutations

    Michel Planat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of permutation gates for universal quantum computing is investigated. The “magic” of computation is clarified in the permutation gates, their eigenstates, the Wootters discrete Wigner function, and state-dependent contextuality (following many contributions on this subject. A first classification of a few types of resulting magic states in low dimensions d≤9 is performed.

  20. Using computer graphics to preserve function in resection of malignant melanoma of the foot.

    Kaufman, M; Vantuyl, A; Japour, C; Ghosh, B C

    2001-08-01

    The increasing incidence of malignant melanoma challenges physicians to find innovative ways to preserve function and appearance in affected areas that require partial resection. We carefully planned the resection of a malignant lesion between the third and fourth toes of a 77-year-old man with the aid of computer technology. The subsequent excision of the third, fourth, and fifth digits was executed such that the new metatarsal arc formed would approximate the dimensions of the optimal hyperbola, thereby minimizing gait disturbance.

  1. Massively parallel signal processing using the graphics processing unit for real-time brain-computer interface feature extraction

    J. Adam Wilson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past five years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card (GPU was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI. The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter, followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally-intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a CPU-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  2. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-01-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and ...

  3. Cloud Computing and Some Scenarios for its Application in Universities

    Cigdem Selcukcan Erol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology and a new trend. In recent years most of organisations start to choose their cloud models. The educational institutions, especially universities, cannot ignore the huge amount of benefits that cloud computing may bring them. In this paper, we are explaining in details the concept of cloud computing, its models and usage areas, its working principle, its advantages and disadvantages. We specifically focus on its importance for universities by giving examples for its implementation in e-Learning.

  4. [Mobile phone-computer wireless interactive graphics transmission technology and its medical application].

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Jing

    2010-05-01

    Application of clinical digital medical imaging has raised many tough issues to tackle, such as data storage, management, and information sharing. Here we investigated a mobile phone based medical image management system which is capable of achieving personal medical imaging information storage, management and comprehensive health information analysis. The technologies related to the management system spanning the wireless transmission technology, the technical capabilities of phone in mobile health care and management of mobile medical database were discussed. Taking medical infrared images transmission between phone and computer as an example, the working principle of the present system was demonstrated.

  5. Live theater on a virtual stage: incorporating soft skills and teamwork in computer graphics education.

    Schweppe, M; Geigel, J

    2011-01-01

    Industry has increasingly emphasized the need for "soft" or interpersonal skills development and team-building experience in the college curriculum. Here, we discuss our experiences with providing such opportunities via a collaborative project called the Virtual Theater. In this joint project between the Rochester Institute of Technology's School of Design and Department of Computer Science, the goal is to enable live performance in a virtual space with participants in different physical locales. Students work in teams, collaborating with other students in and out of their disciplines.

  6. Compute-unified device architecture implementation of a block-matching algorithm for multiple graphical processing unit cards.

    Massanes, Francesc; Cadennes, Marie; Brankov, Jovan G

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a fast implementation of a classical block matching motion estimation algorithm for multiple Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) computing engine. The implemented block matching algorithm (BMA) uses summed absolute difference (SAD) error criterion and full grid search (FS) for finding optimal block displacement. In this evaluation we compared the execution time of a GPU and CPU implementation for images of various sizes, using integer and non-integer search grids.The results show that use of a GPU card can shorten computation time by a factor of 200 times for integer and 1000 times for a non-integer search grid. The additional speedup for non-integer search grid comes from the fact that GPU has built-in hardware for image interpolation. Further, when using multiple GPU cards, the presented evaluation shows the importance of the data splitting method across multiple cards, but an almost linear speedup with a number of cards is achievable.In addition we compared execution time of the proposed FS GPU implementation with two existing, highly optimized non-full grid search CPU based motion estimations methods, namely implementation of the Pyramidal Lucas Kanade Optical flow algorithm in OpenCV and Simplified Unsymmetrical multi-Hexagon search in H.264/AVC standard. In these comparisons, FS GPU implementation still showed modest improvement even though the computational complexity of FS GPU implementation is substantially higher than non-FS CPU implementation.We also demonstrated that for an image sequence of 720×480 pixels in resolution, commonly used in video surveillance, the proposed GPU implementation is sufficiently fast for real-time motion estimation at 30 frames-per-second using two NVIDIA C1060 Tesla GPU cards.

  7. Developing a friendly I/O graphical interface for the integral transport CP2D computer code

    Constantin, M.

    2002-01-01

    The code CP 2 D design and developing involved the newest methods and techniques in the first flight collision probability (FFCP) calculations. These methods are strongly connected with the computer developing both in hardware and software. The code CP 2 D was developed in INR Pitesti, between 1997-2001. It is a transport code in the first flight collision probability formalism, able to treat exactly a lot of complicated geometry (such as CANDU clusters, TRIGA and PWR fuel assemblies). The first version CP 2 D1.0 was released in 1998. The second, CP 2 D2.0, was released in 1999 and uses a multistratified coolant model (MM) for CANDU loss of coolant accident analysis. The third version, CP 2 D3.0 (2000), have incorporated a generalized burning scheme. An user-friendly graphical interface was developed in 2001. It is intended to a rapid introduction of the input data and to extract the interest information from the output files. This information is directly converted into graphics and tables contained into a single MsWord document. The introduced input data are validated by the interface if the numerical, physical and mathematical restrictions are fulfilled. The user can see the representation of the model and can interactively modify the input data until the model is correct. The interface and the code were exhaustively documented and the obtained version was released as CP 2 D4.0. The version allows to a low experienced user to build the input files, to correct the possible errors and to extract the information of interest for the analyzed problem. The paper shows the interface as a useful concept for the upgrade of the classical codes. (author)

  8. BEAMR: An interactive graphic computer program for design of charged particle beam transport systems

    Leonard, R. F.; Giamati, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for a PDP-15 is presented which calculates, to first order, the characteristics of charged-particle beam as it is transported through a sequence of focusing and bending magnets. The maximum dimensions of the beam envelope normal to the transport system axis are continuously plotted on an oscilloscope as a function of distance along the axis. Provision is made to iterate the calculation by changing the types of magnets, their positions, and their field strengths. The program is especially useful for transport system design studies because of the ease and rapidity of altering parameters from panel switches. A typical calculation for a system with eight elements is completed in less than 10 seconds. An IBM 7094 version containing more-detailed printed output but no oscilloscope display is also presented.

  9. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  10. Three-dimensional computer graphics for surgical procedure learning: Web three-dimensional application for cleft lip repair.

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Mori, Ayako; Tanaka, Daigo; Fujino, Toyomi; Chiyokura, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    In surgical procedures for cleft lip, surgeons attempt to use various skin incisions and small flaps to achieve a better and more natural shape postoperatively. They must understand the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the lips. However, they may have difficulty learning the surgical procedures precisely from normal textbooks with two-dimensional illustrations. Recent developments in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT) and laser stereolithography have enabled surgeons to visualize the structures of cleft lips from desired viewpoints. However, this method cannot reflect the advantages offered by specific surgical procedures. To solve this problem, we used the benefits offered by 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) and 3D animation. By using scanning 3D-CT image data of patients with cleft lips, 3D-CG models of the cleft lips were created. Several animations for surgical procedures such as incision designs, rotation of small skin flaps, and sutures were made. This system can recognize the details of an operation procedure clearly from any viewpoint, which cannot be acquired from the usual textbook illustrations. This animation system can be used for developing new skin-flap design, understanding the operational procedure, and using tools in case presentations. The 3D animations can also be uploaded to the World Wide Web for use in teleconferencing.

  11. Computer Graphic Design Using Auto-CAD and Plug Nozzle Research

    Rogers, Rayna C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of creating computer generated images varies widely. They can be use for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), or as a blueprint for designing parts. The schematic that I will be working on the summer will be used to create nozzles that are a part of a larger system. At this phase in the project, the nozzles needed for the systems have been fabricated. One part of my mission is to create both three dimensional and two dimensional models on Auto-CAD 2002 of the nozzles. The research on plug nozzles will allow me to have a better understanding of how they assist in the thrust need for a missile to take off. NASA and the United States military are working together to develop a new design concept. On most missiles a convergent-divergent nozzle is used to create thrust. However, the two are looking into different concepts for the nozzle. The standard convergent-divergent nozzle forces a mixture of combustible fluids and air through a smaller area in comparison to where the combination was mixed. Once it passes through the smaller area known as A8 it comes out the end of the nozzle which is larger the first or area A9. This creates enough thrust for the mechanism whether it is an F-18 fighter jet or a missile. The A9 section of the convergent-divergent nozzle has a mechanism that controls how large A9 can be. This is needed because the pressure of the air coming out nozzle must be equal to that of the ambient pressure other wise there will be a loss of performance in the machine. The plug nozzle however does not need to have an A9 that can vary. When the air flow comes out it can automatically sense what the ambient pressure is and will adjust accordingly. The objective of this design is to create a plug nozzle that is not as complicated mechanically as it counterpart the convergent-divergent nozzle.

  12. The universal computer the road from Leibniz to Turing

    Davis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The breathtakingly rapid pace of change in computing makes it easy to overlook the pioneers who began it all. Written by Martin Davis, respected logician and researcher in the theory of computation, The Universal Computer: The Road from Leibniz to Turing explores the fascinating lives, ideas, and discoveries of seven remarkable mathematicians. It tells the stories of the unsung heroes of the computer age -- the logicians. The story begins with Leibniz in the 17th century and then focuses on Boole, Frege, Cantor, Hilbert, and Godel, before turning to Turing. Turing's analysis of algorithmic pro

  13. Research on the Teaching System of the University Computer Foundation

    Ji Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inonal students, the teaching contents, classification, hierarchical teaching methods with the combination of professional level training, as well as for top-notch students after class to promote comprehensive training methods for different students, establish online Q & A, test platform, to strengthen the integration professional education and computer education and training system of college computer basic course of study and exploration, and the popularization and application of the basic programming course, promote the cultivation of university students in the computer foundation, thinking methods and innovative practice ability, achieve the goal of individualized educ the College of computer basic course teaching, the specific circumstances of the need for students, professiation.

  14. Virtual reality using guided imagery to create Kanji or Hiragana by computer graphics: I

    Ishigame, Masaaki; Miura, Nozomu; Hosaka, Akiko

    1997-04-01

    We have been studying a kind of word-processor that is able to create Japanese characters, Kanji or Hiragana strings in the cursive style, using an electronic writing brush model. Int his paper, we describe in detail the operation characteristics of the electronic writing brush which we have proposed. We defined a touch shape pattern of the electronic writing brush as a form which is projected as a circle and a cone. The brush goes on certain points of the skeleton of the character figure which is given as skeleton data. The thickness of the line is determined by a diametric variable brush pressure. Our progressive action model can rotate the direction of the writing brush tip corresponding to the difference angle between the direction of brush tip and the direction of the brush movement, and also the softness of the writing brush to express the writing brush method called the side writing brush. The front side and back side of the writing brush can be expressed in a calligraphic drawing. With our technique we can draw characters in actual stroke order on a virtual computer plane as if they are written by an actual writing brush.

  15. Graphics and visualization principles & algorithms

    Theoharis, T; Platis, Nikolaos; Patrikalakis, Nicholas M

    2008-01-01

    Computer and engineering collections strong in applied graphics and analysis of visual data via computer will find Graphics & Visualization: Principles and Algorithms makes an excellent classroom text as well as supplemental reading. It integrates coverage of computer graphics and other visualization topics, from shadow geneeration and particle tracing to spatial subdivision and vector data visualization, and it provides a thorough review of literature from multiple experts, making for a comprehensive review essential to any advanced computer study.-California Bookw

  16. Design Graphics

    1990-01-01

    A mathematician, David R. Hedgley, Jr. developed a computer program that considers whether a line in a graphic model of a three-dimensional object should or should not be visible. Known as the Hidden Line Computer Code, the program automatically removes superfluous lines and displays an object from a specific viewpoint, just as the human eye would see it. An example of how one company uses the program is the experience of Birdair which specializes in production of fabric skylights and stadium covers. The fabric called SHEERFILL is a Teflon coated fiberglass material developed in cooperation with DuPont Company. SHEERFILL glazed structures are either tension structures or air-supported tension structures. Both are formed by patterned fabric sheets supported by a steel or aluminum frame or cable network. Birdair uses the Hidden Line Computer Code, to illustrate a prospective structure to an architect or owner. The program generates a three- dimensional perspective with the hidden lines removed. This program is still used by Birdair and continues to be commercially available to the public.

  17. Effects of computer-based graphic organizers to solve one-step word problems for middle school students with mild intellectual disability: A preliminary study.

    Sheriff, Kelli A; Boon, Richard T

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of computer-based graphic organizers, using Kidspiration 3© software, to solve one-step word problems. Participants included three students with mild intellectual disability enrolled in a functional academic skills curriculum in a self-contained classroom. A multiple probe single-subject research design (Horner & Baer, 1978) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-based graphic organizers to solving mathematical one-step word problems. During the baseline phase, the students completed a teacher-generated worksheet that consisted of nine functional word problems in a traditional format using a pencil, paper, and a calculator. In the intervention and maintenance phases, the students were instructed to complete the word problems using a computer-based graphic organizer. Results indicated that all three of the students improved in their ability to solve the one-step word problems using computer-based graphic organizers compared to traditional instructional practices. Limitations of the study and recommendations for future research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a computational system for radiotherapic planning with the IMRT technique applied to the MCNP computer code with 3D graphic interface for voxel models

    Fonseca, Telma Cristina Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy - IMRT is an advanced treatment technique used worldwide in oncology medicine branch. On this master proposal was developed a software package for simulating the IMRT protocol, namely SOFT-RT which attachment the research group 'Nucleo de Radiacoes Ionizantes' - NRI at UFMG. The computational system SOFT-RT allows producing the absorbed dose simulation of the radiotherapic treatment through a three-dimensional voxel model of the patient. The SISCODES code, from NRI, research group, helps in producing the voxel model of the interest region from a set of CT or MRI digitalized images. The SOFT-RT allows also the rotation and translation of the model about the coordinate system axis for better visualization of the model and the beam. The SOFT-RT collects and exports the necessary parameters to MCNP code which will carry out the nuclear radiation transport towards the tumor and adjacent healthy tissues for each orientation and position of the beam planning. Through three-dimensional visualization of voxel model of a patient, it is possible to focus on a tumoral region preserving the whole tissues around them. It takes in account where exactly the radiation beam passes through, which tissues are affected and how much dose is applied in both tissues. The Out-module from SOFT-RT imports the results and express the dose response superimposing dose and voxel model in gray scale in a three-dimensional graphic representation. The present master thesis presents the new computational system of radiotherapic treatment - SOFT-RT code which has been developed using the robust and multi-platform C ++ programming language with the OpenGL graphics packages. The Linux operational system was adopted with the goal of running it in an open source platform and free access. Preliminary simulation results for a cerebral tumor case will be reported as well as some dosimetric evaluations. (author)

  19. Continuous-Time Symmetric Hopfield Nets are Computationally Universal

    Šíma, Jiří; Orponen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2003), s. 693-733 ISSN 0899-7667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA ČR GA201/02/1456 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : continuous-time Hopfield network * Liapunov function * analog computation * computational power * Turing universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2003

  20. ANCIENT SHIPYARD ON TURKEY’S DANA ISLAND: ITS 3D MODELLING WITH PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS

    A. Denker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Although a small island 2 km off the southern coast of Turkey, Dana Island offers a rich history which is likely to shed light upon the Dark Ages. Starting from 2015 our archaeological team discovered through continuing coastal and underwater excavations 274 shipsheds/slipways there. This discovery places Dana Island among the biggest shipyards of antiquity. The slipways varied in dimensions suitable for vessels of different sizes from small boats to large warships. Historical sources suggest that the name of the island may stem from Yadnana, Yadana or Adana which was mentioned in an Assyrian tablet of the 8th century BC, as an island in the vicinity of Cyprus. Archaeological evidence exists that shows Dana Island had played a significant role in seamanship activities in Levant starting from Neolithic times. A substantial part of the naval campaigns must have involved Dana Island which used be the biggest shipyard/naval base of the Eastern Mediterranean. A 3D model of the island has been made by using photogrammetry and computer graphics methods and simulations were executed to check the hypotheses related to the involvement of Dana Island in the major sea battles of antiquity, such as Sea Battle of Lade in 495 BC.

  1. How do trees grow? Response from the graphical and quantitative analyses of computed tomography scanning data collected on stem sections.

    Dutilleul, Pierre; Han, Li Wen; Beaulieu, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Tree growth, as measured via the width of annual rings, is used for environmental impact assessment and climate back-forecasting. This fascinating natural process has been studied at various scales in the stem (from cell and fiber within a growth ring, to ring and entire stem) in one, two, and three dimensions. A new approach is presented to study tree growth in 3D from stem sections, at a scale sufficiently small to allow the delineation of reliable limits for annual rings and large enough to capture directional variation in growth rates. The technology applied is computed tomography scanning, which provides - for one stem section - millions of data (indirect measures of wood density) that can be mapped, together with a companion measure of dispersion and growth ring limits in filigree. Graphical and quantitative analyses are reported for white spruce trees with circular vs non-circular growth. Implications for dendroclimatological research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A computer program with graphical user interface to plot the multigroup cross sections of WIMS-D library

    Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ganesan, S.; Jagannathan, V.; Karthikeyan, R.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme entitled 'Final Stage of the WIMS Library Update Project', new and updated WIMS-D libraries based upon ENDF/B-VI.5, JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2 have become available. A project to prepare an exhaustive handbook of WIMS-D cross sections from old and new libraries has been taken up by the authors. As part of this project, we have developed a computer program XnWlup with user-friendly graphical interface to help the users of WIMS-D library to enable quick visualization of the plots of the energy dependence of the multigroup cross sections of any nuclide of interest. This software enables the user to generate and view the histogram of 69 multi-group cross sections as a function of neutron energy under Microsoft Windows environment. This software is designed using Microsoft Visual C++ and Microsoft Foundation Classes Library. The current features of the software, on-line help manual and future plans for further development are described in this paper

  3. 3D Computer graphics simulation to obtain optimal surgical exposure during microvascular decompression of the glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Matsushima, Toshio; Kawashima, Masatou; Nakahara, Yukiko; Takahashi, Yuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Oishi, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2013-10-01

    The affected artery in glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) is most often the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from the caudal side or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) from the rostral side. This technical report describes two representative cases of GPN, one with PICA as the affected artery and the other with AICA, and demonstrates the optimal approach for each affected artery. We used 3D computer graphics (3D CG) simulation to consider the ideal transposition of the affected artery in any position and approach. Subsequently, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery based on this simulation. For PICA, we used the transcondylar fossa approach in the lateral recumbent position, very close to the prone position, with the patient's head tilted anteriorly for caudal transposition of PICA. In contrast, for AICA, we adopted a lateral suboccipital approach with opening of the lateral cerebellomedullary fissure, to visualize better the root entry zone of the glossopharyngeal nerve and to obtain a wide working space in the cerebellomedullary cistern, for rostral transposition of AICA. Both procedures were performed successfully. The best surgical approach for MVD in patients with GPN is contingent on the affected artery--PICA or AICA. 3D CG simulation provides tailored approach for MVD of the glossopharyngeal nerve, thereby ensuring optimal surgical exposure.

  4. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 3D Graphics with Spreadsheets

    Jan Benacka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the formulas for orthographic parallel projection of 3D bodies on computer screen are derived using secondary school vector algebra. The spreadsheet implementation is demonstrated in six applications that project bodies with increasing intricacy – a convex body (cube with non-solved visibility, convex bodies (cube, chapel with solved visibility, a coloured convex body (chapel with solved visibility, and a coloured non-convex body (church with solved visibility. The projections are revolvable in horizontal and vertical plane, and they are changeable in size. The examples show an unusual way of using spreadsheets as a 3D computer graphics tool. The applications can serve as a simple introduction to the general principles of computer graphics, to the graphics with spreadsheets, and as a tool for exercising stereoscopic vision. The presented approach is usable at visualising 3D scenes within some topics of secondary school curricula as solid geometry (angles and distances of lines and planes within simple bodies or analytic geometry in space (angles and distances of lines and planes in E3, and even at university level within calculus at visualising graphs of z = f(x,y functions. Examples are pictured.

  6. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  7. Methodological Potential of Computer Experiment in Teaching Mathematics at University

    Lin, Kequan; Sokolova, Anna Nikolaevna; Vlasova, Vera K.

    2017-01-01

    The study is relevant due to the opportunity of increasing efficiency of teaching mathematics at university through integration of students of computer experiment conducted with the use of IT in this process. The problem of there search is defined by a contradiction between great potential opportunities of mathematics experiment for motivating and…

  8. Cloud Computing E-Communication Services in the University Environment

    Babin, Ron; Halilovic, Branka

    2017-01-01

    The use of cloud computing services has grown dramatically in post-secondary institutions in the last decade. In particular, universities have been attracted to the low-cost and flexibility of acquiring cloud software services from Google, Microsoft and others, to implement e-mail, calendar and document management and other basic office software.…

  9. Computation of Universal Objects for Distributions Over Co-Trees

    Petersen, Henrik Densing; Topsøe, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    for the model or, equivalently, the corresponding universal code, can be determined exactly via an algorithm of low complexity. Natural relations to problems on the computation of capacity and on the determination of information projections are established. More surprisingly, a direct connection to a problem...

  10. The University of Michigan's Computer-Aided Engineering Network.

    Atkins, D. E.; Olsen, Leslie A.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Computer-Aided Engineering Network (CAEN) of the University of Michigan. Describes its arrangement of workstations, communication networks, and servers. Outlines the factors considered in hardware and software decision making. Reviews the program's impact on students. (ML)

  11. Computer Graphics in Cinematography

    Polozuns, Aleksandrs

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to cover the major characteristics about different techniques presently used in the field of CG and visual effects by giving a variety of examples from the famous movies. Moreover, the history of visual effects and CGI, and how the development process of it changed the industry of cinematography were studied. The practi-cal part of this study is dedicated to analyzing what modern software are the most popular ones among professionals. Several studios were survey...

  12. Co-occurrence rate networks: towards separate training for undirected graphical models

    Zhu, Zhemin

    2015-01-01

    Dependence is a universal phenomenon which can be observed everywhere. In machine learning, probabilistic graphical models (PGMs) represent dependence relations with graphs. PGMs find wide applications in natural language processing (NLP), speech processing, computer vision, biomedicine, information

  13. Microcosm: Mysteries of the Universe and of computing

    2003-01-01

    In the first week of December, two new exhibitions open in Microcosm: "Mysteries of the Universe" and "Computing@CERN". Ever wondered why the Universe is habitable? How many dimensions there are? Or indeed, where matter comes from? In Microcosm's new "Mysteries of the Universe" exhibition 20 CERN researchers reveal the question that intrigues them the most and why they find the search for answers so fascinating. The exhibition consists of 20 stories, told by the researchers themselves in one of 4 languages (English, French, German or Italian). Through their tales, the visitor can discover the essence of CERN - a curiosity to understand the mechanisms of a universe full of surprises, where many fundamental questions remain unresolved. With their diverse nationalities and experience, the participants reveal not only the variety of physics research underway at CERN, but also the experiments yet to come and indeed an element of the international collaboration so essential to the laboratory. In the words of on...

  14. Nonuniform code concatenation for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing

    Nikahd, Eesa; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saheb Zamani, Morteza

    2017-09-01

    Using transversal gates is a straightforward and efficient technique for fault-tolerant quantum computing. Since transversal gates alone cannot be computationally universal, they must be combined with other approaches such as magic state distillation, code switching, or code concatenation to achieve universality. In this paper we propose an alternative approach for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing, mainly based on the code concatenation approach proposed in [T. Jochym-O'Connor and R. Laflamme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 010505 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.010505], but in a nonuniform fashion. The proposed approach is described based on nonuniform concatenation of the 7-qubit Steane code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, as well as the 5-qubit code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, which lead to two 49-qubit and 47-qubit codes, respectively. These codes can correct any arbitrary single physical error with the ability to perform a universal set of fault-tolerant gates, without using magic state distillation.

  15. Computer network access to scientific information systems for minority universities

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Wakim, Nagi T.

    1993-08-01

    The evolution of computer networking technology has lead to the establishment of a massive networking infrastructure which interconnects various types of computing resources at many government, academic, and corporate institutions. A large segment of this infrastructure has been developed to facilitate information exchange and resource sharing within the scientific community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports both the development and the application of computer networks which provide its community with access to many valuable multi-disciplinary scientific information systems and on-line databases. Recognizing the need to extend the benefits of this advanced networking technology to the under-represented community, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in the Space Data and Computing Division at the Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program: a major networking and education initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Universities (MUs). In this paper, we will briefly explain the various components of the MU-SPIN Program while highlighting how, by providing access to scientific information systems and on-line data, it promotes a higher level of collaboration among faculty and students and NASA scientists.

  16. Development of the operator training system using computer graphics. Pt. 1. Defining the system configuration and developing basic techniques

    Takana, Kenchi; Sasou, Kunihide; Sano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Koichi; Noji, Kunio

    2001-01-01

    Efficient and concurrent operator training seems to be crucial in near future because of an increase in operators to be trained due to generation alternations. Ever developed Man -Machine-Simulator (MMS) has several merits: (1) Operators' cognitive and behavioral activities among team in emergency could be simulated based on the concurrent mental model; (2) Simulated scenarios could be expanded to multiple malfunctions events, to all of which procedures could not be stipulated previously, (3) Standard behavior in coping with anomalies including communication and operations could be presented. This paper describes the development of an operator training system by applying this MMS. Three dimensional computer graphics (3D-CG) was adopted for improving the training effects and attracting operators' interest by visually presenting realistic operating team behavior in the main control room. Towards the completion of the operator training system, following designs of system configuration and developments of several basic techniques were availed: (1) Imaging the utilization of the operator training system, functions to be equipped and system configurations for realizing functions were determined. And three of scenarios were chosen in order to appeal the merits of the MMS and to raise training effects. (2) Knowledge base was completed to execute simulations. And connection between operator team model and plant simulator, that is the 2nd generation type simulator of the BTC -4, was executed to obtain simulation results (time sequential log data of plant dynamics and operating team behavior). (3) Operator's actions seen in VCR tapes in real training were classified for eighteen kinds of fundamental categories and those fundamental actions were modeled on 3D-CG using the People Shop software. The 3D-CG of main control panel was prepared using Multi Gen software. (author)

  17. Telehealth in Schools Using a Systematic Educational Model Based on Fiction Screenplays, Interactive Documentaries, and Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics.

    Miranda, Diogo Julien; Chao, Lung Wen

    2018-03-01

    Preliminary studies suggest the need of a global vision in academic reform, leading to education re-invention. This would include problem-based education using transversal topics, developing of thinking skills, social interaction, and information-processing skills. We aimed to develop a new educational model in health with modular components to be broadcast and applied as a tele-education course. We developed a systematic model based on a "Skills and Goals Matrix" to adapt scientific contents on fictional screenplays, three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics of the human body, and interactive documentaries. We selected 13 topics based on youth vulnerabilities in Brazil to be disseminated through a television show with 15 episodes. We developed scientific content for each theme, naturally inserting it into screenplays, together with 3D sequences and interactive documentaries. The modular structure was then adapted to a distance-learning course. The television show was broadcast on national television for two consecutive years to an estimated audience of 30 million homes, and ever since on an Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) channel. It was also reorganized as a tele-education course for 2 years, reaching 1,180 subscriptions from all 27 Brazilian states, resulting in 240 graduates. Positive results indicate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a model of modular entertainment audio-visual productions using health and education integrated concepts. This structure also allowed the model to be interconnected with other sources and applied as tele-education course, educating, informing, and stimulating the behavior change. Future works should reinforce this joint structure of telehealth, communication, and education.

  18. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Graphic Storytelling

    Thompson, John

    2009-01-01

    Graphic storytelling is a medium that allows students to make and share stories, while developing their art communication skills. American comics today are more varied in genre, approach, and audience than ever before. When considering the impact of Japanese manga on the youth, graphic storytelling emerges as a powerful player in pop culture. In…

  20. Introduction to regression graphics

    Cook, R Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Covers the use of dynamic and interactive computer graphics in linear regression analysis, focusing on analytical graphics. Features new techniques like plot rotation. The authors have composed their own regression code, using Xlisp-Stat language called R-code, which is a nearly complete system for linear regression analysis and can be utilized as the main computer program in a linear regression course. The accompanying disks, for both Macintosh and Windows computers, contain the R-code and Xlisp-Stat. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is ava

  1. Clifford algebras, noncommutative tori and universal quantum computers

    Vlasov, Alexander Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Recently author suggested [quant-ph/0010071] an application of Clifford algebras for construction of a "compiler" for universal binary quantum computer together with later development [quant-ph/0012009] of the similar idea for a non-binary base. The non-binary case is related with application of some extension of idea of Clifford algebras. It is noncommutative torus defined by polynomial algebraic relations of order l. For l=2 it coincides with definition of Clifford algebra. Here is presente...

  2. Graphics-oriented application language for LASNEX

    Stringer, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    GOAL, a graphics-oriented application language, was developed to help physicists understand the large amounts of data produced by LASNEX. GOAL combines many aspects of the old LASNEX language, computer graphics, and standard computer languages

  3. Modernization of the graphics post-processors of the Hamburg German Climate Computer Center Carbon Cycle Codes

    Stevens, E.J.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    The existing National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) code in the Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model and the Hamburg Large-Scale Geostrophic Ocean General Circulation Model was modernized and reduced in size while still producing an equivalent end result. A reduction in the size of the existing code from more than 50,000 lines to approximately 7,500 lines in the new code has made the new code much easier to maintain. The existing code in Hamburg model uses legacy NCAR (including even emulated CALCOMP subrountines) graphics to display graphical output. The new code uses only current (version 3.1) NCAR subrountines.

  4. Graphics gems

    Glassner, Andrew S

    1993-01-01

    ""The GRAPHICS GEMS Series"" was started in 1990 by Andrew Glassner. The vision and purpose of the Series was - and still is - to provide tips, techniques, and algorithms for graphics programmers. All of the gems are written by programmers who work in the field and are motivated by a common desire to share interesting ideas and tools with their colleagues. Each volume provides a new set of innovative solutions to a variety of programming problems.

  5. Graphic notation

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Texbook to be used along with training the practise of graphic notation. Describes method; exercises; bibliography; collection of examples. If you can read Danish, please refer to that edition which is by far much more updated.......Texbook to be used along with training the practise of graphic notation. Describes method; exercises; bibliography; collection of examples. If you can read Danish, please refer to that edition which is by far much more updated....

  6. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  7. Cumulative hierarchies and computability over universes of sets

    Domenico Cantone

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Various metamathematical investigations, beginning with Fraenkel’s historical proof of the independence of the axiom of choice, called for suitable definitions of hierarchical universes of sets. This led to the discovery of such important cumulative structures as the one singled out by von Neumann (generally taken as the universe of all sets and Godel’s universe of the so-called constructibles. Variants of those are exploited occasionally in studies concerning the foundations of analysis (according to Abraham Robinson’s approach, or concerning non-well-founded sets. We hence offer a systematic presentation of these many structures, partly motivated by their relevance and pervasiveness in mathematics. As we report, numerous properties of hierarchy-related notions such as rank, have been verified with the assistance of the ÆtnaNova proof-checker.Through SETL and Maple implementations of procedures which effectively handle the Ackermann’s hereditarily finite sets, we illustrate a particularly significant case among those in which the entities which form a universe of sets can be algorithmically constructed and manipulated; hereby, the fruitful bearing on pure mathematics of cumulative set hierarchies ramifies into the realms of theoretical computer science and algorithmics.

  8. Universal quantum computation with temporal-mode bilayer square lattices

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Yokoyama, Shota; Furusawa, Akira; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an experimental design for universal continuous-variable quantum computation that incorporates recent innovations in linear-optics-based continuous-variable cluster state generation and cubic-phase gate teleportation. The first ingredient is a protocol for generating the bilayer-square-lattice cluster state (a universal resource state) with temporal modes of light. With this state, measurement-based implementation of Gaussian unitary gates requires only homodyne detection. Second, we describe a measurement device that implements an adaptive cubic-phase gate, up to a random phase-space displacement. It requires a two-step sequence of homodyne measurements and consumes a (non-Gaussian) cubic-phase state.

  9. Data Sets, Ensemble Cloud Computing, and the University Library (Invited)

    Plale, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The environmental researcher at the public university has new resources at their disposal to aid in research and publishing. Cloud computing provides compute cycles on demand for analysis and modeling scenarios. Cloud computing is attractive for e-Science because of the ease with which cores can be accessed on demand, and because the virtual machine implementation that underlies cloud computing reduces the cost of porting a numeric or analysis code to a new platform. At the university, many libraries at larger universities are developing the e-Science skills to serve as repositories of record for publishable data sets. But these are confusing times for the publication of data sets from environmental research. The large publishers of scientific literature are advocating a process whereby data sets are tightly tied to a publication. In other words, a paper published in the scientific literature that gives results based on data, must have an associated data set accessible that backs up the results. This approach supports reproducibility of results in that publishers maintain a repository for the papers they publish, and the data sets that the papers used. Does such a solution that maps one data set (or subset) to one paper fit the needs of the environmental researcher who among other things uses complex models, mines longitudinal data bases, and generates observational results? The second school of thought has emerged out of NSF, NOAA, and NASA funded efforts over time: data sets exist coherent at a location, such as occurs at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). But when a collection is coherent, reproducibility of individual results is more challenging. We argue for a third complementary option: the university repository as a location for data sets produced as a result of university-based research. This location for a repository relies on the expertise developing in the university libraries across the country, and leverages tools, such as are being developed

  10. THE DESIGNING OF ELECTRONIC TEACHING-METHODS COMPLEX «GRAPHICS» FOR REALIZATION OF COMPUTER-BASED LEARNING OF ENGINEERING-GRAPHIC DISCIPLINES

    Іван Нищак

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contains Theoretical Foundations of designing of author’s electronic educational-methodical complex (EEMC «Graphics», intended to implement the engineering-graphic preparation of future teachers of technology in terms of computer-based learning. The process of designing of electronic educational-methodical complex “Graphics” includes the following successive stages: 1 identification of didactic goals and objectives; 2the designing of patterns of EEMC; 3 the selection of contents and systematization of educational material; 4 the program-technical implementation of EEMC; 5 interface design; 6 expert assessment of quality of EEMC; 7 testing of EEMC; 8 adjusting the software; 9 the development of guidelines and instructions for the use of EEMC.

  11. Six networks on a universal neuromorphic computing substrate

    Thomas ePfeil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.

  12. Six networks on a universal neuromorphic computing substrate.

    Pfeil, Thomas; Grübl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Müller, Eric; Müller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A; Schmuker, Michael; Brüderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.

  13. Roads towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation

    Campbell, Earl T.; Terhal, Barbara M.; Vuillot, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    A practical quantum computer must not merely store information, but also process it. To prevent errors introduced by noise from multiplying and spreading, a fault-tolerant computational architecture is required. Current experiments are taking the first steps toward noise-resilient logical qubits. But to convert these quantum devices from memories to processors, it is necessary to specify how a universal set of gates is performed on them. The leading proposals for doing so, such as magic-state distillation and colour-code techniques, have high resource demands. Alternative schemes, such as those that use high-dimensional quantum codes in a modular architecture, have potential benefits, but need to be explored further.

  14. Mathematical Graphic Organizers

    Zollman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    As part of a math-science partnership, a university mathematics educator and ten elementary school teachers developed a novel approach to mathematical problem solving derived from research on reading and writing pedagogy. Specifically, research indicates that students who use graphic organizers to arrange their ideas improve their comprehension…

  15. Graphic Ecologies

    Brook Weld Muller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay describes strategic approaches to graphic representation associated with critical environmental engagement and that build from the idea of works of architecture as stitches in the ecological fabric of the city. It focuses on the building up of partial or fragmented graphics in order to describe inclusive, open-ended possibilities for making architecture that marry rich experience and responsive performance. An aphoristic approach to crafting drawings involves complex layering, conscious absence and the embracing of tension. A self-critical attitude toward the generation of imagery characterized by the notion of ‘loose precision’ may lead to more transformative and environmentally responsive architectures.

  16. Graphics gems

    Heckbert, Paul S

    1994-01-01

    Graphics Gems IV contains practical techniques for 2D and 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and image processing. The book presents articles on polygons and polyhedral; a mix of formulas, optimized algorithms, and tutorial information on the geometry of 2D, 3D, and n-D space; transformations; and parametric curves and surfaces. The text also includes articles on ray tracing; shading 3D models; and frame buffer techniques. Articles on image processing; algorithms for graphical layout; basic interpolation methods; and subroutine libraries for vector and matrix algebra are also demonstrated. Com

  17. Efficient universal quantum channel simulation in IBM's cloud quantum computer

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Xin, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-07-01

    The study of quantum channels is an important field and promises a wide range of applications, because any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel that transforms an initial state into a final state. Inspired by the method of performing non-unitary operators by the linear combination of unitary operations, we proposed a quantum algorithm for the simulation of the universal single-qubit channel, described by a convex combination of "quasi-extreme" channels corresponding to four Kraus operators, and is scalable to arbitrary higher dimension. We demonstrated the whole algorithm experimentally using the universal IBM cloud-based quantum computer and studied the properties of different qubit quantum channels. We illustrated the quantum capacity of the general qubit quantum channels, which quantifies the amount of quantum information that can be protected. The behavior of quantum capacity in different channels revealed which types of noise processes can support information transmission, and which types are too destructive to protect information. There was a general agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experiments, which strongly supports our method. By realizing the arbitrary qubit channel, this work provides a universally- accepted way to explore various properties of quantum channels and novel prospect for quantum communication.

  18. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ(2 ) Interactions

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2018-04-01

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized—using only linear optics and χ(2 ) (three-wave mixing) interactions—in any (n +1 )-dimensional qudit basis of the n -pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ(2 ) Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u (3 ) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ(2 ) interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ(2 ) interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  19. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ^{(2)} Interactions.

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2018-04-20

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized-using only linear optics and χ^{(2)} (three-wave mixing) interactions-in any (n+1)-dimensional qudit basis of the n-pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ^{(2)} Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u(3) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ^{(2)} interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ^{(2)} interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  20. Availability and Overlap of Quality Computer Science Journal Holdings in Selected University Libraries in Malaysia

    Zainab, A.N.; Ng, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    The study reveals the availability status of quality journals in the field of computer science held in the libraries of the University of Malaya, (UM), University of Science Malaysia (USM), University of Technology Malaysia (UTM), National University of Malaysia (UKM) and University Putra Malaysia (UPM). These universities are selected since they offer degree programmes in computer science. The study also investigates the degree of overlaps and unique titles in the five libraries. The Univers...

  1. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...... of graphical models and genetics. The potential of graphical models is explored and illustrated through a number of example applications where the genetic element is substantial or dominating....

  2. Graphical interpretation of numerical model results

    Drewes, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer software has been developed to produce high quality graphical displays of data from a numerical grid model. The code uses an existing graphical display package (DISSPLA) and overcomes some of the problems of both line-printer output and traditional graphics. The software has been designed to be flexible enough to handle arbitrarily placed computation grids and a variety of display requirements

  3. Functional information technology in geometry-graphic training of engineers

    Irina D. Stolbova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, information technology fundamentally changed the design activity and made significant adjustments to the development of design documentation. Electronic drawings and 3d-models appeared instead of paper drawings and the traditional form of the design documentation. Geometric modeling of 3d-technology has replaced the graphic design technology. Standards on the electronic models are introduced. Electronic prototypes and 3d-printing contribute to the spread of rapid prototyping technologies.In these conditions, the task to find the new learning technology, corresponding to the level of development of information technologies and meeting the requirements of modern design and manufacturing technologies, comes to the fore. The purpose of this paper — the analysis of the information technology capabilities in the formation of geometrical-graphic competences, happening in the base of graphic training of students of technical university. Traditionally, basic graphic training of students in the junior university courses consisted in consecutive studying of the descriptive geometry, engineering and computer graphics. Today, the use of integrative approach is relevant, but the role of computer graphics varies considerably. It is not only an object of study, but also a learning tool, the core base of graphic training of students. Computer graphics is an efficient mechanism for the development of students’ spatial thinking. The role of instrumental training of students to the wide use of CAD-systems increases in the solution of educational problems and in the implementation of project tasks, which corresponds to the modern requirements of the professional work of the designer-constructor.In this paper, the following methods are used: system analysis, synthesis, simulation.General geometric-graphic training model of students of innovation orientation, based on the use of a wide range of computer technology is developed. The

  4. Computer Use and Vision.Related Problems Among University ...

    Related Problems Among University Students In Ajman, United Arab Emirate. ... of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of ... prevalence of vision related problems was noted among university students.

  5. Efficient universal computing architectures for decoding neural activity.

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available The ability to decode neural activity into meaningful control signals for prosthetic devices is critical to the development of clinically useful brain- machine interfaces (BMIs. Such systems require input from tens to hundreds of brain-implanted recording electrodes in order to deliver robust and accurate performance; in serving that primary function they should also minimize power dissipation in order to avoid damaging neural tissue; and they should transmit data wirelessly in order to minimize the risk of infection associated with chronic, transcutaneous implants. Electronic architectures for brain- machine interfaces must therefore minimize size and power consumption, while maximizing the ability to compress data to be transmitted over limited-bandwidth wireless channels. Here we present a system of extremely low computational complexity, designed for real-time decoding of neural signals, and suited for highly scalable implantable systems. Our programmable architecture is an explicit implementation of a universal computing machine emulating the dynamics of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons; it requires no arithmetic operations except for counting, and decodes neural signals using only computationally inexpensive logic operations. The simplicity of this architecture does not compromise its ability to compress raw neural data by factors greater than [Formula: see text]. We describe a set of decoding algorithms based on this computational architecture, one designed to operate within an implanted system, minimizing its power consumption and data transmission bandwidth; and a complementary set of algorithms for learning, programming the decoder, and postprocessing the decoded output, designed to operate in an external, nonimplanted unit. The implementation of the implantable portion is estimated to require fewer than 5000 operations per second. A proof-of-concept, 32-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA implementation of this portion

  6. Advanced diagnostic graphics

    Bray, M.A.; Petersen, R.J.; Clark, M.T.; Gertman, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports US NRC-sponsored research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) involving evaluation of computer-based diagnostic graphics. The specific targets of current evaluations are multivariate data display formats which may be used in Safety Parameter Display Systems (SPDS) being developed for nuclear power plant control rooms. The purpose of the work is to provide a basis for NRC action in regulating licensee SPDSs or later computer/cathode ray tube (CRT) applications in nuclear control rooms

  7. Mikado: A graphic program

    Secretan, Y.

    A discussion of the modular program Mikado is presented. Mikado was developed with the goal of creating a flexible graphic tool to display and help analyze the results of finite element fluid flow computations. Mikado works on unstructured meshes, with elements of mixed geometric type, but also offers the possibility of using structured meshes. The program can be operated by both menu and mouse (interactive), or by command file (batch). Mikado is written in FORTRAN, except for a few system dependent subroutines which are in C. It runs presently on Silicon Graphics' workstations and could be easily ported to the IBM-RISC System/6000 family of workstations.

  8. Programming a massively parallel, computation universal system: static behavior

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1986-01-01

    In previous work by the authors, the ''optimum finding'' properties of Hopfield neural nets were applied to the nets themselves to create a ''neural compiler.'' This was done in such a way that the problem of programming the attractors of one neural net (called the Slave net) was expressed as an optimization problem that was in turn solved by a second neural net (the Master net). In this series of papers that approach is extended to programming nets that contain interneurons (sometimes called ''hidden neurons''), and thus deals with nets capable of universal computation. 22 refs.

  9. Computer Use and Vision-Related Problems Among University Students In Ajman, United Arab Emirate

    Shantakumari, N; Eldeeb, R; Sreedharan, J; Gopal, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: The extensive use of computers as medium of teaching and learning in universities necessitates introspection into the extent of computer related health disorders among student population. Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the pattern of computer usage and related visual problems, among University students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of Science and Technology we...

  10. Completeness of classical spin models and universal quantum computation

    De las Cuevas, Gemma; Dür, Wolfgang; Briegel, Hans J; Van den Nest, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We study mappings between different classical spin systems that leave the partition function invariant. As recently shown in Van den Nest et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 110501), the partition function of the 2D square lattice Ising model in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field can specialize to the partition function of any Ising system on an arbitrary graph. In this sense the 2D Ising model is said to be 'complete'. However, in order to obtain the above result, the coupling strengths on the 2D lattice must assume complex values, and thus do not allow for a physical interpretation. Here we show how a complete model with real—and, hence, 'physical'—couplings can be obtained if the 3D Ising model is considered. We furthermore show how to map general q-state systems with possibly many-body interactions to the 2D Ising model with complex parameters, and give completeness results for these models with real parameters. We also demonstrate that the computational overhead in these constructions is in all relevant cases polynomial. These results are proved by invoking a recently found cross-connection between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, where partition functions are expressed as quantum mechanical amplitudes. Within this framework, there exists a natural correspondence between many-body quantum states that allow for universal quantum computation via local measurements only, and complete classical spin systems

  11. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.; Tewari, Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10 -3 to 10 -4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  12. Resurfacing Graphics

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark. 

  13. Resurfacing Graphics

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark.

  14. High speed graphic program on a personal computer and its utilization in JIPP T-IIU online data-processing system

    Taniguchi, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Nobuaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sato, Masahiro

    1986-01-01

    A high speed graphic program was developed on a personal computer PC9801. Using this program, one can draw a waveform of successive 16 bit-integer data, such as obtained by analog-to-digital convertor. The program is written by the machine language and has a form of a subroutine program which can be called from main programs under N 88 BASIC. The time for drawing one waveform is 4 ms, which is two orders faster than the time with standard graphic routines of BASIC interpreter. This program is very convenient for the real-time display of plasma-monitoring raw data, such as plasma current, loop voltage, rf power etc. in tokamak experiments. This program has been utilized in JIPP T-IIU experiments and enables to display data of 8 channel ADC within a few seconds before the system transmits the data from CAMAC to the computer center of the institute. The program and its utilization are presented. (author)

  15. Graphic filter library implemented in CUDA language

    Peroutková, Hedvika

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problem of reducing computation time of raster image processing by parallel computing on graphics processing unit. Raster image processing thereby refers to the application of graphic filters, which can be applied in sequence with different settings. This thesis evaluates the suitability of using parallelization on graphic card for raster image adjustments based on multicriterial choice. Filters are implemented for graphics processing unit in CUDA language. Opacity ...

  16. Measuring Cognitive Load in Test Items: Static Graphics versus Animated Graphics

    Dindar, M.; Kabakçi Yurdakul, I.; Inan Dönmez, F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multimedia learning studies focus on the use of graphics in learning process but very few of them examine the role of graphics in testing students' knowledge. This study investigates the use of static graphics versus animated graphics in a computer-based English achievement test from a cognitive load theory perspective. Three…

  17. Algerian EFL University Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Miloud Bouchefra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of training and absence of facilities are clearly apparent, stakeholders’ attitudes are a decisive aspect that needs to be mapped out if we are to alter the current situation. Thus, the present work aims at investigating EFL university teachers’ attitudes towards CALL at Djilali Liabes University (western Algeria. The current work is a cross-sectional descriptive study that explores teachers’ attitudes across the three domains (affective, cognitive, and behavioural and investigates other related aspects that may help indicate teachers’ likelihood to adopt CALL in the future. The results are promising as the investigated population not only demonstrated a clearly positive attitude towards CALL but also manifested a number of signs that indicate their likelihood to adopt CALL in the future if circumstances are favourable.

  18. Using computer graphics to analyze the placement of neutral-beam injectors for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Horvath, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    To optimize the neutral-beam current incident on the fusion plasma and limit the heat load on exposed surfaces of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet coils, impingement of the neutral beams on the magnet structure must be minimized. Also, placement of the neutral-beam injectors must comply with specifications for neutral-current heating of the plasma and should allow maximum flexibility to accommodate alternative beam aiming patterns without significant hardware replacement or experiment down-time. Injector placements and aimings are analyzed by means of the Structural Analysis Movie Post Processor (SAMPP), a general-purpose graphics code for the display of three-dimensional finite-element models. SAMPP is used to visually assemble, disassemble, or cut away sections of the complex three-dimensional apparatus, which is represented by an assemblage of 8-node solid finite elements. The resulting picture is used to detect and quantify interactions between the structure and the neutral-particle beams

  19. Computer vision syndrome and ergonomic practices among undergraduate university students.

    Mowatt, Lizette; Gordon, Carron; Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra; Jones, Thaon

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of computer vision syndrome (CVS) and ergonomic practices among students in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at The University of the West Indies (UWI), Jamaica. A cross-sectional study was done with a self-administered questionnaire. Four hundred and nine students participated; 78% were females. The mean age was 21.6 years. Neck pain (75.1%), eye strain (67%), shoulder pain (65.5%) and eye burn (61.9%) were the most common CVS symptoms. Dry eyes (26.2%), double vision (28.9%) and blurred vision (51.6%) were the least commonly experienced symptoms. Eye burning (P = .001), eye strain (P = .041) and neck pain (P = .023) were significantly related to level of viewing. Moderate eye burning (55.1%) and double vision (56%) occurred in those who used handheld devices (P = .001 and .007, respectively). Moderate blurred vision was reported in 52% who looked down at the device compared with 14.8% who held it at an angle. Severe eye strain occurred in 63% of those who looked down at a device compared with 21% who kept the device at eye level. Shoulder pain was not related to pattern of use. Ocular symptoms and neck pain were less likely if the device was held just below eye level. There is a high prevalence of Symptoms of CVS amongst university students which could be reduced, in particular neck pain and eye strain and burning, with improved ergonomic practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Using animated computer-generated text and graphics to depict the risks and benefits of medical treatment.

    Tait, Alan R; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Brennan-Martinez, Colleen; McGonegal, Maureen; Levine, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Conventional print materials for presenting risks and benefits of treatment are often difficult to understand. This study was undertaken to evaluate and compare subjects' understanding and perceptions of risks and benefits presented using animated computerized text and graphics. Adult subjects were randomized to receive identical risk/benefit information regarding taking statins that was presented on an iPad (Apple Corp, Cupertino, Calif) in 1 of 4 different animated formats: text/numbers, pie chart, bar graph, and pictograph. Subjects completed a questionnaire regarding their preferences and perceptions of the message delivery together with their understanding of the information. Health literacy, numeracy, and need for cognition were measured using validated instruments. There were no differences in subject understanding based on the different formats. However, significantly more subjects preferred graphs (82.5%) compared with text (17.5%, Pbenefits offer an effective means to describe medical risk/benefit statistics. That understanding and satisfaction were significantly better when the format matched the individual's preference for message delivery is important and reinforces the value of "tailoring" information to the individual's needs and preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TRIGLAV-W a Windows computer program package with graphical users interface for TRIGA reactor core management calculations

    Zagar, T.; Zefran, B.; Slavic, S.; Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2006-01-01

    TRIGLAV-W is a program package for reactor calculations of TRIGA Mark II research reactor cores. This program package runs under Microsoft Windows operating system and has new friendly graphical user interface (GUI). The main part of the package is the TRIGLAV code based on two dimensional diffusion approximation for flux distribution calculation. The new GUI helps the user to prepare the input files, runs the main code and displays the output files. TRIGLAV-W has a user friendly GUI also for the visualisation of the calculation results. Calculation results can be visualised using 2D and 3D coloured graphs for easy presentations and analysis. In the paper the many options of the new GUI are presented along with the results of extensive testing of the program. The results of the TRIGLAV-W program package were compared with the results of WIMS-D and MCNP code for calculations of TRIGA benchmark. TRIGLAV-W program was also tested using several libraries developed under IAEA WIMS-D Library Update Project. Additional literature and application form for TRIGLAV-W program package beta testing can be found at http://www.rcp.ijs.si/triglav/. (author)

  2. Robotics as an integration subject in the computer science university studies. The experience of the University of Almeria

    Manuela Berenguel Soria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a global view of the role of robotics in computer science studies, mainly in university degrees. The main motivation of the use of robotics in these studies deals with the following issues: robotics permits to put in practice many computer science fundamental topics, it is a multidisciplinary area which allows to complete the basic knowledge of any computer science student, it facilitates the practice and learning of basic competences of any engineer (for instance, teamwork, and there is a wide market looking for people with robotics knowledge. These ideas are discussed from our own experience in the University of Almeria acquired through the studies of Computer Science Technical Engineering, Computer Science Engineering, Computer Science Degree and Computer Science Postgraduate.

  3. Size and asymmetry of the planum temporale. A new three-dimensional method for analysis of the supratemporal plane using MR imaging and computer-aided graphics

    Utsunomiya, H.; Nawata, M.; Ogasawara, T.; Okazaki, M.; Miyoshi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The planum temporale of the supratemporal plane is important for language function and shows left-right asymmetry in most brains. To estimate the size and allow side comparison of the planum temporale, we developed a new technique for 3-D MR analysis of the supratemporal plane using a personal computer and computer-aided graphics. The temporal lobes of 5 human cadavers were imaged by MR in the sagittal plane, at a slice thickness of 3 mm. The images of the supratemporal plane were entered into a personal computer using the original software to determine the positions of anatomic landmarks and the size of the planum temporale. The data were then transferred to a supercomputer to reconstruct the 3-D surface image of the supratemporal plane. Computer images of the spuratemporal plane agreed with macroscopic observations. The positions of anatomic landmarks and the size of the planum temporale also agreed with macroscopic measurements. Thus, the persent technique provides valuable anatomic data on the spuratemporal plane which should be useful for further clarification of the anatomic basis of language function. (orig.)

  4. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  5. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  6. The program system for the automatic graphical representation, on the Calcomp recorder, of the results of numerical or hybrid simulations on the E.A.I. 8900 Computer

    Neel, Daniele

    1970-01-01

    This report was the first subject of a thesis submitted by Madame Daniele NEEL, on the 25 of May 1970, to the Faculte des Sciences in Paris in order to obtain the grade of doctor engineer. The differential equations, treated by hybrid calculations, were solved continuously by the analog machine; at the same time the digital computer sampled the results at different times. The program system was divided Into two parts. A card index system was developed progressively from the results (even if they were in real time); the results were displayed graphically directly on an oscilloscope screen with a memory as a curve or a series of curves or, by a delayed system using a digital tracer. The graphs obtained were ready to be inserted in a report and contained all the relevant information. The second subject 'The hybrid calculation - Generalities and Bibliography' was covered by a note CEA-N-1345. (author) [fr

  7. DOSE-Analyzer. A computer program with graphical user interface to analyze absorbed dose inside a body of mouse and human upon external neutron exposure

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shigemori, Yuji; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2010-06-01

    DOSE-Analyzer is a computer program to retrieve the dose information from a database and generate a graph through a graphical user interface (GUI). The database is constructed for absorbed dose, fluence, and energy distribution inside a body of mouse and human exposed upon external neutrons, which is calculated by our developed Monte-Carlo simulation method using voxel-based phantom and particle transport code PHITS. The input configurations of irradiation geometry, subject, and energy are set by GUI. The results are tabulated at particle types, i.e. electron, proton, deuteron, triton, and alpha particle, and target organs on a data sheet of Microsoft Office Excel TM . Simple analysis to compare the output values for two subjects is also performed on DOSE-Analyzer. This report is a user manual of DOSE-Analyzer. (author)

  8. Research on uranium resource models. Part IV. Logic: a computer graphics program to construct integrated logic circuits for genetic-geologic models. Progress report

    Scott, W.A.; Turner, R.M.; McCammon, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated logic circuits were described as a means of formally representing genetic-geologic models for estimating undiscovered uranium resources. The logic circuits are logical combinations of selected geologic characteristics judged to be associated with particular types of uranium deposits. Each combination takes on a value which corresponds to the combined presence, absence, or don't know states of the selected characteristic within a specified geographic cell. Within each cell, the output of the logic circuit is taken as a measure of the favorability of occurrence of an undiscovered deposit of the type being considered. In this way, geological, geochemical, and geophysical data are incorporated explicitly into potential uranium resource estimates. The present report describes how integrated logic circuits are constructed by use of a computer graphics program. A user's guide is also included

  9. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  10. Use Of Computer Among Library Staff In Four Universities Of ...

    4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern Nigeria. Survey research was adopted with population of 151 Library staff and a random sample size of 120 staff in four (4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern ...

  11. Graphical qualities of educational technology: Using drag-and-drop and text-based programs for introductory computer science.

    DiSalvo, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    To determine appropriate computer science curricula, educators sought to better understand the different affordances of teaching with a visual programming language (Alice) or a text-based language (Jython). Although students often preferred one language, that language wasn't necessarily the one from which they learned the most.

  12. COMPUTER-ASSISTED CONTROL OF ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN ENGINEERING GRAPHICS WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMMES

    Tel'noy Viktor Ivanovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of computer-assisted computer technologies and their integration into the academic activity with a view to the control of the academic performance within the framework of distance learning programmes represent the subject matter of the article. The article is a brief overview of the software programme designated for the monitoring of the academic performance of students enrolled in distance learning programmes. The software is developed on Delphi 7.0 for Windows operating system. The strength of the proposed software consists in the availability of the two modes of its operation that differ in the principle of the problem selection and timing parameters. Interim academic performance assessment is to be performed through the employment of computerized testing procedures that contemplate the use of a data base of testing assignments implemented in the eLearning Server media. Identification of students is to be performed through the installation of video cameras at workplaces of students.

  13. Hierarchical data structures for graphics program languages

    Gonauser, M.; Schinner, P.; Weiss, J.

    1978-01-01

    Graphic data processing with a computer makes exacting demands on the interactive capability of the program language and the management of the graphic data. A description of the structure of a graphics program language which has been shown by initial practical experiments to possess a particularly favorable interactive capability is followed by the evaluation of various data structures (list, tree, ring) with respect to their interactive capability in processing graphics. A practical structure is proposed. (orig.) [de

  14. Application of computer graphics to generate coal resources of the Cache coal bed, Recluse geologic model area, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Schneider, G.B.; Crowley, S.S.; Carey, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Low-sulfur subbituminous coal resources have been calculated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7 1/2 minute quadrangles, Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 275 coal thickness measurements obtained from drill hole data are evenly distributed throughout the area. The Cache coal and associated beds are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth from the surface to the Cache bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The thickness of the coal is as much as 31 feet, but in places the Cache coal bed is absent. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources calculated by computer show the bed to contain 2,316 million short tons or about 6.7 percent more than the hand-calculated figure of 2,160 million short tons.

  15. THE USING OF GRAPHICAL EDITOR IN THE ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND THE COURSE DESIGNING

    KARPYUK L. V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The problems of learning students of the engineering and computer graphics of the course on the base of computer-aided design (CAD were described in the article. The examples of training tasks for acquiring knowledge of work in the environment of graphical editor of AutoCAD were shown. These examples are needed to perform drawings on The Engineering Graphics, and also for a graphic part of Course Projects for students of mechanical specialties.

  16. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  17. Randomness in Contemporary Graphic Art

    Zavřelová, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Veronika Zavřelová Bachelor thesis Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Education, Department of Art Education Randomness in contemporary graphic art imaginative picture card game ANNOTATION This (bachelor) thesis concerns itself with a connection between verbal and visual character system within the topic of Randomness in contemporary graphic art - imaginative picture card game. The thesis is mainly based on the practical part - exclusively created card game Piktim. The card game uses as...

  18. A New Minimum Trees-Based Approach for Shape Matching with Improved Time Computing: Application to Graphical Symbols Recognition

    Franco, Patrick; Ogier, Jean-Marc; Loonis, Pierre; Mullot, Rémy

    Recently we have developed a model for shape description and matching. Based on minimum spanning trees construction and specifics stages like the mixture, it seems to have many desirable properties. Recognition invariance in front shift, rotated and noisy shape was checked through median scale tests related to GREC symbol reference database. Even if extracting the topology of a shape by mapping the shortest path connecting all the pixels seems to be powerful, the construction of graph induces an expensive algorithmic cost. In this article we discuss on the ways to reduce time computing. An alternative solution based on image compression concepts is provided and evaluated. The model no longer operates in the image space but in a compact space, namely the Discrete Cosine space. The use of block discrete cosine transform is discussed and justified. The experimental results led on the GREC2003 database show that the proposed method is characterized by a good discrimination power, a real robustness to noise with an acceptable time computing.

  19. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  20. A MATLAB-based graphical user interface program for computing functionals of the geopotential up to ultra-high degrees and orders

    Bucha, Blažej; Janák, Juraj

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel graphical user interface program GrafLab (GRAvity Field LABoratory) for spherical harmonic synthesis (SHS) created in MATLAB®. This program allows to comfortably compute 38 various functionals of the geopotential up to ultra-high degrees and orders of spherical harmonic expansion. For the most difficult part of the SHS, namely the evaluation of the fully normalized associated Legendre functions (fnALFs), we used three different approaches according to required maximum degree: (i) the standard forward column method (up to maximum degree 1800, in some cases up to degree 2190); (ii) the modified forward column method combined with Horner's scheme (up to maximum degree 2700); (iii) the extended-range arithmetic (up to an arbitrary maximum degree). For the maximum degree 2190, the SHS with fnALFs evaluated using the extended-range arithmetic approach takes only approximately 2-3 times longer than its standard arithmetic counterpart, i.e. the standard forward column method. In the GrafLab, the functionals of the geopotential can be evaluated on a regular grid or point-wise, while the input coordinates can either be read from a data file or entered manually. For the computation on a regular grid we decided to apply the lumped coefficients approach due to significant time-efficiency of this method. Furthermore, if a full variance-covariances matrix of spherical harmonic coefficients is available, it is possible to compute the commission errors of the functionals. When computing on a regular grid, the output functionals or their commission errors may be depicted on a map using automatically selected cartographic projection.

  1. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  2. Teaching introductory computer security at a Department of Defense university

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    1997-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Center for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Studies and Research (NPS CISR) has developed an instructional program in computer security. Its objective is to insure that students not only understand practical aspects of computer security associated with current technology, but also learn the fundamental principles that can be applied to the development of systems for which high confidence in policy enforcement can be achieved. Introduction to Computer Sec...

  3. The graphics editor in ROOT

    Antcheva, Ilka; Brun, Rene; Hof, Carsten; Rademakers, Fons

    2006-01-01

    A well-designed Graphical User Interface (GUI) has critical importance in any computer application. The user interface is where the end users and the complex system intersect. An effective interface design can make a powerful and complex system, such as ROOT, easy and intuitive to learn and operate. This paper describes the main goals we defined and the design solution we found developing the graphics editor in ROOT

  4. Three-dimensional computer graphic animations for studying social approach behaviour in medaka fish: Effects of systematic manipulation of morphological and motion cues.

    Nakayasu, Tomohiro; Yasugi, Masaki; Shiraishi, Soma; Uchida, Seiichi; Watanabe, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    We studied social approach behaviour in medaka fish using three-dimensional computer graphic (3DCG) animations based on the morphological features and motion characteristics obtained from real fish. This is the first study which used 3DCG animations and examined the relative effects of morphological and motion cues on social approach behaviour in medaka. Various visual stimuli, e.g., lack of motion, lack of colour, alternation in shape, lack of locomotion, lack of body motion, and normal virtual fish in which all four features (colour, shape, locomotion, and body motion) were reconstructed, were created and presented to fish using a computer display. Medaka fish presented with normal virtual fish spent a long time in proximity to the display, whereas time spent near the display was decreased in other groups when compared with normal virtual medaka group. The results suggested that the naturalness of visual cues contributes to the induction of social approach behaviour. Differential effects between body motion and locomotion were also detected. 3DCG animations can be a useful tool to study the mechanisms of visual processing and social behaviour in medaka.

  5. Teaching Concept Mapping and University Level Study Strategies Using Computers.

    Mikulecky, Larry; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assesses the utility and effectiveness of three interactive computer programs and associated print materials in instructing and modeling for undergraduates how to comprehend and reconceptualize scientific textbook material. Finds that "how to" reading strategies can be taught via computer and transferred to new material. (RS)

  6. Neurosurgical Virtual Reality Simulation for Brain Tumor Using High-definition Computer Graphics: A Review of the Literature.

    Kin, Taichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Shono, Naoyuki; Nomura, Seiji; Saito, Toki; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-10-15

    Simulation and planning of surgery using a virtual reality model is becoming common with advances in computer technology. In this study, we conducted a literature search to find trends in virtual simulation of surgery for brain tumors. A MEDLINE search for "neurosurgery AND (simulation OR virtual reality)" retrieved a total of 1,298 articles published in the past 10 years. After eliminating studies designed solely for education and training purposes, 28 articles about the clinical application remained. The finding that the vast majority of the articles were about education and training rather than clinical applications suggests that several issues need be addressed for clinical application of surgical simulation. In addition, 10 of the 28 articles were from Japanese groups. In general, the 28 articles demonstrated clinical benefits of virtual surgical simulation. Simulation was particularly useful in better understanding complicated spatial relations of anatomical landmarks and in examining surgical approaches. In some studies, Virtual reality models were used on either surgical navigation system or augmented reality technology, which projects virtual reality images onto the operating field. Reported problems were difficulties in standardized, objective evaluation of surgical simulation systems; inability to respond to tissue deformation caused by surgical maneuvers; absence of the system functionality to reflect features of tissue (e.g., hardness and adhesion); and many problems with image processing. The amount of description about image processing tended to be insufficient, indicating that the level of evidence, risk of bias, precision, and reproducibility need to be addressed for further advances and ultimately for full clinical application.

  7. COMPUTER GRAPHICS MEETS IMAGE FUSION: THE POWER OF TEXTURE BAKING TO SIMULTANEOUSLY VISUALISE 3D SURFACE FEATURES AND COLOUR

    G. J. Verhoeven

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  8. Computer Graphics Meets Image Fusion: the Power of Texture Baking to Simultaneously Visualise 3d Surface Features and Colour

    Verhoeven, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM) approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D) digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  9. Approaching Gender Parity: Women in Computer Science at Afghanistan's Kabul University

    Plane, Jandelyn

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the representation of women in computer science at the tertiary level through data collected about undergraduate computer science education at Kabul University in Afghanistan. Previous studies have theorized reasons for underrepresentation of women in computer science, and while many of these reasons are indeed present in…

  10. [A psychopathological study on three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCGs): special reference to pictures made by a schizophrenic patient before and after the onset].

    Ashizawa, Yuko; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Hori, Masashi; Hori, Takafumi; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Asada, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    A patient with catatonic type schizophrenia drawing 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCGs) before and after the onset is reported. His 3DCGs are discussed from the view of psychopathology. A 21-year-old male was admitted to our hospital. He was an art student. For three months before admission, he had been absorbed in drawing 3DCGs. When he was asked to draw handmade pictures by his teacher, he experienced a bizarre mood and took an overdose of aspirin. At the time of admission, he was in a stupor state, and was diagnosed with catatonic type schizophrenia. After admission, he exhibited excitement and disorganized speech. These symptoms disappeared after administration of neuroleptics, and he was discharged. The 3DCGs he drew before and after the onset revealed several special characteristics. First, the compositions of his pictures were too geometric and too precise. Secondly, the themes of his pictures changed from romantic before the onset to symbolic after it, and the styles changed from realistic to abstractive after the onset. Finally, histograms of the 3DCGs revealed many colors before onset, which converged to simple colors after. Therefore, it was suggested that the latent pathological process at the beginning of schizophrenia might be reflected in his 3DCGs. 3DCGs are a new type of fine art. They can express beautiful and cool images more simply than handmade pictures. Due to these features, artists can create images of their innerworld, with less effort and talent than picture drawings, by computer assistance. This case suggests that the geometric working space, change-free viewpoints, and computer assistance, which are characteristics of the methods in making 3DCGs may be suitable for schizophrenic artists to create images of their innerworld. However, being absorbed in making 3DCGs could also promote the latent schizophrenic process to the onset.

  11. Printing--Graphic Arts--Graphic Communications

    Hauenstein, A. Dean

    1975-01-01

    Recently, "graphic arts" has shifted from printing skills to a conceptual approach of production processes. "Graphic communications" must embrace the total system of communication through graphic media, to serve broad career education purposes; students taught concepts and principles can be flexible and adaptive. The author…

  12. Scientific Computers at the Helsinki University of Technology during the Post Pioneering Stage

    Nykänen, Panu; Andersin, Hans

    The paper describes the process leading from the pioneering phase when the university was free to develop and build its own computers through the period when the university was dependent on cooperation with the local computer companies to the stage when a bureaucratic state organization took over the power to decide on acquiring computing equipment to the universities. This stage ended in the late 1970s when computing power gradually became a commodity that the individual laboratories and research projects could acquire just like any resource. This development paralleled the situation in many other countries and universities as well. We have chosen the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) as a case to illustrate this development process, which for the researchers was very annoying and frustrating when it happened.

  13. A Laboratory Application of Microcomputer Graphics.

    Gehring, Kalle B.; Moore, John W.

    1983-01-01

    A PASCAL graphics and instrument interface program for a Z80/S-100 based microcomputer was developed. The computer interfaces to a stopped-flow spectrophotometer replacing a storage oscilloscope and polaroid camera. Applications of this system are discussed, indicating that graphics and analog-to-digital boards have transformed the computer into…

  14. Graphics with Special Interfaces for Disabled People.

    Tronconi, A.; And Others

    The paper describes new software and special input devices to allow physically impaired children to utilize the graphic capabilities of personal computers. Special input devices for computer graphics access--the voice recognition card, the single switch, or the mouse emulator--can be used either singly or in combination by the disabled to control…

  15. Exploring the Universe with WISE and Cloud Computing

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    WISE is a recently-completed astronomical survey mission that has imaged the entire sky in four infrared wavelength bands. The large quantity of science images returned consists of 2,776,922 individual snapshots in various locations in each band which, along with ancillary data, totals around 110TB of raw, uncompressed data. Making the most use of this data requires advanced computing resources. I will discuss some initial attempts in the use of cloud computing to make this large problem tractable.

  16. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  17. A computer program for controlling a university radioactive material inventory: From confusion to computer to control

    Robb, D.B.; Riches, C.G.; O'Brian, M.J.; Riordan, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington is a large user of radioactive material. Over 250 authorized programs are working in over 600 labs with nearly 3500 orders of radioactive material per year. The state license sets limits on the total amount of material on campus. There are also limits on sewer disposal. To meet these needs it is necessary to know the amount of material on campus at any time. A computer program was developed which covered many aspects of the radiation safety record needs including inventory control. Inventory is now managed by tracking each order from purchase to disposal. A screen menu as part of the interactive program allows immediate and detailed information about the inventory at time of purchase approval and delivery. Because of this system our knowledge and control of radionuclide work on campus has increased dramatically. A description of how this system is used during ordering, delivery and disposal will be given. Details on the methods to check limits are included along with a summary of the reports made possible by the current data files

  18. Gsolve, a Python computer program with a graphical user interface to transform relative gravity survey measurements to absolute gravity values and gravity anomalies

    McCubbine, Jack; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Stagpoole, Vaughan; Smith, Euan; O'Brien, Grant

    2018-01-01

    A Python program (Gsolve) with a graphical user interface has been developed to assist with routine data processing of relative gravity measurements. Gsolve calculates the gravity at each measurement site of a relative gravity survey, which is referenced to at least one known gravity value. The tidal effects of the sun and moon, gravimeter drift and tares in the data are all accounted for during the processing of the survey measurements. The calculation is based on a least squares formulation where the difference between the absolute gravity at each surveyed location and parameters relating to the dynamics of the gravimeter are minimized with respect to the relative gravity observations, and some supplied gravity reference site values. The program additionally allows the user to compute free air gravity anomalies, with respect to the GRS80 and GRS67 reference ellipsoids, from the determined gravity values and calculate terrain corrections at each of the surveyed sites using a prism formula and a user supplied digital elevation model. This paper reviews the mathematical framework used to reduce relative gravimeter survey observations to gravity values. It then goes on to detail how the processing steps can be implemented using the software.

  19. Mapping the Information Trace in Local Field Potentials by a Computational Method of Two-Dimensional Time-Shifting Synchronization Likelihood Based on Graphic Processing Unit Acceleration.

    Zhao, Zi-Fang; Li, Xue-Zhu; Wan, You

    2017-12-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is a signal reflecting the electrical activity of neurons surrounding the electrode tip. Synchronization between LFP signals provides important details about how neural networks are organized. Synchronization between two distant brain regions is hard to detect using linear synchronization algorithms like correlation and coherence. Synchronization likelihood (SL) is a non-linear synchronization-detecting algorithm widely used in studies of neural signals from two distant brain areas. One drawback of non-linear algorithms is the heavy computational burden. In the present study, we proposed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-accelerated implementation of an SL algorithm with optional 2-dimensional time-shifting. We tested the algorithm with both artificial data and raw LFP data. The results showed that this method revealed detailed information from original data with the synchronization values of two temporal axes, delay time and onset time, and thus can be used to reconstruct the temporal structure of a neural network. Our results suggest that this GPU-accelerated method can be extended to other algorithms for processing time-series signals (like EEG and fMRI) using similar recording techniques.

  20. Rough surface scattering simulations using graphics cards

    Klapetek, Petr; Valtr, Miroslav; Poruba, Ales; Necas, David; Ohlidal, Miloslav

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present results of rough surface scattering calculations using a graphical processing unit implementation of the Finite Difference in Time Domain algorithm. Numerical results are compared to real measurements and computational performance is compared to computer processor implementation of the same algorithm. As a basis for computations, atomic force microscope measurements of surface morphology are used. It is shown that the graphical processing unit capabilities can be used to speedup presented computationally demanding algorithms without loss of precision.

  1. Graphical user interface based computer simulation of self-similar modes of a paraxial slow self-focusing laser beam for saturating plasma nonlinearities

    Batra, Karuna; Mitra, Sugata; Subbarao, D.; Sharma, R.P.; Uma, R.

    2005-01-01

    The task for the present study is to make an investigation of self-similarity in a self-focusing laser beam both theoretically and numerically using graphical user interface based interactive computer simulation model in MATLAB (matrix laboratory) software in the presence of saturating ponderomotive force based and relativistic electron quiver based plasma nonlinearities. The corresponding eigenvalue problem is solved analytically using the standard eikonal formalism and the underlying dynamics of self-focusing is dictated by the corrected paraxial theory for slow self-focusing. The results are also compared with computer simulation of self-focusing by the direct fast Fourier transform based spectral methods. It is found that the self-similar solution obtained analytically oscillates around the true numerical solution equating it at regular intervals. The simulation results are the main ones although a feasible semianalytical theory under many assumptions is given to understand the process. The self-similar profiles are called as self-organized profiles (not in a strict sense), which are found to be close to Laguerre-Gaussian curves for all the modes, the shape being conserved. This terminology is chosen because it has already been shown from a phase space analysis that the width of an initially Gaussian beam undergoes periodic oscillations that are damped when any absorption is added in the model, i.e., the beam width converges to a constant value. The research paper also tabulates the specific values of the normalized phase shift for solutions decaying to zero at large transverse distances for first three modes which can, however, be extended to higher order modes

  2. Engineering Design Graphics: Into the 21st Century

    Harris, La Verne Abe; Meyers, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Graphical plans for construction of machinery and architecture have evolved over the last 6,000 years beginning from hieroglyphics to drawings on printable media, from the "Golden Age" of engineering graphics to the innovation of computer graphics and prototyping. The evolution of engineering design graphics as a profession has also evolved. Years…

  3. Computer Use and Vision‑Related Problems Among University ...

    and adjusted OR was calculated using the multiple logistic regression. Results: The ... Nearly 72% of students reported frequent interruption of computer work. Headache ... procedure (non-probability sampling) recruiting 250 .... Table 1: Percentage distribution of visual problems among different genders and ethnic groups.

  4. Computer Self-Efficacy of University Faculty in Lebanon

    Saleh, Hanadi Kassem

    2008-01-01

    Faculty use of technology is a critical issue in higher education; administrators and students are expecting faculty instruction to incorporate technology in classroom and distance education. Competition is demanding technologically proficient graduates for schools and colleges. Research indicates that computer self-efficacy (CSE) may be one…

  5. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  6. Computer-based medical education in Benha University, Egypt: knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions.

    Bayomy, Hanaa; El Awadi, Mona; El Araby, Eman; Abed, Hala A

    2016-12-01

    Computer-assisted medical education has been developed to enhance learning and enable high-quality medical care. This study aimed to assess computer knowledge and attitude toward the inclusion of computers in medical education among second-year medical students in Benha Faculty of Medicine, Egypt, to identify limitations, and obtain suggestions for successful computer-based learning. This was a one-group pre-post-test study, which was carried out on second-year students in Benha Faculty of Medicine. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to compare students' knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions toward computer usage in medical education before and after the computer course to evaluate the change in students' responses. The majority of students were familiar with use of the mouse and keyboard, basic word processing, internet and web searching, and e-mail both before and after the computer course. The proportion of students who were familiar with software programs other than the word processing and trouble-shoot software/hardware was significantly higher after the course (Pcomputer (P=0.008), the inclusion of computer skills course in medical education, downloading lecture handouts, and computer-based exams (Pcomputers limited the inclusion of computer in medical education (Pcomputer labs, lack of Information Technology staff mentoring, large number of students, unclear course outline, and lack of internet access were more frequently reported before the course (Pcomputer labs, inviting Information Technology staff to support computer teaching, and the availability of free Wi-Fi internet access covering several areas in the university campus; all would support computer-assisted medical education. Medical students in Benha University are computer literate, which allows for computer-based medical education. Staff training, provision of computer labs, and internet access are essential requirements for enhancing computer usage in medical

  7. The early days of computer aided newspaper productions sys­tems

    Enlund, Nils; Andersin, Hans

    2007-01-01

    During the years 1970-1973, an ambitious research project, the Computer Graphics Project (CGP), was carried out at the laboratory of Information Processing Science at the Helsinki University of Technology. The initial objective of the project was to develop application oriented system solutions for the emerging computer graphics technology, but the activities were soon focused on the problems of producing newspaper text, advertisement, and complete pages using interactive computer graphics. T...

  8. Computer Mediated Communication for Social and Academic Purposes: Profiles of Use and University Students' Gratifications

    Vrocharidou, Anatoli; Efthymiou, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    The present study approaches the Internet as a social space, where university students make use of computer mediated communication (CMC) applications, i.e. e-mail, instant messaging and social network sites, in order to satisfy social and academic needs. We focus on university students, because they represent one of the most avid groups of CMC…

  9. Resourse Allocation and Pricing Principles for a University Computer Centre. Working Paper Series Number 6819.

    Possen, Uri M.; And Others

    As an introduction, this paper presents a statement of the objectives of the university computing center (UCC) from the viewpoint of the university, the government, the typical user, and the UCC itself. The operating and financial structure of a UCC are described. Three main types of budgeting schemes are discussed: time allocation, pseudo-dollar,…

  10. Factors Affecting University Students' Intention to Use Cloud Computing in Jordan

    Rababah, Khalid Ali; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Nassar, Bilal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors affecting students' intention to use cloud computing in the Jordanian universities. To achieve this purpose, a quantitative research approach which is a survey-based was deployed. Around 400 questionnaires were distributed randomly to Information Technology (IT) students at four universities in…

  11. A universal quantum module for quantum communication, computation, and metrology

    Hanks, Michael; Lo Piparo, Nicolò; Trupke, Michael; Schmiedmayer, Jorg; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we describe a simple module that could be ubiquitous for quantum information based applications. The basic modules comprises a single NV- center in diamond embedded in an optical cavity, where the cavity mediates interactions between photons and the electron spin (enabling entanglement distribution and efficient readout), while the nuclear spins constitutes a long-lived quantum memories capable of storing and processing quantum information. We discuss how a network of connected modules can be used for distributed metrology, communication and computation applications. Finally, we investigate the possible use of alternative diamond centers (SiV/GeV) within the module and illustrate potential advantages.

  12. Incorporating Solid Modeling and Team-Based Design into Freshman Engineering Graphics.

    Buchal, Ralph O.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the integration of these topics through a major team-based design and computer aided design (CAD) modeling project in freshman engineering graphics at the University of Western Ontario. Involves n=250 students working in teams of four to design and document an original Lego toy. Includes 12 references. (Author/YDS)

  13. Computing Services Planning, Downsizing, and Organization at the University of Alberta.

    Beltrametti, Monica

    1993-01-01

    In a six-month period, the University of Alberta (Canada) campus computing services department formulated a strategic plan, and downsized and reorganized to meet financial constraints and respond to changing technology, especially distributed computing. The new department is organized to react more effectively to trends in technology and user…

  14. Evaluating the Implementation of International Computing Curricular in African Universities: A Design-Reality Gap Approach

    Dasuki, Salihu Ibrahim; Ogedebe, Peter; Kanya, Rislana Abdulazeez; Ndume, Hauwa; Makinde, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Efforts are been made by Universities in developing countries to ensure that it's graduate are not left behind in the competitive global information society; thus have adopted international computing curricular for their computing degree programs. However, adopting these international curricula seem to be very challenging for developing countries…

  15. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    Setiani, Tia Dwi; Suprijadi; Haryanto, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10"8 and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  16. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    Setiani, Tia Dwi, E-mail: tiadwisetiani@gmail.com [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Suprijadi [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10{sup 8} and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  17. UCODE, a computer code for universal inverse modeling

    Poeter, E.P.; Hill, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the US Geological Survey computer program UCODE, which was developed in collaboration with the US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station and the International Ground Water Modeling Center of the Colorado School of Mines. UCODE performs inverse modeling, posed as a parameter-estimation problem, using nonlinear regression. Any application model or set of models can be used; the only requirement is that they have numerical (ASCII or text only) input and output files and that the numbers in these files have sufficient significant digits. Application models can include preprocessors and postprocessors as well as models related to the processes of interest (physical, chemical and so on), making UCODE extremely powerful for model calibration. Estimated parameters can be defined flexibly with user-specified functions. Observations to be matched in the regression can be any quantity for which a simulated equivalent value can be produced, thus simulated equivalent values are calculated using values that appear in the application model output files and can be manipulated with additive and multiplicative functions, if necessary. Prior, or direct, information on estimated parameters also can be included in the regression. The nonlinear regression problem is solved by minimizing a weighted least-squares objective function with respect to the parameter values using a modified Gauss-Newton method. Sensitivities needed for the method are calculated approximately by forward or central differences and problems and solutions related to this approximation are discussed. Statistics are calculated and printed for use in (1) diagnosing inadequate data or identifying parameters that probably cannot be estimated with the available data, (2) evaluating estimated parameter values, (3) evaluating the model representation of the actual processes and (4) quantifying the uncertainty of model simulated values. UCODE is intended for use on any computer operating

  18. Faculty Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Instruction at the University of Gaziantep

    Filiz Yalçın TILFARLIOĞLU

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinstruction at University of Gaziantep, Turkey in a multifaceted way. Additionally, ittries to determine underlying factors that shape these attitudes. After a pilot study, thequestionnaire was applied to a sample population of 145 faculty that were chosenrandomly. The results revealed that faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinsruction are positive. Age, sex, teaching experience, level of proficiency in Englishand computer usage skills have no or little effects over these attitudes.According to theresults of the study, faculty who have prior knowledge on computers expose ratherpositive attitudes towards computers in education.Another important outcome of thestudy is the existence of a gender gap in terms of computer assisted instruction.Althoughthere seems to be no difference between male and female faculty concerning theirbackground education regarding computers, male faculty feel confident about thematter, whereas female faculty feel uncomfortable about using computers in theirlessons.

  19. A Description of the Computer Assisted Assessment Program in University Elementary Algebra at Norfolk State University

    White, Ronald L.; Myers, Shadana; Earl, Archie W., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    Many colleges and universities today are faced with the problem of low student academic achievement in math. Some of them are trying to improve student academic achievement through the use of technology. Their proposed solution is to teach children how to use the technological tools available to them and integrate that technology into the…

  20. A graphical interface to the TOUGH family of flow simulators

    O`Sullivan, M.J.; Bullivant, D.P. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand)

    1995-03-01

    A graphical interface for the TOUGH family of simulators is presented. The interface allows the user to graphically create or modify a computer model and then to graphically examine the simulation results. The package uses the X Window System, enabling it to be used on many computer platforms.